The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:06336

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
OCALA

EVE

N1NG
TAR

WEATHER FORECAST Partly cloudy tonight and Wednesday, slightly cooler in centhal portion tonight. TEMPERATURES This Morning, 67; This Afternoon, 78.
Sun Rises Tomorrow, 6:35; Seta, 5:49 OCALA, FLORIDA, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1922 VOLUME TWENTY-EIGHT. NO. 254
. i f i : :

SIXTEEN

RED

!
Wanted by Weeks to Help Train
Young Americans In The
Art of War
Washington. Oct. 24. Amendment
of the national, defense act to increase
the number of sergeants in the army
is asked by Secretary Weeks in order
v.o ou, 1 finA nnn.pnmm;innPf1 of.
ficers ma ybe assigned as instructors U
to the National Guard. The organized
reserves and training corps units
will not have to be cut in rank and
pay due to progressive reduction of
the army.
JUSTICE DAY'S
RESIGNATION ACCEPTED
Washington, Oct. 24. The resigna resignation
tion resignation of William R. Day as associate
justice of the supreme court was ten tendered
dered tendered President Harding today and
accepted. It becomes effective No November
vember November 14th.
BOOZE REUNITED BROTHERS
Little Rock, Oct. 24. John Spencer
of Pope county, and Harry Spencer of
Conway county, Arkansas, half broth-
ers, met for the first time in forty
years when they both were placed in
the same cell in the county jail. They
are held on liquor charges.
DEADLY DESPONDENCY
Plant City, Oct. 24. Mrs. Jamea
Hobkirk, of Coronet, is hovering be-
twen life and death as the result of a
lirge dose of slowly acting poison
taken yesterday with suicidal intent.
She is said to have given some of it
to her baby also.
PEDDY LOST
New Orleans, Oct. 24. Supporters
of E. B. Peddy lost their fight yester
day before a special tribunal of fed federal
eral federal judges to force the use of his
name on the official Texas ballot for
United States senator in opposition to
Earle Mayfield, democratic nominee,
and reputed Ku Klux Klan candidate.
TV.. jJfl U 1 -4 4-14. 4Us- vti4-U
AUG JUUtCS litlU Llldt U"CV WC1C Willi- I
out jurisdiction to grant the relief
asked for by the Peddy faction, add
ing that other questions than that of
jurisdiction were not considered.
SARAH BERNHARDT
ACTIVE AT SEVENTY-SEVEN
Paris, Oct. 24. Day by day, in ev-
ery way, baran tfernnarat seems to
grow younger and younger. Yester-
day she was 77 years old. Yet she is
on the threshhold of a busy winter of
varied and exacting work. Listening J
to her plans for the season, one would j
think the great actress had just at-
tained her prime and was furiously I
struggling in a tide of activities with I
the hope of being swept on to f am
and a career of greatness.
In the first place, the incomparable
French artist expects to appear in
four plays during the coming season,
creating new roles and reviving
ethers. Somehow, she is going to find
time to continue her sculpturing and
her writings.
Last summer during her stay at
Belle Isle, she finished a bust of her
son and now has turned her fingers
to a fresh piece of clay. Her new
r.ovel will be published next month.
Already her pen is busy on the manu
script for another volume. It is to be
a book of advice to actors. Above all
else Mme. Bernhardt will counsel them
'to be singers
'I ought to go to America," she said
the other dav. "America demands
me, and I certainly shall go there. I
should have gone this year, but I must
:eckon with with my age. Perhaps I
will not have time to do all I wish to
do."
Madame Bernhardt will make her
first appearance of the season upon
the stage of her own theater in Paris
in a revival of Maurice Rostand's
"Glory." Later, with Lucien Guitry.
she will give the first performance of
a play written for them by Lucien
Guitry's son, Sacha Guitry.
Her third role of the season will be
"The Sphinx" in the play of that
r.ame by Maurice Rostand, and after
that she will appear in "The Man,"
written by her granddaughter, Mme.
Verneuil, wife of the playwright. This
piece, part of it in prose and part in
verse, is a version of the struggle of
Prometheus with the gods, in which
all the Olympians appear.

ARM

SERGEAHTS

BE
Oil THE ItlSlDE
Unsatisfied With Their Own Immense
Oil Fields, They Covet
Those of Asia
London, Uct. 24 Arrangements for
American oil interests to be repre-
sented jointly with r ranco-Bntish
companies in Mesopotamia are being
completed, according to information
eceived here today.
CUT OUT THE UNDER
SIZED CHRISTMAS CARDS
They are Freaks and Increase
The
Task of the Overworked
Postal Clerks
Washington, Oct. 24. A campaign
to discourage the use of small-sized
j Christmas cards and envelopes has
been inaugurated by the postoffice de
partment. Such cards and envelopes
are responsible for delay during the
Christmas rush, it is declared.
INNIS IS IN THE
LIMELIGHT AGAIN
Atlanta, Oct. 24. Victor Innis,
suspected of complicity in the unsolv-
ei disappearance from San Antonio of
Miss Beatrice Helms and Mrs. Eloise
Helms Dennis, was released from
prison her today after serving seven
years only to be rearrested by federal
authorities on a charge of using the
mails to defraud.
THE HORSE IS NOT
YET A BACK NUMBER
Chicago, Oct. 24. The house still is
a vital factor in American commercial
life. This is shown in the statement
of Wayne Din sm ore, secretary of the
Horse Association of America, that
the number of horses in use in New
York city has increased 100 per cent
in five years.
More than 15,000 horses are in com
mercial use throughout the United
States by one company alone.
The American Railway Express
Company, credited with being the
largest commercial user of horses in
the world, still is finding the horse an
. .
Q1 Q99 ... aOTV
ice 15,254 horses. The average num number
ber number of horses kept jumped from 870.4
in 1917 to 1725.3 in 1921
The averaee lencth of life for
horses still active in the express serv
ice is 5 years, 11 months. Surveys
showed that after using 492 horses
f or five years, they sold for 23 per
cent of their original cost. inese
horses, discarded because unable to
maintain longer and harder work and
the rapid pace required in the express
service, were placed in other work
where the hauling was relatively slow
and reports indicated such horses con
tinued in service for three or four
years
a red cap at the Grand Central ter
minai in New York city was body ser
v&nt to Lord Kitchener for a dozen
years and was the nead interpreter
of the Roosevelt big game expidition
to Africa. He is familiar with 13
ianguages and five African dialects
Result of
Onrflelrt Heirhrs snhnrh of

AIR A TO

KISS; tkS

mS Y I

ender construction have been dynamited. One of the destroyed structures

Feminine Law
Breakers Coming
Way Up Front

Instead of Only Causing Tragedy,
Woman Is Now Taking An
Active Part In It
Chicago, Oct. 24. Nine tragedies
stand out as dramatic spectacles in
the news of America today and all
present women in leading roles. Most
cf them present the eternal triangle.
The nine cases follow:
Kansas City Marie F. Beal, ac acquitted
quitted acquitted last night on the charge of
murdering her lover, Frank Ander Anderson.
son. Anderson. Los Angeles Arthur Burch faces
his third trial on the charge of killing
J. Belton Kennedy. Madeline Oben Oben-chain
chain Oben-chain awaits her third trial on the
same charge.
Los Angeles Jury to try Mrs.
Clara Phillips, accused of beating
Mrs. Alberta Meadows to death with
a hammer, tentatively completed.
Meadows it is alleged was a rival for
the love of Mrs. Phillips' husband.
Fresno, Calif. George T. Harlow
acquitted by coroner's jury, after he
clubbed his wife to death, will be tried
for manslaughter.
Philadelphia Mrs. Catherine Ro
sier, accused oi killing ner husband
and his stenographer, faced trial for
murder.
Hackensack, N. J. George Cline, a
motion picture director, Alice Thorn Thornton
ton Thornton and Charles Scullion, on trial for
the murder of John Bergen.
Cleveland, O. Trial of Mrs. Mabel
Champion, alleged slayer of Thomas
O'Connell, postponed until next week.
White Cloud, Mich. Mrs. Media
Hodell on trial for killing her father-in-law
with poison.
New Brunswick, N. J. State offi
cials took over task of attempting to
solve the Hall-Mills mufders.
MRS. W. R. MILLER
Mrs. Blanche Miller, wife of the
late W. R. Miller, died last night
about eight o'clock at the home of
her daughter, Mrs. J. T. Felts on
North Magnolia street. Mrs. Miller
had been sick for several months and
during her sickness and suffering has
been a patient sufferer. She was born
in Kirkwood, 111., fifty-two years ago
and with her husband and two daugh daughters
ters daughters came to Ocala about eleven years
ago to make her home. She has many
friends who greatly miss her. Her
husband died here about three years
ago. Mrs. Miller is mourned by her
two daughters, Mrs. J. T. Felts and
Mrs. A. W. Hough, both of this city,
and two sisters and one brother who
live in the north. The bereaved ones
have the sympathy of their friends in
the loss of one who was so dear to
them. The funeral services were held
this afternoon from the home of Mrs.
Felts, Rev. W. F. Creson of the Pres Presbyterian
byterian Presbyterian church officiating. C. V.
Roberts & Co. had charge of the ar arrangements.
rangements. arrangements. All cabinet ministers of the Mani Manitoba
toba Manitoba government who took office re recently
cently recently are Scots, or of Scotisvh ex extraction,
traction, extraction, and they are Presbyterians.

Labor War In Cleveland Suburb

1 IP rV?l J

Cleveland. O.. is bavin a labor war.

MRS. GIBSON SAW

THE DOUBLE MURDER

j .itiiuiuiiig iu me iciest tteport from
Scene of the Hall-Mills
Assassination
New Brunswick, N. J., Oct. 24.
(Associated Press). The name of the
woman reputed to have witnessed the
double murder of Rev. Hall and Mrs.
Mills became known today. She is
Mrs. June Gibson, a widow, who with
her son conducts a farm on the Ham Ham-ikon
ikon Ham-ikon road. Before harvest time her
fields are frequently robbed. Each
night she lay in wait to end the thiev thievery.
ery. thievery. The night of the murder, she is
said to have told investigators, she
was riding down DeBrussy's lane thru
the Phillips farm when she saw in the
field the dim outlines of two men and
two women. She became curious,
halted her mule and watched. There
was a moment of loud talking, the
sound of a pistol shot and a streak of
flame and one man fell. A moment
1 'ter there were four more shots and
one woman fell. Mrs. Gibson became
frightened and fled.
CHINESE HAVE TROUBLE
WITH THEIR CHILDREN
Manila, Oct. 17. (By Associated
Press). Wing Ty, a Chinese girl 17
years old, committed suicide today by
drowning, the police said, when her
mother spanked her for bobbing her
hair and cutting her skirts to the
length in vogue among flappers in
America.
BULLOCK AFRAID THE
KUKLUX WILL GET HIM
Boston, Oct. 24. Matthew Bullock,
negro, republican candidate for the
Massachusetts senate, has filed with
the clerk of the house a bill to pro
hibit the organization of a Kuklux
Klan in this state. The clan would be
designated as a menace to the public
peace.
OCCASIONALLY SPEED COPS
ARE HIGHWAYMEN
Miami, Oct. 24. The Miami Ad.
Club is up in arms because of the al alleged
leged alleged action of constables who arrest
speeders in the Arch Creek section
and it is proposed to lodge a formal
complaint with Governor Hardee in
the form of a petition from the club.
Members of the club charge that
the arresting officer or committing
magistrates had been accepting pay
ments of $10.25 by offenders and that
some drivers had been told that if
they did not pay the costs amounting
to that sum they would have to give
$100 bond for appearance in court.
i The $10.25. they said, usually was
forthcoming immediately.
Joe Frank, a member, cited as an
instance the case of a tourist bound
for Miami, arrested at Arch Creek for
speeding. The defendant had a car carload
load carload of furniture on its way to Miami
but because of what he termed his un
iiistifiable arrest he telegraphed to
have it diverted to St. Petersburg.
More than 6,000,000 persons in the
United States engage annually in
hunting during the open season.
1
1
3
In the c urs
f v:lu i. jrt&l bBlMhi&
la here hov.-n.

District Meeting
Knights ot Pythias

At
A Large Attendance and an Evening
Of Good Fellowship And f
Instruction
The Dunnellon Lodge, K. of P., hav having
ing having invited the next district conven convention
tion convention to meet with it, twenty-eight
knights from Ocala and nine from
Reddick motored to the Phosphate
City Monday evening, and met with
the local knights, who had a good good-sized
sized good-sized attendance themselves. The
meeting was called to order by Chan Chancellor
cellor Chancellor Commander C. E. Hood, and
after organizing District Deputy
Chancellor W. W. Stripling took the
chair. The work of the meeting con consisted
sisted consisted of the usual deliberations,
vhich of course are strictly lodge
property. Interesting talks were made
by Knights C. B. Howell, I. U. Forbes,
Arthur Rou, W. H. Hoffman, R. L.
Bryan Jr., William Griffith, C. P.
Howell, W. W. Stripling, S. C. Mayo,
W. W. Rilea and D. W. Ketchum, and
by way of butter to go with the bread
Knight C. M. Cam gave a parody on
a darkey preacher's sermon which
convulsed the house with mirth.
After a couple of hours of work,
the Dunnellon knights summoned
their brethren to refreshment. A feast
was spread in the Sunny South Cafe,
a short distance from the Castle Hall,
and there soon rallied the entire con
gregation. The piece de resistance
was oysters, and they resisted not
much, being large and tender. Those
stewed were stewed in their own
juice, which is the entirely best way,
and were cooked just right- There
were also oysters raw with the usual
trimmings and coffee and cigars at the
close. Sixty-five were at the feast
they sat down hungry and arose hap
py. Mrs. L. Miller, proprietor of the
cafe, certainly knows how to prepare
a nice supper. Beside her regular
helpers, she had the assistance of sev several
eral several Dunnellon knights, each of whom
constituted himself a committee of
one to see that no visitor lacked any
thing.
Supper over, hosts and guests held
an informal meeting in front of the
cafe, exchanging conversation while
they smoked their cigars. It was a
pleasant evening, they were all full
up to their chins and at peace with
the world. There is no more hospi hospitable
table hospitable place than Dunnellon, and its
K. of P. lodge expresses the spirit of
the community.
About half-past ten, guests and
hosts reluctantly parted and the lat latter
ter latter began their run for home, which
was made without incident, only a
tire came off one car, whereupon the
entire cavalcade halted and held an
informal meeting in the woods. Two
or three worked on the car and the
others gave advice.
The road between Ocala and Dun Dunnellon
nellon Dunnellon is in fairly good shape except
in spots. It wouldn't take very much
work to repair these.
Every since he has been presiding
officer of the Ocala lodge, Walter
Pedrick, when making such trips,
keeps one of his cars with two skilled
mechanicians at the rear of the pro procession,
cession, procession, to help any bunch of brethren
who break down. The security car
last evening was a beautiful new
Buick, weighted and balanced so it;
ran easily over the rough places. In
it were Mr. Pedrick himself, two of
his best mechanics, Grover Stafford
and Hampton Terrell, Dr. Dunn and
the Star reporter. Dr. Dunn carried
along his first aid kit, in case of sick sickness
ness sickness or accident. It was a competent,
all around unit, and the reporter con considered
sidered considered himself lucky to belong.
SENATOR FLETCHER SKILLFUL
AT PITCHING HORSE SHOES
St. Petersburg, Oct. 24. Wishing
to learn the art of pitching horseshoes j
so that he could back up a contem- ;
plated challenge to President Warren
G. Harding, a devotee of the sport.
United States Senator Duncan U.
Fletcher, visiting here with the Flor Florida
ida Florida realtors in convention became the
protegee of Mayor Frank Fortune
Pulver of this city yesterday. His
first lesson lasted two minutes, when
the statesman in his initial attempt to
toss the curved bit of steel, missed
the iron upright, forty feet away, by
six yards.
For men of good taste, DON REY
dears. 6-10t

Dunnellon

PHILIPS SPOKE FOR

FLORIDA

But He and Schilling Were Voted
Down by the Other Members
of the Board
Tallahassee, Oct. 24. Chairman
Fhilips of the state road department,
during debate today on a resolution
to accept $300,000 of the proceeds of
the Brevard county road bond issue
and construct road No. 4 through that
county, declared the department had
done practically nothing for South
Florida and but little for the East
Coast. The resolution was defeated,
enly Philips and I. E. Schilling, of Mi Miami,
ami, Miami, who introduced it, voting in the
affirmative.
The board adopted a resolution au authorizing
thorizing authorizing the chief engineer to adver advertise
tise advertise for bids for the construction of
44 miles of highway south of Brad Brad-entown
entown Brad-entown on road No. 5.
MORE ROAD FOR WEST FLORIDA
The board accepted the Madison
county bonds at $7000 per mile and
agreed to grade the highway from
the Suwanee river to Madison and
from Madison to the Georgia line.
FAREWELL PARTY FOR
REV. AND MRS. GATES
The many friends of Rev. and Mrs.
D. W. Gates, in Belleview and Ocala,
will read with interest remarks from
the Perry, N. Y Herald, of their
royal entertainment and farewell
party at their home in Silver Lake,
N. Y. Mr. and Mrs. Gates are due
to arrive in Belleview about the mid middle
dle middle of November and will make their
home for the winter at the Weihe
apartments. Says the Herald:
"The residents of Silver Lake as assembly
sembly assembly were quite thoroughly repre represented
sented represented at a house warming given on
Thursday evening to the Rev. and
Mrs. D. W Gates, who are to leave
soon for' Florida, stopping on the way
at various places where members of
the afmily reside, and spending the
winter at Belleview, Fla. A rather
flexible program was fololowed. The
Rev. Mr. Williamson acted as chair chairman
man chairman and Mrs. Abell, Mrs. F. B. Smith,
Mrs. Oliver and Mrs. Williamson at
reception committee. The Rev. Mr.
Scrimshaw made an appropriate pray-"
er. Mrs. Gates, Mrs. Sherman and
Mrs. Hopkins each gave most amusing
readings, which not only were ap applauded
plauded applauded but called for additional num numbers.
bers. numbers. Mr. Williamson outlined the
ministerial career of Rev. Gates for
the past sixty-two years, to which he
responded most felicitiously, revealing
a steadiness of poise, urbanity of
manner, alertness of memory and
spiritual grip of the essentials of re religion
ligion religion that did us all good. The Rev.
Mr. Strutt gave interesting closing
remarks. Ice cream and cake were
then served and after a pleasant so social
cial social evening the company separated."
ALLEE SAME HAVE TO
SWEAR IN AMERICAN
New York, Oct. 24. Taking a court
oath on the Bible means absolutely
nothing to a Chinese, Judge Alfred J.
Talley, presiding in general sessions
court at the trial of Tom Yee, charged
with the murder in Chinatown last
August of K Low, Kip Sing Tons
president, has learned.
Noting the countenances of the
Confucian witnesses during the hear hear-ing,
ing, hear-ing, Judge Talley said to the inter interpreter:
preter: interpreter: "How much does this oath really
mean to a Chinese?"
"Absolutely nothing," was the reply
of the interpreter, who went on to
explain the kind of oath that would
mean something to a Chinese.
A live chicken would have to be
taken to the court and killed in the
presence of the witness about to be
sworn. The witness would be required
to place his hand on the chicken just
before it expired and in that position
give the oath.
"That will hardly do in an Ameri
can court of justice," Judge Talley
said, and then explained with great
care that, whether the American oath
was or was not one which bound the
conscience of a Chinese, it had the
power of sending a witness to Jail for
perjury if he failed to observe it
strictly.
It is reported that a play by Trotx Trotx-sky
sky Trotx-sky is to be produced in Moscow short shortly.
ly. shortly. We hare all along suspected bis
real motive in seeking despotic pow powers.
ers. powers. Punch (London).



OCA LA EVENING STAR. TUESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1922

Ocala Evening Star
Pabllahed Every Day Eirepl Sunday ky
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY,
OCA LA, FLORIDA

H. J. Mitiaser, President
II. D. Leavearaod, Vlce-Prealdeat
P. V. LeaveaKood, Seeretary-Treaaarcr
J. II. lieajanla, Edltar
Entered at Oca I a. Fla.. postolfic aa
second -class matter.
TELEPHONES
Haalneiui Office Flye-Oae
Ed I far la I Depart me at Twa-ScTea
Saeiety Keparter Flve-Oaa

MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively
entitled for the use for republication of
all news dispatches credited to it or not
otherwise credited in this paper and
also the local newer published herein.
All rights of republication of special
dispatches herein are also reserved.
DOMESTIC SUBSCRIPTION RATES
One year, in advance $6.00
Three months, in advance 3.00
Three months, in advance 1.50
One month, in advance SO

4DVEKTISI.VG RATES
DUplayi Plate 15 cents per inch, for
consecutive insertions. Alternate Inser Insertions
tions Insertions 2 per cent additional. Composi Composition
tion Composition charges on ads. that run less than
ix times 10 cents per inch. Special
position 25 per cent additional. Rates
based on four-inch minimum. Less than
four Inches will take a higher rate,
which will be furnished upon applica application.
tion. application. Readlag Notle$ Five cents per line
for first insertion; three cents per line
for each subsequent Insertion. One
change a week allowed on readers with without
out without extra composition charges.
Iegal advertisements at legal rates.'

DEMOCRATIC DOLLARS

We made a little spiel Saturday, in
v.'hich we said we had nine democratic
dollars, to send to the national com committee,
mittee, committee, and we made a pitiful plea for
a tenth, because there is no luck in
odd numbers, unless they are bigger
than those that are even. Nobody
around this burg chipped in, but last
right we went to Dunnellon with the
K. of P. delegation, and while there
Sam Petteway old Sam, who never
goes back on a friend, and who re remembers
members remembers what too many are forget forgetting,
ting, forgetting, that the democratic party is the
white man's friend handed over that
tenth dollar. So we can send the com committee
mittee committee ten dollars today, which in ad addition
dition addition to the $27 we sent three weeks
ago will make $37. That is a mighty
little money for a big county like
Marion, and $5 of it from New York,
r.nd we will be way down on the list
when the big fight starts in 1924. We
will keep the subscription open until
the election, because the committee
will have "some debts to pay off after
the campaign ends, and not much to
pay with, unless other democrat!
uniWttre" doing better than Marion
county.
Following is the list:
Summerfield Chronicle $1.00
T. D. Lancaster Jr 1.00
Nathan Mayo 5.00
Star Publishing Company 2.00
W. L. Colbert 1.00
R. A. Burford 5.00

J. E. Chace 1.00
Wm. D. Taylor 1.00
Countess von Schimon 5.00
James P. Taylor 1.00
J. W. Hunter ... 1.00
W. T. Gary 1.00
J. G. Parrish 1.00
W. W. Stripling 1.00
John II. Taylor 1.00
K. C. Moore 1.00
Ocala Banner 5.00
Rev. C. L. Collins 1.00
Sam McAteer 1.00
Sam Petteway 1.00

FEDERAL AID

Senator Pepper of Pennsylvania
wants to settle strikes by popular
vote. Any vote would be popular
that would settle a strike. Little
Rock Arkansas Gazette.

It is just announced that John D's
income is larger than Henry Ford's.
Here at last is definite proof that it
isn't the original cost so much as it
is the upkeep. Detroit News.

TOWN PESTS

The Stne-Ace .heiiser vho Sends
on a Kid to riii.: Fnlfcses Doorbells
niul litter u; tleir IN. re s with S-un-l
l-s and rirn:l;irs is irettint: Publicity,
but tlt wmntr kin, and the more he
Gets, the Worn Ort he will be. The
Stone-Ace Advertiser wins the Rubber
Stilts!

There is perhaps no subject in con connection
nection connection with the working out of a good
roads program about which there is so
much confusion as that of federal aid.
There is in some quarters an impres impression
sion impression that the federal government ap appropriates
propriates appropriates a lump sum for aid in road
construction and that all that is neces necessary
sary necessary to enable the road departmentto
secure the benefit of that aid is to put
up an equal amount. No man or body
of men wish more earnestly, that this
conception were correct than the state
road department. i
The federal government first made
p.n appropriation for aid to the states
in road construction by a rider to the
postoffice appropriation bill approved
July 11, 1916, and this was applicable
only to post roads. As there are com comparatively
paratively comparatively few of such roads in Flor Florida,
ida, Florida, it was difficult for this state to

receive the benefit-of the. act. By

amendment approved in 1919, the
scope of the appropriation was en enlarged
larged enlarged to cover roads connecting post

roads and the states were required to

formulate and submit maps showing

a five-year program, the expenditure.

however, to be confined to arterial

roads. This amendment also very ma

terially enlarged the appropriation,
the first appropriation having been ex

tremely small, Florida being allotted

for the first year about $50,000, By
an amendment approved November 9,

1921, practically all reference to post

roads was cut out and there is now

no necessity for submitting post road
data. The present law contemplates a

state and federal highway system

The latest amendment did not increase
the amount of federal aid, but it plac placed
ed placed the operation of the act on a more
definite basis, in that it required that
all federal aid should be expended on

a state, and federal highway, system

which would represent not in excess of

s?ven per cent of the total public road

mileage of any state. This is what is

sometimes referred to as the ."Seven

Per Cent System" and is later referred

to. Of the seven per cent of such en entire
tire entire road mileage of the state, not in

excess of three-seventh constitutes
what is known as the primary system.

and four-sevenths, the secondary sys

tern. The act provides that not less
than sixty per cent of the amount of

federal aid granted shall be expended
upon the primary system while the re- j
mainder may be expended upon the
secondary system. -;
The practical working of federal
aid is in charge of the federal bureau
of public roads, a branch of the de department
partment department of agriculture. The country,
i3 divided into ten districts, Florida
being within the tenth district, the
central office of which is located at
Montgomery, Ala., and is in charge of
A. E. Loder, district engineer. The

representative of the bureau in Flor Florida
ida Florida is H. J. Morrison, senior highway
engineer, with headquarters at Gaines

ville. Mr. Morrison is the official thru
whom the state road department
works most intimately. There has al always
ways always been the heartiest co-operation
between the bureau of public roads
and the road department of Florida
and Mr. Morrison in particular .has
labored untiringly to be of .every as assistance
sistance assistance to the department. .-
No federal aid is extended except
upon projects approved by the bu bureau
reau bureau of public roads, and subsequent
to the passage of the federal act of

1921, it became necessary for the road
department to designate the roads

constituting its seven per cent, and

to further designate of those roads the

three-sevenths constituting the. pri

mary system and the four-sevenths

secondary system. . ,
Federal aid is in fact actually avail

able only after the completion of a

project or the completion of units
thereof, the result being that the
state road department must always
advance the funds necessary to the
construction of the project upon which
federal aid is later received,., Estit
mates and vouchers are made up
monthly by the department during the
progress of the work, which .go first

to Mr. Morrison at Gainesville for ap

proval, then to the Montgomery office
for its approval and finally for the. ap approval
proval approval and payment to the bureau in
Washington. This process takes from
six weeks to three months, during
which time the state must put up the
money or the work would of necessity
stop. Just here it may be well to re remark
mark remark that at the present time federal
participation cannot exceed $16,000
per mile. Under the first act the limit
vas $10,000 per mile, while in 1919
it was raised to $20,000 per mile, be being
ing being reduced to the present figure of
$16,000 per, mile in 1921.
The state road department is the
only state agency recognized by the
bureau of public roads and through
which it works. The bureau has rules
and regulations upon which it insists
ir the carrying on of all construction.
For example, all primary roads must
have a minimum width of eighteen
feet, and all bridges thereon must be
at least twenty feet wide; the mini minimum
mum minimum requirements for secondary
roads are roads sixteen feet in width,
and bridges eighteen feet in width.

The department, therefore, in plan planning
ning planning oa&J'Jupon which federal, aid is
desired must make it3 specifications

comply with the requirements of the

federal bureau.

. As .theprimary object of the state

road department is a system of state

roads, roads, builtiwitha view to serr-
- a.

ing. an enure siate, su me primary

consideration with the federal bureau

of public roads is a national system
of roads which shall serve not alone a
State, but the' entire nation; giving to
the country a complete and connected

system of roads ; which will enable

travelers to proceed from any section

of the country to the other upon con connected
nected connected highways. Accordingly, the
bureau regards as of primary import importance
ance importance those, roads which from their lo location
cation location and the volume of traffic are in interstate
terstate interstate roads, and more readily ex extends
tends extends federal aid on -such roads than
on roads which are merely connecting
links within the state. It is the pref preference
erence preference also of the -bureau- that all
federal aid should be met with state
as distinguished 'from county funds,
and it does not encourage the partici participation
pation participation of counties in -construction of
roads on which federal aid is extended,
holding the state agency, the road de department,
partment, department, responsible for the carrying
out of the project agreements entered
into between the bureau and the de department.
partment. department. The result is as has been
pointed out, that before : undertaking
work -on which federal aid is to be ex extended,
tended, extended, the department must keep the
work moving after its commencement.
In fact, it is estimated that where the
work is to be done by the state and
the federal government (without
county aid), if the project contem contemplates
plates contemplates an expenditure of $100,000 the
road department must have in hand
not less than $75,000, in order to fi finance
nance finance the work until the procedure
necessary to- get the estimates and
vouchers approved and paid by the
bureau is completed, a- process, as for formerly
merly formerly stated, taking usually about
three months.

worth now; and Mr. More "tells us
that $50.00 worth of laznber will build

an air tight crib with whkn to fumi-
gate it. Will the gentleman be so.
kind as to tell where we can get the :

$50.00 and where "the weevils' start!
Oxford, Fla." C.A.-Hooks.

O. H. S. HALLOWE'EN CARNIVAL

Let's go.
Don't forget.
Heaps of fun.
Oodles of pep.
Oct. 28 at high school grounds. 4t

OXFORD

IRVINE

E. L. Wart-

a Wednesday

Irvine, Oct. 23. Mr.

mann of Citra was

caller. u
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Chitty of
Flemington were in ourmidst Friday.
Mr. Millerchamp of Boardman call called
ed called Friday"' -
Mr. and Mrs. L. K. Edwards and
son L. K. Jr.; motored to Ocala Fri Friday
day Friday for the day.
Mr. Leslie Prisoc of Blitchton re returned
turned returned home Saturday "after spending
a few days with reltaives.
Miss Velma Savage of Orange Lake
spent the week-end' with Mrs. G. M.
Blitch.
Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Mathews of
Flemington visited with relatives
here Saturday afternoon.
Mr. Henry Jemigan of Fairfield
was seen in our burg Saturday.
Mr. Kent Ausley of Fairfield was
a business caller Saturday.
Miss Bessie Mae Finley spent the
week-end with het mother, Mrs. Fin Fin-ley
ley Fin-ley of Kendrick.
Mr. and Mrs. Dixon Irvine and Mr.
and Mrs. Kincade Irvine of Orange
Lake, spent Sunday 1 with Mr. and
Mrs. G. M. Blitch.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Chitty attend attended
ed attended services at Flemington Sunday
night.

One quart New Honey, CC
per jar

Irish Potatoes
per peck

Jello 12c. package,
three for

33c

Palm Olive Soap,
three cakes for.
Ucinz Small Can
Beans

Cream of Wheat,
package
Shredded Wheat
Biscuit package..
Corn Flakes
three for

40 c
25c
11c
25c
15c
25c

Quaker Oats, 12c. pkg., OO
three for OuC

Post Toasties,
three for .

Premier Salad
Dressing

Uneedas,
three for.

Octagon Soap,
three for. .

Senate Coffee,
per pound .

Phit Jars Orange Marmalade

25c
43c
20c
20c
40c
40c

Purina Scratch Feed, Chicken Chowder, Cow Chow
and other Feeds

FARMERS EXCHANGE STORE

PHONE 163

AUTOMOBILE STORAGE'

Large Fire Proof Building

OPEN DAY AND NIGHT I

, Oxford, Oct. 23. "I is sho glad that
we's got some one to tell us when the
bugs and worms is chawin' on uses
greens patch, and how to dispatch
'em."

And that other- thing called an-

thrancnose. Gee, what kind of a var varment
ment varment is that? And that nematodes!
It sounds a little like "need more

taters."

And the writer winds up by telling

us how-to kill weevils. Uh. Now
understand,-1 am not much of a far farmer,
mer, farmer, but-. I -do raise "cain" sometimes,
and have had some experience with
weevils. I have heard carbon bisul bisulphide
phide bisulphide recommended a long time, but
it never did impress me much, except
to kill the, deevil after he emerged

from the grain of corn.

I once talked to a man from the

Gainesville agricultural school, who

seemed, to know something about
weevils, and he nor anyone else has

ever been able to tell me just when

and, where the egg or germ was de

posited in the corn.

I once selected some of the best
ears ,of corn I had shucked it and

sealed, it up in a fruit jar, and in due

time the weevils ate it up. At an another
other another time I selected a small quan quantity,
tity, quantity, pf. the best shelled corn I could
find, and also few dozen of the biggest
robust weevils I could run down, and
put .corn and weevils in a big mouth

bottle with a cloth over it to give air,
and. waited, to seethe weevils eat. up

the. corn, and you may not believe it,

but them scoundrels starved to death

in' the . midst of plenty. Perhaps I

shouldhave watered them (?) I did

not molest the bottle, and in a few

weeks there was a new army of

weevils cut out of that corn and de devoured
voured devoured it; and like Alexander the

Great," sat "down and wepted because

there was no more corn to conquer.

I onced supposed that a little fly
layed the egg in the grain just about

roasten(y)ear time; so I experiment

ed by tying some good paper bags
over the ears just before the silk be

gan to dry to keep the supposed fly

away from the corn. I was particular

when gathering, to keep this corn

away from the other corn; but the

weevils feasted on it just the same

By observation, I have found that
weevils cut out of corn, instead of
cutting in, the same as worm cutting
out of hickry-nuts. You ean see them
while yet young, even before they cut
through at ally and just how the egg
is layed, in the grain through a great
shuck still remains a mistery to me.
I am admitting that carbon by by-sulphide
sulphide by-sulphide will kill them as soon as out
of the grain; but how is it going to
reach them in a hermeticaly sealed
grain of corn? If the stuff kills the
weevil in the grain, why will not one
application do the work of two, ex except
cept except to stop his future work?
The best way I have ever found
was to heat the corn sufficiently to
kill the germ. I do not know what
degree of heat to suggest.
Now in conclusion: we have the
land the stock and the time and good
farmers incidently make the corn, and
a great many of them have $50.00

PRINTING

THAT GOOD KIND

STAR PUBLISHING
COMPANY
PRINTING

Cars Washed and Polished
PHONE 291
Florida Auto Supply Company
311-320 M. MAIN STREET

MUST BE SOLD!

Make an offer for 160 acres one mile from head of beautiful Blue
Springs, directly on A. C. L. R. R. and Blue Springs Run. Has phos phosphate,
phate, phosphate, some timber and abundance of wood. Good orange or farm
land. Also 140 acres at Cotton Plant near York on A. C. L. R. R.
Some timber and wood. Good orange and farm land. Must be sold
at once to close an estate.

F. W. DITTO
OCALA, FLORIDA

fifteen (15)
Better
cigarettes

for TlTTtv

JJ.HJ

XV'' fifteen (15) JhL k&

f -lr V lilted

V, NV-(SgN S& -better Burley

Every cigarette lull
weight and full size

Copthicht 1922, Liccrrr & Mtem Tobacco Co.



OCALA EVENING STAB, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1922

y

OCTOBER MONEY SAVERS
AT GERIG'S DRUG STORE

Chocolate Peppermint Patties, 33
cents the pound.
Phenolophthalein Tablets, 100 for
59 cents.
Puretest Epsom Salts, 15 cents spe special.
cial. special. Jonteel Combination Cream, 39
cents each.
Klenzo Liquid Antiseptic, 19 cents.
Rexall Kidney Pills, 39
bcttle.
cents the
!
Oriole Fabric Stationery. Regular
50 cent value for 29 cents.
$1.50 Atomizer for 98 cents.
These prices good only for October
as long as the goods last. 17-tf
- .
mummuats trmrnttrmutrminannm
SASH DOOR
Geo. Hay I Co.
Ocala, Fla.
HARDWARE
HIGH GRADE PAINT
A Word
To the Wise!
There's a time for all things.
It's now time to have your
car painted and topped. The
fall season's here and a paint
job done now will stay a year.
Bring your car to us and be
satisfied. When better paint
jobs are done Spencer-Ped-rick
Motor Company will do
them.
SPENCER PEDRICK
MOTOR CO.
PHONE 8
Plumbing & Electrical
Contracting
Full line of material always
in stock. Estimtaes cheerfully
given.
PHONE 252
Needham Motor Co.
SALT SPIES WATER
Is growing in popularity every
day among Ocalans. It is also
being shipped to every part of
the state. It is sold under a
guarantee. Try a five gallon
container.
CheroCola Bottling Works
Phone 167
Arrival and departure of passenger
ains at OCALA UNION STATION.
The following schedule figures pub pub-ished
ished pub-ished as information and not guar guaranteed.
anteed. guaranteed. (Eastern Standard Time)
ATLANTIC COAST LINE R. R.
Leave for Station Arrive from
2:15 am St. Petersburg 2:27 : m
2:27 am Jacksonville 2:15 am
1:45 pm Jacksonville 3:24 pm
3:24 pm St. Petersburg 1:25 pm
6:15 am Jacksonville 9:00 pm
3:30 pm Homosassa 1:16 pm
7:10 am (p) Wilcox 6:45 pm
7:25 am (j) Lakeland 11:03 pm
(p) Monday, Wednesday, Friday.
j)Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday.
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY
Leave for Station Arrive from
2:34 am Jacksonville-N'York 1:55 am
1:50 pm
4:06 pm
Jacksonville 1:15 pm
Jacksonville 4 :06 pm
Tampa-Manatee-1:55
am St. Petersburg 2:34 am
2:55 am NYork-St. Petrsburg 1:35 am
1:55 am Tampa 2:34 am
1:35 pm Tampa-Manatee 1:30 pm
4:05 pm Tampa-St. Petrsburg 4:05 pm
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CONTRACTOR
ANi BUILDER
Careful estimates made on all con contract
tract contract work. Gives more and better
work for the money than any other
ontractor in the city.

H
fl
N
m

RAILROAD SCHEDULES

1 OCALA QCCURRE11CES
i
If you have any local or society
items for the Star, phone five-one.

j Mr. Geo. K. Robinson went to In In-,
, In-, verness yesterday to spend a week
with his son, Mr. Phil Robinson, and
family.
Mr. and Mrs. E. I. Sasser are receiv-
jng congratulations on the arrival at
their home of a dainty little baby girl,
born yesterday.
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Anderson ar-
'rived in Ocala yesterday for a visit
j with Mr. Anderson's parents, Mr. and
! Mrs. R. L. Anderson Sr.
W. K. Lane, M. D physician and
surgeon, specialist eye, ear, noae and
throat. Office over 5 and 19 cent store
Ocala. FU. tf
DON REY cigars are better. 6-10t
Rev. J. J. Neighbour, rtector of the
Episcopal church, went to Orlando
yesterday for a short stay on busi business
ness business connected with his parish.
Mrs. C. C. Balkcom and children
and Miss Mary McDowell left this
morning for Lakeland. After a short
visit with friends Miss McDowell will
return home but Mrs. Balkcom and
children will remain there until the
frst of December.
Mrs. J. H. Speering who has been
spending the past week in Ocala with
her father and brother, expects to re return
turn return to her home in West Palm Beach
Thursday. Mrs. Speering before her
marriage was Miss Jewell Carroll and
her Ocala friends are delighted to
have her with them fo a short time.
Mrs. H. C. Dozier and Mrs. Philip
Murphy have returned home from
New Orleans, where they attended the
national convention of the American
Legion Auxiliary. Mr. Travis Collier,
who also spent the past week in New
Orleans, attending the American Le Legion
gion Legion convention, has returned home.
"Another Nash." 611
We have
ir Florida.
the best meats
Phone 562.
to be had
13-tf
Dr. D. M. Smith, after a pleasant
stay of several months en the Pa Pacific
cific Pacific coast, with his eldest son, Col.
Dan Morgan Smith, and wife, at Los
Angeles, is now visiting his brother
and sister in Ronceverte, W. Va. The
doctor will return to Ocala as soon as
ve have a spell of weather cool
enough to lay the dengue.
Mr. Howard Clark leaves today for
Teague, Texas, for a short visit with
i his children in Teague, who are living
jvith their grandmother, Mrs. Bonner.
. Later he will go to Dallas, where he
has taken the agency in that district
for the Vitamine Food Corporation.
Mr. Clark's Ocala friends regret to
hear that he expects to make his home
in Texas, but wish him all success in
his new home and business.
Hallowe'en lantern and candle
shades at THE SPECIALTY SHOP,
A. E. Gerig. 18-t
The host of boarders at the Arms
House were treated to an agreeable
surprise last night when they trooped
in to supper. Mrs. C. C. Arms was
i sitting in her usual roeking chair on
the front porch after an absence of
over five months. She did a risky
thing to place hersef unprotected be before
fore before all her boys. They were so glad
to see her that they nearly ate her
alive. Mrs. Arms expects to stay a
while as a guest in her house and will
then take a trip to Miami before com coming
ing coming home for good.
We have the best meats to be had
in Florida. Phone 562. 13-tf
Regarding postoffice matters, we
learned yesterday afternoon that Mr.
Philip Murphy is also out of the race
I U i. 1-it.
ivi lire puauuaaieismp. xie was re refused
fused refused because he has been receiving
his mail at the postoffice in Avon
Park, tho' he has retained his resi residence
dence residence here. Mr. Lester Lucas has
passed the examination, and it is con considered
sidered considered probable that he has the
longest pole and will knock the per persimmon.
simmon. persimmon. However, there's many a
slip betwixt the door and step, and
there may be a dark horse. The re republicans
publicans republicans in this county labor under
the disadvantage of not having a man
who will come out in the open, run
up his flag and work for his party.
Consequently their big bosses put less
confidence in them than in some prom prominent
inent prominent democrats. It might not be out
of place to say that Mr. B. F. Borden,
assistant postmaster, and the man the
town would most prefer to see have
the office, has taken the examination
and passed. JBen however, is a dem democrat,
ocrat, democrat, and has no expectation of being
appointed. Meantime, Colonel Bob
smiles and sits like a benevolent
Buddha on the lid.

OCALA TWENTY YEARS AGO

(Evening Star Oct. 24, 1902)
G. J. Strozier of Oklawaha, representative-elect
to the legislature from
Marion county, was in town today.
(Mr. Strozier now lives at Winter
Garden, and has represented Orange
as he represented Marion).
Dr. Tom Thompson, who has been
visiting his parents, Dr. and Mrs. J.
M. Thompson, will leave tomorrow for
Louisville, to renew and finish up his
medical studies. He will come out
next June a full fledged M. D.
John Priest, son of C. C. Priest,
went over to Pedro yesterday and
stole Alf Proctor's pretty daughter
and brought her home to Anthony,
and last evening at his father's home
they were married by Rev. P. J.
Reeves of Spring Park. About the
same time Rev. T. H. Sistrunk, the
Methodist pastor, at the parsonage,
married Mr. Claude Nix and Miss
Julia Tydings, formerly of this city,
and the young couple left on the night
train for their future home in Lees Lees-burg.
burg. Lees-burg. The community was saddened this
morning when news went forth that
Mrs. J. W. Sylvester was dead. She
had been ill only ten days and while
she was very sick her family did not
think her condition serious.
Ocala Ten Years Ago
(Evening Star Oct. 24, 1912)
Mr. W. O. Massey came up this
morning from North Lake Weir. He
has his home there completed now and
he and Mrs. Massey are very much
pleased with their new home.
Marcus Frank is fitting up the rear
half of the upstairs of his store for
a display room for the ladies' ready to
wear department.
Deputy Sheriff A. J. Brigance hand handed
ed handed the Star a Wilson and Marshal dol dollar
lar dollar today and we are afraid it will be
Marion's last democratic dollar of the
campaign. We are not exactly glad
to say that one or two counties in
Florida have been stingier than Mar Marion.
ion. Marion. (That reads like we had written
it last night).
Mrs. Louis Duval will entertain a
few friends to enjoy an evening with
Mrs. E. H. Mote of Leesburg Thurs Thursday.
day. Thursday. Mrs. Mote is a great social fav favorite
orite favorite in Ocala and her friends are al always
ways always glad to greet her.
Will take pupils In violin, piano and
voice with theory lessons free. Terms
reasonable. Will offer classes in his history
tory history of music, sight singing, dictation
and ear training for small fee. Special
attention given out of town pupils.
Write or call on Cevie Roberts, Ocala,
Fla. Phone 305. 9-15-tf
Seventy-five years ago, a New
Hampshire-born man, Horace Greeley,
gave the advice, "Go West, young
man." Today, New Hampshire is
saying to young westerners, "Come
East, young man." A board of pub publicity,
licity, publicity, serving without pay, is endeav
oring to place before young western
farmers, of American type, the ad advantages
vantages advantages of New Hampshire. This at
tempt to reverse the course of Amer
ican emigration is almost revolution
ary and is confined wholly to those
already farmers and to those of the
Nordic stock.
A process has been developed in
Hungary for treating corn straw in
such a manner that it will produce 40
pounds of cellulose, 40 pounds of mo
lasses and five pounds of artificial
fertilizer from every 100 pounds of
straw.
"Say it with flowers" and buy the
flowers from Mrs. J. E. Hyndman, 1
miles out on the
Phone 30M.
Dunnellon road.
10-tf
SEVEN DAY SERVICE
AUTO
REPAIR
SERVICE
Our plant is equipped for giv giving
ing giving you real service on your car.
We employ none but expert
workmen, and you do not pay
for "breaking in" mechanics.
Let ns clean up and overhaul
your car. You'll be surprised at
the low cost of service in our
shop.
WE SELL
Fox Tires and Tubes
Cord 10,000 mile guarantee.
Fabric 6,000 mile guarantee.
STANDARD PRICES
DIXIE HIGHWAY GARAGE
JAMES ENGESSER
Phone 258121 W. Broadway
Night Phone 533

HOW TO OVERCOME EVIL: Be.
kindly affect! oned one to another with
brotherly love; in honour preferring
soe another; recompense to no mm
ivll for evIL Provide things honest
hi the sight of all men. Be not over over-tome
tome over-tome of evil, but overcome evil with
food. Romans 12: 10, IT, 21.

RED GROSS WINNING
IN FIGHT FOR HEALTH
Better, Stronger Citizenry Now
Emerging Out of Work In
United States.
The American Rsd Cress as an
evangelist of better health ass loeked
Its problem squar in the face. How
it accepted the task revealed to It in
the nation's physical condition as
brought out daring the World War.
and conscientiously applied its activi activities
ties activities to correction forms a vivid chap chapter
ter chapter In the forthcoming annual report
Historically and practically, nursing Is
a basic work for the Red Cross. In Its
public health nursing service. In In Instruction
struction Instruction In home hygiene and care of
the sick, nutrition classes, first aid
and life saving courses and health cen centers,
ters, centers, the American Red Cross Is ap applying
plying applying effectually the lessons learned
during the war end making for a
healthier, stronger and better nour nourished
ished nourished citizenry.
The task of tho Red Cross Public
Health nurse In the 1,240 nursing serv services
ices services now operating throughout the
country Instructing their communities
In health essentials and disease pre prevention
vention prevention Is demonstrating the possibili possibilities
ties possibilities of human betterment and the great
benefits of enlightenment
During the last year 313 new public
healtn nursing services were establish established
ed established by Red Cross Chapters, and several
hundred services so convincingly prov proved
ed proved their effectiveness that they were
takes over by public authorities. In
order to promote this work $30,000 was
allotted to provide women to prepare
themselves for public nursing. The
home visits made by the 1,240 nurses
aggregated nearly 1,800,000, visits to
schools numbered 140,000, and In six
months 1.250,000 school children were
Inspected by these nurses and where
defects were found advised examina examination
tion examination by physicians. In rural commu communities
nities communities this service has made a very
marked advance and has won thou thousands
sands thousands of converts to approved methods
ot disease prevention.
In home hygiene and care of the sick
instruction, which fits the student in
fcethods of proper care where Illness is
not so serious as to require profes professional
sional professional service, the Red Cross conduct conducted
ed conducted 8.SS4 classes during the last year,
enrolled 2,35 Instructors. 93,448 stu students
dents students and issjed 42,656 certificates.
On .Tune CO, 1922, nutrition service
embraced 1,109 classes, with a total of
27,.r.23 children and 2,58) enrolled dieti dietitians.
tians. dietitians. Seventy-eight food selection
classes graduated 7.T3 who received
Red Cross certificates. In general
health activities IWd Cross Chapters
maintained 377 heauh centers, serving
as many core ui unities, provided -S.751
health lectures for largo audiences ev everywhere,
erywhere, everywhere, while clinics numbered over
10,000.
NEW GERMAN MONEY
On Constitution day in Germany the
first three-mark pieces of currency
were distributed by the mint Other
currency will follow. The design of
the coin is by Professor Quackerle of
Munich.
First American Dental College.
The first dental school In the united
States was established In Baltimore
in 1839.
NOTICE
1 have cut the price of strand wood
wr i il. j T
I iu cents on me. cora, as x out cuui
!pelled to get it off the land. Four Four-i
i Four-i foot -wood $3.50 per cord. Phone 471.
E. Gibbons, N. Osceola St. 16-tf
Get your witches and black cats
for Hallowe'en at THE SPECIALTY
SHOP. A. E. Gerig.
18-6t

i i

FOR COMFORT

Cr JJUMPHRBTf

GAS HEATERS
Phone 61 OCALA GAS COMPANY

that bakes with
Calumet and there
are millions of them
has learned three im important
portant important baking facte.

First; that she never has
any failures, which means
no loss of time and ma material.
terial. material. Second; that her bakings
are always pure and
wholesome, which goes
a long way toward perfect
health.
Third; that the greater
than usual leavening

PJHTOfl

SSST BT TEST
strength
j j e

sianus ior economy De De-cause
cause De-cause she uses less.
The Economy EBAESIRHS PQDWBEM
sales are 150 greater than that of
any other brand.
A pound can of Calumet contains full 16 ounces. Some
baking powders come in 12 ounce instead of 16 ounce
cans. Be sure you get a pound when you want it.
r 9
THE WORIJXS GREATEST BAKING POWDEH

A sourc if piriafe
when oitial $Msts
ar? pir9iit. It's

Gmm t the last

PEC. U.S.

!?ggSgfgggMBMeWSMSSJ'MSWSM"SMSSISW'lWWSMS

f O AND
Vpy JSSu STORAGE
WHITE STAR LINE

Negotiable Storage Receipts Iasned on Cotton, Automobiles, Etc

MOVE, PACK, SHIP
LIVE STOCK,
PIANOS, BAGGAGE,
MACHINERY,
FURNITURE, ETC
The
Win dsor
Hotel
JACKSONVILLE, FLA

Star Ads are Business Builders. Phone 51

of Calumet
1
PAT. OFF.
TRANSFER
LONG DISTANCE MOVING
Phone 296
In the heart of the dry, with
Hemming Park for a front
yard. Every modern conveni convenience
ence convenience in each room. Dining
room service is second to none.
IOBERT M. METES,
r. E. KAVANAUGH, Proprietor-



OCA LA EVENING STAR, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1922

UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS

(RATES under this heading axe a
follows: Maximum of six lines one time
25c; three times 50c; six times 75c; one
month $3.00. .All accounts payable la
advance except to those who have reg regular
ular regular advertising accounts.
FOR SALE Airedale pups, pure bred
from big hunting strain. Kingman
Moore, 719 Wenona St. 24-3t

FOUND Some one left a boy's
bicycle on my lawn several days
ago. Owner can have same by de describing
scribing describing property and paying for
this ad. R. N. Dosh. 24-4t
FOR RENT Rooms also nicely fur furnished
nished furnished apartment. Apply to Mrs.
T. II. Johnson, 504 Oklawaha. Phone
376. 24-6t
WANTED Real salesman, no trifler.
Call for Mr. Kelly at the Harring Harrington
ton Harrington Hall hotel. 23-3t

QGALA OGCURREHCES

If you have any local or society
items for the Star, phone five-one.

Will take pupils in violin, piano and
voice with theory lessons free. Terms
reasonable. Will offer classes in his history
tory history of music, sight singing, dictation
and ear training for small fee. Special
attention given out of town pupils.

Write or call on Cevie Roberts, Ocala,

Fla. Phone 305. 15-tf

Mr. Elmer DeCamp returned home

Sunday from a pleasant week's visit

with his sister, Mrs. John Dunn, in
Miami.

The primary school is in need of

contributions for its rummage sale
on Saturday. Please bring them to

the school during school hours. 24-lt

STRAWBERRY PLANTS Mission Missionary
ary Missionary strawberry plants for sale; 50
cents per hundred. Now is the time
to plant. J. L. Leitner. Phone
436. 21-6t

LOST Vhite curly English terrier
on camp ground; black patch on
head; stub tail; slightly blind; name
Topey. Return C. O. D. to J. R.
BORING, Waldo, Fla. 20-6t

FOR SALE Upright piano, small
wood stove, suite oak furniture, two
oak bedsteads, two zinc bath tubs,
half gallon and quart fruit jars, bot bottles
tles bottles for syrup. Call at 447 Okla Oklawaha
waha Oklawaha Ave. 20-6t

FOR RENT A furnished three-room
apartment on the first floor, with
private bath. Apply to Mrs. P. A.

Durand, 614 East Adams St., phone

579. 27-tf

MUSIC Will take pupils in violin
piano and voice with theory lessons
free. Terms reasonable. Will offer

classes in history of music, sight
singing, dictation and ear training
for small free. Special attention
given out of town pupils. Write or

call on Cevie Roberts, Ocala. Phone

305. 15-tf

FOR SALE One 7-passenger Stude-

baker and one Ford light truck
Williams Garage. 3-tf

FOR RENT Rooms furnished or un unfurnished
furnished unfurnished for light housekeeping,

with hot and cold water in baths

Rooms are reasonable and a money
saving proposition. Call at the

Dormitory or phone 305. 27-tf

LOST New 30 x 3 Goodrich safety

tread tine on Maxwell rim, between

Bay Lake and Ocala (via Citra)

Suitable reward for return to W. D

Cam, Ocala. 13-tf

WANTED A salesman for Marion

county to take orders for complete

line of wool, silk, lisle and cotton

hosiery. We deliver and collect

commission paid when order is

taken. Our salesmen average $8

to $15 daily. Pure Silk Hosiery

Mills, Inc., district office 405 Duva

building, Jacksonville, Fla. 21-3t

Settle the Irish question for this

week. Phone 195 or 614. 24-2t

Miss Agnes Person of Orlando has

arrived in Ocala for a short stay and

is the guest of Mrs. R. G. Blake.

We sell VEGEX. Farmers Exchange

Store. Phone 163. 24-12t

Fertilize your pot plants and lawn

flowers with Albert's Plant Food. Sold

in 25c., 50c. and $2 packages at the

Court Pharmacy. 18-tf

A district meeting of the Woman's

Missionary Society of the Methodist

church will be held tomorrow, begin beginning
ning beginning at 10 o'clock and lasting all day.

Three state officers, Mrs. Lipscomb,

Mrs. Baine and Mrs. Jenkins, will be

present. Dinner will be served in the
basement of the church and all mem

bers and friends of the church are in-

ited.

MEETING OF "A" CLUB

NOTICE, SHRKN'ERS

Miss Ava Lee Edwards was hostess

to the "A" Club yesterday afternoon

at its regular weekly meeting. An

innovation in the form of entertain

ment for the afternoon was made. In

stead of the usual games of auction,

the hostess entertained her guests at

the Temple theater, where "The Child

Thou Gavest Me" was the picture

shown, and which was much enjoyed

by those of the party.

After the picture the guests repair

ed to the home of the hostess, where a
pleasant hour was spent. One of the
special features of the afternoon was

the piano solos which were given by

Miss Delia Livingston, who is a tal

ented youg musician. Refreshments
were served by the hostess assisted

by her mother. The refreshments con

sisted of a salad course with hot choc

olate. The afternoon was one filled
vith enjoyment for all present. A
number of guests besides the regular

club members were included in the

invitation list of the afternoon.
Those enjoying Miss Edwards' hos hospitality
pitality hospitality were Mrs. Guy Miller, Mrs.
H. C. Nichols, Mrs. Edmund Martin,
Mrs. Albert Harris, Mrs. W. M. Pal Palmer,
mer, Palmer, Misses Stella, Nina and Nettie

Camp, Bettie Davis, Sarah Dehon,
Ethel Home, Mary Burford, Pearl
Ray, Mamie Sheppard, Delia Living Livingston
ston Livingston and Onie Chazal.

We will have a visitation from some
of the members of the divan of Mo Morocco
rocco Morocco Temple, on Wednesday evening,
Oct. 25th. Supper will be served at
the Masonic temple at 7 o'clock. All
cobles turn out and give them a hearty
welcome wear fez. All nobles that
can possibly do so meet the south southbound
bound southbound limited and give the visiting

nobility a welcome.

Wr. M. Palmer,
R. E. Yonge,
A. L. Lucas,
Ambassadors.

A CARD OF THANKS

USED CAR SALE

We offer some very unusual values in the automobiles listed below,
all of them in good running order. Terms if desired.
1920 Buick Touring (private use only) new tires $675.00
1921 Buick Touring, like new, perfect condition $900.00
Reo Touring with starter. Used by Sumner, Belleview $225.00
Overland Touring, very late model. Mrs. DeCamp's car $260.00
Ford Touring with starter, repainted, new top $250.00
Studebaker without starter, good condition, fine for
light truck $. 90.00
Will gladly demonstrate any of these cars.

McLEOD & WATERS
STUDEBAKER DEALERS, PHONE 170

We wish to thank most sincerely
each and every one for the kindness

and sympathy shown us in our sad
lereavement of our dear son and

brother. Thos. F. Todd.
Sadie C. Todd.
Jessie B. Todd.

FOR COMFORT

NOTICE, GIRL SCOUTS

OCf HUMPHREY

FLORIDA REUNION, U C. V.

Mrs. E. L. Carney has returned
home from a delightful week's visit to

(Tallahassee, where she went to attend

the annual reunion of the Florida di

vision of the United Confederate Vet

erans, as their matron of honor, a po

sition she has held for many years.

Mr. and Mrs. Carney spent several

legislative sessions in Tallahassee,
while the former was senator from

A 25-cent package of Albert's Plant

Food will perform wonders with your
pot plants. Try it. Sold at the Court

Pharmacy. tf

"Another Nash." 6tl

There was a pleasant time Monday

evening, at the home of Mrs. B. F.
Condon, when the past matrons and

past patrons of Ocala Chapter No. 29,

O. E. S., met for the purpose of or

ganizing a past matron's and past

patron's club. The constitution and
by-laws were discussed and ordered
made. Mrs. R. E. Yonge was elected

president, Mrs. C. E. Simmons, vice-

president and Mrs. F. W. Cook, secre

tary and treasurer. There are eleven
or. the charter list. Mrs. Condon and
Mrs. Cook served refreshments con consisting
sisting consisting of fruit custard, maccaroons
end coffee.

The members of the Sunshine Troop

of Girl Scouts will have a party Fri

day night at the home of Miss Lillian
Livingston, instead of the regular
meeting. Any member of this troop
who wish to attend please see Miss

Livingston by Wednesday.

HALLOWE'EN CARD PARTY

7 Tl J

GAS HEATERS
Phone 61 OCALA GAS COMPANY

There will be a card party at the

Catholic rectory Tuesday, October 31.

Make arrangements for your tables
with Mrs. Allen Walkley or Mrs.

Weller Carmichael. 24-6t

The first gold to arrive in Canada
since the signing of the Armistrice
has been received from New York.

Formal announcement was made by

the New York Trust Company that it

this district, and they have many had shipped $500,000 in gold to the

friends in that city who always give Canadian Bank of Commerce.

either or both of them a cordial wel

come.

When the sponsorial ladies were

presented at the morning meeting of

the first day, the master of ceremon- I

Fraternal Orders

ORDER OF EASTERN STAB

ies requested Mrs. Carney to speak a
few words to the veterans. This was

an unexpected honor, but she gra-

ri- ru xt on f v a

meets at the Masonic hall the second

FOR SALE BARGAIN?

Ten acres rich hammock soil on Dixie Highway within city limits
Ocala, known as the Frederitzi place. Six-room bungalow partly
furnished; all necessary outbuildings; 100-foot well; water piped in
house; two registered cows with calves; one work mule and all fann fanning
ing fanning implements; also 100 Leghorn chickens All for $3750 cash or
$4250 half cash.

F. W. DITTO
OCALA, FLORIDA

Mrs. Julie Weihe, W. M.
Mrs. Susan Cook, Secretary.

OCALA LODGE NO. 286, B. P. O. E.

Settle the Irish question for this
week. Phone 195 or 614. 24-2t
For sale, 1920 Cleveland speedster,
mechanically in Al condition. Easy
terms. Spencer-Pedrick Motor oCm oCm-pany.
pany. oCm-pany. 2-tf

They say shoes will be cheaper dur during
ing during the winter, but the do not tell us
what winter. New York American.

Irish potatoes 15 pounds for 35c,
Wednesday and Thursday. U-Serve
Stores. Phones 195 614. 24-2t

DON REY cigars are better. 6-10t

Beautiful Hallowe'en novelties at
THE SPECIALTY SHOP. A. E.
Gerig. 18-6t

Russia has promised Turkey her
moral support which means that
Turkey will remain unsupported.
Nashville Southern Lumberman.

:j-jVmV .Oi .O.

iw1

?

TyE do not charge
" any thing extra (

S for the high Quality of

printing we do or the ;3f

quick service.

Let us do your next

!: job in commercial
vT' nrinf inrT 5.?

Aft

Phone 51
Star Publishing Co.

The ex-members of old Company A

were glad to greet a former comrade

Sunday and Monday. Ex-Sergeant
Thompson, better known as "Long
Top," was greeting his friends here.

Mr. Thompson is an old soldier. He
served in the Spanish-American war

and later under Funston in the Phil

ippines. He was on the border and

went with Company A to Camp
Wheeler, where the medical men de decided
cided decided he was a little too old for a sol

dier. He is mighty spry for a civil

ion, however. He left Monday for a

visit to Waldo, but says he will be

lack in Ocala in a few days.
DON REY quality cigars. 6-10t

Albert's Plant Food is the thing for

making your flower garden and pot
plants bloom. It is odorless and is
sold in 25c. and 10c. packages and $2

sacks. At the Court Pharmacy, tf

The Izaak Walton League has in inaugurated
augurated inaugurated in Chicago a monthly peri periodical,
odical, periodical, supported by contributions

from scores of Izaak Walton chapters

No one connected with the publication
receives pay and a half-dozen famous
novelists are contributors. $t is de devoted
voted devoted to the preservation of angling,

runting and other outdoor sports.

More than 5,000,000 persons in the
United States alone derive their in

comes, in whole or in part, from "tips
or gratuities.

i r 4.v m j .... -v

rtclTr rAI!nnr, onH W talk xs a"u uurm i"urBuy evcum i

..vo.j : I iU o .io.-l.

i uiuutu ai v v,iwa

At the elegant reception Mrs. Car-

rev received with Gen. James A.

Thomas of Dublin, Ga., the com
mander of the Army of Tennessee De

partment, and when the grand ball Ocala Lodge No. 286, Benevolent
began she had the honor of leading anj Protective Order of Elks, meets

the grand march with this distin- tne secon(j and fourth Tuesday ave-

guished gentleman. They were ably nme3 0f each month. Visiting breth-

assisted by dov. Cary Hardee ana ren eiway8 welcome. Lodge rooms

Miss Agnes Person of Orlando, the upstairs over Troxler's and the Book

state president or the U u. L.., uen. J- Shop, 113 Main street.

H. Harp of Crescent City, the com- w. R. Pedrick, E. R.

mander of the Florida Division, U. C. j. p Galloway, Secretary.
V.. and Mrs. Cary Hardee, Gen. W. A. I

Rawls, adjutant general, and Mrs. H. IMAKION-DUNN MASUN1U LUW.1S

H. McCreary. Gen. T. J. Appleyard,

executive naval officer, and Mrs. B. J. Marion-Dunn Lodge No. 19. F. & A.

Eond. and others. During the recep- M., meets on the first and third

tion and dance fruit punch and home- Thursday evenings of each month at

made cake of the finest kind were v:30 o'clock until further notice.

served.

Nothing that could add to the com

fort and pleasure of the guests was

left undone. Every detail was most

carefully planned and perfectly car

:

NOTICE, U. D. C.

Dickison Chapter, U. D. C, will

rr.eet tomorrow, Wednesday, after after-roon,
roon, after-roon, at four o'clock, at the home of

Mrs R. B. Bullock, to meet Miss Ag

nes Person of Orlando, state presi-

j-5t : dent of the Florida Division U. D. C.

All visiting members invited and a
full attendance of members of Dicki-

son Chapter requested.
Mrs. R. B. Bullock, Sec'y.

OUR PHONES
243 and 174
YOURS FOR SEhVICE
COOK'S MARKET and GROCERY

A. C. Blowers, W. M.

B. L. Adams, Secretary.
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIA8

Dtala 1 sArra Mn 19. PjlTIVPTltionR

ried out. This convention was a grand Lld eyery Monday evening at 7.30

success m every way.

Mrs. Carney received

honor, one of the greatest that could

be bestowed on a woman. She was

made a life-time member of the Flor

ida Division U. C. V. sponsorial staff,

with the title of matron-general

One of the most popular visitors
at this reunion was Ocala's beloved
General Frank E. Harris. He was

torn in Tallahassee and her citizens,
both young and old, gave him most
hearty welcome and wherever he went

he received ovations, all of which he Masonic Hall.

o'clock at the castle halL A cordial

a unique . ... .v

I. U. Forbes. C &
C. E. Sage, K. of R. & S.
KNIGHTS TEMPLAR
Ocala Command-

ery Number 19,
Knights Templar,
meets every sec

ond Friday night
in each month at
8 o'clock at the
A. L. Lucas, E. C

well deserves.

Up to September 16, Montreal ele
vators had unloaded 93,881,325 bush

els of grain from lake vessels, and

B. L. Adams, Recorder.

ROYAL ARCH MASONS

Regular conventions of the Ocala

' Irn a. XT 1 0 T A VC V .nli

had at the time loaded ocean vessels "".vu
with 88,849,941 bushels, according to Fnday ln every mAonh Tat 8 p

B. L. Adams, Secretary.
ODD FELLOWS

records of the Harbor Commissioners'

office.

The old idea to put the Turk out of

Europe bag and baggage. Apparent- I Tulula Lodge No. 22, I. O. O. F
ly he must have forgotten a couple of meets every Tuesday evening at 7:30

suit-cases. Manitoba Free Press o'clock at the Odd Fellows hall in the

(Winnipeg). third story of the Gary block. A

warm welcome always extended to

Chile has decided to electrify her visiting brothers.

railroads by means of the abundant

water power to be derived from the

mountain streams.

Joseph Malever, N. G.

II. G. Shealy. Secretary.

WOODMEN OF 'ixi'E WORLD

!SKg!i "Anolher Nash." 611

FOR SALE

About 70 head of
Hogs, 60 Chickens and

100 bales of Hay

Fort Kintr Camp No. 14 meets at

K. of P. hn every second and fourth
Friday evenings of ea;h month at 8
o'clock. Visiting sovereigns are al always
ways always welcome.

P. W. Whiteside, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage, Clerk.

D. G. WHALEY, Receiver

Shadv Grove Road. Ocala i

w

SPANISH WAR VEl'ERANS
Fitzhjeh Lee Camp No. 11, United

Spanish War Veterans, meets the

third Friday of each month at armory
at 8 o'clock p. m.

C. V. Roberts. Commtnder.
L. T. Craft, Adjutant.

CRESCENT SPECIALS

Rice, per pound 7c
Eggs, per dozen 43c
One quart Florida Syrup. . .30c
$1.00 Broom for 85c
85c. Broom for 60c
Pint Heinz Vinegar 20c
One peck Irish Potatoes. .. .60c
2 Cans No. 2 Tomatoes 25c
Beef Roast, per pound 18c
Steak, per pound 20c
Pork Ham, per pound 25c

EXTRA SPECIAL FOR SA

Kingan's Picnic Hams, lb... 25c
Kingan's Box Bacon, per lb. 48c
Pork Sausage, per lb 20c
Sugar Cured Ham, per lb.. 45c
Pam-Olive Soap, per cake... 9c
Qt. Apalachicol Oyslers. . .65c
Lamb Chops, per pound 35c
Fresh Water Trout per lb.. 20c
Lamb Roast, per pound.... 30c
Mullet, per pound 10c
Sea Trout, per pound 20c
TURDAY AND MONDAY,

SUGAR PER POUND, 8c

WE DELIVER TO ANY PART OF THE CITY

Crescent Grocery & Market
PHONE 562

tntnu:::

A Standing Invitation to Germs
Weather-kept foods are risky foods to eat.
Exposed to germ-laden dust and myriad impuri impurities,
ties, impurities, such foods are easy prey for all the enemies of
wholesomeness.
Yet people will take such chances in the Fall
and Winter.
Perhaps they have never discovered how small a a
investment for ice is necessary at this time of the year
. Ocala Ice & Packing Co., Ocala, Fla.

Hardly anything has created such
n outburst of silence as the Kaiser's
memoirs. New York Evening Post.
Irish potatoes 15 pounds for 35c.,
Wednesday and Thursdayr- U-Serve
Stores. Phones 195 614-? 24-2t

They call a man with more than
one wife a bigamist. They should call
him a capitalist. Kingston (Ont.)
Standard.

Ask for DON REY cigars. 6-10t

"Another Nash." 611

We are now in position to serve
cream, sweet milk, buttermilk and ice
cream in any quantity at the Cream Creamery.
ery. Creamery. Butter can be had nearly all the
time. Marion County Creamery.
Phone 94. 19-6t



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