The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:06263

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
M STAR

GALA

EVEN

WEATHER FORECAST iGenerallj fair tonight; Wednesday local thunderehowers.
TEMPERATURES This morning:, 72; thk afternoon, S3.
OCALA, FLORIDA, TUESDAY, AUGUST 1, 1922
VOLUME TWENTY-EIGHT. NO. 182
Son Rises Tomorrow, 5 ;47; Sets, 7:20.

SECOIID MOUTH OF
UIILUCKV DAT
E
THE E
A LOFTY CLIMB
THE SCREWS Oil

W .. T -----

FOR

CONFERENCE TO BE
HELD III CLEVELAND

Oil

A

AK

HA

OT

FHIITFDL MILl'l
DISASTER III FMIICE
Almost a Hundred People Killed Or
Injured When Two Trains
Came Together

RAILROAD

TIE

i nu

Or

Begins Today With All Hands Expect Expecting
ing Expecting a Satisfactory Settle-
ment

i.

Chicago, Aug. 1. (By Associated
' Press). The railroad strike today en entered
tered entered its second month with meetings
in Chicago and New York which are
expected in some quarters to end the
walk-out immediately. Union' chiefs
are meeting here and the railway ex executives
ecutives executives in New York to consider
, ''resident Harding's plan for settle settle-,
, settle-, ment.
HARDING WAS BLUFFING
, Washington, August 1. President
Harding's proposal for ending the rail

strike provides, with reference to the
big controversial point of seniority,
that "all employes now on strike be
' returned to work and to their former
positions with their seniority and
other rights unimpaired."
... - v v
WITH SOME IF NOT ALL
Chicago, Aug. 1. (By Associated
Press). The proposition that the
striking shop crafts settle their strike
with roads willing to agree to Presi Presi-.
. Presi-. dent Harding's proposals regardless of
whether the roads agre to them, will
be laid before the meeting of union
, chiefs in session here.

Slaughter on the Railroad When Pic Picnic
nic Picnic and Passenger Trains
Met Near Cincinnati

Cincinnati,, Aug.. 1. Fifteen per persons
sons persons were killed today when an out outbound
bound outbound negro excursion train on the
Cincinnati, Lebanon & Northern rail railroad
road railroad collided with a regular passenger
train at Pleasant Ridge, a suburb. The

excursion train was carrying negroesjment designed to terminate the pres

for a Sunday school picnic, when it

was struck head-on by an incoming
passenger. It is not known whether
the dead were on the excursion on the
passenger train.
HIT PICNIC TRAIN HEAVY

The injured number 50 to 75. The
southbound train was composed of
five cars and the excursion train of
three. They came together with ter terrific
rific terrific force, telescoping each other.
Most of the fatalities were among the
negroes. Cincinnati fire apparatus,
ambulances, live, saving squads, -patrolmen
and firemen rushed to the
scene to give what aid possible.

Operators and Miners in Central Coal
Fields Will Try to Reach
An Agreement

Philadelphia, Aug. 2. (Associated
Press) A joint wage conference of
opeartors and miners of : the central
competitive bituminous fields to be
held in Cleveland next Monday for the
purpose of negotiating a basic agree-

CHICAGO'S STREETCAR
S MEN ON STRIKE

GLOVER GRABBED IN GRIFFIN

Three Million People of the Windy
City Seeking Improvised.
Transportation

ent coal strike was called today by
President Lewis, of the United Mine
Workers. Lewis also summoned the
general policy committee of the union

to meet in Cleveland at the same time

or the purpose of -acting promptly on

developments as they may occur at
the jpint wage conference. All men
will remain on strike until an agree agreement
ment agreement or definite understanding has

been reached. ; s

INDIANA OPERATORS WONT AT-

V TEND
Indianapolis, Aug. 1. Indiana op

erators will not attend the conference

called at Cleveland by President Lewis

of the miners union for" the purpose
of negotiating a wage agreement for
the central competitive field, the pres

ident of the Indiana coal operators or organization
ganization organization announced today.

Griffin, Ga., Aug. 1. A negro be believed
lieved believed to be John Glover, wanted in
' Macon on a murder charge in connec connec-.
. connec-. tion with the killing of Deputy Sheriff
Byrd and fatal shooting of George

Marshall, negro, and seriously wound wound-'.
'. wound-'. ing another ; negro there Saturday
night, was arrested here early today
after he had shot and wounded Police-
man T. F. Phelps.! :
v Going After Glover
. Macon, Aug. 1 More than twenty-
five automobiles loaded with men are
: en route to Griffin. Officers fear a
V i lynching if the negro is removed from
the Griffin jail. The sheriff's office
stated if the negro is Glover he will
. not be brought back to Macon.
. Got Him
i- x Macon, Aug. 1. Overtaken by a

Chicago, Aug. 1. (By Associated

Press), Twenty thousand motormen,
conductors and guards on surface and

elevated lines went on strike here to to-day
day to-day against a 17 per cent wage reduc

tion and the greater working portion

of Chicago's nearly 3,000,000 popula

tion was forced to seek improvised

transportation. Hundreds of thou

sands walked while others rode every

kind of conveyance. Jitneys from

nearby cities assisted local automo

biles and trucks.

"A" CLUB ENTERTAINED t

BY MRS. ALBERT HARRISS

V

The regular weekly meeting "bfthe
"A" club which was held last night
with Mrs. Albert Harriss as hostess,
proved a delightful evening for all

Increased $8.50 Per Bale in New
Orleans on Report of Depart Department
ment Department of Agriculture

New Orleans, Aug. 1 Cotton jump jumped
ed jumped $8.50 per bale here today 'immed 'immediately
iately 'immediately after the department of agricul agriculture
ture agriculture report placing the condition of
the growing crop at 70.8 per cent.
CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS
SAILS FROM CHICAGO

PERILS OF NEW YORK PIE

It Poisoned a Hundred People And

Shuffled Two Off

New York, Aug. 1. Two girl sten stenographers
ographers stenographers died today and nearly 100
other persons employed in the gar garment
ment garment house section of Broadway are
ill of poison believed to have been

taken in pie eaten in a restaurant at

Broadway and 26thsstreet yesterday.
GIVING A BOY A CHANCE

"mob of 300. the neero identified as the I present. A number of visitors were

.N slayer of Deputy Sheriff Byrd and a invited to join the regular club mem-

negro here Saturday night was put to
death at one o'clock today two miles
from Holton. The negro was arrested
at Griffin this morning, and was be being
ing being brought to Macon when the mob
got him. v

CHRISTIAN RELIEF
S IN THE CRIMEA

Constantinople,' July 1. (By Mail).
Inclined to be indifferent to relief
from non-Christian hands, the Moslem
inhabitants of the Crimea, still in
want, are appealing for succor to the
people of Anatolia, fellow Moslems.
"We have hopes that Turkey, Afghan

istan and Egypt will help us," they
say through their representatives,

"for we prefer a mouthful of bread

from the Turks to sacks of wheat from
other sources."
Nevertheless Christian relief is go going
ing going into the Crimea, for the American
Relief Administration is distributing
foodstuffs there, and Moslems also
have heeded the call. Through the
Red Crescent delegation to the Cri Crimea,
mea, Crimea, Turkey has sent 10,000 sacks of
. flour into the district.

bers at auction, which was the enter entertaining
taining entertaining game indulged in. Two of the
players of the evening were fortunate
enough to take home pretty souvenirs,

Miss Nettie Camp a cutex manciure
set, and Miss Adele Bittinger a Col Colgate's
gate's Colgate's week-end set.

The tables were placed in the long

living room, where many, vases of
beautiful pink roses were admired by

all. The refreshments were served
at the card tables and consisted of
fruit salad in moulds, potato chips, a
brown bread sandwich and iced tea.
Those playing during the evening
were Mrs. W. M. Palmer, Mrs. C. B.
Ayer, Mrs. Edmund Martin, Mrs. Sam
Leigh, Mrs. Harry Walters, Mrs. Paul
Simmons, Misses Nettie, Stella and
Carita Camp, Elizabeth Davis, Adele

Bittinger and Mary Burf ord.

Best full cream cheese per pound

25c. at the U-Serve Stores. l-3t

GEOGRAPHICAL CENTER
OF THE STATE

Tallahassee, Aug. 1 If Florida ever

begins to spin around on its geogra
phical center, the pivot will be in Her

nando county, twelve miles northwest
of Brooksville, according to the Unit

ed States Geological Survey.

The survey has just completed its

investigation to learn the center of

each state and that of the United
States. The center of the country, the

survey says, is in Smith county, in

northern Kansas. That has nothing
to do with the moot center of this
, state, however, and it is in Hernando
county, the survey says.
LYNCHING IN ARKANSAS

Mrs. James Nicholas left Saturday

for Fargo; Ga., the home of her
sister-in-law, Mrs. E. B. Hays, wtfth

who her little son, James Jr., has been

living the last few months. From

Fargo, Mrs. Nicholas and. her little

boy will go on to West Virginia, to

join Mr. Nicholas. After leaving here

some months ago, Mr. Nicholas went
to Brooklyn, and after some weeks
there went to West Virginia, where

his skill as a telegraph operator found
him a good place. As soon as he was
firmly settled in his new position, he

sent for his wife and baby. The
friends of this little family will rejoice

in their reunion, and hope they will

some day return to Ocala.

Hot Springs, Ark, Aug. 1. Bunk
Harris, negro, was taken from officers
here this morning and hanged in the
public square, following the death
early today of Maurice Connelly, an

x insurance solicitor, shot last night by

a negro burglar.

Mr. and Airs. W. J. Tillman and

baby left this afternoon for Indian

Springs, S. C, for a few weeks stay.

En route they will stop a few days

in Columbia.

Miss Myrtle McAteer, who has been

the guest of her cousin. Miss Haze

McAteer, at the home of Mr. and Mrs

Arthur Burgess, left today for her
home in Tampa, much to the regret of
the friends she has made during her

visit.

Best full cream cheese per pound

25c at the U-Serve Stores. l-3t

Economic and Financial Penalties To
, Be Inflicted for Germany's
Breach of Faith

Paris, Aug. 1. (By the Associated

Press). France will impose penalties

of an economic and financial character

uponv Germany on account of her re refusal
fusal refusal to continue payments on debts
contracted by her nationals with al allied
lied allied nationals before the war.

GOLF CHAMPION ABOUT TO

Jacksonville, Aug. 1. No matter

how incorrigible he may be a boy usu usually
ally usually will do what he promises if he

gives his word'of honor, but the gen

eral run of mankind apparently has

little" confidence in a bad one, J. G

Lanier, probation officer here, has the

knack of understanding boys. "Jim,!

as he is known to his" friends, also has

the confidence of thexboys of Jack

sonville and since he has confidence
in them, some of the things he does

in connection with his job of keeping

the lads in the straight and narrow
path cause narrow-minded folks to

hold up their hands in horror. Nine

ty-nine times in one hundred, how.

ever, "Jim's" confidence in a kid is not

misplaced.

Harry Williams, fifteen years old, Is

declared by juvenile court officials here
to have been one of the toughest

propositions ever to come to their notice.-
He was an incorrigible of the
incorrigible.s. Harry managed to be become
come become tangled in the coils of the court

again recently and it was the straw

that broke the camel's back. It was

decided to send him to the industrial

school at Marianna to remain until

he is twenty-one years of age", or un until
til until he has enough credits deposited in

the school's bank of merit to win his
release.-

Harry was lectured by attaches of

the court and in spite of his record

Mr. Lanier decided to let him go to)

Marianna alone. Harry gave his word

of honor that he would report at Ma

rianna and" Mr. Lanier furnished him

with a railroad ticket. The school au

thorities reported that Harry showed
up at the institution when scheduled.

It probably was the first time con

fidence had been shown in the boy

since he was old enough to realize
what it meant and it was too valua

ble for him to violate it. Mr. Lanier

in performing his duties keeps one

fact in mind which apparently is the

secret of his success in solving the in intricate
tricate intricate problems resulting from the

escapades of high spirited youngsters.
He remembers that he was a boy once

himself.

The K. of P. held a well attended
meeting last night and discussed im important
portant important business affairs. There was
an interlude about ten o'clock, during
which the lodge discussed ice cream
and cake.

Mr. E. L. Stapp; one of the enter enterprising
prising enterprising young men who Ocala loaned
to Miami, and who is making good in
that splendid city, is visiting his
friends here. Ocala is always glad to
see "Stappie."

Movie Reproduction of a Great Event
Being Made for School Children
Chicago, August L (By Associated
Press). History was rewritten here
today, shorn of much of its romance
and amplified by facts, by the Yale
University Press. To do this, medie medieval
val medieval sailors dressed in gayly colored
tights and jerkins, with huge knives
in their belts clambered through the
rigging of the Santa Maria off Jack Jackson
son Jackson Park and Christopher Columbus

eaned over the rail, crucifix in hand

and gazed at the receding shores.

Meanwhile two camera men kept

grinding away.

All this was done that the popular

idea of history might be revised and

the school children of America might

have accurate information uncontam-

inated by the legends and myths which

have grown around the discovery of
America during the last 400 years, it

was stated.

The Yale University Press is mak

ing a series of historical pictures for

school use which the history depart department
ment department of the college insists will be as
accurate as research and study can
make them. The exterior and voyacre

views are being made in Chicago, be because
cause because in the lagoon at Jackson Park,

held fast by Columbus' own anchor,

lies an exact reproduction of the great

navigator's flag ship, the Santa Maria.

The Spanish government which built
the boat for the Chicago World's Fair,

says it is correct in every detail.

The historic anchor was drawn up
today and the Santa Maria was towed
into Lake Michigan just opposite the

point where the cross of La Rabida, a
replica of the convent from which the

marina took to the sea, points sky

ward. Here accuracy comes into play

No "shots" except silhouettes are be

ing made of the convent because the
history department at Yale says it is

accurate only in outline and not in de

tail.

On board the Santa Maria there

were mutinies and trouble some times,

Martin Alonzo Pinzon, a Spanish gen

tleman, who owned the Santa Maria,

commanded the Pinta, and furnished

the cash for the trip climbs aboard
for a conference with-the navigator.

Much more is made of Pinzon in the

film than of Queen Isabella's jewels

for the history professors at Yale do

not believe she pawned them at alL

iney say, according to tne, men

making the pictures, Pinzon furnished

most of the money and that although

Isabelle was willing to part with her

gems it was not necessary.

f "We are trying to. make this picture

a model of accuracy, not only in de

tails but in facts," said Roswell Da Da-gue,
gue, Da-gue, assistant production manager in

explaining the work. We are not

writing in a love story to make it more

interesting. This picture .which is the

first of a series dealing with Ameri

can historical events will be checked

over foot by foot by the Yale history
professors and everything they do not
like must come out or be made over."

"There are no actors playing the

parts of priests on board this boat.

While Columbus was an extremely re

ligious man I might say almost fa

natically religious he did not have a
priest; on his first voyage and the

popular picture of him landing follow

ed by a priest bearing a banner is not
accurate. Extracts from Columbus'
lrg book tell us a lot about the voy voyage
age voyage and we are producing everything

in the journey which has any bearing

on the story. There is no plot to the
picture
"We take up Columbus in Portugal

where King John received him and
then double-crossed him by fitting out
his own expedition. We show the

mariner fleeing for his life from the

court and then his solicitations to the

French and English courts. Finally

he is accepted by the king and queen
of Spain and we show his journey,
his return to Spain and his last days in

prison."

Miss Dolores Cassinelli is taking

the part of Queen Isabella and Fred

i Eric is taking the part of Columbus.

GIVE UP THE GHOST

San Jose, Calif., Aug. 1. (By the

Associated Press). John Black, run

ner-up in the recent national open

golf tournament at Glencoe, HL, is In

a hospital today Covering between life
and death, as the result of an auto automobile
mobile automobile accident last night which prov proved
ed proved fatal an another occupant of the
car. Black has concussion of the
brain and several broken ribs.' It was
reported soon, after the accident that
he was fatally hurt but he rallied
during the night, s 1

CONDENSED OPINION
ABOUT MARION COUNTY

Paris, Aug'. X -(By the Associated

Press) Forty persons were killed
and fifty others injured in a collision
between two trains of pflgrims to the
Grotto of Lourdes, one of the world's"
most famous shrines, early today. The

collision occurred near VillecomtaL

TERRORS GAVE THE v

WILDCATS TROUBLE

Ninth Inning Again Captured Ocala's

Nanny Lake City Won By
; Five to Four

The Wildcats lost another game in

the ninth inning yesterday-when Lake
City piled up three runs on them alter
the game was on ice to the tune of
four to two. If the Wildcats could
call their game in, the eighth their
string of victories would climb stead

ily higher but. unfortunately the man

who invented baseball prescribed nine

innings and nine innings have to be
played. ..

Overstreet worked on the slab for
Ocala and allowed ten hits to the

Terrors. Woods tossed them over for

the Terrors and the Wildcats slapped

them, out for 13 hits but the weak

Facts and opinions about Ocala and!

the surrounding country that would be

of interest to its residents as well as

V 1 . , .

are contained in a handsome little :m FjmgwM ner iout

hi,). Th, n, errors, wniie tne Lake City team only

of persons throughout the country. It "Z CZ. P J fTT

wfcjr MuBjr fimuiey wui u&eiy wora

for Ocala. Whit has been on the sick

list for some time but says that he

feels equal to anything now.

BASEBALL NOTICE

is 'a part of an extensive : campaign
which they have undertaken in co

operation with the Strout Farm Agen Agency
cy Agency of which they are representatives.

They are telling the world through

the medium of this booklet that Mar

ion county is the home of the citrus

fruit industry, contains one of na-j In yesterday's paper it was stated

ture's wonders, the largest spring in I that the game Thursday would be

the world; that it is the watermelon I called at 3 o'clock so that the .ball

center of the state, the champion ho team 'tmght-"return, to Palatka that

county in the state and one of the I evening." 'ft should have been so, that

eading corn counties, a leading win-1 the Palatka "fans" could return that

ter trucking district, great livestock I evening because on Thursday we are

and dairy section, a high and health-1 expecting most of Palatka to come

ful place to live, that it has fan ideal lover to see the game, in Ocala.'

climate, a nearly all-year growing

0ouu aim is ewwon ui. prosperous Sot-tttmum vVn nA f

Saturday's Star forgot to address it,

farm owners.

r.:r"f n.Dy S Postoffice box. The paper had

a piece cut out of the first page. This

Thorn & Thomas at 425,000 boxes,

yielding an income of around $1,500,'

000. It is asserted that an income of

$250 to $500 an acre from oranges and

grapefruit is common and that one

50-acre grove near Orange Lake has

yielded 99,860 boxes in 15 years. With

a net income of $2 per box this would

make a total net income of nearly

$200,000 for the owner.

Marion county is credited with hav

ing one of the most up-to-date poultry

farms in the county, which in 1920

produced an average of 161 eggs for
each of its 1000 hens, bringing an

average return of over 50c a dozen.

The value of vegetable crops in

Marion county ia given as $657,611.

The estimates of returns per acre

from various crops as given by the

Marlon County Floridian are given in

the booklet,;

B. E. Raysor of Lowell, tells of the

experiment he made with an acre and

a half of Onions. He states that he

netted $1800 from, it and that he did

not consider this" a bad beginning. He

adds also that he was successful In

tomato, cantaloupe and watermelon

ventures, producing 342 crates of to tomatoes
matoes tomatoes per acre which netted him

$2500 from four acres. The fifteen
acres of watermelons shipped ten cars

and the cantaloupes yielded 231 crates
per acre. Mr. Raysor stated that he

attributed his success in producing

large and profitable yields solely to
the productiveness of Marion county

soils.

To show the rest of the world what

can be done in raising tomatoes in
Florida, a statment is made of the

earnings of J. C. Johnston who ship

ped 8000 crates of tomatoes from 40

acres in ivzi ana soia in em iot j.a j.a-000.
000. j.a-000. His returns from previous years

are given as $16,000 in 1920, $15,000

in 1919 $6000 in 1918 and $7000 in

1917. It is added that Mr. Johnston

has been growing tomatoes for the
last fifteen years and has not had a

single failure.

Mrs. Charles Hardee, who has been

sick for some time is, the Star is glad

to say, much better. Miss Helen Har

dee, who has been nursing her mother,
is again at her post in the U-Serve

Grocery, east of the square.

is to notify the sender that his or her
paper never left Ocala, but he or she

can obtain said paper and try again

by applying at the Star office.

1 I T

First-Class Bicycle
REPAIRING
Pllonc431
BRIBIIAU'S BliSTGLE STORE
Next to Burnett's Tailor Shop

BBEIGJOUS CABS AEOCTiD
ca CAii lis

PHONE 8

spmimpiairuffi
l:otor co.



OCALA EVENING STAB, TUESDAY, AUGUST 1, 1922

Ocala Evening Star
rabllakrd Every TDmr Eiet SumiT T
STAR-PUBUSHIN G-tXJMPANT
OCAtA. FlXRlDi J I V
im ibi ii i i ii i r
H. J. Bltf lager, Prcrtdeat
R, D. Leareas, VI-Palaat
P. r. latecV Ssrtttay-nPrwAWNet
- J. It? Beajaatla Mm 1
' i ft ... I H 1 j
Entered at Oc4la,-Fl.,'potoinrf
eond -class matter.

.jtt TELEPHONES i r $
Basta OfllU..7.;.;.Fl1re-Oai
tentorial Ueaartaieat f TwTti
Sertct Refrarter FIv-0

MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press Is exclusively
entitled far tbense t or republication ot
all news dispatches credited to It or not
otherwise credited ln tht'-ja.per and

aii ritrVttm nf rTniH t !ofi of ameclal I

DUMESTiC SUBSCRIPTION RATES
One Jear, In advance. ..i I... $
Three' months, 'in advancer 3.00
Three months, In advance ....... 1-60
One month, tn advance- .......... .00
7 4DVERT1SIXG RATES ;
itomitmrt Plats' 15 'cents "per Inch for
consecutive Insertions. Alternate' inser insertions
tions insertions 25 per cent additional. Composi Composition
tion Composition charges on ads.-that run-less than
'six times 10 cents per Inch. Special
position 25 .per cent kddltinal. Rates
kMi1 nn fAiir.lnih minimum I11 than

four" lnd t s thrill' : take '-a higher rate,
which will be furnished upon application.

Keadlaa; -JVtleei-: Five cents-pet lin
for -first insertion; three cents per line
for eah-,tfbsquent" Insertion. One
change a week allowed on readers with without
out without extra composition charges.
Legal advertisements at legal rates.

were tired two times we are convinc convinced
ed convinced that some of them were properly
punished. We had one object in view
which; we fear we brought out imper imperfectly;"
fectly;" imperfectly;" and that was that the people
in that long shoe-string of counties,
less than a generation from the wild-

lerness, nave so mucn more iaiin in

their country than we have in ours,
which has I so many greater natural
advantages, and are ; proving their
faith and obtaining profit by their
works. We have passed one stingy
little bond issue and quarreled about
that until its benefit has "been dis discounted
counted discounted about twenty per cent. And
now we need a cross-country road,

Ifrpm Orange Springs to Elmwood.

Will we'' ever have the faith in our
county and' the 'enterprise to bujld it.

EIGHT YEARS AGO

Every dog nowadays is a- hot dog. s

It is time to begin figuring on the
next Marion county fair.

Senator !Laf ollette is one of the most

able men in the Seriate. He' is also
one of the most selfish men anywhere.

Some people have nothing to do and
some, propose writing a national an anthem
them anthem to take, the place, of the Star
Spangled Banner.,
. Winistori has a new; paper, the Sun,
which shines' f pr all its friends.' .Will .William
iam .William Kochler is editor and manager.
Here's hoping it will never set.

' August 1, 1914. Italy seceded from

the triple alliance," formed thirty years
before between Germany, Austria and

Italy. This was a heavy blow to Ger Ger-man:,plans
man:,plans Ger-man:,plans as Italy had been counted

on to attack France from the south

It became known later that France had

already received information of Ital

ian-neutrality, and several army corps

that else would have -been kept on

the Italian frontier were released to

be sent north.

German ambassador left Russia.

. ; Russia made no answer to German

ultimatum.

t German ambassador left France.

.Financial leaders of Europe notified

the powers that they would not tol

erate v universal warfare. J? or some

years; the world had believed such a

threat would stop any war.

Senator Underwood wants the mat

ter of American war claims against

Germany settled by an all-American

commission.- Secretary of State Hughes

wants a mixed commission of Ameri

cans and Germans. We can't see what

business Germans have on the com

mission.- It wasn't the Americans who

were whipped.

. About the only way people' can get
out of 'Ocala 'to Gainesville and points

north is over the' neglected" Blitchtbn
road The ord may t forgive Marion
county for its treatment of that road,

but ne naan t ougnc o. r v.

The eighth wonder of the world is
how-the' women who 'have discarded

corsetsvkeef their stockings up.

Stl Atigfustine Record.'

-A well-built stocking on a : well well-built
built well-built :limb find 3 it perfectly' easy to

keepf' itself up.-

How i can people"1- ever free them themselves
selves themselves from political oppression ''when
they refuse to read and know things

they ..must know if they would vote

intelligently. Fort Lauderdale Senti

nel.
- i
How indeed?

t According to all reports, crowd suc

ceeds crowd this n summer at Salt

Springs. .The bathing is of the best

and the supply of fish is inexhaustible

Some of these days, Salt Springs is

going" to" begone' of the greatest' pleas
ureTesortsf in Florida:

. Ocala's street builders are now fat

work on Oklawaha. There is a pros

peet that the aristocrats living along-

thai gilded thoroughfare will soon be
obliged to buy or hire ; airplanes vto
leave and. return to their homes. Us

common people should worry.

. Henry Ford is a first-class business

man, but his paper, the Dearborn In-'

dependent, is somewhat slushy. Per

haps that is because he hires other
men to edit it for him. It is notice noticeable
able noticeable that: men and women, educated
only on one line, are prone to fall for
slush. '-""'V --I'il"

Tom Watson is criticised by pinhead

editors. But they produce just about

as -much effect as a gnat on a bull's

horn. Fort Lauderdale Sentinel.

o After reading the foregoing from

George i Mathews' caustic pen, we are

glad to -be able to say we have never

criticised Tom -Watson. We have
simply Called him what he is, and let

it go at that.-
k The citizens of Lauderdale appre

ciate the many nice things said about

tluVcity- by J. H. Benjamin, editor of

the Ocala' Star, which he wrote after
making a : visit to this section and
which is published- on this page. Mr.
Benjamin 'says' that if he is ever run
but of Ocala he wants to come- to
Lauderdale, which has started so'me

of-'his 'friends in this city to conniv

ing with the Ocala police to see if

they can find something on him that

will start him running. Fort Lauder
dale Herald.-

' Police know a plenty now, but they
are" better sports than to unload us
on another town.

HORSE "CEMETERY" IN EGYPT

American Expedition Has Unearthed
Graves of Steeds That Once
Bore Proud Royalty.

RA1 LR 0 AD S CH ED U LES

Objects unearthed at El-Kur'uw, on
the Upper Kile, by the Harvard uni university,
versity, university, Museum of Fine Arts expedi expedition
tion expedition shed new light on the early' his

tory of Ethiopia, the tombs of all the J Leave for

kings from 150 B. C to ZM B. C. hav

Arrival and derjarture of passenger

trains at OCALA UNION STATION.

The following schedule figures pub published
lished published as. information and not guar guaranteed.
anteed. guaranteed. (Eastern Standard Time)
ATLANTIC COAST LINE R. R.

Station Arrive from

2:15 am

Ing been recovered. 2:27 am

It is known that King Piankhy was o:.pm
a great connoisseur of horses. In hislgg
account; of his besieging the Egyptian ;o!oa nm

city of Eshman he tells of his anger '-7:i6 am

at turning the horses or King Namlat 7:25 am

starved thin as a result of the siege.

Hence it is reasonably conjectured

that Piankhy started a cemetery of
horse- graves which was found at El-

Kur uw the i only burying ground of ;2:20 am Jacksonville-N'York 2:10 am
its kind that has been discovered in j 1:50 pm Jacksonville 1:50 pm

tne iuie valley. Here, in four rows, pm jacKsonvuie j:oupm
are the graves of the steeds of several i TampaJlanatee-mnnnrr-ris
Thw hvo hn rfnoi-.ui :2:15ara St. Petersburg 4:05am

but not so thoroughly as to prevent ii;5! am N'York-St. Petrsbrg 1:

St. Petersburg---
Jacksonville
Jacksonville
St. Petersburg
Jacksonville
Homosassa
(p) Wilcox
(j) Lakeland

( p ) Monday, Wednesday, Friday.

(j)Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY
Leave for ; Station Arrive from

2:27 ami

2:lo am
3:24 pm
1:25 pm
9:00 pm
1:16 pm
6:45 pm

11:03 pm

11:50 pm

Tampa

Tampa-Manatee

35 am

15 am

1 :35 pm

plume carrier, a silver head band, four j4:05 pm Tampa-St. Petersi)rg 4:05 pm
strings of very large bronze balls.
beads, amulets and other objects. ' t
These horses were manifestly sac-j BETTER not wait until after the
rificed at the funeral of the king in fire. Tt Ditto insure vou now. and

order that their spirits might accom

pany his into the other world.

sacrifice of men and animals at f u- j

nerals is now well established as an
ancient Ethiopian custom by excava excavations
tions excavations in Kerma. But the sacrifice of
horses was a thousand years before
the beginning of the Ethiopian mon monarchy,
archy, monarchy, and in all the royal tombs of
Napata no other survival of the cus custom
tom custom was detected.

! mrrxr rim wnrrv.

The ;

WON FAME AS SEA FIGHTER

Scandinavian Hero Also the Center of
Many Legends That Have En Endeared
deared Endeared Him to Posterity.

11-tf

THE BEST MEATS and
THE BEST GROCERIES
Are none too good for our patrons, and that's
the only kind we ask them to accept. If any anything
thing anything we furnish you is otherwise let us know
and. they're ours.
COOK'S fllAMET and GROCERY
Phone 243 and 174

New bracelets and pendant sets at
THE BOOK SHOP. 29-3t

The more you see of our methods of
handling fresh meats the better you
like it. Come and see us. Main Street

Market. Phone 108. tf

Cards for Friendship Day at THE
GIFT SHOP. 29-3t

A 25-cent package of Albert's Plant
Food will perform wonders with your
pot plants. Try it. Sold at the Court
Pharmacy. tf

CRESCEN T flSB MAiUvE"

On hand at all times a large stock
of fresh and salt water fish Daily
shipments. Will dress and deliver tn
any part of the city on short notice.
rhoe-'5G&; 7-tf J.G.JONfiS.

Weihe's jewelry aucion, between
Carn's and Munroe & Chambliss Bank,
every afternoon, 4 and 8 o'clock, tf

Albert's Plant Food for flowers; 25c
and, 50c. packages. Sold at the Court
Pharmacy. 18-tf

- V i Vi i mmr mmr e

WAMTE1I

One of the great Scandinavian
heroes of modern times was Tordenks Tordenks-jold,
jold, Tordenks-jold, who rose from the rank of naval
cadet to admiral in eight years, and
died, at the age of thirty, and is ac accounted
counted accounted today as a naval strategist of
the first order. It was Tordenksjold
who, by his operations against Charles
XII of Sweden, preserved the freedom
of his native Norway and saved the In Integrity
tegrity Integrity of Denmark.
AH his experiences were- exceed exceedingly
ingly exceedingly colorful and picturesque, so much
so, indeed, that legend has been busy
in providing him with an array, of ad

ventures which undoubtedly never hap-.

pened. One of these is the story-that,
when a boy, he sat down on a grind grindstone
stone grindstone to wear out the leather patches
which had been put on the seat of his
trousers as a punishment for tearing
his clothes.' Once he pursued a frigate
much larger than his own until his
ammunition gave out. He sent word
to the enemy, inviting the commander
to come aboard for a glass of wine and
asking whether he would lend some
powder, to continue the fight. It was
this sort of bravado which his age
delighted in. He was killed in a duel
In 1720.

Line- Rail-mechanics,

car inspectors,
coach painters,

The Orlando Reporter-Star i3 decid decidedly
edly decidedly skeptical. It says: "Will Hays
says, 'I cannot ?fihd the horrors I of
Hollywood.' Neither could Colonel
Nutt find the evidence against the

bootleggers; after he had f advertised

latr he would go look -for it at a cer

tain time."

If that-high wool tariff 4a- imposed.

it will make a ,. great opportunity for

Marion county. .There are thousands
of acres hre where Sheep can be rais

ed. Irt fact, they could be raised at a

considerable profit without any pro

tective tariff. So could almost every

thing else.
: ii 1 i

Most of the East Coast and somej of
the interior papers have been generous

m their praise to the editor of the
Star for his "East Coast of Florida'!

story. At the time we left Ocala to

take the tripwe had ho intention! of
writing anything about it, and took
no notes. But so many of our friebds

called on us for the yarn that we de

cided ,to write 'it, if f or hq other irea

sony to convince them they shouldn't

have made-the request. And as each

and every one cf the fifteen chapters
was, written .after midnight, when we

OCALA TWENTY YEARS AGO I
(Evening Star Aug. 1, 1902)
Miss Liliie Frost, the accomplished
saleslady at H. B. Masters, is spend spending,
ing, spending, her vacation at Cottage City,
Mass.
."'AlexaMobrhead left this morning
for Hernando to survey for a switch
running from Ford & Hitler's phos
phate mine.
, Miss Ellie' B. Tydings, missionary
from Mexico, who is staying in town,
has gone to Anthony to visit relatives.

Hamp Chambers of Mcintosh is in

town. Mr. Chambers will buy cotton

for Geo. KL Robinson.

. The Ocala Spoke & Rim Factory is

erecting another closed storage shed,

35 by 150 feet, this being the third to

be "put up. The mill is running full

time and Manager Reagan and his

assistant, W. C. Galbraith have all
thai they can do.

Sanford Jewett returned from

Gainesville today.

Mrs. H. A. Ford and daughter, Miss

Emily, left today for Atlantic Beach,

where they will spend several weeks.

Ocala Ten Years Ago
(Evening Star Aug. 1, 1912)

Dr. D. M. Boney is up from a short

but. severe spell of fever.

Miss Janet Weathers left yesterday

ttfi spend the summer, in New York.

Mrs. R; Ci Muncaster has returned

from a visit with her parents in Jack
sonville.

Messrs. Pat Anderson and Olaf Ze-

wadski inform the Star that they

will leave soon for a visit to New

York.
Mrs.-F. Robinson and daughter,
Miss Alice Robertson, of New York,
are in Ocala the guests of relatives.
Mrs. C. R. Kreger and baby left this
morning to visit Mrs. Xreger's rela relatives
tives relatives on Long Island.
; Mr.: Charles Peyser and little grand granddaughter
daughter granddaughter went- to Jacksonville today
to meet Mrs. Peyser, whvo has been
visiting -relatives in New York city.

Disillusionment.
' Into the restaurant she came, with
the air of a prmcess, a truly regal fig

ure clad in Brown from top to toe, and

looking as if she had just visited a

Parisian modiste and a beauty parlor

-a perfectly groomed, handsome

woman.

There was an air of refinement

about her. She looked expensively
turned out in the simple, deceptive

way. v

She seated herself at a table and

thef-e were little exclamations of admi

ration and envy from other diners

near.

A waitress aDDroached. Every one

hushed to listen to the beaufiful crea

ture speak.
In a high-pitched voice she ordered:
' "Bring me an 'onion omelet."
It was brought and she ate It with
her spoon!

Advertise in the Star.

g By the Atlantic Coafct
road Company, skilled

including machinists, boiler makers,
I blacksmiths, pipe fitters, electri-

I cians, car repairers,
coach carpenters,

I upholsterers, moulders and heljpers,
at shops at
I Waycross,;Ga.. t
Jacksonville, Fla.
I' Sanlord, Fla. .y
;; Lakeland, Fla.
High Springs, FIa.v
I Port Tampa, Fla.
: -. : '. : '.
i Permanent employment. Applicati o ns
should be made to the Master Mechanic or Su-
j perintendent Rates established by the United
i States Labor Board will be paid.
.
I J C. MURCH IS ON
& 'GENER AL SUPERINTENDENT

REDICTION M KELLY-SPRINGFIELD TIRES

UNTIL FURTHER NOTICE

2

J TEyPORRY

OLD PRICE
30x3 Fabric $12.90
30x3K 14.70
32x3 Cord 24.30
32x4 44 32.75
33x4 33.75
34x4 34.95
32x4 y 42.40
33x4 44.00
34x4Vi 44.30
33x5 52.30
35x5 'i 54.40

NEW PRICE
$ 9.85
N 12.00 ;
: 20.50 v
27.85

28.70
129.72
36.00 :
. 37.0
37.60,
44.40
"46.20

CORD 15 OFF

COMPANY

OCALA AUTO & GARAGE
PHONE 24

in
:l:

s3SK3' ill

hi

:x:
:i:
hi
:i:
hi

FABRIC 20 OFF

3

in-



OCALA EVENING STAB, TUESDAY, AUGUST. 1, 1922

.1

Salt Springs Water
We always have on
hand a quantity of this
famous MINERAL WATER
ready for delivery in five
gallon containers.
PHONE 167
Chero-Cola Bottling Works
Phone 597 Night Phone 408
WILLIAMS GARAGE
. v We Specialize in
WELDING,
ELECTRICAL WORK
REBORING CYLINDERS,
GRINDING CRANK SHAFTS,
GIVE US A TRIAL
Osceola St.. Just of! Ft. King
Needham Motor Co
PLUMBING & ELECTRICAL
CONTRACTING
General Auto
' Repairing
PnONE 252
sash
DOO
Ocala, Fla.
HARDWARE
HIGH GRADE PAINT
to irf kiuisiimfiis
vux uuvcxa waut iu iiciii vuu tret txn
the ICE you need every day, this sum summerbut
merbut summerbut they need your help.
.When you put your ICE CARD out
on time, you save them extra trips
and that's saving ice .for everybody.
When you keep the ice compartment
of your refrigerator free from food
and bottles, you are saving time and
ice.
V Just these two simple rules, follow followed
ed followed daily, will help us make sure that
you are well served this summer.
Ocala Ice & Packing Co.
PHONE 34. OCALA. FLA.
PALATKA-OCALA
BUS LINE
SCHEDULE
Leave Palatka .... 8:00 A M.
Arrive Ocala. 12:00 M.
Leave Ocaia ...... 2:15 P. M.
Arrive Palatka .... 6:00 P. M.
Ocala Leaving Point, Ocala House
Paaltka leaving point, James hotel
Route via Anthony, Sparr,
Citra, Orange Springs, Ken Kenwood
wood Kenwood and Rodman.
C P. PILLANS, Prop.
Ocala. Phone 527
R. R. R.
Don'l Say Roach Powder
DEMAND
RAY'S ROACH
ROUTER
NOT POISON
Guaranteed to Rid Yonr Douse
of Roaches
See Your Grocer or Druggist
25 and 50 cents a box
Manufactured by E. D. Ray,
1015 Franklin St, Tampa

Ceo; MacKay I Co.

Erskine
Dale,

Pioneer

John Fox, Jr.
Illustrated byR.lL. Liringtton
Copyright br Charles Soribnar'a Boo.
CHAPTER XV
Dawned 1781:
'Hie war was coming Into Virginia at
last. Virginia falling would thrust a
great wedge through the center of the
confederacy, feed the British armies
and end the fight. Cornwallis was to j
drive the wedge, and never had the j
opening seemed easier. Virginia was j
drained of her fighting men, and seuth j
of the mountains was protected only j
by a militia, for the most part, of j
old men and boys. North and south i
rem despair. The soldiers had no pay. j
little food, and only, old wornout coats, j
tattered linen overalls, and one Man-!
ket between three men, to protect!
them from drifting snow and icy 'wind, j
Even the great Washington was near!
despair, and In foreign help his sole )
hope lay. Already the traitor, Arnold, j
had taken Richmond, burned ware-;
houses, and returned, but little har-j
assed, to Portsmouth.
Cornwallis was coming on. Tarle-j
ton's white rangers were bedeviling!
the land, and it was at this time that :
Erskine Dale once more rode Firefly
to the river James. ,, j
The boy had been two years in the;
wilds. When he left the Shawnee
camp winter was setting In, that ter-!
rible winter of '79 ofdeep snow and;
hunger and cold.; When he reached'
Kaskaskia, Captain Clark had gone to;
Kentucky, .and Erskine found bad
news. Hamilton and Hay had taken
Vincennes. There Captain Helm's Ore-L
oles, as soon as they saw the red-
coats, slipped away from him to sur-'
render their arms to the British, and
thus deserted by all, he and the two1
or three Americans-with him had to'
give up the fort. The French reswore
allegiance to Britain. Hamilton con-'
fiscated their liquor and broke up their
billiard tables. He let his Indians
scatter to their villages, and with his'
regulars, volunteers, white x Indian'
leaders and red "auxiliaries went Into
winter quarters. One band of Shaw-
nees he sent to Ohio to scout and ',
take scalps in the settlements. In the
spring he would sweep Kentucky and j
destroy all the settlements west of
the AUeghanles. So Erskine and Dave
went for Clark; and that trip neither!
ever forgot. Storms had followed each
other since late. November and the'
snow lay deep. Cattle and horses j
perished, deer and elk were found dead ;
In the woods, and buffalo came at
nightfall to old Jerome Sanders' f ort
for food and eomnanionshln with his'
starving herd. There was no' salt or
vegetable food ; nothing but the flesh
of lean wild game. Yet,' while the!
uvuuciuucu iciunuKU uuwueu ui
the stockades and the men hunted and
the women made clothes of tanned
deer hides, buffalo-wool cloth, and nefe-tie-bark
linen, and both hollowed "nog "noggins"
gins" "noggins" out of the knot of a tree, Clark
made his amazing march to Vin Vincennes,
cennes, Vincennes, recaptured it by the end of
February, and sent Hamilton to Wil Williamsburg
liamsburg Williamsburg a prisoner. Erskine pleaded
to be allowed to take him there, but
Clark would not let him go. Perma Permanent
nent Permanent garrisons were placed at Vin Vincennes
cennes Vincennes and Cahokia, and at Kaskaskia.
Erskine stayed to help make peace
with the Indians, punish marauders
and hunting bands, so that by the
end of the year Clark' might sit at
the falls of the Ohio as a shield for
the West and a sure guarantee that
the whites would never be forced to
abandon wild Kentucky.
The two years in the wilderness
had left their mark on Erskine. He
was tall, lean, swarthy, eaunt. and
A VISIT TO THE CEMETERY
Will show many examples of our skill
as monument builders. Among them
are every sort of memorial ranging
from the very simplest to the most
ornate and stately. And every one
bears the hall mark of good taste and
skillful workmanship. Our book of
designs will be shown to any who plan
stone for their plot.
Ocala Marble Works
OCALA, FLORIDA
Watch for the August Victor records
at THE BOOK SHOP. 29-3t

yet he was not all woodsman, for
his born inheritance as gentleman had
been more than emphasized by his as association
sociation association with Clark and certain Cre Creole
ole Creole officers in the Northwest, who had
Improved his French and gratified one
pet wish of his life since his last visit
to the James they had taught him to
fence. His mother he had not seen
again, but he had learned that she
was alive and not yet blind. Of Early
Morn he had heard nothing at alL
Once a traveler had brought word of
Dane Grey.- Grey was in Philadelphia
and prominent In the gay doings of
that city. He bad taken part in a
brilliant pageant called the "MiscM "MiscM-anza,"
anza," "MiscM-anza," which was staged by Andre,
and was reported 1 a close friend of
that ill-fated young gentleman.
After the fight at Piqua, with Clark
Erskine put forth, for old Jerome San Sanders
ders Sanders fort. He found the hard days
of want over. There was not only
corn In plenty but wheat, potatoes,
pumpkins, turnips, melons. Game was
plentiful, and cattle, horses, and hogs
had multiplied on cane and buffalo
clover. Indeed, it was a comparative comparatively
ly comparatively peaceful fall, and though Clark
pleaded with him, Erskine stubbornly
set his face for Virginia.
At Williamsburg Erskine learned
many things. Colonel Dale, now a
general, was still with Washington and
Harry was with him. Hugh was with
the Virginia militia and Dave with
Lafayette.
Tarleton's legion of rangers in their
white uniforms were scourging Vir Virginia
ginia Virginia as they had scourged the Car Car-ollnas.
ollnas. Car-ollnas. Through the James River
country they had gone with fire and
word, burning houses, carrying off

The Two Years in the Wilderness Had
Left Their, Mark on Erskine.
horses, destroying crops, burning grain
in the mills, laying plantations to
waste. Barbara's mother was dead.
Her neighbors had moved to safety,
but Barbara, he heard, still lived with
old Mammy and Ephraim at Red Oaks,
unless that, too, had Been recently
put to the torch. Where, then, would
he find hpr?
(Continued Tomorrow)
ENGLISH ARCHERS LOSE HOME
Ancient Organization Puzzled as to the
Disposition of Its Relics of
Days Long Past.
There is a Royal Toxophilite society
in England, i which has had its head headquarters
quarters headquarters in Regent's park for many
years. Now, however, the society has
to move, and is concerned as to the fu future
ture future resting place of the wonderful
treasury of archery relics now In
Archers' halL
One bow and set of arrows are more
than 4,000 years old. These were
taken from the tombs at Sakkarah, In
Egypt, and are believed to have been
In use about 2000 B. C.
Another bow was' given to the soci society
ety society by Mahomet EffendL "embassy
from the Sublime Porte," in 1794when
he came to England for the first time,
bringing his bow and arrows with him.
When this Turkish official saw the
ground at Regent's park he said it was
much too small, so he went into a
street outside the park and shot his
arrows Into a field. The distance was
measured and found to be a quarter
of a mile. Mahmoud was so pleased
with this shot that he presented his
bow and arrows to the society. The
bow Is beautifully carved and is of
immense strength.
Over-indulgence in Sugar.
We eatHoo much sugar, and we usu usually
ally usually take it In too concentrated form,
says George EL Oornforth, writing on
"Use and Abuse of Sugar in Life and
Health (Washington). If we should eatv
sugar In no more concentrated form
than that in which it grows, we should
not eat enough to do us any harm,
thinks Mr. Cornforth, according to the
literary Digest. But In the con concentrated
centrated concentrated form of candy, confectionery,
sirups and foods sweetened with granu granulated
lated granulated sugar, Its taste Is so mach en enjoyed
joyed enjoyed and It is so nutritious, that it is
very easy to eat enough to be detri detrimental
mental detrimental to the health, or rather, it Is
very hard not to do so.'
Just received Ballard's Obelisk
Flour. Let us supply your grocery
needs. Main Street Market. Phone
108. S. Main street. 22-tf

i
New bar pins at THE BOOK SHOP

MOSTLY PEOPLE OF WEALTH

French Are Leaving for Italy as Eng-
lish Move-Into France Swiss Trek
to Baden While Hebrews and Others
From Poland Are Looking to Amer-
ica People of Small Fixed Incomes
vv.iwiiiiiy r i win viiv vvuihi iv
Another in Europe.
"One result of the war is that a big bigger
ger bigger exodus is now taking place among
the nations than at any time since the
days of Moses." This statement, made,
on his way homeward through Paris
by an American, who has "until recent recently
ly recently been engaged on M. C. A. work
In Czecho-Slovakia, exaggerated as it
may sound, expresses only one side of
a very large truth.
For in the days of the Jewish ex exodus,
odus, exodus, or of the great tribal movements
!t the first settlement of Europe, when
whole nations., moved, they included
many individuals, but little wealth.
Nowadays It Is the people with the
wealth who are migrating a try
much more serious thing for those who
remain behind, says the New York
Herald.
Within the last twelve months sev several
eral several thousand French families esti estimates
mates estimates run from' two to seven have
left their homes to settle In Italy.
They are all more or less well to do,
in jnost cases possessing fixed in incomes
comes incomes which In fnture, while draw drawing
ing drawing them from France, they will spend
in Italy. The reason Is no lack of
patriotism or love for Italy it is
simply and purely because the French
franc is worth two Italian lire and
they can live twice as comfortably on
the same income.
The majority of them are from the
.southern departments and they have
not moved very far in some cases
only a matter of twenty miles or so
hut the frontier is behind them, and
although prices are to some small ex extent
tent extent higher than on the French side
of the boundary they, are not enough
nearly to counterbalance the differ difference
ence difference in exchange.
Many English Arriving.
Tii is Is only one example out of
many similar hegiras," which can only
he described as worldwide. While the
French are leaving France the English
are moving into it. In the old days
of the mid-Nineteenth century hun hundreds
dreds hundreds of English families lived In
Calais, Boulogne, or Montreuil. In
maiiy cases they were there to escape
(heir creditors at home as in the case
for instance of the famous Beaul
Jjrummei, or tne even more famous
Liuly Hamilton, Nelson's friend. For
the rest there were innumerable half halfway
way halfway ofiicers and elderly people with
fixed, small incomes such, as you may
read of in the pages of Thackeray or
Albert Smith.
This movement has nowadays ''re ''revived
vived ''revived to a vastly greater degree. It
is no exaggeration to say that half
middle-class England is turning its
eyes toward France, where its money
will be worth double what it is at
home, and where, by a little manipula-"
Mon it isjossible to escape the crush crushing
ing crushing weight of home taxation.
As one typical Instance may he
mentioned an English ex-officer, mem mem-her
her mem-her of a minor country family. Before
the war he had peifhaps 2,000- a year
income, or $10,000. Considering taxa taxation
tion taxation and the cost of living, his in income
come income in England would t now be re reduced
duced reduced to about 350 a year, or $1,400.
He no longer lives In England, but in
Paris. What is more, he has sold bis
land and his securities In England
getting a high price for the former
when the land boom was at Its height.
His proceeds are urested in Belgium.
He escapes English taxes; he has no
income In France; he Is, if a bad citi citizen,
zen, citizen, almost as wealthy as he was
before the war, and his money is
worth twice its home value.
Seeking Easier Life.
So far as England and France are
concerned, it is not only the well-to-do
who are crossing the channel. Mil Millions
lions Millions of young men and tens of thou thousands
sands thousands of young women learned during
the war as soldiers, W. A. A. C's or
W. It. A. F.'s that life can be very
pleasant in France when there is not
a war on. Now that unemployment
has reached such desperate lengths In
England they are turning their steps
toward France.
Paris is full of young Englishwomen
of the clerk and stenographer class,
seeking employment in some English
or American firm established there. So
overstocked is the market that warn warnings
ings warnings have been officially Issued to dis dissuade
suade dissuade them but they are coming still,
by the hundreds and the British con consulate
sulate consulate Is kept busy with their woes.
So, If you travel anywhere in France,
especially in the North, you will find
that it is peppered with young Eng Englishmen,
lishmen, Englishmen, mechanics and the like.
Many of them married French girls
during the war and came back as soon
as they were demobilized ; others have
come over in the search of work they
cannot find at home and "have stayed
on. In many cases the plunge has Jus Justified
tified Justified Itself; there Is little unemploy unemployment
ment unemployment in -France and although wages
are low, compared to the English
trades union standards, they compart
more favorably when the difference In
exchange Is considered.
The ease of Switzerland presents
yet another asnect of the international
Beautiful framed mottoes for
Friendship Day at THE SPECIALTY
SHOP, A. E. Gerig. 28-6t
BETTER let Ditto figure with yon 1
on the home building proposition. Lots
and material will go up now and then ;
you will be sorry yon didn act on

the suggestion. Buy and build now. j
Ditto. Realtor. 11-tf

CLEAN
PAINT
TUNE

If

j p
j B
jjl
g
g
y We are equipped to give com-
f plete renovation and v repair
H service on your car. We get it
ready for the road in jig time
g and -at low prices. AH expert
M workmen. V-;
GAS OIL GREASE
DIXIE HIGHWAY
GARAGE
JAMES EXGESSER
Phone 258 Night Phone 533
121 West Broadway
Ocala, Florida.
SEVEN DAY SERVICE
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CONTRACTOR
ANi BUILDER
Careful estimates made on all con contract
tract contract work. Gives more and better
work for the money than any other
contractor in the city.
"Say it with flowers," and buy the
flowers from Mrs. J. E. Hyndman, lVi
miles out on the Dunnellon road.
Phone 30M. Zinnias, rosea, pinks and
pink Vint, in bloom now. 7-7-lm
Weihe's jewelry auction, between
Cam's and Munrbe & Chambliss Bank,
every afternoon, 4 and 8 o'clock, tf
THE BOOK SHOP is showing a set
of white gold band china, 29-3t

ii:t;;ninntt;iiiiiiiiii;iimmfflanmmi::iir.i:i!iiiiiii:;i!i:intgaug

The s
Windsor
Hotel

JACKSONVILLE, FLA

WHITE STAR LME

,
Negotiable Storage Receipt leaned on Cotton, Automobile, Ete
z

MOVE, PACK, SHIP
LIVE STOCK,
PIANOS, BAGGAGE,
MACHINERY,
FURNITURE, ETC

COMMERCIAL

"THAT'S US

PUBLISHING

mem thee

Prices Reduced
Effective at once, we
wish to announce that
the prices on : HOOD
STIRES and TUBES have
been substantially re-,
duceoV The famous
HOOD needs no intro introduction,
duction, introduction, so get our
prices before, buying
new equipment for
your car.
OCALA
TIRE & VULCAHIZIIIG
COMPANY
Phone 438
John R. Long W. A. Strond
-OCALA, FLORIDA
A nice, thoroughly modern bunga bungalow
low bungalow home for aomebodv ia beincr built
by the Citizens Investment Co. on a
ot on Dougherty street. Price : and
terms easy. Call and see it. Phone
'285 f or particulara.
22-tf
IN the heart of the city, with
Hemming Park for a front
yard. Every modern convent
ience in each room; Dining
room service is second to none.
V
ROBERT M. MEYERt x
Manager
J. E. KAVANAUGH
-' Proprietor

TRANSFER :
.
AM) v
Vim STORAGE

e
e
e
LONG DISTANCE MOVING
Pflionc 296 j
in
9?
COMPANY
lit

NG

A

R



OCALA EVENING STAB, TUESDAY, AUGUST 1, 1922

; RMOMi MOTICEs
After August 1st I will be lo located
cated located in my former place, be

tween Baptist Witness build- eg

ing and Fire Station, wiiere I
will continue to carrv a full

line, as heretofore,

AUTOMOBILES
SPEEDWAGONS

Full line Reo parts; fall line accessories
AUTOMOBILE REPAIRING and WELDING
PENNSYLVANIA VACUUM CUP TIRES
STORAGE BATTERIES SOLD, RECHARGED and REPAIRED
Foil line Bicycles and Supplies; Renting and Repairing

OCALA OCCURRENCES

NOTICE, LEGION AUXILIARY

The regular "meeting of the Wom-

If you have any local or society Aufiliary of the American Legion

items for the Star, call five-one.

will be held Tuesday, August 2, at the

armory at eight o'clock. The hostesses

Mrs. E. C. Bennett went to Orlando "U be Mrs. Ernest Blair .Mrs. Charles

this morning on a short business trip. Moremen, Mrs. F. E. McClane and

Miss Mary Marshall.
Mrs. J. H. Dunn has as her guest 2 Mrs. R. L. Anderson Sr., Pres.

her niece, Mrs. Bear of St. Petersburg.

i.

Mrs. E. T. Helvenston and children

W. K. Lane, 31. D., physician and ,W1" ieave tomorrow lor Asheville, N.

surgeon, specialist eye, ear, nose and to be gone until the first of Octo-

Kar Tv H AltrATief An Iaq 0to o 4-Via

throat. Office over 5 and 10 cent store, j er

Ocala, Fla.

.tf

Mr. Lee Sharpe of Rheinauer's left
Sunday for Atlanta, where he will
spend his vacation at his former home.

Some wonderful values in
beads at THE BOOK SHOP.

pearl
l-3t

The Catholic Ladies'
will sell candy Friday
band concert.

Aid Society
night at the
l-4t

same time, accompanying his family

to Asheville and then going to New

York, where he will spend ten days
buying his fall and winter goods.

Albert's Plant Food is the thing for

making your flower garden and pot
plants bloom. It is odorless and is
sold in 25c. and 50c. packages and $2

sacks. At the Court Pharmacy tf

Mrs. H. C. Dunn of Orlando is in

Ocala visiting her brother-in-law, Dr.
J. H. Dunn and Mrs. Dunn.

IB. F. 0DMD)KI

Plenty of Parts and Lots of Service
Phone 129

HO

Jy w Jx

UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS
(RATES under this heading are as
follows: Maximum, of six lines one time
25c; three times 60c; six times 76c; one
month X00. All accounts payable la
advaace except to those who have reg regular
ular regular advertising accounts.

LOST Key ring with three keys, one
. short and two longer and rather
thin. Lost somewhere on the way to
the Country Club. Finder please
return to Mrs. W. E. Smith. 31-6t

FOR SALE One Ford touring car,
- used fifteen months. 1 Address Miss
" Shelton Souter. Anthony, Fla. 31-6t
LOST- Saturday evening, July 22, a
green herring bone coat. Was placed
in a Ford car in front of the Anti Anti-Monopoly.
Monopoly. Anti-Monopoly. Drugstore by mistake.
Finder please notify '.Parker &
Guynn's store, N. Magnolia St. 3t

FOR RENT Furnished down stairs
apartment; bedroom, dining room,
kitchen, reception parlor, back and
front porch. Apply to Mrs. Rags Rags-dale,
dale, Rags-dale, 24 Ray St., phone. 530. 31-3t
FOUND A white and lemon (part
bird) dog. Owner may find same at
E. R. Kidder's, R. F. D. A., An Anthony
thony Anthony Road. 29-3t

Tuesday, June 27th.
Finder please wire
Lodi, California.

$10 reward.
Karl Klaus,

r 20-12t

FOR SALE Number one preserving

pears. Phone 298. l-3t

FOR SALE CHEAP A second hand

gas stove. Apply to Mrs. F. E.
Wetherbee, 12 Watula St. Phone

255. l-3t

WAjyrjvu A plasterer to put on
about a thousand yards of plaster

at Oxford. Apply J. H. Pittman,

Oxford, Fla. l-3t

WANTED House, about eight rooms,

"- modern conveniences, nice location
Responsible party. Must be reason reasonable.
able. reasonable. P. O. Box 461. 31-3t

LiUai-7-tounday, July Zdtn, from car
at Blue Springs, a square of green
broadcloth used as carriage robe.
Reward if returned to this office. 3t

Mrs. John Pasteur has gone to Mi

ami, where she will visit her son ana

daughter-in-law, Mr. and, Mrs. Tom
Pasteur.

Travel between Florida and the

north by way of Merchants & Miners

Jacksonville steamers and obtain full
satisfaction. Round trip, Boston,
Mass., Mass $71.74; Providence, R.

L, $69.56. Return limit October 31st.

Meals and berth included on steam

ers. it

Mrs. Kiplinger who has been spend

ing the winter in .Miami, has joined

her husband. Dr. Kiplinger, at 'the

Ocala House.

Mrs. Turnley, who has been visiting

her sister, Mrs. E. T. Helvenston and

family, left yesterday for her home in

Fort Meade.

Apples for canning $1.85 bushel box.

Ollie Mordis.' l-3t

The latest in beads at THE BOOK

SHOP. l-3t

Mrs. F. B. Weaver of Miami, who
has been the guest of her sister, Mrs.

A. A. Winer for several weeks, left

yesterday for her home.

Mrs. Robert Lott, of Douglas, Ga.,
is in Ocala with the two younger chil children
dren children of Mr. R. J. Perkins, and will

keep house for her brother, Mr. Per

kins, during the absence of Mrs. Per

kins in Asheville.

Solid mahogany

BOOK SHOP.

clocks

at THE
l-3t

Mr. W.'W. Stripling, our efficient

county tax collector, leaves tomorrow

for Weaverville, N. C, where he will

spend his first vacation in two years."
He will be accompanied by Mrs. Strip Stripling.
ling. Stripling. During his absence from the of office
fice office Mr. R. G. Sumner will act as tax
collector, since his regular assistant?

Mr. George Looney is indisposed. v-

New jewelry to match your costume
at THE BOOK SHOP. 29-3t

BETTER be safe than sorry. Ditto
works for your town. Why not insure
with Ditto? tf

Onr Service Car is Always at the Gomnand ol csr Patrcss

MCEMIM

Change in Ownership oi Tire
and Vulcanizing Business

- V

On and after August 1st, ? the undersigned
will have charge of the OCALA TIRE & YUL-'
CANIZING COMPANY, next to MacKay & Co.,
on North Magnolia street. We are thor thoroughly
oughly thoroughly equipped for handling 'VULCANIZING
of every description on short notice, and we
solicit the patronage of the car owners of
Marion and nearby counties. Our prices
will be found reasonable, and we guarantee
every piece ot work turned out.
JOHN R. LONG
mi A. STROUD
Exclusive Agency lor Hood Tires and Tabes

The friends of Mr. H. W. Clements,

who made his home in Ocala for some

time, being with the Commercial
Bank and one of. the pitchers on the
Ocala baseball team last season, will
be sorry to hear that he has been in
the Southside hospital in Miami for
the past three weeks, with a broken
leg, which injury he received while
playing ball. Mr. Clements left here
to accept a position with a bank at
Fort Lauderdale and this season has
been playing ball with the Fort Lau Lauderdale
derdale Lauderdale team. It is hoped that he will
soon be out and as well as ever.

NOTICE, EASTERN STARS

Mrs. C. S. Cullen and
Cullen leave Thursday

Miss : Alice
morning. to.

The Eastern Star sewing circle will join Mr. Cullen and sons in Bender
meet at 3:30 Wednesday afternoon in sonville, where they have secured a

the hall,
quested.

A good attendance is re-'house and will enjoy. the summer.

Two new styles of .ladies' sport ox oxfords
fords oxfords just in; one plain and one two two-tone.
tone. two-tone. Little's Shoe Parlor. 28-6t

Friendship Day August 6th. Cards
at THE GIFT SHOP. 29-3t

The friends of Mr. T. H. Johnson

will be sorry, to hear that he is sick!

They hope, for his rapid recovery.

Nice assortment of
Cards at The Gift Shop.

Friendship
27-St

Kingan's Peerless Butter in pound,
cartons for 42 cents, at the U-Serve
stores. l-3t

The Catholic .Ladies'
will sell cantiy Friday
band, concert.

Miss Juliette Ward of Kendrick left
today for Lakeland, where she has

J been offered an excellent position.'
Aid Society Miss Ward has many friends in Ocala
night at the and Kendrick, and they hope she will
l-4t not stay away fro mthem too long.

Bracelets to match your costume at
THE BOOK SHOP. 29-3t

FOR SALE Seven head Jersey milk
cows, good for dairy. Will sell sep

arately or in herd. Call on or write

Matthews, Inter lachen, Flor-

LOST One male lemon and white
- pointer drop. Answers to ,the name
' ; of Dewey. A liberal reward will be
paid for information and return to
Fred Malever, Ocala. 29-tf
FOR SALE Oliver typewriter, little
used and a bargain. Also .Corona
typewriter in good condition and a
bargain. THE BOOK SHOP. 29-6t

T. S.

ida.

Jl-6t

WANTED Sweet milk customers.
Sweet milk 10c. a quart, delivered
morning and evening. Drop me a
card. Robert O. Williams, Mgr., R.
A., care J. T. Nelson. 19-tf

LET MOTHERS REST-Special rates
for families through the summer
months. Children half price, at the
Arms House. 26-tf

FOR SALEr1922 Buick touring car,
. good condition, on original tires.
Practically half price; $200 down
payment secures delivery. Balance
on easy terms. McLeod & Waters,
Studebaker dealers, Ocala. 26-6t

FOR RENT Two furnished rooms
for light housekeeping. All conven conveniences.
iences. conveniences. Apply to Mrs. J. W. Akin,
615 South Tuscawilla street, or
phone 235. 26-6t

FOR SALE 1920 Studebaker Special
Six touring, 1 in first class mechan mechanical
ical mechanical condition. Was owned by Mr.
Borland. Price very low; $250 down
secures delivery. Will accept small
car as first cash payment. McLeod
A Waters, Studebaker dealers. 26-6t

H. H. SUMMERLIN Shoe Repair
Shop, 2 Magnolia St, west of the
courthouse. Repairing youths' shoes
60c. and $1; adults' $1.25, $1.50 and
$1.75; all others $2.25 and $2.50. lm

WANTED Roomers and table board boarders.
ers. boarders. Apply to Mrs. Alta Hinton, 16
v N. Watula street. 27-6t

FOUND July 26th, new Goodyear
tire on rim. Owner write to C. J.
Rast, Orange Springs, Fla. 29-tf

Fertilize your pot plants and lawn
flowers with Albert's Plant Food. Sold
in 25c, 50c and $2 packages at tha
Court Pharmacy. T-tf

DR. K. J. WEIHE,

, unrnmetrist una untinan

.v Eyesight Specialist

114 Main Street, Jacksonville
18 East Broadway, Gcala

NOTICE

FOR RENT Five room

apartment; private bath, private
entrance. C. C. Bryant, 805 Tusca Tuscawilla
willa Tuscawilla St. Phone 332. 22-tf

COWS FOR SALE Small herd

seven fine ; Jerseys, two just fresh
and three coming in between Au August
gust August and December. If you are
wanting something good at a bar bargain
gain bargain nee A". Pooser, at B. Goldman's
store. Box 347, Ocala. 21-
LOST Leather pocket check book
. containing, about $100, lost at the
'White House hotel, ''v'nesville, on

Notice is hereby given that the
board of public instruction in and for
Marion county will receive bids until
3 o'clock Wednesday afternoon, Aug.

furnished !! f?r letting the dormitory for the

ioiiowing year, oeginmng oepiriuuer
1st. Bids should be sealed and ad addressed
dressed addressed to H. G. Shealy, Ocala, Flor Florida.
ida. Florida. Board reserves' the right to re reject
ject reject any and all bids. By order of the

of board of public instruction, Marion

county. H. G. Shealy,
8-1-tf Secretary-'

BETTER insure before rather than
ifter the fire. Let Ditto insure you. tf

August 6th is Friendship Card Day.
You will find just the sentiment you
are looking for at THE SPECIALTY
SHOP, A. E. Gfrig.X 28-6t
If the Star's readers could under understand
stand understand that five-one is the number of
the phone for the society reporter and
business department, and two-seven is
that of the editorial department, they
would save themselves some trouble.

The Catholic Ladies'

will sell candy Friday

band concert.

Aid Society
night at the
l-4t

Apples for canning $1.85 bushel box.

Ollie Mordis. l-3t

Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Harriss, who

are enjoying the summer at Asheville;

write home that the weather has been

delightful and that it has been so cold
that blankets are in demand. They

say fires are comfortable in the morn mornings
ings mornings and evenings.

Florentine jewelry at

SHOP.

THE

BOOK
l-3t

Apples for canning $1.85 bushel box.
Ollie Mordis. l-3t

Mr. Fred J. Burden accompanied by

his daughter Miss Lillian, of Emporia,

passed through the city today en route
to Gainesville for a few days' visit.
They will stop on their return trip for

a short visit with their xormer ucaia

friends.

ft
s

9

v i i.:ri mm r-m Lit- .mm wrmr r- w m iri-jjr' mmwL. m --mm. m m m

TODAY, DIRECT FROM CHICAGO
REPRESENTING

Some of the newest earrings
THE BOOK SHOP. l-3t

at

BETTER buy a lot before they go
up, and build a home while materials
are cheap. Let Ditto show you. 11 tf

Mr. and Mrs. T. E. Bridges and son,
Mr. Leroy Bridges, left this morning
in their car for Weaverville, N. C. Mr.
Leroy Bridges will stop in Atlanta to
transact business, returning to Ocala
in a short time. Mr. and Mrs. Bridges
will spend the remainder of the sum summer
mer summer in the mountains.

9

Kingan's Peerless Butter in pound
cartons for 42 cents, at the U-Serve
stores. l-3t

TAILORS

Order your suit while Mr. Sunderland is with us,
and have it delivered when you want it. He will be
with us until Thursday noon, August 3d. Come in and
look through our complete line of Fall and Winter sam samples
ples samples for Suits and Overcoats.
h; a waterman, the haberdasher

... -i-i r

V e never sacrince quality to seii sg.
at a low price. Our meats are nej W

ket. Phone 108. 22-tf ? &S&a4f-i&T

i

6

r
A



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TXT4 9e971a23f9d0fa4754e9870b8f46b59b 14248
0108.txt
METS1 unknownx-mets 80c060574d635962b74c0454a4c9cde6 9856
UF00075908_06263.mets
METS:structMap STRUCT1 physical
METS:div DMDID ADMID The ORDER 0 main
PDIV1 Main
PAGE1 Page
METS:fptr FILEID
PAGE2
PAGE3
PAGE4 4
STRUCT2 other
ODIV1
FILES1