The Ocala evening star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:06209

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
OCALA

EVENING

TAR

WEATHER FORECAST-Cloudy, probably rain, fresh, possibly shifting winds. TEMPERATURES This morning, 70; this afternoon, 90.
San Rises Tomorrow, 5:25; Sets, 7:24. OCALA, FLORIDA, TUESDAY, MAY 30, 1922 VOLUME TWEXTY-EIGHT. NO. 128
. ,mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm,mmmmm-mmmmmmmmmn.-mmm.m
' i
--

HEROES COBB STEPPE
F
III
THE NEXT CAPITAL
Oil UMPIRE'S TOES
THE USUAL FOG
I
ST. JOHIIS RIVER
I

LOAT AROUND

AUTOMOBILE RACE
AT IIIDIAIIAPOLIS

WRECK

REMOVA

MEETING

J

The American Legion Today Lays
Flowers on Each Lamented
Comrade's Grave

Indianapolis, May 30. (Associated
Press). While the home folks today
are honoring the soldier dead who, rest
in the soil of their country, the Amer American
ican American Legion overseas is visiting and
decorating more than 32,000 graves of
Americans who fell and are buried on
foreign soil. Of these graves, 31,400
are located in five cemeteries in
France, 488 are in England, 140 in
Scotland, 40 in Ireland and one in
Spain.'
Several thousands of dollars have
been sent to the Legion's committee in
Paris, of which Cabot Ward, an Amer American
ican American attorney, is chairman, to be ex expended
pended expended on flowers and flags for the
decoration of A. E. F. graves. Local
committees in England, Scotland and
Ireland and several in France will
visit the cemeteries and minister per personally
sonally personally to each grave. To raise this
decoration fund, National Commander
MacNider of the Legion asked each
ltgionaire to contribute five cents and
the response has been generous, the
organization's headquarters here re re-.
. re-. ports.
Many parents of American soldiers
killed and buried overseas have re requested
quested requested the decoration of the graves
with particular kinds of flowers or
with individual floral arrangements.
Most of them have requested the
Legion to supply them with photo photographs
graphs photographs of the graves so decorated,
and the request is being complied with.
For the larger part, however, the
overseas graves will be decorated
alike, with the highest officer and the
newest private being honored by an
American flag and decorations con consisting
sisting consisting of flowers native to the coun country
try country in which the grave is located.
Reports to Legion headquarters
here also show that Memorial Day is
being generally observed, both in the
North and South.
NATHAN HAS THE GOOD
WILL OF HIS NEIGHBORS
Editor Star: Please allow us space
to say a few words in behalf of Mr.
Nathan Mayo, who is a candidate for
re-election to the House of Represen Representatives.
tatives. Representatives. Mr. Mayo is now very busy help helping
ing helping us farmers get a square deal and
best prices for our truck and has not
had or taken the time to make a cam
paign. This we admire in him, for
her is at work for his community
which now needs him.
Mr. Mayo is a merchant, farmer,
trucker and orange grower himself
and fully understands and realizes
our circumstances and needs. He
sells us goods and helps us make our
crops and then sees we get their value
at the selling end. He is the "wheel
horse' 'of our county and if there
were more like him in other parts of
the county the farmer would be much
better off, for he is our friend from
start to finish. He has made a sue
cess in all of his ventures, coming to
Summerfield twenty-one years ago
with less than $200, so we are told.
He now has one of the best businesses
between Ocala and Plant City. He is
full of pep, snap and business and his
customers of the day he started in
business are his customers today. Had
he not been square, fair and honest,
he could not have built up such a bus business.
iness. business. In short, he is the farmer's
friend from start to finish, and we be believe
lieve believe the people will make a big mis mistake
take mistake if they do not send him back to
Tallahassee. 'Respectfully,
W. J. Piatt.
M. M. Proctor.
J. C. Perry.
Walter Nichols.
Summerfield, Fla., May 30.
FREE TUBERCULOSIS CLINIC
A fre tuberculosis clinic will be
held in Ocala Friday and Saturday of
this week. On Friday, June 2nd, at
the Metropolitan Bank building from
4 to 6 p. m. and from 7 to 9 p. m. for
colored people; Saturday, June 3rd, at
the Woman's Club from 10 to 12 a. m.
and from 1 to 3 p. m. for white people.
The examination and advice given by
the experts in charge is absolutely
free to all who care to take advantage
of this opportunity.
Mrs. E. A. Osborne,
Chairman of Health Committee, Ocala
Woman's Club. 30-3t
The Irish border is frayed. Green Greenville
ville Greenville Piedmont.

President Johnson of the American
League Showed Him Where
He Got Off

St. Louis, May 30. (By Associated
Press) Manager, Cobb and Outfielder
Heilmann, of the Detroit Americans,
were indefinitely suspended by Presi President
dent President Johnson of the American League
before the morning game today with
St. Louis. During an argument yes
terday Cobb stepped on Umpire Wil
son's toes and was banished. The
cause of Heilmann's suspension was
not stated in the message received
here.
MORNING GAMES
The morning games today resulted
as follows. National: St. Louis 1,
Chicago 4; Cincinnati 9, Pittsburgh
3; New York 8, Philadelphia, 9, ten
innings; Boston 3, Brooklyn, 9; Chi
cago 4, Cleveland, 0; Detroit 6, St.
Louis 5.
LINCOLN MEMORIAL
ACCEPTED TODAY BY
THE AMERICAN NATION
Washington, May 30. (Associated
Press). The Lincoln Memorial dedi dedicated
cated dedicated her today was accepted on be be-hal
hal be-hal fof the nation by President Hard Harding.
ing. Harding. Mr. Cecil Bryant and Mr. Percy
Thigpen have recently purchased the
Converse property at North Lake
Weir. This property is just west of
the home of Mr. Charles Rheinauer
and is one of the prettiest locations
on this part of the lake. The cottage
on the place has been moved to one
side near a grove of trees which will
give it ample shade from the summer
sun. Sleeping porches have been
been added to each side, a large porch
on the front and a dining room and
kitchen built. The cottage has prac
tically been rebuilt and the Bryant
family will soon occupy it for the
summer. Mr. Thigpen will begin
building as soon as the shipping sea season
son season is over, and until then Mr. and
Mrs. Thigpen will occupy the cottage j
with the Bryants.
Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Blowers and son,
Robert Blowers, arrived home yester yesterday
day yesterday from Tennessee. Mr. and Mrs.
Blowers left the first part of last
week for Columbia, where their son
attended Columbia Military Academy,
and from which institution he grad graduated
uated graduated this commencement. They made
the trip in their car, leaving there
Wednesday and spending a day each
in Birmingham and Montgomery. The
roads are in bad condition in places,
the water was over the running board
and many big culverts were covered
with water, the sand having been
washed away in many instances and
boards had to be provided for cross crossing.
ing. crossing. Mr. Blowers says that people
can talk all they want to about their
good roads, but that he didn't find
any good roads until he struck the
Florida state line.
Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Green left this
afternoon for Jacksonville, where they
will be with their daughter for the
next week, after which they will move
into the new bungalow on Liberty
street they recently purchased. This
house is an attractive six-room bun bungalow
galow bungalow with all modern conveniences
and it has been entirely renovated in inside
side inside and out. The property is conven conveniently
iently conveniently located and just a block from
the home of their daughter. For many
years Ocala has claimed Mr. and Mrs.
Green as residents and the only thing
that reconciles our people is the fact
that Mr. Green says they will rent
their Jacksonville home in the, winter
and return here for the season.
Ocala was thrown into a state of
excitement last night about 11:45
when the fire bell rang five times.
Five taps means that the fire is in the
business portion of the town and al always
ways always causes the town to sit up and
take notice. The alarm came in from
the Harrington Hall and a large
crowd soon assembled at the Fort
King entrance of the hotel where the
trucks stopped. The fire proved to be
in the hot water furnace. The porter
had fired up the heater and the smoke
was settling low over the roof of the
hotel so that some one thought that
the building was on fire and sent in
an alarm.
Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Tillman and
baby have returned from a p'nnt
week-end spent in Oran"

Germans Promise Reparations Com

mission to Do Something Provided
Allies Do Some Othe Things
Paris, May 30. (By the Associated
Press) The German reply to the rep reparation
aration reparation commission's demands says
the German government will under undertake
take undertake on the hypothesis that it be
given aid through a foreign loan with within
in within a suitable time, to maintain its
power of circulation within the limits
reached March 31, and in general
comply with conditions fixed by the
commission for a partial moratorium.
MATHILDE SEEMS NOT
ANXIOUS TO MEET
HER RIDING MASTER
Chicago, May 30. (By Associated
Press). Matilde McCormick, instead
of sailing today from New York for
Switzerland, supposedly to wed Max
Oser, her Swiss riding master, re returned
turned returned to Chicago unexpectedly. She
refused to make any statement of her
plans for marriage or otherwise.
CRACKERS ARE NOT SO
SCARCE IN FLORIDA
Jacksonville, May 30. (Associated
Press). The remark that one rarely
meets a native Floridian in Florida is
heard with remarkable frequency but
an analysis of reports from the census
bureau on the census of 1920 indicates
that there is little ground for the im impression
pression impression that Florida's population is
made up of a mere sprinkling of na native
tive native crackers.
The 1920 census placed Florida's
total population at 968,470 and the
statistics show that of this number
560,103 or 58 per cent were natives of
the state.
The foreign born inhabitants num numbered
bered numbered only 53,864 in spite of the fact
that in other parts of the country
many persons cling to the erroneous
belief that both Tampa and Key West
are composed largely of foreigners.
The total white population was 638,-
153 while negroes numbered 329,487.
Of the negroes, 10,665 were born out outside
side outside of the 'United States, principally
in the Bahamas and West Indies.
With the exception of native Florid-
ians, Georgia had more representa
tives in Florida than any other state.
They numbered 102,530. Alabama was
second with 50,630, followed in order
by South Carolina with 34,930 and
North Carolina with 17,358.
Other states represented by large
numbers, in order, follow:
New York, 15,918; Ohio, 13,744; H H-linois,
linois, H-linois, 11,505; Pennsylvania, 11,025;
Indiana, 8,467; Tennessee, 8,340; Ken Kentucky,
tucky, Kentucky, 8,055; Virginia, 6,672; Michi Michigan,
gan, Michigan, 6,554; Mississippi, 5,073; Mis Mis-feouri,
feouri, Mis-feouri, 4,622; Massachusets, 4,728. All
others, 39,434.
The often repeated statement that
Florida's population is composed most mostly
ly mostly of northern people also is far from
correct. Giving to the northern, east eastern
ern eastern and western states mentioned in
the table the total figures credited to
"all other states," the aggregate
would be only 111,405, leaving a bal balance
ance balance of 803,201 native southerners and
not taking into account the 53,864
foreign born.
Eliminating the Southern born
from the 39,434 credited to "all other
states" the probability is that there
are more Georgians alone, in Florida,
than natives of the northern, eastern
and western states.
REALLY THE REASON
London, May 30. (By Associated
Press). British troops are being kept
in Dublin not at the request of the
Irish provisional government, but be because
cause because the process of evacuation has
been temporarily suspended, it was
announced in the house of commons
today.
BATTLE RAGING ALONG
THE ULSTER BORDER
London, May 30. (By Associated
Press). Heavy firing on the Tyrone Tyrone-Donegal
Donegal Tyrone-Donegal border at Strabane and Lif Lif-ford
ford Lif-ford occurred between midnight and
7 a. m., says a Strabane dispatch.
Sniping from roofs was continuous
and armored cars and machine guns
were in action. The casualties are un unknown.
known. unknown. Economy now thinks it has scored
if the country is run as cheaply in
peace as in war. Buffalo Enquirer.

Will be Held in Palatka Tuesday, June
13, and Representatives of Thirty
Counties Will be Present

Palatka, May 30. (By Associated
Press). Acting Secretary Hart, of
the Florida Capital Removal Associa Association,
tion, Association, announced today the next meet meeting
ing meeting of the association will be held in
Palatka, June 13th. The announce announcement
ment announcement was made after a conference
with George H. Wilder, of Plant City,
president of the organization. Repre Representatives
sentatives Representatives from thirty counties will be
recommended to the secretary for
membership on the board of direc directors.
tors. directors. MERRITT'S GOOD MOVE
Duval Sheriff Starts a Drive On Auto Auto-ists
ists Auto-ists Who Don't Use Their
Dimmers
Jacksonville, May 30. (Associated
Press). Local automobile accessory
dealers are expecting heavy purchases
of light-dimming equipment as a re result
sult result of Sheriff Merritt's announcement
that from now on his deputies will ar arrest
rest arrest and place in jail immediately all
motorists found on the highways of
Duval county who fail to switch off
their bright lights and drive with dim
lights upon approaching another car.
Accidents due to driving with bright
lights have been many during recent.
months and it is believed this feature
contributed in part toward a collision
betwen two cars on the Pablo Beach
road near here early Thursday in
which two men were killed and eight
injured.
Several times during the last few
months the sheriff has warned motor motorists
ists motorists that their cars must be equipped
with dimmers and that the dimmers
must be used. Many small cars are
not supplies with dimmers and their
drivers .travel the highways with
lights that would do credit to a loco locomotive.
motive. locomotive. Such drivers will be compell compelled
ed compelled to put dimmers on their cars and
applications for equipment are ex expected
pected expected by the accessory dealers to be
numerous within the next few days.
The sheriff declares no favors will
be shown and that drivers arrested for
violation of the order will not be per per-mited
mited per-mited to scurry around town in search
of bondsmen. They will go directly to
jail and will have to summon their
friends from there. The order applies
to all motorists and persons who re reside
side reside in other parts of the state and
who enter Duval county will be taken
up, as quickly as a resident, if they
violate it.
NOTICE, EASTERN STARS
. The sewing circle will meet at three
o'clock Wednesday afternoon in the
Masonic hall.
SPANISH-AMERICAN VETERANS
TO MEET IN THE ANCIENT CITY
St. Augustine, May 30. St. Augus
tine folk plan to give a royal welcome
to Spanish war veterans who meet
here in their state convention July 3
to 5. In addition to the members of
the Florida department, United Span
ish War Veterans, there is expected to
be a large number of camp followers
in the nature of the veterans' families,
in attendance.
Arrangements for the meeting have
already been gotten under way here
even at this early date. A gathering
of Sparish War Veterans in, this state
carries added interest because of the
fact that many of the "battles" of that
camnaism were fought in Florida
camps.
The election of a departmental
commander will feature the business
sessions of the convention. The post
is now held by Frank Dale, of Key
West. It is said to be the custom of
the 'organization to nominate a man
for that post from the city in which
the annual convention is held, but the
St. Augustine veterans have extended
a special tribute to Mr. Dale by sug suggesting
gesting suggesting that he be he-elected.
NOTICE
The first annual meeting of the
Bonita Fishing Club will be held on
Wednesday, June 7th, A. D. 1922, at
(eight o'clock p. m. at the rooms of
the Marion County Chamber of Com Commerce,
merce, Commerce, in Ocala, Florida. Election of
(officers and other important business
, will come up for disposal, and all
' members are specially urged to be
present. T. T. Munroe, President,
j B. F. McGraw, Secretary.

Twenty-Seven Drivers Lined Up For
The Tenth Annual 500-Mile
Drive

Indianapolis, May 30. (Associated
Press). Twenty-seven drivers lined
up today awaiting the starting bomb
to send them away on the tenth an annual
nual annual 500-mile race at the Indianapolis
Motor Speedway. The start will be
made at 10 o'clock for 200 laps of the
two and one-half mile track.
BARNEY PACED THE BUNCH
A record-crowd' of 135,000 specta spectators
tors spectators was in the stands when the cars
started. The racers were paced the
first lap by' Barney Oldfield, retired
star of the racing world.
MURPHY SURELY MOVED
Jimmy Murphy, driving an eight eight-cylinder
cylinder eight-cylinder special car, jumped into the
lead, with Leon Duray second and
Ralph DePalma third. Murphy made
the first lap at 95 miles an hour.
Howard Wilcox was the first driver
forced out of the race by valve trou trouble
ble trouble on the sixth lap. Murphy con continued
tinued continued to lead at the end of fifty
miles, with an average of more than
95 miles an hour, and a half-mile
ahead of Duray in second place. Harry
Hartz was third and DePalma fourth.
JULES ROUGHLY JERKED
Jules Ellingboe is out of the race.
One rear wheel off his car came off
and the car spun completely around
three times, crashing into the wall.
Neither the driver nor mechanician
were hurt. Jules Goux was forced
out by a broken axle after covering
sixty miles. The car driven by Wil Wilbur
bur Wilbur Dalene burst into flames in the
103rd mile. The driver and mechanic
ian extinguished the blaze and the
car was withdrawn. i
Murphy was still leading at 150
miles and nearly two miles ahead of
Hartz, in second place. His average
speed was 95.11 miles an hour. Up
to that time Murphy had won nearly
$3000 in lap prizes.
HARTZ WENT UP HEAD
Hartz went into the lead at 185
miles, when Murphy was forced to
make his first stop to exchange four
tires and replenish his fuel supply. At
200 miles Murphy was fourth.
COLONIAL DINING ROOM
WILL OPEN TODAY
Since Mrs. H. C. Jones took over
the active management of the Colo Colonial
nial Colonial Hotel two months ago, many im improvements
provements improvements have been made that will
add much to the comfort and conveni convenience
ence convenience of the guests. The walls have
been re-decorated, the woodwork has
been re-painted and the floors have
been re-finished. This comfortable
hotel, which has a first-class reputa reputation
tion reputation with the traveling public, and is
also popular with winter visitors, has
been filled to overflowing for the past
month. Every available room has
been occupied and the dining room,
which has not been open, has been
used for sleeping quarters, cots hav having
ing having been placed there.
Along with the general renovation
of the hotel the dining room has come
in for its full share of attention. The
prettily tinted, deep cream walls and
white woodwork make this one of the
most inviting dining rooms in town.
The dining room opened today with
Mrs. J. E. Hays of Webster in charge.
Mrs. Webster, who has been in the
hotel business for many years, is well
known to the traveling public and has
the reputation of setting an excellent
table and giving the public first class
service.
ANOTHER HEARING ON
GASOLINE TAX LAW
Tallahassee, May 30. The supreme
court yesterday entered an order
granting a hearing in the much dis
cussed gasoline tax case, officially
known as "Ernest Amos, as comptrol comptroller
ler comptroller of the state of Florida, appellant,
vs. bnelton J. bonn. individually, and
a taxpayer, etc., appellee."
The court did not file an opinion in
granting the rehearing, but there was
filed an opinion by Judge Ellis stating
the grounds upon which he favored.
On April 7, last, the court affirmed
a decree entered by Circuit Judge
Love in said case, and held that the
gasoline tax bill never became a law.
Judges Whitfield and West dissented
from the decision. Both of these
judges favered granting the rehear rehearing.
ing. rehearing. Tampa Tribune. t

Schooner Marion N. Cobb of Mobile

Shattered But May Be
Salvaged
Jacksonville, May 30. (Associated
Press). The American schooner Mar.
ion N. Cobb, of Mobile, Venezuela for
Jacksonville with a cargo of guano,
was believed here early today at the
bottom of the Atlantic five miles off
the mouth of the St. Johns river. The
steamer Sun Dance, en route Tampa
to Jacksonville, took off the Cobb's
crew early last night and in a wire wireless
less wireless message to the Associated Press
shortly before midnight, Captain
Stanford of the steamer said the
schooner's decks were awash when
last seen.
The Sun Dance entered the river
this morning and is due here at noon.
She also has aboard eleven members
of the St. Augustine shrimp fleet,
rescued from four small boats at sea
Sunday. The steam yacht Florence,
reported in a radio message late yes
terday from the British steamer Sia-
mere Prince as disabled and at anchor
twenty miles off the St. Johns river,
has. not been heard from today but no
fears are felt for her safety as the
sea is subsiding.
The British schooner Perceler, which
went ashore on St. George bar near
the mouth of the St. Johns river Sun Sunday
day Sunday afternoon is still aground with a
tug trying to float her.
SCHOONER MAY BE SALVAGED
The Sun Dance arrived during the
forenoon and reported the Cobb still
afloat today with her decks awash. It
is believed the vessel can be salvaged.
E. P. RENTZ
The many friends in Marion county
of Mr. E. P. Rentz will read with deep
regret the following from the Times Times-Union:
Union: Times-Union: Word was received in Jacksonville
last night of the death of E. P. Rentz,
which occurred yesterday afternoon
at the residence of his daughter, Mrs.
H. L. Oliver, of Apalachicola, where
he had made his home for the past two
years. Mr. Rentz .had been ill for a
long time and although his death was
not entirely unexpected, the end came
as a great shock to his family and the
many friends he had throughout the
state.
He was a native of Georgia, where
he was born sixty years ago, coming
to Florida about two decades ago and
locating in Ocala, where he was prom prominently
inently prominently identified in business. He en engaged
gaged engaged in the manufacture of lumber
and operated very extensively, having
mills in several sections of the state.
He also financed and built the Okla Okla-waha
waha Okla-waha Valley railroad.
The deceased is survived by three
children, Mrs. Rentz having died
about five years ago. The children are
Mrs. H. L. Oliver and Miss Louise
Rentz of Apalachicola, and George
Rentz of Jacksonville. The telegram
received here last night stated that
the funeral would be held today in
Bartow, Ga.
GRAND STAND AT
PLANT FIELD BURNED
Tampa, May 30. (By Associated
Press). Incendiarism is blamed for
the early morning fire which destroy destroyed
ed destroyed the grand stand at Plant Field
here.
PURE FRESH SWEET CREAM
If you are not using our pure fresh
pasteurized cream wire or write us to
ship you a trial ten gallon can of
thirty or forty per cent by first ex
press. The quality is unexcelled and
we guarantee it to arrive sweet and
cold packed in iced tubs.
Ezell-Griffin Company Creamery,
5-29-5t Eatonton, Ga.
CAMPAIGN ITINERARY
The following appointments hare
been made for democratic campaign
meetings:
Dunnellon, night meeting, Tuesday,
May 30th.
Oklawaha on the Dixie Highway in
the Oklawaha school house on Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday evening, May 31, at 8 o'clock.
Fellowship, Friday, June 2.
Grahamville all day picnic Satur
day, June 3.
Communities desiring campaign ap appointments
pointments appointments should immediately notify
the undersigned, so as to avoid eon-
iusion in dates.
Democratic Campaign Committee,
12-tf Ocala, Fla.



OCALA EVENING STAR, TUESDAY, MAY 30, 1922

i

Ocala Evening Star
rabllahed Every Duy Except Saadar by
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY,
OCALA, FLORIDA
II. J. Bltllascr, Prealdcat
II. D. Leareasoad, Vlce-Prealdcat
P. V. Lareosood, Seeretary-Treaaarer
J. II. Ilcajanila, Edltar
Entered at Ocala, Fla.. postolfic &
aecond-claM matter.
TELEPHONES
ffnalaeM Office Flve-Oaa
Editorial Department Twa-Serea
Society Keporter FlTe-0
MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively
entitled for the use for republication of
all news dispatches credited to it or not
otherwise' credited 4n this papar and
also the local news published herein.
All rights of republication of special
dispatches herein are also reserved.
DOMESTIC SUBSCRIPTION RATES
One year, in advance $6.00
Three months, in advance 3.00
Three months, in advance 1.50
One month, in advance 60
ADVERTISING RATES
Display t Plate 15 cents per inch for
consecutive insertions. Alternate inser insertions
tions insertions 25 per cent additional. Composi Composition
tion Composition charges on ads. that run less than
six times 10 cents per Inch. tipeclal
position 25 per cent additional. Kates
based on four-inch minimum. .Less than
four Inches will take a higher rate,
which will be furnished upon applica application.
tion. application. Readlas Notlcest Five cents per line
for first insertion; three cents per line
for each subsequent insertion. One
change a week allowed on readers with without
out without extra composition charges.
Legal advertisements at legal rates.
ANNOUNCEMENT OF RATES FOR
CAMPAIGN ADVERTISING
For the coming democratic primary
campaign the following rates will be
charged for announcements, not to ex exceed
ceed exceed twenty lines, PAYABLE WHEN
COPY IS SUBMITTED:
Weekly Star: For member of legis legislature,
lature, legislature, member of school board, mem member
ber member of board of county commissioners.
county surveyor, registration officer,
constable and justice of the peace, $5;
all state and national officers, 110.
Evening Star: (One insertion each
week) Same rates as Weekly Star.
Announcements under this rate are
to run from date of insertion until date
of primary election.
Readers for insertion will be charged
t the regular commercial rates.
The Tampa Times insinuates that
the Ocala Star is a gnat and a mos mosquito.
quito. mosquito. Now watch Brother Benjamin
proceed to wiggle his stinger and he
sure has one. Winter Haven Chief.
The Times is doing the wiggling.
When it comes to original headings,
Brother Benjamin has the rest of the
Florida scribes backed off the board.
We enjoy reading them as much as
we do his witty paragraphs. This is
how he heads the article in which it
told of the New Rochelle, N. Y., mill millionaire
ionaire millionaire shooting the blackmailer who
had previously collected $25,000 from
him and demanded more: "Paid His
Final Installment in Lead." Orlando
Reporter-Star.
Thanks, Friend Brossier; your kind
words are balm to our wounded spirit.
Our linotype operator is so fed up on
our heads that he threatens to dehorn
an article occasionally.
We confess that we are somewhat
puzzled by the utterances of Goode
Guerry, editor of the Palatka News.
Mr. Guerry is a gentleman whom we
have never met, but whose newspaper
work we have admired and praised.
And, as such things generally work
out, good will for his work has caused
a feeling of good will for the author.
We have had one or two controversies
with him, in which we have thumped
him, but he has thumped back, and
we supposed that he, like we, thought
it was all in the game. So when, a
few weeks ago, we criticised another
paper for misrepresenting one of our
friends, we were surprised to have
Mr. Guerry jump on us from behind
a distinct violation of newspaper eth ethics.
ics. ethics. We did not feel, aggrieved or
damaged by this unprovoked assault,
but out of curiosity inquired of Mr.
Guerry what was biting him. This
brought an ambiguous answer, out of
which the only thing we could glean
was that probably and unknowingly
we had hurt the gentle Goode in his
MIC:!E SAYS
C TVO Br tWr CxtTS lW
fcV o HVA V1HACT OP AM
soxJKuoefcs tvwo arts ou
A Utl A.0 AM' -XVVEVi
BEeox rr oovrr jooa up
REMEIA&ATW WORE. VAOkK
TW MORE LOOA
OVASUCS

I T
Iff (i'Ar
1 sir
1 1 AlPs asowwoh
I .SEtv

tender feelings. Being anxious to

explain and if possible make amends,
we again asked Mr. Guerry the why why-foreness
foreness why-foreness of the which. All the infor
mation we could extract from him
seemed to us to point to the fact that
Mr. Guerry doesn't like the way the
Star is edited. This saddens us. But
as we have no idea how Mr. Guerry
would like to have the work done, we
do not see the way clear to making
any changes. We like the way Mr.
Guerry edits his paper very much and
occasionally cull some of his bright
thoughts for the delectation of our
readers. We are sorry that he does
not approve of our crude efforts to
keep our readers interested, but about
the only remedy we can suggest to
h;m is that he do not read the Star.
COUNTY COMMISSIONERS
MEET THURSDAY
The county commissioners meet
Thursday, June 1 (day after tomor
row), with the intention of letting a
contract, or contracts, to finish the
county's part of the work on the
Dixie Highway between the Lake
county line and Belleview. They will
do this unless they are enjoined or
tied up in some legal proceedings that
will cause delay.
There is one thing that the taxpay
ers should fully understand, and that
is that every interference with the
commissioners m this matter will
cause expense that will fall upon the
said taxpayers. If the commission commissioners
ers commissioners are enjoined or other legal pro proceedings
ceedings proceedings taken against them, they
will have to employ counsel and resist
the proceedings, possibly to the su supreme
preme supreme court. At the same time, every
day of delay does damage to the work
already done on the road, and if there
is much more delay the state will have
to temporarily withdraw its support
and give it to some other road where
there is not so infernally much bick bickering,
ering, bickering, and this support withdrawn it
will be exceedingly difficult to regain
in.
It's no friend of the people of Mar
ion county who will cause any more
delay at this time.
ANDREW RICHARD GRIFFIN
It was with sincere regret that the
Star learned of the death Sunday of
Mr. A. R. Griffin of Anthony an old
citizen for whom the people of not
only his own community but the
county had the greatest goodwill and
respect.
Mr. Griffin was born in South Geor
gia almost three-quarters of a century
ago. A boy of sixteen, he entered the
Confederate army and served through
the last year of the civil war. Re
turning home after the conflict wj
over, neworkea two or tnree years
on the old homestead farm, but some somewhere
where somewhere between 1868 and 1870 he came
to Florida. He settled near Eureka,
and lived there as a farmer and mer merchant
chant merchant for almost thirty years. About
1898 he removed to Anthony, where
he has since made his home. He had
not been well for some time, and a
few days ago his last illness came
upon him and brought to an end a long
and useful life.
Mr. Griffin leaves to mourn their
loss his widow and eight children
Messrs. J. Arthur, C. H., W. Ward,
DeWitt and Albert Griffin, Misses
Cora C, Sarah D. and Aosta Louise.
An exceptionally fine family, the
members of which are all devoted to
each other and plunged in the deepest
sorrow at the loss of its head.
Funeral services for Mr. Griffin
were held at his home in Anthony
Monday afternoon. Rev. Mann assist
ed by Rev. C. W. White conducting the
services. Interment was made in the
Anthony cemetery. The funeral was
attended not only by the people of
Anthony but by many others from
different parts of the county.
Mr. Griffin was county treasurer
for eight years, and served on the
school board for fourteen years. In
public as in private life he was faith faithful
ful faithful to every trust, and the Star, in
common with hundreds of others.
mourns his loss as that of a personal
friend.
The following written by Arthur
Brisbane will probably set to think
ing those who claim that the wicked
receive all their punishment in this
life: "Millions of German soldiers arp
dead in the great war, through no
fault of theirs. They obeyed, as sol soldiers
diers soldiers did everywhere. Their, mould
ering bodies are worth perhaps three
cents as fertilizer. They are forgot
ten. The kaiser who gave them the
orders has finished writing bis me
moirs and will be paid $1,000,000 for
the writing. He will tell what he
wants the world to believe he prob probably
ably probably believes it himself by this time.
His war knocked the mark down to
a third of 1 cent. His story of how
it happened will bring him 300,000,000
marks. Justice prevails in the long
iuu, ui cuurs. dui on mis eartn it
is better to be a kaiser, and start it,
and get a million for telling about it,
than to be the man obeying orders.'
Don Rey. "that good cigar." 39-10

DECORATING THE GRAVES

OF THE VETERANS
Following are the members of the
committees who decorated the graves,
of our dead this morning:
No. 1, Oklawaha church: Dr. J. W.
Hood and Mrs. Hood.
No. 2, Fellowship, Blitchton, Mor-
riston and Williston
C. W. Hunter,
M. A. O'Neal.
No. 3, Cotton Plant: F. W.
A. B. Halsell.
No. 4, Anthony, Fort McCoy:
C. C.
Priest, B. R. Chapman.
No. 5, Oxford: L. H. Chazal
T. C. Thomsen.
ana ;
No. 6, Citra, Fairfield and Reddick:
H. G. Shealy, Baxter Carn and F. W.
Stanley.
No. 1, Moss Bluff: Laurie Izlar and
Mr. Condrey.
No. 7, Ocala: C. V. Roberts, W. T.
Gary.
No. 8, Local Cemeteries: W. T.
Gary, C. V. Roberts, John J. Neigh Neighbour,
bour, Neighbour, Mrs. J. W. Dumas, Mrs. Earl
Hall, Mrs. F. E. McClane, Miss Mary
Burford.
For the Gray and the Blue
At the suggestion of Mr. Neighbour, j
the committees inquired of veterans
of the war between the states if they
should also decorate the graves of the
dead heroes of that great conflict.
This graceful suggestion met with
favor, but as there were so many of
these graves, and so widely scattered,
the committee decided to select two
to represent them all. Accordingly.
many flowers were laid upon the grave
of Col.. John M. Martin for the Con Confederacy
federacy Confederacy and on that of Private Flynn
for the Union.
BIG JOB FOR BLANDING
A special to the Tampa Tribune
from Leesburg says: Capt. F .C. W.
Kramer of Leesburg, director of the
Florida Citrus Exchange from the
Highland Sub-Exchange, authorizes
announcement that Gen. A. H. Bland Bland-ing
ing Bland-ing of Bartow has been elected man manager
ager manager jointly for the Highland and
Marion sub-exchanges, with office in
Leesburg. General Blanding will as assume
sume assume the position June 1. M. E. Mil Miller
ler Miller of Leesburg will be assistant man manager
ager manager and secretary.
It is understood this movement is
made in preparation for a consider considerable
able considerable enlargement in the activities of
the co-operative marketing organiza organization
tion organization in Lake and Marion counties,
where it is represented already by a
number of packing houses and a con considerable
siderable considerable membership. It is said that
exchange officials are looking forward
to handling the largest volume of
fruit next season in the history of the
co-operative movement in this section.
The recent dry spell is said to have
affected the citrus areas of this sec section
tion section less than in almost any other
locality. Growers are looking for forward
ward forward to good crops, and with the ad admitted
mitted admitted shortage of California oranges
for next season are anticipating good
returns on their fruit.
FELLOWSHIP
Fellowship, May 29 We are having
quite a lot of rain. One extreme fol follows
lows follows another.
jir. Jimmie Kawis nas accepted a
position with Mr. George Proctor of
Pedro.
Mr. and Mrs. S. J. McCully and
daughter, Miss Winifred, spent Sun
day with Mr. and Mrs. N. H. Lanier
of Morriston.
Miss Leone Brooks has spent the
past ten days in Tallahassee with Mr.
and Mrs. R. W. Ervin and family and
is seeing some of the sights of the
old red hills of Leon county.
This scribe attended the picnic and
fish fry at Eureka last Saturday and
had a very pleasant time. Some of
the speakers spoke in the rain, but
what differences does it make if they
can get the votes.
Mrs. J. T. McCully of Houston,
Texas, is the guest of Mrs. J. T. Phil Phillips.
lips. Phillips. Mrs. McCully has been in Texas
about two years and likes it very
much.
The Jolly Jokers will meet with
Miss Nellie Prine next Wednesday
afternoon.
IRVINE
Irvine, May 29. Mr. L. K, Edwards
attended the land sale at Lowell Wed
nesday.
Dr. and Mrs. J. L. Davis, Mrs. Sue
Mclver and Mr. Lum Mclver were
Ocala visitors Thursday.
Mr. L. WT. Traxler of Mcintosh was
ir our burg Thursday.
Mrs. Louisa Williams of Orange
Lake spent Thursday and Friday with
Mrs. J. L. Davis.
Messrs. Grubbs and Traxler ship shipped
ped shipped their first car of melons from
here Saturday.
Miss Eloise Geiger of Micanopy
and Mr. Charlie Smith of Hawthorn
spent Sunday with Miss Mamie Fant.
A 25-cent package of Albert's Plant
Food will perform wonders with your
pot plants. Try it Sold at the Court
Pharmacy. 18-tf

OCALA TWENTY YEARS AGO

(Evening Star May 30, 1902)
A cordial invitation is extenced to
all who are in sympathy with the
above named occasion to meet with
Ocala Post No. 17, G. A. R., at the old
cemetery, where services will be held.
T. J. Owens, Post Commander.
Joseph Bumby, Adjutant.
S Messrs. J. C. and Lee Howell, sue sue-Ditto,
Ditto, sue-Ditto, ces5fui truckers, are in town to ne
gotiate for four one-horse wagons to
haul cantaloupes and melons. They
say prospects never were so bright as
they were this season.
Hon. W. A. Carter of Tampa, law
partner of Hon. S. M. vSparkman, will
be Ocala's orator on the 4th of July.
Geo. K. Robinson, L. R. Chazal, D.
M. Smith and J. M. Meffert are stay staying
ing staying at the lake.
Miss Kate Gamsby gave her piano
recital at the Ocala House parlors
last night and it was a treat for
those present. The sixteen numbers
were all played by girls except those
played by Master Norton Davis and
Miss Violet Harris. Miss Jessie Pal
mer and Miss Louise Scott made the
highest scores for the eighth month,
Miss Violet Harris was presented the
medal.
Prof. Josiah Varn, principal of the
Ocala school, is writing New York
Life insurance during vacation.
Ocala Ten Years Ago
(Evening Star May 30, 1912)
Ed Lawrence, the actor, so long
with the Mabel Paige Company, is
now with the Reagin-Lewis Company,
playing at the Duval in Jacksonville.
Mr. James Jackson, the popular
hotel clerk, has accepted a position in
Fort Myers.
Mr. Witherspoon Dodge has arrived
in town to visit his parents.
Mr. Geo. E. Easterling shipped two
more cars of melons from his Martel
farm today.
For some time Mr. J. C. Caldwell,
the efficient superintendent of the
city electric light plant, has been
supplying the Star with the report of
the weather conditions for each day.
He would feel well rewarded if he
knew how eagerly the reports
read.
were
The beaches of the North and the
rocky shores of New England are
pleasantly reached through use of
Merchants and Miners steamers. Fre Frequent
quent Frequent sailings from Jacksonville. Ad Address.
dress. Address. Mr. C. M. Haile, general agent,
for information. It
Don Rey, "that good cigar ?.9-10t

TELL IT TO US
10 PeOple 'We want to publish all
of the news of this communis
T, ty for the information of our
yy XlO subscribers. We cannot be in
500 different places at once,
TT rnl and we don't wanl to miss
KnOW l hingS anything tvorth printing. Will
you tell it to us?
1 PHONE 51 OR 27

You Can Buy These Brands of Flour
and Feel Sale

xxr- mi M m ,.tm .

X 1321

The

Muske
By
VICTOR
ROUSSEAU
To Victor Rousseau, the
author of many charm charming
ing charming tales, rails the honor
of writing the first really
big romance concerned
with railroad building
and empire winning in
northern Canada.
The heart-breaking
struggle of an engineer
against terrific odds; the
love of a woman which
made her almost a mar martyr;
tyr; martyr; the love of another
woman which outlawed
her best instincts; the
swift death that came
from nowhere; the de devious
vious devious ways of a fox with
heart of a beast and
body of a man all
this woven into a fabric
of singular fascination--of
compelling interest.
j jj
J Is Our JVetv Serial
Starling
IN A FEW DAiS
EPISCOPAL BENEFIT
CARD PARTY WEDNESDAY
The Episcopal benefit card party
j will be held at the home of Mr. and
Mrs. Christian Ax on Fort King ave avenue
nue avenue Wednesday at four o'clock; 50
cents each for players, 25 cents for
tea guests. For tables phone Mrs.
Wade Dumas, Mrs. R. L. Anderson Jr.
or Mrs. Robert Hager. 29-2t
Birdsey's Best
Plain, Super Grade
Light House
Self Rising
"It's the Best"

1!

'WlliKlUHlIIIu

Every Sack Guaranteed
Pillans and Smith
Wholesale Distributers

CROWING
Yes we are crowing about our special
Florida and Western Steaks.
Hot Vegetable Dinner
Daily 50c.
Hot WTaffles and Cakes, Child's
Style, for Breakfast
RIALTO CAFE
Upto-Date Dining Room in rear.
SUPERIOR DINING SERVICE
We would never be satisfied with
rendering anything but superior din dining
ing dining service. There are too many res restaurants
taurants restaurants in business that are content
to merely satisfy. We endeavor to
will anticipate every meal here. Our
menu is the talk of the town. Our
special dishes are masterpieces of the
culinary art. Everything the best at
DAVIDSON'S
100 Sanitary. Ask the Hotel
Inspector
GOING OFF FOR THE SUMMER
Look over our lir.fc of Roundtree
trunks and Lily luggage before buy buying
ing buying your summer traveling necessi necessities.
ties. necessities. Guarantee Clothing & Shoe Co.
Y. M. B. O. D. 17-tf
Don Rey, "that good cigar." 19-10t

Mr lucm-itaccn-



OCALA EVENING STAR, TUESDAY, MAT 30, 1922

ICE

We can supply you with ice at most
reasonable prices for all purposes,
whether you want a car load or mere merely
ly merely a small quantity each day for your
home use. Our ice is absolutely pure,
being made from pure distilled water
and can be used for all purposes with
perfect safety.
Ocala Ice & Packing Co.
PHONE 34, OCALA. FLA.
Needham Motor Co
PLUMBING & ELECTRICAL
CONTRACTING
General Atito
Repairing
PHONE 252
Arrival and departure of passenger
trains at OCALA UNION STATION.
The fololwing schedule figures ub ub-lished
lished ub-lished as information and not guar guaranteed.
anteed. guaranteed. (Eastern Standard Time)
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILROAD
Leave Station Arrive
2:20 am Jacksonville-N'York 2:10 am
1:50 pm Jacksonville 1:50 pm
4:17 pm Jacksonville 3:50 pm
Tampa-Manatee-
2:15 am St. Petersburg 4:05 i.a
2:55 am N'York-St. Petrsbrg 1:35 am
2:15 am Tampa 2:15 am
1:50 pm Tampa-Manatee 1:35 pm
4:05 pm Tampa-St. Petersbrg 4:05 pm
ATLANTIC COAST LINE R. R.
Leaves Station Arrives
6:42 am Ocala-Jacksonville 12:25 pm
1:45 pm Ocala-Jacksonville 6:45 pm
3:25 pm Ocala-St. Petersbrg 9:16 pm
2:33 am Ocala-St. Petersbrg 8:20 am
2:27 am Ocala-Jacksonville 7:00 am
3:25 pm Ocala-Homosassa 6:20 pm
1 :10 am JOcala-Wilcox 11 :59 am
7:25 am fOcala-Lakeland 11:50 am
JMonday, Wednesday, Friday.
tTuesday, Thursday, Saturday.
PACIFIC MUTUAL MULTIPLE
PROTECTION INSURANCE
PAYS
DEATH,
Permanent Total Disability,
OLD AGE,
ACCIDENT,
SICKNESS.
H. E. GOBLE
BOX 352, Ocala, Fla.
Repair work
on all makes
of battery
done skilful skilfully
ly skilfully and rea reasonably
sonably reasonably B. F. CONDON
Distributor
Wholesale & Retail
Phone 129
HOTEL
jftoroftYUix-nooG
Ewopvm FVn Complete Modsitv Screened ntwfa routs,
Swa Hmad W-50 Cafe n mnneUtaw, Convener
Eir)rthMS hn hewt of CiB Send for BooUcL
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CONTRACTOR
AND BUILDER
Careful estimates made on all con contract
tract contract work. Gives more and better
work for the money than any other
contractor in the city.
Don Rey. "that good cigar." 19-10t

IM SCHEDULES

If

MADE MOCK Of SCIENTISTS

Man Emerged Unharmed From Oven
in Which Chicken and Bread
Had Been Roasted.
For a wager of $200 a man named
Martinez suffered himself to be practi practically
cally practically baked alive some years ago in
Paris in the presence of a number of
scientists. He entered a huge oven,
specially built, after it had been heat heated
ed heated to a temperature of 312 dbgrees
Fahrenheit, or about 100 degrees hot hotter
ter hotter than boiling water.
Then the door was closed, and he
was left alone for an hour, in company
with an uncooked chicken and an un unbaked
baked unbaked loaf of bread. Candles were
also provided that he might have light
during his incarceration or Inciner Incineration,
ation, Incineration, as many people thought It would
turn out.
When he was released, however, he
was found alive and well, with the
chicken and loaf cooked to a turn. The
candles had became boiling tallow.
Martinez afterward repeated his per performance
formance performance in Brussels, Milan and other
cities, but there must have been some something
thing something abnormal In his constitution,
since of several would-be emulators of
his feat none succeeded In staying out
the full hour, while two, at least, per perished
ished perished miserably.
Probably his success was due In part
to the care he took to have every par particle
ticle particle of moisture extracted from the
oven before he entered It, since It is a
well-known fact that hot, dry air does
not so adversely affect a human being
as hot, moist air. Detroit News.
NIGHT ON THE AEGEAN SEA
Author's Beautiful Word Painting of
Marvelous Pictures Formed by
the Lunar Rainbows.
Writing of lunar rainbows, In his
"The Opal Sea," John C. Van Dyke
says: "And what pictures, never
painted by master, ancient or modern,
are to be seen by the weather rail at
night when the lunar 'rainbow ; with
its arch of subtle light-and-dark fol follows
lows follows on the ship's beam, when the pur purple
ple purple water flashes through the patches
of the mist. The summer nights upon
the Aegean when the small Island
steamer sweeps you past Syrian
ships becalmed their hulls lost In the
low-lying vapors, their sails looming
above the drifts into the white moon moonlight
light moonlight are never to be forgotten. They
are only Impressions of Intangible light
and color, momentary revelations of
pictorial poetry without literary mean meaning
ing meaning or association; and yet very In
sistent revelations, very striking Im Impressions.
pressions. Impressions. We do not readily define
them, but we feel their effect upon us,
nevertheless. It is an effect analogous
perhaps to that produced by music
pale music in a minor key, dreamy
music that moves In slow-heaving ca cadences
dences cadences or faints in realms of sun-shot
haze or gleams In chords of lustrous
silver."
Immortal Poets.
The palm for exquisite poetry should
go to Keats. In lofty Ideas of death.
Wordsworth and Bryant march hand
In hand. Shelly, compared with the
other three, seems Immature. As to
these four poets. It Is curious to note
that Bryant died at the age of 84, his
death being caused by a sunstroke
when he was giving an address In
Centr::l park. New York, on the un unveiling
veiling unveiling of a statue; Keats died of con
sumption In Rome at the age 25, and
was buried there, in the old Protestant
cemetery the following epitaph
(which he had desired placed there)
being put on his tomb : "Here lies one
whose name was writ In water." Shelly
was drowned when he was sailing on
tu Bay of Spezia. before he was quite
80, and was cremated (although his
heart would not burn), and the ashes
hurled near the grave of Keats, and
Wordsworth died rt the age of 80,
at Rydal Mount, Westmoreland.
Color Blindness.
It Is declared that people suffering
from color-blindness often have better,
clearer vision than people with normal
sight. While 4 per cent of our male
population suffer from color-blindness,
only one-half of one per cent of the fe female
male female population is affected. This Imper Imperfection
fection Imperfection of the sight is very pronounced
among Jews and Quakers. The origin
of color-blindness is as completely un unknown
known unknown to scientists as is the reason
for thus attacking only certain sec sections
tions sections of people, but women may be free
from It. probably because their eyes
have been trained to color for gener generations,
ations, generations, while Quakers are peculiarly
susceptible, owing to the monotonous
color of their garments. Color-blindness
runs In a family for generations,
and. although it is always In the males,
it descends through the females. The
daughters of color-blind men invari invariably
ably invariably have color-blind sons. The Sun Sunday
day Sunday at Home.
INSURANCE
j When you want reliable insurance,
I fire or life, let we show you the propo propo-(
( propo-( sitions offered by some of the strong strong-jest
jest strong-jest companies in the land.
2-3-tf F. W. DITTO, Agent.
See the newest thing in ladies foot footwear,
wear, footwear, Red Cross Patent Leather Ox Oxfords.
fords. Oxfords. Guarantee Clothing & Shoe Co.
Y. M. B. O. D. 17-tf
Albert's Plant Food is the thing for
making your flower garden and pot
plants bloom. It is odorless and is
sold in 25c and 50c packages and $2
sacks. At the Court Pharmacy. 18-tf

scours
(Conducted by National Council of tie Bo
Scout a ( America.)
BEATTY REVIEWS SEA SCOUTS
The sea scouts of Chicago were re recently
cently recently accorded the great honor f be being
ing being reviewed by Admiral Beatty. They
were lined up at the Blackstone ho hotel,
tel, hotel, and the admiral shook hands with
each one of them, and asked questions
about scouting and sea scouting. Later
he gave the whole group an interest interesting
ing interesting talk about the work the British
sea scouts rendered, patrolling the
coast during the war.
Through the good offices of Howard
D. Gillette of the Chicago local council,
Lieutenant Keane, who for the last
four years has been assistant to the
commandant of the Great Lakes train training
ing training station, Is meeting the sea scouts
once a week on board the Commodore,
the naval training boat anchored just
off Grant park. The government life
saving crew has also accorded the sea
scouts the privilege of the use of
quarters, and the Hamilton club has
offered Its swimming tank and the
services f an instructor. Each one
of the seven districts of Chicago will
soon have its sea scout troop, and It
Is expected that by spring there will
be some 200 boys actively enrolled In
the sea scout fleet.
8C0UTS BUILD LOG CABINS
Troop 159 of Brooklyn Demonstrating
the Art of Double Quick Time in
Construction.
BOWLINE SAVES HORSE
The knowledge of how to tie ths
right kind of a knot at the right time
and put it to the right use is some something
thing something every scout may be proud and
glad to possess. An incident in point
occurred recently when a group of boy
scouts of Troop 6. Manhattan, dis discovered
covered discovered a horse which, having broken
through an old bridge, was having
difficulty in keeping his head above
water, terrified as he was and crushed
down by the weight of the debris
which had fallen on him in his ten ten-foot
foot ten-foot drop Into the water. The boy
promptly got a rope and helped their
scoutmaster make a bowline knot In
a noose and throwing It around the
horse's neck, kept him above the cur cur-rent
rent cur-rent until he could be rescued. A
well-meaning amateur attempting te
do the same thing might easily have
choked the animal by rising the wronf
kind of knot
BOY SCOUTS GREET FOCH
The following greetings were given
to Marshal Foch by the boy scouts of
Chicago :
"Greeting to Chicago's Honored Guest,
Marshal Foch :
"We, the boy scouts of Chicago, are
proud to meet and greet you and to
have you honor our home city by your
visit.
"We regret that we were not old
enough to have served with our elder
brothers under your victorious banner.
We earnestly appreciate and thank you
for your leadership, which brought im immortal
mortal immortal victory.
"Accept our love and grateful appre appreciation,
ciation, appreciation, and hear across the sea to
the boy scouts of your dear France
a warm message of deep friendship
and brotherhood straight from ths
boy scouts of Chicago.
"By order of and with most cordial
respect, the Chicago Council, 43
Stents of America.'
A REAL OPPORTUNITY
Most desirable building site in Ocala j
located on Fort King avenue in best (
residential section. This is a real bar bargain
gain bargain for some one who is looking for
good city property; 109 feet front by
112 feet deep. C. E. Ahearn. 5-29-6t
Sweet milk at the Main Street Mar Market.
ket. Market. Phone 108. tf

STARVING ELK RESCUED
BY TWO FOREST RANGERS

Tip That Animals Were Snow Snowbound
bound Snowbound Came From an Aerial
Mail Flyer.
After an arduous trip of 50 miles
into the mountainous region at the
headwaters of Dunganess river, two
forest rangers succeeded In releasing a
herd of 80 or 90 wild elk, snowbound
in a draw or hole and which were on
the verge of death by starvation.
By a queer coincidence Eddie Hub Hubbard,
bard, Hubbard, carrying mall by airplane be between
tween between Seattle and Victoria, Canada,
routed his homeward trip Inland over
the foothills of the Olympic moun mountains
tains mountains to avoid a strong gale on Paget
Sound. Skirting close to the tope of
the forest trees he observed the wild
elk snowbound in a natural lnclosure
of drifted snow. When he reached
home he notified the state game
commissioner's office of his belief, who
at once ordered an investigation.
Alex McPherson and George Gates
of Quilcene, Wash., started at once
over a well-known trail carrying pro provisions
visions provisions on pack horses. The 50 miles
into the wilderness was made in two
days and the elk located. The ani animals
mals animals were belly deep in snow floun floundering
dering floundering about, subsisting on fir boughs
and moss. Breaking through a snow snowdrift
drift snowdrift barrier, the elk gamely followed
the two, men and their horses down
into the valley where grazing material
flourished In abundance. Of the ex exhausted
hausted exhausted animals but two fell dead
after release.
The brave act Is being heralded
throughout Elkdom fraternity and the
two rangers will be presented with a
suitable reward.
The Olympic elk usually foretell big
snowstorms and hurry into the valleys,
but this bunch herded ap together in a
sheltered hole and were cut off from
food.
C)COCOCOCXXXXXXX)COOCOCOCOO
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES
FOR WOMEN IN MEXICO
CX)OCXXXXXXX30CXXXXX)CCOOCOO
Catherine Elizabeth Butterfleld, who
refused to be called "Mrs." because
the title is "undignified" for a busi business
ness business woman," Is In California for a
short rest from her mining labors
near Rosarla, Sinaloa, Mex. "If wom women
en women want to make money, if they want
to be treated with genuine respect, if
they want to be happy and safe, my
advice to them is to go to Mexico,"
she declared. Mrs. Butterfleld has
been engaged In gold and stiver min mining
ing mining In Mexico for 16 years and is said
to be one of the most successful min miners
ers miners In Mexico. She admits that the
bandits carried off her gold and sti stiver,
ver, stiver, but says they never touched either
she or any of her employees. She la
very strong for Mexico.
UNER WAKES WHALES
Boat Bears Down en Seven Giants
Snoozing Peacefully on Top of Water.
Capt. F. J. Holland of the Pacific
mail liner Cuba, on a visit to Los
Angeles harbor, told a story of how he
rang the breakfast bell for seven
whales In the Pacific ocean.
They were big fellows, ranging from
sixty to ninety feet in length. The
seven were "snoozing" peacefully on
top of the water as the Cuba bore
down upon them. The captain said he
didn't hear them snoring, but he
knew they were sleeping, because
when whales sleep they ride high In
the water.
Evidently one whale was afflicted
with insomnia, for as the vessel drew
near he shook himself Into action and
proceeded to pour water on the others.
Aroused from their slumbers under
the rays of the early morning sun,
the seven whales scampered away,
frothing the water with their rushes
and seeming to protest against the
rude steamship that had so sudden suddenly
ly suddenly broken their beauty naps.
Visit the Teapot Self Serve Grocery.
Youll like it. tf
Bargain, one Ford, 1917
Spencer-Pedrick Motor Co.
model.
23-tf

Zf Zs -3- :Zs -3" -3- -3- -3

I WHEN YOU THMK OF EATS
I THINK OF US

TELEPHONE
74

When you buy your Groceries and Meat from us
you know you are getting the best quality and lowest
prices. Our lines of
WESTERN AND FLORIDA MEATS
GROCERIES, FRUITS AND VEGETABLES
sare always fresh and the best to be had on the mar market.
ket. market. GIVE US A TRIAL.

FREE DELIVERY
m nr 11 in ix is r
C MULL uKuLLKl

122 S. MAIN STREET

v1-v viL--vS-- vj v.-y vJJ.-vf.:

WHITE STAR LINE

Negotiable Storage Receipts Issued on Cotton. Automobiles, Ete

MOVE, PACK, SHIP
LIVE STOCK,
PIANOS, BAGGAGE,
MACHINERY,
FURNITURE, ETC.
A VISIT TO THE CEMETERY
Will show many examples of our skill
as monument builders. Among them
are every sort of memorial ranging
from the very simplest to the most
ornate and stately. And every one
bears the hall mark of good taste and
skillful workmanship. Our book of
designs will be shown to any who plan
a stone for their plot.
Ocala Marble Works
OCALA, FLORIDA
SASH
DOOR
Geo. MacKay I Co.
Ocala, Fla.
HARDWARE
HIGH GRADE PAINT
NOTICE
Hemstitching and pecoting done on
short notice. All work guaranteed.
We furnish the thread. Singers and
other makes of machines for sale. We
carry needles, oil and parts for all
sewing machines. All repair work
guaranteed. Phone 502 green.
Card well Sewing Machine Co.,
1-tf 317 N. Magnolia St, Ocala, Fla.
CASH PRICES AT
OCALA CASH MARKET
Western and Florida Beef at best
prices.
Fresh Fish 11 cents pound.
Creamery Butter, 45 cents pound.
Phone 110. Ocala' Cash Market. 3t
Comfort and style in our Society
Brand and Fashion Park clothes. We
have a full line of the summer fabrics.
Guarantee Clothing & Shoe Co., Y. M.
B. O. D. 17-tf
Visit the Teapot Self Serve Grocery.
:YonH like it.

- .n&n;2;i-

S. MAIN ST.
122
PHONE 74
! m mm, w r
ana MeAT MAmirT
.r-. .-T-. .-r-. .-v-. s. v
VC-" -"r,r,r,r'-
e

TRANSFER
AND
PROOF STORAGE

t
s
LONG DISTANCE MOVING
Phone 296
e
e
xoncK
The board of county commissioners
of Marion county, Florida, in session
May 2nd, 1922, appointed the following
persons to serve as inspectors and
clerks of the primary election in the
several precincts as indicated, in said
county, to be held June 6th, 1922:
Precinct No. 1. Box A to L) Ocala.
A. O. Harriss, O. B. Howse, A. L. Iiucas.
Inspectors; F. E. Harris Jr., clerk. (Box
M to Z) D. B. Mayo, W. J. McGehee,
Li. H. Pillans, inspectors; L. AL Murray,
clerk.
Precinct No. 2. Roddick. J. F.
Bishop, Emma M. Cromartie, Lydle E.
Dansby, Inspectors; EL D. Rou, clerk.
Precinct No. S. Fleming-ton. ,W. H.
Anderson, Doug-las Fant, C. H. Gray,
inspectors; C. M. Mathews .clerk.
Precinct No. 4. Cotton Plant. J. A.
Keller, O. W. Mills, H. E. Snowden, in inspectors;
spectors; inspectors; D. N. Barco, clerk.
Precinct No. 5. Romeo. J. F. Folks,
T. E. Hutchins, J. C. Nettles, inspectors;
T. F. Morgan, clerk.
Precinct No. 6. Camp Izzard. 6. W.
Jordan, J. T. Ross. W. C. Strickland,
inspectors; H. A. Ross, clerk.
Precinct No. 7. Shady. J. M. Go ins,
Lw I Horne, William Jones, inspectors;
S. R. Pyles, clerk.
Precinct No. 8. Summerfleld. Mrs.
Reba Davis. J. T. Hougrh. Mrs. Mollis
Reynolds, inspectors; Julia R. Collens,
clerk.
Precinct No. 9. Lake Weir. J. J.
Drigers, Mrs. Mella V. Spurlm, Mrs.
Anna M. Blair, inspetcors; John T.
Lewis cleric.
Precinct No. 10. Moss Bluff. J. C.
Pillans, O. Squires, Oliver Fort. Inspec Inspectors;
tors; Inspectors; J. F. Hombeck, clerk.
Precinct No. 11. Graham-vine. It. W.
Wilson, F. C. Emlth, R. C Fort, Inspec Inspectors;
tors; Inspectors; T. Lk RandalL clerk.
Precinct No. 12. Salt Springs. Cal Calvin
vin Calvin Long, W. P. Williamson, J. N. Mc Mc-Quaig,
Quaig, Mc-Quaig, inspectors; M. E. Williamson,
clerk.
Precinct No. 13. Fort McCoy. C. T.
Boatwright, J. W. Stephens, W. I. Cow Cow-art,
art, Cow-art, inspectors; J. L. Grantham, clerk.
Precinct No. 14. Orange Bp rings. Ijr Ijr-nitia
nitia Ijr-nitia Bryson. R. B. Detwtler. Ethel
Hall, inspectors; C. J. Rast, clerk.
Precinct No. 15. Lin ad ale. W. H.
Corbett, Paul Hawkins, C. A. McCraney.
inspectors; F. D. Drawdy, clerk.
Precinct No. 16. Citra. Etta Boris Boris-son,
son, Boris-son, May B. Dupree, D. F. Simmons, In Inspectors;
spectors; Inspectors; W. J. Crosby, clerk.
Precmct No. 17. Anthony. Ida E.
Fielding, Kate M Meadows, C. V.
Swain, inspectors; W. C. Credle. clerk.
Precinct No. 18. Martin. N. J. Town Town-send.
send. Town-send. J. H. Knoblock. John Relff, In Inspectors;
spectors; Inspectors; J. E. Turnipseed, clerk.
Precinct No. 19. Stanton. W. B.
Cog-gins, W. C. Black, R. L. Lytle, In Inspectors;
spectors; Inspectors; J. E. Brown, clerk.
Precinct No. 20. Blitchton. Locals
Blitch, J. W. Coulter, R. B. Fant, in inspectors;
spectors; inspectors; Land is Blitcii. clerk.
Precinct No. 21. Bellevlew. J. I
Adams, J. A. Freeman, O. M. Gale, In Inspectors:
spectors: Inspectors: C. E. Armstrong, clerk.
Precinct No. 22. Mcintosh. Gladys
B. Burry, W. E. Christian, E. Rebecca
Gist. Inspectors; I T. Hickson, clerk.
Precinct No. 23. Pedro. R. J. Perry.
Walter Nichols. H. P. Oliver, Inspec Inspectors;
tors; Inspectors; J. C. Perry, clerk.
Precinct No. 24. Dunnellon. B. J.
Benson. W. FL Folks, C. E. Hood. In Inspectors,
spectors, Inspectors, W. J. Mix son. clerk.
Precinct No. 25. Candler. P. A. Fort,
J. H. Mathews, J. N. Marshall, inspec inspectors;
tors; inspectors; B. ,D. Belcher, clerk.
Precinct No. 28. Sparr. H. D. Gran Grantham,
tham, Grantham, S. P. Burton, Frances R. Pasteur,
inspectors; Ethel M. Stephens, clerk.
Precinct No. 27. Eureka. R. I Brln Brln-son.
son. Brln-son. L A. Marsh, Wm. E. Moore, Inspec Inspectors;
tors; Inspectors; G. B. Parramore, clerk.
Precinct No. 28. Lev on. E. W. Crf Crf-der.
der. Crf-der. C E. Lucius, Will Freer, inspec inspectors;
tors; inspectors; J. W. Piatt, clerk.
Precinct No. 29. R. B. Ward. G. N.
Shealy, E. F. Lyles, inspetcors; B. C.
Webb, clerk.
Precinct No. 30. MarteL P. R. Mc Mc-Mullen,
Mullen, Mc-Mullen, H. L. Shearer, J. Seckinger, in inspectors?
spectors? inspectors? Aubry Frink. clerk.
Precinct No. 31. Fairfield. Bessie
T. Gibbon. B. 6. Jennings, C. G. Miller,
inspectors; M. L. Payne, clerk.
Precinct No 32. Geiger. W. R. Dre Dre-her.
her. Dre-her. R. P. Raterie. G. H. Wbitttngton.
inspectors; D. R. Zetrouer, cleik.
Precinct No? 3 J. Em&thla. S. B.
Brooks. 6. J. McCully. V. M. Seckinger.
inspectors; A. J. McLaughlin, clerk.
T. D. LANCASTER JR.,
5-12-lt Clerk of Said Board.
RED CROSS SHOES
The latest arrival, the best for style
and comfort. Guarantee Gothing &
Shoe Co. Y.M.EO. D. 17tf



1

OCALA EVENING STAR, TUESDAY, MAY 30, 1922

f I 7, I " :

.fJL&yj..i: ."i .as-

OCALA OCCURRENCES

NOTHING BUT THE TRUTH

i

The play, "Nothing But the Truth,"
which will be reproduced Friday night,
June 2nd, Temple theater, by the
members of the senior class, has made

Mr. and Mrs. Charles McLueas have a great hit wherever it has appeared.

If you have any local or society
items for the Star, call five-one.

given their handsome little
name of Charles Alfred.

Curtain rises at 8:30.

Fraternal Orders

ROYAL ARCH MASONS

A ROMANCE of railroad building in
S- the grim reaches of the far North, where
love and the passions of revenge and hate flame as
quickly over the eternal snows as in tropic isles
under the moon.
An absorbing story of a man who left to
his best friend a legacy not merely of difficulty
and strife, but of something infinitely more danger dangerous
ous dangerous and disturbing. A tale of strong manhood and
womanhood battling against the forces of nature
and against more troublesome forces arising in
human hearts.
This great novel by the author of "Wooden Spoit
" Jacqueline of Golden River," etc, we shall
print in serial installments
BEGINNING IN A FEW DAYS

son the Duval high school, Rollins College
and Emory College have presented it
:with great success within the last few

Dr. H. C. Dozier is home from St. weeks- Redpath Chautauqua put

i Louis, where he attended a conven- on tne soutnern circuit last season.
I tion of surgeons. The play is produced under heavy

royalty. The senior class oi tne
Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Christiansen cala gh school will show you some
are comfortably located with Mr. and real acting, and a good time Friday

Mrs. T. H. Johnson on Oklawaha ave- niSnt
nnp

I The friends of Mr. F. Eric Watson,

Hot Boston Baked Beans for Wed- an 0cala raised boy, will be interested

nesday night's supper at Carter's to hear of his engagement to Miss
Bakery. 30-2t Liola L. Silvers, of New Smyrna. The
wedding wil ltake place Sunday, June

Have you ever tried telling the 4th at the home of the bride's par

absolute truth for twenty-four hours? ents- Immediately after the cere cere-See
See cere-See the senior class play, "Nothing mony the bride and groom will leave
But the Truth," Friday night, June 2. for Jacksonville, where they will
Pricos 50.7rw K'n Coofc rvmD spend the night, coming to Ocala

early. 30-2t Monday, June 5th, for a short visit to
friends and relatives here. They will
Mr. Ralph Simmons, who is with then return to fGW Smyrna to make
the engineering firm of Young & Mer- their future home. The friends of
rin, is home for a short stay with his this yunS couple wish them a long
parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Simmons. and haPPy life-
j
Mr. Andrew Christiansen, who has Fertilize your pot plants and lawn
been in Tallahassee for a few davs on flowers with Albert's Plant Food. Sold

business connected with the Oklawaha in 25c 50c and 2 packages at the

Valley railroad, is expected home to- Court Pharmacy. 18-tf
day. j
j Lady Fingers today at Carter's
Mr. and Mrs. Holly of Atlanta ar-' Bakery. 29-2t
rived in Ocala' yesterday from that'
city, making the trip in their car. i Funeral services for the late Will Will-While
While Will-While in town they will visit Mrs. iam Peterson were held yesterday
Holly's sister, Mrs. H. H. Henderson, afternoon at the chapel of George
MacKay & Company at 2:30 o'clock.
W. K. Lane. M. D.. physician and Rev- W- F- Creson of the Presbyterian
surgeon, specialist eye. ear. nose and urch officiated. Mrs. Emma Ran-

throat. Office over 5 and 10 cent store, dal1' sister of the deceased, who ar-

Ocala, FI. tf ; rived m Ocala J? riday, having been

called here by the sudden death of
Lady Fingers today at Carter's her brother, left on the afternoon

Bakery. 29-2t train with the remains for Ypsilanti,

! Mich., Mr. Peterson s former home,
Fashion's newest creations in So- where interment will be made.

ciety Brand clothes. Guarantee Cloth

ing & Shoe Co. Y. M. B. O. D. 17-tf

Regular conventions of the Ocala
Chapter No. 13, R. A. M., on the f ourti:
Friday in every month at 8 p. m.
A. L. Lucas. H. P.
B. L. Adams, Secretary.

KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS

Ucala Lodge No. 19. Conventions
held every Monday evening at eight
o'clock at the castle hall. A cordial
welcome to visiting brothers.
W. R. Pedrick, C. ii
C. K. Sage, K. of R. & S.

UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISFJV1ENTS
(RATES under tbis heading are aa
follows: Maximum of six lines one tlm
25c; three times 50c; six times 75c; one one-month
month one-month $3.00. All accounts payable la
Tiirc except to those who have reg regular
ular regular advertising accounts.
WANTED To rent Underwood type typewriter
writer typewriter for two months. Address
"T," care Star. 30-3t

FOR RENT Furnished house with
all modern conveniences. Possession
June 1st. Apply to C. V. Roberts,
or phone 305. 29-tf

SPANISH WAR VETERANS
Fitzhugh Lee Camp No. 11, United
Spanish War Veterans, meets the
third Friday of each month at armory,

at 8 o'clock p. m.

C. V. Roberts, Commander.
L. T. Craft, Adjutant.

ORDER OF EASTERN STAR
Ocala Chapter No. 29, O. E. S.,
meets at the Masonic hall the second
i.nd fourth Thursday evening of each
month at 8 o'clock.
Mrs. Julie Weihe, W. M.
Mrs. Susan Cook, Secretary.

IARION-DUNN MASONIC LODGE
Marion-Dunn Lodge No. 19, F. & A.
M., meets on the first and third
Thursday evenings of each month at
7:30 o'clock until further notice.
A. C. Blowers, W. M.
B. L. Adams, Secretary.

LOST Short gold vest chain with
locket, engraved "From Babe" on
one side, "1906" on the other. Much
worn. Reward if brought to Weihe
Company, the Ocala Jewelers. 30-3t

WANTED Live man to work in
Ocala; good proposition. Call at
Florida House between 7 and 8 p.
m. Ask for Mr. Davis. 30-3t

FOR SALE Five acre lot on lake, a
small bungalow and barn, also large
town lot, cheap. Box 13, Candler,
Fla. 29-2t

CHEAP FOR QUICK SALE Buick
four; Nl mechanical condition W.
B. Flewellen, Mcintosh, Fla. 27-6t

20t

1JEL.1 Visit X

Mrs. G. C. Shephard and two chil

dren have returned from Orlando,

wher they spent the past week with

Fashion Park clothes are made for
the man who cares. Guarantee Cloth Clothing;
ing; Clothing; & Shoe Co. Y. M. B. O. D. 17-tf

We keep the best Florida and West-

Mrs. Shephard's sister, Mrs. Frank ern Meats all the time, fresh and

Bourlay. Mrs. Shephard made the clean, jhagle Grocery and Meat Mar-

trip in her car.

,ket. Phone 74.

19-8t

OCALA LODGE NO. 286, B. P. O. E.
Ocala Lodge No. 286, Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, meets
the second and fourth Tuesday eve evenings
nings evenings of each month. Visiting breth

ren always welcome. Lodge rooms
upstairs over Troxler's and the Book
Sr op, 113 Main street.

A. A. Vandenbrock, E. R R-C.
C. R-C. Y. Miller Secretary.

FURNISHED APARTMENT FOR
RENT-Phone 182. 27-tf
WANTED A second hand Ford in
good condition. A car worn out not
wanted. Address "Ford," care the
Star. 27-3t

KNIGHTS TEMPLAR
Ocala Command-

ery Number 19,

Knights Templar, j

meets every sec second
ond second Friday night
in each month at
8 o'clock at the

Masonic Hall. A. L. Lucas, E. C.
B. L. Adams, Recorder.

ODD FELLOWS
Tulula Lodge No. 22, I. O. O. F.,
meets every Tuesday evening at eight
o'clock at the Odd Fellows hall in the
third story of the Gary block. A

warm welcome always extended to

Mr. and Mrs. George Batts and lit-' Hot Boston Baked Beans for Wed

tip rlnnahtpr Anitn loft tndar for nesday night's supper at Carter's

Smithville, Ga., for a visit with rela- bakery. 60-Zt

tives. It is hoped that, the change' warm welcome
will hp hpnefipml to thp health of Mr. : The members of Circles A and B of 1 visiting brothers

Rntts who hns not Wn rloino- so wpII the Baptist church were delightfully! E. E. Converse, N. G.

, n
lately. entertained yesterday afternoon by
, Mrs. J. E. Godwin and Mrs. F. E. Mc-

WANTED AN EXPERIENCED
STEAM SHOVEL OPERATOR
FOR MODEL 21 MARION MA MACHINE.
CHINE. MACHINE. MUST BE CAPABLE
OF TAKING CARE OF MA MACHINERY.
CHINERY. MACHINERY. ADDRESS T. S.
MATTHEWS, INTERLACHEN,
FLA. 29-6t

$50 REWARD Will pay this reward
for the return of three setters, two
males and one' female, lost some
days ago. One has black ears and

black face; two have small black
spot at root of tail. J. B. Christ,ei

at Chero-Cola
Ocala, Fla:

t Bottling Works,
27-tf

MlDDHPs: SIADK TO ORDER
MIKKUKO RESILVERED
Florida Glass and Novelty Works.
218 Riverside Avenue, Jacksonville,
Florida. tf

FOR RENT Two or three rooms fur furnished
nished furnished for light housekeeping.' Ap Apply
ply Apply 212 Orange Ave. 22-tf

PIIOISE 243

The Temperature Rises and Falls, but Our Prices
Are Always Low and Quality High
COOK'S MARKET and GROCERY
Watch for Our Delivery Hoys With Red Wheels

9

38

ICE CREAM
DELIVERED
At Your Home

Our delicious ice cream will be delivered anywhere in the city,
two quarts or more, packed, in bulk or in bricks, direct from the
creamery, to reach you in time for dinner or supper or entertain entertainment.
ment. entertainment. Bulk: One gallon, packed, $1.50, delivered; half-gallon, pack packed,
ed, packed, 90c. delivered; one quart, nnot packed, 50c. at creamery. Bricks:
Two or more quart bricks, packed, 60c. a quart, delivered; quart
brick, not packed, 50c. at Creamery.
Fresh Creamery Butter Daily
We are making butter daily. Try a pound. It can now be had at
the following stores and markets: Farmers Exchange Store, Main
Street Market, O. K. Teapot Grocery, Ollie Mordis and Pasteur &
llrcwn Market.
MARION COUNTY CREAMERY CO.
.Phone 94

In a good size field of starters, Clane at the home of the latter on
Judge Lee Futch distanced the bunch Eleventh street. This attractive home
on a guessing contest at the Eagle is ideally planned for entertaining
Grovery Saturday, and was awarded and tne afternoon spent there proved
a fine melon for his accuracy in guess- unusually pleasant. There were about
ing the weight of the big melon on twenty-six members present and the

display there for several days. ,aiternoon was spent in sewing, the
;latter part of the afternoon being
Don Key. "that good cigar." 19-10t;&iven over entirely to a social time,
jwhen refreshments were served by
Albert's Plant Food for flowers: 25c Miss Helen Killebrew, granddaugh-

and 50c. packages.
Pharmacy.

Sold at the Court ter rs- McClane, and Miss Katie

18-tf Lee-

Sliced Wilson and Swift Hams at" "Gifts that Last" for graduates:
the Eagle Grocery and Meat Market, j Bracelets, Watches, Bar Pins, Cameos,
Phone 74 19-8t Pearls and many other things, at The
! : i BOOK SHOP. 30-3t

Frank G. Churchill, Secretary-

WOODMEN OF THE WORLD
Fort King Camp No. 14 -'leets at
K. of P. hall every second Friday
evening at eight o'clock. Visit Visiting
ing Visiting sovereigns are always welcome.
P. W. Whiteiides, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage, Clerk.

FOR SALE Three SEWING MA MACHINES
CHINES MACHINES and other slightly used
FURNITURE. See Max Fishel
Tuesdays to Fridays. 22-12t

BOX LABELS We are equipped for
furnishing the fruit and vegetable
growers wi.h box labels in one or
more cole; of ink at reasonable
prices cn short notice. Star Pub Publishing
lishing Publishing Co. Ocala, Fla. 22-tf

Mr. and Mrs. William Wolfe and

dauo-htpr. Miss Rose Wolfe, left ves-' Mr- and Mrs- G- S- Scott Mr- and

terday in their car for their new!Mrs- John Taylor, Dr. and Mrs. H.
home in Columbus, Ga. For many!W- Henry Miss Mamie Taylor and
years the Wolfe family have madeiMr- Ben Rneinauer left yesterday for
Ocala their home and it is with regret !Los Angeles, to attend the national

that their friends learn- thev have notary convention

moved away.

Mr. and Mrs. Donald Dyrenforth
and two children, who have been
spending the winter at Indian Rocks
with Mr. Dyrenforth's mother, arriv-

fi'cd in town this afternoon to visit

Mrs. Dyrenforth's aunt, Mrs. Geo. K.
Williams, after which they will go to
Jacksonville, where they will make
their home.

The
Windsor
Hotel

I JACKSONVILLE, FLA

IN the heart of the city, with
Hemming Park for a front
yard. Every modern conven convenience
ience convenience in each room. Dining
room service is second to none.
ROBERT M. MEYER,
Manager
J. E. KAVANAUGH
Proprietor

Mrs. L. T. Izlar asks the Star to
thank her friends for their kindnesses
to her during her recent long and
severe illness. She also wishes to ex express
press express her appreciation to the nurses
at the hospital and the physicians for
their professional and personal inter interest
est interest and attention to her during her
sickness.

Lady Fingers today
Bakery.

at Carter's
29-2t

Visit the Teapot Self Serve Grocery.
You'll like it. tf

Sweet milk at the Main Street Mar-

y ket. Phone 108. tf

a
ts
H
8
n
a

u

Don Rey. "that good cigar." 19-10t
Have you ever tried telling the
absolute truth for twenty-four hours?
See the senior class play, "Nothing
But the Truth," Friday night, June 2.
Prices, 50-75c.No reserve seats. Come
early. 30-2t

Mrs. H. C. Nichols was hostess
last night at the regular weekly meet meeting
ing meeting of the "A" Club.

PHONE

277

for messenger boys. Errands run, mes
sages and small packages delivered any anywhere
where anywhere in the city for 10 cents.

r

The Letter you care for
your eyes the betteT

0s 'your eyes will care fot

.w1 you.
DR. K. J. WEIHE,
Optometrist and Optician
Eyesight Specialist

Beautiful line of
WHITING'S

At THE BOOK SHOP

ARE YOU PARTICULAR

FROM A BUSINESS STANDPOINT GOOD PRINTING IS GOOD INVESTMENT

Would you
send out a
poorly
dressed
representative?

Your business
stationery is
your business
representative.

ARE YOU HARD
TO PLEASE?
i
Of course you are if you
are interested in getting
the best results from your
business.
Nothing will suit you ex except
cept except what is right in' every
detail. Then get your job
printing where they take a
pride in doing every detail
right.

CALL FHONEZNUMBER FIVE-ONE AND LET US TALK IT OVER
STAR PUBLISHING CO.

3

hThTiiThThIhThImTi



Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8 standalone no
fcla fda yes
!-- Ocala evening star ( Newspaper ) --
METS:mets OBJID UF00075908_06209
xmlns:METS http:www.loc.govMETS
xmlns:xlink http:www.w3.org1999xlink
xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance
xmlns:daitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss
xmlns:mods http:www.loc.govmodsv3
xmlns:sobekcm http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcm
xmlns:gml http:www.opengis.netgml
xmlns:lom http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcm_lom
xsi:schemaLocation
http:www.loc.govstandardsmetsmets.xsd
http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss.xsd
http:www.loc.govmodsv3mods-3-4.xsd
http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcmsobekcm.xsd
METS:metsHdr CREATEDATE 2014-07-31T18:23:08Z ID LASTMODDATE 2009-04-29T15:57:01Z RECORDSTATUS COMPLETE
METS:agent ROLE CREATOR TYPE ORGANIZATION
METS:name UF,University of Florida
OTHERTYPE SOFTWARE OTHER
Go UFDC FDA Preparation Tool
INDIVIDUAL
UFAD\renner
METS:dmdSec DMD1
METS:mdWrap MDTYPE MODS MIMETYPE textxml LABEL Metadata
METS:xmlData
mods:mods
mods:accessCondition This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
mods:genre authority marcgt newspaper
sobekcm newspaper
mods:identifier type OCLC 11319113
ALEPHBIBNUM 2052267
LCCN sn 84027621
sn 84027621
mods:language
mods:languageTerm text English
code iso639-2b eng
mods:location
mods:physicalLocation University of Florida
UF
mods:note dates or sequential designation Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
funding Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855
mods:originInfo
mods:publisher Porter & Harding
mods:place
mods:placeTerm marccountry flu
mods:dateIssued May 30, 1922
marc point start 1895
end 1943
mods:frequency Daily (except Sunday)
marcfrequency daily
normalized irregular
mods:recordInfo
mods:recordIdentifier source UF00075908_06209
mods:recordCreationDate 841027
mods:recordOrigin Imported from (OCLC)11319113
mods:recordContentSource University of Florida
marcorg NPU
FUG
OCLCQ
mods:languageOfCataloging
English
eng
mods:relatedItem original
mods:physicalDescription
mods:extent v. : ; 61 cm.
series
mods:part
mods:detail Enum2
mods:caption Issue 128
mods:number 128
Year
1922
1922
Month
May
5
Day
30
30
lccn 84027622
oclc 11319138
mods:titleInfo
mods:title Ocala weekly star
mods:subject SUBJ651_1 lcsh
mods:geographic Ocala (Fla.)
Newspapers
SUBJ651_2
Marion County (Fla.)
Newspapers
mods:hierarchicalGeographic
mods:country United States
mods:state Florida
mods:county Marion
mods:city Ocala
mods:nonSort The
Ocala evening star
uniform
Ocala Evening Star
alternative displayLabel Other title
Evening star
Star
mods:typeOfResource text
DMD2
OTHERMDTYPE SOBEKCM SobekCM Custom
sobekcm:procParam
sobekcm:Aggregation FDNL1
FDNLN
NDNP
sobekcm:MainThumbnail 0006thm.jpg
sobekcm:Wordmark UFPKY
NEH
CHRAM
sobekcm:bibDesc
sobekcm:BibID UF00075908
sobekcm:VID 06209
sobekcm:EncodingLevel #
sobekcm:Publisher
sobekcm:Name Porter & Harding
sobekcm:PlaceTerm Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
sobekcm:Source
sobekcm:statement UF University of Florida
sobekcm:SortDate 693595
sobekcm:serial
sobekcm:SerialHierarchy level 1 order 1922 1922
2 5 May
3 30 30
DMD3
GML Geographic Markup Language
gml:FeatureCollection
gml:featureMember
gml:Point label Place of Publication
gml:Coordinates 29.187778,-82.130556
METS:amdSec
METS:digiprovMD DIGIPROV1
DAITSS Archiving Information
daitss:daitss
daitss:AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT PROJECT UFDC
METS:techMD TECH1
File Technical Details
sobekcm:FileInfo
METS:fileSec
METS:fileGrp USE reference
METS:file GROUPID G1 JP21 imagejp2 CHECKSUM 2ef0875c67b80695fc429519f4ae0780 CHECKSUMTYPE MD5 SIZE 6103241
METS:FLocat LOCTYPE OTHERLOCTYPE SYSTEM xlink:href 0541.jp2
G2 JP22 fe6d347a7aad2c4c2f5285479fe4e2b9 6147182
0542.jp2
G3 JP23 ac3336f5ca14c8c3af85515538157f33 6146441
0543.jp2
G4 JP24 9400dae84b0106c548ca4db793f04661 6166462
0544.jp2
archive
TIF1 imagetiff 450d5851b9beca5f86f12bf9b41415ff 48816803
0541.tif
TIF2 479e7a48137bde6dacea932a13b7ed52 49168359
0542.tif
TIF3 1708591fb2ad7852c45982ae6088c03d 49154133
0543.tif
TIF4 70eaf7ba891793c89d941b73b14bdc48 49306223
0544.tif
TXT1 textplain 1d98d508a23761dac6b9c13e49d53410 25655
0541.txt
TXT2 5249cc3a302387b433c42b443ff99cf8 19029
0542.txt
TXT3 bfc760c8fde10c201e3cf4d57a1c2164 22319
0543.txt
TXT4 8c6d9931860ef64cbc2bcfa5492c2927 14879
0544.txt
ALTO1 unknownx-alto acd6fc9fc4a400e5b194c2363f2eba25 771466
0541.alto
ALTO2 b4fb79295b03c0eb3a133843278b5bb3 589392
0542.alto
ALTO3 8fb713cbd4d82c2359e1d072caf627ea 671158
0543.alto
ALTO4 eaf8472b7e0c89084ce0cde6d847a614 481746
0544.alto
METS1 unknownx-mets 943681a2b6317b8ebedc320b22a195ea 9737
UF00075908_06209.mets
METS:structMap STRUCT1 physical
METS:div DMDID ADMID The ORDER 0 main
PDIV1 Main
PAGE1 Page
METS:fptr FILEID
PAGE2
PAGE3
PAGE4 4
STRUCT2 other
ODIV1
FILES1