The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:06054

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
I.
WEATHEIR FO RECAST Fair tonight and Wednesday; light frost in interior of north portion tonight.
TEMPERATURES This afternoon, 39; this morning, 59.
VOL 21
OGALA, FLORIDA, TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 29,1921
NO. 2S0
CHEERFUL OUTLOOK FITZGERALD FilT BY
FOR THE CHINESE DISASTROUS FIRE
RAID Oil A SOAP
BARON'S RESIDENCE
SOLDIER'S
TEH DAYS STRIKE
. EIIDS III TAMPA
STORM STACKED UP.
Oil ANOTHER STU!
BURDEII TOO HEAVY

Representatives of the Other Powers
y Disposed to Concede Their Full
Territorial Rights

Washington, Nov. 29. (Associated
Press) The scheduled meeting to today
day today of the big five naval experts, the
first general meeting held by the
naval men, for nearly a; week, was
postponed until tomorrow at the re request
quest request of one of -the delegations. No
official statement as to ihe reason for
postponement or 'the delegation mak making
ing making the request was given.
CONTINUANCE OF CONFERENCE
President Harding's saggestion for
continuing the conference of nations
it expected by administration officials
to become the subject of formal dis discussion
cussion discussion "before the present conference
ends. ; '.
TALKING ABOUT WITHDRAWAL
OF TROOPS
The nine powers in conference on
Pacific and far eastern questions to today
day today adopted resolutions providing for
relinquishment of ; foreign extra ter territorial
ritorial territorial rights in China. After adop adoption
tion adoption of the resolution, the delegates
continued discussion of Chinese re requests
quests requests for withdrawal of foreign
troops. ,-
PERMANENT TARIFF BILL
Chairman Penrose, of the Senate fi finance
nance finance v committee, announced "today
that hearings on the permanent -tariff
bill would be resumed Dec. 7th. The
tobacco schedule will be taken up first
and the cotton 'schedule next.
INVESTIGATE MORSE
The government is preparing to lay
before the federal grand jury here-
Dee. 8th, the results of its investigaA
tion in connection with certain traifs
7
actions between Lharies W. Mcrse
and the shipping board.
CENTRA URO S"UNK
ately Lost atw
fit T in
Medi
terranean Storm
AHiociatMl Press)
London, Nov." 29. The Ltalian de
atroyer Centra Uro founde ted in the
Mediterranean off Odalia, during a
storm. The loss u life is piot known.
BIG FOOTBALL GAME 00
BE PLAYED IN SAN DIEGO
' (Associated Pre as)
Danville, Nov. 29. Th Centre Col College
lege College football eleven will play a game
at San Diego, "Calif., latej next month
against either Leland Stanford, the
University of Southern: (California or
Washington. State, it wals announced
today.
STATE ROAD NUMBER FIVE
, OPENED T3 TRAFFIC
; (Associated Press)
Tampa, Nov. 29. The c ounty com commissioners
missioners commissioners announced toda- j that state
road No. 5, Renown also i s the Lutz
road, will be completely paved some
time tomorrow and be opefried to traf
fics Thursday. The payiritg material
used is asphalt block.
RIALTO DEATH LIST
LENGTHENED TO SIX
(Associated Press
i
New Haven, Nov. 29. (There were
two more deaths today as a result of
the Rialto theater fire he
e Sunday
night, bringing the total o six, the
coroner having eliminated! the name
of one man who was a Ivictim of
heart disease.
BIG PRICES PAID
FOR LIBERTTY BONDS
(Associated Press.
New York, Nov. 29. SeVen of the
liberty bond jssues soared tto new high
records for the year todai', the first
fours increasing one dollar per hun-
fied.
. Smoke Don Rey. That glood cigar.
Overland 90, five passenger; good
tires, top, upholstering f and paint;
?S50. Terms-. Bpencer-Ffedrick Motor
Co. Phone 8, city. 1 5-tf
Smoke Don Rey. Thatf good cigar.

Big Blaze this Morning in Business
Center of an Enterprising
Georgia Town

Associated Pres)
Fitzgerald, Ga., Nov. 29. One-half
of the 100 block in the-main business
section of Fitzgerald was practically
wiped out by fire this morning, with
a losos of about $300,000. Only a
small paA was covered by. insurance.
MISS .CLARK SUBJECl TO.
FITS OF MELANCHOLY
SHev Wanted Envelopes and Stamps To
Match, West Palm Beach
-' Postmaster Says '
: f Associated Press)
Orlando, Nov. 29. G. r L. Smith,
assistant postmaster at West Palm
"Beach, was tke first witness to be put
on the stand today by the defense in
the Clark trial. Smith testified to the
erratic conduct of the defendant, who
he said was subject tosfits of melan melancholy
choly melancholy after? the death of her. brother.
One of her peculiarities, he said, was
her fascination for the blending of
colors. She would often put a 50-cent
stamp on a letter to make the color of
the stamp blend with the envelope.
.Officials believe testimony will be
concluded by tomorrow and argument
begun ,not later, than Wednesday.
ROTARY BANQUET FOR
POSTCARD VISITORS
The crowning feature of Ocala's
program of entertainment for the
postcard visitors from the middle west
took place last night at seven o'clock
at the Masonic shall when the Rotary
Club gave a banquet for the guests
and the varjous local committees in interested
terested interested in their entertainment.
The banquet was served by the la ladies
dies ladies of the Presbyterian church and
will be remembered by all present as
one of the best prepared apd best J
served turkey dinners ever eaten. The
menu consisted of fruit cocktail, tur turkey
key turkey and dressing, creamed potatoes,
celery hearts lettuce salad, bread,
butter, angel food cake and ice tea
followed by coffee. The banquet was
served at six tables, with ten at each
table. A color scheme of pink was
carried out with pink roses and pink
love vine. Each table had a bud'vase
of ross entwined with love vine.
President Harry Borland of the
Rotary Club let not a moment -pass
J V 1 A. At. A. A. 11 1
cuirmg me Danquet inai was not lineu
with some entertainment, foolish or
otherwise. Mr. Lester Lucas, Mrs.
H. M. Hampton and Mrs. Philip G.
Murphy sang songs during the eve evening.
ning. evening. The famous Gerig brothers
rendered several negro song selections
and Mr. A. E. Gerig soloed one num number
ber number of his own.
Mr. Jake Gerig conducted a very-
amusing class in school, having as his
pupils Miss Virginia (Pat) Hall, Mrs.
C. W. Moremen, Mr. Bill Wngate,
Mr. Rose, Mr. A. E. Gerig an(J Mike
Knight. Miss' Virginia HalL one pf
the visitors, claimed a particular an
tipathy to speaking in public and it
seemed that Mr Borland picked on
her, especially. The pews .leaked out
that she is called 'Pat" by her friends
because she orates as well as Patrick
Henry ever di4 when in Wa prime,
"Grandfather" Ben Rbeinauer, so
celled because one of the visiting
scouts said he looked like his grand,
father, was called on for a talk on
his trip to Indianapolis, but he begged
off because he was afraid that the
visitors from that place nyght expose
any error he made..
Each of the visitors was called on
for a talk and each expressed herself
as having a good time in Ocala and
wishing for more time to enjoy her
hospitality.
After singing Rotary songs and
erdine up with a grand march and
general hand shaking reception, the j
crowd dispersed, leaving the visitors 1
with a few hours time to rest before
taking the midnight train for Jack Jacksonville.
sonville. Jacksonville. Overland 83. five passenger; good
tires, top and upholstering, $250.
Terms. Spencer-Pedrick Motor Co.,
phone 8, city. 1 J5-tf
X L - '
Get your galax leaves at THE
BOOK SHOP, 20c. per dozen, 28-3t

Desperadoes Entered Home of W. C. j LieuU-Colonel Whittlesey, Who Com Com-Proctor
Proctor Com-Proctor and Carried Off Jewelry j mandextthe Famous "Lost Bat-

Worth More than a Hundred
Thousand Dollars
, I Associated Press)
Cincinnati, Nov. 29. Fu rarmed
robbers early today raided the resi residence
dence residence of William Cooper Proctor,
president of the Proctor & Gamble
Company, in Glendale, a suburb of
Cincinnati. They forced three wom women
en women members of the household, who
were alone in the house, to become
prisoners in the cellar, then ransack ransacked
ed ransacked the home, escaping with jewelry
aiued, the police said, at more than
$100,000.
IT STIRS THEM UP
(Associated Pre-?) r
Chicago, Nov. 29. Virgil G. Hin Hin-shaw,
shaw, Hin-shaw, chairman of the prohibition
party, called today for vigilance com committees
mittees committees to "arise ail over the country
to co-operate with the enforcement
officials." Mr. Flinshaw sounded this
note in opening & national prohibition
conference and meeting of the prohi prohibition
bition prohibition national committee.
"We fare a new opportunity, an
opportunity to enforce the law that
now exists,' 'the prohibition chairman
told the conference. "This is our job.
"If we cannot get the administra administration
tion administration now in power to lead the way we
shall have to elect one that will.
"One of the disappointing things
about our presidtnt is that he has
made no public appeal to the nation!
to uphold the 13th amendment, and
he appointed a secretary of treasury
conspicuously known as pro-booze.
"However, the American people
must take things into their own
hands."
Mr. Hinshaw, who has just returned
from Europe, added that its nations
were being flooded with pro-liquor
propaganda from America. "Brewers
and distillers abroad are fighting by
use of the press as though on their
last legs,'Vhe said.
LOST LIST OF WITNESSES
YET TO BE HEARD
l
I-
(Associated Press)
San Francisco, Nov. 29. Rebuttal
testimony 'began at the reopening of
the Arbuckle manslaughter trial this
morning. The district attorney's of office,
fice, office, after a conference with all en
gaged in the prosecution, announced
that ab0ut forty witnesses would be
1
hear(j
I i
There's noxtra charge for clean cleaning
ing cleaning your fish at the' City Fish Market.
Phone 158. tf

To Our Delinquent,
Subscribers

Our subscription list has not
had the attention that it should
have had for the past few months,
and as a consequence quite a few
subscribers are in arrears with their
account. These have either been
mailed a statement of, the account
or served with a personal notice of
their arrearages. Unless past due
accounts are settled within a short
time the paper willlje discontinue.
Newspapers, like other lines of busi business,
ness, business, cannot carry accounts inde
initely without attention. Nuff'sed.

talion,- Probably Took
His Own Life

(Associated Press)
jew York, Nov. 29. Secret brood brooding
ing brooding over memories of his experiences
in the war from which he emerged
one of America's greatest individual
heroes, is ascribed today by friends
and relatives of Lieutenant Colonel
Charles W. Whittlesey as the cause
of his taking his life Sunday while
en route to Havana. Leaving sev sev-eiaj,
eiaj, sev-eiaj, letters, presumably explaining
the act, the commander of the "Lost
Battal'on" disappeared from the
steamship Tolea 24 hours out of New
York.
COLLECTED BUT LITTLE
CASH AT ST. CLOUD
Robbers in That Town Found a Scanty
Store of Rubles
. j
V (Associated Press)
St! Cloud. Nov. 29. Robbers blew
the safe in the express office here last
night. It is not known what the loss
was but it is believed to be about $200
in cash. Several thousand dollars in
checks and currency in the safe was
overlooked:
ARMORED CAR FOR
A TAMPA BANK
Tampa, Nov. 28. People of Tampa
will shortly have to accustom them themselves
selves themselves to the sight of an armored car
proceeding sedately through' the city
streets.
This car," which is being built Jiere
for the Citizens-American Bank and
Trust Company, will be used for
transporting payroll money from the
bank to the several large cigar ac ac-torieswhich
torieswhich ac-torieswhich are customers of the in institution.
stitution. institution. A crew of three men will
ma nthe truck two of them on the
inside of the steel shell, the third in
the driver's seat. .There will be five
"portholes" in the armor, all of them
closing from the inside of the car.
jOne will be at the front, two at each
side. The guards will be, armed with
s: .wed-off shotguns and pistols.
While there has been but one at attempted
tempted attempted holdup of a payroll messen messenger
ger messenger in this city, ard that unsuccess unsuccessful.,
ful., unsuccessful., attempts in other cities have been
frequent and the bauk decided an
armored car would at least be a good
advertisement for it, and decidedly a
damper on the enthusiasm of bandits.
Some of the factories here have pay payrolls
rolls payrolls of more than $30,000 a week.
Smoke Don Rey. That good cigar.

Some Employers Made Concessions
And Some of the Strikers
Wouldn't Stick

' (Associated Press j
Tampa, Nov. 29. The ten days'
strike of union employes in the cigar
industry here which affected 12,000
workers, was called off today by union
officials. Union leaders said they
called the strike off because about
3000 men refused to remain on strike,
and the manufacturers refused to
grant the workers' demands.
ARCHBISHOP CURLEYS
ARRIVAL IN BALTIMORE
(Associated Press)
Baltimore, Nov. 29. Archbishop Archbishop-elect
elect Archbishop-elect Michael J. Curley will arrive in
Baltimore today and tomorrow morn morning
ing morning will be installed as head of the
arch diocese of Baltimore. Members
of the Catholic parishes of Baltimore
and vicinity and delegations from
Washington and various places in
Maryland will line the roue of the new
archbishop's drive from the railroad
station to the arch Episcopal resi residence.
dence. residence. Choirs of children stationed at
intervals along the may will sing
hymns and songs of welcome.
BATTLESHIP NO LONGER
THE NAVY'S BACKBONE
"Waterbury, Conn., Nov. 29. The
battleship is no longer the backbone
of the navy, declared Vice Admiral
William S Sims, president of the
Naval War College, speaking Tiere
ast night. "The battleship has no
defense against airplanes and no of
fensive power against airplane car carriers
riers carriers which have speed enough to keep
away," he declared.
"I heartily approve of the disarm
ament program, because if the tre
mendous cost of the 1916 building pro program
gram program is saved and a small portion of
the money is expended on airplane
carriers the defensive strength of the
navy will be greatly increased."
RIGOR OF LIFE IN RUSSIA
(Associated Press)
Riga, aLtivia, Oct. 11. (By the
Associated Press). After several
years of censored silence, letters are
erican, English and Russian people of
erican, English and Russion people of
g?ntle birth who remained and sur survived
vived survived the great experiment in human
lives in communistic Russia. These
tell in an impressive way what the
mere task of keeping alive has meant
to these persons accustomed, before
the revolution, to lives of luxury.
Here is an extract from a letter
written by an American woman, 83
years old, from Petrograd.
MIn three years, I have not heard
from any of my friends, the dearest
have in the world. They must be
greaUy astonished at my having 'so
far survived all these horrors, at ray
years, when thousands ol younger
people are dairy dying of starvation
and untold hardships.
"It was most kind and thoughtful
of you to send that money, I only
hope it may arrive. For of course,
although i work seven to eight hours
a day (official translation work, com
parativeiy wen paidj the economic
conditions are so monstrous that it is
impossible to earn anywhere near
enough for the very barest' necessities
of life. No wonder when butter and
sugar are 25,000 rubles a pound.
"Therefore, what I need more even
than money is food the plainest ar
tides of food. These three years 1
and my faithful companion, for many
years my maid, but for whom I should
certainly not be living today, have
subsisted on black ryebread and wa
ter porridge and gruels, drinking our
so-called 'tea' and 'coffee' (sorry
surrogates) without milk and sugar,
with black bread, well salted. We
have forgotten what wheat bread is
like, and as for eggs, I should like to
see one before I die.
"Now the assistance I would crave
of you is simply this: From time to
time send me food. We have not seen
meat for three years, and for pity's
sake, send sweets, but most especially
candy and chocolates. Do not laugh
at me, just imagine, three years with
out sugar or anything sweet. The
longing for sweets at times becomes
absolutely morbid.'

People of New England Reparing the
Damage Caused by the First
Blizzard of the Winter

(Associated Press)
Boston, Nov. 29. New England is
recovering today from the damage
and confusion as a result of storms
of the last two days. While efforts
were being made to restore the light lighting,
ing, lighting, communication and transporta transportation
tion transportation services, a new storm of hail set
in in eastern Masachusetts. The
weather turned cold again and the icy
btirdenhat prostrated the wires,
poles and limbs of trees increased.
PACIFIC PEOPLES
According to Their Union Conference,
Can be Allied Only By
Education
(Associated Press)
San Francisco, Nov. 29. Education
'alone will bind together the peoples
M me i-acmc, it was aecided at a
series of conferences held recently
under the auspices of the Pan Pacific
Union in Honolulu, the cross roads
of the Pacific, according to Alexander
Iume Ford, secrstary-director of the
union. .Leading stientists, educators
and editors of Pacific lands attended
the meetings.
Summing up the work of the con
ference, Mr. Ford, while here recent-
y, said it was decided that. the press
was the surest medium of educating
the peoples of the Pacific as to each
other's true aims and ambitions and
in bringing 'them into better under understanding.
standing. understanding. Through the Pan Pacific Union,
which is now supported by all the
governments about the greatest of
oceans, the scientists are arranging
to study 'the scientific problems of.
the Pacific and to seek their proper
solutions," Mr. Ford said. "Already
they have found the remedy for lep
rosy, which is now being wiped out.
hey are taking up the study .of fish
bod supply of the Pacific with the
fsurance that with scientific propa
gation and protection of fish in Pa-
ific waters the Pacific ocean will
upply sufficient fish food, preserved.
to feed the world. The problem of
saturation, or the knowledge of just
how many people a country may nat
urally support, is to be taken up by
the Pan Pacific Union and a confer conference
ence conference will be called to discuss the sub
ject. Two-thirds of the world s pop
ulation live adjacent to Pacific lands
and the immigration problem has be
come an acute one. Japan allows
but 1500 Chinese to migrate to her
shores annually and California does
not wish .this many Japanese, while
lawaii cries for thousands more
Oriental laborers for her sugar cane
fields.
"It has been pointed out by some
acific scientists that the United
States cannot support a population of
more than a quarter of a billion living
according to the standard of. the
Anglo Saxon, while she might easily
support a billion population living ac according
cording according to the standard of the Japa
nese and twice as many if the Chi Chinese
nese Chinese standard of living is adopted.
Science steps in and says that per
haps means may be found to make
the soil twice as productive as it is at
present, which would, of course, solve
the Japanese "immigration problem
for another generation and banish
famine and starvation from China for
some time to come. They point out
that Java, with a population of six
millions a century ago, suffered from
famine and over-population. The
Dutch stepped in with scientific meth methods
ods methods of agriculture, witb the result
that today Java, with a population of
thirty-six millions, is threatened with
a serious shortage" of labor.
"These .are some of the problems
discussed at the Pan Pacific Union
conferences. The heads of all Paci
fic countries are officers of the .union
and it is even "hoped that next sum
mer a conference may be held in
Honolulu of the presidents and pre
miers of Pacific lands.
"A Pan Pacific school of journalism,
located "at the ocean's cross roads, is
one of the recommendations of the
press congress and this may be es established
tablished established to train men of all langu languages
ages languages of the ocean in modern newspa newspaper
per newspaper methods."

CAFE ---DIN
NER 75 CENTS
ALWAYS) EAT

AT DAVIDSON'S UNION ST AT I O N



OCALA EVENING STAB, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1921

tola Evening Star
rsMlabed Every Day Exetft Sady by
STAB PUBLISHING COMPANY,
OCALA, FLORIDA
fl. K. Carroll, President
r. V. Vraisad, Sretry-Trerr
. HU BemjanLB, Editor

i
Entered at Oca la. Fla.. poatofflce as
aecood-claA-s matter.
TELEPB05E8
ftulidui Oflrt ....... '.Flve-OM
aMlrfal Dcpartmcat Two-Sti
SMitety Reporter Itrf-Oae
MEMBER ASOCIJffiai PRESS
Ttie Associated Press Is exclusively
entitled for the ue for repu blica-ti an of
sot -otherwise credited in this paper and ;
also the local news published herein.
All rtarhts of republication of special
dispntches herein are also reserved.
DOMESTIC SUBSCRIPTION RATES
One year, tn advance ...$8.00
Six laxmths. in advance 3.00
ThTe months, in advance 1.50
One month, is advance .60
ADVERTISING RATES
Dlleplayi Plate 15 cents per lncn for
jonaecutive insertions. Alternate lnaer lnaer-tlonu
tlonu lnaer-tlonu 25 per cent additional Compos!
tlon charges on ads. that run less than
six times 10 cents per inch. Special
position 25 per cent additional. Rater
cased on four-inch mixtinmrn. Less than
four Inches will take a higher rate,
whi:h will be furnished upon applica application.
tion. application. ,. t j
Wells hints at an alliance of Great
Britain and Germany against France.
We wonder if Wells ever heard of
Edith CavelL
They talk about. German influence
over Russia, but when the Russian
people come to their senses it won't
be Germany that will lead them.
Bryan has told Washington thai
Florida is decidedly wet. Thus we
are advertised by our loving friends.
Sanford Herald.
So far as our personal observation
extends, Bryan is a prevaricationist.
Recalling what Richard III did to
the princes we counsel him to avoid
butts of Malmsey. Miami Herald.
What princes were they, Friend
Herald We thought it was the Duke
of Clarence.
. The Jacksonville Metropolis cruelly
says : "The postoffice department an announces
nounces announces that marines will not even be
reprimanded for shooting hoboes.
And the public generally wouldn't
raises a howl if the marines practiced
on the chocolate soldiers who infest
city street corners.".
, The Gainesville News is evidently
not a pacifist. It says: "It is well
to remember that it is the gun that
isn't loaded that always kills people.
IfoAII 111 4-VtA nisi viswiAA.a BninMMl
' J- ...... v-' -t
'a gun is dangerous, even if it hasn't
t lock, stock or barrel.' Every boy
should be taught to handle, firearms,
and at the same time should be sharp sharply
ly sharply warned of their danger, and of the
necessity of constant caution while
handling them."
Says the always cheerful and en encouraging
couraging encouraging Times-Union Short Talks
of the Marion County Fair: "Ocala
was gay and lively all of last week,
for it was fair week, and the Marion
County Fair brought thousands to
enjoy the splendid displays and to
take part in the many diversions and
amusements, offered. Marion is one
of Florida's richest and best counties,
and her annual fair always brings in
Myftery, Romance,
Adventure, CharaQer
and Humor
The Girl
and a Dog
FRANCIS LYNDE
THE clever author of .The
Wreckers" and other great rail,
ro ad tales, has turned his atten attention
tion attention to a different theme. It is
of the West, matchless in its
expression of the out-of-doors,
with charming human types
and an absorbing and fascinat fascinat-,
, fascinat-, ing wealth of incident. The
search' for a lost mine is inter interwoven
woven interwoven with a most delightful
love story. Watch for it as a
serial in this publication. If not
a subscriber, become one now.
iYou Mull Not Miss It!

Horse

crowds, not only from all over the J

county, but from adjoining counties
and -all parts of the state. Among!
the varied attractions the races ap- j
industry and product of the county
seemed to' have been represented in
the splendid exhibits, and the fair
was voted one of the best and most
interesting ever held."
The Oklawaha Valley railroad has
adjusted its affairs with the Seaboard
and its trains are again running into
Ocala. Now, let our people give the
little road as much business as pos possible
sible possible and try and keep it in operation.
It isn't worth very muchfto Ocala at
present but in a few years, when
population increases along its line, it
will be worth a good deal. The mat matter
ter matter in hand is to keep it alive until it
can grow strong enough to keep it
self. We hope the new management
will inaugurate a schedule more fa fa-fcrable
fcrable fa-fcrable to Ocala. If, for instance, the
train that now arriveshere at noon,
or later, and turns around and starts
back to Talatka at 2:05 d. m.. would
wait for the A. C. L. southbound and
the two Seaboard limiteds, and leave)
for Palatka at 4:30, it would do riore
business and be a greater accommo accommodation
dation accommodation for the country people from
Orange Springs south who desire to
come to Ocala to trade and attend to
legal affairs at their county seat. The
only trains the O. V. connects with at
Palatka are also connected with by.
the A. C. L. or Seaboard, and in the
Star's opinion the local business is
much the more important. The union
station officials inform the Star that
very few people use the O. V. for
connection with either the East' Coast
or the A. C. L., but many people out
in the county, who now use cars,
would prefer the raijroad, particular particularly
ly particularly in bad weather, if they could have
enough time in Ocala to attend to
business. I
For the last few days there has
been a persistent rumor that all the
garages and gasoline stations in
Ocala were to be closed on Sundays
First it was to be by order of the
mayor,; and second the council' would
pass an ordinance to that effect. The
mayor says he has no such idea, let
alone intention, and two aldermen in
terviewed by the Star said no motion
to that effect had been brought before
the council. The Star thinks that if
the garage men could make an agree
ment among themselves by which one
garage and filling station would keep
open every Sunday and all the others
close, it would be desirable. 1 policy,
but it is foolish to talk about com compelling
pelling compelling them to close. Gasoline and
car repairs are among the necessities
of life and a law to cut them off from
the people any day in the week would
be disregarded.
A five-year-old American girl is for
a moment famous for having refused
tc kiss Foch. But what doth it profit
a girl if she win fame by refusing to
kiss a marshal of France only to be
spanked by her mother? Orlando
Sentinel.
Perhaps her mother should be
spanked. She should be if she tried
to make her little daughter kiss the
marshal Even a great general may
consider a kiss from a sweet little
girl a great favor. 1
Tax receipts s of the government
during the fiscal year, 1921, decreased
nearly a billion dollars as compared
with the previous year while the cost
of collection increased 32 cents for
each $100, according to the annual
report of the bureau of internal reve revenue.
nue. revenue. Collections by the bureau dur during
ing during the past fiscal year totalled
$4,595,000,765 against $5,407,580,251
for the fiscal year ended June 30, 1920,
a decrease of $812,579,486, or 15 per
cent.
,Whoinell brought H G. Wells over
here from England to exhaust his
fevered peg describing France at the
universal brotherhood conference?
Can't we go -into the backwoods and
lassoo some American reportorial
neophyte with less venom to acquaint
us with the situation at the confer conferencesome
encesome conferencesome reporter who is given
more to reporting facts and less to
dispensing editorial punk ? Charles
Leidy in Tampa Citizeju
Leidy has the right pig by the' ear.
Mayor Mitchell of St. Petersburg,
recalled at a recent election in that
city is a candidate for re-election.
Mr. Mitchell was in Ocala in 1916,
during the primary campaign, in
which he was a candidate, we think,
for governor. He did not impress our
people as being highly qualified for
any office.
The Ocala Star thinks that "next to
a miser's heart, the most soulless
thing in the world is a old biscuit."
Yes, the miser is too close to his
dough and the biscuit is too far from
its dough. Jacksonville Metropolis.
It isn't the distance from the dough
but the distance from the oven that
counts against the biscuit.

W HEN CONGRESS MET

IN WALL STREET
Some Uttle & nown Chapters in The
History of the United
State
BY O. P. AUSTIN
Statistician of the National City Bank
of New York
Just 131 years ago the Congress of
the United States was bidding adieu
to W&11 street, where it had associat associated
ed associated with the "money power" for a five five-year
year five-year period, returning temporarily to
its, scenes of former activity at Phil Philadelphia,
adelphia, Philadelphia, whence it was to finally re remove
move remove to the new capitol to be estab established
lished established on the Potomac.
Few of the thousands of people who
pass the historic spot at the corner
of Wall and Nassau streets, ; but a
few feet from the doors of the Na National
tional National City Bank of New York, are
mindful of the stirring events which
occurred during the five years in
which it was the abiding place of
Congress.
New York Eighth Capital
It was in 1785 that the Congress of
the Confederation, after a decade of
wandering in "search of a permanent
abiding place, established itself in the
modest old City Hall, which then
stood at the corner of Wall and Nas
sau streets. During the period of its
existence, which began at Philadel Philadelphia
phia Philadelphia in 1774, it had held sessions in no
less than seven different cities and
towns, thus making New York the
eighth capital of the United States,
while Washington becamei in it3 turn
the ninth capital.!
Kept on the Run
The peripatetic live which Congress
had led during the decade before set
tling down in New York had been in
large degree due to the necessity of
hurried moves to prevent the capital
and the Congress falling into -the
hands of the British.
The first movement from the origi
nal meeting place, Philadelphia, oc occurred
curred occurred in 1776, when the British were
preparing to move upon- that town,
and the December session of that
year, 1776, was held at Baltimore.
1 With the danger of an immediate
occupation of Philadelphia temporari temporarily
ly temporarily removed, however, the Congress
returned to that city in .March, 1777,
But with another movement 1 of the
British in that direction, it hastily re removed
moved removed to Lancaster, t Penn., where it
remained but for three days, remov removing
ing removing thence to New York on the oppo
site side of the Susquehanna, where
it spent all of that terrible winter in
which Washington was at Valley
Forge.'
Returns to Old Quarters j
On the evacuation of Philadelphia
bj the British in 1778, Congress' re returned
turned returned to its old quarters in that city,
remaining there until 1783. Owing
tc some misunderstandings with the
Philadelphia authorities, it removed
over night to Princeton, N. J. At
Princeton it completed its session and
there adopted a plan for the creation
of two permanent capital cities, one
to be located on the Potomac and the
other on the Delaware; the sessions
pending the construction of the proper
buildings at the new capitals to be
held alternately at Annapolis and
Trenton. 4
Lure of Great City
The session of 1783 was held at An Annapolis
napolis Annapolis and that of 1784 at Trenton,
where it appears that the lure of the
great city of New York, which had
then a population of 33,000, overturn overturned
ed overturned the double capital plan, and in
January, 1785, the Congress removed
to New York, where it was granted
the use of the City Hall.
All of the meetings up to this time
had, of course, occurred under the
articles of confederation, which, how however,
ever, however, had proven unsatisfactory, and
when the ninth state ratified the pro proposed
posed proposed constitution, in 1788, the Con Congress,
gress, Congress, then in session in New York,
hastily passed a measure! requiring
DANGER!
" Stop,
Look and
Listen
It is not
safe.to wait
any longer.
Give me
that suit or
overcoat order at once.
Don't let cold weather
catch you unprepared.
J. A. CHANDLER
120 S. Main SL, Upstairs
Thompson Building

1 1 hi
7 j
Jiff

VX A b IUC lVbC AVI U1C piT-SJUCUb, W

vided by the new constitution, should
occur on "the first Wednesday in Jan January,
uary, January, 1789, that the electoral votes
should be cast on "the first Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday in February, and that the presi president
dent president should be inaugurated, on "the
first Wednesday in March As it
happened that the first Wednesday in
March fell upon the fourth day, of
the month.the date "March 4th," as
the beginning of the term of the
president and Congress, was thus
permanently established. '
Inauguration is Delayed
With the limited facilities of com communication
munication communication and travel which charac characterized
terized characterized those days in which the tele telegraph,
graph, telegraph, the wireless, the railroad or
the flying machine had not yet been
dreamed of, the official report of the
election did not reach General Wash
ington at his home in Virginia until
April 14 1789, and because of the
time occupied by his journey thence
to New York, his actual inauguration
did not occur until April ; 30, 1789.
Meantime, the enterprising citizens of
New York, realizing that the dignity
of Congress and president under the
new constitution required more suit
able surroundings than those offered
by the old City Hall, had contributed
$32,500 for the improvement of that
building, and it was re-named Fed
eral Hall" and thus became the meet
ing place of the First Congress under
the constitution and the place in
which Washington took the oath of
office as the first president of the
United States.
Why Congress Moved
It was during the second session of
that first Congress under the new
constitution that the events occurred
which resulted in the departure of. the
Congress from New York and the
ertablishment of the permanent cap capitol
itol capitol of the nation at the spot now des designated
ignated designated as the District of Columbia
and the city of Washington. One of
the first important questions laid be before
fore before the Congress had been that of
the assumption by the government of
the existing debts of the Confedera Confederation
tion Confederation and those which the states had
created during the revolution. The
foreign debt amounted to $12,000,000,
the domestic debt of the Confedera Confederation
tion Confederation $42,000,000, while the debts of
the various states incurred during the
revolutionary war aggregated $26, $26,-000,000,
000,000, $26,-000,000, making the grand total of
$80,000,000, a sum which then sound
ed so large, no matter how small it
seems to us in these days in which we
count governmental appropriations in
terms of billions.
Hamilton's Three Proposals
The proposition submitted to the
Congress by Hamilton included:
First, the assumption of the foreign
debt of the Confederation; second, the
full payment had fallen far below on
its market value; and, third, the as assumption
sumption assumption by the government of the
debts incurred by the respective
states during the revolution. The
first proposition, for full payment of
the foreign debt met with no opposi opposition,
tion, opposition, and that for the payment of the
domestic debt was opposed by many
but received a majority vote.
Opposition is Aroused
The third proposition, that the gov government
ernment government of the United States should
assume the debts created by the re respective
spective respective states during the revolution revolutionary
ary revolutionary war was bitterly opposed and its
final settlement resulted incidentally
WE
Repair All Cars
Weld All Metals
Rebore Cylinder
Blocks
For Satisfaction Give Us a
' Trial.
WILLIAMS' GARAGE
Phone 597 Mgrs. Phone 408
DOOR H
SASH
Geo. MacKay I Co.
Ocala, Fla.
HARDWARE
HIGH GRADE PAINT
ssr-ncttrntfl' tr
LOCATION AND PHONE NOTICE
Dr. F. E. McClane is now located
m Commercial Bank building. OfS;e
phone 211 two rings; residence
phone 151. 15-tf
Flaconettes perfumery put op In
glass, with aluminum case no better
ever sold. To be bought only at the
Court Pharmacy. Phone 284. 16-t
For fresh meat call phone ICS. Main
Street Market. tf

ir the good-bye of Congress to Wall j
street. The opposition to payment by i
the government of the claims of the

respective states was bitteA and long
drawn out, much of the opposition
being based upon the assertion that j
the claims had been already bought j
up by speculators and that the as-j
sumption by Congress under that j
date would not be materially benefi-l
ficial to the states themselves. Most
of these claims were held m the north, j
and as a result, the members from
the northern states favored the prop
osition, while those 6f the South were J
almost solidly against it and succeed-
ed in temporarily defeating this feat-
ure of the measure. 1
'
nun ti nu otriiK-vi j
f
At this juncture, when the assump- I
tion of the debts of the states seemld 1
likely to fail, diplomacy got in its'fine
work. The questionas to the perma
nent location of the capital of the na
tion was then pending. ?$ew York,
Philadelphia and Baltimore wanted it.
So did" several other enterprising
cities and towns in the middle states!
and in Virginia. The South, which
was opposing the measure for th
payment of the claims of the states, i
was solidly in favor of the transfer 1
of the permanent seat of government j
to that section of the country. Hamil- j
ton favored the payment of the claims
of the states, Jefferson favored the
location of the camti at th. south.
and these, two experienced men,'put-
ting their heads together, worked out
a plan which was lajd before certain
of their colleagues at a dinner at the
home of Jefferson, where the details
were agreed upon. The next day, to
the astonishment of those not immed immediately
iately immediately participating in the agreement,
the hostility- of certain Southern!
members to the payment of the claims j
of the states "mysteriously disappear disappeared.
ed. disappeared. The bill for payment of these
claims was passed and & little later
the. measure establishing a permanent
seat of government on the Potomac
became a law, with a proviso that
Congress should remove to Philadel-'
phia before the date set for the next j
session, the first Monday in Decern-j
ber, 1790, and remain there until the ;
year 1800, by which time the dapitol
buildings and presidential residence
would be ready for occupancy. j
And this is howit happened tfeat
131 years ago Congress was tearfutiy
packing its belongings, at the corner
of Wall and Nassau streets preparaA
tory to the trip to Philadelphia, which
was then a matter of several days in instead
stead instead of a couple of hours as at pres-
nt.

amaB-BMaHHMMKBaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaBaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaat

n

4 SE-R VICE '.TRY

PHONE 74
Simmons' GARAGE

ARE YOU PARTICULAR
FROM A BUSINESS STANDPOINT GOOD PRINTING IS GX)D INVESTMENT
1

Would you
. send out a
poorly
. dressed
representative?
Your business
stationery is
your business,
representative.

CALL PHONE XUMBER FIVE-ONE ANJD LET US TALK IT OVER
l!lllll!llll!ll!linillllilinilllllllllll!l!!llllllll Illllllllillllllllillill!!! fcj

B STAR PT JBLIS1HING CO. 1

fliDIIH

Salt n illot, alrtady scaled, at the
City Fish Market. 24-tf

OCALA ELECTRIC
SHOE SHOP
A. G. PAPPAS, Prop
Phone 143
IF you have an old pair of shoes that
you think you cannot use.
And have decided to throw them away,
Kindly give US one trial well fix
.
them up in style 1
j And you can have them for the next
...
' Rainy Day.
For your .Soles Sake
Phone Us.
Our work is Walk About
Others' work Is Talk
At), lit.
OCALA,
?
'
.
- FLORIDA
1 trill hroal a TH Fovr nnrt
j n, (u
Grippe quicker than an tbmg
WC knOW.prCVCIlUng paCQClOnin
-
( tm p A JK W
7 UiiiAt
UNION-HADE
A newwrk parmeut so de-iii-td
that the drop-seat 'will not
fchow. Buttons are invisible
and plact-d so as cot to stick ia
wearer's back when lyiDgdown.
XONG wearing
COMFORT COVERALLS ar md
from lss tntnai and guaranteed
to wear tiuod art abrunk twforo
tb ganoenta ara mad op.
Insist oh "PA SAUA Brand
Kaha Mfg. Co Mobile. Ala.
To Malt
Good"
1111111111
.j
ARK YOU HARD
0 PLEASE?
Of opurse you are if you
are in
terested in getting
the best results from your
business.
Notiiing will suit you ex- e
cept v
hat is right in every 3
detail.
Then get your job
printing where they take a
pride
right.
tn doing every detail

m

iiiiiiiiniiiiiiii!



OCA LA EVENING STAB, TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 29. 1921

load Things to
EatJust In

PARTY FOR THE

POSTCARD PEOPLE'

California budded Walnuts
New Brazil Nuts,
Paper Shell Pecans,
: Imported Malaga Table Raisins.
Seeded Raw i as,
Seedless Rabins.
Citron, Orange and Lemon Peel

Pineapple and Assorted Fruits,
J Candied Cherries
Xlaniototo Brand Canned Rabbit,
Gurton's Ready to Fry Codfish,.
Manhattan Claw Chowder,
i.. Sunbeam Apple Juice,
Mott's Apple Cider,
Imported Anti Pasto,
- i Samp (Big1 Hominy)
' 1 Real French Peas,
Fyinan Haddie,
Dutch Herring, ;

Pearl Barley,
Pearl Tapico,
Graham Flour,
Whole Wheat Flour,
Plain Buckwheat Flour,

Roquefort Cheese,
Edam Cheese Imported,
New York State Cheese,5
Stero Bouillon Cubes,
'Kippered Herring,
Bell's Poultry Seasoning,
Split Peas, etc.

TEAPOBGROCERY
PIIQNES 16 and 174?

I can no crive you the
0c? ver atest, r up-to-date

most Vcareful

svxNvthe

, thoro service. -;
OR K. j. weihe;
i OfifomArist ijnd Optician,
, K vsi eht nwi all:

you
and

- Fifteen 'Years' Experience
EAT
at the
BIALTO : CAFE
Up-lo-Date Lunch Counter;
and Dining Room
OPEN D AY AND NIGpi
Sea Foods," Western
Meats, Delicatessen ;
1 and Vegetables.
American, French, Spanish and
i Italian Cooking
JOHN METfilE
, Proprietor ;
'108 South Magnolia St.

During their short stay here the

postcard people were tendered several

delightful social affairs. Among those
that will be a delightful memory to
them was the tea that Mrs. Clarence

Camp gave in their honor at the

Ocala Country Clmb yesterday afternoon

Mrs. Camp and her daughter. Miss

Stella Camp, r informally met the
guests as they arrived. In the main
room upstairs the guests pleasantly
passed away the time with conversa conversation
tion conversation and music, while several couples
took advantage of the music" for
dancing.

The guests of honor arrived late,

having been taken to the springs as
soon as they arrived in town. The

dining room of the club house, where

tea was served, was cozy and attrac

tive with potted plants, while in the
center of each table was a big vase
of shaggy yellow chrysanthemums, j

Mrs. William Hocker and Mrs. Jack

Camp poured tea. Misses Stella and

Nettie Camp assisted Mrs. Camp dur

ing the afternoon.

The Star's New Serial
Starts Tomorrow

Be Sure to Read the Opening Chapter
of this Thrilling and Popular Story by the
Noted Author, Francis Ly nde

53 l kA

The guests, besides the guests of

honor., were three Boy Scouts and
Scout Master Cassil from the local

troop, a itumber of ladies and gentle

men who were asked to meet the vis visitors.1
itors.1 visitors.1 r I

The Ocala Country Club is one pt

the-beauty, spots of our city and tjie
gracious hospitality of Mr. and Mrs.
Clarence? Camp made this informal
tea one of the pleasant memories jof
the Sunny South' to the visitors ;

OCALA APPRECIATED f

v THE POSTCARD VISITORS

Day Phone7. Night Phone 515
! GEORGE MacKAY & CO.
Funeral Directors, Embalmers
G. B. Overton, Mgr.
Ocala. Fla. "..

L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CONTRACTOR
I ; AND BUILDER
Caref ul estimates made on all con contract
tract contract work. Gives more and better
work for the money than Any other
contractor in the city.

IMS SHE
Airrival and departure of passenger
trains at OCALA UNION STATION.
The following schedule figures pub

lished as 'information and not guar-;
anteed.
(Eastern Standard Time)
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILROAD
Leave Arrive
2:20 am Jacksonville-NTTork 2:10 am
1:55 pm v Jacksonville 1:50 pm
4:17 pm Jacksonville 3:50 pm
i Tampa Tampa-2:15
2:15 Tampa-2:15 am Manatee-St Petrsbrg 4:05 m
2:55 am N'York-St Petrsbrg 1:35 am
2:15 am Tampa 2:15 un
:50 pm Tampa-Manatee 1:35 pm
4:05 pm Tampa-St Petrsbrg 4:05 pm
ATLANTIC COAST LINE R.-R,
Lernve "V- Arrive
2:27 am Jacksonville-N'York 2:33 on
1:45 pm Jksonville-Gainsville 3:24 pm

6:4Zam J ksonviue-uansvuie wnapm
2:33 am St Petsbrg-Lakeland 2:27 am
3:24 pm St Petsbrg-Lakeland 1:25 pm
7:10 am Dunnellon-Wilcox
7:25 am Dttnellon-Lkeland 11:03 pm
3:30 pm Honiosassa 1:25 pm
10:15 pm Leesburg- 6:42 am
4:45 pm Gainesville 11:50 am
Monday, Wednesday, Friday.
"'Tuesday. Thursdav. Saturdav.

-

mm

til Xif J? i a ; fe jy.
V,, J JtZ-tf

Get your galax leaves at THE
BOOK SHOP, 20c. per dozen. 28-3t

The postcard visitors from the mid

west, who have been touring Florida
as" the guests of various cities, "had
a wonderful time" in Ocala yesterday

afternoon and" last nignt. The visitors j

Miss Harriet Dithmer, of Indianap

olis, queen; Miss i Virginia Hall, of

Indianapolis, first maid of hoonr;
Miss Charlotte Watchter, of Dayton,
second maid of honor; ;Kenneth R.
Davis, of Springfield, HL,Neil Robert Robertson,
son, Robertson, of Cattle Creek, Mich., William

R. Wingate, of Cleveland, Boy Scouts,
and Mrs. Joe J'Schmid, of Indianap Indianapolis,
olis, Indianapolis, chaperone, reached here several
hours behind their schedule j because
of a misunderstanding which resulted
in their taking the wrong., train out

of St. Petersburg, arriving here at

4:17 instead of 1:30. This cut into

Ocala V program and was- a keen dis

appointment to both the visitors and
to the organizations that' had plan planned
ned planned for their entertainment. As much
of the program as. possible, however,

was crowded 'into the few hours avail

able. The visitors were delighted
with Ocala and Ocala was delighted

with thenu

Upon their, arrival here the three
young ladies, the three scouts and
their chaperone. were met at the union

station by committees representing
the Woman's Club, the Rotary Club,
and the Board of Trade. The party

was taken in automobiles direct to

Silver f Springs, where there was "a

hurried view of these famous waters
thru the glass-bottomed boats. From
the springs the visitors were taken
to the Ocala Country Club, where
they had a' view of the golf links, now
most beautiful. Mrs. Clarence Camp
was the hostess at a delightful tea
given in the 'club house for the visi visitors.
tors. visitors. Then at seven o'clock in the
evening a dinner was given by the
Rotary Club. It was a turkey dinner
and delightfully served by the ladies
of the Presbyterian church. It was
one of -the liveliest affairs that the
Rotes have had and the' visitors ex expressed
pressed expressed themselves as having enjoyed
it immensely. Miss Dithmer, speak speaking
ing speaking for the members of her l party,
very gracefully expressed their ap appreciation
preciation appreciation of their visit here.
It has beeji originally planned that
the postcard party would arrive here
yesterday at 1:20 and leave this aft afternoon
ernoon afternoon at 1:45. The Woman's Club
had arranged a buffet luncheon at the

club house to be served immediately

upon the arrival of the train, and for

an automobile trip to the wild orange

groves near Citra; the Rotary Club
had planned the dinner for the eve

ning, and as guests of -the Marion

County Board of Trade the visitors
were to have been shown the city and

tcken to Silver Springs this morning,

when they would have had the full ef

fect of the reflection of the sunlight

thru the wonderfully clear waters.
When it was Teamed that the visit
here would be cut short, the Woman's

Club and the Board of Trade combin combined
ed combined their programs as best as "'was

possible, Mrs. Clarence Camp extend

ed a most hospitable invitation to the

tea at the Country Club and the
Rotary dinner was carried out as
scheduled.
The committees on arrangements
for the entertainment were: for the

Woman's Club, Mrs. Philip G. Mur Murphy,
phy, Murphy, chairman, Mrs. Frank Logan,
Mrs. H. ii Boorland and Mrs. Walter
Hood; for the Rotary Club, Albert
9

BOM a silver-spoon and soft-mattress existence, Stan Stan-3rd
3rd Stan-3rd Broughton suddenly is confronted with the alter alternative
native alternative of looking for a job or, another kind of quest, try
and locate a mysterious legacy left him by an eccentric
x grandfather.
, He does not know the characterof the property, but the
grandfather's directions say that it is somewhere between
the 105th and 110th degrees of longitude west from
Greenwich, and the 35th and 40th degrees north latitude.
; When he finds it he will be able to identify it by the"
! presence 'of a girl with brown hair and blue eyes, a small
mole on her left shoulder, a piebald horse and a cjag with
a split face half black and half white. He is game and
. he starts to look for the combination. The troubles he
has in locating it and the adventures and dangers through
vhich he passes in securing possession of the property,
. also the romantic incidents in which the girl is a figure,
make up this very fascinating narrative.
It is Mr. Lynde's habit to tell stories like this, and there
nre readers in multitudes who would be sorry to have
him depart from the custom.

j REALS IT AS A SERIAL IN THESE COLUMNS

Gerig, Ben Rheinauer and Carl Rose,
and for the Board of Trade, Frederick

R. Hocker, L. T. Izlar and Dr. C. W.
Moremeri,
The visitors left on the 2:10 train
this morning for Jacksonville. They
were accompanied to the train by
Secretary Chazal of the Board of
Trade.

1922 AUTOMOBILE
LICENSE INFORMATION

IN MEMORIAM

I will have in my office during the
entire month of December 1921, a spe special
cial special deputy to render information and
assist in filling out automobile license
applications. This service will be
free, to the people of this county and
will be tendered for the month of De December
cember December only. Anyone desiring infor

mation on the above is invited to calL
T. D. Lancaster Jr.,
Clerk Circuit Court.
Ocala. Florida. ll-22-4t-tues

Sacred to the memory of our dear
friend, Mrs. Susie M. Mitchell, who
died one year ago, November 29, 1920.
"One year ago you left us,

"It seems but yesterday
"When your smiles of cheer and words
of love
"Rang out so merrily."
As witnesses- we stand that your
wish was carried out that when your
last days on earth were ending, that
our redeemer would spare you long

grief and pain.
We know that God has taken you
home" with him, tut when we found
that you had left us, it nearly broke
our hearts.
We miss your kind and loving
hands, your loving friendship some somewhere
where somewhere beyond the pearly gates. We
bid vou watch anr wait. It may be

we are all nearer home. Yes, nearer

than we know or think.

Mrs. W. P. Parker and Family.

ADAMS & MMMM (PARAGE'
.
Magnetos Recharged Cars Washed and Polish cd
Repair Worlt, Accessories, Gasoline,
plls and Greases
i
Corner Oklawaha Ave. and Osceola St.
Telephone 584 Ocala, Florida

OCALA AUTO &' GARAGE CO.
Dealers

Fours
$1340

Delivered

Eights

Tires, Tubes and Accessories

Philadelphia Diamond Grid Batteries
See Our Used Car Bargains
v All Guaranteed as Represented

Phone 249

North Side ol Post OIIIcc Ocala, Florida

COOK'S MARKET and GROCERY
Everything Good To Eat
MEATS and GROCERIES, FRUITS and VEGETABLES
Phone - 243

At

. 'TEE WMPSOE MOTEL
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
In the heart of the city with Hemming Park for a front yard.
Every modern conyenience in each room. Dining room tervic l

second to uon

ROBERT MjMEYER,
' Manager.

J. E. KAVANAUGH
Proprietor.

rifS'ANSFE

4

FIRE
PROOF

6S8 is a prescription for Colds,

Fever and LaGrippe. It's the
most speedy remedy lve know.

W. K. v Lane, 31. D, pnyaician and
surgeon, specialist eye, ear, nose and
throat. Office over 5 and 10 eeM store,
Ocala, Fla. Adr-tf

'.taJHITE STAR LIP4E
;
Negotiable Storage Reeipta laaoed oa Cotton. Antojnobiiea, Etc

LONG DISTANCE MOVING
PHibnc.298

AOVE, PACK, snip
LIVE 'STOCK,
PIANOS. BAGGAGE,
MACHINERY,
FURNITURE, ETC

iR r

Star Ads are Business Builders. Phone 51



OCALA EVENING STAR, TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29. 1921

CLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEIENTS

FOR SALE -Ford, 1920, model. Used
in private family only. Price, $250.
Can be seen at Adams & Morrison
garage.
26-tf
FOR SALE; Ford roadster, aaiH;
bargain for cash. Apply to A. F.
Ingram, 815 Er Adams St. 25-6t
FpR RENT lve room apartment.
Apply to Jerry Burnett, Cot. Fort
King and 5. Magnolia, phone 73. tf
FOR SALE Ford worm drive truck
in excellent condition, equipped
with cord tires. A gocdL'buy. Apply
Chero-Cela Company 24-tf
LOST at basket ball game Saturday
night, black ribbon watch fob, hav
ing round medal with medical in
signia suspended from gold bar
. with world "Florida' 'on it. Return
to Herbert Freelander, at Ocala
high school. 28-3t
WANTEDrTok rent two sleeping
rooms and kitchen. 'Apply to J. H.
; Reeder, Star office. V 28t
WANTED-A middle aged woman to
act as companion for an elderly
lady from 9 a. m,to 3 p. m., in re return
turn return for room rent and other priv priv-ileves.
ileves. priv-ileves. Phone 568 between 7 and
9 in the evening. 28-6t
FOR RENT -Unfurnished rooms.
Apply 120 N. Sanchez. 28:tf
DRESSMAKING Mme. Thiebauac, a
French dress maker, 215 W. 5th
St specialist u in evening dresses
and lingerie. -Will be pleased to
-serve the ladies of Ocala in these
lines of work.
28-6t
1
FOR RENT Six room furnished
house, with use of piano (615 South
Sancheis St.) for $35 per month.
Apply to 615 S. Sanchez street, or
. write Mrs. F. Lytle, Stanton, Flor-
, ida. 24-6t
CORDREY'S Transfer is on the 40b
Jay and night. Moving household
furniture and baggage our special special-Nea.
Nea. special-Nea. Once tried, always used. "Phone
24. L. E. Cordrey, Prop. 16-lm
FOR SALE Florida JSurehead cab cabbage
bage cabbage and Big Boston lettuce plants,
25 cents per hundred, $2 per thou
s sand, if. o. b. Ocala. C. H. Cooner,
. 746 Wyomina stret, phone 389,
Ocala, Fla. 16-tf
MULES Ten pair fourv. year old
matched mules, will weigh 1100
pounds when grown; sound; price
three hundred and fifty to four hun
dred and fifty a pair. Anthony
Farmis, Anthony, Fla. 28-tf
- . M
SHOE REPAIRING Why discard
your old shoes when a small amount
of repairs will make them as 'good
- as new for all practical purposes ?
Work neatly executed on short no notice.
tice. notice. Only best material used. A.
B. Halsell, J2 West Ft. King Ave Ave-.nue.
.nue. Ave-.nue. 11-8-lm
FOR SALE Just received a carload
of cedar posts large and small.
Apply to Ray & Thomson yard, old
Converse lot at A. C. L. depot. 15-tf
BAXTER TRANSFER CO.-When in
need ,of any kind of hauling, give
us-a trial. Satisfaction guaranteed.
Charges reasonable. Phone 169 and
117. -v:; 28-tf
FOR SALE Home of seven' rooms,
pantry and bath room in fine 'loca 'location.
tion. 'location. All modern conveniences. Ga Garage
rage Garage for two cars. Terms if desired.
For further information call at
' Needham Bros', store, opposite Har Harrington
rington Harrington Hair hotel. 30-tf
HEMSTITCHING At Singer Sewing
Machine office, No. 2 Fort King
Ave. Mail orders returned same day
as received. 28-tf
FORD SEDAN'
A' Ford sedan, good mechanical
condition, first class almost new
tires; body and inside finish fair. A
bargain. R. R. Carroll, Ocala. Fla. 3t
NAPIER GRASS
Plant now and have abundance of
high value green feed for dairy cows,
pigs, chickens, etc For plants and
particualrs see F. W. Ditto. Ocala,
Fla. 17-tf
EATAT THE MAXINE
Best msals in the city for 50 cents.
Twenty-one meal ticket for $7. Phone
2604 310 N. Main street. tf
NOTICE
' Sinrer Sewing Machine office is
now located in the ( Burnett build building.
ing. building. V 28-6t
Ci:Wily-Tisin,astiseplic and pain
tiller for infected sores, tetter,
eprsiss, neuralgia, rhen'inatism

QCALA OCCUHREliCESl:

If you have any society items for
the Star, please call five-one.
After a pleasant visit to her par parents'
ents' parents' here, Miss Erin Broome has re returned
turned returned to school in Orlando.
Cake, candy and lancy work for
sale on the Ocala House porch at 10
o'clock Saturday, Dec. 3rd, by the
ladies of the Catholic church. 25-6t
We have on hand two seven-passenger
cars which we will sell at a
bargain. Needfiam Motor Co. 12-tf
Mrs. J. A: Mann of Winter Haven,
has returned home after a short visit
in Ocala, the guest of Mrs. J. C. La Lanier.
nier. Lanier. j if u t tit ii.
The friends of Mrs. F. E. Wether
, , . .
t, , , .
the hospital, will be glad to learn that
s"he is doin well "'"
--
,
Our several flavors of cup cakes
, ,
taice the worry off the housewife who
, ,. i. t
doesnt know what Kind of cakes to
x Vv,. Tr, ,
Smoke Don Rey. That good cigar.
t r m it. v v
Miss Jessie Pinson, one of the high
"
. .
Bkuuut iavuuj( 13 CAICVICU UUU1C 11U1U
DeLand, where she has been for some
weeks,' on account of the illness of
her mother.
Smoke Don Rey. That good cigar.
Mr. and Mrs. R. S. Hall returned
home yesterday from Greensboro, N.
C, where they went especially to at attend
tend attend the wedding of Mrs. Hall's sis sister.
ter. sister. ''.'"'. '' :
If ypuve ever eaten better bread
and drolls than we serve you, tell us
about it. Federal Bakery. 15-6t
Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Revels have re
turned home from an auto trip thru"
West Florida, as far as Pensacola.
They had a pleasant outing but are I
glad id be home again.
Test our delivery service when you
-vant FRESH meat. Just call phone
108., Main Street Markets tf
This Is a Studebaker year. tf
Mr. Wyatt Aiken, who has been in
the city : the" last two weeks, and made
many friends during his sojourn here,
left-yesterday for his home in South
Carolina. :
Best dinner in the state for 75c. Eat
and drink all you want. Union Station
Restaurant. 100 per cent sanitary.
Ask the hotel inspector. 22-tf
1 Are you looking for some "unusual
remembrances" to send to your
riends ? Circle No. 1 of the Presby
terian Auxiliary will have just what
you want in their JAPANESE GIFT
SHOP, which will open Dec. 6th,
across from Cam's Grocery. It
Call phone iUSwhen you want groc groceries
eries groceries in a hurry. Main Street Market.
Are you looking for some "unusual
remembrances to send to your
friends ? Circle No. 1 of the Presby
terian Auxiliary will have just what
you want in their JAPANESE GIFT
SHOP, which will bpen Dec. 6th,
across from Cam's Grocery. It
Your favorite odor of -perfumery
can be had in the famous French Fla
conettes at the-Court Pharmacy. -6t
Ask f or the new "sweet" Honeyboy
at the Federal Bakery. 15-6t
It is with regret that Ocala loses
the family of Mr. J. A. Winn, who
have been occupying the down stairs
apartment of Mrs. McDowell. Mrs.
Winn and children left yesterday, for
Memphis, where they will stay with
Mrs. Winn's mother- until after
Christmas. Mr. Winn will ke in At
lanta for some time. After, Christ
mas Mrs. Winn and children will join
Mr. Winn in Spartanburg, S. C,
here in the future they will make
their home. ;
One Ford roadster truck will be
sold cheap if sold at once. Needham
Motor Co. Phone 252. 26-tf
- This is a Studebaker year. tf
Mr. A. T. Thomas, yesterday eve evening,
ning, evening, had a painful accident that will
lay him up for a few days. A short
time after supper, he was going to
his office on the second floor of the
Holder .block, and seeing the door to
the elevator open supposed the lift
was in its proper place. But it was
one or two stories up, so when Mr.
Thomas stepped thru the door he had
an ugly fall, some eight feet, to the
floor of the basement. He did not at
first realize! how badly he was hurt,
and stood up and called for the eleva-

tor man, who summoned assistance.

Mr. Thomas' right ankle was dislo
cated and a small bone in his foot
broken. He is resting easy today and
his friends hope to soon see out
again. There is no accounting for
the way the elevator door was left
open.'
Flaconeftes is the .best perfumery
ever put up a big statement, but let
us prove it. Court Pharmacy. 16-6t
Flaconettes perfumery, all odors.
Phone 284. Court Pharmacy. 16-t
Mrs.5 Edmund Martin was hostess
last evening at the regular weekly
meeting of the A Club. Auction was
the game enjoyed during the evening.
; at which Mrs. H. C Nichols made the
highest score arid Miss Sara Dehon
the lowest, both being presented with
I pretty and appropriate prizes. Mrs.
;,. f , A, ,r
; Martin, assisted by her mother, Mrs.
' W. W. Harnss, served refreshments
: - ,
!consistinS frozen fruit salad, to-.
jmato. and brown bread sandwiches,
'and coffee. Those playing were Mrs.
TI ..." r. ,
; H. C. Nichols, Mrs. R. L. Anderson
L, ,c
iTr., Mrs. A. M... Withers, Miss Ava
, r, ... r t-
I Lee Edwards, Miss Hannay Ellis,
Miss Stella Camp, Miss Elizabeth Da Davis,
vis, Davis, Miss Mabel Meffert, Miss Sara
kDehon, Miss Mary Sheppard, Miss
Nettie Camp, Miss Margaret Lloyd,
. ,T t, ... ...
Mieo Moir Hnf aiH Mica I ollin Ilia
.uioj mai j auaavau, avaaoo value uia
sendaner. Miss Ethel Home and Miss
Dorothy Schreiber.
Try our layer cakes. They're just
like the realhome made ones you like
so well.1 Federal Bakery. 15-t
Apalachicola oysters every day, 70
cents a quart; $2.50 a gallon. City
Fish Market: Phone 158. tf
Auto owners can find blanks for li licence1
cence1 licence1 applications afmy. bank, the
offices of the county judge," clerk cir
cuit court, tax collectors or motor
club. After about the first of Decem December
ber December these will also have information
as to weights and rates on cars and
trucks.
This is a Studebaker year.
-tf

v. M

W:. FRANK'S

REGISTER AT THE'
BOARD OF TRADE

Are you sending visitors to the
Board of Trade to register? Urge all
to register. Following is a list of re recent
cent recent registrations:
E. D.Biechel, Miami; D. B. Rob Roberts,
erts, Roberts, Akron, O.; F. Griswold, Cleve Cleveland,
land, Cleveland, O.; William Feasington, Bijime,
Minn.; Mr. and -Mrs. G. Georgeff,
Pontiac, Mich.; Mr. and Mrs. E. D.
Fredenburg and three children, Ben
ton Harbor, Mich.; Mr. and Mrs. C.
Anderson, Benton Harbor, Mich.; Miss
Ij. P. Blow, Virginia Beach, -Va.; C.
Blow, Virginia Beach, Va.; Mr. and
Mrs. J. Middleton," Rochester, Ind.;
Mrs. Elaine; T. Eastman, Miss Dora
Eastman, Miss Florence Eastman,
Northampton, Mass.; Mr. and Mrs. A.
F. Bergstrom, Minneapolis, Minn.; J.
E. Griffin, Marshville, Ny C; Gust D.
Zimmerman, Miss Gertrude Zimmer Zimmerman,
man, Zimmerman, Edward Kolnigshef, J. C. Brant,
Niles. Mich.; W. Aiken, Washington;
Mr. and Mrs. Joe t Evans, Atlanta;
Albert H. Brooks Atlantic "City, N.
J.; .George W. McRory, Thomasville,
Ga.; Jas. R. Miller, Albertsville, Ala.;
M. M. Blessing, Boaz, Ala.; T. ..J.
Hines, Holstein, Neb.; J. D. Tynen,
Milwaukee, Wis.; J. L. McKay, Kene Kene-saw,
saw, Kene-saw, Neb. '
6CALA KNIGHTS WILL
- VISIT LEESBURG
Monday night there was a good
number of knights at the regular
weekly fraternal session of the K. of
P. "Nominations of officers were made
for the ensuing term. An invitation
was received from the Leesburg
lodge for the members of Castle Hall
No. 19 to visit their lodge and assist
in initiating some candidates in the
rank of Wight. It was decided that
the team should go, and in order that
they may "be ready for the work the
chancellor commander, requested the
captain of the team to have ft special
drill on Thursday night, Dec. 1st,' at
7:30 p. m. All members of the team
are urgently requested to be present
athis meeting.
1 .
This is a Studebaker year. tf

i) x

FRANK'S

The Fashion Center

- Earliest Buying
Makes Happiest Giving

CHRISTMAS is always a joy time, except to those who pnw,
crastinate, and have all their gifts to buy when the whole
world gets in a'hectic rush to do in the last minute the select selecting
ing selecting that might be soeasily and pleasantly done a couple of
weeks haead,
What a treasure house this store is today. How full of
new and beautiful things, and useful and comfort-giving
things. How cheerful and comfortable it is, before the holiday
rush begins. The stocks are so coipplete; the service is so
gratifying; there is no elbowing and pushing. Customers are.
not worried and salespeople are not tired out.
Early purchasers get the best of everything and what a
satisfaction it is, when you get near. to Christmas Day to
realize that all the shopping is done and all the gifts are ready
and wrapped for mail, and many are on their way.

Delightful weather, too, to
sides,

Save 25 on purchases you make now.

Before you make your purchases for the biggest holiday of
the whole year we invite you to inspect our useful holiday
gift selections. 1

FRANK'S "The

ROBINSON-VAN ZANT

A telegram was received yesterday Regular meeting night Thursday,
afternoon announcing the marriage December 1st, 7:30. Work in the third
o Miss Emma Van Zant to Mr. Ralph degree, B. L. Adams, Sec'y.
K. Robinson, in New York city, yes-
Urday at noon.- j NEW RESTAURANT
This announcement will be. received
with interest in Ocala, where both of Dinner 12 to 2, 60 cents; special
the contracting parties are well dinner Sundays, 75 cents. A la carte
known Mrs. Robinson Slaving spent service day and night. West side of
several winters with hr mother and public square.
sister at" South Lake Weir, and also tf DEWEY & LAWRENCE LAWRENCE-s?veral
s?veral LAWRENCE-s?veral month3 in Qcala. She. is an
attractive young woman and during Are you looking for some unusual
her stay she made f& number "of remembrances" to send to your
friends by whom she will be, pleasant- friends Circle No. 1 of the Presby-

ly remembered. Until recently she
has" been living" in New Jersey "with
her mother.
Mr. Robinson is the oldest son of
Mr, and Mrs. Geo. K. Robinson, of
this city. He was born here and
made Ocala his home until four years
ago. when he "went to Youngstown, O,
and during the war did his bit with
the United States Steel Corporation,
having been released from active serv
ice." For the past two years he has
been in Lorain, Ohio, where he holds
an excellent position with the Na National
tional National Tube Corporation.
After a short wedding trip Mr. and
Mrs. Robinson wifl return to, Lorain,
where they will in the future make
their home.
The weeding came asva complete
surprise to their Ocala friends, who
extend their heartiest-good wishes
and congratulations and look forward
to the time when Mr. and Mrs. Robin Robinson
son Robinson will come to Ocala.
Here's your opportunity to furnish
your entire home. Until January 1
we will sell any item jri"our store at
greatly reduced prices for cash.
Theus Brothers. Pi.one 19. 15tf
SPANISH' WA VTERA'NS
FitzhughLee tamp No. llUnited
Spanish War. Veterans, meets the
at "7:30 o'clock p. m.
W. T. Gary, Gammander.
W. A. Knight, Adjutant.
come and look around, and
Fashion Center

NOTICE, MASONS

termn Auxiliary will have just what
ycu want in their JAPANESE GIFT
SHOP, which will 'open Dec. 6th,
rc-ross from Cam's Grocery. It
Get your galax leaves at THE
' BOOK SHOP, 20c. per dozen. 28-3t
'
Until January 1st we will s4
FURNITURE at greatly reduced
prices for cash. Phons 19 and let us
krw your need. Th :us Bros. 15-tf
UNCLE SAM
is on the
Job at his
.Electric
0
No. 114 Fl. King Avenue
Wbert-j'ou cm .k,!1 yur
w. r' df'ne o(( rt inirice.
Cnt.out -5his atlaiul oiioj
.,vith vou ;nd you will -.:et
a 10 per cepr redu ti n on
S.-HICKEL
be
51
X:
f

f .VA



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