The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:06275

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
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WEATHER FORECAST Local showers tonight or Wednesday.
TEMPERATURES This morning, 68; thisafternoon, 88.
Sun Rises Tomorrow, 5:53; Sets, 7:12.
OCALA, FLORIDA, TUESDAY, AUGUST 15, 1922
VOLUME TWENTY-EIGHT. NO. 194
IT WILL PROMISE
TING RAILWAY
AIRPLANES 10 ALL
PARTS OE AMERICA
CITRA Mil HAVE
MODERN UTILITIES
SOFT COAL STRIKE
ABORT TO SUBSIDE
THE RAILROADS PROTECTION
WAGES III CANADA

PRESIDE!

y

y

Union Labar Leaders Have Rejected His Prcpessls, end Will Go

Back to Negotiations With Railway Executives.

Washington, Aug. 15. (Associated
Press). President Harding, having
abandoned efforts at mediation in the
rail strike, was declared today by his
advisers to have virtually decided to
inform the railroad executives of the
country that in operating trains they
will be given the full protection and
aid of the government. The president,
it was stated, is determined that the
only course the government now could
pursue was the path it followed in the
coal strike the extension of an invi invitation
tation invitation to the employers to operate
their properties and the federal gov government
ernment government with the co-operation of the
different states would stand behind
them in their efforts, so far as they
were directed to serving the public.
Consideration is being given by the
president, it was asserted, to the prop proposition
osition proposition of going before Congress with within
in within the next few days with a compre comprehensive
hensive comprehensive statement of the whole rail
strike situation, including the rebuffs
that have met the government's at attempts
tempts attempts at settlement. This statement
if made, it was said, would include no
suggestions as to legislation but
would be designed to place before Con Congress
gress Congress and the country the facts in the
situation as view by the government.
PUT IT UP TO CONGRESS
President Harding will place the
rail strike situation before Congress
and before the country within forty forty-eight
eight forty-eight hours, it was officially announc announced
ed announced today at the White House.
BEGIN TO SIT UP TO THEIR OLD
BOSSES
Leaders of railroad labor organiza organizations
tions organizations today made public the rejection,
of President Harding's final offer for
settlement of the strike but declared
attempts to mediate the difficulties by
direct dealings between the railroad
executives and heads of the four
brotherhoods were still in progress.
CONSULTING WITH THE BIG
FOUR
Washington, Aug. 15. Visible ac activities
tivities activities here in the rail strike situation
were confined today to a continuation
of mediation efforts of the chairman
of the big four brotherhood organiza organizations
tions organizations in whose hands the striking shop
crafts have placed their case. These
chairmen spent two hours with Presi President
dent President Harding late yesterday and this
morning again went into conference
with representatives of the striking
unions.
RUMOR UNFOUNDED
Jacksonville, Aug. 15 R. M. Spark Spark-man,
man, Spark-man, secretary of the local lodge of
Brotherhood of Locomotive Engineers,
today denied reports that last night
members of the big four on railroads
entering Jacksonville would notify the
railroads today they would refuse to
operate trains if guards were not
withdrawn from railroad property
here. Sparkman said the subject was
discussed at length at a mass meeting
of the brotherhoods last night but no
action was taken.
HOW RAILROAD MEN
WOULD GOVERN AMERICA
Las Vegas, Nevada, Aug. 14. In
accordance with an agreement to
move marooned passengers out of the
blistering heat of the desert, four
trains left here last night iced, water watered
ed watered and inspected by strikers. The
trains were the Los Angeles Limited,
Continental Limited and Overland Ex
press, eastbound.
All four trains proceeded slowly
for the first mile out of Las Vegas,
with striking rail men riding on all
cars to frustrate any possible at
tempt to haul non-union employes out
of town, the train crews refusing, ac
cording to the strike committee, to
handle trains carrying such passen
gers.
Meanwhile approximately 150 non
union employes and guards are ma
rooned in the famous "bull pen" built
during the 1911 strike. Strikers are
picketing the town to prevent the de delivery
livery delivery of food to these men, foodstuffs
which the Overland Express brought
ir last night for the non-unionists re remaining
maining remaining outside the yards, the truck
men refusing to handle the shipment.
INHUMAN ACTS
Chicago, Aug. 14. The action of
members of the "big four" brother

hoods in abandoning through passen passenger
ger passenger Plains at Needies, Arizona, Bar Bar-niow.
niow. Bar-niow. Calif., and Seiigman, Arizona,
.' Op denounced last night as a delib delib-.:
.: delib-.: e conspiracy, a violation of their
.-joL-mn agreements with the railroad
a "id an inhuman act, by A. G. Wells,
vice piesident of the Atchison, Topeka
.S'anla Fee railway.
"None oi' the reasons given for
these lawless acts is valid," Mr. Wells
declared. "The Santa Fe has asked
no man to take out unsafe equipment,
ti has no unsafe equipment and has
been and is literally meeting all re requirements
quirements requirements of the safety appliance
act. Inspectors of the bureau of
saftty, interstate commerce, have
made many examinations recently of
the Santa Fe power and have given
the company a clean bill of health.
"The sympathetic strikers have giv given,
en, given, no specifications as to unsafe equip equipment
ment equipment or other unsafe conditions in the
environment wher the strike took
place. For justification of their law lawless
less lawless and inhuman conduct at Needles
and other desert places they are driv driven
en driven to refer to some bomb throwing a
few days ago at San Bernardino, 250
miles away from Needles, where the
trouble has not been of a sort to in induce
duce induce train service men to refuse to
perform their accustomed duties, .and
which incidentally occurred subse subsequently
quently subsequently to the calling of the strike at

Needles.
"Aften abandoning trains filled with
people, including aged, infirm, wom-
jn and children, in the desert, with the
mercury at 125 in the shade, the strike
committee of the big four in session
it Needles received a committee of
five representing the marooned pas
sengers who asked them to man the
tiains to help the sufferers. They
were told that 'not a damned wheel
would turn until the Santa Fe remov
ed the guaids about its yards.'
"In addition to the indefensible
treatment of the passengers, nearly
"000 carloads of perishable products
belonging to farmers are standing at
Needles and other points and are fast
deteriorating."
HARDING OFFERED HELP
Washington, Aug. 14. President
Harding, in a telegram last night to
Governor Campbell, of Arizona, of offered
fered offered the assistance of the federal
government to relieve hardships
among passengers on Santa Fe trains
marooned at junction points.
The president declared it was the
obligation of the government to re relieve
lieve relieve the people "who are thus shame shamefully
fully shamefully subjected to hardships."
THe president's telegram follows:
"I am informed that several pass passenger
enger passenger trains on the Santa Fe railway
it re marooned at junction points in
your state because of their abandon abandon-nient
nient abandon-nient by their crews. It is the obliga obligation
tion obligation of the government to relieve the
people who are thus shamefully sub subjected
jected subjected to hardships. If you have not
facilities for the relief, wdiich I know
you will gladly bestow, then any
forces at the command of the federal
government will be promptly ordered
to your assistance. Kindly advise
whether such assistance is needed."
FAIRFAX HARRISON
READY TO FIGHT
Washington, Aug. 15. The South
em Railway which to date has made
efforts to combat the shopmen's strike,
has announced through its president,
Fairfax Harrison, that it would em
i loy any help available to keep trains
in operation.
Mr. Harrison in a formal statement
said that the Southern had made ev-
erv effort to settle with the men even
"to the extent of offering the terms
that they had previously agreed to ac
cept," and without result, and that "if
it means war to run the Southern
Railway, then let us have it now now-not
not now-not later."
In another column of today's paper
will be noted the advertisement of our
former townsman, Frank E. Wether Wether-bee,
bee, Wether-bee, who is now engaged in growing
guavas for the market at Leesburg.
Those who have used his fruit here
say that it has no superior for making
jelly.
"A bus like a parlor car" head headlines
lines headlines the Digest. All the seats must
be taken. Greenville Piedmont.

Lf.bor War in the United States Car.
ries No Fear On the Other
Side of the Line

Montreal, Aug. 15. Canadian rail railways
ways railways today cut the semi-monthly
wages of their shopmen about $200, $200,-000,
000, $200,-000, although 37,000 workers had
threatened to strike if action was tak tak-;
; tak-; before the board of conciliation had
decided the dispute.
KSIMETT BOYLE IS
A REAL EXECUTIVE
Governor of Nevada Got the Drop On
a Ruffianly Striker With
a Gun
San Francisco. Aug. 15. Strikers
'. ere arrested in Nevada and Calif or or-i
i or-i la yesterday as a result of the rail
strike and trains were moved on the
Si.nta Fe system which had been tied
uj- ince last Thursday.
Governor Emmett Boyle of Nevada,
was at Las Vegas, when seventeen
men wsre taken into custody. No
charges have been filed against the
men. Governor Boyle had obtained a
pistol taken from one of the men and
was the object of one of the strikers'
pistols, when the governor got the
drop on the man. No shots were fired
but ire man was arrested.
GOV. HARDEE AT
CAMP JOHNSTON
Will Review Today Florida Troops,
Who Are Concluding Their
Annual Encampment
Jacksonville, Aug. 15. Governor
Hardee is at Camp Johnston today to
review the Florida National Guard,
which is nearing the end of its two
weeks "annual tour of duty. The gov
ernor arrived at camp late vesterdav
and spent last night at military head headquarters.
quarters. headquarters. IMPROVEMENT IN CONDITION
OF GABRIALE D'ANNUNZIO
Gardone Riviere, Italy, Aug. 15.
Improvement in the condition of Gab-
riale D'Annunzio, seriously injured in
a fall at his villa here Sunday, was in
dicated i na bulletin issued late last
night by his physician.
LAUGHTER PROVOKING
BRANCH OF THE LEGION
Jacksonville, August 15. The local
post of the American Legion has or organized
ganized organized a chapter of the La Societe
Nationals des 40 Hommes et 8 Chev Chev-eaux,
eaux, Chev-eaux, the fun-making branch of the
Legion. Other posts through the
state have taken similar action in line
with provision made by the national
organization whereby the means of
doughboy transportation in France
is memorialized.
The light side of the Legion de derives
rives derives its name from the dinky rail railroad
road railroad equpment in which the soldiers
were huddled. The cars, were not
ashamed of themselves; they pro proclaimed
claimed proclaimed their ability in broad letters
to carry 40 men and eight horses.
Instead of horses the American army
used the space for "non-coms."
FALLEN A HUNDRED
MARKS BELOW ZERO
New York, Aug. 15 German marks j
were quoted today by local banks and!
foreign exchange houses at ten for a
Ct-nt, the lowest price ever recorded.
The normal pre-war price of the mark
was 23.8 cents. The price later drop dropped
ped dropped to 9 cents per hundred marks.
COUNTY FEE LAW SUSTAINED
BY THE SUPREME COURT

' Tallahassee, Aug. 15. The county j
officers' fee law enacted by the legis-j.
lature of 1921 was yesterday declared (jk)
valid by the supreme court. A per-j-Jitj
emptory writ of mandamus was !;,
awarded the state, directing that Ben'j.
Campbell, tax assessor of Dade coun- j
ty, comply with the statute's provis-;
inns. Th oninion was delivered bv'H1

Justice Whitfield.

!
It no longer being safe for them to
kill Englishmen, Americans, Belgians ; ,X
and Frenchmen, the German Junkers:.::
now have to content themselves by
ii i i Ar

assassinating meir xeiiow cuuxury
men-NewYork Tribute.

Columbus Taxicab Company Invites!

People to Use Its Speedy
Overhead Service
Columbus, Ohio, Aug. 15. A local
taxicab company today advertised air air-i
i air-i iane service to all parts of the Unit United
ed United States. Business men wishing to
make a quick trip to Chicago or New
York or other parts, are advised in the
advertisement that they telephone the
t ':"cab company which will send a
ca', to take them to the landing field.
SEARCHING FOR FLORIDA
GIRL IN CHICAGO
1 ilian Burgess of Tampa Said To Be
Hidden in the Windy City
Chicago, Aug. 15. The Chicago po police
lice police today were asked to search for
Lilian Burgess, eighteen, of Tampa,
F'a., believed to be living here with
f ionds. A letter from A. D. Williams
of the Tampa office of a bonding com company
pany company ,to Chief of Detectives Hughes
said the young woman had inherited
an estate left by Dr. Fred Kidder of
Tr.mpa.
TOMATO GROWERS MET
AT REDDICK AND CITRA
The first of a series of meetings to
b held this week at various points in
the county in the interest of the to tomato
mato tomato growers association now being
formed, were held Monday afternoon
at Reddick and Monday evening at
Sparr. At each of these places a large
number of growers turned out and ex ex-piessed
piessed ex-piessed themselves as favorable to a
co-operative, marketing association.
Iho details of the association were
; resented to the meeting by Mr. S. C.
Hood, field representative of the North
American Fruit Exchange, Mr. K. C.
rv'oore, county agricultural agent, and
i-.ii-. Louis H. Chazal, secretary of the
Chamber of Commerce.
Meetings will be held this afternoon
at Mcintosh and there wil probably be
a meeting tonight at Martin. There
Ai!l be a meeting at Anthony tomor tomorrow
row tomorrow afternoon and Shady tomorrow
night; Belleview Thursday afternoon
and Pedro Thursday night. It is very
p. obable, too, that there will be a
meeting at Bushnell in Sumter county,
Friday morning.
Tomato growers who wish to see
copies of the by-laws of the associa association
tion association and a copy of the contract and
membership application blank can ob obtain
tain obtain same at the Chamber of Com Commerce.
merce. Commerce. Miss Sina L. Kite, superintendent of
the industrial school, has returned
home from a pleasant and well de deserved
served deserved vacation at her mountain home
nt ar Johnson City, Tenn. She was ac accompanied
companied accompanied by her sister, Miss Janette
Kite, another pretty young lady from
the Tinnessee mountains, who will
remain the guest of her sister for
several weeks.
Mr. Collier Wade Adams is home
from a pleasant visit to friends and
relatives near Cordele, Ga. Mr. Adams
didn't worry much about the strike.
He has a good pair of Georgia built
legs and could have walked home if
necessary.
At the meeting of the K. of P. last
night, Mr. J. H. Freeman received the
degree of esquire.
Advertising is the bridge that con connects
nects connects the buying public with the goods
you are offering for sale. Use it.
.". ss ys .. .. .".
r-jt i v.-- -4- l
."11:
TUT
1
i -zy
'

EES

Ice Will be Manufactured, Lights And

Water Provided for the "Home
Of the Pineapple Orange
The Citra Ice, Light & Development
Company expects to be ready for busi business
ness business within ninety days. The machin machinery
ery machinery for the new plant which will pro provide
vide provide the "Home of the PineanDle
Orange"' with light, power, water, ice
and cold storage facilities, was order order-j
j order-j ed yesterday. The company was only
j recently organized and is an evidence
of the energetic and enterprising way
in which the people of Citra have set
about the development of their com community
munity community and surroundings. The new
plant expects to provide power for the
packing houses of the famous Citra
orangeg roves.
The officers of the Citra Ice, Light
& Development Company are M. A.
Iliee, president; E. L. Wartmann, vice
president; W. M. Knight, secretary secretary-treasurer,
treasurer, secretary-treasurer, and H. Gilbert and W. T.
DuPree directors.
PINELLAS VOTE IS
PROBLEMATICAL
Powerful Opposition to a Bond Issue
In the Southern End Of
The Peninsula
Clearwater, Aug. 15. Pinellas coun county
ty county is voting today on a $2,695,000
highway bond issue with the outcome
problematical as the result of strenu strenuous
ous strenuous opposition from the south end of
the county, including St. Petersburg.
LOCAL LEGISLATION
The city council meets this evening
in regular session. We understand it
will be the aim of the council to do
everything possible to meet expenses,
make essential improvements and
keep down the taxes. The millage, of
course, will have to be raised, but not
so much if this policy is followed as
if some thousands of dollars is appro appropriated
priated appropriated for non-essentials. The neces necessities
sities necessities of the city, next to administra administration,
tion, administration, police and fire protection, are the
light and water plant and the streets.
It is the wish of the council, so we are
told, to keep everything running in
good order, and add a few blocks to
the paved streets every year without
calling for a new bond issue. It seems
to be the opinion of the council that
if its present members can keep up
this policy, it will be followed by its
successors until the paving catches
up with the street area and we have
a well paved town. If some council
twenty years ago or more had inau inau-j
j inau-j gurated this plan, we would now have
j good streets and comparatively low
! taxation.
The Literary Digest's referendum
would seem to indicate that while
Americans object to a flood, they do
not to live in a Sahrara. Boston
Transcript.
Ambassador Geddes says that the
English do not understand America,
and it may be added that, in view of
! some of the things that are happen happen-i
i happen-i ing here, it is becoming increasingly
i difficult for Americans to understand
I it. Boston Transcript.
! Chinese revolutionists fired on the
American flag and got away with it;
j but they are in for some real trouble
I now, having fired on a boat belonging
; to the Standard Oil Company. Nash Nash-!
! Nash-! ville Southern Lumberman.

Ocala versus Leesburg

SB

.
- 0:S)'

Operators and Miners Will Sign An
Agreement for Part Settlement
This Afternoon

Cleveland, Aug. 13.-(By Associated
Press.) Both operators and miners
to dayratified an agreement to bring
about part settlement of the soft coal
strike. Formal signing of the agree agreement
ment agreement went over until the joint confer conference
ence conference this afternoon.
LEESBURG LOST
The Wildcats invaded the Leesburg
diamond yesterday afternoon and
brought home the bacon. The crack
Leesburg nine was no match for the
revised edition of the Wildcats and
we licked -them to the tune of five to
one.
Old Folks Whitney performed for
the Wildcats and did his regular good
work. He held the Leesburg sluggers
to six scattered hits and at no time
was in any serious danger. Scharding
pitched for Leesburg and also held the
Wildcats to six safeties but we were
able to turn our hits into runs and hit
when hits counted for more than those
of the Leesburg lads.
Leesburg made three errors while
Ocala made only two. Edwards start started
ed started the game behind the bat for Lees
burg but their old friend Buckles was
discovered in the grandstand and he
was requested to dress in uniform and
take his old position.
The Ocala band and quite a large
number of rooters went with the
Wildcats. The band played frequently
during the game although it did not
appear that Leesburg appreciated the
music much. They requested the um
pire to have the band play shorter
pieces and fewer of them because they
had come to a ball game and not a
band concert.
The Ocata fans, however, much ap appreciated
preciated appreciated the presence of the band
and thank its members for making the
trip.
Iesburg will play in Ocala this
afternoon and Thursday afternoon.
Ocala returns to Leesburg Friday aft afternoon.
ernoon. afternoon. EASTLAKE PACKING HOUSE
ENLARGED AND IMPROVED
(Sealedsweet Chronicle)
The packing house of the Eastlake
Investment Company at Eastlake in
Marion county, is to be considerably
enlarged and improved by the opening
of the shipping season.
A roomy concrete basement is being
constructed, the addition of which
will give the equivalent of two floors.
Additional machinery and equipment
i3 to be installed which will consider considerably
ably considerably increase the capacity of the
house, and thus provide for the in increasing
creasing increasing movement of fruit through it.
A coloring room also will beadded,
to take care of -Parson Brown oranges
which are an important feature in this
section.
The house stands at the edge of
beautiful Lake Weir, one of the large
bodies of water in the state. The con construction
struction construction of a sea wall now will per permit
mit permit placing a clay driveway all around
j the house. When the present improve
ments are completed, Manager W. R.
Lee will have arrangements for the
receipt of fruit via truck, boat and
railroad.
The man who carried the "Message
to Garcia" has been decorated for
j making the late Elbert Hubbard fam fam-I
I fam-I ous. New York Morning Telegraph.
E



OCALA EVENING STAR, TUESDAY, AUGUST 15. 1922

f i

Oeaia Evening Star
rablUbd Krery Day Eept Zum&mj by
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY,
OCALA, FLORIDA

would not walk down the beach a few with you, George? Have you ever done 2W$m$2$m$mm$

nunareu yaras ana iook over Biijuimg iu p mat juu uavc

II. J. lilt I lager, President
H. D. Leaveaicvod, Vlce-Pretdet
P. V. l.epod, Seerelarr-Treasarcr
J. If. Heajamla, Editor
Entered at Ocala, Fli., poatoffic
econd-claas matter.

to prove that you have

starting ground should be named enough bravery and skill to become a
"Doolittle." Wauchula Advocate. i member of the aviation branch of the
That shows how much you don't. United States army?
know about the beach, George. The'
lieutenant had walked alone it a short EIGHT YEARS AGO

time before, but it only taxes a lew.

minutes for a soft spot to form. Aug. 15, 1914. Battle between

STOP

WW

mm

TELEPHONES
Usilnnw Of flee Flve-Oa
KdJtorlal Department Two-STe
Society Heporter FlTe-Oae

ME 31 It ICR ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Tress Is exclusively
entitled for tbe use for republication of
all news dispatches credited to it or not
otherwise credited in this paper and
also the local news published herein.
All rights of republication of special
dispatches herein are also reserved.
DOMESTJC St'BSCniPTlOX RATES
One vear. in advance $6.00

Three month, in advance 3.00
Three months, in advance 1.50
One montn. in advance 60

ADVERTISING RATES

Ulnpluyt Plate 15 cents per Inch for
consecutive insertions. Alternate Inser

tions 25 ner cent additional. Compos!

tlon charges on ads. that run less than

six times 10 cents per inch. Special

. Dositlon 25 Dtr cent additional. Rates

based on four-inch minimum. Less than
four inches will take a higher rate.

which will be furnished upon application.

Heading; Notice t Five cents per line
for first insertion; three cents per line
for each subsequent Insertion. One
change a week allowed on readers with-

out extra composition cnarges.
.. Legal advertisements at legal rates.

We clip the following innocent in in-qury
qury in-qury from the Clearwater Sun: "One

of the unsolved mysteries why did

they abandon the Oldsmar oil well?

The Orlando Chamber of Commerce
has appointed a committee to take up
with other commercial organizations
throughout the state a proposal that

a state tax levy for the purpose of ad

vertising Florida be authorized. It's
to be hoped that it will be defeated.
Advertising is none of the state's
business, and in this state it would

be another great opening for graft.

Union engineers on the Santa Fe
lines refuse to pull trains through

towns where armed guards are sta stationed.
tioned. stationed. But we have never heard of

the armed guards precipitating a riot

or kidnapping workmen and beating

them up. Tampa Times.

As the Star has remarked a time or

two before, this is war, and that the
union idea of making war is to jump

on somebody who is helpless.

The discontinuance of several trains
on the west coast division of the Sea Seaboard
board Seaboard has disturbed the distribution of

the mails in this county considerably

The Weekly Star frinstance which

should reach the subscribers on Sat

urday has been arriving several days

late for the past few weeks. When the

"I Won't Work" bunch changes its
mind and decides to go to work these

conditions will change, and we trust

that this clay is not long in the future

The St. Augustine Record and the
Ocala Star having settled, to their own

satisfaction, the serious matter of
woman and her stockings, can now
turn to less important matters, as the

strikes or the Irish problem, for in

stance. Perhaps, however, they would
prefer to discuss the maternity law in

its practical operation. Times-Union

' We fear that's almost too serious a
subject for Herb; but we've seen the

T.-U. tackle some problems it was less

acquainted with.

Lieut. Doolittle, the man who se secured
cured secured so much publicity on account of

his avowed plan to make a one-day.

one-light airplane trip from Jackson

ville to California, is evidently prop properly
erly properly named. He was to start from
Pablo Beach but struck a soft place

in the beach and wrecked his plane.

man contemplating such a trip and yet

r t ( up
L.lUi.lC on I o

tue j

GOTTA, WNMfc Tv4 tAOViN

KVO f" (aEN-S VOUO OOvit VMMT

FEW, STto'tV-VtKTS COWf

EVERYBODY'S BUSINESS

j ijcigiaiia auu uciuiaiio at. x-i ici, iuu l y ; a
1 five miles southeast of Antwerp. Ger Ger-mans
mans Ger-mans temporarily repulsed. tyl

The Tampa Tribune carefully sizes Germans sunk several small merch-;$j

up as follows tne puonc s interest in':"- ... TV-

strikes:

Every man, woman and child in

South Florida is directly concerned in
the settlement of the railroad miner's
strikes.

If the strikes should be settled on

terms that do not guarantee for every

man the right to work, your own liber liberty
ty liberty of action will be abridged.

Should such a settlement of the

coal strike be arranged as would make
possible a monopolistic control of the

production in all mines by those re responsible
sponsible responsible for the present strike, then
the next time a strike is called there
would be no independent miners and
operators to protect you.

Even as it is, the strike grip is so

tight on the throat of industry that

with the slowing of transportation,
because of the railroad strike, there is

serious danger that public utilities

will be without coal. What would it

mean to you if the water company
the gas company, the electric light
companies and the street car com company
pany company were unable to operate?

Public tolerance of strikes such as

now afflict our country is largely re

sponsible for their frequency.

The average man who is not a min

er or a railroader or an employer of
either, considers it none of his affair.

The lawyer, the doctor, the mer

chant each goes about his daily busi

ness with a "let George do it" atti attitude
tude attitude toward the movement for the
settlement of the strikes.

Yet coal and transportation are so

important to every individual that the
slightest disturbance in the service
which provides them for the country

directly affects the individual.

More than 700,000 union miners go

on strike and about 400,000 union rail railroad
road railroad shop craftsmen lay down their
tools, and after a period of seriously

crippled industry suggest terms upon

which they are willing to go back to

work.

The lawyer, the doctor, the mer

chant still pursuing the even tenor

of his way glances hurriedly at the
headlines in the papers and says,

"Sure, let's have the thing settled."

Then he is told that the thing that

stands in the way of settlement is the
fact that the railroad executives de decline
cline decline to comply with the strikers de demand
mand demand that all non-union workmen be
discharged.

And unless he stops to think, this
"innocent bystander" is going to say,
"Sure, settle the strike at any price"
and that is where he gets hurt.
The nonunion or independent work workmen
men workmen kept the cars moving and the
coal coming while the other men were
on a strike. They have a right to
work. They must be allowed to con continue
tinue continue to work.

If they are to be discharged on or

ders of the strikers, then how long

will it be until there are no independ
ent workers to serve the public when

ever a group of dissatisfied employes

quit their jobs?

The responsibility for maintaining

competitive condititions in the field of
production is upon the public that
great mass of the citizenship which is
not directly identified with the mines

or the railroads.
The butcher, the baker, the candle
stick maker and all the other thou

sands of noncombatants in South

Florida can raise their voices in a de

mand that the strikes be settled, but

that they be settled on terms that will

guarantee to every man "the right to

work and to live by that work," and to

be protected m that right by the

government from any man or group
of men who seek to deny him that

right.

Let every man and women pledge
to the president of the United States

and state, county and municipal of

ficials of Florida their full aid and
support in behalf of law enforcement

for the perpetuation of public rights

and for the absolute freedom of every

citizen to work at any lawful occu

pation without let or hindrance from

any source whatsoever.

the Humber river.

lwo baaiy battered isritisn war-

Germans won a battle m the China .T.
sea.
Reported that .Kitchener said war j
would last eighteen months. Years

alter, jvuenener s ciose irienas aemea
that he ever made such a remark.

The Wauchula Advocate is the most

neatly wrapped paper that comes to

this office, and there's alwajTs good

stuff in that wrapper, too.

Lieut. Doolittle has been ordered to

ship his plane and report at San An

tonio, Texas. Army officers can some

times spot a four-flusher, even if some

of. the great dailies of America can
not. Wauchula Advocate.

A man who had just flown a plane
fourteen hundred miles in less than
twelve hours, who was preparing to
repeat the trip, with another thousand
miles added to it, is anything but a

tour-nusner. What's the matter

And we think the Greek army would
look much more dignified rushing Con Constantinople
stantinople Constantinople in long pants than they
would in those silly little flapper skirts
they wear. Times-Union.
The Greeks who fought at Mara Marathon,
thon, Marathon, Thermopylae and Plataea, at
Issus and Arbela, the Roman legion legionaries
aries legionaries who expanded the limits of their
little republic into the greatest empire
of antiquity, the Scotch Highlanders
who have established a reputation as
soldiers unexcelled anywhere in the

world, have all worn those little flap flapper
per flapper skirts.

Dear correspondents, reporters, etc.:

Please quit writing, "Mr. and Mrs.

Soandso and family." "Mr. Soandso
and family" is correct and enough. If

you are afraid the "Mrs." won't be

considered as a member of the family,
write "Mr. and Mrs. Soandso and chil children,"
dren," children," or if there is only one child,
"Mr. and Mrs. Soandso and son." or

"Mr. and Mrs. Soandso and daughter,"
as the case may be. There are always
some mistakes in everybody's copy,

including the editor's, but the one we

refer to has become unusually prev

alent of late.

A SET OF FORD TIRES TO BE GIVEN AWAY BY
TUCKER & SIMMONS
We will take one hundred subscriptions to
The Dearborn Independent, at S1.50 each, ev every
ery every subscription to be numbered. After the
required number of subscriptions are received
the holder of the original receipt bearing a cer certain
tain certain number (which will be announced later)
will be awarded a set of Ford tires.
The Dearborn Independent is a weekly pa paper
per paper published at Dearborn, Mich., by Henry
Ford, at $1.50 a year. A subscription may be
the means of you securing this set of Ford
tires absolutely free.

TUCK

EM & SIMMONS

OCALA TWENTY YEARS AGO
(Evening Star Aug. 15, 1902)

Congressman Sparkman of Tampa,!

was in the city on legal business and

made the Star a very pleasant call to

day.

The gas supply ceased last evening

and the printing offices were compell compelled
ed compelled to shut down as there was no power
to run the presses and the linotype.

Messrs. Mclver & MacKay will soon
begin the building of another story on
their double brick store. This will
give them two handsome rooms in ad

dition to the one they are now using.
They have just put in a cement floor

in their two brick warehouses and

luwe just completed some roomy and
convenient warehouses.

A number of farmers living in the
western part of the county who plant planted
ed planted cotton this season have already
begun to pick the fleecy staple.
Mrs. G. S. Scott, Miss Louise and
Mr. Laurie Scott left today for Sea Seabreeze.
breeze. Seabreeze. Marcus Frank has returned from
his vacation and looks well and
happy.
Ocala Ten Years Ago
(Evening Star Aug. 15, 1912)
Miss Clara Johnson leaves Satur Saturday
day Saturday for White Springs, where she
will visit Miss Mary Skipworth.
Miss Myrtle Whitfield is pleasing
the Air Dome audiences these eve evenings
nings evenings with her piano music.
Prof. J. H. Brinson who has been on
the sick list is able to be out again.
Manager Hunter and his picked

band of ball swatters left this after afternoon
noon afternoon for Gainesville, where we hone

that they will win the game.
Messrs. W. D. Tompkins, Chas. K.
Scge, W. M. Gober and E. L. Stapp
will go to Martel this evening to help
the K. of P. of that place in degree
work.

X

DEALERS

OCALA, FLORIDA

ated by leaders on both sides who are

building up what they consider their j

own interests, at the expense .of the
well being of the whole people.
This nation, and no nation, can
survive if it rests upon a feeling of
suspicion. Mistrust of employe for
employer, of employer for employe,
of citk i for public official, of official
for voter these are evidence of a
spirit that will ultimately destroy our
democracy. The leader, in capital or
labor, in religion or politics, who fos fosters
ters fosters suspicion is an enemy of the pub public.
lic. public. He should be spurned by the
people whom he seeks to lead.

I

NEEDED MORE CONFIDENCE

(Miami Herald)
The railroad strikers have rejected
the latest proposal of the president,
on the theory that it does not offer
anything constructive. The real
reason probably is that Mr. Hard Harding
ing Harding proposes that all the matters now
in dispute be referred.
This is the crux of the whole matter
This is the reason that there are strik strikers
ers strikers and lockouts in many industries.
This is the reason that class is array arrayed
ed arrayed against class. This is the reason
that hatreds are generated that lead
to disturbance and violence. The
spirit of suspicion has undermined all
the faith in each other that is neces necessary
sary necessary if the industrial structure is to
b-? maintained.
Men are being taught that they
must look askance at anyone who is in
a different "class." No one's word
must b? accepted at its face value. It
must be assumed that when a man
makes a statement he has some ulter ulterior
ior ulterior motive in making it. This spirit
is not natural. People naturally trust
each other. The spirit is being gener-

TUE hOME OF
First-Class Bicycle
REPAIRING
Phone 431
WMl BICYCLE STOR
Next to Burnett's Tailor Shop

E

Corn Flakes
three for

Jello 12c. package,
three for.

Quaker Oats, 12c. pkg.,
three for
Marocala Butter,
per pound

One quart new honey,
per jar

25c
33c
33c
45c
65c

Post Toasties,
three for .

Premier Salad
Dressing....

Uneedas,
three for.

Octagon Soap,
three for. .

Senate Coffee,
per pound..

Pint Jars Orange Marmalade,
Ten-ounce Glasses Guava Jelly

25 c
40c
20c
20c
40c
40c
25c

Purina Scratch Feed, Chicken Chowder, Cow Chow
and other Feeds
FARMERS EXCHANGE STORE
PHONE 163

A nice, thoroughly modern bunga bungalow
low bungalow home for somebody is being built
by the Citizens Investment Co. on a
ot on Dougherty street. Price and
terms easy. Call and see it. Phone
2S5 for particulars. 22-tf
Will sell four-foot wood, pine and
oak for $3.50 per cord for this month.
Have best of red oak and pine wood
at $2.50 per strand. Prompt delivery.
Phone 471-Blue. Earl Gibbons, North
Osceola St. 6-6t

SOLD SO YEARS A FINE GENERAL, TONIC

Ifaataoldtrj

W. K. Lane, M. D-, physician and
surgeon, specialist eye, ear, nose and
throat. Office over 5 and 10 cent store,
Ocala, Fla. tf

SALT SPRINGS WATER
Is growing in popularity every
day among Ocalans. It is also
being shipped to every part of
the state. It is sold under a
guarantee. Try a five gallon
container.
Chero-Cola Bottling Works
Phone 167

SASH

DOOR

3,

Geo. MacKay 2 Co.
Ocala, Fla.
HARDWARE
HIGH GRADE PAINT

Hats cleaned and reblocked. Royal
Cleaners, 15 E. Ft. King avenue. John
Meliai Hatter. 7-lm

We never sacrifice quality to sell
at a low price. Our meats are the
BEST to be had. Main Street Mar Market.'
ket.' Market.' Phone 108. 22-tf



OCALA EVENING STAB, TUESDAY, AUGUST 15, 1922

PALATKA-OCALA
BUSLINE

SCHEDULE
Leave Palalka 8:00 A &I.
Arrive Ocala.. 12:00 U.
Leave Oeala 2:15 P. M.
Arrive Palatka .... 6:00 P. M.
Ocala Leaving Point, Ocala House
Paaltka leaving: point, James hotel
Route via Anthony, Sparr,
Citra, Orange Springs, Ken Kenwood
wood Kenwood and Hodman.
C. P. PILLANS, Prop.
Ocala, Phone 527
Phone 597 Night Phone 408
WILLIAMS GARAGE
We Specialize in
WELDING,
ELECTRICAL WORK
REBORING CYLINDERS,
GRINDING CRANK SHAFTS,
GIVE US A TRIAL
Osceola St.. just oil Ft. King
TO ICE CONSUMERS
Our drivers want to help you get all
the ICE you need every day this sum summer
mer summer but they need your help.
When you put your ICE CARD out
on time, you save them extra trips
and that's saving ice for everybody.
When you keep the ice compartment
of your refrigerator free from food
and bottles, you are saving time and
ice.
Just these two simple rules, follow followed
ed followed daily, will help us make sure that
you are well served this summer.
Ocala Ice & Packing Co.
PHONE 34, OCALA. FLA.
Needham Motor Co
PLUMBING & ELECTRICAL
CONTRACTING
General Auto
Repairing
PHONE 252
Sewing Machines Repaired
RAILROAD SCHEDULES
Arrival and departure of passenger
ains at OCALA UNION STATION.
The following schedule figures pub pub-ished
ished pub-ished as information and not guar guaranteed.
anteed. guaranteed. (Eastern Standard Time)
Atlantic Coast line r. r.
Leave for Station Arrive from
2:15 am St. Petersburg 2:27 am
2:27 am Jacksonville 2:15 am
1:45 pm Jacksonville 3:24 pm
3:24 pm St. Petersburg 1:25 pm
6:15 am Jacksonville 9:00 pm
3:30 pm Homosassa 1:16 pm
7:10 am (p) Wilcox 6:45 pm
7:25 am (j) Lakeland 11:03 pm
(p)Monday, Wednesday, Friday,
j) Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday.
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY
Leave for Station Arrive from
2:34 am Jacksonville-N'York 1:55 am
50
06
55
55
55
35
pm Jacksonville 1:15 pm
pm Jacksonville 4:06 pm
Tampa-Manatee-
am St. Petersburg 2:34 am
am NTork-St. Petrsburg 1:35 am
am Tampa 2:34 am
pm Tampa-Manatee 1:30 pm
4:05 pm Tampa-St. Petrsburg 4:05 pm
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CONTRACTOR
AND BUILDER
Careful estimates made on all con con-tract
tract con-tract work. Gives more and better
work for the money than any other
ontractor in the city.
TELEPHONE NO. 605
Call this number when you want
absolute satisfaction in dry cleaning.
Ladies' suits and skirts our hobby.
Counts Dry Cleaning Plant. 3-tf
BETTER insure before rather than
after the fire. Let Ditto insure you. tf
proviaea they possess the genius and
can get their work past the censorship.

ir

ZShc
Cross-Cut
By
Courtney Ryley
Cooper
BlaatrationM byR.B. Van Niem
Ooprdght by Little, Brown & Co.
SYNOPSIS
CHAPTER I. At Thornton Falrchild's
death his eon Robert learns there has
been a dark period in bis father's life
which for almost thirty years has caused
him suffering- The secret Is hinted at
In a document left by the elder Fair Fair-child,
child, Fair-child, which also informs Robert he ts
now owner of a mining claim In Colo Colorado,
rado, Colorado, and advising him to see Henry
Beamish, a lawyer.
CHAPTER II. Beamish tells Robert his
claim, a silver mine, is at Ohadl, thirty thirty-eight
eight thirty-eight miles from Denver. He also warns
him against a certain man, "Squint" Ro Ro-daine,
daine, Ro-daine, his father's enemy. Robert decides
to go to Ohadl.
CHAPTER III. On the road to Ohadl
from Denver Falrchild assists a girl, ap apparently
parently apparently in a frenzy of haste, to change
a tire on her auto. When she has left,
the sheriff and a posse appear, tn pur pursuit
suit pursuit of a bandit. Falrchild bewildered,
misleads them as to the direction the
girl had taken.
CHAPTER IV. At Ohadi Falrchild Is
warmly greeted by "Mother" Howard,
boarding-house keeper, for his father's
sake.
CHAPTER V. From Mother Howard,
Falrchild learns something of the mystery
connected with the disappearance of "Sis "Sis-sie"
sie" "Sis-sie" Larsen, his father's co-worker in
the mine. He meets the girl he had as assisted,
sisted, assisted, but she denies her Identity. She
Is Anita Richmond, Judge Richmond's
daughter.
"IindfTlne'R a rattlesnake, m ouu
a rattlesnake. His wife's crazy Old
Crazy Laura. He drove her that way.
She lives by herself, in an old house
on the Georpeville road. And she'd
kill for him, even if he does beat her
when she goes to his house and begs
him to take her back. That's the kind
of a crowd it is. Just to put a good
finish on it all, the young 'un moves
in the best society in town and spends
most of his time trying, to argue the
former district judge's daughter into
marrying him. So there you are.
That's all Mother Howard knows,
Son."
She turned to the door and then,
turning, patted Falrchild on the shoul shoulder.
der. shoulder. "Boy," came quietly, "you've got a
broad back and a good head. Rodaine
beat your father don't let him beat
you. And always remember one
thing: Old Mother Howard's played
the game before, and she'll play it
with you dark streets aren't exactly
the place for you."
Robert Falrchild obeyed the in instructions,
structions, instructions, a victim of many a conjec conjecture,
ture, conjecture, many an attempt at reasoning
as he sought sleep that was far away.
Again and again there rose before
him the vision of two men In an open
buggy, with a person between them
whom Ohadi believed to be an effeminate-voiced
Swede; in reality, only a
woman. And why had they adopted
the expedient? Why had not Larsen
been with them In reality? It was
hours before Falrchild found sleep,
and even then It was a thing of
troubled visions.
Streaming sun awakened him, and
he hurried to the dining room to find
himself the last lodger at the tables.
He ate a rather hasty meal, made
more so by an impatient waitress,
then with the necessary papers In his
pocket, Falrchild etarted toward the
courthouse and the legal procedure
which must be undergone before be
made his first trip to the mine.
A block or two, and then Falrchild
suddenly halted. Crossing the street
at an angle just before him was a
young woman whose features, whose
mannerisms he recognized. The whip whipcord
cord whipcord riding habit had given place now
to a tailored suit which deprived her
of the boyishness that had been so
apparent on their first meeting. The
cap had disappeared before a close close-fitting,
fitting, close-fitting, varicolored turban. But the
straying brown hair still was there,
the brown eyes, the piquant little nose
and the prettily formed Hps. Fair Fair-child's
child's Fair-child's heart thumped nor did he stop
to consider why. A quickening of his
pace, and he met her just as she
stepped to the curbing.
Tm so glad of this opportunIty,,
he exclaimed happily. "I want to re return
turn return that money to you. I I was so
fussed yesterday I didn't realize
"Aren't you mistaken?" She looked
at him with a slight smile. Falrchild
did not catch the inflection.
"Oh. no. Tm the man, you know,
who helped you change that tire on
the Denver road yesterday."
"Pardon me." This time one brown
eye had wavered ever so slightly. In Indicating
dicating Indicating someone behind Falrchild.
"But I wasn't on the Denver road
yesterday, and if you'll excuse me for
saying so, I don't remember ever hav having
ing having seen you before."
There was a little light in her eyes
which took away the sting of the de denial,
nial, denial, a light which seemed to urge cau caution,
tion, caution, and at the same time to tell Fair Fair-child
child Fair-child that she-trusted him to do his
part as a gentleman in a thing she
wished forgotten. More fussed than
ever, he drew back and bent low in
apology, while she passed on. Half a
block away, m young man rounded a
corner and. rt-in her. hastened to
join her. ;-he extended her hand;
they chatted a moment, then strolled

up tne street t.'tner. raircmi'i
watched blan!:!v. then turned at a
lie1-le just ? e,;;:d him enianaT'ns
;'i;r r?e beanie! l'. of an old miner,
afinr on the t-.r,e coping in front
-f n -mail son-.
"I"'- ti.e wrrnis fiily. pardner?"
liitne ttm query. Faln-hild managed
"Hness so." Then he Hod on!-k!y.
"T thonirht she was a girl from Den Denver."
ver." Denver." "Her? The old miner stretched.
"Xo'if. Tint's Anita Richmond, old
Judge Hi. iiinon d"s daughter. fJuess
fche must hev been expecting that
yonng fellow or she wouldn't have
cut you oil so short. She ain't usually
that way."
"Her fianr-e?" Fairchild asked the
question with misgiving. The miner
finished his stretch and added a yawn
to it. Then he looked appraisingly up
the street toward the retreating fig figures.
ures. figures. "Well, some say he Is and some
say he ain't. Guess It mostly depends
on the girl, and she ain't telling yet."
"And the man who is he?"
"Him? Oh, he's Maurice Rodaine.
Son of a pretty famous character

"Oh, He's Maurice Rodaine."
around here, old Squint Rodaine.
Owns the Silver Queen property up
the hill. Ever hear of him?"
The eyes of Robert Falrchild nar narrowed,
rowed, narrowed, and a desire to fight a long longing
ing longing to grapple with Squint Rodaine
and all that belonged to him surged
Into his heart. But his voice, when he
spoke, was slow and suppressed.
"Squint Rodaine? Yes, I think I
have. The name sounds rather fa familiar."
miliar." familiar." Then, deliberately, he started up the
street, following at a distance the
man and the girl who walked before
him.
(Continued Tomorrow)
Oldest Known Paint.
White lead is the very oldest light light-col
col light-col ned paint of which anj tiling is
known. It was mentioned by the
Ore 'k general, Xenophon, who wrote
some 400 years B. C. It was made by
putting vinegar in a jar then some
tv. igs to support the layers of lead
a! ove the vinegar. After the lead was
placed on the twigs the jar was cov covered
ered covered to keep out the dirt and buried
in stable manure. The manure fer fermented,
mented, fermented, produced a gentle heat and
also carbonic acid gas.
When the jar was opened after, a
considerable period the lead would
le corroded under the influence or
ttie heat and gas. Thus a large pro proportion
portion proportion of the lead would be ehangei
into a fine white powder v hich would
be purified and used as a pigment for
paint.
"Charge of the Light Brigade."
The charge of the light cavalry at
the battle of Balaklava in 1S54 during
the Crimean war, and celebrated in
Tennyson's great poem. "The Charge
of the I-ight Brigade," was one of the
most noted military actions of modern
times. It was the result of a serious
blunder on the part of the British
commander.
A large force of Russians, more or
less disorganized by the British heavy
cavalry, was attacked by the "Light
Brigade," under Lord Cardigan. The
Russians had reformed on their own
ground, and of the 070 of the British
force, only 198 returned to their own
lines after the failure of the charge.
It was in this same action that the
British infantry was first termed a
"thin red line."
Fertilize your pot prants and lawn
flowers with Albert's Plant Food. Sold
in 25c, 50c and $2 packages at the
Court Pharmacy. 18-tt
BETTER let Ditto figure with you
on the home building proposition. Lots
and material will go up now and then
you will be sorry you' didn't act on
the suggestion. Buy and build now,
Ditto, Realtor. 11-tf
Coal may soon be on the "I know
where you can get it list." Wall
Street Journal.
The buyer will visit the store to
which he or she is invited a half dozen
times oftener than the one which
doesnt' invite them. Advertise.
Seed for fall gardens at Bitting's
Drug Store. Phone 14. 14-12t

BUSINESS MEN IN SCOUTING
Barron Collier of New York City is
typical of some of the biggest business
men In The country who are devoting
much time to boy scout interests. Mr.
Collier is a man of very extensive na national
tional national business interests. He is vice vice-chairman
chairman vice-chairman of the Greater New York
committee of which Franklin D.
Roosevelt is chairman. Mr. Collier Is
himself chairman of the camping
committee for Greater New York,
which Is operating at this time the
largest boys camp in the world.

. '. ...-:-,..-: :.::v
' V ' X f
t'M-UyA ft

Barron Collier.
This camp Is located at Kanohwahke
lakes, Bear mountain, Interstate Pali Palisades
sades Palisades park, New York. This camp ac accommodates
commodates accommodates 2,700 boys per week and
consists of 21 different mess units.
Boys come not only from Greater New
York but froni Westchester county,
New Y'ork state, and many communi communities
ties communities in New Jersey.
It is through the Interest of men
like Mr. Collier, Mr. Roosevelt, Morti Mortimer
mer Mortimer L. Schiff, and others, that ac accomplishments
complishments accomplishments of this kind are pos possible.
sible. possible. BOY SCOUTS NUMBER 432,013
It has just been officially announced
that the gain in boy scouts during the
past full year has been 18,544. This
makes the present total of boy scouts
432,013, the high water mark in the
history of scouting. The number of
scout officials in the country today is
127,580, making a grand total of 559, 559,-500
500 559,-500 scouts and scout officials.
These figures were given out in a
report of the chief scout executive at
a meeting of the executive board of
the national council of the Boy Scouts
of America, which was held a short
time ago. This was the last meeting
of the executive board until fall.
Other figures showing a great con constant
stant constant increasing Interest in scouting,
the country over, are that during the
past five months of this year a total
of 57,000 merit badges were obtained
by scouts as compared with 40,736 for
the same period last year, or a gain
of 41 per cent. Hie merit badges are
the awards of merit that a scout at attains
tains attains after he goes on up the ladder
from a first class scout. Five hundred
and sixty-seven boys have qualified as
eagle scouts, as compared with 329
during the same period of last year.
Eagle scout represents the highest
standard of scouting that a boy can
attain.
All of the above figures are very
significant of the onward march of the
largest movement for boys In Jthe
world that has to do with character
building and citizenship training.
GOOD TURN TO HOSPITAL
Terre Haute scouts have, by their
own earnings, provided for the fur furnishing
nishing furnishing of a room at the New Union
hospital. In carrying through this
project it is worth noting that the
boys adhered strictly to scout prin principles
ciples principles and asked no money from the
public. The Terre Haute Star In
commenting upon this good turn,
says : "Through the years to come that
the hospital serves humanity the boy
scout room will remain as a memorial
to the great movement to make better
boys and as a tribute to the boys who
were inspired to be helpful In a sub substantial
stantial substantial way for the lasting benefit of
the community.'
TAKE A BOOK TO CAMP
The library commission of the Boy
Scouts of America Is developing a na nationwide
tionwide nationwide campaigning In the Interest of
the literature of the out-of-doors.
"Take a Book to Camp" Is the slogan.
Editorial features are appearing in all
scout publications and effort is being
made to interest national and local
organizations to lend co-operation in
making it possible for boys to take
with them to camps such books on the
out-of-doors as will make nature the
more meaningful to them
"Say it with flowers" and buy the
flowers from Sirs. J. E. Hyndman, Vt
miles out on the Dunnellon road.
Phone 30M. 10-tf
BETTER not wait until after the
fire. Let Ditto insnre you now, and
carry the worry. 11-tf

THE BEST MEATS and
THE BEST GROCERIES
Are none too good for our patrons, and that's
the only kind we ask them to accept. If any anything
thing anything we furnish you is otherwise let us know
and they're ours.
COOK'S MARKET and GROCERY
Phones 243 and 174

"roof STORAGE
WHITE STAR LINE
Negotiable Storage Receipts Issued on Cotton, Automobiles, lite

I
MOVE, PACK, SHIP
LIVE STOCK,
PIANOS, BAGGAGE,
MACHINERY,
FURNITURE, ETC
tttmm:
The
Windsor
Hotel
JACKSONVILLE, FLA
..iiiii iiii.iii
NOTUB OF INTENTION TO
, APPL1 FOR LETTERS PATENT
Notice is hereby given that the un undersigned
dersigned undersigned intend to apply to the Hon Honorable
orable Honorable Cary A. Hardee, governor of the
state of Florida, on the twenty-fourth
day of Ausrust, A. D. 1922, at Talla Tallahassee,
hassee, Tallahassee, Florida, for Issuance of letters
patent on the following proposed char charter
ter charter of Citra Ice, Light & Development
Company.
This the twelfth day of August, A.
D. 1922.
M A. RICE.
V. M. KNIGHT.
W. T. DUPREE.
H. GILBERT.
The Proponed Charter of CItrs lee,
Light & Development Compuf
1. The name of the corporation shall
be: Citra Ice, Light & Development
Company. The principal place of busi business
ness business of said corporation shall be In
Citra, in Marion county, Florida, but it
may establish such other jjlace or
places of business, either within or
without the state of Florida, as it may
deem proper.
2. The general nature of the busi business
ness business to be transacted by said corpora corporation
tion corporation shall be:
To generate, manufacture, buy, selL
deal in, distribute and produce elec electricity
tricity electricity and ice. To own, build, acquire,
buy, sell, lease, maintain and opera.te
electric light plants and systems, water
works, plants and systems and cold
storage plants. To buy, build, acquire,
own, sell, maintain, lease and operate
electric lines, power lines and all other
things, devices, machines and appar apparatus
atus apparatus for the transmission of electricity.
To buy, sell, lease, rent, own and main maintain
tain maintain all things necessary or useful In
the operation of cold storage plants or
ice plants. To own, buy, sell, deal In,
lease, rent and acquire all kinds of
electrical machinery, devices, eqnlp eqnlp-ment,
ment, eqnlp-ment, supplies and apparatus; also all
kinds of machinery, pipe, stand pipes,
reservoirs and other devices useful in
the pumping, distribution or storage
of water. To secure and accept fran franchises
chises franchises from cities and towns for the
operation of electric, ice and water
plants therein and to enter into any
and all contracts in regard thereto. To
buy, sell, deal in, produce,
develop, own, operate, lease, mortgage,
acquire and convey orange groves,
farms, all kinds of fruit orchards, real
estate, all kinds of personal property,
farm products, live stock, farm and or orchard
chard orchard tools and supplies and all kinds
of citrus fruits and other orchard pro products.
ducts. products. To build houses for sale or rent.
To build, buy, sell, operate and main maintain
tain maintain water mains and water pipe lines
for the transmission of water. To bor borrow
row borrow and lend money either with or
without security. To issue, buy, sell,
deal in, acquire and exchange all forms
of securities, stocks, bonds and nego negotiable
tiable negotiable instruments, including its own.
To give and take mortgages on per personal
sonal personal property and real estate. To act
as agent and broker far others and to
act with respect to any one or more of
the businesses or powers above men mentioned
tioned mentioned in this charted as producer,
manufacturer, jobber, wholesaler, re retailer,
tailer, retailer, partner, factor, agent or other otherwise
wise otherwise and likewise to carry on its busi business
ness business thru others as such. To have and
exercise all such other rights, powers,
privileges and immunities in addition
to those herein mentioned which it
would be competent to herein enumer-
3! The amount of authorized capital
stock of said corporation shall bo
Thirty Thousand Dollars ($30,000.00) to
be divided into 600 shares of the "par
value of Fifty Dollars ($50.00) each. All
or any portion of the capital stock
may be paid in cash or in property,
labor or services, at a Just valuation to
be flxed by the board of directors at a
meeting called for such purpose.
4. The term for which this corpora corporation
tion corporation shall exist shall be nine hundred
and ninety-nine years.
5. The business of this corporation
shall oe conducted by a president, first
vie president, second vice president
secretary and treasurer, and board of
directors. Any. two offices may be held
by the same person. The board of
directors shall consist of not less than
three or more than seven members.
The directors shall be elected by the
stockholders at the annual stockhold stockholders'
ers' stockholders' meeting- and the other officers shall
be elected by the board of directors at
their firft meeting after each annual
stockholders meeting. The annual
Ttifctines of this corporation shall be
held on the first Tuesday In January of

TRANSFER

s
LONG DISTANCE MOVING
Phone 296
s
::
In the heart of the city, with
Hemming Park for a front
yard- Every modern conveni convenience
ence convenience in each room. Dining
room service is second to none.
IOBERT M. MEYER, Manager,
r. E. KAVANAUGH, Proprietor.
minim1 1
each year, and the first meeting of said
corporation shall be held on the first
Tuesday in September, A. D. 1922. The
following officers shall conduct the
business of said corporation until those
elected at the first annual election
shall have qualified:
President, M. A. Rice.
Secretary, W. M. Knight.
Treasurer; W. M. Knight.
Board of Directors: M. A. Rice, W.
M. Knight. W. T. DuPree, H. Gilbert.
6. The highest amount of indebted indebtedness
ness indebtedness to which this corporation can at
any time subject itself Is Thirty
Thousand Dollars ($30,000.00).
7. The names, residences and amount
o'f stock subscribed for by each of the
subscribers are as follows:
M. A. Rice, Citra, Fla.. 20 sharea
W. M. Knight, Citra, Fla, 20 sharea
TV. T. DuPree, Citra, Fla,, 20 shares.
H. Gilbert, Citra, Fla., 20 shares.
COUNTY OF MARION,
STATE OF FLORIDA.
I hereby certify that this day per personally
sonally personally appeared before me, the under undersigned
signed undersigned authority, M. A. Rice, W. M.
Knight, W. T. DuPree and H. Gilbert,
all to me well known and known to me
to be the individuals described In and
who subscribed the foregoing proposed
charter and articles of incorporation
of Citra Ice, Light & Development Com Company,
pany, Company, and who did each acknowledge
before me that they did each sign the
same for the uses and purposes therein
set forth and expressed, and that they
did each subscribe for the number of
shares of capital stock of said cor corporation
poration corporation set opposite his name. M
Witness my signature and official
seal at Citra, in Marion county. Flor Florida,
ida, Florida, this the twelfth day of August. A.
' ("') 8. A. GRAVES.
Notary Public State of Florida at
Large. My commission expires Novem November
ber November 6, 1925.
mmmmmm
WE do not charge 0
" any thing extra
for the high quality of ll
printing we do or the
Let us do your next
s? iob in commercial
jg printing.
jg. Phone 51
(5 Star Publishing Co.
Jnst received Ballard's Obelisk
Flour. Let us supply your grocery
needs. Main Street Market. Phone
108. S. Main street. 22-tf
The more you see of our methods of
hardline? fresh meats the better you
like it. Come and see us. Main Street
'Market. Phone 108. tf



OCALA EVENING STAB, TUESDAY, AUGUST 15, 1922

I

MerFIrst Love Affair.
One mgftnffght night after attendm
a literary fiwiety meeting at a rnral
school house, a friend of mine esrorted ;
roe to my home, writes a correspond correspond-em.
em. correspond-em. As we stepped upon the front I
porch. Rorer, our flog, decided the
stranger did not belong there. He
chased him tmtil he jumped over the j
hedge.! laaglied, of course. Others re-
turning from the meeting saw the
entire scene. A full account of the j
Incident was given In the paper at the.
next meeting. This ended my first j
love affair.

OCALA Q0CURRENCE8

If you have any local or society
items for the Star, call five-one.

ANOTHER BAND CONCERT i
FRIDAY EVENING

Mrs. L. W. Ponder returned yester yesterday
day yesterday from Tampa, where she has been
visiting her sister, Mrs. Sayle.

The friends of Mr. T. H. Johnson j
are glad to know that he is again able
to be out after two weeks' illness. (

j
Wets will ret little relief through

the Literary Digest's Prohibition poll. 1
It isn't that kind of a ctraw. Wash-
ington Post. I

Plant your garden now. Get your

seed at Pnuhps Drug Company. lo-3t

One wonders what became of those-(
clothes we sent the Belgians when, one :
sees the pictures taken on the beach j

at Ostend. Life.

Mrs. E. C. Staley and children ex expect
pect expect to leave tomorrow for Manitou,
Colo., where they will spend several
weeks.

The weatHer permitting, the band
will give a concert on the square Fri Friday
day Friday night. It will be a benefit concert.
The appropriation made by the city
for concerts this summer has been ex exhausted
hausted exhausted and funds must be raised by
public subscription if the concerts are
X) continue. A collection will be
taken up at the concert Friday night,
therefore., and it is hoped that at least
S5C0 will be raised, so that the con concerts
certs concerts can continue at least six weeks ;
monger.

ABVERTISETsi&W

The "A" Club, which usually meets
Monday evening, will meet this week
Thursday evening, rith Mrs. H. C.
Nichols as hostess.

rilATES under this heading are aa

25c; three times 50c; six titnea 75c; one I

month 3

advance ex

ular adve

The f.plendor of days and starry
nights at sea invigorate and rest one.
Ask Mr. C. M. Haile, general agent,

.00. AH accounts ynyahie la j Jacksonville, about Merchants and
!xcept to those who have reg- M- -i
rtiains accounts. Miners service. ii

WANTED Plain and fancy sewing,
Mrs. C. B. Abbott, 614 East Adams
street. Phone 579. 15-3t
" '- r i -in- i .1-
FOR SALE A rooster, six hens, 16
broilers, coop, brooders, feeding
troughs, also some hardware. A
bargain is sold in a lot. Apply to
C. L. Nelson, North Ocala. 15-3t
WANTED Field peas. Ocala Seed &
Supply Company. 14-lt

A friend in Torrington, Conn., sends
it sthe following. He says Mrs. Col Collins
lins Collins is from Oklawaha, this county:
:Mrs. Michael F. Collins, wife of Dep Deputy
uty Deputy Sheriff Michael F. Collins of Mil-

bid, is a patient at St. Raphael's hos-

ital in New Haven. She underwent
n operation and word from the hos

pital today is to the c-ffect that her

.ir.Jttion is favorable. She and her
lusband have visited Torrington fre frequently
quently frequently of late years and both have- a

number of friends here. The patient's
husband is brother of John M. Collins.

raoprietor of the Germania hotel on
East Main street."

Cranford Standley returned to

Gainesville yesterday after a short

visit with his mother, Mrs. S. A.

Standley.

STRAYED White and red speckled
milk cow; dehorned. Reward. W.
T. Hall, South Orange Ave. 14-3t
WANTED To buy a home with modr
ern conveniences. Give location and
lowest cash price. Address. Box
266, city. 14-3t
LOST Gold rimmed eyeglasses, be be-tween's
tween's be-tween's Gerig's Drug tSore and
.public library. Reward for return
to Mrs. L. H. Van Engelken, 709
E. Fifth street. 14-3t

FOR SALE One International speed

truck, slightly used; cab tip and

express body. Practically good as
new. See D. W. Tompikn3 at O'Neal

& Holly's garage. 14-6t

FOUND On Sanchez street Friday

afternoon, headlight rim and class

apparently from Ford car. Call at
my house and pay for this ad. B.
N. Dosh. 12-3t

Mrs. Kate Clements and Mrs. C. L.

Bittinger went to Lake Weir yester yesterday
day yesterday afternon to spend this week with

Mrs. Alex Wynne.

BETTER be safe than sorry. Ditto

works for your town. Why not insure

with Ditto? tf

Mrs. E. G. Lindner and children
and Mrs. Sam Pyles and baby are

spending this week in Candler at the

orange grove recently purchased by

Dr. Lindner.

Mr. and Mrs. John Mathews of

Candler were visitors in Ocala yester

day. They expect to leave today for

a vacation in the mountains of North

Carolina.

Miss Martha Isaac of Jacksonville
md Mrs. Max Kraft of Savannah, are

rju&sts of their sister, Mrs. J. Malever.

Early this morning a party composed

of Mr. and Mrs. J. Malever, Mr. Fred

Malever, Mr. and -Mrs. R. Malever and
Mrs. Malever's two sisters left for Mi Miami.
ami. Miami. They will probably return the
last of this week.

Fresh garden seeds at Phillips
Drug Company. 15-3t

BETTER insure before rather than
after the fire. Let Ditto insure you. tf

WANTED Young white man wants
work. Experienced truck driver.
Frank Oswald, No 1 West Fifth
street. ll-3t
FOR SALE Old Trusty incubator,
150 to 17.S-.egg capacity, good as
now, price $17; some good chick
coops also chick fencing and used
lumber; 2-eight inch tiling. J. E.
Frampton, 1109 E. 5th St., Ocala,
Fla. Phone 501. 10-6t
FOR RENT Upstairs and downstairs
unfurnished apartments, six rooms
and bath each. Front, back and
sleeping porches, private entrances.
Enquire at house. Mrs. S. A. Stand Stand-ley,
ley, Stand-ley, 447 Oklawaha avenue. 10-6t
FOR SALE 1920 Dodge touring car;
1921 Nash six touring car. Blalock
Bros. Phone 78. 9-tf
FOR RENT One lower furnished
bed room; also garage. Apply to
Mrs Geo. F. Young, 215 South Tus Tus-cawilla
cawilla Tus-cawilla St. Phone 543. 7-6t
FOR SALE On Fort King avenue,
easy terms, lot 60 by 500. See
Mrs. J. II. Cramer, East Fort King
avenue. 2-tf

LET MOTHERS REST-Special rates
for families through the summer
months. Children half price, at the
Arms Houe. 26-tf

Mrs. S. A. Standley had as her over over-Sunday
Sunday over-Sunday guests her brother, Mr. John
S. Edwards, and family of Lakeland.
They are en route to Randolph county,
Georgia, for a visit with relatives.

Mr. and Mrs. James Engesser have
as their guest, Mr. Engesser's nephew,
Mr. W. M. Engesser of Atlanta. They
expect to go to Salt Springs tomor tomorrow,
row, tomorrow, where Mr. W. M. Engesser will
remain for a few days.

BETTER Duy a lot betore they go
up, and build a home vvhile materials
are cheap. Let Ditto show you. 11 tf

Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Hays of Dawson,
Ga., have come to Ocala and expect to
make their home here. Mr. Hays has
a position with the Chero-Cola plant
and Mr. and Mrs. Hays are for the
present making their home with Mr.
J. B. Christie.

A 25-cent package of Albert's Plant
Food will perform wonders with your
pot plants. Try it. Sold at the Court
Pharmacy. tf

Mr. and Mrs. T. M. Moore moved
yesterday into their new home on the
lower floor of the Bell flat. Mr. L. T.
Izlar, who for the past three years
has had a room- at the Moore resi residence,
dence, residence, has moved to the S. R. Whaley
home on Oklawaha.

DR. K. J. WEIMK.

v. .Optometrist nzd Gptiris

VY Eyesight Specuiift
114 Main Street, Jacksonville
18 East Broadway, Ccala

PAINTING

BRING JtCUK ARS AROUND
08 CALL US

PHONE 8

SPHVCER-PEDRICK
MOTOR CO.

Albert's Plant Food is the thing; for
making your flower garden and pet
plants bloom. It is odorless and is
sold in 25c. and 50c, packages and $2
sacks. At the Court Pharmacy, tf

The regular weekly meeting, of the
sewing circle of the Eastern Star wi?l
be held at the hall tomorrow after afternoon
noon afternoon at 3:30 o'clock.

Mr. and Mrs. N. A. RusselT return returned
ed returned last night from a pleasant two
weeks visit with friends and. relatives
in Plant City.

Albert's Plant Food for flowers; 2?c
and 50c. packages. Sold at the Court
Pharmacy. l?--tf

Messrs. L. D. Beck, J. R. Shearer
and H. L. Shearer of Cottage Hill,
shipped a carload of fat hoes to JacV-

! sonville last week and received top
j quotations for them.
I Mr. James Gilmore is again at his
! place in the Ocala National Bank after
i a six weeks absence in Gainesville,
; where he took a business course at
the summer school.

R. D. Fuller, dentist. Union block,
phone 601. S-2-tf

Mr. and Mrsr James Floyd, former
residents of Ocala, stopped in town
Sunday en route from Gainesville,
where they have been visiting Mr.
Floyd's mother. They were en route
to Tampa, where Mr. Floyd is now
connected with a produce firm.

Mrs. B. Goldman, who has been vis visiting
iting visiting relatives in Savannah for some
time, is expected home tonight. She
will be accompanied by her mother,

Mrs. I. Malever. Mrs. Goldman has j
been quite sick for some time but is j
now much improved. j

Mrs. Dillard of Kissimmee is in the
city, the guest of Miss Ullaine Bar Bar-nett.
nett. Bar-nett. Mrs. Dillard has many friends
la the city, having attended the Ocala
high school.

Mr. West Keeffe of Gainesville
spent Sunday in Ocala with his moth mother,
er, mother, Mrs. S. L. Keeffe. Mr. Keeffe came

especially to see his mother, who haj.
been sick for the past week. y
d
W. M. Harper and wife of Citra
were callers at the Star office today.
Mr. Harper had some of the finest
syrup that we have seen in a lon

time.

The friends of Mrs. Philip G. Mur Murphy
phy Murphy are glad to have her with them
again. She returned hon-je yesterday,
and is receiving a warm welcome.

Mr. Frank Churchi.il is spending his
vacation with his si iter in Miami.

LAKE GRIFFIN GUAVAS now
ripe. Best fruit for jelly. Per crate
$1.50 f. o. b. Leesburg. Give orders
to Fred W. Cook, Ocala, or address
F. E. WETHERBEE, Leesburg, "Florida-
15-12t

'rmowncvng

A vdiolfyiVew line o cars buut on time-tried
Buick principles but with improvements and
refinements which make their introduction
an event of nation-wide interest.
14 Distinctive Models
Astonishing Values and Prices

SIX CYLINDER MODELS

23-41 Tour. Sedan, 5 pass.
23-44 Roadster, 2 pass
23-45 Touring, 5 pass
23-47 Sedan, 5 pass
23-48 Coupe, 4 pass
23-49 Touring, 7 pass..

$2140
f ?? A
1370
22G0
2100
J025

1820
1875

23-54 Sport Road, 3 pass..
23 55 Sport Tour, 4 pass.

FOUR CYLINDER MODELS
23-34 Roadster, 2 pass $1000
23 35-Touring, 5 pass 1020
23-36 Coupe, 3 pass 1360
23-37 Sedan. 5 pass. 1575
23-38 -Tour. Sednn, 5 pass. 1500

23-50 Sedan, 7 pass 2210

Delivered in Marion, Sumter, Citrus snd Levy Counties

2

- -.

A V.I

m M ttm E M H. M

or n v i

PHONE 8

C XL&9 FLORIDA

Co

WHEN BETTEK AUTOMOBILES ARE BUILT, BUICK WILL BUILD THETfr

TURNER FARM

During this abuse of the bootJeg bootJeg-gers,
gers, bootJeg-gers, we should not forget that no one
has ever charged them with drinking

tneir own stuff. Boston Shoe and

Leather Reporter.

Turner Farm, Aug. 15. Mr. J. T.
Hall and family spent Sunday with'
Mr. and Mrs. Hardee.
Mr. W. W. John made a business
trip to Ocala Tuesday.
Mrs. S. S. Smith is visiting her
daughter, Mrs. Owen, at Umatilla this

week.

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Harper of Or

ange S urines visited Mr. Harper's

brother. Mr. W. M. Harper, here Sunday.

The candy pulling given by Miss

Gladys- Hardee Wednesday night was

greatly enjoyed by all who attended.
Some cl those attending were Misses
Leonis and Grace Brown and Mr.
Norman Brown of Lochloosa and Mr.
Hobson Fryar of Hawthorn.
Mr. C-laf Harper spent Saturday
and Sunday with his grandparents,
Mr. and Mrs. L. T. Matchett, near
Bay Lake.
Mr. Luther L. Waldron of this place
and Miss Alma May Marsh of Bur Bur-bank
bank Bur-bank weve married Thursday at the
home of the bride's parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Marsh. The wedding dinner was
served at the home of Mr. Waldron's

sister, Mrs. A. W. Wells. The bride
and groom left in their car for the
eat coast. We join with their many
fi-iends in wishing them a long and
happy married life.
- v -ind Mrs. L. T. Matchett spent
q. with Mr. an:l Mrs. I. N. Wells.
M ?s ;rs. Clyde and Felder Wells left
lo: ihi Eat Coast Thursday.
::cv. Hardester and Rev. J. C. Boat Boat-wright
wright Boat-wright will hold a protracted meeting
i-t.fc i--2ginring Sunday, Aug. 28th.
-.e.jbcdy is invited to attend.

TTO)

r

CLEAN Tt

TUNE

We are equipped to give com complete
plete complete renovation and repair
service on your car. We get It
ready for the road in jig time
and at low prices. All expert
workmen.

Something Doing.
T!k- job is v.-hut counts. The world
riu-v(..-ts the man wlio works. It has

small use or re.ievt for the man who
loafs becav.se he f..e!s himself above
the jo!, that offered Mm. The man
who produces t,oiiierhing even though
it be nothing more than a day's work j
at the bottom of a trench, is of more ;
importance to the world than he who
loiter for a kid glove situation. Lo
Angelas Times.
7h: ".iiver.toi- of the ukulele has!
-.u :--t died in Hawtii. As he reached i
Ine age of ahnost eighty, he seems
T.ba iy to l.ave lived down his crime.
i'.ruc".-:?ster Union.

OIL GREASE

DIXIE HIGHWAY
GARAGE
JAMES ENGESSER
Phone 258 Night Phone 535
121 West Broadway
Ocala, Florida.

SEVEN DAY SERVICE

323TE

New garden and flower seed now at
;tting's Drug Store. Phone 14. 14-12t

I TEMPORARY

$1 CORD 15 OFF
I OCALA

REDUCTION ON EELLY-SPRINGFIELD TIRES
-UKTIL FUKl'HEE NOTICE

old pmcz

PIUCE

30x3 Fabric $12.93 $ 9.S3
3')x.'Ua 54.70 12.00
:V2:3' Cotd 24.3U 20.50
.52x4 44 32.75 27.85
33x4 -7 2870
H'dxitf 42.40 36.00
33x4 41.00 37.40
34x4y2 44.30 37.60
33x5 52.30 44.40
35x5 '! 54.40 46.20

Y71

WITH
ifri t

AUTO a GAEAG
PHONE 24

FABRIC 20 OFF

COMPANY



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English
eng
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mods:caption 1922
mods:number 1922
Enum2
August
8
Enum3
15
15
lccn 84027622
oclc 11319138
mods:titleInfo
mods:title Ocala weekly star
mods:subject SUBJ651_1 lcsh
mods:geographic Ocala (Fla.)
Newspapers
SUBJ651_2
Marion County (Fla.)
Newspapers
mods:hierarchicalGeographic
mods:country United States
mods:state Florida
mods:county Marion
mods:city Ocala
mods:nonSort The
Ocala evening star
uniform
Ocala Evening Star
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Star
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sobekcm:VID 06275
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sobekcm:Name Porter & Harding
sobekcm:PlaceTerm Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
sobekcm:Source
sobekcm:statement UF University of Florida
sobekcm:SortDate 693595
sobekcm:serial
sobekcm:SerialHierarchy level 1 order 1922 1922
2 8 August
3 15 15
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