The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:06329

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
TA!R

J,
WEATHER FORECAST Showers tonight and Wednesday, somewhat cooler Wednesday in north and central portions.
TEMPERATURES This Morning, 72; This Afternoon, 86.
Sun Rises Tomorrow, 6:31; Sets, 5:55
OCALA, FLORIDA, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1922
VOLUME TWENTY-EIGHT. NO. 248
DESTRUCTION OF
T
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THIRTEEN MOUTHS
AND A HOLIDAY
MAY CRUISE AGAIN
DIRIGIBLE
IS HEEDED
OUTFLY AN ANGEL

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Discussion on the Subject Between
British Embassy And Our
State Department

Washington, Oct. 17. (Associated
Press). Negotiations between the
British embassy and state department
looking to release from custody ol
British vessels seized by the prohibi prohibition
tion prohibition forces outside the three-mile limit
are expected to take a definite form,
as a result of refusal by the British
government to enter an agreement
which would permit of reprical au authority.
thority. authority. LEGAL BATTLE OVER HIGH HIGH-SEAS
SEAS HIGH-SEAS LIQUOR
New York, Oct. 17. The legal bat battle
tle battle to determine the right of foreign
owned ships to enter ports in the
United States with liquor aboard was
opened last night with the issuing by
District Attorney Hayward of a reply
to the bills in equity brought by five
foreign steamship companies to re restrain
strain restrain enforcement of the recent rul ruling
ing ruling preventing the carrying of liquor
on vessels entering American ports.
The reply makes in the main, four
contentions:
That the district court, before which
the cases are to be heard, has no juris jurisdiction
diction jurisdiction in the matter; that suits are
really against the United States gov government;
ernment; government; that they do not show the
government has consented to be sued,
and that they do not disclose any
basis for an action in equity.
Upon these grounds the defense of
Secretary of the Treasury Mellon,
Henry C. Stuart, acting collector of
customs for the port of New York,
and Ralph A. Day, federal prohibition
director for the state of New York,
who are made defendants in the suits
brought by the companies, will b
built in court today.
Mr. Hayward, who is acting for
Secretary Mellon in the reply, answers
specifically the ground upon which the
requests for injunctions are based.
As to the difficulty which the for foreign
eign foreign steamship companies state they
would suffer by reason of laws com compelling
pelling compelling them to furnish wines to mem members
bers members of the crew, District Attorney
Hayward says the payment of higher
wages would recompense crews for the
lack of such stimulants.
Regarding the loss of the profit
made by the foreign ships in the sale
of liquor, Mr. Hayward claims that
this loss is the only one which the
companies will suffer under a strict
adherence to the new ruling.
To the charge of the complaining
steamship companies that the attor attorney
ney attorney general's ruling is a misinterpre misinterpretation
tation misinterpretation of the Volstead act, the reply
states:
"If the complainants are correct in
their construction of the national pro prohibition
hibition prohibition act, the implications involved
are exceedingly serious and the claim
of the complainants, if allowed, would
carry with it as a necessary corollary,
the right of any ship to transport liq liquor
uor liquor within the territorial waters of
the United States."
Answering the plea of the carriers
to permit the possession on board
ships of liquors, which would be kept
under lock and key during "in port"
periods, the defendants claimed that
such permission would make the en enforcement
forcement enforcement of prohibition against the
importation of liquors "already diffi difficult,"
cult," difficult," practically impossible.
The enforcement of the ruling of the
attorney general as to foreign ships
is necessary to the protection of
American owned tonnage the reply
said, holding "on information and be belief"
lief" belief" that the sale of intoxicating liq liquors
uors liquors on the high seas by vessels car carrying
rying carrying the American flag ceased with
the issuance of the attorney general's
ruling, while sale of liquor on other
vessels has continued.
The continuance of such an arrange arrangement
ment arrangement will result, the reply charged, in
"damage to the merchant marine
which will be great and irreparable."
STROUP'S SPHERE OF
USEFULNESS SHIFTED
Jacksonville, Oct. 16 It was learn learned
ed learned today that Prohibition Commis Commissioner
sioner Commissioner Haynes has ordered the trans transfer
fer transfer of A. B. Stroup, now diivsion
chief of the federal dry force in Flor Florida,
ida, Florida, in conformity with his policy of
shifting prohibition chiefs. It is not
known here where Stroup will go or
who will relieve him.
Advertise in the Evening Star.

C-2, After Crossing America, And
Coming Halfway Back, Went
Up in Smoke

San Antonio, Texas, Oct. 17. The
army dirigible C-2, which recently
completed a trans-continental flight
and had reached San Antonio on the
way back to Washington, was burned
early today while being taken from its
hanger at Brooks Field preparatory to
a flight over the city. Several of the
crew were hurt, one seriously. The
dirigible caught on the frame work of
the hanger as it was being taken out.
The bag split and the gas ignited. Ii
the car of the dirigible were members
of the crew and several passengers.
Two men had their arms and legs
broken and several were slightly
burned. The dirigible was destroyed.
LIEUT. BALL LOST HIS LIFE
Another of Our Gallant Boys Killed
In Discharge of His Duty
San Antonio, Texas, Oct. 17 Lieut.
Walter A. Ball, twenty-seven, station stationed
ed stationed at Kelly Field, was crushed to
death today when his airplane fell 500
feet.
FIFTY MILLION DOLLARS
FROM GREAT BRITAIN
Washington, Oct. 17 A payment ol
$50,000,000 from the British govern government
ment government on account of interst on Great
Britain's obligations to the United
States has been received by the treas treasury
ury treasury through the Federal Reserve Bank
at New York. A second payment of
approximately the same amount is ex expected
pected expected November 15th.
The, treasury announced that the
money just received would be used to
provide in part for the $137,000,000 of
interest which became due and pay payable
able payable yesterday on liberty bonds and
treasury certificates. Provision is
made in the liberty loan act that in interest
terest interest on war loans should be utilized
for this purpose.
The payment by the British treas treasury,
ury, treasury, which was made through J. P.
Morgan & Co., is the first interest in installment
stallment installment on the $4,750,000,000 British
debt to be paid since May, 1919, when
such payments were suspended under
a tentative agreement between the
United States and debtor nations. Up
to that time, Great Britain had paid
approximtaely $250,000,000.
COMMUNISTS UP BEFORE
THE MICHIGAN COURT
St. Joseph, Mich., Oct. 17. (By the
Associated Press). Twenty alleged-
communists charged with plotting to
overthrow the government of the
United States by force will be ar
raigned today in the first test of the
Michigan anti-syndicalism act, passed
as a wartime measure. Sixteen of the
defendants were arrested August 22d
when the authorities swooped down on
a wooded glen near Bridgeman and
interrupted what the government
charges was a national convention of
the communist party in America.
MRS. HALL AND BROTHERS
SUSPECTED OF THE MURDER
New Brunswick, Oct. 17. Mrs
Hall and her brother, Willie Stevens,
were brought to the court house by a
detective today for further examina
tion by the authorities investigating
the murder of Rev. Edward Wheeler
Hall and Mrs. Eleanor Mills.
County Prosecutors Beekman and
Striker, who have predicted at least
two more arrests before night, began
questioning Henry Stevens, another
brother of Mrs. Hall, shortly before
their arrival at the court house.
TURKEYS SHOULD BE
CHEAP FOR THANKSGIVING
Chicago, Oct. 17. Turkeys for
Thanksgiving dinner and. eggs for
breakfast should be cheaper this year,
according to members of the National
Poultry, Butter and Egg Association
in session here. The current turkey
crop is said to be unusually plentiful
and the egg supply is the greatest in
years.
NEW GOODS JUST IN
Yellow cornmeal, Farina Pancake
Flour, Dried Apples in bulk, 5c. pack
age Sun Maid Raisins. U-SERVE
STORES. Two phones, 195614. 2t

Destruction of the C-2, Folowing Loss

Of the Roma, Expected to Make
That Plain Even to Congress
Washington, Oct. 17. The loss by
fire of the C-2 today, following de
struction of the Roma at Hampton
Roads several months ago, is expected
by air officials here to renew the agi
tation for the development of a non non-combustion
combustion non-combustion gas for use in all govern
ment lighter than air machines.
THIRTY THOUSAND BEATING
IT OUT OF THRACE
Sight that Christian Nations Must Be
Proud to Stand By and See
Adrianople, Oct. 17. (Associated
Press). Thirty thousand Greeks and
Armenians have passed from this city
to the west since Saturday and the
road between here and the Maritza
river is an unbroken line of men,
women and children, with oxcarts,
cattle and camels.
MUST BE CAREFUL ABOUT
USING MIAMI AIR
Miami, Oct. 17 Because the atmos
phere over and above Miami was con
gested with airplanes and seaplanes
during the tourist season last winter,
the municipal government is taking
steps to enact an ordinance for the
regulation of airmen and their ma
chines. Mayor Leffier states that one
provision will prohibit the passage of
any machine over the city at an alti
tude of less than fifteen hundred feet
and that no parking will be permitted
on the bay front near Royal Palm
Park.
Each plane here will have certain
marking on the under side of the
lower wings, of such size that one can
be distinguished when the plane is at
an altitude of 1500 feet, another at
1000 feet and the third at 500 feet.
If the police or any citizen notice a
plane flying over the city and can dis distinguish
tinguish distinguish either the 500 foot or 1000
foot mark it will be taken for grant
ed that the pilot has violated the
ordinance.
VENIZELOS KEEPS
A DISCREET SILENCE
London, Oct. 17. (By Associated
Press). Former Premier Venizelos of
Greece declined today to discuss the
report from Athens that a republican
movement was on foot in Greece with
the object of making Venizelos presi president.
dent. president. STEAMER LENAPE AGROUND
OFF THE ST. JOHNS BAR
Jacksonville, Oct. 17. The Clyde
Line's crack ship Lenape, with 227
passengers aboard, bound for Jack Jacksonville,
sonville, Jacksonville, went aground during a fog
today off St. Johns bar near the mouth
of St. Johns river. The ship is in no
danger and it is expected that she will
float at high tide later today.
VLADIVOSTOK IS AN
UNHEALTHY VICINITY
Tokio, Oct. 17. (By the Associated
Press). Dispatches from Vladivostok
report that city in imminent danger
of invasion by soviet troops. Mem Members
bers Members of the Vladivostok government
have boarded the tseamer ready to
depart.
GEORGIA DEMOCRATS ARE
ENJOYING A PRIMARY
Atlanta, Oct. 17. Georgia voters
today are balloting in a special dem democratic
ocratic democratic primary to nominate a suc successor
cessor successor to the late Senator Watson.
Each of the four candidates. Gover Governor
nor Governor Hardwick, Seaborn Wright, John
R. Cooper and Walter F. George, made
last minute claims of victory in state statements.
ments. statements. Mack McCain, the bootlegger cap captured
tured captured by Officers Morgan and WTig WTig-crina
crina WTig-crina PnMav. has been released on

$1000 bail. Mr. R. T. Adams went on of interest and relatives, has return return-his
his return-his bond. to er home in Dunnellon.

Hindus are vegetarians and regard
the cow as a sacred animal; in their
eyes to kill a cow is a greater sin
than to Mil a man.
We have the best meats to be had
in Florida. Phone 562. 13-tf

Terrific Speed Attained in a Biplame

By Lieut. Maughn at the Mt.
Clemens Test
Mount Clemens, Mich., Oct. 17.
Aeronautical engineers and army and
navy experts at Selfridge Field were
speculating today as to what might be
the next unheard of aerial feat. They
came here a week ago prepared for
surprises but none had expected to see
a human being plunge through space
at the rate of nearly 400 feet a sec second.
ond. second. This was the performance yes yesterday
terday yesterday of Lieut. R. L. Maughn, army
pilot, who drove a Curtiss army bi
plane at the rate of 248 miles an
hour, surpassing by more than thirty thirty-two
two thirty-two miles the previous official record.
STEEL CARS STOOD THE STRAIN
Wreck on the Monon Yesterday But
Very Little Harm Done
Chicago, Oct. 16. Several coaches
on the Monon railroad's fast all-steel
Pullman train, Louisville to Chicago,
were derailed near Dyer, Ind., early
today. One woman passenger and
one trainman were slightly hurt. The
cause of the accident is undetermined.
BRITAIN APPRECIATES
A FLORIDA BOY
Daytona, Oct. 17 Charles S. Spark Spark-man,
man, Spark-man, younger brother of Hugh Spark Spark-man,
man, Spark-man, publisher and editor of the Day Daytona
tona Daytona Morning Journal, is believed to
have been the first Floridian killed in
the World War. Charles left his home
in Palmetto, Manatee county, early In
1915, went to Jamaica and a few
weeks later enlisted with a British
West Indian regiment. After a period
of training he was sent to Egypt
where he served a year before going
to the French front. He was killed at
Ypres on July 29, 1917, just after the
United States declared war.
Mr. Sparkman has just received?
from the British government a memo memorial
rial memorial scroll and bronze plaque which
are being sent to the next of kin of
all members of the British forces who
lost their lives during the conflict. A
note from King George which accom accompanies
panies accompanies the memorials follows:
"I join with my grateful people In
sending you this memorial of a brave
life given for others in the Great
War."
FLORIDA ROSE FARM
Tavares, Oct. 17. Steps for the
production of roses by the acre on hfs
property at Howey on the south shore
of Lake Harris are being taken by J.
H. Kelly, of this city, who has accept accepted
ed accepted the proposal of a company manu manufacturing
facturing manufacturing oils from roses for use by
the perfume and extract industry, to
supply petals for a plant now being
erected here. The oil concern is es establishing
tablishing establishing a plant with six stills witn
a total capacity of 300 gallons every
two hours.
Mr. Kelley, who owns hundreds of
acres of land in the vicinity of Howey,
is preparing twenty acres of land
upon which to set out the first rose
cuttings and this acreage is expected
to be expanded within the near future.
Fourteen varieties of roses have been
selected as those from which the oils
will be distilled.
SHAD COMMITTED SUICIDE
Jacksonville, Oct. 16. Charles
Shad, local jeweler and owner of an
ocean pier and other buildings on the
boardwalk at Pablo Beach, committed
suicide sometime last night in his
store on Bay street here. The body
was found in the back room when the
place was opened for business today.
There was a rubber tube from a gas
jet to his mouth. His partner said he
believed" his rash act was due to finan financial
cial financial worry as he spent yesterday with
his bookkeeper running over his ac accounts.
counts. accounts. Mrs. B. F. Meredith, who has been
in the mountains of West Tennessee
for the last six weeks, visiting points
I Mrs. B. T. Vaughn and two children
of Jacksonville and Miss Martha Fort
of Moss Bluff, have returned home
j after a pleasant visit in Ocala with
Mrs. E. C. Jordan.
Advertise in the Evening Star.

Mr. Gompers Poured a Drumfire Into
The Ex-Service Men This
Morning

New Orleans, Oct. 17. (Associated
Press). San Francisco was selected
for the next convention city at the
session of the American Legion here
this morning.
The Legion today heard Samuel
Gompers tell of labor's aims and as as-uirations
uirations as-uirations and what it believes to be its
rights and duties.
DAVE WOODROW TOLD
ROTARIANS ABOUT MIAMI
The Rotarians had as their guest at
today's luncheon a former member of
the club, Dave Woodrow, who is now
a resident of Miami. He told about
the wonderful growth of his adopted
home city, how those people do things
on a big scale and of the phenomenal
results of constant boosting by every everybody.
body. everybody. The club enjoyed Dave's talk
very much.
Another feature of today's meeting
wa3 the "quiz" period conducted by
Hugh Henry, in which he showed up
a whole lot of what the Rotes did not
know about their own organization.
Next week's program committee
is composed of Jake Gerig and John
Wilkes and the attendance committee,
Ardis Waterman and Ben Rheinauer.
Attendance is on the increase and
the club hopes to have 100 per cent
meetings soon.
BADE HIS FELLOW
WORKMEN GOOD-BYE
Tampa, Oct. 16. Waving adieu to
his fellow workers at the Tampa wa water
ter water works, Paul Roulston, fifty years
old, backed his automobile into the
garage across the street from his
home today and killed himself with a
pistol. Ill health is believed to have
been the cause. He leaves a wife and
five children.
JOHN POPE MUST GO
BACK TO THE JUG
Tallahassee, Oct. 17. The supreme
court yesterday afternoon affirmed
the judgment of the circuit court for
Duval county in the case of John R.
Pope, plaintiff in error, vs. the state
of Florida, defendant in error. Pope
has a life sentence for being "con "constructively
structively "constructively present" at the murder of
George H. Hickman, in Jacksonville,
summer before last.
EDWIN H. VARE
Philadelphia, Oct. 16. State Sena Senator
tor Senator Edwin H. Vare, republican leader
of Philadelphia, died today.
HURRICANE GOING
AWAY FROM HERE
Washington, Oct 17. The disturb disturbance
ance disturbance of the northwestern Caribbean
was central this morning at the south southeastern
eastern southeastern end of Cuba and moving
northwest toward the Yucatan chan channel.
nel. channel. FRADVS HEALTH IS FRAIL
Chicago, Oct. 16. Edgar Frady,
facing trial for the killing of his wife
at Miami, is said to be suffering from
a malignant growth which has made
his condition serious. Frady is report reported
ed reported under the care of specialists here
with the view of performing an ope operation.
ration. operation. SOMEWHAT OF A SCRAP
Rock Island, I1L, Oct. 16. Two po policemen
licemen policemen and one negro are dead as the
result of an underworld gunfight here
last night.
We have the best meats to be had
in Florida. Phone 562. 13-tf
Mr. Horace Whetstone has the best
of his tussle with the dengue.
Hallowe'en masks at THE GIFT
SHOP. 14-3t
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Simmons and lit little
tle little daughter, Mary Elizabeth, are
home again after three weeks spent in
New York city, where they saw many
Ocala people and had a delightful
time.
Advertise in the Evening Star.

Is the Sort of a Year that th Inter International
national International Fixed Calendar Year
Would Dope Out for Us

Washington, Oct. 17 Julius Caesar,
by his unscientific juggling of the
calendar, has caused unnecessary con confusion
fusion confusion for centuries, say members of
the International Fixed Calendar
League, who advocate the adoption or
a 13-month year with each month con containing
taining containing twenty-height days and an in international
ternational international holiday added each year to
make up the 365 days of the solar cal calendar.
endar. calendar. There is really no reason why the
calendar should be so broken up, tne
league members say. In the days of
the ancient Egyptians, who originated
the calendar, working with the shad shadows
ows shadows of pyramids and obelisks, the cal calendar
endar calendar was arranged with thirten
months of equal length, with a five
days festival at the end of the year
t: square things up with the sun. The
reason for the pyramids and obelisks
was their use in astronomy and cal calendar
endar calendar making, it is said.
In 46 B. C, Julius Caesar, dissatis dissatisfied
fied dissatisfied with the moon-chasing calendar
of his day, adopted the Egyptian sys system
tem system with modifications. The Romans
were superstitious about odd numbers,
so Julius started to do with the cal calendar
endar calendar as he had done with the world
and when he was through the equal
length months were all broken up, the
five day festival was eliminated, and?
the months were arranged alternately
with 30 and 31 days.
So pleased was the Roman senate
with Caesar's work, it immediately
named the seventh month in his calen calendar
dar calendar in his honor, and the system is
known as the Julian calendar.
That worked for a while until one
of Caesar's successors, Augustus by
name, changed his forbear's work, in
B. C. 28, and when his heavy hand
was through, the calendar resulted in,
its present state; the odd and even
numbered months were changed
around and arbitrarily fixed, Febru February
ary February was given a little more liberty
than the other months, and the half half-years
years half-years were set on unequal basis the
first half getting only 181 days ano?
the second 184. The Roman senate
retaliated by changing the name of
the eighth month to honor Augustus,
as that was his birth month as July
was Julius's.
"Constantine the Great," says a
league publication, "conferred the
ever-welcome Sabbath rest each 7th
day on Europeans, but the unequal
lengths of 28 and 31-day months im imposed
posed imposed by Julius and Augustus have
since forced the Constantine weeks
yearly to slice months into different
weeks, and at month-ends almost split
weeks into parts, incessantly but
needlessly confusing the weeks and
months."
In 1852 another change was made,
when Pope Gregory XIII found Julius
had been wrong in his arithmetic and
made an error in computing leap
years, and that as a result ten extra
days had piled up from somewhere la
the meanwhile. The sun and the
earth, according to that time-table,
were not traveling on the same sched schedule.
ule. schedule. So Gregory did what many other
people wished they could do, he dug
out ten days from one month Octo October
ber October of that year and threw them into
the discard, in order to readjust the
21st of March to the Equinox and the
rest of the calendar to the seasons.
Since then we have been traveling
under the Gregorian calendar. In con consequence,
sequence, consequence, the league complains, Greg Gregory
ory Gregory moved the Christian year's end
(which ever since the establishment
of the Christian era had been cele celebrated
brated celebrated as Christmas) from Christmas
to January 1st one week farther
away from "nature's year's-end, De December
cember December 22nd." Russia and Greece
did not comply with this edict, and
continue as of old.
After several national and interna international
tional international conferences during 1922, of
those interested in the new movement,
a final international confernece was
planned to be held sometime during
the coming year. It will be held here,
at the president's call. Many repre representatives
sentatives representatives of world nations will at attend,
tend, attend, to discuss a program which In Includes:
cludes: Includes: Location of the "Year Day," remov removal
al removal of "leap day" to be a midsummer's
holiday, the best arrangement to fit
the present 52 yearly weks into per permanent
manent permanent months, a name for the pro-
( Continued on Fourth Page)



OCALA EVENING STAR, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1922

Ocala Evening Star
Pabllafced Every Day Eseept Saaday by
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY,
OCALA, FLORIDA
II. J. DlttlBft-er, Presldeat
II. D. Leaveacood, Vlce-Prealdeat
P. V. LeiTCBgoo, Seeretary-Treaanrer
J. II. Beajaula, Editor
Entered at Ocala, Fla.. poatoffica ai
e;ond-cla8 matter.
TELEPHOVEJ
Baalaeaa OfJlc .Flre-Oaa
Editorial Departmeat Tw-StTei
Saelcty Iteporter Flre-Oaa
MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press la exclusively
entitled for the use for republication of
all news dispatches credited to it or not
otherwise credited In this paper and
also the local news published herein.
All rights of republication of special
dispatches herein are also reserved.
DOMESTIC SUBSCRIPTION RATES
One year, in advance $6.08
Three months, in advance 3.00
Three months, in advance 1.50
One month, in advance SO
ADVERTISING RATES
Dlaplays Plate 15 cents per Inch for
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change a week allowed on readers with without
out without extra composition charges.
Legal advertisements at legal rates.

DEMOCRATIC DOLLARS
Rev. C. L. Collins has given us a
dollar for the democratic campaign
fund. Now, what do you think of
that? If a preacher can give a dol dollar,
lar, dollar, who can't?
This was the first dollar we had re received
ceived received since the Banner sent a roll of
them big enough to choke a pelican
one day last week.
Election is only three weeks off. We
must forward what we have not later
than next Monday. Now is the time
for all good men, and as many as pos possible
sible possible of the bad ones, to come to the
aid of the party.
Following is the list:
Summerfield Chronicle $1.00
T. D. Lancaster Jr. 1.00
Nathan Mayo 5.00
Star Publishing Company 2.00
W. L. Colbert 1.00
R. A. Burford 5.00
J. E. Chace 1.00
Wm. D. Taylor 1.00
Countess von Schimon 5.00
James P. Taylor . 1.00
J. W. Hunter 1.00
W. T. Gary 1.00
J. G. Parrish 1.00
W. W. Stripling 1.00
John H. Taylor 1.00
K. C. Moore 1.00
Ocala Banner 5.00
Rev. C. L. Collins 1.00
HOW DOES HE DO IT?
Is it not unfair for an official, who
has drawn over $40,000 from the state
of Kansas, as salary, and who has
other income besides, to withhold
some of his property from taxation?
If unfair, what of the example set by
Judge Rankin, who had money in the
bank on March 1st, 1922, and had a
set of abstract books; had a watch,
and had silver plate in his house; had
other property, too?
The certified copy of his statement
in this issue tells the exact truth, as
to what he gave in. Another thing
The list of those, who paid income tax
returns in 1922, posted up in the post
office, in Paola, shows that Mr. Ran
kin made no return to the government
whatever. Is this fair? Suppose the
farmers of this county, who have not
made one-third of what Judge Rankin
has drawn as salary, would hide out
their property Where would we raise
the money to pay county officers, build
bridges, and the like Men and worn
TOWN PESTS
The Frank Guy, who Always Says
What lie Thinks, is a Cheese of the
First Whey and a Town Pest than
Which there is None Whicher. Here
the Pest who Always Says What He
Thinks has Met Up with the Chap
who Always does What He Wants To
and the Result is Most Amphibuous,
as the Feller Sez!

en in Paola, and in Olathe, who are
familiar with Judge Rankin's finances
and his possessions, rate him at from
$800 to $10,000. Is his return, there therefore,
fore, therefore, a good example to the county,
generally? Western Spirit, Miami,
Kan.

Gosh. How does he do it? If a
Florida paper printed anything like
the foregoing about a private citizen,
it would be prosecuted for criminal
libel; if it printed it about a judge the
editor would go to jail for con
tempt of court.
K. OF P. CONVENTION
District Deputy Grand Chancellor
W. W. Stripling has called a district
meeting of the K. of P. at Dunnellon,
Monday, Oct. 23. It is expected that
between thirty and forty knights will
gc from Ocala. They will leave from
the Castle Hall at six o'clock Monday
evening. There will, in consequence,
be no meeting of the lodge that eve
ning.
The local lodge had a big meeting
Monday evening, fifty-four members
being present and several visitors
from other lodges. Esquires M. M.
Morgan, H. A. Owens, H. B. Johnson
and C. A. Savage were called into the
hall, and it being found that they had
endured with credit to themselves the
tests as pages and esquires, they were
pronounced ready to endure the final
ordeal as knights. This they also
passed, the sword was laid upon their
shoulders and they emerged into
knighthood in full flower.
O. H. S. WILL GO TO ORLANDO
Saturday afternoon the O. H. S. will
meet the O. H. S. on the Orlando field
Coach Blitch is going to invade the
Orange county metropolis with h:s
Wildcats and hopes to bring home the
bacon. The trouble now is that walk
ing is extremely bad and the boys
have not cars enough to take the en
tire team to Orlando. Coach Blitch
wonders if there are not a few of the
fans who saw last Saturday's inter
esting game who would like to see the
game in Orlando and who will offer
to take a few of the team in their car
with them. Such an offer will be
greatly appreciated. If you feel thus-
ly please phone Mr. Blitch at the resl
dence of Mrs. Robert Marsh or at the
school house.
DO THEY THINK THIS
WAS A SQUARE DEAL?
The Madison Enterprise-Recorder
seems to have something of "the peo
pie be damned" spirit. Listen to this
relative to the proposed reapportion reapportionment
ment reapportionment amendment: "South Florida
papers may fight the amendment if
they wish, they are only cutting off
their nose to spite their face. The
amendment is offered. It is either to
take it or leave it as they wish. The
old system doesn't hurt West Flor
ida." South Florida people can afford
to let it alone and test out the ques
tion as to whether the people of Flor Florida
ida Florida or a bunch of north and west Flor
ida politicians shall rule the state in
coming years. The constitution pro
vides for a reapportionment that
means something if senators and rep
resentatives will live up to their oath
of office. Winter Haven Chief.
We don't think it shows a "people
b damned" spirit; it rather shows
the spirit that some South Florida
papers have been trying to goad the
people of West Florida into for the
last three months. Ocala Star.
We thank the Star for its comment
on the reapportionment article. The
Enterprise-Recorder did publish the
remarks attributed to it, and it meant
every word of them. But the four
sentences that the Chief quotes were
simply the last four sentences to a
column long editorial in which we
showed how the proposed amendment
would be eminently fair to South
Florida, how it would give to Hills Hillsborough
borough Hillsborough county one senator and three
representatives instead of a half of a
senator and two representatives as at
present, how it would give to Pinellas
county one senator and two represen representatives
tatives representatives instead of a half of a senator
and one representative as at present;
how it would give to Dade county one
senator and three representatives In Instead
stead Instead of a sixth of a senator and one
representative as at present, and how
it would give to Palm Beach county a
half of a senator and two representa representatives
tives representatives instead of a sixth of a senator
and one representative as at present.
And by the way, this proposed amend amendment,
ment, amendment, which is so vicious, so enthrall enthralling,
ing, enthralling, so wool-pulling, would give the
great county of Polk, in which the
Chief is published, three representa representatives
tives representatives instead of two as at present.
Nothing vicious in that towards Polk
that we can see.
But, friend Star, not a single paper,
so far as we have seen, and we looked,
reproduced the whole editorial. The
Tampa Tribune, like the Chief, pub published
lished published the last few lines and of course
adversely commented. But the great
Tribune did not publish it all. It may
have been that the article was hot
worth reproducing in full, and it may

have been that they knew if they did

reproduce it, it would knock out prac
tically all of their thunder against the
proposed amendment, and of course
that wouldn't do. Madison Enter
prise-Recorder.
Do the Chief and the papers that
quoted it, think they gave the Enter
prise-Recorder a square deal
EIGHT YEARS AGO
Oct. 17, 1914. The mighty battle
which began in Northern France, five
weeks ago proceeds. German attacks
on Verdun have been repulsed. The
French from the vicinity of Rheims
are pressing toward Metz. The Ger
mans have tried and failed to advance
from their intrenched positions near
Soissons. The British have taken- a
number of German positions on the
northwest end of the line. The long
line from the North Sea to Switzer Switzerland,
land, Switzerland, which was to hold almost four
years, is nearly complete.
The Belgian army under King Al
bert, which defended Antwerp, has
marched around the German right and
joined the Allies in Flanders.
The Germans have captured Ostend
and bragged they would next occupy
Calais.
The French took Altkirk and Mul-
hausen in Alsace from the Germans.
OCALA TWENTY YEARS AGO
(Evening Star Oct. 17, 1902)
It is estimated that $500 was ex
changed in this city yesterday for fall
hats.
Mr. and Mrs. D. S. Woodrow were
accompanied from Scotland by Miss
Norma Kerr and Miss H. A. Cullen
of Nottingham, England. Miss Kerr
will spend part of the winter with Mr,
and Mrs. Woodrow and then visit
Cuba, while Miss Cullen, who is the
sister of Mr. Chas. S. Cullen, secre
tary of the Central Lumber Company,
will spend the winter with his family.
Word comes from Mr. J. G. Spurlin,
who went to Hawkinsville, Ga., a few
days ago to attend his sick brother
and father, that they are dead, the
former dying Monday night and the
other just twenty-four hours later.
Mrs. J. J. Dickison, widow of the
late Gen. J. J. Dickison, in a letter
thanking the R. E. Lee post in Jack
sonville for so graciously and lovingly
looking after and interring the re
mains of her husband, said that she
would make her home in Jacksonville.
Ocala Ten Years Ago
(Evening Star Oct. 17, 1912)
Today's paper contained a notice of
the marriage of Miss Ethel Wimberly
of Gainesville to Mr. J. Leon Stuckey,
son of Mr. A. P. Stuckey.
Mr. L. T. Hickson of Mcintosh, who
was in town today to see the circut,
gave Mr. Gary $1 for the democratic
campaign fund. (Wonder if Mr. Hick Hick-son
son Hick-son has a dollar this year ? )
Mr. J. J. Gerig returned this after afternoon
noon afternoon from his trip through the west
He left his wife and daughter with
their relatives in Indiana, where they
will remain until cold weather.
CITRA
Citra, Oct. 16. On Wednesday, Oct.
11, the friends of Mr. and Mrs. M. C.
Dunnick gathered at their beautiful
little home in the vicinity of Burbank
to remind Mr. Dunnick that it was his
67th birthday. At the noon hour the
table was loaded with everything good
to eat and the dining room was pret
tily decorated with golden rod and
other cut flowers. The day was spent
in social talk. A short but very im impressive
pressive impressive greeting was given by Rev,
McCann, after which all departed to
their homes, thanking Mr. and Mrs
Dunnick for their kindness and cour courtesy
tesy courtesy and wishing Mr. Dunnick many
more happy birthdays.
TURNER FARM
Turner Farm, Oct. 17. The farm
ers of this place are busy saving hay
between showers.
Mr. J. B. Hall and son Hugh, of Or
ange Springs, were business callers
here Tuesday.
Mr. Virgil Smith was combining
business with pleasure in Citra Sat
urday.
Mr. arid Mrs. W. W. Johns are the
proud parents of a baby girl.
Rev. Hardester filled his regular ap
pointment at the Simmons Baptist
church Sunday night. He was accom
panied by his wife.
Messrs. Hobson Tryar and Kirby
Sriiith of Hawthorne were business
callers here Saturday.
Mr. I. D. Matchett of Orange
Springs was a caller at the home of
Mr. M. M. Harper Saturday.
Our community was saddened by
the death of Mr. J. C. Waldron. who
passed away at his home here Mon
day night, about 10 o'clock. He leaves
to mourn his death his wife and eight
children. Our sympathy goes out to
the sorrowing ones.
Your Ford will make nine miles on
one quart of gas. See B. F. Russell,
1135 S. Orange St 16-6t

ENGAGEMENT ANNOUNCED

Mr. and Mrs. George Howard Mc-
Mahon announce the engagement of
their daughter, Elizabeth Arana, to
Mr. Wilbur Counts, of Ocala, Fla., the
wedding to occur at the home of the
bride's parents on November 5th.
News, Macon, Ga.
This refers to our clever young
friend, Mr. Wilbur Counts, a born and
bred Marion county boy. The Star and
his other friends are glad to know
he is going to bring one of Macon's
fair daughters to dwell among us.
In another page begins a new serial
story, "The Grafting Circus." It is
not only interesting but instructive,
for ther is no telling when a tinhorn
show will be along. Read it.
Mr. Frank Kay Anderson, who for
a number of years has been promi
nently connected with the citrus fruit
industry in Florida, has entered the
employ of the American Fruit Grow
ers, Inc., and will be actively connect connected
ed connected with the handling of this season's
crop, with headquatrers in Orlando.
R. D. Zetrouer, a member of the
county executive committee and his
sturdy young son, Albert, of Geiger,
were in Ocala yesterday.
Dad, Llolhor,
Ironizod Yoasl
for nhoumaticm
Do You Realize What I ro nixed
Yea.t-ViLmine. Will Do for
Rheumatism and Lumbago?
Do you knew that vitamines and
Iron are part of your very life? Do
you know that the tissue-and-blood
factory in your body needs these two
materials, and needs them badly? Do
you know that if your body furnace
does not get enough of these, that
Wioopec! Rkrnmatiim Pain and
Agony All Gone. Ironised Yeast
In Sorely Wonderful!"
queer poisons, joint poisons, muscle
poisons, acid poisons are formed in instead
stead instead of the healthy flesh and the
rich blood you used to have in days
gone by? If you hobble in your eait.
if pains distort your body, If bending
over is an unspeakable agony, if dull
pains make you breathe heavily and
moan, do not grumble at the rough roughness
ness roughness of the way, smile sweetly,
there is a rainbow ahead. Things
are different now than they used to
be, in the days of liniments, salves,
complicated drugs, and all that, re remember?
member? remember? The happy secret today Is
ironized yeast, one of the greatest
body-and-blood builders of all time.
Begin taking Ironized Yeast today.
Beware of imitations and substitutes,
because Ironized Yeast is not a mere
combination of yeast and Iron, but Is
yeast ironized, which is a substance
all by itself. There ia only one Iron Ironized
ized Ironized Yeast In all the world. Sold at
all drug stores at $1.00 a package and
containing 60 tablets, each tablet
sealed. They never lose their power.
M'fd only by Ironized Yeast Co.,
Atlanta, Ga. Say goodbye to rheu rheumatism
matism rheumatism from now on!

VIRGINIA TOBACCO

feci
Lipcrrr & Mtirs Tobacco Co.

CRESCENT

Rice, per pound 7c
Eggs, per dozen 43c
One quart Florida Syrup 30c
$1.00 Broom for 85c
85c. Broom for 60c
Pint Heinz Vinegar 20c
One peck Irish Potatoes 60c
2 Cans No. 2 Tomatoes 25c
Beef Roast, per pound 18c
Steak, per pound 20c j
Pork Ham, per pound 25c j

EXTRA SPECIAL FOR SA
SUGAR
WE DELIVER TO ANY

Crescent Grocery & Market
PHONE 562

Florida Auto Supply Company
DISTRIBUTORS

DAYTON THOROBREB
TIRES AND TUBES

Guaranteed Mileage Fabrics, 7500 miles; Cords, 10,000
miles. We make tbe adjustments.
Complete Line ot Auto Accessories
Phone 291
314-320 N. Main St. OCALA, FLA

Tlfoe same m flavor
yesterday and tomorrow
"(&m& to f lie last drop"

RIC. U.S.
Newest Brogue in Florsheim and
Crossett shoes, Mallory and No-Name
hats and Merton's caps. Guarantee
Clothing & Shoe Co. 10-tf
Fertilize your pot plants and lawn
flowers with Albert's Plant Food. Sold
in 25c., 50c. and $2 packages at the
Court Pharmacy. 18-tf

i nr t i mm w

. rae& i&ri m i- r

Fragrant old Virginia; best
liked by those who know to tobaccos
baccos tobaccos best for its unmatched
mildness and natural purity
of flavor.
For cigarettes Virginia
. r .1. 1

looacco

iniaCrarette

SPECIALS

Kingan's Picnic Hams, lb...25ri
Kingan's Box Bacon, per lb. 48c
Pork Sausage, per lb 20c
Sugar Cured Ham, per lb.. 45c
Pam-Olive Soap, per cake. . 9c
Qt. Apalachicol Oysters. .. .65c
Lamb Chops, per pound. . ,35c
Fresh Water Trout per lb.. 20c
Lamb Roast, per pound.... 30c
Mullet, per pound lCc
Sea Trout, per pound 20c
TURDAY AND MONDAY,
PER POUND, 8c
PART OF THE CITY
PAT. OFF.
NOTICE
I have cut the price of strand wood
75 cents on the cord, as I am com compelled
pelled compelled to get it off the land. Four Four-foot
foot Four-foot wood $3.50 per cord. Phone 471.
E Gibbons, N. Osceola St. 16-tf
Beautiful long-stemmed dahlias, in
five colors. Phone 550. 5-tf
Many t vu merry yarn
thou old tart mould spin
while puffing their pipes
of fragrant Virginia.
is inc par. y-



OCALA EVENING STAB, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1922

SEVEN DAY SERVICE
AUTO
REPAIR
SERVICE
Our plant is equipped for giv giving
ing giving you real service on your car.
We employ none but expert
workmen, and you do not pay
for "breaking in" mechanics.
Let us ciean up and overhaul
your car. Y'ou'll be surprised at
the low cost of service in our
shop.
WE SELL
Fox Tires and Tubes
Cord 10,000 mile guarantee.
Fabric 6,000 mile guarantee.
STANDARD PRICES

II

JAMES ENGESSER
Phone 258121 W. Broadway
Night Phone 533

E

A Word 1
To the Wise!
There's a time for all things, j
It's now time to have your
car painted and topped. The j
fall season's here and a paint
job done now will stay a year, g
Bring your car to us and be j

g satisfied. When better paint f
g jobs are done Spencer-Ped- j3
m rick Motor Company will do p
k them. B

SPENCER PEDKICK 1
MOTOR CO. J
PHONE 8 I

SALT SPRINGS WATER

Is growing in popularity every
day among Ocalans. It is also
being shipped to every part of
the state. It is sold under a
guarantee. Try a five gallon
container.
Chero-Cola Ecttlirig Works
Phone 167

Plumbing & Electrical
Contracting

Full line of material always
in stock. Estimtaes cheerfully
given.
PHONE 252

Needham Motor Co.

THE GRAFTING CIRCUS

AN EXPOSE

By "KID" HARRIS

:1

n

SASH

m fcA 4

DOOR I

Geo. MacKay I Co.
Ocala, Fla.
HARDWARE
HIGH GRADE PAINT

'

L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CONTRACTOR
ANi BUILDER
Careful estimates made on all con contract
tract contract work. Gives more and better
work for the mor.iy than any other
ontractor in the ciy.

WOODMEN CIRCLE
POINSETTIA GROVE 228

There will be a meeting of Poin Poin-settia
settia Poin-settia Grove at the Woodmen hall
Tuesday evening, October 17th, at 8

o'clock. Three transfers to act on.
All members are urged to be present
and pay up dues. Rylla B. Adams,
16-2t Secretary.

I think that I may safely say that
every normal man, woman and child
loves the circus. They love it even as
we love baseball. Yet there are cir circuses
cuses circuses and circuses. By that I mean
there are some straight, legitimate,
henestly conducted ones and there are
others which are only cloaks or ex excuses
cuses excuses for securing "easy" money thru
the operation of gambling devices,
short-changing and obscene dancing.
The men who own and conduct such
circuses are really not circus men, but
parasite showmen.
WTiy I Write
It is of these parasite circus men
that I shall write. And I shall write
authentically and out of the fullness

of experience, having traveled, during

the past thirty years, with nearly
every circus in the United State

the Sparks Show, the Al G. Barfces
and the Ringling Brothers and Bar Bar-num
num Bar-num & Baily circuses being about the
only exceptions (inasmuch as the pro

prietors of these organizations have
always been opposed to graft in any
form, I never dared to "light" around
them). I have been and "outside
man" and an "inside man" on the
graft games, as well as a "fixer" for
them. I have operated these nefar nefarious
ious nefarious games, and also short changed
people from coast to coast, in this
country, and all thru Canada, and I
know whereof I speak. Three months
ago I experienced a genuine change of
heart, at a mission service in the Ro Roman
man Roman Catholic Church and, making a
full confession to the priest, I began
life anew. My conversion was not
spectacular or emotional, but real.
I am neither a fanatic nor a reformer.
If I may seem overzealous in this
matter I am about to present to the
public I want you to know that it is
because I earnestly and sincerely de desire
sire desire to do my utmost to make amends
for the infinite amount of harm and
evil I have perpetrated the many
years I misdirected my energies with
grafting circuses. For too long I
have been a parasite; now I desire to
become a useful member of society.

But to my subject, in a sane dispas dispassionate,
sionate, dispassionate, truthful manner:
Graft-Circuses Carry Gamblers
How many Americans know that if
gambling devices are operated in
connection with a circus they are not
operated by "followers", but are de deliberately
liberately deliberately carried by the show and
form a distinctive and highly profit

able part thereof? Alsoi how many

Americans know that every "graft "graft-circus"
circus" "graft-circus" (as the questionable tent show
has ever been designated) carries a
man (who usually has an assistant)
whose work it is to adroitly bribe,
with tickets or money, or with both,
city and county officials; to the end
that the ancient shell game (the little
black pill and the little square boxes
being present day garb), the equally
antique three-card monte and various

spindle and block games and other
devices, all of them unfair, may be
operated in the side-show or on the
circus grounds?

Also Carry Short-Changers
And how general is the knowledge
that graft circuses have always car carried
ried carried men (known, among themselves,
as "short-change" workers) who al although
though although posing as ticket sellers or
"candy butchers," deliberately steal
money from patrons of the show and
divide the spoils with the show man management.
agement. management. Organized Graft and Theft

It is to acquaint the unsuspecting

public with the facts concerning the

cunningly conceived system of organ organized
ized organized graft and theft, in all its ramifi ramifications,
cations, ramifications, and the slick methods of buy buying
ing buying protection from criminal prosecu prosecution,
tion, prosecution, which the "graft circuses" use,
that I write.
Information for Public

first, l desire to "wise up, or in inform,
form, inform, the unsuspecting public, so that

men may know how to protect them themselves
selves themselves and their friends when they at

tend a graft circus; secondly, I deem

it my duty to let the general public
know the truth about the manner in
which a town's, or a city's, or a coun county's
ty's county's police officials are bribed, in order
that a grafting circus may ply its
games of chance, etc., to the end that

this knowledge will awaken the clergy
(Protestant, Catholic and Jewish
alike), superintendents and principals
of schools, members of boards of
trade, chambers of commerce, Kt Kt-wanis,
wanis, Kt-wanis, Rotary, Lions and civic clubs,
editors and all other patriotic and
public-spirited citizens, to the great
menace of the graft circus as a cor corrupter
rupter corrupter of the morals of young and

old for it starts countless boys and
young men on the demoralizing road
of gambling and loose living ana
plays havoc with the moral fiber of

I

the public officials who permit them- i

selves to be purchased.
Obscene Dancing
Still another menace found with
questionable circuses is the obscene
dancing by women, this species of cor corruption
ruption corruption being the natural outgrowth
of the awry, grafting psychology of
the grafting proprietors.
But let me begin at the beginning:
The Graft-Circus "Fixer"
Every grafting circus carries an ad adjuster,
juster, adjuster, better known in the language
of the white tops as the "fixer" or
"mender." This fellow is the man who
talks with the police and prosecuting
officials and other officials, and sec secretly
retly secretly arranges with them to operate
gambling devices on the circus
grounds.
Officials "Fixer" Must "See"
The officials that must be "seen" in
this connection are the chief of police,
the city attorney, the mayor, the dep deputy
uty deputy sheriffs, the local judge and the
justices of the peace, if the city or
village is not a county seat; if the
place be a county seat then, of course,
the prosecuting attorney and the high
sheriff are "seen" also.
"Stalling 'the Officials
Sometimes all of the officials wilf
unofficially permit the games of,
chance to operate; again, one of the
officials will be opposed to "joints" (as
the games are called). In such an
event, if the "fixer" cannot induce one
of the other officials to cause the so so-called
called so-called "wrong" official to "lay off" and
let the parasite showmen conduct their
games, these grafters will "go over
the head" of the "wrong" official, even
tho he be mayor or prosecuting attor attorney.
ney. attorney. In such an event the grafting
showmen "stall" the "wrong" official
and "sneak" their games. If they can
"stall" the unruly one away from the
the side-show they will operate in the
daytime; if the honest official insists
on "looking around" and going into
the side-show, etc., the showmen will
wait until night before they operate
their "rackets." In any event they
take considerable care to watch the
movements of the "wrong" official.
(Continued Tomorrow)

NOTICE

I will pay $10 reward to any person
who will locate the female cur dog
which was taken one mile from Ocala
on the Blitchton road Sept. 30. De Description:
scription: Description: solid white, right ear light
brindle, dew clawed on hind legs. Will
come to name Beulah. If you find this
dog notify E. Crosby on Blitchton
road or Dan Eillins, 109 Broadway,
Ocala and get your money. No ques questions
tions questions asked. 16-Gt

EVANGELISTIC TENT MEETINGS

Eighth street across from high

school, each evening at 7:45 except
Saturday, conducted by Evangelists
Farring and Bumpus. Reasons for

believing in God, Christ and the Bible

and other important Bible themes will

be expounded. Public cordially invit

ed. Comfortable seats. Hymn books
provided. No collection. No connec connection
tion connection with Mormonism, Russellism or

Holy Rollerism. 16-6t

How Noiseless Is the Growth.
Much has been accomplished; more
than people are aware, so gradual has
been the advance. How noiseless la
the growth of cornl Watch It night
and day for a week, and you will never
see it growing; but return after tw
months, and you will find It all whiten whitening
ing whitening for the harvest; such, and M
Imperceptible In the stages of their
motion, are the victories of the press.
D Qulncey.

Daddys

?dEveiii&

Fairy Tale
XAARY GRAHAM BQNAfER

DOG AND CAT

"The collie dog and the angora cat;

were talking," said Daddy.
"I must tell you what they were
talking about," he added, and both
Nick and Nancy said at once :
"Oh yes. Daddy, please dol"
"The collie dog was very beautiful.
The angora cat was very beautiful,
too.
"They both belonged to the same
mistress and they had a very happy
home. They got along very well to together,
gether, together, too.
" T saw such a strange thing today,'
said the collie dog.
"'Did you? inquired the angora
cat, in a most polite way. Tell me,
won't you, what you saw that was so
strange?'
" 'I'm merely hinting for an invita invitation
tion invitation to tell it,' the collie dog grinned.
" 'I'm waiting to hear," said the
cat, 'for then I have something I want
to tell you.'
" 'Good,' said the dog. 'Well, I will
proceed.
" 'What is that you are going to do?
asked the cat.
"'Proceed,' repeated the dog.
'"And what may that be?' inquired
the cat.
" 'That means that I will start,' said
the dog.
" 'Oh, oh, me-ow, me-ow, now I see,'
said the cat.
" 'Do proceed, the cat now asked
with a grin.
" 'I was out on the street today,'
the do? commenced, 'and I saw two

Will take pupils in violin, piano and
voice with theory lessons free. Terms
reasonable. Will offer classes in his history
tory history of music, sight singing, dictation
and ear training for small fee. Special
attention given out of town pupils.
Write or call on Cevie Roberts, Ocala,
Fla, Phone 305. 9-15-tf

RAILROAD SCHEDULES

Arrival and departure of passenger
ains at OCALA UNION STATION.
The following schedule figures pub-

ished as information and not guar

anteed.
(Eastern Standard Time)
ATLANTIC COAST LINE R. R.
Leave for Station Arrive from
2:15 am St. Petersburg 2:27 :on

2:27 am Jacksonville 2:15 am
1:45 pm Jacksonville 3:24 pm

3:24 nm St. Petersburg 1:25 pm

6:15 am Jacksonville 9:00 pm

3:30 pm Homosassa 1:16 pm
7:10am (d) Wilcox 6:45 pm

7:25 am (j) Lakeland 11:03 pm

(p) Monday, Wednesday, Friday,
j) Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday.
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY

Leave for Station Arrive from

2:34 am Jacksonville-NTfork 1:55 am
1 : 50 pm Jacksonville 1:15 pm

4:06 pm Jacksonville 4:06 pm

Tampa-Manatee-

1:55 am St. Petersburg 2:34 am

2:55 am NTork-St. Petrsburg 1:35 am

1:55 am Tampa 2:34 am

1:35 pm Tampa-Manatee 1:30 pm

4:05 pm Tampa-St. Petrsburg 4:05 pm

"Do Proceed," the Cat Now Asked.
ladies. They weren't old and they
weren't so very young.
"'By that I mean they were quite,
quite Krowri-up. Hut they were act acting
ing acting like children.
" 'They were hopping on one foot
and then on the other. They were
waiting for a trolley car and they
seemed to enjoy hopping a bit.'
" 'Well,' said the cat, 'I suppose
their feet hadn't grown up as much as
the rest of them.'
" 'That must have been the reason
for it,' said the dog. 'Anyway I
watched them. I put my head on one
side and then on the other and I said
to myself:
44 "This Is very curious. How
strangely they are behaving. This
Isn't just the thing to do for grown grownups
ups grownups to be hopping like that."
" 'Well, thly saw me as I was
watching them. Of course then I
looked away for I didn't want to be
rude.
" They laughed then and one of
them said :
"'"Did you see that dog look at
us? He looked at us just as though
he were a person and as though he
thought this behavior was rather
strange. But as though, too, he should
look away when he saw we noticed
him."
" 'They seemed much amused by the
way I had been looking at them, but
I was much amused at the way they
were acting.

"'But now, cat, tell me your story.
I have told you of my strange experi experience,
ence, experience, for I do think It was a strange
pic-ht nnd I think it was amusing to
se that the people thought it was so
funny I should look at them as a
person would. They evidently thought
me lacking In any powers of observa observation.'
tion.' observation.' 'What are powers of observation?
asked the cat.
" 'Powers of seeing things and no noticing
ticing noticing them carefully,' said the dog.
'But gracious me, bow-wow, I want to
hear what you have to tell me.'

'"You know how I love to jump
in the bath-tub when there Is a little
v. ater in it and splash around and play
in it?" the cat assked.
"The dog wdded.
" 'And yon know how I love to jump
in it. too, when the water Is running
nut, after enough has gone out so It
isn't t-'O deep for me, so I can play
with the stopper and play with the
water as It goes out?
"The dog nodded again and wagged
hi tail understandingly.
" 'Well, my mistress was telling
me one about me today and the per person
son person to whom she was telling this was
really quite amazed.
" 'Of course cats don't like water
and baths and playing in water as a
rule.
" 'It is true I am very different. I
don't know why I am, but I Just am.
" 'Bin the funny thing was that the
person said.
'A story should be written about
that cat!" Wasn't that exciting?
"And," ended Daddy, "the story was
told to me and it is quite, quite true."

EE vei?$r 4 EI(S)iinseraS
SHaould Heow These Facte
About Baliie 6 Powder
that a big can at a low cost many times results in
bakings that are unfit for food.
that lack of proper leavening strength means failure
and disappointment on bake-day.
that one cent's worth of inferior Baking Powder many
times ruins one dollar's worth of other ingredients.
that millions depend on
The Economy B RUING P&WMEM

TEST

not because of quanti quantity
ty quantity but on account of quali qualitynot
tynot qualitynot because of price
but by reason of results.
That is why the sale of
Calumet is 2 times
as much as that of
any other baking
powder.
Buy it try it never fail
to use it
A pound can of Calumet
contains full 16 ounce.
Some baking powders
come in 12 ounce instead
of 16 ounce cans. Be
sure you get a pound
when you want it.

THE WORUfS GREATEST BAKING POWDEZL

NOTICE!

JEANES & DAVIS
Dealers in
TENNESSEE NORSES AND MULES

Sales Barn at Sam Christian's Place on the
Atlantic Coast Line R. R. in Ocala J

We Invite the Pulic to See Them

MUST BE SOLD!

Make an offer for 160 acres one mile from head of beautiful Blue
Springs, directly on A. C. L. R. R. and Blue Springs Run. Has phos phosphate,
phate, phosphate, some timber and abundance of wood. Good orange or farm
land. Also 140 acres at Cotton Plant near York on A. C. L. R. R.
Some timber and wood. Good orange and farm land. Must be sold
at once to close an estate.

F. W. D I T T 0
OCALA, FLORIDA

A Standing Invitation to Germs
Weather-kept foods are risky foods to eat.
Exposed to germ-laden dust and myriad impuri impurities,
ties, impurities, such foods are easy prey for all the enemies of
wholesomeness.
Yet people will take such chances in the Fall
and Winter.
Perhaps they have never discovered how small an
investment for ice is necessary at this time of the year
Ocala Ice & Packing Co., Ocala, Fla.

mmniiniiimiiiiiiiiiiHHV'iimw

19 2

TOURING CAR
FOR SALE OR TRADE
Al Condition Terms II Desired
BLALOCK BROTHERS

VOX



OCALA EVENING STAR, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17, 1922

UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS

(RATES under this heading are as
follows: Maximum of six lines one time
25c; three times 50c; six times 75c; one
month $3.00. All accounts payable l
advaare except to those who have reg regular
ular regular advertising accounts.
LOST Tuesday morning, two miles
south of Lowell, a black leather
traveling bag. Reward for return.
Notify L. E. Gott, 556 Second St. S.,
St. Petersburg, Fla. 17-3t
FOR RENT Upstairs apartment,
furnished. Phone 207-Blue. Mrs.
W. V. Newsom, 1129 East Fort
King avenue. 17-tf
FOR RENT Front bedroom. Prefer
a school girl. Price reasonable. Ap Apply
ply Apply 507 East Second street. 17-tf
FOR SALE A mechanical drawing
set in good condition. Price $5. Ap Apply
ply Apply at Star office. 17-3t
CAREFUL HEMSTITCHING With
special threads; hat shapes and
lamp shades to order; millinery ma
terials; hand-made flowers, baskets,
wax bead3, art needlework. Mrs
Luella M. Grimbly, 701 Oklawaha
Ave., Ocala. Phone 409. 17-6t
LOST New 30 x 3 Ms Goodrich safety
tread tine on Maxwell rim, between
Bay Lake and Ocala (via Citra)
Suitable reward for return to W. D.
Carn, Ocala. 13-tf
FOR SALE Three horses, weight
from 950 to 1050; ten heavy work
horses; several pair of four to six-
year-old mules. Raised on farm
Work anywhere. Sound. Anthony
Farms, Anthony, Fla. 13-4t
FOR SALE Late model Ford tour
ing, with starter, demountable rims,
in good condition, at bargain; $100
down. McLeod & Waters, Stude-
baker dealers. Phone 170. 13-6t
FOR SALE 1921 Overland touring,
privately owned and in good condi condition:
tion: condition: paint and tires good. Priced
very low for quick sale; $100 down,
McLeod & Waters, Studebaker
dealers. Phone 170. 13-6t
FOR SALE A Studebaker touring
car without starter but in Al con condition.
dition. condition. Performance of this car
will surprise you. Price $100. Mc McLeod
Leod McLeod & Waters. Phone 170. 13-6t
WANTED Three or four fresh Jer Jersey
sey Jersey cows, must be good all round
cows and a bargain. Call on or
write T. O. Thrash, Ocala, Fla.,
Route A, Box 5-A. ll-9t
SEWING I will do all kinds of sew sewing,
ing, sewing, making over old dresses; chil children's
dren's children's and girls' dresses a specialty.
Mrs. J. F. Ricketson, No. 15 West
Fifth street. 13-6t
FOR SALE 160 acre farm, two
dwelling houses and barns on prop property,
erty, property, adjoining the famous Pyles
hammock. All land enclosed and
practically all under cultivation.
Apply to F. W. Bishop, Box 25, An Anthony,
thony, Anthony, Fla. 14-6t
WANTED Clean cotton rags not
sewing room scraps. 5c. a pound.
Star office.
FOR SALE House and 20 acres of
land known as the Lang estate. Is
well located in Ocala on newly pav paved
ed paved street. Apply to F. W. Bishop,
administrator, Box 25, Anthony,
Fla. l4-6t
PLANTS FOR SALE Charleston
and Jersey Wakefield cabbage,
selected Globe tomatoes, Ruby King
peppers, 25c per 100, $2 per 1000,
cash with order. C. H. Cooner.
Phone 389. 746 Wyomenia street,
Ocala. i46t
FOR SALE OR RENT 165 acres of
land all fenced, cleared and in cul cultivation.
tivation. cultivation. Easy terms. Apply to
W. H. Crigler, Ocala. 16-6t
COLONIAL DINING ROOM Serves
meals. Prices reasonable. Good
service and home cooking. 9-1 m
FOR RENT A furnished three-room
apartment on the first floor, with
private bath. Apply to Mrs. P. A.
Durand, 614 East Adams St., phone
579. 27-tf
MUSIC Will take pupils in violin,
piano and voice with theory lessons
free. Terms reasonable. Will offer
classes in history of music, sight
singing, dictation and ear training
for small free. Special attention
given out of town pupils. Write or
call on Cevie Roberts, Ocala. Phone
305. i5tf
FOR SALE One 7-passenger Stude Studebaker
baker Studebaker and one Ford light truck.
Williams Garage. 3-tf
FOR RENT Rooms furnish ea or un unfurnished
furnished unfurnished for light housekeeping,
with hot and cold water in baths.
Rooms are reasonable and a money
saving proposition. Call at
the
Dormitory or phone 305. 27-tf
FOR RENT Two furnished rooms
for light housekeeping. Apply at
No. 803 E. Second St. 16-3t

THIRTEEN MONTHS
AND A HOLIDAY

(Continued from First Page)
posed month "Sol," the best perma
nent date for Easter, the best date on
which to begin the "yearal" or equal I
month year (tentatively set at 1928),
and to "draft recommendations con
cerning the above into legislative
form for adoption by all nations and
remit that standard bill to their re
spective governments to insert their
national holidays therein and together
make it law for their respective .na .nations."
tions." .nations." Practically, it is said, the revisecf
calendar would aid in agriculture In
preventing crop failures by planting
at incorrect times because the calen calendar
dar calendar calls for it. It would be of value
to labor and capital alike, it is claim
ed, and would aid industry generally.
It would equalize dating systems
throughout the world, and, finally, the
2H day months would free about nine
per cent of monthly money now held
for 3 and 31 days.
DRY WOOD
Ten cords dry stove wood. Full
load $1.75. Nix & Harris, Route A.6t
Call 76 at 12 o'clock. Hot rolls and
bread every day, 6:30 p. m. hot bread.
Broadway Bakery, No. 16 W. Broad
way. 9-12t
Make nine miles on one quart of
gas. See B. F. Russell, 1135 South
Orange stret. 16-6t
'Another Nash." 6tl
Ask for Broadway Bakery Daisy
Bread. If your merchant does not
have it, phone 76. Quick delivery, 9
and 15-cent loaves. 9-12t
Mrs. H. A. Fausett and daughter,
Miss Pearl, are home after a very
pleasant three months spent mostly in
North Carolina and Indiana. They
went from Ocala to Asheville, where
they were the guests for several
weeks of Mrs. J. M. Raysor and
daughter, Miss Mary. Mrs. Raysor
has spent several winters in Ocala,
her daughter attending our school and
each making a number of friends.
From Asheville Mrs. Fausett and Miss
Fausett went to Jeffersonville, Ind.,
where they visited several more weeks
Mrs. Fausett's second son, Mr. Harry
Fausett, and his family, who are do doing
ing doing very well in that Hoosier town.
This was the first time that Mrs.
Fausett had been away from home
except for a short trip, in thirty years,
and she, as well as Miss Pearl, great greatly
ly greatly enjoyed their vacation.
The Eastern Star sewing circle will
meet tomorrow afternoon at the hall
at 3 o'clock. A good attendance is
desired as plans for this winter are
to be made.
For men of good taste, DON REY
cigars. 6-10t
The friends of Mr. George Borde
and family, who have made Ocala
their home for the past year, will re regret
gret regret to hear that they are leaving for
lakeland to reside. Mr. Borde went
yesterday and his family will follow
in a week or ten days. This musical
family have added much to the enjoy enjoyment
ment enjoyment of the dancing set and in musical
circles will be greatly missed.
Sheriff Thomas has returned from
Jasper, bringing with him Ulius D.
Hardester, accused of stealing Miss
Ruby Cappleman's car. The man
with him, John Pariott, has for the
time being escaped. Hardester is out
on a $500 bond, Mr. T. J. Kemp going
his security.
Mrs. C. K. Sage has returned home
from Columbus, Ga., where she was
called on account of the serious illness
of her daughter, Mrs. George Pitts.
Mrs. Pitts was much improved when
her mother left and on the road to re recovery.
covery. recovery. Mr. Nelson Geise of Tampa, spent
the week-end in Ocala with his brother-in-law
and sister, Mr. and Mrs. L.
W. Ponder, and then went to Palatka,
wher he was joined by his wife, who
has been visiting Mr. Geise's sister,
Mrs. James Johnson, and together
they will go to Atlanta, where they
will make their future home.
Rev. and Mrs. E. C. Wyatt are re receiving
ceiving receiving congratulations on the arrival
of a dainty baby girl, born Oct. 15th.
Mrs. Wyatt and little daughter will
be at the Marion County Hospital
until they return to their home in
DeLand.
Mrs. M. A. Ten Eyck had the mis-
. fortune a couple of weeks ago to slip
', on tne stairway and badly injure her
foot. It has been giving her a great
deal of trouble since then and an ope-
ration was necessary, which was per
formed yesterday. Her friends hope
that she will soon be fully recovered.

OCALA OCCURRENCES

If you have any local or society
item3 for the Star, phone five-one.
W. H. Hutchinson of Gaiter was in
Ocala yesterday and paid the Star a
pleasant call.
New York, Atlantic City, Washing
ton are easily reached through use of
Merchants & Miners steamers to Bal
timore and Philadelphia. Round trip
to Washington, D. C $53.42; Atlantic
City, Xt. J, 8.60; Asbury Park, N.
J, $60.62.
It
Watch for Theus Brothers'
Day Aluminum announcement
Dollar
3t
Mr. Sam Burford of Birmingham, is
spending a short time in Ocala with
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Bur-
ford.
"Another Nash."
6tir-
W. K. Lane, M. D., physician and
surgeon, specialist eye, ear, nose and
throat. Office over 5 and 10 cent store,
Ocala, Fla. tf
Miss Louise Spencer returned home
yesterday afternoon from Miami,
where she has spent the past week
with Mr. and Mrs. Frazure.
Ask for DON REY cigars. 6-10t
A 25-cent package of Albert's Plant
Food will perform wonders with your
pot plants.. Try it. Sold at the Court
Pharmacy.
tl
Don't miss the Dollar Day Alumi
num Sale at Theus Brothers. Watch
for their announcement. 17-3t
D. E. Knoblock of Martin, one of
Marion county's prosperous young
farmers, was a business visitor in the
city yesterday.
Party favors at The Gift Shop. 3t
, DON REY; quality cigars. 6-10t
Make nine miles on one quart of
gas. See B. F. Russell, 1135 South
Orange stret. 16-6t
Our Dollar Day Aluminum Sale will
be a money saver. Watch for an announcement
nouncement announcement of date. Theus Bros. 3t
Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Palmer have
returned from a week's trip to Clear
water and Tampa.
DON REY cigars are better. 6-10t
For sale, 1920 Cleveland speedster,
mechanically in Al condition. Easy
terms. Spencer-Pedrick Motor oCm-
pany. 2-tf
Mr. James Pyles is painting his res residence
idence residence on Watula street, which will
add greatly to the appearance of the
place.
See our display of items that will
be sold at the Dollar Day Aluminum
Sale in the north window. Theus
Brothers. 17-3t
"Another Nash." 6If
Your Ford will make nine miles on
one quart of gas. See B. F. Russell,
1135 S. Orange St. 16-6t
The friends of Mrs. C. B. Ayer will
be glad to hear that she is recovering
from her recent painful illness and
hope that in a short time she will be
entirely well.
Oiit ef a oarnnA nf TAtrht Siv Stlle-
bakers received last week we have
left one touring and one coupe. They
; anH if von ro inter-

ested in a high grade six at $1140 we tion. It is a car of very fine appoint-,f-
m ll and insect these ments throughout, fully equipped with

cars while we can make immediate
deliverv. This is a model on which
the factory is so far over sold. Mc-
rA Wo tc nhnnp 17ft. 1fi2t.
ruv I
miss r ranees lunge uj. vn.aunviiic i
accompanied Mrs. R. E. Yonge to
Ocala for a" visit with her grandpar grandparents.
ents. grandparents. "Another Nash." 6tf
Come in and see our newest novel novelties
ties novelties in ladies Red Cross snoes. Guar Guarantee
antee Guarantee Clothing & Shoe Co. 10-tf
DON REY cigars are better. 6-10t
Mr. and Mrs. Keltner and children
of Tampa, arrived in Ocala Monday
by automobile. Mr. Keltner has re returned
turned returned home but Mrs. Keltner and
children will remain until Friday.
Everything for Hallowe'en at THE
GIFT SHOP. 14-3t
j "Say it with flowers" and buy the
' flowers from Mrs. J. E. Hyndman, 1
miles out on the Dunnellon -" road,
Phone S0M. 10-tf

MARION ASSOCIATION

Program of Annual Baptist W. M. U.
Of Marion Association, at Willis Willis-ton
ton Willis-ton October 25th, 7 :30 p. m.
Devotional.
Address, Mrs.
H. C. Peelman, Jack-
sonville
Solo, Mrs. E. A. Burnette, Williston.
Address, "Our Work" Dr. S. B.
Rogers, Jacksonville.
Thursday, October 26, 10 a. m.
Devotional, Fellowship society.
Announcement of committees: Nom-
inating, Mrs. S. A. Standley. chair-
man: resolutions, Mrs. F. Cranford,
chairman; enrollment, Mrs. C. C.
Boone, chairman.
Reports of superintendents and sec secretary.
retary. secretary. "How Mav We Make the Work of
0ur Association More Effective?"
Inverness.
"Stewardship" Mrs. J. K. Chris
tian, Mcintosh.
"Are We Paving Our Pledges?"
Mrs. O. E. Cox, Ocala.
Mission study, Mrs. R. J. Rawls,
Crystal River.
Literature, Mrs. Ella Prater, Mica-
nopy.
Sunbeams, R. A's. and G. A's. Wil
liston.
Y. W. A's. Mrs. Edna Strong,
Belleview
Reports of committees and election
of officers.
Consecration service.
All delegates who can be at the
night service or who go on trains will
pease notify Mrs. E. A .Burnette, of
williston, as they have provided ample
entertainment for all who may be able
to attend. Dinner will be served at
the church on Thursday.
Mrs. T. N. Strange, President.
OCTOBER MONEY SAVERS
AT GERIG'S DRUG STORE
Chocolate Peppermint Patties, 33
cents the pound.
Phenolophthalein Tablets, 100 for
59 cents.
Puretest Epsom Salts, 15 cents spe
cial.
Jonteel Combination Cream, 39
cents each.
Klenzo Liquid Antiseptic, 19 cents.
Rexall Kidney Pills, 39 cents the
bottle.
Oriole Fabric Stationery. Regular
50 cent value for 29 cents.
$1.50 Atomizer for 98 cents.
Thes prices good only for October
as long as the good last. 17-tf
OFFICERS OF W. M. S.
At the annual meeting of the Wom
an's Missionary Society of the Baptist
church the following ladies were elect elected
ed elected as officers for the coming year:
Mrs. C. L. Collins, president; Mrs. O.
E. Cox, vice president; Mrs. JVC. La
nier, second vice president; Mrs. J. R.
Rogers, secretary; Mrs. Walter Marsh,
treasurer; Mrs. R. H. Floyd, publicity
reporter. These ladies met yesterday
at the home of Mrs. Collins to make
plans for the coming year.
HALLOWE'EN CARD PARTY
There will be a card party at the
Catholic rectory Tuesday, Oct. 31.
Make arrangements for your table
with Mrs. Allen Walkley or Mrs.
Weller Carmichael. 17-2t
The biggest value in aluminum ware
you ever saw will be offered you for a
dollar at the Dollar Day Aluminum
Sale. Theus Brothers. 3t
The much discussed Big Six Speed Speedster
ster Speedster is now on display at the show
rooms of McLeod & Waters, local
Studebaker dealers. This is a wonder
value in the sport car field and you
invited to cal1 and examine this
raooei or pnone i u ior oenODHr
Biflcx bumpers Deluxe motometer
disc wheels with two extra wheels and
tires. They want anyone teretea
m nne cars 10 bee uii wr
I ... 1
lmmeaiaieiy mxeresieu. m puiwuuw w
not. 16-Zt
Uncle Sam has furnished each of
the local mail carriers with a badge
bearing his number. The boys look
like real sports when they come down
the street but we are glad they wear
the badges on their hats instead of on
their coats. It looks too much like a
police badge for comfort if your con conscience
science conscience happens to be a little dis disturbed.
turbed. disturbed. For quality and style, wear Society
Brand clothes at moderate prices.
Guarantee Clothing & Shoe Co. 10-tf
Albert's Plant Food is the thing for
making your flower garden and pot
plants bloom. It is odorless and is
sold in 25c. and 10c. packages and $2
sacks. At the Court Pharmacy, tf
Party caps at The Gift Shop. 3t
Advertise in the Evening Star.

FOR SALE

Ten acres rich hammock soil on Dixie Highway within city limits
Ocala, known as the Frederitzi place. Six-room bungalow partly
furnished; all necessary outbuildings; 100-foot well; water piped in
house; two registered cows with calves; one work mule and all farm farming
ing farming implements; also 100 Leghorn chickens.. All for $3750 cash or
$4250 half cash.

F W B I T T O
OCALA, FLORIDA

One quart New Honey, PC-
per jar OOC
Irish Potatoes (
per peck IvC
Palm Olive Soap, QEJr
three cakes for "OC
Heinz Small Can 1 1
Beans A X C
Cream of Wheat,
package OC
Shredded WTieat 1 C
Biscuit package. IwC
Corn Flakes OP
three for uC

Pint Jars Orange Marmalade

Purina Scratch Feed, Chicken Chowder, Cow Chow
and other Feeds
FARMERS EXCHANGE STORE
PHONE 163

OUR PHONES
243 and 174
OYSTERS

YOURS FOR SEKVICE
COOK'S MARKET and GROCERY

tmimnn;nmnnmmmttttttfflt
The
Win dsor
Hotel
JACKSONVILLE, FLA

r V
V J
FIRE

PROOF

WHITE STAR LINE

v.

Negotiable Storage Receipts Incited on Cotton. AuiomoLilea.JFte

I
MOVE. PACK, SniP
LIVE STOCK, 1'
PIANOS, BAGGAGE,
MACHINERY.
FURNITURE ETC

Star Ads are Business Builders. Phone 51

BARGAIN!

Jello 12c. package,
j three for
j Quaker Oats, 12c. pkg
33c
33c
25c
43c
20c
20c
40c
40c
turcj for
Post Toasties,
three for
Premier Salad
Dressing
Uneedas,
three for,
Octagon Soap,
three for
Senate Coffee,
per pound.
Visitors to the
Cemetery
Usually admire monuments of
simple dignity and good taste.
We are proud to say that me memorials
morials memorials of our l. aking are se selected
lected selected as the finest of all they
have seen. Our work is not ex expensive.
pensive. expensive. You can procure it
monument for a surprisingly
small cum considering quality
and workmanship.
OCALA MARBLE WORKS
Phone 183
imnmirmntmrmmmnniirrmmntmt
In the heart of the city, with
Hemming Park for a front
yard. Every modern conveni convenience
ence convenience in each room. Dining
room service is second to none.
tOBERT M. MEYER, Manager,
r. E. KAVANAUGH, Proprietor.
TRANSFER
AND
STORAGE
LONGDISTANCE MOVING
Phone 296



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sobekcm newspaper
mods:identifier type OCLC 11319113
ALEPHBIBNUM 2052267
LCCN sn 84027621
sn 84027621
mods:language
mods:languageTerm text English
code iso639-2b eng
mods:location
mods:physicalLocation University of Florida
UF
mods:note dates or sequential designation Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
funding Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855
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mods:publisher Porter & Harding
mods:place
mods:placeTerm marccountry flu
mods:dateIssued October 17, 1922
marc point start 1895
end 1943
mods:frequency Daily (except Sunday)
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mods:recordIdentifier source UF00075908_06329
mods:recordCreationDate 841027
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mods:recordContentSource University of Florida
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eng
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mods:detail Enum1
mods:caption 1922
mods:number 1922
Enum2
October
10
Enum3
17
17
lccn 84027622
oclc 11319138
mods:titleInfo
mods:title Ocala weekly star
mods:subject SUBJ651_1 lcsh
mods:geographic Ocala (Fla.)
Newspapers
SUBJ651_2
Marion County (Fla.)
Newspapers
mods:hierarchicalGeographic
mods:country United States
mods:state Florida
mods:county Marion
mods:city Ocala
mods:nonSort The
Ocala evening star
uniform
Ocala Evening Star
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Evening star
Star
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sobekcm:VID 06329
sobekcm:EncodingLevel #
sobekcm:Publisher
sobekcm:Name Porter & Harding
sobekcm:PlaceTerm Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
sobekcm:Source
sobekcm:statement UF University of Florida
sobekcm:SortDate 693595
sobekcm:serial
sobekcm:SerialHierarchy level 1 order 1922 1922
2 10 October
3 17 17
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