The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:06283

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
OCALA

NO

TAR

WEATHER FORECAST Partly cloudy tonight; Friday local showers. TEMPERATURES This Morning, 68; This Afternoon, 88.
Sun Rises Tomorrow, 6:00; Sets, 6:59. OCALA, FLORIDA, THURSDAY, AUGUST 24, 1922 VOLUME TWENTY-EIGHT. NO. 202
- l l ; i :

RES

DENTS OF
AGAIN THE BONUS
BILL COMES UP
THIRTY MILLION
TONS PER YEAR
FREE STATE' S
Y MONTH FOR
THE TRADE BODY
ROADS STAND PAT
T FOR

VISITORS TOOK THREE
STRAIGHT VICTORIES

IS

A

On Seniority Question, But Way Is
Not Yet Entirely Blocked
To Agreement

New York, Aug. 24.-(By Associated
Press). A majority group of the As Association
sociation Association of Railway Executives by a
vote of 254 to 4 yesterday rejected
the proposal of the big five train
service brotherhoods that the carriers
end the naion-wide shopmen's strike
by reinstating the men with seniority
unimpaired and Bert M. Jewell, offi official
cial official spokesman for the strikers, de declared
clared declared the association had closed the
door to peace and voted for a lockout
to smash unionism.
At the same time, splitting awa
from the majority, was a group of
twenty-five railroads, principally the
V Ht' in lir.ps, which debated a new
- s'tgpesi.K'n of the brotherhoods that
individual settltments be effected.
This minority, while professing to
-!.:tnd with the majority in reaffirm reaffirming
ing reaffirming th" taud on seniority, still indi indicated
cated indicated that it desired to har further
1-KaH'in.cc the individual settlement
-;iirgeslion.
lisle Holden, president of the Chi Chicago,
cago, Chicago, Burlington & Quincy, who at attended
tended attended a meeting of the minority held
int the Vale Club after the general
membership of the association had
ended its sassion, joined with mem members
bers members of the majority group in denying
that there was any split.
"There is no question of a split,"
he asserted. "The railroads are all
standing pat on seniority and any in individual
dividual individual settlement will have to be
made in the light of that understand understanding."
ing." understanding." PROBING INTO POSSIBILITIES
New York, Aug. 23. (By the As Associated
sociated Associated Press). Brotherhood chiefs
. and representatives of a score of rail railroads
roads railroads today prepared to thresh out
the possibility of individual lines set settling
tling settling with their striking shopmen.
This possibility was raised by leaders
of the transportation unions appear appearing
ing appearing as mediators at the conference
yesterday with the entire membership
of the Association of Railway Execu Executives
tives Executives which rejected the proposal of
the brotherhood men that the rail
heads yield on the disputed question
of seniority rights.
Members of the brotherhood grouj
of rail strike mediators met today at
an uptown hotel, then left hurriedly
for a secret conference at an undis undisclosed
closed undisclosed place with representatives of
the small group of railroad executives
who yesterday were ready to take up
as individual roads further negotia negotiations.
tions. negotiations. THREE HOURS' TALKFEST
Representatives of a score of roads
and brotherhood chiefs conferred for
three hours today on the possibility of
a separate agreemnt between indi individual
vidual individual lines and their striking shop.
men. The meeting adjourned at 1:25
without announcement whether an another
other another session will be held today.
ATE WIND PUDDING
The brotherhood mediators spent
ithe lunch period with leaders of the
hop crafts unions. The rail execu
jtives remained at the Yale Club but
'it was understood they would resume
the conferences with the mediators
-.this afternoon.
SHOPMEN MUST DECIDE
"It's now up to the shopmen," said
f the spokesman for the brotherhood
"chiefs this afternoon after they had
. conferred with the committee repre representing
senting representing about twenty roads on the
proposition for effecting separate
settlements between individual roads
and the strikers.
PAINTING
BRING YOUR CARS AROUND
OR CALL US

PHONE 8
SPfcNCER-PEDRICK
MOTOR CO.

After Approving Committee Changes,
Senate Is Considering Indi Individual
vidual Individual Amendments

Washington, Aug. 24. With com com-mitte
mitte com-mitte changes in the House soldiers'
bonus bill approved, the Senate turn turned
ed turned today to consideration of individ individual
ual individual amendments. Disposition of these
is not expected to consume a great
deal of time and passage of the meas measure
ure measure this wek is regarded by some
leaders as a possibility.
FOREIGN DEBTS
Funding of the four billion, one
hundred and thirty-five million dollar
war debt owed by Great Britain to
the United States was declared today
by Secretary Mellon to have no rela relation
tion relation to war loans made by the United
;' ? ; r.d .('vjr. Britain lo other
;o vi am; -nis r to questions arising
r.s ti the condition of reparations
.;:; n nt of the former central pow-
ii'H'SE SAT ON TINKIIAM
The resignation of Volstead as
chairman and a member of the House
judiciary committee because of help
alleged to have been given him in the
last election by the Anti-Saloon
League was requested in a resolution
presented in the House today by Tink Tink-ham,
ham, Tink-ham, republican, of Massachusetts.
The resolution was laid on the tab,
which amounted to killing it and it
was stricken from the record.
JACKSONVILLE WILL SEND
JOY RIDERS TO JAIL
Mayor Martin Will Sign Ordinance
Making Work Sentences
Mandatory
Jacksonville, Aug. 24 Mayor Mar Martin
tin Martin announced today he Would sign to tomorrow
morrow tomorrow the ordinance making it man mandatory
datory mandatory upon the municipal judge to
give jail sentences in cases where per persons
sons persons are arrested for driving an au automobile
tomobile automobile while under the influence of
liquor. It will be impossible in future
to assess fines, except for the first
two offenses.
H. S. CUMMINGS
The Palatka News of the 21st says
of Mr. H. S. Cumimngs, who died in
Atlanta Sunday:
Henry Spurgeon Cummings was
born in South Carolina fifty-three
years ago, and came to Rodman twenty-two
years ago. He leaves a widow,
two brothers and four sisters, J. J.
Cummings, of Savannah; P. S. Cum Cummings,
mings, Cummings, of Bronson, Ga.; Mrs. Corey
Williams, of Allendale, S. C; Mrs. W.
A. McDaniels and Mrs. M. E. Doan,
of Beaufort, S. C, and Mrs. L. P.
Knepton, of Steen, Fla.
He was president of the Rodman
Lumber Company and formerly re receiver
ceiver receiver for the Oklawaha Valley rail railroad,
road, railroad, and had been engaged in the
lumber business at Rodman for the
last twenty-two years. He was a de devout
vout devout member of the Baptist church
and contributed generously to many
charities.
During his life he amassed quite a
fortune and his operations in the lum lumber
ber lumber business were extensive. He leaves
a wife but no children.
The remains arrived from Atlanta
at noon today- and were at once taken
t-j the home of W. A. Goethe. Mr.
Goethe accompanied the remains, with
Mrs. Cummings.
The funeral will ta"ke place tomor tomorrow
row tomorrow afternoon at Oak Hill cemetery.
The remains will be taken from the
late residence at Rodman, having ar arrived
rived arrived here today at noon, at three
o'clock. Rev. J. F. Savell, pastor of
the First Baptist church of Palatka,
will conduct the service.
BETTER be safe than sorry. Ditto
works for youij town. Why not insure
with Ditto? tf
I C. V. Roberts & Co.
fj FUNERAL DIRECTORS
0 AND EMBALMERS
a H
K Motor Equipment H
Residence Phone 305
Office Phone 350, Ocala, Fla. 3
3

Ij Expected to be the Output of Coal
In the Central Pennsyl Pennsylvania
vania Pennsylvania Field

Altoona, Aug. 24. (By Associated
Press). Union leaders today are no notifying
tifying notifying their forty-five thousand min miners
ers miners in the central Pennsylvania field
to return immediately to the work
they left five months ago while the
operators are rushing plans that will
mean the production of thirty million
tons of coal er year. This action fol follows
lows follows signing of an agreement last
night.
OCALA BOYS AND GIRLS
GOING AWAY TO SCHOOL
Now that the summer is drawing to
a close and vacation time is nearly
over, in a few weeks many of our
young people will be leaving for
schools and colleges, throughout the
South and some to more northern
places. Below is a partial list of
thos who will be leaving in the next
two or three weeks. The University
of Florida claims the largest number,
with the State College for Women at
Tallahassee next. This fact certainl
speaks well for the state colleges in
Florida and the people of the state
should be proud that their own edu educational
cational educational institutions claim as many or
more than all the other higher schools
and colleges of the country together,
outside the state.
The following will report at the
opening of the University of Florida:
Walter Troxler, Jack Williams, Otis
Green, Robert Hall, James Melton,
Leonard Wesson, Jack Robertson,
Leonard Todd, Robert Smith, Lamar
Barnett and Marshall Cam.
Those leaving for the State College
for Women at Tallahassee will be
Misses Annie Rooney, Lyndal Matth Matthews,
ews, Matthews, Olive Whaley, Edith Edwards,
Elizabeth Home, Mabel Lytle, Mar Marguerite
guerite Marguerite Edwards, Marie Robertson,
Rubye Edwards and Annabelle Wes Wesson.
son. Wesson. Several of these are new stud students.
ents. students. Edward Burhman and Ronk Burh Burh-man
man Burh-man will attend Southern College.
J. M. and G. L. Meffert expect to
return to Jackson Military Academy
at Jackson, Tenn.
Miss Elizabeth Hocker will resume
her work at Randolph-Macon College,
Lynchburg, Va.
Junie Counts and Wilson Pierce ex expect
pect expect to enter Emery College.
Tom Wallis will be a student at
Tulane, where he expects to take up
the study of medicine.
Robert Chace, James Chace and
Ralph Cullen will return to Amherst,
at Amherst, Mass.
Hugh Chace will return to Mercers Mercers-burg
burg Mercers-burg Academy, at Mercersburg, Pa.
Jack and Henry Camp, who spent
the summer in Ashevile, will return
to Woodberry Forest, Va.
Robert Blowers will enter the Uni University
versity University of Pennsylvania.
Miss Rhoda Thomas goes to Char Charlotte,
lotte, Charlotte, N. C, where she will be a
student at Queens College.
Miss Carita Camp will go to New
York city where she will take a
course in kindergarten work.
Miss Irene Tompkins will attend
Southern College.
Miss Caroline White expects to re
turn to Wesleyan this fall.
Miss Ruth Warner will go to Ann
Arbor, Mich.
Miss Lucille Gissendaner goes to
the Church Home and Infirmary, Bal
timore, to study for the profession of
a trained nurse.
Several of this year's high school
graduates have attended summer
school and expect to teach during the
coming school term. Among them
are Misses Margaret Overton and
Edna Bryce and Inez Vaughn, and
also several have been taking business
courses and will enter the business
world. Amorg these are Misses
Maudie Marshall and Ullaine Barnett.
j Miss Irene Cam, one of last year's
I high school graduates, has started
j training in the Marion County Hospi Hospi-j
j Hospi-j tal and expects to leave this winter to
; enter Johns Hopkins-
NOTICE
All parties who pledged $10
toward the support of our base-

New Southern Parliament Expected
To Meet in Dublin The Day
After Tomorrow

Dublin, Aug. 24. (By Associated
Press). Dublin began to recover
somewhat today from the shock caus caused
ed caused by the dramatic death of Michael
Collins and plans went forward for
a meeting of the new southern parlia parliament
ment parliament Saturday when the ministerial
changes necessitated by the sudden
fith are expected to be made.
DIED IN THE LINE OF DUTY
Board of Investigation Cleared the
Name of Lieut.-Col. Beck
Washington, Aug. 24. Lieut. Cpl.
Paul Beck, army air service, who was
killed last April by a "gunshot wound
in the head inflicted by a revolver held ;
in the hand of" Jean P. Day of Okla Oklahoma
homa Oklahoma City, died "in the line of duty"
and his death was "not due to his own
wilful misconduct," according to offi official
cial official findings of an army investigating
board made public and approved by
Secretary Weeks. Charges that Col Colonel
onel Colonel Beck was killed during an attack
upon Mrs. Day were not substantiat substantiated
ed substantiated by the report, it was said.
AFTERNOON PARTY FOR
MRS. HUBERT TEN EYCK
Mrs. M. A. Ten Eyck entertained at
her home on South Fifth street yester
day afternoon for her daughter-in-law,
Mrs. Hubert Ten Eyck. The Ten
Eyck home was unusually attractive,
being decorated with vines and flow flowers.
ers. flowers. A color motif of pink was car carried
ried carried out in the living room while yel
low was the cheerful color which
greeted the guests as the entered the
reception hall. The hostess and the
honoree cordially greeted the guests
as they arrived, the guest sof the aft'.
ernoon including about thirty young
ladies.
Every minute was thoroughly en enjoyed,
joyed, enjoyed, a number of games and contests
having been arranged. One especially
clever diversion was called "an auto automobile
mobile automobile contest." Misses Ruth Collins
and Margaret Overton were the most
proficient in the art of manipulating
this popular vehicle.
Several musical numbers were given
by Misses Ruth Simmons and Eliza Elizabeth
beth Elizabeth Bennett. Miss Ruth Collins also
gave several vocal selections, and
Miss Thelma Smedley gave a reading
which was thoroughly enjoyed by all.
Mrs. Ten Eyck was assisted in en entertaining
tertaining entertaining her guests by Mrs. Wayne
Ten Eyck and Mrs. Floyd. After an
afternoon of games and music the
hostess served refreshments of angel
food cake with sliced peaches and
whipped cream ice cream and devil's
food cake.
Mrs. Hubert Ten Eyck before her
marriage has visited in Ocala several
times and it was a pleasure to renew
the acquaintance and her friends are
delighted to have her added to their
circle.
ISN'T GOING TO GIVE
THE PROVINCES UP
Santiago, Aug. 24. It is under understood
stood understood the Chilean senate at a secret
session yesterday considered a project
referring to an administrative regime
for the provinces of Tacna and Arica.
S-K Breakfast Bacon by the strip
35c. lb. at Eagle Market, Phone 74. tf
1 BA

Long and Creditable Record for The!

Chamber of Commerce Given At
Last Night's Session
Since its last meeting on April 20,
the Marion County Chamber of Com Commerce
merce Commerce has been engaged in numerous
activities, some of outstanding im importance
portance importance to the city and county. It
has been one of the most active periods
for the trade body since is reorgani reorganization
zation reorganization in the spring of 1919. The at attendance
tendance attendance at the regular meeting of
the Chamber of Commerce Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday night was slight. The problem of
attendance at regular meetings is one
of the problems that few commercial
organizations have solved successful successfully,
ly, successfully, according to the record. At Wed Wednesday's
nesday's Wednesday's meeting a report on the
work since the last meeting was read.
President Rose was authorized to ap appoint
point appoint a committee of six to raise $600
for band concerts with a view to main maintaining
taining maintaining a band the year around. A
revised budget, as recommended by
the board of governors, was adopted,
and resolutions in regard to exemp exemption
tion exemption from income taxation of public
securities were tabled. The position
was taken that the matter of exemp
tion from income tax is a national
problem which requires much study
and expert knowledge.
A full report of the activities of the
Chamber of Commerce since its last
meeting in April was read and will
appear in tomorrow's issue.
SOME BAD FRIENDS
OF THE STRIKERS
In Jacksonville Sowed Dynamite Near
The Seaboard Shops
Jacksonville, Aug. 24. Two sticks
of dynamite buried in the ground near
a storeroom at the Seaboard Air Line
shops here exploded early today. No
damage. There is no clue to the per per-pertators.
pertators. per-pertators. SEAPLANE ARRIVED AT
GUANTANAMO SAFELY
Washington, Aug. 24. The arrival
at Guantanamo, Cuba, of the cruiser
Denver which rescued Lieut. Hinton
and his companions of the wrecked
seaplane Sampaio Correia, off the
Cuban boast, was reported today to
the navy department. The Denver
arrived last night and had in convoy
a tug towing the seaplane.
FAIRFAX HARRISON CAME
IN ON THE FUND i
Salisbury, N. C, Aug. 24. Presi-
i dent Harrison of the Southern Rail Rail-;
; Rail-; way, sent his personal check for f 1000
i want upon the part of women and
tmiuicu ui sinning buup -xru.ts uexe
and at Spencer.
C. E. GRAHAM
Jacksonville, Aug. 24. C E. Greu
J ham of Greenville, S. C, a textile
j magnate who two years ago purchas purchas-!
! purchas-! ed the Heard Bank building here for
half a million dollars and gave it to
the Ministerial Relief Association of
the Southern Presbyterian church,
died last night in Asheville, N. C.
If you like good things to eat read
the U-Serve ad. in this issue. 23-2t
Guavas $ 1.75 per crate. Leave your
order with us. Farmers Exchange
Store. Phone 163. 22-tf

E2

MM'MW

Ocala versus Leesburg

Third Game of the Series Went To
The Pals by the Score Of
Three to Two

The Pals took the third and last
game of the series with the Wildcats
yesterday afternoon by the close
score of three to two. The Wildcats
plays a much better game of ball yes yesterday
terday yesterday than they did in the two pre preceding
ceding preceding games and the game was close
and exciting from the jump. The Pals
made their first two runs in the fourth
inning when Robinson singled to cen center
ter center and went on to second while
Brown was decided whether to throw
the ball or eat it. Callahan hit a slow
one to Francis and beat, it out whilb
Robinson went to third. Thomas went
out pitcher to first but Peters hit a
clean single to left. Rymer made a
strenuous eifort to reach the ball ana
fell headlong in the attempt but was
not quite able to catch it. When he
failed to catch the fly it got away
from him for another base and both
runners scored.
The Wildcats tied the score in the
fifth. Rymer walked, Hernandez
singled to right and Rymer went to
third. Kymer and Hernandez worked
a double steal and Rymer went home
safely when Thomas threw wild to
Larzo. Bracken went out third to
first. Wood singled and scored Her Hernandez.
nandez. Hernandez. The score remained tied until the
ninth when the Pals slipped the win winning
ning winning run across. Peters led off with
a triple to center. Quinn hit a secri secri-fice
fice secri-fice fly to right and scored Peters.
Bugs Ery of Lakeland did the
slinging for the Pals and Bugs was
good enough for this league. He held
the Cats to live scattered hits and dis distributed
tributed distributed only one free pass. But for
a couple of errors on the part of
Thomas it is doubtful whether the
Wildcats would have been able to
score on him but once.
Hernandez of the Saints occupied
the slab for the Wildcats and both
players and fans are satisfied with
the way he handles the pill. He fan fanned
ned fanned seven of the Pals' heavy hitters
and allowed only ten hits, several of
which came as a direct result of the
failure of some of the players to heed
bis advice as to where they should
play for certain hitters. In the ninth
when Peters made the triple that won
the game Brown was playing a deep
second base instead of center field.
Robinson enabled Bracken to mak
the star play of the afternoon when
he drove one over the third sack in
the first inning. The ball went like a
shot right across the bag. Bracken
threw himself after it, knocked the
ball down and at the same time fell
sprawling himself. He made a light lightning
ning lightning recovery of his equilibrium and
recoverd the ball and threw Bobby
out at first.
Francis pulled. off a pretty play
when he nabbed Gonzales' line drive
just before it hit the ground and
threw Laroz out for a double at first.
Ocala was glad to see Eddie Over Over-street
street Over-street back in the game yesterday and
Eddie celebrated by getting two bit
out of three attempts. Eddie caught
a good game and showed clearly what
good work we had been missing be behind
hind behind the bat. Kawolski was again the
batting hero of the contest with three
hits out of four chances. Both Calla Callahan
han Callahan and Peters hit triples into deep
right center where the fence cuts the
southwest comer off the park. Both
balls were hard hit but might have
(Concluded on Fourth Page)
I j .ii
i
5
J
:4

217; W. Broadway g

mail check to
C. G. Rose, President.

1
J



OCALA EVENING STAR, THURSDAY. AUGUST 24, 1922

UCtiid 1 vciiiiki ami
i
PwhlUbrd Evrry Dy r.r-pt Sunday by'
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY,
OCALA, FLORIDA
II. J. Ilitlinger, PrelJ!Bt
II. St. ia t ea good, Vlee-Prelt
P. V. UavenKood, Secretary-! reurer
J. II. Ileojaiulu, Ciiltor
EntereJ at Ocala, Fix. postotflco aa
eionti-class, matter.
',ni 4
telepiio.m:s
Hunlnrn Ofnre Flve-Oao
KUliurlal Department Two-Sevea
rlrt lirporter Flve-On
MB Mil Kit ASSOCIATED PHESS
The Associated Press la exclusively
entitled for the use for reprbltcatioxi of
ail new dispatches credited to It or not
jitieriviif cftiiteJ i3 tola paper and
rlso the local news published herein.
All rights of republication of special
'li.xpatcli'-s iiertin are a!o reserved.
nnMKTiC lLll IPTIO KATES
One y-ar. in advance $6.00
T!:re uiontnj, in ad-. .nice 3.00
Three months, in advance 1-50
One month, in advance 60
lUVEIlTlJiiMI RATES
!ip!u : Plate 15 cents per inch for
consecutive insertions. Alternate inser insertions
tions insertions 25 per cent additional. Composi Composition
tion Composition charges on ads. that run less than
-lx times 10 cents per inch. Special
position 25 per cent additional. Kates
based on four-inch minimum. Less than
four Inches will take a higher rate,
which will be furnished upon applica application.
tion. application. Iteadlnic -Votlcen: Five cents per line
for lirst insertion: three cents per line
for each subsequent insertion. One
change a week allowed on readers with without
out without extra composition charges.
Legal advertisements at legal rates
So far Mr. Harding has said much
and done nothing.

(
task for an utterance made by the
Dade City Banner. ; The Tribune
apologies to both. Tampa Tribune.
The Tribune's mistake didn't do the

Star any damage and an apology is j
unnecessary. The Tribune and Star :
8gree on most great issues; the small
ones are not worth worrying about.
Let's forget the little disagreement
and go on with the big works.

OCALA TWENTY YEARS AGO

MICHAEL COLLINS

A petition asking voters to endorse
W. S. Cawthon for state superinten superintendent
dent superintendent of education, is at Superintend Superintendent
ent Superintendent Shealy's office, and all citizens
who favor Mr. Cawthon are asked to
step in and sign it.

Editor Dobson is calling for a
South Florida democrat with a Grover
Cleveland backbone for governor in
1924. We need such men in more offi offices
ces offices than the governor's chair. Or Orlando
lando Orlando Reporter-Star.
There is not enough such men to
fill a tenth of the offices.

Again we suggest that business
men who want to inquire of the Star
about advertising and job printing
call Phone 51 instead of Phone 27.
The latter phone is in the editorial
room, which doesn't know anything
about advertising, subscriptions or
job printing.

Some doubts having been expressed
that the 1922-model 5-cent cigar, just
coming into circulation, is smokable,
the Tampa Times insists that said
weed is manufactured in its town and
13 all to the good. This is reassuring
to the subjects of Lady Nicotine. We
have never heard of bad cigars being
made in Tampa.

A part of the street force is busy

pushing the roadway on Fort King

out to the city limit. When this is
done, we are informed, the county
will put the road from the city line
to the industrial school in good order.
It is an improvement greatly needed,
not only by the school, but by almost
everybody in Ocala who drives a car.

In killing Michael Collins, the Irish ;
irreconciliables did the worst possible ;
thing for themselves. They proved j
that they are ruled by blind hate, and ;
are unscrupulous enemies not so much j
of England as of the entire world, j
and most particularly of their own j

country.
Little is known of the early life ot
Collins, except that he is said to have have-been
been have-been born of humble parents in Coun County
ty County Kerry. He was educated in the
national school and after working
with a brother in the grocery business
entered the postal service.
Collins sprang into prominence in
October. 1914, in connection with the
Sinn Fein movement. In 1916 he com commanded
manded commanded a section of the rebel army in
Ireland of which Patrick H. Pearce,
who later was executed was com
mander in chief.
Of a retiring disposition and known
as a man who "dodged the crowds,"
Collins nevertheless was a most as assiduous
siduous assiduous worker, both in the govern government
ment government and in the field. He also was an
orator of great ability, whose speeches
generally moved his hearers.
With Arthur Griffith, Collins was
considered one of the mainstays of the
provisional government since its in inception.
ception. inception. Collins prior to entering the fac factions
tions factions in Ireland favorable to peace
had fought with the j Sinn Feiners
against the Black and Tans and the
Ttoyal Irish constabulary, and was
one of the many Irishmen who for a
long time were "on the run" from the
British. j
During the conferences in London
on the treaty and various other sub subjects
jects subjects connected with Ireland, David
Lloyd George, the prime minister,
Winston Spencer Churchill, secretary
for the colonies, and Lord Birkenhead,
the lord high chancellor, were said to
have held Collins in the highest es esteem.
teem. esteem. Collins still was in his thirties. Last
May it was announced that Miss Kit Kitty
ty Kitty Kiernam, who belongs to one of
the leading families in Longford, was
engaged to marry him.

(Evening Star August 24. 1902;
The ?tore of C. Rheinauer & Com Company
pany Company was entered ?ome time after
midnight by a thief who made selec selection
tion selection of some of the best stock. This
is the first robbery ever made in this
firm during its thirty years in busi business.
ness. business. Miss C. M. Buckbee, the faithful
superintendent of the Emerson Home
school, who has been spending her va vacation
cation vacation in East Chatham. N. Y., will
return this week to resume her work.
The East Florida Ice Manufactur Manufacturing
ing Manufacturing Company is up and under roof and
will soon be ready for occupancy.
Mr. and Mrs. Z. C. Chambliss are
enjoying the sights of Atlanta.
Guy Toph of Tampa came up yes yesterday
terday yesterday to visit his father.
Will Gary and John Pasteur went
to Lake Weir today to enjoy a fishing
trip.
Miss Bessie Porter, who has been
visiting Miss Blanche Hall at Candler,
has returned home.
Ocala Ten Years Ago
(Evening Star August 24, 1912)
Dr. W. P. Newman of Bartow and
Miss Corinne Williams of Ocala were
married by Rev. Grady at the Metho Methodist
dist Methodist parsonage Aug. 12, at Sarasota.
After a wedding dinner at the Bay Bay-Villa
Villa Bay-Villa hotel the couple left on their
wedding trip.
Mrs. J. P. Galloway went to Brooks Brooks-ville
ville Brooks-ville this morning to pay a visit to Mr.
and Mrs. Bert McDonald in Jackson Jacksonville.
ville. Jacksonville. Bernard Koonce went to Brooks Brooks-ville
ville Brooks-ville this morning to visit his father.
Dr. W. F. Yocum arrived yesterday
from Dade City to visit his daughter,
Mrs. WT. T. Gary.
Mr. R. A. Alfred was in the city to today
day today on his way to Port Inglis.
Mr. N. I. Gottlieb returned this aft afternoon
ernoon afternoon from Mcintosh, where he or organized
ganized organized an F. U. of A. lodge.
Mr. Bob Sanders came to Ocala
from Dunnellon today, making the
trip in his car.

EIGHT YEARS AGO

If the railroad strikers could guar guarantee
antee guarantee order and safety in the rail railroad
road railroad yards, they would be very quick quickly
ly quickly relieved of the embarrassing pres presence
ence presence of armed guards. They are not
kept there for idle show. Tampa
Times.
The fiction that strikers never act
disorderly that all the rioting done
during strikes is the work of the
hoodlum element in the vicinity has
been pretty well dispelled by thm
events of the past few months.

August 24, 1914. British, all day
Sunday, fought greatly superior force
of Germans near Mons and held theii
ground.
Immense drawn battle between
Germans and Allies on Franco-Belgian
frontier.
After six days fighting in East
Prussia near Edytkunen, Germans re retreated,
treated, retreated, leaving victory to the Rus Russians.
sians. Russians. Germans making steady gains over
French in Northeast France.
Japanese fleet bombarding Kiao

j Chau. i
i British and French fighting Ger-
I mane nr. olmncf f Vio i c o -vt s nAn t- A

where British and Germans fought
French ninety-nine years ago.

An error in credit recently caused
the Tribune to take the Ocala Star to

After estimating that about ten
thousand bushels of wood-based cuts
are used in the newspapers of the
United States every week, we can't
see how the country can avoid a wood
famine. The printers of the country
should get together and insist on
standardized metal bases for all cuts.

. By so doing they would save not only
j wood but a tremendous amount of
, work and trouble for themselves.

.YiiCKih SAYS

fcCSS etM3 'X NVVi VC "Ml

OF "TVE KOXTY POVjeV

I

I

Km

CONNER

tumIs us au

VOESUUE DO

PR.mTMCr

& 1 ijil

Conner, Aug. 24. Mrs. P. T. Ran Randall
dall Randall went to Jacksonville Sunday, re returning
turning returning Monday, accompanied by Mr.
Randall, who has been at St. Vincent's
hospital for several weeks for treat treatment.
ment. treatment. Mr. Randall's friends are
gratified to know that he is much
improved.
Mrs. C. H. Rogers of Ocala is visit visiting
ing visiting relatives near Lynne.
Miss Gladys Stanaland went to
Ocala Tuesday.
Rev. E. M. Henderson of Jackson Jacksonville
ville Jacksonville is visiting relatives at his old
home near Lynne.
Mr. and Mrs. O. G. Jones and chil children
dren children spent Sunday and Monday at
Anthony.
Dr. A. H. Wingo was a business
visitor in Ocala Saturday.
E. L. Mills was a vistor to the
county seat yesterday.
R. O. Gnann and wife went to Ocala
Saturday on a shopping trip.
Our roads are in bad condition ow owing
ing owing to recent ehavy rains.

Albert's Plant Food is the thing for
making your flower garden and pot
plants bloom. It is odorless and is
sold in 25c. and 50c. packages and $2
sacks. At the Court Pharmacy, tf

ANTHONY

Anthony, August 24. Mr. and Mrs.
H. J. Stewart and little daughter Ruth

returned home Thursday from Ply Plymouth.
mouth. Plymouth. Mr. C. Cottrill who has been visit visiting
ing visiting Mrs. G. M. Brown and family,
left for Missouri Thursday.
Messrs. Holmes Baskin and James
Palmour left last week for Georgia.
Mrs. Josie Graham and little
granddaughter, Hallie Graham, of
Waldo, arrived Saturday for a week's
visit with Mrs. Graham's sister, Mrs.
B. F. Mims.
Mr. Leon Stewart left Sunday foi
a visit with relatives in Plymouth and
Tampa.
Mr. J. R. Olds and family returned
home Sunday from a three weeks'
stay at Salt Springs.
Mr. and Mrs. S. J. McQuaig spent
Sunday in Dunnellon with their
daughter, Mrs. G. W. Wood.
Mrs. A. M. Boon and son, Mr.
Daniel Boon of Larkins, arrived Sun Sunday
day Sunday for a several weeks' visit with
relatives here. They have host of
friends here in their old home who
are glad to welcome them back again.
Mr. Clarence Shealy spent last week
with Supt. H. G. Shealy of Ocala.
Mr. Hentz Griffin of Orlando was
in Anthony last week for a few days.
Mr. R. E. Palmour and family have
been intertaining Mr. Palmour's sis sister,
ter, sister, Mrs. J. D. Whelehel and two
sons, granddaughter and daughter,
Mrs. J. H. Fenn of Cordele, Ga.
Mr. J. J. Reeves returned home
Monday from a visit with relatives in
Quincy and Jacksonville.
Mr. B. K. Padgett and Mrs. G. D.
Pasteur had the misfortune to have
their cars collide Monday afternoon,
We are glad to say no one was seri seriously
ously seriously hurt but the cars were damaged
quite a bit.
Mrs. D. W. Shealy has been on the
sik list this week but is improving.
Our little town was greatly sad saddened
dened saddened Saturday when news came that
Mr. Coney Hathaway, who was spend spending
ing spending a few days at Salt Springs, was
seriously hurt from a plunge in the
water. He is at the Ocala hospital,
not expected to live. Coney is a good
Christian boy and will be greatly
missed in the church and Sunday
school also by many friends in and
around Anthony.

Try our rrsts. They are good. The
E?gle Market. Phone 74. tf

Phone 597 Night Phone 403
WILLIAMS GARAGE
We Specialize in
WELDING,
ELECTRICAL WORK
REBORING CYLINDERS,
GRINDING CRANK SILAFTS.
GIVE US A TRIAL
Osceola St.. jus! off Ft. King

VIRGI

MUL TOBACCO

1 II fI i-C r iTrJAMt! M wri dome, the earfy

Firginia planttrs en enjoyed
joyed enjoyed themselves at the
game boix ls.

To this day, no other

climate nor soil has produced
tobacco of Virginia's mildness
and natural purity of flavor.
For cigarettes Virginia

tobacco is the best.

TfTi

Liggett & Myers Tobacco Co.

Special Six
Touring

SAVINGS resulting from capac capacity
ity capacity manufacture are now
offered to the buyer of the Stude Stude-baker
baker Stude-baker Special -Six. The new price of
$1 2 75 is $200 underits formerprice.
Studebaker reductions became
effective August 1st after Stude Studebaker
baker Studebaker had completed the- biggest
seven months in its70 years' history.
And at a time when Studebaker
had 15,000 unfilled orders on hand!
It is a Studebaker policy of long
standing to share manufacturing
savings with the customer.
The performance, durability,
comfort and quality of the Special-

Six are recognized everywhere. And
here's new proof of its endurance:
Studebaker's sales of repair parts,
covering accidents as well as service,
for the first seven months of 1922
were less than they were for the
first seven months of 1919, in spite
of the fact that 186,000 new cars
were sold and put into operation
since January 1, 1920.
The Special-Six at $1275 repre represents
sents represents a new standard of value
the greatest value Studebaker has
everoffered, and that means a value
that is positively uriapproached
anywhere in the industry.

Cowl lights; cowl ventilator: massive head lamps; tonneau light with long
extension cord; rain-proof, one-piece windshield; windshield -wiper; aight aight-day
day aight-day clock; thief -proof transmission lock; tool compartment in left front door.

MODELS AND PRICES, o. 6. factories

LIGHT-SIX
5-Pasa.. IIV XV. B.. 40 H. P.

SPECIAL-SIX
5-Parm 119" W. B.. SO H. P.

... BIG-SIX
7-Pman., 126' W. 9 60 TT. P.

Touring..

$975
975

Roadster (3-Pass.)

Coupe-Roadster
(2-Pass.) 1225
Sedan 1550

Touring $1275
Roadster (2-Pass.). 1250
Roadster (4-Past.) 1275
Coupe (4-Pass.) 1875
Sedan 2050

Touring... $1650
Speedster (4-Pass.)- 1785
Coupe (4-Pass.) 2275
Sedan 2475

Cord Tires Standard Equipment

McLEOD & WATERS

THIS

N. Main St.

I S

OCALA, FLA.

Phone 170

STUDEBAKER YEAR

; A nice, thoroughly modern bunga bunga-1
1 bunga-1 home for somebody is being built
y the Citizens Investment Co. on a
i ot on Dougherty street. Price and
term? easy. Call and see it. Phone
jg- for particulars. 22-tf
The country can say that it asked

the Republican party for bread and

received pie. Asheville Times.

BETTEK ouy a lot betore they go

up, and build a home while materials j

are cheap. Let Ditto show yon. 11 tf

Swift's Premium Hams at the Eagle
Market. Pbone 74. tf

doesn't mix around among the folks
; much. Washington Post.

BETTER let Ditto figure vfth you
on the home building proposition. Lots
and material will go up now aid then
you will be sorry you didn't act on
the suggestion. Buy and buiid now.
Ditto, Realtor. 11-tf

!

I R. V. Fuller, dentist. Union block,
j phone 601. 8-2-tf

BETTER insure before rather than
after the fire. Let Ditto insure you. tf

New York City seems determined
to preserve its subway jams New
York Morning Telegraph. j
BETTER insure before ratter than
after the fire. Let Ditto insur yon. tf



OCALA EVENING STAR, THURSDAY, AUGUST 24. 1922

1 HOW'S YOUR O
I AUTO RUNNING
g :
H Maybe you hear those little
? squeaking noises in the running
if of your car. If so, you'd bet-
g ter have U3 listen to them for
5 you they may be serious. We

are experts in repairing elec electrical
trical electrical troubles.
We Sell
FOX
p TIRES AND TUBES
Oil HIGHWAY GARAGE
James Engesser
8
tt
H
it
P! one 258 Night Phone 533
121 West Broadway
H SEVEN DAY SERVICE
H
1
illliliiZZiii
Ncedham Motor Co
PLUMBING & ELECTRICAL
CONTRACTING
General Auto
Repairing
PHONE 252
Sewing Machines Repaired
p SASH doos I
tx
i n 6 fi 5 . an. 1
i boo. rayy & uo.
8
Ocala, rla.
llAUb WARE
v.
HIGH GiiADE FAINT
SALT SPRINGS WATER
Is growing in popularity every
day among Ocalans. It is also
being shipped to every part of
the state. It is sold under a
guarantee. Try a five gallon
container.
Chero-Cola Bottling Works
Phone 167
III ICE CONSOMERS
Our drivers want to help you get all
the ICE you need every day this sum summer
mer summer but they need your help.
When you put your ICE CARD out
on time, you save them extra trips
and that's saving ice for everybody.
When you keep the ice compartment
of your refrigerator free from food
and bottles, you are saving time and
ice.
Just these two simple rules, follow followed
ed followed daily, will help us make sure that
you are well served this summer.
Ocala Ice & Packing Co.
PHCNE 34. OCALA, FL
mm mm
Arrival and departure of passenger
ains at OCALA UNION STATION.
The following schedule figures pub pub-ished
ished pub-ished as information and not guar guaranteed.
anteed. guaranteed. (Eastern Standard Time)
ATLANTIC COAST LINE R. R.
Leave for Station Arrive from
2:15 am St. Petersburg 2:27 am
2:27 am Jacksonville 2:15 am
1:45 pm Jacksonville 3:24 pm
3:24 pm St. Petersburg 1:25 pm
(:15am Jacksonville 9:00 pm
3:30 pm Homosassa 1:16 pm
7:10 am (p) Wilcox 6:45 pm
7:25 am (j) Lakeland 11:03 pm
(p) Monday, Wednesday. Friday.
j) Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday.
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY
Leave for Station Arrive from
2:34 am Jacksonville-N'York 1:55 am
1:50 pm Jacksonville 1:15 pm
4:06 pm Jacksonville 4:06 pm
Tampa-Manatee-1:55
am St. Petersburg 2:34 am
2:55 am N'York-St. Petrsburg 1:35 am
1:55 am Tampa 2:34 am
1:35 pm Tampa-Manatee 1:30 pm
4:05 pm Tampa-St. Petrsburg 4:05 pm
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CONTRACTOR
ANL BUILDER
Careful estimates made on all con contract
tract contract work. Gives more and better
work for the money than any other
on tractor in the city.

Cross-Cut

By
Courtney Ryley
Cooper
Elastratioiu byJLB. Van Ntcm
OopriisM by Little, Brown Oo.
triuuiiiy. tjut not as a deputy.
Who wants to volunteer?"
Half a dozen men came forward,
and from them the sheriff chose two.
Fairchild turned to say good-by to
Anita. In vain. Already Maurice Ro Ro-dalne
dalne Ro-dalne bad escorted her, apparently
against her will, to a far end of the
dance hall, and there was quarreling
with her. Fairchild hurried to join
the sheriff and his two deputies, Just
starting out of the dance halh Five
minutes later they were in a motor car,
chugging up Kentucky gulch.
Slowly, the motor car fighting
against the grade, the trip was ac accomplished.
complished. accomplished. Then the four men leaped
from the machine at the last rise be before
fore before the tunnel was reached and three
of them went forward afoot toward
where a slight 'gleam of light (time
from the mouth of the Bl:.;'' Poppy.
The sheriff took the lead, at last to
stop behind a boulder and to shout a
command :
"Hey you. in there."
"Ey Yourself!" It was Harry's
voice.
"Come out and be quick about It.
Hold your light in front of your face
with both hands."
"The 'ell I will And 'oo's talking?"
"Sheriff Adams of Clear Creek coun county.
ty. county. You've got one minute to come
out or I'll shoot."
"I'm coining on the run !"
And almost instantly the form of
Harry, his acetylene lamp lighting up
his bulbous, surprised countenance
with its spraylike mustache, appeared
at the mouth of the tunnel.
"What the bloody 'ell?" he gasped,
ns he looked into the muzzle of the
revolver. From down the mountain
side came the shout of one of the dep deputies
uties deputies :
"Sheriff! Looks like it's him, all
right I've found a horse down here
all sweated up from running."
'That's about the answer." Sher Sheriff
iff Sheriff A'lai::s vent forward and with a
motion of his revolver sent Harry's
"He Was That Fellow's Partner."
hands into the air. "Let's see what
you've got on you."
A light gleamed below as an elec electric
tric electric flash in the hands of one of the
deputies began an investigation of the
surroundings. The sheriff, finishing
his search of 'Arry's pockets, stepped
back.
"Well," he demanded, "what did you
do with the proceeds?"
"The proceeds?" Harry stared blank blankly.
ly. blankly. "Of what?"'
"Quit your kidding, now. They've
found your horse down there."
"Wouldn't it be a good idea" Fair-
child had cut in acridly "to save
your accusations on this thing until
you're a little surer of it? Harry
hasn't any horse. If he's rented one,
you ought to be able to find that out
pretty shortly."
As if in answer, the sheriff turned
and shouted a question down the
mountain side. And back came the
answer :
"It's Doc Mason's. Must have been
stolen. Doc was at the dance."
"I guess that settles it." The offi officer
cer officer reached for his hip pocket. "Stick
out your hands. Harry, while I put
the cuffs on them."
"But 'ow in bloody 'ell 'ave I been
doing anything when I've been up 'ere
working on the chiv wheel? 'Ow ?"
They say you held up the dance
tonight and robbed us." Fairchild cut
In. Harry's face lost its surprised
look, to give way to a glance of keen
questioning.
"And do you say it?"
I most eert.inK- do not Th ideJ3-
Advertise in the Star.

tlflcation was given by that honorable j
person known as Mr. Maurice Ro- J
daine." j
"Oh One thief Identifying an- j

other
"Sheriff !" Again the voice from be-
low
Yeh !" i

"We've found a cache down here. ness caller here Tuesday.
Must have been made in a hurry two A number of people from here at at-new
new at-new revolvers, bullets, a mask, a cou- J tended the barbecue at Fort McCoy on
pie of new handkerchiefs and the j Thursday and report a wonderful time.
money j Miss Dora Farris of Fort McCoy, is
Harry eyes grew wide. Then he j thg of Mrs G A Clineman this
stuck out his hands. J
ivra i i i ill

xne eviuence cerxainiy is puing
up!" he grunted. "I might as well j

'That's a good idea." The sheriff J I. Turner for several weeKs, leit sat sat-snapped
snapped sat-snapped the handcuffs Into place. urday for her home in Sanford.
Then Fairchild shut off the pumps Messrs. H. I. Turner, H. E. Abbott
and they started toward the machine, j ?,n(j George Taylor paid Ocala a visit
Back in Ohadi more news awaited ; Saturdav
them. Harry if Harry had been the j Mrg jIargaret Walls and Miss Em
highwayman, had gone to no expense i T ,, T .,, ,.;;,.
. ' , ,v, i ; ma Walls of Jacksonville are visiting
for his outfit. The combined general , , J?
store and hardware emporium of t thTe former s Parents. Mr. and Mrs. T.
Gregg Brothers had been robbed of Watson,
the articles necessary for a disguise j
also the revolvers and their bullets. OAK VALE
Robert Fairchild watched Harry i
placed In the solitary cell of the county j Qak Vale. Aue. 22. Miss Lonie

Jail with a spirit that could not re- j
u w 6
his assurances that morning would
bring a righting of affairs. Four
charees hune heaw above him : that
of horse-stealing, of burglary, of high-

way robbery, and worse, the final as- I the coming term, having filled that
sault with attempt to kill. Fairchild position for three winters,
turned wearily away ; he could not Mr. Patrick Anderson, wife and lit lit-find
find lit-find the optimism to join Harry's ; tle Pat Jr spent Sunday with the for-

cneerrui announcement mat it woum ;
otherwise. Besides, up in the little
hospital on the hill. Fairchild had seen
lights gleaming as he entered the Jail,
and he knew that doctors were work working
ing working there over the wounded body of
the fiddler. Tired, heavy at heart,
his earlier conquest of the night sod-
den and overshadowed now, he turned
away from the cell and Its optimistic
occupant out into the night.
It was only a short walk to the hos hospital
pital hospital and Fairchild went there, to
leave with at least a ray of hope. The

probing operation had been completed ; ed a position as teacher of the seventh
the fiddler would live, and at least the and eighth grades in a school of five
charge against Harry would not be teachers in Madison. She will take up
one of murder. That was a thing for her work the first Sunday in Septem Septem-whlch
whlch Septem-whlch to be thankful ; but there was er
plenty to cause consternation, as Fair- on- juv.
child walked slowly down the dark, 1 Mr- and Mrs' C' S' Mlms and
winding street toward the main thor- Virginia attended preaching services
oughfare. Without Harry, Fairchild at the Baptist church in Williston
now felt himself lost. Before the big, Sunday and spent the rest of the day
genial, eccentric Cornishman had come ; with Mrs. Mims' parents.
Into his life, he had believed, with

some sort of divine ignorance, that
he could carry out his ambitions by
nlcal details necessary to mining, with ;
no
previous history of the Blue Pop-
py to guide him, and with no help
against the enemies who seemed every
where. Now he saw that it was im-
possible. More, the Incidents of the j
night showed how swiftly those ene- '.
mles were working, how sharp and ;
stiletto-like their weapons.
That Harry was innocent was cer- J
tain to Robert Fairchild. j
Looking back over it now, he could
see how easily Fate had played into
the hands of the Rodalnes, if the Ro Ro-daines
daines Ro-daines had not possessed a deeper con concern
cern concern than merely to seize upon a hap happening
pening happening and turn it to their own ac account.
count. account. The highwayman was big. The
highwayman talked with a "Cousin "Cousin-Jack"
Jack" "Cousin-Jack" accent for all Cornishmen are
"Cousin Jacks" In the mining country.
Those two features in themselves.
Fairchild thought, as he stumbled
along In the darkness, were sufficient
to start the scheming plot in the brain
of Maurice Rodaine, already ugly and
evil through the trick played by Harry
on his father and the rebuke that had
come from Anita Richmond. It was
an easy matter for him to get the in inspiration,
spiration, inspiration, leap out of the window, and
then wait until the robber had gone,
that he might flare forth with his
accusation. And after that
Either Chance, or something strong stronger,
er, stronger, had done the rest. The finding of
the stolen horse and the carelessly
made cache near the mouth of the
Blue Poppy mine would be sufficient
In the eyes of any Jury. The evidence
was both direct and circumstantial.
To Falrchlld's mind, there was small
chance for escape by Harry, once his
case went to trial.
Down the dark street the man wan
dered, his hands sunk deep in nisj
pockets, his head low between hisj
shoulders only to suddenly galvanize j
Into intensity, and to stop short that;
he might hear again the voice which
had come to him. At one side was
a big house a house whose occupants
he knew instinctively, for he had seen
the shadow of a woman, hands out outstretched,
stretched, outstretched, as she passed the light light-strewn
strewn light-strewn shade of a window on the sec second
ond second floor. More, he had heard her
voice, supplemented by gruffer tones.
And then it ram again
(Continued Tomorrow)
TELEPHONE NO. 605
Call this number when you want
absolute satisfaction in dry cleaning.
Ladies' suits and skirts our hobby.
Counts Dry Cleaning Plant. 3-tf
Turks, who are urged by the Allies
to economize, will perhaps save a
few Armenians for a rainy day. Wall
Street Journal.
Will sell four-foot wood, pine and
oak for $3.50 per cord for this month.
Have best of red oak and pine wood
at $2.50 per strand. Prompt delivery.
Phone 471 -Blue. Earl Gibbons, North
Osceola street. 22-9t

BURBANK

Burbank, Aug. 23. Mr. M. D. L.
. i r 1 T 4.
yjriXlletl11 "s iciuntcu Hum
!very pleasant visit with his daughter,
' Mrs. A. C. Hillman, in Jacksonville.
Mr. Morthland of Ocala was a busi- j
Miss Alice Gooding McKim, who
j nas Deen visiting ner msici, inis. h.
i i -ii i r TV
CIancv has as her guest this week
ijliss Hattie Akin of St. Catherine,
i ... .... j-
I M,ss Akm is one of the leading teach-
! ers in Manatee county. She will be
principal of the Cortez graded school j
mpr, nt Mr and Mrs. W. H.
Anderson.
Mr. and Mrs. A. Strickland and
children spent Sunday with friends in
Williston.
Mis. H. E. Colding is spending
some time with her daughter, Mrs.
Sam Peeples of Williston, and mak-
ing the acquaintance of her new
grandson.
Mr. Bert Britt of Central, spent
Sunday at his uncle's, O. P. Britt.
Miss Lou Eva Anderson has accept-
LAKE GRIFFIN GUAVAS now
ripe. Best fruit for jelly. Per crate
f- b" JAl G,ve
rea OOK. vcaja or a""
F. E. WETHERBEE, Leesburg, Flor
ida. 15-12t
a 25-cent package of Albert's Plant
Food win perf0rm wonders with your
t nlnt Trv it. Sold at the Court
Pharmacv tf
r"'tIndLy
- -
Headquarters for
GOOD THINGS
TO EAT
We have today
Carrots
Beets
Egg Plants
White Turnips
Rutabagas
Celery
Spanish
Onions
Fresh
Tomatoes
Cabbage
New Sweet
Potatoes
Grapes
Peaches
Avocado Pears
Delaware
Cantaloupes
Apples
FREE DELIVERY SATURDAY
ON ORDERS OF
TWO DOLLARS OR MORE
PHONES 195 and 614
U-Serve Stores

Letters Of A Florida Citrus
Grower To His Nephew

in.
From Jonas Arland at Hammock
0roves, Florida, to Samuel
Newcomer, Bentonville, Mich,
Dear Sam:
You have put a wrong construction on my last letter. I didn't mean yon
to believe the fellows speculating in fruit in Florida all were crooks and
confidence men. Some are not above reproach, but there are others who
are Just about ordinary business men with average human fallings.
However, as a grower I haven't much use for any of them. For instance,
there ia one fruit buyer I know pretty welL He is about as decent a citizen
as you will find; has the usual one wife and some mighty nice children.
If he were doing something else for a living he would be an asset to his
community. As it Is, he is a liability and I'll tell you why:
Last December Oscar Harland sold him his crop of Valencias for two
dollars on the tree, Oscar being hard up and needing money mighty bad.
Now when this Christian gentleman came to pick these oranges this spring
he figured up his expense and considered that they cost him about three dol dollars
lars dollars plus a nickel packed and on the cars. So, needing a little money right
et that time himself, he proceeded to take a long (?) profit and sold them
right quick to net himself about three dollars and ninety cents a box. Now,
you might wonder why I should kick about this. It is not because he cleared
eighty-five cents profit on his investment and risk, but I do kick because he
didn't know what the fruit was worth. Our own Association had two cart of
Valencias Just sold in the same town where he sold his, which the Florida
Citrus Exchange had sold for us to net us Just about six dollare at the pack packing
ing packing house. This well meaning gentleman Just naturally knocked the bottom
out of prices for several days in the town where he sold this fruit, and
cost us and a lot of other growers considerable money.
I am citing you a single instance, but each season furnishes hundreds
of Instances of this sort. Most of these speculators haven't any real line
on the markets and the actual worth of fruit. In the last few years we
have had at times some remarkably good prices, but I'll tell you honestly,
none of us really knows yet what Florida oranges and grapefruit are wortn.
as measured by the law of supply and demand. Just because of this hit-or-mlss
selling.
I have seen cases where speculators in some years bought seedling
oranges at fifty cents a box, and less, from growers who were plumb up
against it, and then sold them for a quick profit of maybe ten or fifteen centa
a box, when the growers' actual cost of production maybe ran to seventy seventy-five
five seventy-five or eighty oents a box. The big trouble with these speculator fellows
is that generally they have no interest in the growers' cost of production
or in obtaining the value of the fruit except so far as shows them a profit
on their purchases. More than once they have furnished the paving stones
of good intentions that let the citrus business go straight to the Devil's
hangout.
Once upon a time some used to argue that they served a purpose In fur furnishing
nishing furnishing ready money to growers who Just had to have it; but that time la
past. Allied with our selling agency, the Florida Citrus Exchange, we now
have our own crop-loan organization, the Growers' Loan & Guaranty Com Company.
pany. Company. Any member of the Exchange through it can obtain on his crop
about all the money that is good for him, on payment, of Just legal Interest;
and does not have to pay an outrageous rate for money through letting soma
other fellow make a profit on his fruit
You are your own boss, or at least that good looking wife of yours lets
you think you are, and it Is up to you to make your own decision. Whaterer
you decide to do with our fruit is no skin off my nose. However, I am reason
ably sure you will In the long run do what most all of us have done who
have made a real success of growing fruit; that is. Join the ranks of the
Florida Citrus Exchange where your own organization will make sales et
actual cost, and you will get back the full worth of your fruit as sold In the
markets.
Give Etta and the kids my love and fix things np so you can come down
this winter all of you and pay a visit to
Your lonesome Uncle, JONAS.

From Jonas Arland at Hammock
Groves, Florida, to Samuel
Newcomer, Bentonvflle, Mich,
Dear Sam:
You never were more wrong in your life than when you figured that I and
others who belong to the Florida Citrus Exchange are warped In our views
and "bitter" toward speculative fruit buyers.
The situation is Just this: There is only Just so much fruit each crop
year and no matter how hard we may compete to get fruit we can't increase
the crop. It is not like two manufacturing concerns putting out, say, vacuum
cleaners where the harder they compete the more machines both sell because
the market is thus enlarged. On the contrary, the more the co-operative
movement spreads in Florida the less fruit there is left for the speculators
to handle. As the movement grows, consequently speculators are bound to
be put out of business. In view of this it is only natural that they should
fight and fight hard in order to keep themselves in business. It is a pretty
sorry poodle dog, that won't try to give a bulldog a tussle if he is caught In
a corner.
The co-operative movement in Florida has been, and is, steadily growing.
A considerable number of fellows who have made a living out of the frat
game have been caught in corners more or less. Some of them have fought
pretty hard and pretty bitterly. One of the favorite methods is by propa
ganda." That is a rather nice-sounding word the war gave us to cover e
pretty nasty sort of activity. In a big organization like ours, with about
five thousand growers, there are bound to be a certain number of folks who
will believe part of everything they hear. Therefore, when some of my
fellow-members hear some rumor that we are paying our directors at Tampa
ten thousand dollars a year, instead of a measly little per diem to cover ex expenses
penses expenses that most men wouldn't let drag them away from their business, they
will get excited and mill around a bit, until finally someone of them comes
out with it, and the real facts can be brought out and the matter laid at rest
These things are awkward and at times confusing. We live them down,
in the course of time, and go right on ahead. Just here, I want to tell you we
are going ahead right along.
However, you cannot talk about a man, or a set of men, behind his
back or their backs and obtain any large portion of love and esteem wheft
the talk gets known. Also, the very fellows who at first were misled by
such propaganda are apt to feel pretty hard when they find our the tnn facts.
I don't want you to believe we have reached the millenium here in
Florida and that our nice wooly grower-lambs are lying down in peace with
the speculative interests. No, not if the lambs know it Facts is facts, how
ever; and the growers having learned the fruit speculators mean no good
to the industry in which the growers have their money, tied up, feel Justified
in setting forth the real state of affairs to those who, like you, are lacking
experience in these things. That does not necessarily imply any bitterness
at alL
The School of Experience don't put out correspondence courses; and I
don't know if you can be expected to get much good out of these letters.
However, I find the writing of them is good for me. Previously, I hare
thought out a lot of these things in a hary sort of way, but writing you has
served to focus my mind and I see them more clearly than ever before. I
believe I am a better and more loyal Exchange memben for having written
them.
Tell the kids 1 wore the new necktie they sent me to church last
Sunday, and George Hopper, our village wit, said I was all dressed up like
a new filling station. Bies their hearts, kiss the kids for me and accept
best love for Etta and yourself, from
Your Uncle, JONAS.

These letters constitute the second Installment of a series. Addi Additional
tional Additional ones will be published In early Issues.

Now the drys have invaded Ger- j The crime wave has abated tempor tempor-many,
many, tempor-many, and there are Germans who willlarily, owing to the absence of the
doubtless hold that this i3 the last j criminals on their vacations in Eo--straw
Marion Star. I rope. New York Tribune.

rv.



OCALA EVENING STAR, THURSDAY, AUGUST 24, 1922

i

UNCLASSIFIED
ADVB1TISBIENTS

(RATES under this heaoin? are as
follows. Maxiiu jra of six ltijes on time
2ic; three times SOc; nix times 75c; one
montb ii.O). -Ml accounts payable tn
atlva.cc- except to those who have reg regular
ular regular advertl.ins account.

Leo Goetz,
8-10t

FOR SALE Chufas.
. Stanton.

CITRUS NURSERY STOCK FOR
SALE Pineapple, Parson Brown,
Valencia and Tangerine orange; also

Marsh seedless grajjefruit. All ar&

budded on sour stock, carefully
grown, clean and first class in every
respect. No Bermuda or other in

jurious grasses in the nurseries.

Price upon application. MARION

COUNTY NURSERIES, Box 366,

Ocala, Fla. 8-21-tf

SWEET GUAVAS $1.50 six-basket

carrier, f. o. b. Weirsdale; $1.50 a
bushel at residence. T. B. Snook,
Weirsdale, Fla. 8-18-tf
FOR RENT One furnished front
room, two blocks from postoffice;
bath and other conveniences. Apply
at No. 12 Watula street. 19-6t
LET MOTHERS REST-Special rates
for families through the summer
months. Children half price, at the
Arms Koue. 26-tf
BRADENTOWN For sale, trade or
H O T E L lease. Nineteen room;
good condition. Built of concrete
blocks. Plenty sleeping porches up upstairs;
stairs; upstairs; overlooks Manatee river. Lo Located
cated Located at 419 Upham street. Apply
for fuilher information to C. M.
Livingston, owner, Ocala, Fla. 12t

FOR SALE--1020 Dodge touring car;
1921 Nash six touring car. Blalock
Bros. Phone 78. 9-tf

FOR SALE Old Trusty incubator,
150 to 175-egg capacity, good as
now, price $17; some good chick
coops, also chick fencing and used
lumber; 2-eight inch tiling. J. E.
Frampton, liOJ E. 5th St., Ocala,
Fla. Phone 501. 17-6t
FOR SALE On Fort King avenue,
easy terms, lot GO by 500. See
Mrs. J. II. Cramer, East Fort King
avenue. 2-tf
BARGAIN To the first man giivng
me a check for $275 I will turn over
a pretty little Buick four D-35. A
bargain for somebdy. Koestline.
Phone 113, Dunnellon. 23-3t
WANTED Position as cleTk in store
or office. Owing to recent illness
am compelled to give up outside
work; owing to dependents must
work. Am not weakling, but willing
to do anything in my power. Can
sell anything from Uneeda biscuits
to ladies' waists. Can give refer references.
ences. references. Address, "Need," in care of
Ocala Star. 23-2t
WANTED Position as clerk in store
or office. Several years experience,
with references. Must have work to
keep family of small children. Will
appreciate your offer. Address Jay
Darling. 23-lt

REWARD Suitable reward will be
paid to any person returning to the
office of this paper a large abstract
of title covering big body of land,
map of same tract and notes on
abstract. Above papers disappeared
from office in Ocala about three
weeks ago. 23-6t

BUS LINE FOR SALE Due to poor
health am forced to sell my Packard
auto service. Most wanted and best
paying bus line in state. One twin
six Packard, mechanically perfect,
new tires. Must sell at once; $1250,
half cash, balance terms. A. M.
Jones, Kissimmee, Fla. 23-3t

OCALA OCCURRENCES
If you have any local or society
items for the Star, call five-one.

Dr. Slaughter, the Southern Marion
Aesculapius, was with his Ocala
friends today.

M I

3
!

Miss Elizabeth Bennett has return returned
ed returned from a very pleasant stay with
friends in Orlando.

If you like good things to eat read
the U-Serve ad. in this issue. 23-2t

Mr. D. W. Tompkins, who has been
a victim of dengue fever for a week,
is up again.

The friends of Dr. E. G. Peek are
glad to know that he is able to resume
his practice after several days of illness.

14 POUNDS OF SUGAR FOR $1.00
With two dollar purchase of other
goods, Saturday and Monday.
24-3t O. K. TEAPOT GROCERY.

We are sorry for the poor fellows
who don't have to work Thursday aft aft-ernons.
ernons. aft-ernons. They really do look lonesome.

Judge Futch has issued marriag.
license to Mr. Milton S..Bodgett of
Missouri and Miss Edith Manning of
Lynne.

New York, Atlantic City, Washing Washing-ten
ten Washing-ten are easily reached through use of
Merchants & Miners steamers to Bal Baltimore
timore Baltimore and Philadelphia. Round trip
o Washington, D. C, $33.42; Atlantic
City, N. J., S58.G0; Asbury Park. N.
J., S60.G2. It
Mr. and Mrs. T. E. Bridges, who
have been staying at Weaverville, N.
C, have joined the Ocala colony in
Asheville.

Mr. Max Israelson. who has been in
New York purchasing goods fot
Frank's Store, is expected home Tuesday.

"Say it with flowers" and buy the
flowers from Mrs. J. E. Ilyndman, 1
miles out on the Dunnellon road.
Phone 30M. 10-tf

Messrs. O. H. Love of Orlando and
W. D. Allen of Tampa, two of South
Florida's live traveling men, wore in
town today.

Mrs. John Preer and little son,
Johnnie, who have been visiting rela relatives
tives relatives in Georgia and Alabama are
expected home the first of September
14 POUNDS OF SUGAR FOR $1.00
With two dollar purchase of other
goods, Saturday and Monday.
24-3t O. K. TEAPOT GROCERY.

The Ocala primary school, Miss
Nellie Stevens principal, will open
Monday, Oct. 2. The North Ocala
school, Miss Lygeia Shealy principal,
will open on the same date.

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Thompson of
Lakeland expected to visit friends in
Ocala this week but on account oi
sickness their visit has been postponed.

Mrs. E. J. Crook and son, Mr.
George Looney, will probably arrive
home about the first of the month. Mr.
Looney who has been quite sick sines
leaving Ocala is now much improved.

Hats cleaned and reblocked. Royal
Cleaners, 15 E. Ft. King avenue. Job;.
Melin, Hatter. 7-1m

Just received Ballard's Obelisk
Flour. Let us supply your grocery
noeds. Main Street Market. Phone
108. p. Main street. 22-tf

THE BAND WILL PLAY

TOMORROW EVENING

! VISITORS TOOK THREE
STRAIGHT VICTORIES

(Continued from Page One

THE HOME OF
First-Class Bicycle
REPAIRING
Phone 431
BRICK BICYCLE STORE
Next to Burnett's Tailor Shop

DR. K. J. WEUIL.

Optometrist and Optic.

WS Eyesight Spiiw
114 Main Street, Jacksonville
18 East Broadway, Ocala

Two of the young ladies teaching n
the Ocala schools in former years
have accepted positions at other
places for the coming term. Mips
Mabel Beck will go to Clearwater and
we understand that Miss Mabel Mef Mef-fert
fert Mef-fert will go to Fort Meade.

Another band concert will be given

Fridav night. The urogram will be as I ; ; ; :
follows- handled if the fielders had been
1. March. National Soirit (Hummel) in? a littIs deePer-
2. Overture, Lustpief Keler Bela). lae, management reports the best
3. Suwanee River Moon ..Clarke). I attendance at -Jus series of game

tr.a.i r:;-- oi-tn b.iuwn at any otner
g-tr.ies this year. Fans seem to be

t .; k ir.tr m'.iv' active interest m the

Angel Child (Williams).

Among the Roses, a summer idyl.

Marie (Mstzan).

7. March, Faustina (Watson.
Intermission
8. Lygia (Beyer).
9. Humoresque, violin and
(Dvorak).

!,. Wyoming Lullaby (Williams).
11. Georgia (Donaldson).
V). Star Spangled Banner.

i t Oct. 11

band, I

Pals
Kavoiki.
Robirs'.-n.

I CaU: .,i..
i

Th" ir. as.

i he Box Score
AB R II PO A

W. K. Lane. M. D., phvsician and

surgeon, specialist eye, ear, rose and
throat. Office over 5 and 10 cent store,
Ocala, Fla. tf

TRUCK FARMS AT AUCTION
AT SANTOS STATION
ON DIXIE HIGHWAY
TUESDAY, AUGUST 29

a nr..

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Royal Scarlet Canned Goods

Need no introduction. We only want to let Ocalnns
know that we have just received a new lot of Royal
Scarlet Salmon Steak, Baby Lima Beans, Stuffed
Olives, Salted Peanutsand Walnuts.
COOK'S MARKET and GROCERY
Phones 243 and 171

Free Dinner Served Twelve O'clock.
Auction Starts Just After
Dinner
Arrangements will he made for a
good speaker. Sale will be made in
farms of forty acres and up. Sold on
easy terms. Either F. W. Ditto oi
R. E. Smedley, ownvr, both of Ocala,
will show you this fine high hammock
.nd before the sale day. Be .sine to
.e the biir circular giviny: full partic

ulars.
Don't forge t thf t'roe ar.d d-;te. j
T-i.-?dav. A-f. 2!'th, 12 oVl ok -h i
. TV '.' 1 1 i v "i v 'iriv ,: :.
Osi'a .n -oua :"! i'.i'lf of:
S'r.ntos. FINCH BROTHERS, -W-l
lienors, Jacksonville. tu-'hur-sat
I
NOTICE. lit) V A L ARCH MASOX3

V-l Z 1'- 27 10 4
Wildcats A B R II TO A
F:'t! -i . 4 1 2 3 0
Taylor, 1st 4 0 0 11 1 1
T.et.i r:u 4 0 0 1 5 0
Brown, cf 4 0 0 2 0 1
T?; .-rn. If 3 1 0 0 1 1
!Tf:n ndc 4 1 1 1 1 0
Bracken, 3id 3 0 0 0 2 0
Wo d rf 3 0 1 2 0 0
Ov rslivet. i 3 0 2 T 1 0
32 2 5 27 14 3
c ., ... ( ,e. R II E
Pair, 000 200 Oul3 10 4
T'i-I-.-ts 000 020 O K? 2 5 3
Stir :!;.. .- !(." hits. Quinn:
Fr Wildcats 1; struck
' T. 5 .!:.: 1; a
i :!.- r: !. t:f? If nrr 0
''u' ti'a". 7. ; ci u iayior. Uin-

An instant favorSt
with lovers of' fine
"Good to tho last dro
RIC. U.S. PAT. OPP.

TT

special meeting oi ueaia l-iraptcr
No. 13, R. A. M., Ausru t 24th. 7:30
p. m. Void in the Past and Most Ex Excellent
cellent Excellent Masters' degrees. Visiting
brothers are cordially invited to at attend.
tend. attend. A. L. Lucas, High Priest.
B. L. Adams, Secretary. 2t
James Borland and Harry Dozier,
who have heen at Camp Sapphire,
Brevard. S. C, are expected home this
week. The former will probably ar arrive
rive arrive Friday and the latter today or
tomorrow.

14 POUNDS OF SUGAR FOR $1.00
With two dollar purchase of other
goods, Saturday and Monday.
24-3t O. K. TEAPOT GROCERY.

PALATKA-OCALA
! BUS LINE

SCHEDULE

5 Leave Palatiia 8:00 A M.
! Arrive Orala 12:00 U.

r

ifavc Ocala..

2:15 P. M.

3 ArrHe Palalka .... 6:00 P. M.
I Ocala Leaving Point, Ocala House
I I'aahka leaving point, James hotel

Mr. L. W. Ponder is going to build

a cozv bungalow on his lot on East s

- IS t . i wr

Broadway, near the Episcopal church, j i LIU' 1, Uraiige DpnngS, lieil

r oute via Anthony, Sparr,

MacKay & Company have the con
tract and the work will begin in Sep
timber.

1

wcr-d and Rodman.

Dr. C. L. Collins, who has been
quite sick for the past week, is up to to-day
day to-day for the first time. Dr. Collins
was unable to fill the pulpit at the
Baptist church last Sunday, but hopes
to be well enough this Sunday.

I

i

C. .?. FILLANS, Prop.

Ocala. Phone 527

u fi f 1 rl -J 1 0 ITaM n li

AlOUlllOlWU'J

I DWINELL-WR1CHT CO., I

C "RTAIN, TO PROVE A DISTINCT ACOUIS1TION to your plana
i jr si.cial entertainment. "Simply Delicious' "Just Splendid" "A Won Won-(iir
(iir Won-(iir ful Flavor" are its most frequent praises wherever society has discov discovered
ered discovered it.

NONE
BETTER

AT ANY
price"

i

LFWIS-CHITTY CONSOLIDATED
Wholesale Distributors, OCALA, FLA.

Misses Christine Close, Jess Dehon, J
Cornelia Dozier and Lucille Home, I
who have heen enjoying the summer J
at Camp Keystone at Brevard, N. C,

will probably arrive home on the 1st
of September as they break camp on
August 30th.

The Girls Auxiliary of the Baptist j
church will meet Friday afternoon at j
3:30 at the home of Mrs. Hugh Floyd, j
303 Oklawaha avenue. Every mem- j
ber is urged to attend and those j
wishing G. A. pins should bring 25c.

The officers of the society must be
able to discuss fully thy constitution
and by-laws.

I

Mr. Joe Blalock, of the firm of Bla- j
lock Brothers, local agents for the
Nash automobile, came in last night j
with three of these attractive car s, j
This is the second consignment of
these cars the firm has handled, the i
lirst being quickly disposed of and ;
!h;s shipment will probably go in a
hurry. j

Mrs. J. H. McClymonds and niece,
Mrs. C. F. Benjamin, have returned
from a visit of several weeks in At Atlanta.
lanta. Atlanta. They spent a very pleasant
time as the guests of Miss Annie
Sharpe, Mrs. McClymonds" niece, and
with Mrs. Scott, who wish to be re remembered
membered remembered to their Ocala friends. The
trip proved not only pleasant but
beneficial to both, but they say they
are glad to get back home.

The friends of Kenneth Ausley will :
i fgret to learn that he met with quite :
a nainful accident yesterday at the
mill when a shingle block flew out 1
and struck him on the head, knocking :
him unconscious. He was immediately j
brought to town for medical treat- j
ment. There was a deep cut under his
left eye but apparently no other in- i
juries except bruises. He will be con- j
f.ned to his bed for a few davs. ;

Mr. H. C. Heseman has purchased
35i acres on the Silver Springs road,
about a mile and thee-ouarfers out :
of the city, from Mr. W. D. Cam. Mr.
Heseman will build a modern bunga bungalow
low bungalow on the property and this winter
will plant a vineyard of Carmen
grapes. The planting of grapes is :
spreading throughout the peninsula

Rev. and Mrs. ;W. F. Creson expect j and Mr. Heseman is one of the men

to leave the first of September for a who believe tr.at Marion county is a
month's vacation. Rev. Creson will j natural grape growing: section be-
spend his time in Mobile, while Mrs. t cause of the fact that wild grapes
Creson will visit relatives in Augusta. grow so extensively in this section.

mam-

You Can't Beat
This Tire
At The Price!
The Goodrich "55" is a
real tire of real value at a
price remarkably low.
It is the economy tire for
light cars made with all
the skill of Goodrich.
It has everything you de demand
mand demand in a tire tugged
construction, long mile mileage
age mileage and good looks.
You can't beat this tire for all all-around
around all-around economy. And we sell
it at an unusually low price.

BLALOCK BROTHERS
'VULCANIZING
GOODRICH TIRES AND TUBES
Ocala, Fla.



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gml:FeatureCollection
gml:featureMember
gml:Point label Place of Publication
gml:Coordinates 29.187778,-82.130556
METS:amdSec
METS:digiprovMD DIGIPROV1
DAITSS Archiving Information
daitss:daitss
daitss:AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT PROJECT UFDC
METS:techMD TECH1
File Technical Details
sobekcm:FileInfo
METS:fileSec
METS:fileGrp USE reference
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archive
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METS1 unknownx-mets 40eabdf1ec070ea9b2bdb3148aa754c9 9858
UF00075908_06283.mets
METS:structMap STRUCT1 physical
METS:div DMDID ADMID The ORDER 0 main
PDIV1 Main
PAGE1 Page
METS:fptr FILEID
PAGE2
PAGE3
PAGE4 4
STRUCT2 other
ODIV1
FILES1