The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:06298

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
inNrti
ill NUJ
WEATHER FORECAST Local showers tonight or Tuesday. Not quite so warm in extreme northwest portion.
TEMPERATURES This morning, 68; this afternoon, 88.
Sun rises tomorrow, 6;11; sets, 6:38.
OCALA, FLORIDA, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1922
VOLUME TWENTY-EIGHT. NO. 217

1 fh

1

IDLENESS ALWAYS ilT IS TIME FOR
BECOMESISOMEj UNITED ACTION

Miners Who Have Been on Strike All An Understanding of Entente Powers

Summer, Going Back to Work
With a Rush

Wilkesbarre. Pa., Sept. 11. There

Imperatively Needed In The

Near East

London. Spt.

11. (By Associated

. ti n i x"

was a striking contract to the idleness "'.-P. e ore iu.
of the last five months in the anthra-j Mir :n a hirhvjnd cam cam-cite
cite cam-cite coal fields today with scenes of I pa'gn lasting only two weeks, Turkish
feverish activity when most of the j nationalists under Mustapaha Kemal

SAINT AUGUSTINE

ARGUMENTS Oil

Afraid Some Other Section of The
State Will Get a Little More
Of the Rake-OfT

STRIKE INJUNCTION

Opened in Chicago this Morning With
a Formidable Array Of
Exhibits

155.000 mine

work. Many of them did not wait for
the formal signing of the agreement
which was ratified Saturday by the
district convention, but were waiting
at the mine mouth when the whistles
blew six o'clock.
SCALE SIGNED
Scranton, Pa., Sept. 11 The con contract
tract contract that sent 155,000 miners back to
work at the old wages after being idle
five months was formally signed to today.
day. today. APPLICATIONS FOR PARDONS

Following are the names of parties
who will make applications for par pardons
dons pardons at the meeting of the state par pardoning
doning pardoning board beginning Sept. 12:
Ray Anderson. Maggie Lee Arm Armstrong.
strong. Armstrong. G. F. Barker, R. J. Barnard, Abra Abraham
ham Abraham Bibbe, Preston Brown, Enoch
Broyles.
Anderson Carter, Alvy C. Caruth Caruth-ers,
ers, Caruth-ers, Wayne C. Cobb, Arthur F. Cole,
A. Edw. Corthell, T. D. Cox, Virgil
Croft, T. W. Cunningham.

Matt Dennis, C. S. Douglas, Andrew

Dunsford.
Charlie Eichelberger.
Chris Fitchter.

Will Giddens, Joe Gilliard, John A.

Gillis, J. B. Griffin, Jack E. Goode.

W. W. Hall, Perry Hambrick, Jo Joseph
seph Joseph Hawkins, Charles Hester, Mar Marion
ion Marion B. Highsmith, Edw. F. Hinson,

J. C. Hobbe. Sam Holland, Frank

Houston.

J. H. Jackson, William Johnson,

Pinkney Jones.

Frank Landrum, Bert Lasher, Jeff

Lee.
Jasper Mimbs, Lewis C. Mercer, II

B. Mosley, Walter L. McKnight.
H. L. Nostrand.
Mosley Purvis.
Oliver Raekard, James Reid, Frank
Rice, W. B. Roux.
Leroy Sampson, John Scott, J. M.
Sims, Mary Sims, Clyde G. Skaggs,
Frank Smith, Herbert Spanish, Dono

van Studstill, William Stuckey.
Noah Taylor, Will Thurman, J. II.
Troutman.
W. K. Umphrey.
Charles Walker, Sylvester Warren,
Fletcher Watson, A. White, J. F.
Whitfield, Cassie Williams, Charlie
Williamson, Joe Wilmette, Isom Wil Wilson,
son, Wilson, Pink Wright, Joe Worthy,
George Worthy.
Following Is list of cases docketed
but not placed on calendar for hearing
at meeting of -state board of pardons
beginning Sep.t 12th, 1922, on account
of absence of notice of publication of
intention to apply for pardon:
Laura Adams, Oswald Albury, J. E.
Barker, Ira Barwick, Jeff Boyd,
Chandler Brudham, Lawrence Camp Campbell,
bell, Campbell, Dallas Choran, Arthur F. Close,

J. B. Croom Jr., Freddie Davis, J. L.
Dixon, Charlie Dolan. Ethel Everett,
J. J. Goridean, H. C. and Ed Gibson,

John Gill, Tom Graham. George

Grover, Wm. H. Hathcock, Preston
Holder, Fulton Jackson, Roy Johnson,
Walter Kennedy, Raphael Knowles,
Bernice Larmon, Ned Long, Walter
Love, Lee Lyons, Presley Mack, Theo Theodore
dore Theodore Mack, David J. Mears, Freddie
MeRae, Mack Mcintosh, N. J. Nelson,
Lewis J. Nize, Ollie Preston, Ed Riley,
Joe Sheffield, Lee Stephens, Felix
Swain, Dave T. Tomlinson, Smiley
Whiddon, William Whitehurst, Frank
Williams, Arbert Wright.

toiy and at the same time at least
partly nullified the losses to their ra ration
tion ration through the world war. Thus is
created a situation full of the gravest
possibilities, one demanding immed

iate adoption of a united policy of
Great Britain, France and Italy, and
such a policy is far from existent, ac according
cording according to the view generally held
here.

BLAME IT ON THE GREEKS
Rome, Sept. ll.A dispatch to the

Giornale DTtalia from Smyrna today
declared that Brusa was set on fire by

the Greeks and the ancient Turkish

capital destroyed by the flames.

FLYING PARSON'S FUNERAL
Wilmington, N. C... Sept. 11. The
funeral of Lieut. Kelvin W. Maynard,
known throughout the 'country as
"The Flying Parson," and who was
killed in an airplane accident at Rut

land, Vermont, Thursday of last week,

was held at the home of Dr. and Mrs.

A. A. Maynard, parents and the de

ceased, in Sampson county yesterday
afternoon at 3 o'clock.

Notwithstanding the inaccessibility

by rail of the old Maynard home, it

being seven miles from the nearest

railroad, a crowd of more than three
thousand people attended the service,

which was participated in by four

ministers, all of whom were close

personal friends of Maynard.

Two airplanes from Pope Field,

Camp Bragg, arrived to the north of
the Maynard home about ten minutes

before the hour for the funeral but

the pilots were unable to locate the

heme and the throng on account of

the density of a large oak grove, in
the midst of which is located the

Maynard home. Consequently their
scheduled part of dropping flowers
from the air was not carried out. Af After
ter After circling about to the north for a
few minutes the airmen headed to toward
ward toward Camp Bragg.
Tho services were conducted from

the porch of the old country home of

Lieut. Maynard's father, near Har Har-rell's
rell's Har-rell's store.

St. Augustine, Sept. 11. The go:u Chicago, Sept. 11. Arguments on
roads committee of the St. Augustine J the governments' motion to make per per-board
board per-board of trade this morning wired, manent the temporary injunction
St-m-tor Duncan U. Fletcher, request- j against the rail strikers opened this
ing that he join in efforts with Sera-j morning before Federal Judge Wilker Wilker-tor
tor Wilker-tor Harreld, of Oklahoma, in urging sen. Blackburn Esterline, assistant
upon the secretary cf agriculture an i to the solicitor general, opened for the

investigation of charges that state government, with a formal reading of
road commissions in certain states the list of defendants on whom per-

dave been influenced hv pojiticai i scnal service had been obtained

consideration and favoritism" in lav

ing out roads which share federal aid.

The committee asked that the situa situation
tion situation be probed with particular respect
to conditions in Florida.

LODGE FIGHTS FOR

HIS POLITICAL LIFE

Donald Richberg, attorney for B. M.
Jewell, president, and John Scott, secretary-treasurer
of the railway em employes
ployes employes department of the American
Federation of Labor, called attention
to the motion filed Friday asking dis dismissal
missal dismissal of the injunction so far as it
relates to his clients and said it
should take precedence over the gov-

Most Bitter of Its Primary Campaigns I

Closes Tomorrow In Massachusetts

Boston, Sept. 11. The most bitter

primary campaign ever fought in this
state is being closed today with nom

inations for United States senator,
governor and lesser state offices to be

made at the polls tomorrow.

MILD IN MARYLAND
Baltimore, Sept. 11. Maryland vot vot-ters
ters vot-ters went to the polls today to select

candidates for United States senator

and congressmen. The only republi republican
can republican contest was for senator. John W.
Garrett, secretary of the Washington

STOUT HICKORY SWITCHES

Well Laid On the Remedies Macon's
Hightoned Vagrants Mostly
Need

Macon, Ga., Sept. 11. Arriving at

their home in the fashionable residen

tial section of Macon this morning,
Mrs. J. Garnett Starr, nineteen, who

with her sister, Valeria Lamar, fif

teen, disappeared from their home ten

days ago, said that H. C. Graham, in

jail here on the charge of kidnapping

the young women, was innocent.

"Mr. Graham is innocent of the
charges against him," Mrs. Starr said.

ennferenffl finnnsincr Spnnt.Or FYanco

- rpr., j. "We did not leave the city with him,
for re-nominations. The democrats ...

have a three-cornered fight for sena senator
tor senator and contests in five of the six con

gressional districts.
McLEOD IS CONFIDENT
Columbia. S. C, Sept. 11. Return Returning
ing Returning from a tour of the Piedmont coun counties,
ties, counties, Thomas G. McLeod declared in a
statement here yesterday he is con confident
fident confident he will defeat Cole L. Blease
Tuesday for the democratic nomina nomination
tion nomination for governor of South Carolina.

He will spend today, the last day be before
fore before the primary, speaking in York
and Lancaster.

but 1 cannot tell you with whom I did

leave

AVARICE THE LEADING

CAUSE OF CRIME

PUTTING IT IN

THE PIGEONHOLE

House of Representatives Buries The

Daugherty Impeachment
Resolution

Washington, Sept. 11. A demand

for impeachment of Attorney General

Daugherty for "high crimes and mis

demeanors" was made in the House
today by Representative Keller, re

publican, of Minnesota. By an over overwhelming
whelming overwhelming vote however, the question
was referred to the judiciary commit committee,
tee, committee, thus, in the opinion of leaders,
disposing of it finally.

NO CHANGE FOR MRS. HARDING

Washington, Sept. 11. Mrs. Hard

ing spent "a fairly restful night," but

there was no marked change in her
condition, Secretary Wallace was in

formed at the White House when he
called shortly after eight o'clock this
morning to inquire as to her condition.
The agriculture secretary did not see
the president but talked to White

House attaches.

Secretary Weeks, who called at the
White House soon after Secretary
Wallace left, announced on leaving

that Mrs. Harding spent the best
night in several nights and the slight

improvement which set in Sunday was

continuing with the patient's temper

ature nearer normal. A decision as
to the advisability of an operation has
not yet been reached.

MA II

1

ALL OVER AMERICA

Large Attendance at the Twenty
Third Annual Trapshoot
At Atlantic City

Atlantic City, Sept. 11. More than
seven hundred crack shots represent representing
ing representing all sections of North America are
entered in the twenty-third annual
grand American handicap trapshoot trapshoot-ing
ing trapshoot-ing championships starting here today.

ELECTION GOING ON
IN MAINE TODAY

Not Likely There Will be Landslide
In Either Direction

Portland, Maine, Sept. 11. The
first state election for 1922 was under
way in Maine today with United
States senator, four representatives
in Congress and governor heading the
officials to be chosen. The adage "as
Maine goes so goes the country," at attracted
tracted attracted nation-wide interest in the re result,
sult, result, although only a tremendous
tirn-over. would change the present
republican control.

LIVELY DAYS AT
FORT LAUDERDALE

Mix-Up Between a Bank Official And
a Minister

PARTY FOR LITTLE FOLKS

FLAPPER'S REIGN AT AN END

BEGIN WORK SOON
ON GANDY BRIDGE

St. Petersburg, Sept. 11. Authori Authoritative
tative Authoritative announcement is made that the
Candy bridge, across Old Tampa Bay,
to connect Tampa and St. Petersburg,
will be started on or about October 1.
The announcement was made at the
office of the Gandy Bridge Company.
The bridge project involves some two
million dollars.

MRS. KIRK MUNROE

SAILORS SCURRIED TO
PLACES OF SAFETY

Jacksonville, Sept. 11. Visions of
disaster arose aboard the United Am

erican freighter Georgian, which came
into port yesterday. Shortly after
the vessel docked, a bolt of lightning
found its mark on one of the vessel's

topmasts. The mast was splintered,

Miami, Sept. 10. Mrs. Kirk Mun

roe, noted author, club woman and
state Audubon society official, who
died very unexpectedly at her home
in Cocoanut Grove Friday, was buried
here yesterday with the utmost sim simplicity.
plicity. simplicity. Her husband. Kirk Munroe,
her physician and two others, were the
only persons present at the grave
where her body was taken directly
from her home, in conformity with
her expressed wish.

Chicago, Sept. 11. That the reign
of the flapper is an an end and rather
than her abbreviated skirt, exposed
knees and bobbed hair will appear a
graceful, long-skirted figure, with
hair piled high on hr head and pink

ears showing, is the unanimous de decree
cree decree of fashion for the fall and win winter
ter winter by leading American fashion ar artists
tists artists who compose the membership of

the Fashion Art League of America,
here for the thirty-fourth semi-annual
convention.
Contrary to the usual pre-meeting
gossip of business and plans fc
strategic maneuvers and swinging
convention policies, the advance grard
of the more than 200 fashion creators
who are expected to attend, livened
up the hours by drawing descriptive
pictures of startling new ideas they

have in gowns, wraps, suits and other
womens' apparel to be displayed for
madam's approval. Mme. Alia Ripley,
president of the league, p'-omi-es
some alluring departures in feminine
costume.
The elaborate semi-annual feature

CLEMENCEAU IS COMING

Ilarrisburg, Sept. 10. Avarice led
all human failings as a cause of crime

for which arrests were made by the

Pennsylvania state police during 1921

Of a total of 12,908 arrests covered in
a report for the year, made public
here recently, 5550 were listed under
tis heading.
The police report bases crime on
human emotions and lists most of the
offenses under headings suggestive of
the fundemental traits responsible.
Avarice covers the various forms of
theft and robbery. Under the head heading
ing heading recklessness are listed 4289 ar arrests
rests arrests which were the result largely of

violations of the automobile laws. Al Alcoholic
coholic Alcoholic stimulation was responsible
for 1270 arrests. The other headings
and the totals are: Drugs, 4; lust, 627;

revenge, 1026; subnormal mentality,
141.
More single than married men were
arrested and for most of those taken

into custody the offiense was

first. There were 7141 single men
and 5767 married men arrested. Of
the total 11,798 were first offenders,
187 second offenders and 932 thrid
offenders. The report lists 12,162 as
white and 746 black. There were 12, 12,-202
202 12,-202 men and 706 women.

The youngest offenders were ten
years old and there were 37 of these.
The oldest was 80. There was only
one of this age although there were
two of 78 and two of 76.
The most dangerous years appar apparently
ently apparently were between 20 and 35. There
were more offenders 648 of the age

Paris, Sept. 11. M. Clemenceau,
the war premier, will sail for New
York in four weeks on an extended
tour of the United States for the
purpose of telling the American peo people
ple people what are the rights and duties of
the nations which jointly won the war,
and also to try to restore the prestige

which France has lost in the United
States.

I O I 4.1 r iV Tl,. A

of the league, the "Fashion Snow hx- J
a;i n u ,a "'-ar mark second with 576.

II aU! Ulllai ic, v in iitjvj vii tin- i

ernoon and evening of Wednesday,
September 13. The creations exhibit exhibited
ed exhibited will be entirely those of American
fashion artists, and will be featured
on the most attractive mannequins
available.
"The league has accomplished a
work of outstanding importance in
bringing the American fashion artist
to the attention. of the women of Am America,"
erica," America," declared Mme. Ripley. "Well

HIS ENEMIES GOT
OLD TOM AT LAST
Jacksonville, Sept. 11. The belief
that Tom Hysler Sr. of White House
was killed early Sunday morning as
a result of a long standing enmity
between the Hyslers and neighboring
families and that four men accom accompanied
panied accompanied by a barefooted boy were in involved
volved involved in the shooting was expressed

dressed American women no longer j today by the authorities investigating

find it necessary to go abroad m quest j the crime

of the latest modes. This is of ereat

!

Saturday afternoon at 4:30 o'clock
in response to pretty little invitations
which had been previously sent ou to
a number of the little folks in town,
numbers of invited guests began to
arrive at the home of Mr. and Mrs.
Howard Walters to celebrate the first
anniversary of the birthday of How Howard
ard Howard Wallace Walters, the son of Mr.
and Mrs. Howard Walters.
The lawn was the place where the
happy children enjoyed the games
that had been arranged for them,
while the mothers and nurses of the

little beaus and belles of the future
watched them play. Pretty pink pa paper
per paper hats trimmed with little black
witches were distributed to the guests

and these they wore during the after afternoon
noon afternoon while they played and frollicked

on the lawn.

On the porch was put up a big
sheet on which was a baby and each

guest was blindfolded and given a cap
and told to pin it on the baby. Nell

Stroud managed to put the cap in the
proper place and was given a box of

candy.

Later in the afternoon after a cou

ple of hours tf games the guests were
invited to the south side of the lawn,

where a table had been decorated, the
colors pink and white being carried

out. Running across the center of

their table from both directions were

long strips of crepe paper and in the

center of the table was a large birth

day cake, with just one lighted candle

When the cake was cut Barbara Lind Lindner
ner Lindner cut the thimble, Frances Mitchell

the ring and Jay Armour the dime.

Mrs. Walters was assisted in enter

taining the little guests by Mrs. Mas-

ton O'Neal, Delzell Pasteur, Harriett
Armour, Mrs. .William Stroud and
Alice Miller. Lemonade and cake
were served and pretty pink baskets

filled with candy were distributed to

the guests.

All the little ones had a wonderfu

time and the honor guest was the

recipient of many useful birthday
presents. Those present and who
wished the young honoree many hap hap-ply
ply hap-ply returns of the day were Sara

Frances Tucker, Jack Horrell, Sam

Pyles, Margaret and Virginia Painter,

Betty Harris, Billy Borden, Billy

Stroud, Nell Israelson, Frances Mit

chell, Barbara Lindner, Jack Lindner,
Barbara Olds, Anita Batts, Mickey
Taylor, H. C. Nichols Jr., Henry
Grumbles, David Swindell, William
Blood, Betty Carroll, Frances Young,
Harriet Armour, Jay Armour and
Frances Vivian Tucker.

importance, not only to the fashion
artistrv of America, but to the Amer-

Germany believes she would now be

able to stand a loan. New York

several of the crew were momentarily Evening Mail.

stunned while" the

! ican textile industry.'

The people who are not worrymy
are those who think the crop move

ment is some kind ot a r.-w nnnee

Wnenever Lloyd George has a gen generous
erous generous moment, he forgives Germany
a little more of the debt she owes
France. Bethlehem Globe.

Fort Lauderdale, Sept. 10. Fort

Lauderdale rested at ease last night

bllowing the airing in municipal

court yesterday of the set-to in which
the Rev. Dr. John C. Walker, pastor

of the Baptist church, and J. N. Cain,
assistant cashier of the Fort Lauder Lauderdale
dale Lauderdale State Bank, were principals, and

in which the bank's president, W. C.

Kyle, also figured according to testi

mony introduced.

Rev. Walker and Cain were fined

$14.25 each by Mayor Reed. The spe specific
cific specific charge against them was fighting
and disturbing the peace. The court
room provided the stellar attraction

for the community, supporters of both

principals crowding the room and reg

istering their approval as their fav

orite scored a point.

Mayor Reed expressed regret at the

publication of the trouble which is un understood
derstood understood to be the outcome of Dr. Wal

ker's professional work.

Trouble brewed first at a meeting

of the trustees of the church, Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday night, according to testimony

introduced. Cain, chairman of the
trustees, it was testified, asked for the
pastor's resignation, and the argu

ment that ensued was marked by the
free passing of the lie. Cain, it was
also testified, called the pastor's wife
an "old witch."

The pastor went to the bank and

the argument was renewed. Witnesses

testified that Kyle came in at this

juncture, urging Cain to hit the min

ister. The fight took place out side

the building.

Dr. Walker, who acted as his own

attorney, demanded that charges be

placed against Kyle for his alleged
part in the affair, but Mayor Reed
suggested that such charge would
have to follow the orderly process.
Members of the pastor's flock say
that he was brought to Fort Lauder Lauderdale
dale Lauderdale to break up bootlegging and
other objectionable matters and that
the trouble originated from his severe
denunciation of men he believed to be
lawbreakers. Only two persons voted
for his removal from the pastorate
when the question was submitted it
was declared. Dr. Walker at one
time in his trial asked that the cir circuit
cuit circuit court be given jurisdiction in his
case and asked that he be committed
to jail in lieu of payment of fine. This,
however, was not done. He will bring

a suit of slander against the bank, he
testified, on the ground that the alter altercation
cation altercation began in the bank while he was
there transacting business.

more fortunate.

mindful of the vessels' cargo scurried i Whenever the indemity falls due, step. Zanesville Times-Rtcorder.
for safety. The freighter carried 400 j the Allies prepare for another Ger- I
tons of TNT. ; man gas attack. Life. j It's none of our business, but

! Lenine

According to insurance actuaries

Naturally the soft coal strike was
broken before the hard coal strike.
Columbia Record.

s j An enterprising American firm

recovers from death after ? has designed a machine for testing the

And Mr. Hardine has such exeat death, we cann't heln wonderinc- i streneth of nackiner-cases. In this

people are living longer now, but that hopes that this first term would be a 'what kind of elands' he uses. country, of course, we rely on our

Senator Edge maintains that the
tariff bill should be tlastic. Undoubt Undoubt-edlybearing
edlybearing Undoubt-edlybearing in mind that it's -those
tlastic things that keep other things
up. Manila Bulletin.

Y'ou may be in a bad business; but
suppose you ran a life insurance
company in Ireland? Toledo News-Bee.

they take longer to do it. Punch. term of endearment. Erie Times. McKeesport Recorder.

i Railway Companies. Punch.

If Europe is slow about coming
across with the amount of her debt to
us, maybe we can send a few lectur

ers over there and get it that way.,

New York Evening Mail.

Small ads. pay big interest.

We see by the papers that -we are

going to have a coal commission. The
important question, however is wheth

er we are going to have coaL New
York Sun.

The proposal of Herr Fischer that
the Allies should finance Germany in
the present crisis suggests that he
has completely recovered from his re recent
cent recent nerve trouble, Punch.

!



OCALA EVENING STAR, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1922

Ocala Evening Star
Paltlltibed f.wrjr I)y Eirpt Sanday by
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY.
OCALA, I LORIDA

II. J. liltilnsrer, rrealdent
H. I). UavrBKooil. Vlee-Prealdeat
P. V. UaieiiKudi ecretr -Treasurer
J. If. l;ru runic, i:IitAr
Entered at O.Ua, Fla, postofSce
etrond-claes muter.
as
'I !.I.Ei'HOES
Hualuea OfC e Fi vr-Oae
UdltvrLrtl Orp irtuicfci Two-Sevea
Stx-iety Mci:rt-r Flve-Oae
MKJIUKii AVjOrtATfcD PBESS
The Asso.vUed I'ress Is exclusively
entitled ijr ?..e use for republication of
all news 4 a ;.tc,ea credited to it or not
otherwise cr. l!eI In this paper and
hlsio the lo-a! :kws published herein.
All rights f republication of special
dispatches h n are also reserved.
DOMEMiC St.MSCIUPTIOX HATES
One year, in n '. .ince $6.00
Three months, l,i advance 3.00
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urif montti. in advance 60
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!ipa! Plate 15 cems pr inch for
:oriscu tive insertions. Alternate inser insertions
tions insertions 25 per t-nt additional. Composi Composition
tion Composition charges on ads. that run less than
nix ti nes 10 cents per inch. Special
position 23 ptr cent additional. Kates
based on four-inch minimum. Less than
four inches will take a higher rate,
which will he furnished upon applica application.
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change a week allowed on readers with without
out without extra composition charges.
Legal advertisements at legal rates.
Jimmy Cox is home from Europe
and maybe he will tell us all about
what Europe is doing and America
should do.
The Mayor Reed they have at Fort
Lauderdale seems to be rather broken,
and there is talk of Snow-ing him
under.
A fit of anger is as fatal to dignity
as a dose of arsenic is to life. Or Orlando
lando Orlando Reporter-Star.
Nix you can build a new dignity.
The Orlando Reporter-Star prints
an impressive forecast of the An An-gerbilt
gerbilt An-gerbilt and new San Juan hotels as
they will appear when complete,
which will be soon. Gives a fellow
the eye-itch to go see them.
One of the needs of Florida is a
strong fish and game protection law.
Will the legislature of 1922 enact
it ? Times-Union.-
It will enact one that will smell
strong, if you don't watch out.
Jimmy Cox says he favors suspen suspension
sion suspension of the inter-allied war debts. Be Being
ing Being as Europe has no money and Am America
erica America doesnt' have to have the money
right now, Jimmy's advice sounds
wise. After all, it was our war, too.
We used to think it the very refine refinement
ment refinement of cruelty when the teacher sent
us out for a hickory to be used on us;
but we saw a married man carrying
home a rolling pin yesterday! Tam Tampa
pa Tampa Tribune.
He was in luck. Suppose his wife
was addicted to the magazine gun?
From the way some of these young
folks we know stay out at night, it
would seem they are trying to be
stars. Orlando Reporter-Star.
Morning stars, must be. Oftimes we
turn over for our second nap, and
peeking out our window note them
autobubbling down to Shorty David Davidson's
son's Davidson's for a 2:30 a. m. lunch.
Up to date, an American woman
who married a foreigner became a
foreigner. When the nineteenth
amendment passed, many an Ameri-ean-born
woman who had married the
subject of another nation found her herself
self herself barred from American citizen citizenship.
ship. citizenship. This led to much trouble and
heartburning among loyal, native-
ItfiCKiE SAYS
j WJPttt, M0VTSS OVa PEACES,
NVT SXSO ROtT. STJXNW, "CELL
1 sTv&.ViGfcfcs, "cos, vaer. oovir
DO
Aov$rnstN3
EARuy
r anc i
Qai?

a.

PESTER THE j
PRINTERS )

I

born women, who had to take the
alien's troublesome path to citizen citizenship.
ship. citizenship. This disability exists no longer.
Born an American, you live and die

an American, unless you swear allegi- :
ance to another power. You can't lose
your nationality nor forfeit it nor
throw it away.
To many people in America, and
many in Europe tho' they under understand
stand understand the matter there better as
I Hit ji ace x lauvc cwiu vuitt o iv j
neutral, while Turkey drives Greece I
out of Asia Minor the two great
Christian powers, so-called, seem un
faithful, cowardly and ungrateful. It
would seem natural that these pow powers
ers powers should go at once to the rescue
of Greece. But if people look back
a scant eight years they will probably
remember things that prove that
France and Britain are not only pol- j
itic but just. When, in 1914, Germany
and Austria brought on the great war,
if Greece, then the strongest nation
of the Balkans, had kept her word, it
is more than probable that Turkey and
Bulgaria would have stayed out of
the war and the Central Allies been
shorn of a sixth of their strength. But
Greece abandoned Serbia and betray betrayed
ed betrayed the Entente, and when her only
statesman finally borrowed a measure
of success for her, she cast him out,
recalled her pro-German king and be began
gan began another war which is costing her
a disastrous defeat. But this is not
the only reason why France and Brit Britain
ain Britain won't help a Christian nation
against the Turks. In Northern Af Africa,
rica, Africa, France possesses a great empire,
won by the sword, but held by good
government and good faith. The peo people
ple people of this great empire are Moham Mohammedans,
medans, Mohammedans, and when Germany came
down on France like a wolf on the
fold, they sent hundreds of thousands
of splendid fighters to help break the
Teuton columns at the Marne and hold
them back thru the bloody four years
that followed. And Britain, in India,
has a great empire, mostly ruled by
Mohammedans, and they, too, were
"faithful to their salt"; they sent
hundreds of thousands of as fine
troops as Europe ever saw to fight in
France, to hold Egypt, to tear Pales Palestine
tine Palestine and Mesopotamia from the German-ruled
Turks. All these Moham Mohammedans,
medans, Mohammedans, that fought so well for a
"Christian civilization," feel that now,
the baneful influence of the Teuton is
iifted, that it is not too much to ask
of their French and British comrades
that the little remnant of the Turks
be allowed to rule the land they re retook
took retook against great odds. And who
shall say they are not right? Greeca
had again her chance to be the Greece
of Pericles if she threw it awa
whose fault but her own?
It is a matter of gratification to the
people of Lauderdale that in all the
huge crowd that gathered here on
Labor Day not one drunk was seen on
the streets nor at the picnic grounds.
Neither was there a quarrel or any
kind of trouble. Only two minor ac accidents
cidents accidents occurred and in neither was
anyone hurt. It was an easy day for
the police. All they had to do was
direct traffic. Fort Lauderdale Her Herald.
ald. Herald. Little testimonials like this coming
from a thousand parts of the country
are worth infinitely more than whisky
propaganda or Literary Digest straw
votes.
We would fain say unto Phil Arm Armstrong
strong Armstrong that we write them headlines
he refers to because they seem to
please the readers of the paper. Any
time they want a different brand of
headline they can obtain it. We car carry
ry carry several varieties in stock. We
note, by the way, that Phil sticks
pretty close to a certain type of para-
! graph, and we have heard no kick
on it.
First issue of the Times, West Palm
Beach's evening paper, has reached
this office, and is indeed a creditable
publication. Anybody who didn't
know the enterprise and snap of those
Eoast Coast towns would think the
Times was printed in a city of at least
twenty-five thousand people. It starts
out with sixteen pages, carries a full
telegraph service and plenty of local
news, beside a number of well-edited
departments. One Vernon L. of the
all-pervading family of Smith is editor
and F. P. Fildes is manager. The
Star wishes the Times long life and
unbroken success.
Guavas $1.75 per erf te. Leave youi
order with us. Farmers Exchange
Store. Phone 163. 22-tf
Fifteen pounds of sugar for one
dollar with a dollar's worth of other
groceries SATURDAY ONLY at the
U-SERVE STORES. 8-2t
Fertilize your pot plants and lawn
flowers with Albert's Plant Food. Sold
in 25c, 50c. and $2 packages at the
Court Pharmacy. 18-tf
A 25-cent package of Albert's Plant
Food will perform wonders with your
pot plants. Try it. Sold at the Court
Pharmacy. tf

ONLY OCALA AND PALATKA
CAN SAVE THE O. V

Elsewhere in this issue appears
schedules for the new auto bus line
which the Oklawaha Valley railroad
has inaugurated between Palatka and
Ocala in the hope of bolstering up the
finances of the road to such an extent
that it can meet operating costs. The
road is in dire financial straits, the
promised aid from Palatka and Ocala
merchants having failed to material materialize.
ize. materialize. Receiver Christensen said that the
revenues have been gradually shrink shrinking
ing shrinking up, and now that the Wilson Cy Cypress
press Cypress Company, formerly the heaviest
shippers over the line, have ceased
operations over the road, and with the
Rodman Lumber Company threaten threatening
ing threatening to do likewise, there seems little
hope that the road can be made self self-sustaining
sustaining self-sustaining unless something is done
very shortly. Mr. Christensen said
that if liberal patronage is given the
road by Palatka and Ocala merchants,
and that if the traveling public will
avail themselves of the quickest
schedule between here and Ocala, the
road may be kept above water.
It is understood that other plans
are now maturing for the taking over
of the road by a new concern, but
nothing definite from this source has
been announced. Palatka News.
What the News says about the ab absolute
solute absolute necessity of Ocala-Palatka pat patronage
ronage patronage is true enough, but as for tak taking
ing taking over the road by another concern,
we don't think there is much chance
of that. At any rate, the road can
be made very useful to the two cities
and they will be blind to their inter interests
ests interests if they do not keep it running.
EIGHT YEARS AGO
Sept. 11, 1914. Germans retreat
slowly from the Marne. Allies hamp hampered
ered hampered in pursuit by great exhaustion
of men and horses. Mistaken feeling
among Allied peoples that end of war
is near at hand.
Name of St. Petersburg changed to
Petrograd.
Austrians abandoned Cracow to the
Russians.
Austrians have lost 120,00 men to
date fighting against the Russians.
OCALA TWENTY YEARS AGO
(Evening Star Sept. 11, 1902)
Major Chas. H. Smith, popularly
known as "Bill Arp," is lying critical critically
ly critically ill at his home in Cartersville, Ga.
He is eighty-two years old. This gal gallant
lant gallant old Confederate veteran and
writer is well known in Ocala where
he has lectured on several occasions.
Miss Bertha Estelle West was mar married
ried married to Mr. John Calhoun Brown at
the home of the bride's sister, Mrs. J.
E. Charles at Oxford last night.
George MacKay has the annex of
the Baptist church almost completed
and the big two-story annex to the
Ocala high school is nearing comple completion.
tion. completion. John Z. Reardon won the gold medal
Monday night and wears it proudly as
the best drilled man in the Ocala
Rifles.
Ocala Ten Years Ago
(Evening Star Sept. 11, 1912)
Dr. and Mrs. Walter Hood left over
the Seaboard this afternoon to attend
the Zewadski-Lawrence wedding in
Tampa tomorrow night.
Miss Frances Chambers remained
as Mrs. W. W. Clyatt's guest after
her mother left for Tampa Sunday.
Mr. Ernest Crook is home from his
visit to New York.
Miss Elizabeth Mizelle, who has
been assisting Supt. Brinson in grad grading
ing grading examination papers, left this
morning for her home at Orange
Lake.
Mrs. L. Home and family who have
been spending the past month at
Fairfax, Va., are now in Daytona
Beach, where they will stay until time
for school to open, and will then re return
turn return to Ocala.
At the meeting of Tulula Lodge last
night Mr. Henry Stokes took the in initiatory
itiatory initiatory degree of Odd Fellowship.
The attendance was large and the de degree
gree degree team worked almost to perfec perfection.
tion. perfection. Tulula Lodge is growing stead steadily.
ily. steadily. Miss Ethel Haycraft will leave the
last of the week to resume her studies
at Brenau.
Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Tydings will
leave on Monday for a sea trip from
J?cksonville to Baltimore. From theree
they will" go to Washington city for a
week's stay. Robert will enter the
College of Electrical Engineering to
remain all winter.
The Star regrets to learn that Ocala
will lose Mr. J. O. Dekle and family.
Mr. Dekle has bought a good business
in Miami and will leave to join his
famil ythere tomorrow.
Misses Clifford and Catherine Pyles
leave tomorrow for Brenau College.
Mr. E. C. Sheridan, who has been
at the Arms House this summer, will
leave tomorrow for Stetson Univers University,
ity, University, where he will resume his studies
for the ministry.

BALL GA3IE BETWEEN
HUSBANDS AND BACHELORS

Next Thursday afternoon eighteen
cf Ocala's most prominent young:
men are planning a regular baseball
game for the benefit of the Wildcats'
tall club. A nine composed of the
married men will contest for the city
championship with nine youngsters.
The married men contend that they
will have more endurance because t
their wives keep them in trim. They
have a good place to eat and are given
the best of care and training. On the
other hand, the bachelors think they j
have the secret of success up their
sleeves. The single men's pitcher
will be instructed to throw 'em close
in. It is most likely that any mar- ;
ied man will naturally duck when he
sees the ball coming close to him for ;
it closely resembles a tea cup and
would be a vivid reminder of various ;
episodes with brooms, rolling pins and j
the like.
If these ambitious youngsters and
otherwise succeed in staging this
game it will be a side-splitting comedy
and should be unanimously attended
by the entire town. Further details
of the plans will be published later in
the week.
GCKLAWAHA VALLEY
RAILROAD COMPANY
Fastest and Most Direct Route
Between
PALATKA and OCALA
DAILY SERVICE
Leave Palatka daily .... 8:00 A. M.
Arrive Ocala daily 11:00 A. M.
Leave Ocala daily
Arrive Palatka daily.
. .12:45 P.M.
. 3:45 P. M.
Making connection with all Atlantic
Coast Line and Seaboard Air Line aft aft-ernon
ernon aft-ernon trains at Ocala, and all Florida
East Coast and Atlantic Coast Line
afternoon trains at Palatka.
Effective September 14th, 1922
Automobile
. '.
Repairing
While we do all kinds of re-1
pair work on cars and trucks, we
make a specialty of Reboring
Cylinders, Welding, Valve Grind- f.
ing and Electrical Work. k
WILLIAMS GARAGE
I
Phone 597 Night Plione 408
SALT SPRINGS WAFER
Is growing in popularity every
day among Ocalans. It is also
being shipped to every part of
the state. It is sold under a
guarantee. Try a five gallon
container.
Chero-Cola Bottling lUrks
Phone 167
Needham Motor Co
PLUMBING & ELECTRICAL
CONTRACTING
General Auto
Repairing
PHONE 252
Sewing Machines Repaired
SASH
DOOR
2 Gbo. MacKaylCo. S
I Ocala. Fla.
HARDWARE
3
HIGH GRADE PAINT g
rrrm;m?ffii;tn".Hagttn
"Say it with flowers" and buy the
flowers from Mrs. J. E. Hyndman, 1
miles out on the Dunnellon road.
Phone 30M. 10-tf
665 cures Chills and Fever, Adv.

Oinally!
(Y) H I Y) HO
u CXZKA
C
STORAGE BATTERX
Guaranteed 1 Years

OUR P II ONES
243 and 174

YOU US FOR SElvVICE

COOK'S MARKET and GROCERY

AUTOMOBILE STORAGE

Large Fire Proof Building

OPEM DAY

Cars m eshed and Polished
PHONE 291

lorfda Auto Supply Company

- m
1 3W-320 N.
:
'0

Will Yon idp the Democratic
i'arty Win this Campaign?
if so the iiiudt hfclj.rtil thins: you can do now is to contribute to
t!e ratic Jvjational Campaign Fund so that the education
al work of the democratic National Committee can be carried out
u.-s planned.
THE DEMOCRATIC NATIONAL COMMITTEE NEEDS
MONEY AND NEEDS IT NOW
For the purpose of getting the record of failure of this Repub Republican
lican Republican Do-Xotnmg Congress and Do-Nothing- Administration before
tin: ;,t.-..j.it: ,:uid to s:.o-.v them again the road to Democratic Proa Proa-per.
per. Proa-per. y, wi.K;. i .ey traveled for eight years of Democratic rule.
SEND YOLU CONTRIBUTION TODAY TO THE STAR
! !.-. nuoratie National Committee has arranged with the
puu!:-atis uf iiie ftiwi; to receive and receipt for contributions. A
duplicate- rtiMpt will be mailed from Democratic National Head-'
qua rh i .-.
GIVE WHAT YOU CAN AFFORD MUCH OR LITTLE BUT
GIVE IT NOW
The Democratic Party has no privileged classes, no protected
profiteers, no trusts or moneybunds to appeal to. It represents
only the people, therefore it appeals only to them.
THIS ia A DEMOCRATIC YEAR. Do your share to help win
the victory.
DEMOCRATIC PROSPERITY VS. REPUBLICAN DISASTER
The estimated wealth of the United States when President
Wilson went into office in 1913 was $185,000,000,000; it increased to
$300,000,000,000 in eight years of Democratic rule a gain of $115. $115.-000.000,000.
000.000,000. $115.-000.000,000. The present estimated wealth of the United States Is
$225.000,000,000 a loss of $75,000,000,000 in fifteen months nnder
Republican rule.
Since the Republican party was voted into power In November,
1920, the American farmers alone nave suffered a loss of near $30, $30,-000,000,000.
000,000,000. $30,-000,000,000. f SOME REPUBLICAN BROKEN PR03IISES
The Republicans promised the country PROSPERITY; they
have -given it ADVERSITY.
They promised to stimulate agriculture and business; they
have given an industrial panic and destroyed our foreign markets.
Foreign trade declined from $13,500,000,000 In 1920 to near $6,000. $6,000.-000,000
000,000 $6,000.-000,000 In 1922.
They promised to reduce taxes; they have shifted taxes of the
multi-millionaire and profiteering class to the smaller taxpayers
without lifting taxes or reducing them. Repeal of the Excess
Profits tax relieved the Big Interests of paying $450,000,000 In
taxes: reduction of the higher surtax relieved them of paying
$61,500,000.
They promised to reduce the high cost of llTing; they haye
given a Profiteers tariff bill which increases the high cost of liv living,
ing, living, and makes the farmer pay $5 on everything be -buys for eacn
51 of '"protection" he gets.
They promise! to reduce the expenses of the government; they
have increased the exrenses of running the various departments of
the government 1923 budget), three years after the war $536,000, $536,000,-000
000 $536,000,-000 compared to 1915. three years before the war with an estimated
deficit of $500.0J0,000 tn addition or $1,000,000,000 Increase-

Just
Flour,
needs.
108. S.
received. Ballard's Obelisk
Let us supply your grocery
Main Street Market. Phone!
Main street.
22-tf
Western meats now in stock at
Cook's Market and Grocery. 8-4t
! Rub-My-Tiam, an antiseptic Adv.

VICTOR ADDING
MACHINE
Take Or.? cn Trial for a
Fei.- Days
THE BOOK SHOP
Exclusive Dealers
OCALA, FLA.

we so specialize in
intelligent Service for ?H
makes of batteries.
3U
6 AN
AND NIGHT
MAIN STREET
We never saennce quality to sen
at a low price. Our meats are the
BEST, to be had. Main Street Mar-
ket. Phone 108.
22-tf
Rub-My-Hsm for Rheumatisms-Ad.
Western meats now in stock at
Cook's Market and Grocery. 8-4t



4

OCALA EVENING STAR, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1922

8

UOVV'S YOUR 9
AUTO RUNNING

Maybe you hear those little
squeaking noises in the running
of your car. If so, you'd bet better
ter better have us listen to them for
you they may be serious. We
are experts in repairing elec electrical
trical electrical troubles.
We Sell
FOX
TIRES AND TUBES
DIXIE HIGHWAY fii.il I
James Engesser
Phone 258 Night Thone 533
121 West Broadway
K
I
SEVEN DAY SERVICE
PALATKA-OCALA
BUS LINE
SCHEDULE
Leave Palalka 8:00 A K.
Arrive Ocala 12:00 M.
Leave Ocala 2:15 P. M.
Arrive Palalka fi:C0 P. f!.
Ocala Leaving Point, Ocala House
Paaltka leaving point, James hotel i
Route via Anlhony, Sparr, 1
Citra, Orange Springs, Keis-
wood and Hodman, g
C. P. PILLANS, Prop.
Ocala. Fhone 527 I
1 C. V. Roberts & Co. l
FUNERAL DIRECTORS
AND EMBALMERS I
Motor Equipment f
Residence Phone 305
Office Phone 350, Ocala, Fla. ti
217 W. Broadway
j:
LIFE
FIRE j
i
!
A. E GER1G
INSURANCE
Ocala, Florida

OCCIDENT

AUTOMOBILE
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CONTRACTOR
ANb BUILDER
Careful estimates made on all con con-tract
tract con-tract work. Gives more and better
work for tho money than any other
ontractor in the city.

COME

Cross-Cut

CD
By
Courtney Ryley
Cooper
Illustration by R. &. Van Nlcm
Ooprnbi bx Little, Brown & Ox
CHAPTER XVI
It was as though shades of the past
had come to life again, to repeat in
the Twentieth century a happening of
the Nineteenth. There was only one
difference no form of a dead man
now lay against the foot wall, to rest
there more than a score of years un until
til until it should come to light, a pile of
bones in time-shredded clothing. And
as he thought of it, Fairchild remem remembered
bered remembered that the earthly remains of
"Sissie" Larsen had lain within almost
a few feet of the spot where he had
drilled the prospect hole into the foot
wall, there to discover the ore that
promised bonanza.
But this time there was nothing and
no clue to the mystery of Harry's
disappearance. Fairchild suddenly
strengthened with an idea. Perhaps,
after all, he had been on the other
side of the cave-in and had hurried
on out of the mine. But in that event,
would be not have waited for his re return,
turn, return, to tell him of the accident? Flow Flow-ever,
ever, Flow-ever, it was a chance, and Fairchild
took It. Once more he crawled through
the hole that he had made in the cave cave-in
in cave-in and sought the outward world.
Then he hurried down Kentucky
gulch and to the Sampler. But Harry
had not been there. He went tlmuijrh
town, asking questions, striving his
best to shield his anxiety. clo:ik!ng his
queries under the cover of cursory re remarks.
marks. remarks. Harry had not been seen. At
last, with the coming of night, he
turned toward the boarding house, and
on his arrival. Mother Howard, sight sighting
ing sighting his white face, hurried to him.
"Have you seen Harry?" he asked.
"No he hasn't been here."
It was the last chance. Clutching
fear at his heart, he told Mother How Howard
ard Howard of the happenings at the mine,
quickly, as plainly as possible. Then
once more he went forth, to retrace
his steps to the Blue Poppy, to buck
the wind and the fine snow and the
high, piled drifts, and to go below. But
the surroundings were the same : still
the cave-in, with its small hole where
he had torn through it, still the rag- j
ged hanging wall where Harry had j
fired the last shots of dynamite in his ;
investigations, still the trampled bit
of fuse with its can attached. Noth- i
ing more.
Back into the Mack night, with the
winds whistlin : through the pines.
Back to viindering about through the
hills, hcrrvMig forward ft the sight
of every faint, dark object against :
the snow, in the hope that Harry,
crippled by tho cave-in, might have
some way gotten out of the shaft.
But they were only boulders or logs
or stumps of trees. At midnight,
Fairchild turned once more toward
town and to the hoarding house. But
Harry had not appeared. There was
only one thing left to do.
This time, when Fairchild left
Mother Howard's, his steps did not
lead him toward Kentucky gulch. In Instead
stead Instead he kept straight on up the
street, past the little line of store
buildings and to the courthouse, where
he sought out the sole remaining light
In the bleak, black building Sheriff
Bardwell's office. That personage was
nodding in his chair, but removed his
feet from the desk and turned drow-

HULA!

AND

eily as Fairchild entered. I
"Well?" he questioned, "what's up?"
"My partner has disappeared. I j
want to report to you and see if I j

can get some help."
Disappeared? Who?"
"Harry Harkins. He's a big Cor Cor-nishman.
nishman. Cor-nishman. with a Inrsrf mustache, very ;
red face, about s!sty years old. I f
should judge
"Wait a minute," Bardwell's eyes
narrowed. "Ain't he the fellow I ar-
rested in the Blue Poppy mine the S
night of the Old Times dance?"
"Yes.- j
"And you say he's disappeared?
When does his trial come up?" j
"A week from tomorrow."
"And he's disappeared." A slow j
smile came over the other man's lips, j
"I don't think itwill help much to
start any relief expedition for him.
The thing to do Is to get a picture
and a general description and send it i
around to the police in the various
parts of the country! That'll be the
best way to find him !" j
Fairchild's teeth gritted, but he j
could not escape the force of the ar-
gument, from the sheriff's standpoint, i
For a moment there was silence, then
the miner came closer to the desk. j
"Sheriff," said he as calmly as pos- j
sible, "you have a perfect right to
give that sort of view. That's your j
business to suspect people. However.
some sort of an accident happened at i
the mine this afternoon a cave-in or
an explosion that tore out the roof j
of the tunnel and I am sure that mv i
partner is wandering among the hills.
Will you help me to find him?"
The sheriff wheeled aho-n in his
chair and studied a iii..-:it. Then he
rose.
"Guess I will," he announced. "It j
can't do any harm to look for him. I
anyway." j
Half an hour later, aided by two
deputies who had been summoned j
from their homes, Fairchild and the j
sheriff left for the hills to begin the
search for the missing Harry. Lnte
the next afternoon, they returned o ;
town, tired, their horses almost crawt- j
ing in their dragging pice after six
teen hours of travel through the
drifts of the hills and gullies. Harry
had not been found, and so Fairchild
reported when, with drooping shoul shoulders,
ders, shoulders, he returned to the boarding
house and to the waiting Mother How Howard.
ard. Howard. And both knew that this time
Harry's disappearance was no joke, as
it had been before. They realized
that back of It all was some sinister
reason, some mystery which they
could not solve for the present, at
least. That night, Fairchild faced the
future and made his resolve.
There was only a week now until
Harry's case should come to trial.
Only a week until the failure of the
defendant to appear should throw the
deeds of the Blue Poppy mine into the
hands of the court, to be sold for the ;
amount of the balL And in spite of
the fact that Fairchild now felt his
mine to be a bonanza, unless some
sort of a miracle could happen before
that time, the mine was the same as
lost. True, it would go to the highest
bidder at a public Eale and any money
brought In above the amount of bail
would be returned to hirn. Bet who
would be that bidder? Who vould j
get the mine perhnps tor twenty or j
twenty-five thousand d liars, when it j
now was worth noiio? Certainly j
not he. Unless sometlung should hap happen
pen happen to intervene, unless Tiarry should j
return, or in some way JjVrchlld I
could raise the necessary fva thou thousand
sand thousand dollars to furnish a cash bond
and again recover the deeds of the
Blue Poppy, he was no better off than j
before the strike was made. Long lit j
thought, finally to come to his conclu- i
dnn nnr thou with Vs rf a era m-
MA.-. JV .1. 11. kUl. Ull A l ,.411. j
bier who has placed his last bet to ;
win or lose, he went to bed.
But morning found him awake lonsi
before the rest of the house was siir siir-ring.
ring. siir-ring. The first workers on the street
that morning found Fairchild offering
them six dollars a day. And by eight
o'clock, ten of them were at Mork!
in the drift of the Blue I'oppy mine.
working against time that they might j
repair the damage which had been I
caused by the cave-in. j
(Continued Tomorrow)
I Vl si X

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The SilverUywn is made by an organization with 52
years experience in rubber manufacture.
There is only one quality in SilverUrwn Tires. The
materials and workmanship in one are the same as
in all others. The name of Sflvertown is always a
symbol of one quality.
Year deakreiH ach yog tbonSHvo tbonSHvo-town
town tbonSHvo-town in air sas from30TJ3tgv
tHB B.P.GOODRICH RUBBER COMPANY, AUrm. Chi
ESTABLISHED T870

GOODRICH TIRES
Sold in Ocala by
BLALOCK BROTHERS

Cor. Oklawaha Ave. and N. Main St.

The 3if ITerance in price
Is small-tho difference
in quality, great.
"Good to the last drop"

RBCl U.S.

iliwpi

Star Ads are Business Builders. Phone 51

JIMV

14 11 ft x s. 4 a a

YOUR

DOLLAR

ImThTiiThTmtmimtmththihihihi

IslvertewB

Cord Tire
"BEST IN THE LONG HON
PAT. OFF.

MA

PI D ail

W

A.A.O-.i
TT.T.

Fraternal Orders

KNIGHTS TEMPLAR
Ocala Command Command-ery
ery Command-ery Number 19,
&Jt&& Knights Templar,
r-VjJ? meets every sec
ond Friday night
in each month at
8 o'clock at the
Masonic HalL A. L. Lucas. E. C
B. L. Adams, Recorder.
OCALA LODGE NO. 286. B, P. O. E.
Ocala Lodge No. 256, Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, meets
the second and fourth Tuesday eve evenings
nings evenings of each month. Visiting breth brethren
ren brethren elways welcome. Lodge rooms
upstairs over Troxler's and the Book
Shop, 113 Main street.
W. R. Pedrick, E. R.
J. P. Galloway, Secretary.
ROYAL ARCH MASONS
Regular conventions of the Ocala
Chapter No. 13 R. A. M., on the fourth
Friday in every month at 8 p Jn.
A. L. Lucas, H. P.
B. L. Adams, Secretary.
MARION-DUNN MASONIC LODGE
Marion-Dunn Lodge No. 19, F. & A.
M., meets on the first and third
Thursday evenings of each month at
7:30 o'clock until further notice.
A. a Blowers, W. M.
B. L. Adams, Secretary.
SPANISH WAR VETERANS
Fitzhugh Lee Camp No. 11, United
Spanish War Veterans, meets the
third Friday of each month at armory
at 8 o'clock p. m.
C. V. Roberts. Commtnder.
L. T. Craft, Adjutant.
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
Ocala Lodge No. 19. Conventions
held every Monday evening at eight
o'clock at the castle halL A cordial
welcome to visiting brothers.
L U. Forbes. C a
C. K. Sage, K. of R. & S.
ODD FELLOWS
Tulula Lodge No. 22, I. O. O. F
meets every Tuesday evening at eight
o'clock at the Odd Fellows hall in the
third story of the Gary block. A
warm welcome always extended to
visiting brothers.
Joseph Malever, N. G.
H. G. Shealy, Secretary.
WOOD3IEN OF liiE WORLD
Fort Xing Camp No. 14 meets at
K. of P. hall every second and fourth
Friday evenings of each month at 8
o'clock. Visiting sovereigns are al always
ways always welcome.
P. W. Whiteside, a a
Chas. K. Sage, Clerk.
ORDER OF EASTERN STAR
Ocala Charter No. 29, O. E.
meets at the Masonic hall the second
and fourth Thursday evening of each
month at 8 o'clock.
Mrs. Julie Weihe, W. M.
Mrs. Susan Cook, Secretary.
W. K. Lane, M. D physician and
surgeon, specialist eye, ear, nose and
throat. Office over 5 and 10 cent store,
Ocala, Fla. tf
Western meats now in stock at
Cook's Market and Grocery. 8-4t
White and yellow Bermuda onion
seed just arrived at Bitting's Drug
Store. l-9t
BUY
WIhTmYmM



OCALA EVENING STAR, MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 11, 1922

UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS

(RATES under thi3 heading atfi a
follows: Maximum of six lines one time
25c; three timea SOe; six times 75c; one
month $3.00. All accounts payable la
dvasre except to those .vUo have reg regular
ular regular advertl.-sir: account.
FOR SALE About 250 feet good
picket fence, saved live oak posts;
cheap. William Hocker. ll-3t
FOR RENT Furnished or unfur unfurnished
nished unfurnished apartment; can be arranged
comfortably for two families if de-
. sired. Immediate possession. Ad Address
dress Address Mrs. II. Ragsdale, No. 24 Ray
street. 11-Gt
LOST Probably on S. A. L. train No.
4 today, between Belleview and
Ocala, gold Eversharp pencil. Re Return
turn Return to Miss Elinor Tremere,
Belleview, and receive reward, ltdh
PEARS FOR SALE Cincincus pears
for sale, for preserving. Phone 219.
W. W. Harriss. 9-9-6t
FOR SALE Six room cottage in good
repair, big lawn and double garage.
All modern conveniences. Address
309 S, Pine St., Ocala. 9-6t
FOR RENT Six room cottage with
all modern conveniences and garage.
Immediate possession. Apply to R.
L. Carter. Phone 526. 8-tf
FOR RENT Three rooms nicely fur furnished
nished furnished for light housekeeping. All
modern conveniences. Apply at 212
Orange avenue. 8-tf
HEBREW" NEW YEAR CARDS The
Star job office is equipped for mak making
ing making up Jewish New Year cards with
proper inscriptions for the occasion.
Prices: 100 with envelopes $2.25; 50
with envelopes $1.75. Phone 51. tf
FOR SALE An eight room dwelling,
all conveniences, good location, ga ga-.rage
.rage ga-.rage and flower garden; cash or
terms to the right party. Address
P. O. Box 602. 7-6t
WANTED First class, experienced
saleslady. Apply to J. Malever. tf
FOR SALE Studebaker Special Six
touring, late model in first-class
condition, $250 down, balance easy
monthly payments. Ask for dem demonstration.
onstration. demonstration. McLeod & Waters, the
Studebaker dealers, Ocala, Fla. 6-6t
FOR SALE Ford sedan; practically
new; hun less than sixty days.
Nathan Mayo, Summerfield,Fla. 5-tf
FOR RENT Furnished house ready
to occupy now. Apply Mrs. T. C.
Carter, Carter's Baker. 9-2-tf
FOR RENT Two unfurnished apart apartments:
ments: apartments: 6 rooms and bath; sleeping
porches; private entrance; front
and back porches. Recently remod
eled throughout. Cor. Ocklawaha
and Anthony road. Mrs. S. A. Stan
ley, 447 Ocklawaha avenue. 9tf
SWEET GUAVAS $1.50 six-basket
carrier, f. o. b. Weirsdale; $1.50 a
bushel at residence. T. B. Snook,
Weirsdale, Fla. 8-18-tf
HAW SCHEOULES
Arrival and departure of passenger
ains at OCALA UNION STATION.
The following schedule figures pub pub-ished
ished pub-ished as information and not guar guaranteed.
anteed. guaranteed. (Eastern Standard Time)
ATLANTIC COAST LINE R. R.
Leave for Station Arrive from
2:15 am St. Petersburg 2:27 tun
2:27 am Jacksonville 2:15 am
1:45 pm Jacksonville 3:24 pm
3:24 pm St. Petersburg 1:25 pm
6:15 am Jacksonville 9:00 pm
3:30 pm Homosassa 1:16 pm
7:10 am (p) Wilcox 6:45pm
7:25am (j) Lakeland 11:03 pm
(p) Monday, Wednesday, Friday.
j)Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday.
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY
Leave for Station Arrive from
2:34 am Jacksonville-N'York 1:55 am
1:50 pm Jacksonville 1:15 pm
4:06 pm Jacksonville 4:06 pm
Tampa-Manatee-1:55
am St. Petersburg 2:34 am
2:55 am N'York-St. Petrsburg 1:35 am
1:55 am Tampa 2:34 am
1 :35 pm Tampa-Manatee 1 :30 pm
4:05 pm Tampa-St. Petrsburg 4:05 pm
Yearly Coal Production.
It Is reported that about 65,000
pounds of coral, worth $71)0,000 ar
taken each year from the coral beds
of Japan. The work is done by divers,
the master diver receiving and grad grading
ing grading the coral as It is brought In. Whole Wholesale
sale Wholesale and exporting firms keep repre representatives
sentatives representatives there to inspect the coral
nd make bids for it. The color has
much to do with the value. The most
expensive Is "boke," a pale quince
color; next in value is pink, then
white, light red and dark red.
611k Culture Still Primitive in Japan.
The culture of silk in China is an in industry
dustry industry which is probably 20 centuries
old. and methods pursued today are
much the sume as the original ones.
The spinning wheel used by the Pil Pilgrims
grims Pilgrims is a modern affair compared
with some which are to be found In
operation today in the celestial country.

OCALA OCCURRENCES

If you have any local or society
items for the Star, call five-one.
Mr. E. Bledsoe, of the furniture de department
partment department of George MacKay & Com Company,
pany, Company, spent Sunday in Orlando with
friends.
Miss Hazel Lawson has returned
home from Tennessee, where she has
been the guest of her aunt this sum summer.
mer. summer. Mr. R. G. Sumner left Saturday
night for a short visit with his par parents
ents parents in St. Petersburg, expecting to
return to Ocala Tuesday.
The splendor of days and starry
nights at sea invigorate and rest one.
Ask Mr. C. M. Haile, general agent,
Jacksonville, about Merchants and
Miners service. It
L. T. Izlar is spending today with
his father and mother at Clermont,
but will return to Ocala sometime to tonight
night tonight and be on the job as usual to
morrow morning.
Mr. George Wenzel, who has been
working for some time in Sanford,
spent the week end at home. George
returned to Sanford yesterday after
noon in his car.
Mrs. L. R. Chazal. Mr. Louis H.
Chazal and Misses Charlotte and
Anita Chazal left Saturday for Day
tona Beach, where they expect to
spend the next three weeks.
666 quickly relieves a cold. Adv.
The more you see of our methods of
handling fresh meats the better you
like it. Come and see us. Main Street
Market. Phone 108. 22-tt
Little Miss Alice Miller arrived in
Ocala Saturday from Virginia, where
she has been attending a summer
camp, bhe is en route to her home in
Tampa. Wliile here she visited her
aunt, Mrs. Howard Walters.
Mr. G. H. Morthland left Saturday
afternoon for Sedalia, Mo., where he
will transact business with sis home
office. After finishing his business
trip, he will have a short vacation
returning to Ocala on or about Oc
tober 1st.
Plant your fall garden early. White
Bermuda onion sets and garden seeds
at BITTING'S DRUG STORE. 26-lm
666 cures Bilious Fever. Adv.
Mr. Eric Boswell of Inverness pass passed
ed passed through Ocala yesterday en route
to Gainesville to spend a few days
at the University. Eric has played
ball so much for and against Ocala
that he seems like a home boy to
many of us.
Mr. J. W. Neff, who has been in
Tampa doing some contract work for
the past month or two, is back in
Ocala greeting his many friends.
is to be hoped that Mr. Neff will find
Ocala sufficiently busy to keep him
here in the future.
Palm Beach suits and white flanne!
trousers cleaned and pressed right
Counts Dry Cleaning Plant. Phone
605. No. 216 South Main St. 29-tf
666 cures Malarial Fever. Adv.
Jessie Lee of Jacksonville is in the
city, visiting his sister, Miss Katie
Mae Lee. Jessie was a small but alert
boy when he left Ocala, and has in
creased considerably in quantity and
quality. His friends are glad to see
him.
Because of the wet weather the city
paving crews were unable to open
Lake Weir avenue from South Fift
tc South Eighth last week as had been
expected. The brick is all laid and
the bats are in place but the rains
have been so frequent that the sand
cushion under the brick is too wet to
stand the weight of the roller and the
street cannot be opened to the public
until it is rolled and covered wit
sand.
White and yellow Sermuda onion
seed just arrived at Bitting's Drug
Store. l-9t
666 cured Dengue Fever. Adv
Mr. and Mrs. F. T. Martin of Crys Crystal
tal Crystal River, spent Saturday in Ocala.
They were busy shopping and mak making
ing making preparations for opening the
Crystal River Inn, which they have
conducted very successfully for sev several
eral several years. This home-like hostelry
is an ideal place for those wishing to
enjoy a few weeks fishing, or for those
seeking a place to rest, and for the
past season has had an excellent pat patronage.
ronage. patronage. Mr. and Mrs. Martin are
looking forward to the best winter
season in the inn's history.

HAMMEL-HARRIS

The marriage of Miss Elise Harris
and Mr. Harry Hammel was solemn solemnized
ized solemnized on Sunday afternoon, Sept. 3rd,
at 4 o'clock at the home of the bride's
aunt, Mrs. Ermile Eger, at Chicago.
Tehr were no attendants, the bride
wearing a wedding gown of white
georgette trimmed with embroidered
panels, and wore tulle veing, her flow
ers being shower bouquet of bride
roses and valley lilies. Following the
ceremony the guests repaired to the
Chicago Beach hotel, where a wedding
supper was served. Orlando Sentinel.
Mrs. Hammell is well known in
Ocala, having visited friends here
several times and her marriage will
be of interest to them and they ex
tend best wishes for her future happi happiness.
ness. happiness. The O. H. S. Wildcats are to hold

tbeir first 1922 football practice this i perambulating near the Seaboard de de-afternoon.
afternoon. de-afternoon. Coach Blitch will be in j pCt Sunday afternoon, when they
town to begin work with his recruits i her r J a noise lik all th furniture

and although the first few practices
will be only light work and prelim
inary practice the boys are enthus enthusiastic
iastic enthusiastic and a large number are ex ex-ptcted
ptcted ex-ptcted out for the first work-out. Mr.
Blitch has wide experience in both
the playing and coaching end of the
game and with the co-operation of
the boys will be able to give Ocala the
best high school football team she
has yet sent into a scrimmage.
The notice of the death of Mrs.
Kirk Munroe at her home at Cocoanut
Grove will be read with real regret
by Ocalans to whom she was person
ally known. Mrs. Munroe was a well
known club woman and at the meeting
of the federation held in Ocala a few
years ago she took a prominent part
on the program. Mrs. Munroe was a
daughter of the late Amelia E. Barr,
well known novelist.
Miss Mary Sheppard, who has been
at her home in Newberry this sum summer,
mer, summer, returned to Ocala last night and
for the winter will be at the home of
her sister, Mrs. John Edwards. Miss
Sheppard, who has been the successful
principal of the Ocala schools for the
past two terms, will again hold that
responsible position this year.
Ralph Cullen left this morning on
the early train for Jacksonville, where
he will be joined by James Chace, who
has been visiting his grandfather, and
this afternoon they will sail for Mas
sachusetts via Clyde Line. They will
gc to Amherst, where they will re
sume their studies for the winter.
Mr. and Mrs. Paul Reynolds of Al
bany, Ga., are the guests of Mr. and
Mrs. Luther Reynolds at their home
in Lynwood. Mr. Reynolds is here in
the interest of Swift & Company and
will probably be in Ocala about ten
days.
Mrs. John Pasteur, who has been
visiting at the home of her son, Mr.
Tom Pasteur in Miami, has returned
home and reports that the new baby
in that family is getting along fine
and has been given the name of T. B.
Pasteur Jr.
Dr. and Mrs. C. B. Ayer and son
Clifford, and Mr. G. T. Maughs re
turned Saturday from a pleasant stay
at Daytona Beach. Dr. Ayer went to
attend the dental association wrhich
convened there last week. Dr. Chace
and Dr. Shephard were also among the
Ocalans at the convention.
Mr. Guy Zewadski leaves tomorrow
for his home in Tampa, after a short
visit in Ocala with his father, Mr. W.
K. Zewadski. His many friends in
Ocala were delighted to see him but
sorry his visit was so short.
Mrs. Thomas Sexton accompanied
Mr. Sexton as far as Floral City this
morning on his regular weekly trip
Mrs. Sexton will be the guest of Mr
sexton s niece, 3irs. tnannon tor a
few days.
Miss Marguerite Edwards left yes
terday afternoon for Tallahassee, to
resume her studies at the Woman's
College. The other Ocala girls who
will attend that institution this term
left this afternoon.
Mr. John T. Moore of Tampa, is in
the city today on business connected
with his real estate holdings here. He
reports his new grandson in the Cigar
City as enjoying good health.
Miss Elizabeth Home left this aft-
ternoon for Tallahassee, where she
will again attend the Woman's Col
lege.
Mr. and Mrs. John Taylor have gone
to Daytona Beach, and will occupy
one of their cottages there for a short
vacation.
Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Wilds have
rented the W. C. Jeffords house on
Oklawaha which they will occupy by
the first of October.

To prevent a cold, take 666. Adv.

During the past week at the Capitol
Theater, New York, there appeared
Irene Castle in the interesting moving
picture "Slim Shoulders," and in con connection
nection connection with this picture there was

held a brilliant fashion promenade, a
review of the latest fashions, which
is considered the finest that has ever
ben given at this popular theater,
which is noted for its forgeous feat-
ures. Appearing in this production
was a young lady known in the pro professional
fessional professional world as Betty Burton, who
in private life is Miss Israelson and
a sister of Mr. Max Israelson of this
city. In this month's issue of the
Motion Picture Magazine there also i
appears a picture of this young lady, 1
with a number of well known screen
beauties, and is under the title "Is
Your Face Your Fortune?"
The bluejacket twins, Policemen
Bronscn and Morgan, were peacefully
Vi-as breaking up, and rushing rapidly
to the home of George Jackson and
his wife Allie, found them engaged in
marital combat. Our two discreet and
valiant cops dislike to come between j
a man and his wife, but in this case it
seemed like they must be torn apart
lest they tear each other to pieces.
George and Ollie were arrested, but
instead of being lugged off to repent
in the bastille they were placed under
cash bonds, which allowed them to put
in the remainder of Sunday in tran tran-quilizing
quilizing tran-quilizing their tempers and rearrang rearranging
ing rearranging the furniture.
Prof. Hensley of Palatka, and a for former
mer former principal of the Ocala high school,
was a week-end visitor in the city.
Get your advertising copy in early
for Dollar Days, September 19 and 20.
Dollar Days Sept. 19 and 20.
Rev. R. F. Brennann left yesterday
in his car for St. Augustine, where he
expects to remain until Thursday.
Mr. T, C. Carter and children went
to Salt Springs today for a two
veeks camp.
Mr. and Mrs. Maston O'Neal are the
proud parents of a fine nine-pound
boy, born at the hospital yesterday
afternoon.
LION TAMER AFRAID OF CATS
Jim Coyle, Who Pacifies Wild Beasts,
Trembles at the Sisht of the
Domestic Tabby.
Jim Coyle, head keeper at the Cen Central
tral Central park zoo, who beards the lion in
his den and calls the fiercest black
leopard in captivity Tootzie, is efrvld
of only one animal a house cat.
"I can't explain why an ordinary
cat that babies will play with holds
such terror for me," Coyle said, ac according
cording according to the New York Sun.
"Late at night when something goes
wrong in the lion house and they all
get to roaring so that I'm afraid
they'll wake up residents on Fifth
avenue I can go Into' their cages with
the same feeling of security that I
would go Into a child's room at night.
But let a cat brush against me and I
come back through the dark and I'm
scared to death."
In handling the Hons one of Coyle's
ringers was bitten off and his arm
ripped from his wrist to his elbow
and he holds no grudge against the
Hon.
"Oh, that Hon and I were the best
of friends after the accident." he s:id.
"You see It was partly my own fault.
I went in to latch his cage after
hours, when he wasn't expecting aiij aiij-body,
body, aiij-body, and I didn't have on my uni uniform,
form, uniform, to which he was accustomed.
But the main thing was, I forgot to
make him speak first. If I had called
him by name before Bticking my arm
in the cage he would have known me
instantly."
Coyle says that a Hon not only
knows those he has met before, but
that he knows the moment a person
steps before the cge whether that
person likes animals. And right here
Is. perhaps, the reason Coyle dislikes
cats.
"I never feel that a cat Is really
my friend." he said. "Maybe because
I'm afraid of them to the extent that
I never get chummy enough witn
them. But I always have the feeling
that they like me for what they can
get out of me and that they'd turn
against me in a minute. It makes cold
chills run up and down my back to
have one of the slippery thing?
around me.
"It's foolish, perhaps, because they
couldn't do you a lot of harm if they
did turn against you but give me
panthers and wolves and wildcats
even and keep your Tabby away."
Severed Love's Tie.
One day u young uwn whom I hai
admired for some time, but who was
keeping sturdy company with auothei
girl, asked to take te to a party.
was overjoyed, thinking that he had
left her and had come to me, only to
learn later that she didn't think that
she could come, and, wanting to take
some giri, he had asked me. When he
arrived at the party he found his old
sweetheart there and turneJ all his at attention
tention attention to her. Worst of all, I had to
walk home alone. That was my first
and last time with him. Chicago Jour-

EAGLE MEAT MARKET

Phone

FRESH BEEF AND LAMB
SWIFT'S PREMIUM HAMS
All Kinds of Fruits and Vegetables
Froe Delivery any Part of Town

Main Street, Opposite Harrington Hall Hotel

J.
We have a service car. Call
on us when out on the road.

Ocala Tire & Vulcanizing Co.

J. R. LONG
PHONE
- c i miff
EMERGENCY
CALLS FOE ICE

to meet them. Our wagons may all be out with both regular and
extra crews making every effort to take care of their routes.
It requires extra effort andextra cost, which are cheerfully ex expended
pended expended in the interest of first class service. Customers first and
then transients; but all are served.
OCALA HE & PACKING CO., Ocala, Fla.

P
XT

. i

WHITE STAR LINE

Negotiable Storage Itetfipts Insure! on Cotton, A at oniobilr-t, Etc

?3:,riOVE. PACK, SHIP
i LIVE STOCK,
fj?? PIANOS. BAGGAGE,
ili MACHINERY,
II Li FURNITURE, ETC
PAINTJNG
BRIN YOUR CARS AROUND
0!i CALL US
PHONE 8
SPLNCER-PEDRICK
MOTOR CO.
Soten;ng Hard Putty.
Pirtty thnt has become hardened by
exposure, as around window glass,
may be softened and removed by the
use of the folio.-. :ns mixture: Shake
8 pounds qu'cklime In water and add
one pound pearly sh. making rue whole
about the eonveney of paint. Apply
to the putty n both sides of the glass
and let it remain for about 12 hours.
It should then be possible to lift the
glass oct without trouble.

I
i

il

t

74

HOfT am! FEDERAL
TIRES and TUBES
438
W. A. STROUD
Our office telephone is sure enough
busy whenever the weather turns
hot. Emergency calls often come
at a time when it it difficult indeed
Visitors to the
Cemetery
Usually admire monuments of
simple dignity and good taste.
We are proud to say that me memorials
morials memorials of our l-aking are se selected
lected selected as the finest of all they
have seen. Our work is not ex expensive.
pensive. expensive. You can procure a
monument for a surprisingly
small sum considering quality
and workmanship.
OCALA MARBLE WORKS
Phone 183
TRANSFER
AND
STORAGE
LONG DISTANCE MOVING
Phone 296
NOTICE
The Board o Public Instruction in
and for Marion county, Florida, will
receive bids for transportation for the
following routes. Bids should be seal sealed
ed sealed and addressed to Supt. H. G.
Shealy, Ocala, Fla. Bid3 must be in
the office of the Board of Public In Instruction
struction Instruction by noon, Tuesday, Sept. 12,
1922. Board reserves the right to re reject
ject reject any and all bids:
Beginning at Will Proctor's house,
down hard road to Summerfield school
house.
Beginning about L. H. Snowden's
house, around by Walter Nichols to
school house, thence to Summerfield
school house. H. G. Shealy,
9-8-2t Secretary.
Albert's Plant Food is the thing for
miking your flower garden and pot
plants bloom. It is odorless and is
sold in 25c. and 50c. packages and $2
lacks. At the Court Pharmacy, tf
The Savage Pike.
When bathing In Frensham pond,
Surrey, Miss Shallis of Ah'ersbot was
bitten by a large pike on the leg. Its
teeth making deep cuts. "When thm
monster darted toward me with- "iXM
mouth pen it looked ilke.a shark,
said Miss Shallls. "and I was M
frightened when it bit uiy leg that I
had difficulty in shouting for assist
ance." London Dally Mall.



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sobekcm newspaper
mods:identifier type OCLC 11319113
ALEPHBIBNUM 2052267
LCCN sn 84027621
sn 84027621
mods:language
mods:languageTerm text English
code iso639-2b eng
mods:location
mods:physicalLocation University of Florida
UF
mods:note dates or sequential designation Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
funding Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855
mods:originInfo
mods:publisher Porter & Harding
mods:place
mods:placeTerm marccountry flu
mods:dateIssued September 11, 1922
marc point start 1895
end 1943
mods:frequency Daily (except Sunday)
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mods:recordIdentifier source UF00075908_06298
mods:recordCreationDate 841027
mods:recordOrigin Imported from (OCLC)11319113
mods:recordContentSource University of Florida
marcorg NPU
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mods:languageOfCataloging
English
eng
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mods:extent v. : ; 61 cm.
series
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mods:detail Enum1
mods:caption 1922
mods:number 1922
Enum2
September
9
Enum3
11
11
lccn 84027622
oclc 11319138
mods:titleInfo
mods:title Ocala weekly star
mods:subject SUBJ651_1 lcsh
mods:geographic Ocala (Fla.)
Newspapers
SUBJ651_2
Marion County (Fla.)
Newspapers
mods:hierarchicalGeographic
mods:country United States
mods:state Florida
mods:county Marion
mods:city Ocala
mods:nonSort The
Ocala evening star
uniform
Ocala Evening Star
alternative displayLabel Other title
Evening star
Star
mods:typeOfResource text
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sobekcm:BibID UF00075908
sobekcm:VID 06298
sobekcm:EncodingLevel #
sobekcm:Publisher
sobekcm:Name Porter & Harding
sobekcm:PlaceTerm Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
sobekcm:Source
sobekcm:statement UF University of Florida
sobekcm:SortDate 693595
sobekcm:serial
sobekcm:SerialHierarchy level 1 order 1922 1922
2 9 September
3 11 11
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