The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:06245

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
NINO
WEATHER FORECAST Partly cloudy tonight and Wednesday, local thundershowers Wednesday and in extreme south portion tonight.
TEMPERATURES This morning:, 70; this afternoon, 93.
San rises tomorrow, 5:34; Sets, 7:31.
OCALA, FLORIDA, TUESDAY, JULY 11. 1922
VOLUME TWENTY-EIGHT. NO. 164
RAILROAD STRIKE IS RAPIDLY
DEGENERATING INTO CIVIL WAR
WILDCATS LOST
TO THE MULLETS
I WITH
PRESIDENT F.1ADE A
FAIR PROPOSITI
HIT AT HARVARD
THE U. S. MAIL

mm

eve

MIII'S

HEAVV

I

Attacks 'on Men Who Want to Work,f

Interference With Train Service
And General Disorder On
The Increase
Chicago, July 11. (By Associated
Press)Increasing disorders, cur curtailment
tailment curtailment of train service and addition additional
al additional troops on duty at several trouble
centers marked the progress of the
rail strike today. The ranks of the
strikers were also recruited as clerks
on the Norfolk & Western were au
thorized to strike at 10 a m. today.
--Troops are on guard over railroad
property at Bloomington and Clinton,
Ills., Parsons, Kans., and New Frank Franklin,
lin, Franklin, Mo., with other units. under arms
ready to entrain. '
United States marshals are protect
ing the mails on southwestern lines
and guarding the Burlington shops at
Aurora. Ills., which had been sur-
. rounded by 1000 pickets.
Many of the rail centers are blank
eted with injunctions .issued by fed
eral courts restraining the strikers
from interfering with operation of
trains and shops. Picketing is gener general
al general throughout the country.
New York and the east began to
feel the combined effects of the min miners'
ers' miners' and railroad men's strikes today.
Twenty-one passenger trains on the
Erie and all double sections on the
West Shore were discontinued. All
express trains on the Norfolk & West Western
ern Western are said to have been delayed
from three to six hours on account of
shortage of locomotives and coal.
BATTLE AT BLOOMINGTON
Bloomington, July 11. r(Associated
Press) More than 300 shots were ex
changed by National Guardsmen and
snipers during the first night's con control
trol control of Chicago & Alton shops by the
troops. Two-men hidden in a gulley
north of the shops fired rtwice at a
sentinel shortly before 3 a. m. Three
hundred rounds 'from automatic rifles
were poured into the gulley. The place
was searched at daylight but there
was no trace of the snipers. Shooting
was resumed at 7:15 a.s m. when
snipers fired at another sentry.
s A LATER ACCOUNT
Springfield; July 11. (Associated
Press). Colonel Culbertson, in com command
mand command of state troops at Bloomington,
reported to Adjutant General Black
this morning only three shots were
fired at the Chicago & Alton shops,
"one from outside the "military line and
two from the inside, one of which was
accidental.
SIGNALMEN ARE CAUTIOUS
Chicago, July 11. The Brother
hood of Railroad Signalmen will not
strike for. the,, present at least, accord
ing to a statement today by President
Helt of that organization.
STRUCK DOWN. BY STRB5ERS
Milwaukee, tJuly 11. Two Chicago
Northwestern railroad guards were
attacked by a band of twelve men
armed with stones and clubs early to today.
day. today. The guards were found in a
semi-conscious condition.
N. & W. CLERKS. STICK".
Roanoke, July 11. Not a single
clerk struck at the general offices of
the Norfolk & Western this morning
at 10 cfclock, the time set for a gen gen-"
" gen-" eral walk-out on the system, accord according
ing according to railroad officials. Information
from other points is not available.
WABASH TAKES OFF TRAINS
Danville, Ills., July 11. Fifty-four
trains have been taken off the Wabash
Railway. Officials of the road said
the curtailment was due to a lack of
coal coming from Kentucky and not
. due to the strike. .' $
w SECTION MEN. QUIT
Dennison, O., July. 11 One hundred
Pennsylvania section men quit work
here today in protect against the five
per centw cut ordered by the railroad
labor board and effective today.
, SITUATION IN FLORIDA
Jacksonville, July 11 Striking rail
road shopmen in the state stood ada
mant to the ultimatums issued by the
Atlantic Coast Line and Florida East
Coast railroads, the time ilmit of
which expired at ten o'clock yester
day morning. With the exception of
St. Augustine none of the strikers
have returned to work in response to
what was described as the last word
by the two railroads, according to re-

ports reaching here. The ranks of

those holding out had not issued an
ultimatum so far as is known here.
MAKE RIGHT OF WAY
FOR THE MUSIC
Cut Out Noise on the Public Square
Tonight and Give the Band a
Fair Chance
A demonstration band concert will
beg iven in the band stand on the
qpurth ouse squareXtonight at eight
o'clock, by the newly organized band.
One of the drawbacks to having band
concerts on the square has been the
amount of noise that has at times in
the past drowned out the music. Re
quest is made, therefore, that every
effort be made to reduce the noise& to
a minimum during the playing of the
numbers on theprograra. Parents are
asked to see to it that the children
do not make too much noise in the
immediate vicinity of the band stand
during the concert. The starting up
of automobiles having cutouts, has
been a very disagreeable feature of
some of the band concerts in the past
and it is hoped that this will not be
a drawback to the concert tonight and
to other concerts in the future.
- If the concert tonight proves to be
a success, Mr. H. N. Lord, director of
the band, s expects to begin a regular
program 'of band "concerts on Friday
night. The concert tonight will not
be as complete in numbers as will be
the regular concerts. There will be
nine numbers tonight. The regular
concerts will have at least twelve
numbers on the program.
BAND CONCERTS TO BEGIN
A Demonstration Performance Will be
' Given on the Courthouse Square
This Evening
The newly organized band under
the direction of Mr. H. N. Lord will
give a demonstration concert this
evening in the band stand on the
courthduse square at eight o'clock. If
everything is found to be satisfactory,
it is planned to begin a regular series
of summer band concerts on next Fn
day night. The new organization has
had a number of rehearsals and is
most encouraged over the progress
that has been made.
The program for Tuesday night will
be as follows:
.1. March, Emergency Aid (Beyer).
2. 'Gin, Gin, 'Ginny Shore (Don
aldson).
3. The Sunny South (selection of
Southern plantation songs!
4. Ka-lu-a (Kern).
Intermission.
5. March, "High Pride" (Heed).
6.
8.
9.
Love Dreams (Golden).
I Want my Mammy (Breau).
Star Spangled Banner.
TWENTIETH HIT FOR TILLIE
Philadelphia, July 11. Tillie Wal
ker, Athletic outfielder, hit his twen
tieth home run today in the opening
inning of the first game of a double
header with Detroit.
HE TOOK MANY FELLOW-
CITIZENS WITH HIM
Rome, July 11, Arrested on the
charge of manufacturing bombs, Fi Fi-ladelf
ladelf Fi-ladelf o Castro, mayor of Lentini,
Sicily, blew up the courthouse, killing
all occupants,' says a dispatch to the
Central News. Numerous bombs
were found in the home of the mayor,
who" was declared to have made them
for socialist members of the municipal
council.
Ruptured?
Don't wear harness. Let us show
you a -truss built to give service and
comfort. No thigh straps, no unnec unnec-esary
esary unnec-esary buckles. Phillips Drug Co., the
store reliable. ll-2t ltwky
Wood
Four foot wood reduced to $3.50 per
cord until Sept. 1st. Now is the time
to lay. in your winter's supply. E.
Gibbons, N. Osceola street, phone
471-Blue. 7-ll-6t
The prohibitionists must now tell
to the
Times.
merchant ; marine. Asheville
anomaly, anyhow. Dallas News.

Ancient City Team is an Aggregation
Worthy of Ocala's Best
Efforts

In spite of the herculean efforts of
Old Folks Whitney the Wildcats were
unable to scale the Mullets in the first
game of a three-game series on the
home lot Monday. Whitney was in
him prime and pitched a game of ball
that was worth any man's money to
see. He only allowed the Saints four
hits, only two of which came in one
inning. Whitney had the odds slight slightly
ly slightly on Collee, who twirled for the Mul Mullets.
lets. Mullets. Collee also only let up four hits
and like Whitney's four hits, he only
allowed two to be bunched in any one
inning, but Collee did not have the
control that Whitney -displayed. He
walked two men, hit one and has a
couple of wild pitches charged to his
credit. On the other hand, he struck
out five to WTrit's two. Taken all in
al, the pitcher's battle was very near-.
y a draw.
When it came to miscues, the Wild
cats made one more than "the Mullets
and it was this extra error that cost
the extra run that the visitors made.
Brooks threw wild to third and' let
Collee score in the seventh inning.
Each of the. battling teams snatch
ed a double play from their opponents
Van Landingham, Leon and Brooks
pulled off the twin out for Ocala,
while Collee and Follette did the Same
stunt for the Saints.
The game was the fastest seen here
this season and was chock full of
snappy plays. Probably the outstand
ing feature of the game was the long
running catch made by Harry Wood
in right field when he robbed Davies
of a wonderful hit. Harry surely
covered himself with glory when he
nabbed that one. Ocala's Van made
pretty jumping .catch of. the line
drive that Andreu tried to hit over
him. That same Louis- v an also made
a peach of a stop when he stabbed the
hot grounder that Wolfe tried to hit
through him. Louis played a jam-up
same of ball yesterday. Davies dis
tinguished himself in left field when
he caught LiddelPs fly just before it
hit the ground. Jimmie says that all
Davies needs is a mask and a white
horse.
Neither side scored until the sev seventh.
enth. seventh. In her half St. Augustine made
two runs. Francis led off with a clean
single. Carter went out, second to
first, advancing Francis to second.
Collee doubled to center field, scoring
Francis. Hernandez hit to third who
threw him out at first but Collee
made third and crossed the plate on
a wild throw by Brooks to Louis Van
Landingham. (Why spell it out?
Well Louis has a brother playing
third for the Mullets. Since both
brothers play third it is pretty hard
to keep them straight.) Follette
walked but was caught sound asleep
on first and the side was retired with
only two runs.
In her half of the seventh Ocala
made her lone tally. Overstreet
fanned. Wood flew out to short.
Brooks walked and went to second on
a wild pitch. Liddell singled, scoring
Brooks. Whitney singled and Liddell
should have gone to third but loafed
on the job and stopped on second.
Both Whitney and Liddell advanced a
base on another wild pitch but died on
second and third when Taylor fanned.
The hitting of Collee and Overstreet
was the best in the game. Each t)f
these boys slapped the pill on the nose
for two bases.
These teams play here today and
tomorrow. Fully 100 people saw Mon
day's game. It's a shame to play ball
like that for only a little 'handful of
fans.
The Box Score
Mullets
Van L., 3rd
Andreau, rf
Francis, ss
Carter, c ......
C. Collee, p
Hernandez, cf ....
Follette, 1st ...
Davies, If .
"Wolfe, 2nd
ABJR H PO A E
4
4
3 ;
3
2 1
3
2
3
3
0
0
1
0
1
a,
0
0
0
0
1
1
.1
1
0
0
0
0
1
0
2
9
1
0
10
2
2
2
0
1
0
2
0
0
0
4
9
27 2
AB R
. 4 0
4 27
H PO
Wildcats
A
2
7
2
0
2
Taylor, ss
0
0
0
0
1
1
1
3
0
3
it! Van L, 3rd ...... 2
0
0
0
C
Leon, 2nd 4
Rymer, If 4
Overstreet, c 4
0
1
2
0
Brooks, 1st 3 1 014 0

Declared It Confered Degree no Gov.

Harding in Order to Keep Him
On Federal Reserve Board
Washington, July 11. Continuing
his attack on the Federal Reserve
Board and Governor W. P. G. Hard
ing, Senator Heflin, of Alaabma, de declared
clared declared in the Senate today that Har Harvard
vard Harvard University confered the degree
of doctor of laws on Harding "to help
Wall street in its effort to get him re
appointed governor."
SUMMER STORM SWEPT
' MIDDLE WESTERN STATES
Small Loss of Life but Property
Suffered Severely
Chicago, July 11. (By Associated
Press).- The middle western states
are recovering today from the effects
of hail, rain and wind fctorms which
swept over Iowa, Illinois, Missouri,
South Dakota, Nebraska and Kansas
yesterday, causing heavy property
damage and a small loss of life One
man was killed in South Dakota and
two in Nebraska.
VAN ARSDALE WONT HAVE
TO FACE A JURY
Newport News, July 11. Russell
Van Arsdale, charged v with the mur murder
der murder of Miss Rose Brady at Camp Eus Eus-tis,
tis, Eus-tis, was found dead in his cell in the
city jail here today. An autopsy will
be held to determine whether it is a
case of suicide by poisoning or heart
failure.
"NO MAN'S LAND" WILL
EXIST NO LONGER
St. Augustine, July 11. (By Asso Associated
ciated Associated Press). That famous 600 foot
section of the Dixie Highway between
St. Augustine and Jacksonville, better
known as "No Man's Land" is a strip
over which St. Johns and Duval coun counties
ties counties have disagreed for many years,
each county claiming that it is part
of the other. St. Johns county erected
a concrete arch over the highway at
what it declared to be the St. Johns
county line. Duval paved the high highway
way highway with brick to a point within 600
feet of the arch and the end of the St.
Johns county section of the highway,
declaring its paving -ended at the
Duval county line. That left the 600
feet of road between the two sections
of the brick unpaved. Somebody lat
er dumped rock along "No Man's
Land" and it has been possible to ne negotiate
gotiate negotiate it with a car in high gear but
the bumps in the bw feet were in
number almost as many as would be
found were 600 feet of rough water
reproduced in concrete. .
St. Johns county in paving "No
Man's Land" will scarify the road.
widen it to eighteen feet and roll and
oil it.
iddell, cf ...
3 0 1 2'0 0
2 0 1 0 4 0
Whitney, p .,
30 1
Score by innings:
4 27 17
R H
2
E
1
Mullets ...000 000 2002
4
4
Wildcats 000 000 1001
Summary: Sacrifice hits, Collee,
Andreu. Stolen bases, Louis Van 2.
Two base hits, Collee, Overstreet.
Struck out by Collee 5, by Whitney, 1.
Walked by Collee 2, by Whitney 1.
Hit by Collee 1. Earned runs, Mullets
1, Wildcats 1. Time 1:25. Umpires,
Galloway, and Leavengood.
Lasker seems to spell it transpotat-
ion. Dallas News.
BA
0
E

Administration is Now. at the Point
Where Grover Cleveland
Took Action

Washington, July 11 The announc announced
ed announced determination of the government
to maintain transportation of the
mails and interstate commerce during
the shopmen's strike has failed to
check- today a stream of reports to the
postoffice department tf interference
by strikers with mail trains. Three
thousand miles of railway mail service
on the Wabash Railway is not being
operated.
THERE WILL BE OTHERS
New Orleans, July 11.- Two men
and two women 'were arrested today,
charged" with violating federal in injunctions
junctions injunctions to prevent interference with
trains. They are charged specifically
with assault upon a maid employed by
the Pullman company.
ELMER DOVER STEPPED
DOWN AND OUT
Washington, July 11. Information
was obtained at the capital from
treasury officials today that Elmer
Dover, of Tacoma, Wash., assistant
secretary of the treasury in charge of
customs and internal revenue and one
of the principals of the Blair-Dover
controversy, had submitted his resig
nation," effective July 15th.
The regular weekly meeting of the
"A" Club was entertained at the home
of Miss Elizabeth Davis last night.
A" number of rounds of auction were
enjoyed by the members and a few
friends who were asked to spend the
evening with the club members. After
five rounds of auction four of the
players were presented with useful
gifts. The visitors thus rewarded
were Mrs. R. S. Hall and Miss Nettie
Camp, and the club members, Mrs,
A. M. Withers and Mrs. W. M. Pal Palmer.
mer. Palmer. At the conclusion of the game
dainty refreshments of salad, ice tea
and sandwiches were served. Those
playing were Mrs. A. M. Withers,
Mrs. W. M. Palmer, Mrs. R. S. Hall,
Mrs. Edmund Martin. Mrs. Albert
Harriss, Mrs. N. P. Davis, Mrs. J. N.
Bryan, Misses Agnes Burford, Eliza
beth Burton, -Nettie Camp and Mar
guerite Edwards. x
The Court Pharmacy has brighten
ed itself with fresh wallpaper and is
now a more pleasant resort than ever.
Mr. Jack Camp, who with his wife
is spending several months in Ashe
ville, is a business visitor in town for
several days..
Mr. and Mrs. D.'B. Mayo are wel
coming to their home a sturdy young
son, born this morning at the hospital
This is the youngest of six and his
brothers and sisters think he is the
finest baby that ever was.
MrsJNrTfryan Jr. of Tampa and
her bright little boy, J. N. Ill, are in
the city, the guests of Mrs. Bryan's
parents, Mr.' and Mrs. W. W. Strip Stripling.
ling. Stripling. Mrs. Bryan as Mbs Ellen Strip Stripling,
ling, Stripling, was one of Ocala's brightest and
most popular girls, and she always
has a hearty welcome from scores of
friends when she comes to town.
2
Mrs. Florence George of Clearwater
and her niece and nephew, Miss Ruth
and Ralph George of Morriston, were
welcome visitors to Ocala Sunday.
Mrs. George makes her home in Clear
water, but comes back to the old
home section every once in awhile.

Stt. AUGUSTINE Vs.

TM11W

Owners, Miners and the Public to Be
Represented on the Board Of
Arbitration

Washington, July 11. Representa Representatives
tives Representatives of non-union coal operators will
be called together at the end of the
week to -consider means for dealing
with the smaller operators who are
selling coal t prices in advance of
the maximums recently reached by
voluntary .agreement. Secretary Her Herbert
bert Herbert Hoover announced today. -.
The arbitration commission propos-
ed by Mr. Harding would consist of'
three members appointed by the
United Mine Workers of America,
three appointed by the operators and
five representatives of the public, to
be named by the president.
All representatives of the groups
concerned had delayed definite an answers
swers answers to the proposal, although union
officials informed the president they
had no power to give acceptance or
refusal, btu would summon the gen general
eral general policy committee of the United
Mine .Workers of America here Sat Saturday
urday Saturday to consider the matter.

TRIPLE CITIES WILL HAVE
GREAT MASONIC TEMPLE
Daytona, July 11. (By Associated
Press). Masons of the Triple Cities,
Daytona, ; Seabreeze and Daytona
Beach, have announced that con construction
struction construction of a Masonic Temple to cost
$40,000 ""will be undertaken here in
the near future. .The building will be
of hollow tile faced with brick and
three stories in height.
Mr. and Mrs. J. Ei Walker and son
J.' E. Jr., after a short stay in Ocala,'
left this aftemon for their home in
Orlando. While in town they were
guests of Mrs. Perdue.
Miss Sarah Agnew of Jacksonville,
arrived in Ocala last week and ex
pects to spend the next month here
with her sister, Mrs. J. Carstens.
The sale of summer millinery at the
Style Hat Shop is going along briskly.
Many of the patrons of this store are
taking advantage of the bargains of
fered there.
In the county judge's office Satur Saturday,
day, Saturday, Judge Futch officiating, Mr. S.
V. Proctor and Miss Elma E. Swearin Swearin-gen,'
gen,' Swearin-gen,' both of Pedro, were made man
and wife. The Pedro settlement is
noted for pretty girls, and Mrs. Proc Proctor
tor Proctor sustained the reputation of her
neighborhood. We understand there is
only one unattached young man left
in Pedro, which is a straight tip for
any of the boys in other parts of the
county to go visiting in that favored
section.
LIBRARY NOTICE
The regular monthly meeting of the
library board will be held this eve
ning at the library at 8 o'clock.
Oil signs are being found in the
Philippines. This proves their claim
to independence "is unjust. Oklahoma
News. ' v
Americans in Germany say they are
charged too much. Germans want
them to feel at home cCleveland
Press.
Has it occured to the Busches that
they have given Shipping Board ves vessels
sels vessels some valuable publicity ? Bir Birmingham,.
mingham,. Birmingham,. Age-Herald.
OCALA



, .: t

OCALA EVENING STAB. TUESDAY, JULY 11. 1922

Oeala Evening Star

blUbed Everr DT Eveept Saadar by
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY,
, OCALA, FLORIDA

H. J. Blttlaser, President
H. D. LeareasMd, Vlee-Prealdeat
P. V. Laveaa4, Seeretary-Treaaure
J. 11. Bcajawla, Edltar
Entered at Ocala. Fla.. poatofflce as
a3ond-claM matter.
TELEPHONES
, BuImm Of flee Ffve-Oa
f U(rUI Departmea Twa-See
, 8afctjr Reverter Fl-Oaa

; MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS
Th Associated Press la exclusively
entitled for the use for republication of
t all news dispatches credited to It or not
otherwise credited 4n this paper and
also the local news published herein.
All rights of republication of special
dispatches herein are also reserved.

DOMESTIC SUBSCRIPTION RATES
One year, in advance .......... ..$6.00
Three months. In advance 3.00
Three months, In advance 1.50
One month, in advance 60

ADVERTISING RATES

Display i Plate 15 cents per Inch for
,, consecutive Insertions. Alternate Inser Insertions
tions Insertions 25 per cent additional. Composl Composl-!
! Composl-! tlon charges on ads. that run less than
. six times 10 cents per Inch. Special

position 25 .per cent additional. Rates
based on four-Inch minimum. Less than
four Inches will take a higher rate,
-which will be furnished upon applica application.
tion. application.
Reading; Xottcess Five cents per line
.;for first insertion; three cents per line
.for each subsequent insertion. One
' change a week allowed on readers with with-,
, with-, out extra composition charges.
Legal advertisements at legal rates.

We haven't been able to obtain any
statistics, but we can see there is
building going on all over town.

and while it would have cost less mon

ey to do that than be burned out, he

would not have had so fine a building

nor one such an ornament to the town
a3 that bcimr rzoidly completed.

MacKays new chapel is an immense
improvement on the old one. ; Beside
the handsome new buildings, the con conflagration
flagration conflagration brought about a much much-needed
needed much-needed shake-up in the fire depart department,
ment, department, revealing deficiencies that were
being allowed to exist, and which
sooner or later would have been re revealed
vealed revealed at perhaps a worse conflagra conflagration;
tion; conflagration; caused the purchase of the new
and uptodate' fire machine and other

needed equipment. A few weeks more,
the burned district will look like there
had never been any fire, but that
some wizard had waved his wand over
it, making everything better than it
wa3 before.

THE EAST COAST OF FLORIDA

VL

CLYATT CONTRIBUTES
A CAUSTIC CRITICISM

The city is improving the street
'from Magnolia to the jail. Some peo people
ple people think that street is almost too
easy to travel now.'

The ex-kaiser is reported to, have
taken up the study of the weather.
He is probably looking for a prospect
,,j of another rein. New York Tribune.
Hell find more hail than rain.

i The members of Fort King Camp
W. O. W. have a large class of can candidates
didates candidates to initiate at their meeting
Friday night, and ther should be a
good attendance We understand the
degree team will be in action with its
old-time efficiency.

After some years of work under
great disadvantages, Tuscawilla Park
is beginning to attain some of the
beauty that may be expected of it.
The park, however, needs trimming
up, which should be done as soon as
the rainy season is over

,The Tampa Tribune insinuates that
Fordney needed the nightie he exhibit exhibited
ed exhibited in Congress the other day. It says:
"Still, one perhaps cannot blame 'Joe'
Fordney for going into this matter of
$60, nightgowns. Mr. .Fordney is
about to retire."

The members of the band have
been practicing with skill and dili diligence
gence diligence for the past several nights.
They expect to give the result of their
.work to the public in a concert on
the k public square this evening, and it
is to be hoped that there will be a
large attendance to hear them.

. Citv Manager Brumhv and his force

are making unprecedented good time j is made h? those

v t paving North. Main street. They laid
j brick from Washington to Adams
. yesterday, meantime preparing the
next block for brick, which they are
laying today, and also preparing an another
other another block ahead. They expect to
reach the union station plaza by
. next Tuesday.

No child should be permitted to re remain
main remain in bed later than six o'clock.
The habit formed when young clings
to' one through life. It is early in
the morning that the mind is .most
active, and the energies most aroused.
Any child who would apply them themselves
selves themselves could by using the two hours
they give to unneeded sleep acquire
;an education. But they sleep, and
later will say, "If I had just been
given the chance, I would have ac acquired
quired acquired an education." Everything de depends
pends depends on the child and but little on the
school. Children, just get out at six
a. m. and apply the time to self self-improvement
improvement self-improvement and you will be surpris-
. ed at the result. Fort Lauderdale
Sentinel.
Our experience with children was
that we would cheerfully have paid
some of them a dollar apiece a month
to stay asleep until six o'clock every
morning.

Editor Star: A news item is sent
out from Tallahassee proclaiming
that Governor Hardee has kept his
campaign pledge to reduce taxes. It
is not true. The governor by his rec recommendation
ommendation recommendation and influence induced
the 1921 legislature to create an-additional
office and misnamed it "tax
equalizer," instead of dubbing it "tax
raiser," and the failure to have its
true purpose stated in the title might
invalidate the law. The governor's
recent campaign manager was ap appointed
pointed appointed to draw the salary and with without
out without any inspection of property in
Marion county he issues an order to
the tax assessor of Marion county,
not to equalize, but. arbitrarily in increase
crease increase all real estate values in the

county ten per cent. That is to say

that property now assessed at 10 per

cent of its true value, shall be increas

ed to 11 per cent of its true value,
and property now, r.ssessed at full
value be increased 10 per vent above

its actual value. After doing this the

administration reduces the state tax

rate less than one-seventh of one per

cent, below the 1921 rate, and it is
carried in double column headlines
as a boast of having reduced taxes.

It will take $8000 in tax valuation to

amount to $1 in reduction of the state
taxes below the 1921 rate, whereas

this $8000 arbitrarily increased to

$8800, the tax payer will be called oh
to pay $7.50 more state taxes in 1921
on the same property, an increase of
near $1 per thousand. A scheme
worked like this, instead of being a
reduction of one one-eighth v of one
mill, in dollars and cents of taxes
paid, wifl actually amount to an in increase
crease increase of nearly seven-eights of one
mill, and this the taxpayer will find
out when he pays his taxes, if he is
able to pay them. The worst thing
about a tax-burdened state, is that
there is no rift in the clouds, no ray of
hope for the future. I thought that
when our tax rate went from $17 to
$50.75 per thousand in twenty years,
that the limit had been reached, but
not so. I understand the board of
county commissioners contemplates
increasing the county levy about ten
per cent above the present high-water
mark in taxation, and that the city
rate will probably be increased 20 or
25 per cent. It seems that no effort

in authority to

economize or reduce the burden of
taxation; on the contrary, it is a con constant
stant constant cry for more and then more
taxes. When a limit has been fixed
by the constitution then the consti constitution
tution constitution has been amended, and the peo

ple are called upon now the second or

third time to amend the constitution
in order that taxation may be in increased.
creased. increased. If you oppose this amend

ment, what will happen to you? The

editor of the Star knows from ex

perience. You might incur the1 enmity

of the "Flying Squadron."
W. W. Clyatt.

Kemal Pasha will not permit a com
mission of Allied inquiry to invest!

gate the Turkish atrocities. He says

he thinks the demand unprecedented

So, according to the information, were

the atrocities. New York Morning

Telegraph.

i
: I The fire of last February was hard
on the people whose property was
destroyed, but it was a blessing in
disguise to the city. The most promi prominent
nent prominent part of the blessing is in the
better structures that are replacing
the old, which were neat and good,
but were getting out of date. The
buildings belonging to Mrs. J. E.
Chace and Mr. J. J. Gerig, now com complete
plete complete and again occupied, are much
more handsome and convenient than
those they lost. It would not have
been long before MacKay would have
had to put a third story on his block,

au pnone ius early and you
i i .

won c nave long to wait lor your
meats and groceries for dinner. Main

Street Market. 2-tf

The college graduate thinks he is
going to run the world some day, and

the irritating thing about it is that he

is. New York Tribune.

Meals and berth on steamers in

eluded in price of tickets Jacksonville

to Baltimore and Philadelphia. Ad Address
dress Address Mr. C. M. Haile, general agent,

Jacksonville, for fares to all points.

It is hard to understand why Euro

peans are so poor. They don't have
to support bootleggers. Washington
Past.

A dinner without a nice piece of
fresh meat is like the play of Hamlet
with Hamlet on a vacation. Phone us
you wants for tomorrow's dinner.
Main Street Market. Call 108. 2-tf

Within the triangle formed by the
East Coast Railway, as it runs south southwest
west southwest from St. Augustine to East Pa-

latka, and from East Palatka south-

east toward Ormond and Daytona, has
been worked another of the latterday
miracles that are proving the fertility
of Florida, long believed by those who
knew her not, and many who thought
they knew her, to be a demi-desert.
Up to twenty years ago it was a big
patch of flatwoods. To both the native

and arrival from other states the
flatwoods were once hopeless. With a
hard-clay pan under the topsoil, they
were either swamps or dried mud. But
somebody found out, by accident, that
in the soil in this particular patch
of flatwoods there was an element
favorable to the growth of the humble
but useful Irish potato, second only to
bread as food. And now this country,
drained and cultivated, is an immense
farm, and raises more of the bog or oranges
anges oranges every year than there, can be
furnished trains to haul them away.
And other crops as well. Last time I
saw Hastings, it was a little Godfor

saken settlement out in the woods,

nothing to it but the railroad station

and a few ramshackle wooden houses
scattered around in the pines. Now,
its quite a city, and farms and resi residences
dences residences stretch away for miles in every

direction.

ine road from rJast faiatka ran

northeast for a short distance toward
St. Augustine, then east, then curved

around to the- southwest, then turned

again in its true direction, the south

east. It was a nine-foot brick road.

For some miles the homes and farms
were thick. Then we were out in the
almost unbroken wilderness, thru

which the brick highway ran in a

long brown line. A nine-foot road is

all right as long as your car has it
to itself, but there is always a bump

and sometimes a wrench whenever it
has to turn out for another auto.
Travel was thick that day, and for
several miles we met five or six cars
every mile. We had a weak back tire,
and just as we were rolling off a
bridge across a drainage canal said
tire went blooey. Since it had to do

this, it considerately picked a good
place, and the car stopped where there
was plenty of shade. This was a

great help, for even in the shade the

heat was oppressive and the mosqui mosquitoes
toes mosquitoes were thick.

I became acciistomed to the East

Coast mosquito long ago and do not

hold him greatly in awe. One cf our

Oklawaha river mosquitoes could

whip a dozen of the East Coast brand.

if the latter would fight according to

regular prize ring rules and come on

not more than two at a time. How However,
ever, However, when you have to remain still for
any length of time, or sleep without

screens or nets and sometimes with
them the E. C. mosquito is a trouble

some bird. It must be said in his favor

that he is not malicious, and in draw

ing off superfluous blood ia rather a

benefit to those endowed with phil

osophy. Philosophy, by the way, is a

rather scarce article.

It looked like that tire had served

its time, so we left it and the rind of

the watermelon at t that bridge. The
watermelon gone, there was m6re

t a 1 m -w

room in me car; a lact wnicn l ap

preciated, as the melon had been

parked between my -.feet. which need

all the room they can obtain.

We were now thru with car troubles

for several days and hundreds of

miles, and the flivver, with, four per

fectly good wheels under it, romped
merrily to the southeast. Houses

were few and far between, but after
awhile we came to Bunnell, county
seat of Flagler. Last time I saw

Bunnell, it was only a sawmill with

some shanties in the vicinity. Now
it is a neat and modern town, indis indisputably
putably indisputably doing good business. Our old
friend, -Bob Harper, is-running a live

paper, the Flagler Tribune, at Bun

nell, and I should have been glad to
see him, but we were five hours be behind
hind behind time, so I had to deny myself

that pleasure.

There is a fine road from Bunnell
out to the ocean, and the Bunnellites
go to the beach as Ocalans go to Sil

ver Springs.

A few miles further, and we were
among the curves of the Tomoka, a
river up which I have journeyed in a
steam launch when there was nothing
but trees and alligators on its shores.
I found in their place quite an aggre aggregation
gation aggregation of good-looking buildings
docks and boathouses. Then we turn turned
ed turned to the left and crossed the East
Coast canal, to that branch of the
highway which runs along the eastern
shore of the broad smiling Halifax
river.
I almost forgot to say that at the

Flagler county line, a short distance
from the Tomoka, the brick road
came to an end, and we entered on a
wider and rougher tho hardened
road, which had the great merit of
allowing cars to pass without turning
out.
We had a good view of the Halifax,
as we rolled down its eastern shore.
It is the prettiest of all Florida tide-

Oi-O'. -O-J- vIl'--""I"1 -2.-1vI"--1"- 'm- -" -"T"--m"- -"m -"j1--"m"--'m-'m--"-'m'- -"My. ;

(5)

TPI TTTS n T" T 1 TT TT Cs rfS

I U W ft A lK

STA1T

TO

AT NINE O'CLOCK

i3& -.
-ZLr
.-2

$: Come Early and Get Some ol the FREE PRIZES I
jcS. - ' f

P

" The Fashion Center

OCALA FLORIDA

water rivera not near so broad as
the Indian but broad enough. Soon
the town of Ormond on the other
side came in sight and about the same
time we found ourselves in the village
of Ormond Beach. John D. Rockefel Rockefeller's
ler's Rockefeller's winter boardinghouse, the. Hotel

Ormond, loomed up ahead. It was,

closed, else we might have stopped for
lunch; as it was, we turned to the left

and traveled eastward up the long,
gentle hill from the bridge to the
ocean. We had not gone many yards

when' beyond the1 brow of that hill

we saw another long, long, wide, wide
hill of blue, seeming to rise in the
most smooth and gradual of slopes to

where it met the down-curving sky,

and a little further, and with a turn
to the right, we were traveling upon

the matchless road, that the waves
thru thousands of years have built
beside the Atlantic ocean. jhb.

OCALA TWENTY YEARS AGO

(Evening Star July 11,. 1902)
A letter from Mrs. Munden to a

friends here reports that she is great

ly pleased with her new home in
Tampa and that her hsalth is very
much improved since going there.

A letter from Mrs. Mamie Mallet

in Atlanta states that she is god godmother
mother godmother to the John McCarthy girls
and that in a few weeks they will
come and live with her. She also says

that she met on the streets of At

lanta Jake Israel, his mother, Chester
Finch and Rev. C. B. Wilmer, all
former Ocalans.
"Miss Donnie Griffin of Anthony,
who accompanied Mr. and Mrs. H. C.
Groves to the national Sunday school
convention in Denver, enjoyed an ex excursion
cursion excursion to the Yellowstone Park at
the close of the convention.
Mr., John M. Thompson and wife,
who have been visiting friends in
South Carolina, have returned home.
'John Pelot has been in Jacksonville
the past week helping his father
handle their melon crop.
. Ocala Ten Years Ago
(Evening Star July 11, 1912)
Mr., and Mrs. S. R. Whaley and
daughters, Misses Blanche and Olive,
left today for a visit to friends in
North Georgia.
Col. R. W.. Davis of Tampa, one of
the foremost lawyers of the state, is
in town registered at the Colonial.
He is here to aid State Attorney Da Davis
vis Davis in the prosecution of Willis Bax Bax-ley.
ley. Bax-ley. Mrs. Robert Flinn and children left

this morning for St. Augustine for a
visit, after which they will go to Lake
City, S. C, for the remainder of the
summer.
Dr. H. M. DePass came down from

Gainesville last night and this morn morning
ing morning 'accompanied Messrs. Clarence and

Jack Camp to Bay Port, near Brooks

ville, wher they will join Mr. W. B.
Taylor of Gainesville at his fishing

lodge.

; Miss Hope Robinson was the hos

tess this morning to the young ladies'
sewing club and after the "industrious

hour," she served refreshments.

Misses Agnes Burford, Nina and
Nettie Camp returned this morning

from Seabreeze, where they were

sruests of Misses Martha Kate and

Louise Rentz.

Carefnl attention to the wants of

people who know good meats when

they see them is what has built up the

Main Street Market. Phone 108. tf

To help promote good
health see that the articles
you use in your bakings
give you v
Food containing gluten

which is vital to your

vitality

Gluten is the soul of flour
the real nutritive element
It is gluten that builds health,
' strength, -and makes robust children
and healthy men and women.
Why take a chance on
losing the full value of this
gluten? Goocl, wholesome bak bakings
ings bakings can be made only from good
materials no other wayso use only
good baking powder and plain flour ;
' for best results. C 1 .. m
Don't use substitutes such as
self -rising flour, Cake Mixes,
and Egg Savers (sb-calldd).
The safe course which is
pointed out to the family physi physician
cian physician is to recommend pureplain flour
and a baking powder or standard
quality, and to be especially watchful
- in allcases of malnutrition to be sure the
diet carries strength giving properties.

For best result? use
Calumet Baking Powder and a
good plain flourv

Salt Springs Water
, We always have on
htfnd a quantity of this
famous MINERAL WATER
ready for delivery in five
gallon retainers.
PHONE 167
Chero-ola Bottling Works

DOOR

SASU

Geo. MacKay & Co.
Ocala. Fla.
HARDWARE
HIGH GRADE PAINT



OCALA EVENING STAB, TUESDAY, JULY 11. 1922

SRine.

ilSiPi

John Fox, Jn

iwtraf ed by
COPYRIGHT BY CHARLES
CHAPTER I
Streaks of red rah upward, and In
answer the great gray eye of the wil wilderness
derness wilderness lifted Its mist-fringed lid.
From the green depths came the flat flat-lng
lng flat-lng of a lone wood-thrush. A congar
leaped from the low limb of an oak,
missed, and a shuddering deer
streaked through a forest aisle,
bounded into a little clearing, stopped
rigid, sniffed a deadlier enemy, and
whirled into the wilderness again.
Still deeper in the depths a boy with a
bow and arrow and naked, except for
scalp-lock and breech-clout, sprang
from sleep and again took flight along
a buffalo trail. Again, not far behind
him, three grunting savages were tak taking
ing taking up the print of his moccasined
feet
An hour before a red flare rose
within the staked enclosure that was
reared In the center of the little clear-
lng, and above it smoke was seen ris rising.
ing. rising. Before the first glimmer of day
the gates yawned a little and three
dim shapes appeared and moved leis leisurely
urely leisurely for the woods each man with a
long flintlock rifle in the hollow of his
arm, a hunting knife In his belt, and
a coonskin cap on his head. At either
end of the stockade a watch-tower of
oak became visible and in each a
sleepy sentinel yawned and sniffed
the welcome smell of frying venison
below him.
- One sentinel rose towering to the
full of bis stature, stretched his
mighty arms with a yawn, and lightly
leaped, rifle in hand, into the en enclosure.
closure. enclosure. A, girl climbing the rude lad1
der to the tower stopped midway.
"MornhV, Dave!"
"Mornin Polly!-
Ton don't seem to have much use
for this ladder."
' "Not unless Tm goin up; and I
wouldn't then if I could jump as high
as I can fall." He went toward her to
help her down.
"I wouldn't climb very high," she
said, and scorning his hand with a
tantalizing little grimace she leaped
as lightly as had he to the ground.
Two older women who sat about a
kettle of steaming clothes watched
her.
"Look at Polly Conrad, won't ye? J
declare that gal
"Lyddyl" cried Polly, "bring Dave's
breakfast!"
At the door of each log cabin, as
solidly built as a little fort, a hunter
was cleaning a long rifle. At the
western angle two men were strength strengthening,
ening, strengthening, the pickets of the palisade.
About the fire two mothers were
suckling babes at naked breasts.
At the fire a tall girl rose, pushed
- a mass of sunburned hair from her
heated forehead, and a flush not from
the fire fused with her smile.
"I reckon Dave can walk this far
be don't look very puny."
' A voice vibrant with sarcasm rose
from one of the women about the
Steaming kettle
"Honor r She cried, "Honor San Sanders!"
ders!" Sanders!" In a doorway near, a third girl was
framed deep-eyed, -deep-breasted.
Honor!" cried the old woman,
"stop wastln' yo time with that weav weav-.
. weav-. In In thar an come out here an he'p
these two gals to git Dave his break breakfast"
fast" breakfast" Dave Yandell laughed loudly.
"Come on. Honor," he called, but
the girl turned and the whir of a loom
started again like the humming of
' bees. Lydla Noe handed the hunter
a pan of deer meat and corn bread,
and Polly poured him a cup of steam steaming
ing steaming liquid made from sassafras
leaves. Dave looked up Into Polly's
black eyes, shifted to Lydia, swerved
to the door whence came the whir of
the loom.
Tou are looking very handsome
this morning, Polly," he said gravely,
"and Lydla is lovelier even than usual,
and Honor Is a woodland dream." He
shook his head. "No," he said, "I
really couldn't"
"Couldn't what?" asked Polly,
though she knew some nonsense was
coming.
"Be happy, even with two, If t'other
were far away."
"I reckon youH have to try some
day with all of us far away," said
the gentle Lydla.
"No doubt no doubt" He fell upon
his breakfast
"Poor boy!" said Lydla, and Polly
looked at her with quickening wonder.
Dave gave his hunting knife a pa pathetic
thetic pathetic flourish.
v "And when the Virginia gallants
come, where will poor Dave be?"
"I wonder," said Lydla, "if they'll
have long hair like Dave?" Dave
shook his long locks with mock pride.
"Yes, but it wont be their own an
, lfll be powdered."
"Lord, Td like to see the first In Indian
dian Indian who takes one of their scalps."
; Polly laughed, but there was a shud shudder
der shudder in Lydla's smile. Dave rose.
Tin going to sleep. till dinner dont
let anybody wake me," he said, and at

dm

f

j

II f H I

V,

RKLivingstone
SCRIBNERS SONS"--
once both girls were serious and kind.
"We won't Dave." j
Cow bells began to clang at the I
edge of the forest j
"There they are," cried Polly. "Come
on, LIddy." The young hunter entered
a door and within threw himself
across a rude bed, face down.
"Honor!" cried one of the old wom women,
en, women, "you go an' git a bucket o' water."
The whir stopped Instantly, the girl j
stepped with a sort of slow majesty
lcviu uik mum, auu euieuug me ucai,
pausea on me mresnoiu as uer eyes
t ;
on the bed and already in heavy sleep.
She felt the flush In, her face and to
conceal it she turned her head angrily
when she came out A few minutes
later she was at the spring and ladling ;
water into her pail with a gourd. I
Near by the other two girls were milk-
lng each with her forehead against i
the soft flank of a dun-colored cow ;
whose hoofs were stained with the ;
Juice of wild strawberries. Honor j
dipped lazily. When her bucket was
full she fell a-dreaming, and when the j
Kins wer uiruugu mui im-ir i
they turned to find her with deep, un-
seeing eyes on the dark wilderness.-
"Boo!" cried Polly, startling her,
and then teasingly :
i i
"Are you In love with Dave, too,
Honor?"
The girl reddened.
"No," she whipped out, "an' I ain't
goin' to be." And then she reddened
again angrily as Polly's hearty laugh
told her she had given herself away, j
As Honor turned abruptly for the fort,
a shot came from the woods followed
by a war-whoop that stopped the
blood shuddering In their veins.
"Oh, my God!" each cried, and
catching at their wet skirts they fled
in terror through the long grass.
They heard the quick commotion in
the fort, heard sharp commands, cries j
of warning, frantic calls for them to j
hurry, saw strained faces at the gates,
saw Dave Douna tnrougn ana rusn
toward them. And from the forest i
there was nothing but Its silence until
that was again broken this time by
a loud laughs the laugh of a white
man. Then at tne edge or tne wilder wilderness
ness wilderness appeared the fool. Behind him
followed the other two who had gone
out that morning, one with a deer
swung about his shoulders, and all
could hear the oaths of both as they
cursed the fool in front who had
given shot and war-whoop x to frighten
women and make them run. The sickly j
smile passed from the face of the fel-
low,, shame took its place, and when j
he fronted the terrible eyes of old r
Jerome Sanders at the gate, that face i
grew white with fear.
"Thar ain't an Injun In a hundred
"miles," he stammered, and then he
shrank down as though he were al almost
most almost going to his knees, when sud-
Another Arrow Hurtled Between the
Boy's Upraised Arm and His Body
and Stuck Quivering in One of Its
Upright Bars.
oenl.v old Jerome slipped his rifle from
his shoulder and fired past the fel fellow's
low's fellow's head with a simultaneous roar
of command :
"Git In ever'body git in quick!"
From a watch-tower, too, a rifle had
cracked. A naked savage had bounded
Into a spot of sunlight that quivered
on the .buffalo trail a hundred yards
deep in the forest and leaped lithelv
aside into, the bushes both rifles bad
jnlssed. Deeper from the woods came
two war-wnoops real ones and in
the silence that followed the gates
were swiftly closed and barred, and a
keen-eyed rifleman was at every port porthole
hole porthole in the fort From the tower old

Jerome saw reeds begin to shake la a

cane-Drue to ine lext oi tne spttng.
"Look thar!" he called, and three
rifles, with his own, covered the spot
A small brown arm was thrust above
the shaking reeds, with the palm of
the hand toward the fort the peace
sign of the Indian and a moment
later a naked boy sprang from the
cane-brake and ran toward the block blockhouse,
house, blockhouse, with a bow-and arrow in his
left hand and his right stretched
above his head, its pleading palm
still outward.
"Don't shoot! don't nobody shoot r
shouted the old man. No shot came
from the fort, but from the' woods
came yells of rage, and as the boy
streaked through the clearing an ar arrow
row arrow whistled past his head.
"Let him In!" shouted Jerome, and
as Dave opened the gates another ar arrow
row arrow hurtled between the boy's up upraised
raised upraised arm and his body and stuck
j quivering in one of its upright bars.
The boy slid through and stood pant panting,
ing, panting, shrinking, wild-eyed. The arrow
had grazed his skin, and when Dave
lifted his arm and looked at the ooz oozing
ing oozing drops of blood he gave a startled
oath, for he saw a flash of white un under
der under the loosened breech-clout below.
The boy understood. Quickly ho
pushed the clout aside on his thigh
that all might see, nodded gravely,
and proudly tapped his breast
Paleface!" he half grunted, "white
man '"
The wilds were aulet The bor.
pointed to them and held up three
nneers io indicate mat mere wpr
only three red men there, and shook
his head to say there would be no
attack from them. Old Jerome studied
the little stranger closely, wonderfn
what new trick those red devIlg were
trying nqw to play. Dave made an
Impatient gesture for silence.
"What's your name?" The boy shook
his head and looked eagerly around.
"Francais French?" he asked, and
In turn the big woodsman shook his
head nobody there spoke French.
However, Dave knew a little Shawnee,
a good deal of the sign-language, and
the boy seemed to underetand a good
manj words m Engllsh. that the
bier woodsman nien mi h t
with considerable accuracy and turned
to tell it to Jerome. The Indians had
crossed the Big river, were as many
as the leaves, and meant to attack the
whites. For the first time they had
allowed the boy 'to go on a war party.
Some one had treated .him badly he
pointed out the bruises of cuffs and
kicks on his body. The Indians called
him White Arrow, and he knew he
was white from the girdle of uu uu-tanned
tanned uu-tanned skin under" his breech-clout
and because the Indian boys taunted
him. Asked why he had come to the
fort, he pointed again to his bruises,
put both hands against his breast, and
stretched them wide as though he
would seek shelter in the arms of
his own race" and take them to his
heart; and for the first time a smile
came to his face that showed him
plainly as a curious product of his
race and the savage forces that for
years had been moulding him. That
smile could have never come to the
face of an Indian. No Indian would
ever have so lost himself in his own
emotions. No white man would have
used his gestures and the symbols of
nature to which he appealed. Only an
Indian coma nave snown sucn a
cruel, vindictive, merciless fire in his
eyes when he told of hlfc wrong3, and
when he saw tears in Lydla's eyes, the
first burning in his life came to his
own, and brushing across them with
fierce shame he turned Indian stoic
again and stood with his arms folded
over his bow and arrows at his breast,
looking neither to right nor left, as
though he were waiting for Judgment
at their hands and cared little what
his fate might be. as perfect from
head to foot as a statue of the anci ancient
ent ancient little god, who, in him, had for forsaken
saken forsaken the couches of love for the tents
of war.
CHAPTER II
Old Jerome and Dave and the older
men gathered in one corner of the
stockade for a council of war. The
boy had made it plain that the attack-,
lng party was at least two days be
hind the three Indians from whom he
had escaped, so that there was no
danger that day, and they could wait
until night to send messengers to warn
the settlers outside to seek safety
within the fort Meanwhile, Jerome
would dispatch five men with Dave to
scout for the three Indians who might
be near by in the woods, and the boy,
who saw them slip out the rear gate
of the fort, at once knew their, pur purpose,
pose, purpose, shook his head, and waved his
"hand to say that his late friends were
gone back to hurry on the big war
party to the attack, now that the
whites themselves knew their danger.
Old Jerome nodded that he under under-stood,
stood, under-stood, and nodded to others his appre
ciation of the sense and keenness of
the lad, but he let the men go just the
same.
Mother Sanders appeared and cried
to Bud to bring the "Injun" to her
cabin. She had been unearthing
clothes for the "little heathen," and
Bud helped to put them on. In a few
minutes the lad reappeared In fringed
hunting shirt and trousers wriggling
In them most uncomfortably, for they
made him itch, but at the same time
wearing them proudly.
On the mighty wilderness the sun
sank slowly and old Jerome sat in
the western tower to watch alone. The
silence out there was oppressive and
significant for it meant that the boy's
theory was right; the three Indians
had gone back to their fellows, and
when darkness came the old man sent
runners to the outlying cabins to warn
the inmates to take refuge within the
fort And the gathering wa$ none
too soon. The hooting of owls started
before dawn. A flaming arrow hissed

from the woods, thudded into the roof
of one of the cabins, sputtered feebly
on a dew-drenched ridge-pole, and
went out Savage war-whoops rent
the air, and the battle was on. All day
the fight went on. There were feints
of attack in front and rushes from the
rear, and there were rushes from all
sides. The women loaded rifles and
cooked and cared for the wounded.
Thrice an Indian reached the wall of
the stockade and set a cabin on fire,
but no one of the three got back to
the woods alive. The stranger boy sat
stoically in the center of the enclosure
watching everything, and making no
effort to take part Late in the after afternoon
noon afternoon the ammunition began to run
low and the muddy discoloration of
the river showed that the red men had
begun to tunnel under the walls of the
fort And yet a last sally was made
just before sunset A body pushed
against Dave In the tower and Dave
saw the stranger boy at his side with
his' bow and arrow. A -few minutes
later he heard a yell from the lad
which rang .high over the din, and he
saw the feathered tip of an arrow
shaking in the breast of a big Indian
who staggered and fell behind a bush.
Just at that moment there were yells
from the woods behind the yells of
white men that were answered by
Joyful yells within the fort:
"The Virginians! The Virginians!"
And as the rescuers dashed Into sight
on horse and afoot Dave saw the lad
leap the wall of the stockade and dls-"
appear behind the fleeing Indians.
"Gone back to 'em," he grunted to
himself. The gates were thrown open.
Old Jerome and his men rushed out
and besieged and rescuers poured all
their fire after the running Indians,
some of whom turned bravely to emp empty
ty empty their rifles once more.
"Git in! Git In, quick!" yelled old
Joel. He knew another volley would
come as soon as the Indians reached
the cover of thick woods, and come
the volley did. Three men fell one
the leader of the Virginians, whose
head flopped forward as he entered
the gate and was caught In old JoeTp
arms. Not another sound came from
the woods, but again Dave from the

tower saw the cane-brusK rustle at the
edge of a thicket, saw a hand thrust
upward with the palm of peace
toward the fort, and. agam the
stranger boy emerged this time with
a bloody scalp dangling in his left
hand. Dave sprang down and met him
at the gate. The boy shook his bow
and arrow proudly, pointed to a criss
cross scar on the scalp, and Dave
made out from his explanation that
oncev before the lad had tried to kill
his tormentor and that the scar was
the sign. In the center of the enclos
ure the wounded Virginian lay, and
when old Jerome stripped the shirt
from his breast he shook his head
gravely. The wounded man opened
his eyes just In time to see and he
OUJ11CU.
"I know it" he said faintly, and
then his eyes caught the boy with the
Wh U
That Boyr
Sharply,
He Asked
scalp, were toed steadily and began
to widen,.
"Yb fs that boyr he asked
sharply.
"Never mind now," said old Joel
soothingly, "you must keep still P
The boy's eyes had begun to shiftun-
aer tne scrutiny and he started away.
"Come back here!" commanded the
wounded man, and still searching the
lad he said sharply again:
"Who Is that boy?" Nor would he
have his wound dressed or even take
the cup of water handed to him until
old Joel briefly told the story, when he
lay back on the ground and closed
his eyes.
Darknes feL In each tower .a
watcher kept his eyes strained toward
the black silent woods. The dying
man was laid on a rude bed within
one cabin, android Joel lay on the
floor of it dosd to the door. The
stranger lad refused t sleep Indoors
and huddled himself in a blanket on
the ground in one corner of the stock stockade.
ade. stockade. Men, women and children fell
to a deep and weary sleep. An hour
later the boy In the corner threw
aside his blanket, and when, a mo moment
ment moment later, Lydla Noe, feverish and
thirsty, rose from her bed to get a
drink of water outside her door, she
stopped short on the threshold. The
lad, stark naked but for his breech breech-clout
clout breech-clout and swinging his bloody scalp
over his head, was stamping around
the fire dancing the scalp-dance of
the savage to a low, fierce, guttural
song. The boy saw her, saw her fact

In the .blaze, stricken white with
fright and horror, saw her too para paralyzed
lyzed paralyzed to move and he stopped, staring
at her a moment with savage rage,
and went on again. Old Joel's body
filled the next doorway. He called oat
with a harsh oath, and again the boy
stopped. With anotlier oath and a
threatening gesture Joel motioned to
the corner of the stockade, and with
a flare of defiance in his black eyes
the lad stalked slowly and proudly
away. From behind him-the voice of
the wounded man called, and old Joel
turned. There was a ghastly smile on
the Virginian's pallid face.
"I saw it" he said painfully. That's
that's my son !"

(Continued Tomorrow)
in 22 Days
Another startling evidence
of Ironized Yeast's wonder wonderful
ful wonderful value as a weight-build-erf
In a test conducted
under the supervision of a
prominent physician, Mis3
Dorothy Byrne, pretty
movie beauty and artist's
model, gains 10 i pounds
in only 22 days. Her actual
measurements are given at
the left You, too, can have
the pleasing and
alluringfigurethat
a few more pounds
will bring.Ironized
Yeast supplies
WefghtKKlba.115 1-Zlt.
Boat 28 in. 81 1-2 in.
Calf 12h. IS in.
Arm l-2ra.l0in.
Neck 121-4 in. 123-4 in.
the very elements needed to build firm
tissue. Many thin folks report training 5 to 9
J",!011 the verJ Package! Get Ironized
Yeast from your druggist today.
THE PHOT YEAST THATJS CENUlNEtSfiROfUZED)
QdJh
o joor jour
BestObmorrow
Take care of your
skin tonight before
retiring.
Tissue Cream for dry
skin, Acne' Cream for
Pimples, Astringent
Cream for large
pores. Lettuce Cream
for cleansing, Whit Whitening
ening Whitening Cream for
Bleaching.'
Milady Beauty Parlor,
112 Ft. King Ave.
Ocala, Florida.
Phone orders of five dollars and
over put up and delivered free at the
U-Serve Stores.- Phones 195 & 614. 2t
fl
One

hslOPbimds

MP
r-
O

quality

the standard for all

Goodrich Tires

Size or price cannot modify the one
quality Goodrich standard. You can buy
any Goodrich Tire, Silvertown Cord or
the popular 30 x 3J4 clincher fabric, and
know beyond a doubt that you are getting
the same quality always.- It is this quality
which has made 'Goodrich Tires unsur
passed for dependability and durabflity
in service, mileage and value.
This principle has put the teal meaning
in the widely known Goodrich slogan of
"best in the long run

Look for this Goodrich Tire sign ovr
your tire dealer's store. It means ta
faction in every transaction
THE B. F. GOODRICH RUBBER COMPACT

I i FABRICS
SILVERTOWN CORDS

CLEAN
PAINT
TUNE

We are equipped to give com complete
plete complete renovation and repair
service on your car. We get it
ready for the road in jig time
and at low prices. All expert
workmen,
GAS OIL GREASE
DIXIE HIGHWAY
GARAGE
JAMES ENGESSER
Phone 258 Night Phone 533
121 West Broadway
V Ocala, Florida.
SEVEN DAY SERVICE
Arrival and departure of passenger
trains at OCALA UNION STATION.
The fololwing schedule figures ub ub-lished
lished ub-lished as information and not guar
anteed.
(Eastern Standard Time)
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILWAY
Station Arrive
Jacksonville-NTork 2 :10 am
Jacksonville 1:50 pm
' Jacksonville 3:50 pm
: Tampa-Manatee-
t Petersburg 4:05 tun
NTork-St. Petrsbrg 1:35 am
Tampa 2:15 am
Tampa-Manatee 1:35 cm
2:20 am
1:50 pm
4:17 cm
2:15 am
2:55 am
2:15 am
1:50 nm
4:05 pm
Tampa-St Petersbrg 4:05 pm
ATLANTIC COAST LINE R. R.
Leaves Station Arrives
6 :42 am Ocala-Jacksonville 12:25 pm
1:45 Dm Ocala Jacksonville fi:45nm
3:25 pm Ocala-St Petersbrg 9:16 pa
am ucaia-st Petersbrg 8:20 am
z:zi am Ucala-J acksonviile 7:00 am
3 :25 pm Ocala-Homosassa 6:20 pm
:10 am JOcala-Wilcox 11:59 am
7:25 am fOcala-Lakeland 11 :50 azv
JMonday, Wednesday, Friday,
t Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday.
Needham Motor Co
PLUMBING & ELECTRICAL
CONTRACTING
General Auto
Repairing
, PHONE 252
A few odds in ladies' low shoes; for former
mer former price $6.00 to $8.00, to close out
at $1.50. Little's Shoe Parlor. 4-6t
TUBES

RAILROAD SCHEDULES

only



OCALA EVENING STAR, TUESDAY, JULY 11. 1922
1

EXCURSION!

SAVAfiNAE, GA. $ 8.00 1
CHARLESTON, S. C 10.00
FROM OCALA I
i

via
ATLANTIC COAST LINE

OCALA OCCURREHCES
If you have any local or society
items for the Star, call five-ona.

Mr. Albert Harriss is out and look looking
ing looking after business again afters a ten
days' illness. t

: -r
Tickets sold for trains July
12th and limited to reach l

Ocala July 18.
For further information
and reservations phone
J. F. RICKETSON
Depot Ticket Agent, Ocala
NJ. R. KIRKLAWD
Div. Pass. Agent, Tumpa

TO ICE CONSUMERS

Our drivers want to help you get all

the ICE you need every day this sum
mer rbut they need your help.

When you put your ICE CARD out

on time, you save them extra trips
and that's saving ice for everybody,

When you keep the ice compartment
of your refrigerator free from food

and bottles, you are saving time and

ice.

Just these two simple rules, followed-daily,
will help us make sure, that
you are well served this summer.
Ocala Ice & Packing Co.
PHONE 34, OCALA. FLA.

Mrs. T. ,C. Carter and two children

left this morning for a few days'

visit to friends in South Florida.

BETTER insure before rather than

after the fire. Let Ditto insure you. tf

A 25-cent package of Albert's Plant

Food will perform wonders with your
pot plants. Try it. Sold at the Court

Pharmacy. 18-tf

Mr. Thelbert Troxler of St. Peters

burg, is spending a few days with

his parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. W. Trox
ler.

UNCLASSIFIED

ADVERTISEMENTS
(RATES under this heading are as
follows: Maximum of six lines one time

25e; three times 50c; six times 5c; one
month $3.00. All accounts payable to
advaace except to those who have reg

ular advertising accounts.

PARTY FOR MRS. MACKINTOSH

THE DINING ROOM Of the Colo-

nial Hotel is again open- Regular
meals 50c. Mrs. S. B. Arnold, Man Manager.
ager. Manager. llT6t

FOR SALE One Overland four 1921.
Five good tires, one has never been
on car; $300. Very best shape. The
Autogenous Welding 'Co. ll-6t

WANTED Married man wants posi position
tion position as clerk in grocery store. Have
had three years experience and can

furnish references. If interested

now or in the near future, address

J. H. Gale, Route A, Box 67, Ocala,

Fla. ll-6t

Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Wilds left this
morning in their car for a week's
vacation to be spent in Clearwater,
St. Petersburg and Tampa.

Fifty pair men's shoes, factory cost
today is $6.75. Will close outsat $5.
Little's Shoe Parlor. 4-6t

BETTER buy a lot before they go
up, and build a home while materials
are cheap. Let Ditto show you. 11 tf

FOR SALE My entire household
furniture; practically new dining

room suite, round table, chairs and

buffet. Call 116, see Mrs. James

Nicholas. 10-3t

AUTO SPECIALTY Factory wants
salesman as distributor for. this

county. Big money and permanent
position if you can qualify. Myncro

Motors Co., Battle Creek, Mich. It

Mrs. Harrison Black and little
daughter, who have been guests of
Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Effinger in West
Palm Beach, are now in Ocala with
Mrs. Black's mother, Mrs. Geo. W.
Martin.

DR. K. J. WEIHE,

Optometrist and Optician

9sylf' Eyesight SP"1118
114 Main Street, Jacksonville
18 East Broadway, Ccala

Mr. and Mrs. John Taylor and Mr.
and Mrs. U. S. Scott have "gone to

Ltheir home at North Lake Weir for

the remainder of the summer. Mr.
Scott and Mr. Taylor will go to the
lake each evening.

Phone 597 Night Phone 408
WILLIAMS GARAGE
We Specialize in
WELDING,
ELECTRICAL WORK
REBORING CYLINDERS,
GRINDING CRANK SHAFTS,
GIVE UP A TRIAL
Osceola St.. just off Ft. King

A nice, thoroughly modern bunga bungalow
low bungalow home for somebody is being built
by the Citizens Investment Co. on a
ot on Dougherty street. Price and
terms easy. Call and see it. Phone
285 for particulars. 22-tf

FOR SALE Registered Poland China
boar; weight about 400 pounds. Ad

dress George Adams, Route A,

Phone 39M. 10-6t

FOR RENT Light housekeeping
apartment, furnished. Apply to E.

A. Revels at Revels Studio. 8-tf

tUK SAL,; un Jbort King avenue,
easy terms, one lot 60 x 500. See

Mrs. J. H. Cramer, East Fort Xing

avenue. fri-sat-tf

BETTER be safe than sorry. Ditto
works for your town. Why not insure
with Ditto? 11-tf

L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CONTRACTOR
ASv BUILDER s
Careful estimates made on all con contract
tract contract work. Gives more and better
work for the money than any other
contractor in the city.

, Mr. Sam Mathews of the First
National Bank of Tampa, is expected
to spend his vacation with his parents,
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Mathews, and
his sister, Mrs. George Yancey, in

Candler. He will probably arrive the
latter part of the week.

The friends of Mrs. John Bailey,
who has been sick for the past two
months, will regret to hear that her

condition has been gradually growing
worse for some time and all hopes for
her recovery have been abmioned.
The end is expected hourly.

AGENTS $100 commission first week

selling whirlwind seller to cigar
stands, confectioners, etc. Exclus

ive sales plan. Pocket sample. Write
quick. Peoria Novelty Co, Peoria,

111. It

WAiNTJi.JJ Stove or range, wood
burner; oven not less than 15" high,

18" wide, 22" deep. Prefer larger
one. Address Mrs. E. A. N., care
the Star. 7-8-3t

Mrs. Peter Mackintosh of Miami,
was the guest of honor last night
when Mrs. W. A. Wilds and Miss
Alice Sexton entertained at the home
of Mrs. Thomas Sexton on North

Sanchez street.

The two large living rooms ofthe

Sexton home were filled with flowers,

black-eyed daisies being used in one

and vari-colored zinnias in the other.

Mrs. Wilds and Miss Sexton with the

guest of honor received informally.

Auction was played, and after five

rounds of that game, .the hostesses,
assisted by Mrs. Leon Mason, Misses
Clifton and Marguerite Sexton and

Frances Clark, served ice cream with
whipped cream and cake.

The guest of honor was presented a

handsome piece of household linen.

and Mrs. Sam Leigh and Miss Mar

garet Jackson were fortunate enough
to take home pretty remembrances bf

the evening, the former a pair of silk
hose and the latter a linen handker.
chief.

Those who enjoyed the evening

with their hostesses were Mrs. Mack

intosh, Mrs. Max Israelson, Mrs. C. B.
Ayer, Mrs. Sam Leigh, Mrs. Leon

Mason, Mrs. C. P. Chazal, Mrs.
Claude Kreger, Mrs. B. F. Condon,
Mrs. J. G. Parrish, Mrs, P. V. Leaven Leaven-good,
good, Leaven-good, Mrs. H. C. Dozier, Mrs. Harvey
Clark, Mrs. Harry Walters, Mrs. J.
G. Perkins, Mrs. W. I. Evans, Mrs.

Paul Theus, Misses Annie Benton

Fuller, Marian Dewey, Louise Spen Spencer,
cer, Spencer, Adele Bittinger, Edith Williams,
Susie Lou Ellis, Mary. McDowell and
Margaret Jackson.

- FARMERS EXCHANGE STORE
Marocala Creamery .Butter,. ..-v.-.--.. 40C
Uneedas, 3 for. ..... 20C
Jello, 12c. 3 for :.- 33c
Corn Flakes and Post Toast ies, 3 for 25c
Quaker Oats 12c, 3 for.. 33c
Octagon Soap, 3 for... 20c
Star Soap, 7 for...'. J 25c
Polar White Soap, 6 for. ...... ... .... 25
PHONE 163

r

W. K. Lane, M. D., physician and
surgeon, specialist eye, ear, nose and
throat. Office over 5 and 10 cent store,
Ocala, Fla. tf

Albert's Plant Food for flowers; 25c
and 50c. packages. Sold at the Court
Pharmacy. 18-tf

Fraternal Orders

WANTED Sweet milk customers.
Sweet milk 10c. a quart, delivered
morning and evening. Drop me a
acrd. Robert O. Williams, Mgr.'R.
A., care J. T. Nelson. 8-6t

WANTED Passenger for trip to De De-Land.
Land. De-Land. Auto leaving Ocala Tuesday
noon, also' Wednesday morning.
Phone 307 for particulars. 8-2t

-t.

Ladies' Ke.ds, high top, value $2.50,
to close out at $1.50. Children's sizes
up to 2 at $1.00. Little's Shoe Par Parlor.
lor. Parlor. 4-6t

BETTER not wait until
fire. Let Ditto insure you
carry the worry.

after the
now, and
11-tf

saw

A VISIT TO THE CEMETERY
Will show many examples of onr skib
as monument builders. Among them
are every sort of memorial ranging
from the very simplest to the most
ornate and stately. And every one
bears the hall mark of good taste and
skillful workmanship. Our book of
designs will be shown to any who plan
stone for their plot.
Ocala Marble Works
OCALA, FLORIDA

Mr. J. F. Ricketson has resignd his
position as ticket agent at the union
station and will be relief agent for the
Seaboard, being at Inverness for the
present. His family will remain, in
Ocala. Mr. Ricketson's numerous
Ocala friends will greatly regret to
lose him.

FOR RENT After July 2Q, four four-room
room four-room furnished apartment, sleeping

porch, private bath and private en entrance.
trance. entrance. 805 Tuscawilla St. 8-3t

H. H. SUMMERLIN Shoe Repair
Shop, 2 Magnolia St., west of the
courthouse. Repairing youths' shoes
60c and $1; adults $1.25, $1.50 and
$1.75; all others $2.25 and $2.50. m
SALESMEN WANTED Two addi addi-tienal
tienal addi-tienal salesman for Ocala and Mar Marion
ion Marion county; bond and car necessary.
Address Singer Sewing Machine
Co., Gainesvile, Fla. 4-5t

KNIGHTS TEMPLAR
ucala Command-

ery Number 19,
Knights Templar,
meets every sec

ond Friday night

in each month at

8 o'clock at the

Masonic Hall. A. L. Lucas, E. C
B. L. Adams, Recorder.

TRANSFER

Hi

F1RF.
PROOF

STORAGE

WHITE STAR LINE

Negotiable Storage Receipts Issued on Cotton, Antomobilea, Etc

LCKG DISTANCE MOVING
Pluone 296

:

I

MOVE, PACK, SHIP
LIVE STOCK,
PIANOS, BAGGAGE.
MACHINERY,
FURNITURE, ETC.

-

ROYAL ARCH MASONS

Regular conventions of the Ocala
Chapter No. 13 R. A. M., on the fourth
Friday in every month at 8 p .m.
A. L. Lucas, H. P.
B. Lf Adams, Secretary.

Fitzhugh Lee Camp No. 11, United

Spanish War Veterans, meets the
third Friday of each month at armory
at 8 o'clock p. m.

C. V. Roberts, Commtnder.
L. T. Craft, Adjutant.

BETTER let Ditto figure with you
on the home building proposition. Lots
and material will go? up now and then
you will be sorry you didn't act on
the suggestion. Buy and build now.
Ditto, Realtor. 11-tf

The cry of the Shipping Board:

"Don't give up the

Press.

sip." Cleveland

Phone orders of five dollars and

over put up and delivered free at the
U-Serve Stores. Phones 195 & 614. 2t

Monkeys in one's family tree are

preferable to bats in one's belfry.

Birmingham Age-Herald.

Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Effinger, ac accompanied
companied accompanied by Mrs. Harrison Blacky
who has been their guest for several
weeks and Mr. Robert Blake, arrived

m town last night from West Palm
Beach. Mr. and Mrs. Effinger return returned
ed returned today, but Mr. Robert Blake will
remain in town for a few days with
his mother, Mrs. R. G. Blake. This

is Robert's first visit home in eighteen
months and his 'friends here are giv

ing him a warm welcome.

FOR SALE Following used cars
traded in on Studebakers: 1922
Buick four touring, thoroughly over

hauled by Seneff and in good condi condition,
tion, condition, cord tires, $650, terms or trade;
1917 Buick six touring. This is in
unusually good mechanical condi condition,
tion, condition, tires very good, spare on rear,
motormeter, bumper, well cared
for $325, half cash; 1918 Buick four,
Mr. Clair's car, condition like new,
at special price; 1920 Ford touring,
with starter, demountable rims, good
tires, owned by Mr. Lyles, Summer Summer-field,
field, Summer-field, $275. Cars can be seen at
Bridges garage. Will gladly dem demonstrate.
onstrate. demonstrate. McLeod & Waters, Stude Stude-baker
baker Stude-baker dealers. vThis is a greater
Studebaker year. 7-l-6t

FOR RENT Two or three unfurnish

ed rooms. All conveniences. Apply

at No. 104 N. Sanchez St. 5-3t

OAT SEED FOR SALE 500 bushels
genuine old Florida 90-day oat seed.
The only sure erf p oat for this sec section.
tion. section. Ten bushel lots, $2 per busheL
Newcomb Barco, Cotton Plant, Flor Florida.
ida. Florida. 6-18-lm

"Say it with flowers,' and buy the
flowers from Mrs. J. E. Hyndman, 1
miles out on the Dunnellon road.
Phone 30M. Zinnias, roses, pinks and
pink vine in bloom now. 7-7-1 m

Albert's Plant Food Is the thing for
making your flower garden and pot
plants bloom. It is odorless and is
sold in 25c and 50c packages and $2
sacks. At the Court Pharmacy. 18-tf

Then, again, perhaps honesty is the
best policy because it has so little
competition. Philadelphia Inquirer.

' During the recent visit o. Bishop
Mann to Ocala, Mr. A. R. Cassil was
commissioned by the bishop as a lay
reader of the Episcopal church and
arrangements have been made for
services to be held in Grace church
during the absence of the rector, Rev.
J. J. Neighbour, who is now in Long
Branch, N. J., where he will probably
remain until the latter part of Au August.
gust. August. More definite announcement
will appear in this paper later.

STOVE REPAIRING I am prepared

to repair an maKes oi gas, oil or

wood stoves on short notice, and

.make a specialty of relining. Phone

146. J. G. Meadows. 27-12t

FOR RENT Furnished house, close
in; reasonable rent. Call phone

116. 6-28-tf

haailu 15 y a middle aged man,

room and board, or board only, in
a privte family. Address P. O. Box

95, Ocala. v 7-7-3t

FOR RENT To couple, lower floor
of house conveniently located, two
blocks of postoffice; five rooms, two
porches and a garage. Rent reason reasonable.
able. reasonable. See D. R. Connor in shoe
department at H. B. Masters Co. 3t

SPANISH WAR VETERANS

F O R SALE
NEW FORD TOURING CAR
Guaranteed t3 lisvz ONLY run five blocks. .Discount lor cash

ALSO
One 1919 Touring Chevrolet
One 1920 Touring Chevrolet
One 1920 Ford Roadster
One 1920 Dodge Roadster

150.00
200.C0
125.00
250.60

OCALA M OTOR COMPANY

Fhone 71

KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS

Ocala Lodge No. 19. Conventions

held, every Monday evening at eight

o'clock at the castle hall. A cordial

welcome to visiting brothers.

L U. Forbes, C. C.
C. K. Sage, K. of R. & S.

ODD FELLOWS

Tulula Lodge No. 22, I. O. O. F.,

meets every Tuesday evening at eight
o'clock at the Odd Fellows hall in the

third story of the Gary 1 block. A
warm welcome always extended to
visiting brothers.

Joseph Malever, N. G.
W. L. Colbert, Secretary.

1

HI 'M VS

m3

ICE CRE AM
DELIVERED
At our Home

Our delicious ice cream will be delivered anywaere in the city,
two quarts or more, packed, in bulk or in bricks, direct from the
creamery, to reach you in time for dinner or supper or entertain-
ment. Bulk: One gallon, packed, $1.C0, delivered; Lalf-gallon, pack packed,,
ed,, packed,, 90c. delivered; one quart, nnot packed, 50cf at .creamery. Bricks:
Two or more quart bricks, packed, 60c. a quart, delivered; quart
brick, not packed, 50c at Creamery.
Fresh Creamery .Butter Daily
Can now be had at the following places.
Farmers Exchange Store Main T i: cot Market
1 H. B. Masters Company Five U-Serve Stores.
Fresh milk in any quantity at U-Serve Stores,
" MARION COUNTY CREAMERY CO.
Phone 94

MARION-DUNN MASONIC LODGE

Marion-Dunn Lodge No. 19, F. & A.

M meets on the first and third
Thursday evenings of each month at

7:30 o'clock until further notice.

A. C. Blowers, W. M.
B. L. Adams, Secretary.

WOODMEN OF THE WORLD

Fort King Camp No. 14 meets at
K. of P. hall every second and fourth
Friday evenings of each month at 8
o'clock. Visiting sovereigns are al always
ways always welcome.
P. W. Whiteside,, C. C
Chas. K. Sage, Clerk.

ii

I he

Wi

ridsoi

IN the heart of the city, with
Hemming Fark for a front
yard. Every modern conven convenience
ience convenience in each room. Dining
room service is second to none.

Hotel

JACKSONVILLE, FLA

ROBERT M. MEYER,
, Manager
J. E. KAVANAUGH
. 'Proprietor

ORDER OF EASTERN STAR
Ocala Chapter No. 29, O. E. S.,
meets at the Masonic hall the second
and.fourth Thursday evening of each
month at 8 o'clock.
Mrs. Julie Weihe, W. M.
Mrs. Susan Cook, Secretary.

If Uncle Sam must get the bootleg bootlegging
ging bootlegging business, let us hope he sells bet better
ter better stuff than some cf bis associates

it. New York Tribune.

in

OCALA LODGE NO. 286, B. P. O. E.
Ocala Lodge ,No. 286, Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, meets
the second and fourth Tuesday eve evenings
nings evenings of each month. Visiting breth brethren
ren brethren el ways welcome. Lodge rooms
upstairs over Troxlers and the Book
Shop, 113 Main street.
W. R. Pedrick, E. R.
J. P. Galloway, Secretary. v

Fertilize your pot pianta and laws
flowers with Albert's Plant Food. Sold

25c, 50c and $2 packages at th3

IE

Court Pharmacy.

18-tf

"Graft Is Charged,'' S2ys a headline
Well, it won's be long until the public
will get a bill for it. Albion (Iowa)
Union and Republican.

CRESCENT FISH MARKET

. On hand at all times a large stock
of fresh and salt water fish. Daily
shipments. Will dress and deliver to
any part of the city db short notice.
Phone 562. 7-tf J. G. JONES.

Our stocK of fresh meats, vege vegetables
tables vegetables and poultry is always the best
to be had. Reasonable prices and
prompt delivery. Main Street Market.
Phone 108. 1 2-tf

China is such a big country that the
correspondents have to hire guides to
lead them to the war. New York

Tribune.

The salvation of the Florida farmer
this season is cotton. Dont let the

boll weevil get' yours. Let the ClarV ClarV-son
son ClarV-son Hardware Company tell you
to control this pest. 7-5-121
Rub-My-Tism, an antiseptic Adv.

s



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