The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:06027

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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ASSOCIATED
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WEATHER FORECAST Generally fair tonight and Saturday. TEaiTERVTURES This rnoraing, 64; this sitcreoon, 74.
vol 27 ;-:.!v-;;v;''- ocala, Florida, Friday, ogtobeb 2s, 1921 n8T254

A.

PDDEIII HID

In an Elegant Address
Devotion
Following is the full text of Presi President
dent President Harding's spech in Atlanta last
night:
Fellow Americans: I can, not tell
ycu how glad I am to La here, to greet
you men and women of Atlanta, of
Georgia, and the South, and to receive
this testimony of devotion to our com common
mon common country. Be assured that, -much
as I crave, and wish to deserve, your
good will, I shall, not mistakenly as
sume that such a greeting as this is
for me, or ever coulu be for any one
man. I recognize is as the tribute
which a great people pay3 to a con constituted
stituted constituted authority in its public life.
It is the reflection of the spirit which
makes our popularly governed insti institutions
tutions institutions secure. But you will permit
me to say, from my heart, that no nowhere
where nowhere else do they do these things
with quite the game zest and flavor
and convincing enthusiasm which
spice the hospitality of your wonder wonderful
ful wonderful South. As private citizen 'or pub public
lic public official, it has always been to me
an especial pleasure to come to the
South.- As a young man I was very
near indeed to becoming a" resident of
the South and a citizen of your neigh neighboring
boring neighboring state, Tennessee. Even for
the sake of paying p compliment, I
shall not tell you I am entirely sorry
I didn't come; it might imply a lack
of appreciation for 'the somewhat
notable kindnesses that have been ex
tended to me by the pf -iple of my own
state, operating in cor. junction with a
verv impressive company of friends
in other parts. ;
To come to Georgia is to come to
the heart of the South. To come to
Georgia .on this, of all days of the
year the birthday of Roosevelt is
to realize that the heart of the South
throbs for all the ration. To the
making of that typical American of
the new era went equally the warmer
strains of the Old South, and the
sturdy stock that gave the nation its
.Empire State. v
So it is good, in greeting you men
and women of Georgia, to recall the
career of that outstanding American
who in his life, as in his lineage,
taught us how much we are prospered
and exalted because of being united.
And, coming thus among you, it is
peculiarly a satisfaction to speak
from the shadow '. of the shaft which
you have reared to the memory of one
who taught a reunited nation its du duties,
ties, duties, its obligations, its possibilities.
. For I recall the thrill with wihch I
read, as a young man, the address of
Henry W. Grady to the New England
Club; that most famous oration, I
think, of its generation; that inspiring
' call to a nation to awaken to itself,
tc understand that its yesterday was
dead, its tomorrow pregnant with
magnificent opportunity.
If t ret one man was ordained to
speak with the tongue of conviction
and the voice of a great people, that
man was Grady. Gifted with the
poet's imagery, i the seer's wisdom,
the plain man's humor, and the states statesman's
man's statesman's vision, he pretended to be nef nef-ther
ther nef-ther poet, seer4 nor statesman; he
sought no public place, but preferred
the private post close to his people.
But somehow it was his to understand
and interpret the longing of the na nation
tion nation for a true and perfect reunion. He
appraised the difficulty of fashioning
a new temple of concord and hope out
of disappointment and sorrow incident
to conflict, but he saw beneath the
sxirface the hungering to develop a
common inheritance, he caught the
aspirations for a common glory, he
touched the chords of sympathy which
echoed the note jf common rejoicing.
With heart aglow and tongue in inspired,
spired, inspired, he felt.it his duty to preach
the gospel of new understanding, and
having uttered his new gospel at
home, he came north, the evangel of a
new day, and made his New England
speech. Since that night he has be belonged
longed belonged not to you of Georgia but to
the nation, to the truly reunited na nation,
tion, nation, of which, in his day, he was the
foremost apostle and spokesman. The
South never had. a more loyal or jeal jealous
ous jealous son; but he saw, with an eye for
wider scopes, that this people was not
to be divided. And he preached that
gospel North and South; the gospel
of unity and common destiny; and
when he died untimely, at 38 years of
age, the nation which so soon had
learned to love him, bowed its head in
a universal sorrow.. Reading his pas passionate
sionate passionate pleadings for a nation-wide
understanding, I can not but feel that
he would have been content to go as
he did if he could have known how
close that tie : or common sorrow
would bring the people for whom his
life had been the labor of a supreme
leve. i

All ELOQUENT

THE SOUTH AHO ITS

Delivered in Atlanta Last Night He Praised the
ot Dixie's Men" and Women to a
Reunited America.

How strangely has destiny, inter interwoven
woven interwoven the parts in this drama of a
nation's resoration! The same yet-r of
1889 that saw Grady laid away with
love's laurels on his proud and noble
brow, saw another son of a mother of
Georgia and the South entered in the
career of national service. In that
year Theodore Roosevelt, following
his impetuous appeals for better po-
tical morals at the Baltimore civil
service conference, was appointed by
President Harrison to the civil service
commission, ana nis national career
began. A son of the East and the
South, but already adopted by the
West, he had become a devout admir
er of that son of the ?outh whom all
the" nation had taken to its heart.
Think of them,' you Georgians, you
mon and women of -the whole South South-think
think South-think of their services and careers
and tell me, for such sons as these
would you wish to provide a lesser
stage than that of the united country
on which they played theirparts? I
know you would not, and never will.
For geniuses such as these you fur furnish,
nish, furnish, you must at-least let us afford a
fitting scene and setting. No "pent-up
Utica" for such as they!
The other day there came into my
hands a volume' of the letters of a
group of eminent Georgians of the
civil' war and reconstruction period.
In the main, they represented the
correspondence of Alexander H.
Stephens, Howell Cobb, Robert
Toombs, and Gov. Joe Brown. Only
recently published, they proved fasci fascinating
nating fascinating reading as I turned the pages
and felt myself admitted to the very
irner thoughts which these leaders of
the Confederacy were thinking in the
years immediately following the war.
Especially was I interested in the ex
tensive correspondence between these
Southern leaders and prominent men
of the North, which was carried on at
that period. It was nothing less than
astonishing to note how little of bit bitterness,
terness, bitterness, of resentment, of hatred, and
recalcitrance was manifested on either
side. With almost no exception, they
breathed the fine spirit of chivalry;
of readiness to accept in whole heart
and good nature the arbitrament of
the war. They held a flavor of some
thing more than resignation, as, if al
ready the writers were realizing how
fortunate it was that union should
have been preserved. They were all
back in the harness, working for the
restoration of their state, their peo people,
ple, people, their preserved country. They
wrote thoughtful, earnest counsels as
to the wiser policies in state and na nation,
tion, nation, seeking always to make their
f i lends in the North understand how
complete and sincere was the South's
acceptance of its place in the restored
Union, how determined it was to con contribute
tribute contribute its utmost to a perfect na national
tional national accord. At times they sounded
the note of disappointment that the
North seemed slow to accept their
protestations as in complete good
faith, and be assured that they could
be dealt with in complete confidence.
But they were seldom impatient; they
held their heads high, had no apolo apologies
gies apologies to make for the past, but were
looking clear-eyed to the future of
indissoluble union.
That was the spirit which made re reconstruction,
construction, reconstruction, despite bungling and
some exceptional manifestations of
acerbity, on the whole so rapid and
effective a process, when measured by
like incidents in human history. They
wanted to be taken back into full fel
lowship." "We would rather have one
immigrant from the North than fifty
from Europe, wrote one, a few years
after.. Appomattox; and he urged his
Northern friend to make the North
ern people understand how welcome
they would be. ,Not even the unre unre-constructible
constructible unre-constructible hatred of Old Thad
Stevens could maintain an effective
front against such appeals as that.
The North did come to you, with olive
branch, instead of sword: and you
went to the North and West, and be became
came became full partners in maMnsr that
new empire which together we carved
out of the trans-Missouri wilderness;
and now truly there, can be descried
no sectional division of this land. .:
Recently, passing ia a motor car
thvouh a section where historical in interest
terest interest has inspired the setting of tab
lets marking Mason and Dixon's line,
I heard a group of highly intelligent
people quarreling about its geogra geography,
phy, geography, half of them insisting that it
didn't belong there at all, but some
hundreds of miles farther south!
Neither the atlases nor the election re returns
turns returns give us nowadays a dependable
basis for judgment of what is South
and what North; we have been polit
ically annexing you when you were

TRIBUTE

PATRIOTIC PEOPLE
not politically taking us into camp
and we have been socially, industrial industrially,
ly, industrially, economically invading and seizing
a3 much of your imperial opportuni opportunities
ties opportunities as we could get our hands on. We
have been pooling our capital with
your brains and resources, and both
sides earning good dividends on the
transaction, and all the time jointly
making a greater republic.
It would be hard to- find a more fit fitting
ting fitting platform from which to preach
a gospel of confidence, courage, and
determination than 'is afforded here in
your wonderful city of Atlanta. In
one of' his speeches I think it was
the one at the New England Society
dinner Henry Grady, turning to Gen.
Sherman, who sat near him, observed
that Gen. Sherman" was" ."considered
an able man in our parts, though some
people think he is a kind of careless
man about fire." That grim joke con contained
tained contained the spirit of the South, the
courage of Atlanta, the eternal vision
of the brighter side that is so natural
to you people of the land of sunshine.
One who comes to your metropolis of
today can not but realize how useless
to attempt, with fire and sword, to
discourage such a people as this, to
extinguish their enthusiasm, to daunt
their matchless courage. What
chance is 'there to keep down a peo people
ple people who, when you bum their house,
rear in its place a palace of marble;
and when amid the passions of war I
you drive them !in thousands from
their home, return in tens of thou thousands
sands thousands to build it into a metropolis?
The reason why the South recovered
so soon from the war was that it was
made up of just that sort of people.
But I ought to say, because I speak as
a son of a veteran of that conflict,
that the ..North had no desire to de destroy.
stroy. destroy. It was merely the combat of
understanding, cruel though it was,
and a battle ta preserve the great
Ark of the Covenant, in which preser preservation
vation preservation we commonly rejoice today.
It has. seemed to me, many times in
the period since the world war ended,
that the world at large might well let
us show it the marvel which was
wrought through a reunited and re restored
stored restored America. Because there was
the .will to get down to work, to cease
repinings and regrets, we have among
us erected here, out of the wreckage
of that our war wrought, a country in
which we may fitly take the pride
wh:ch every American feels.
; Who would have ours less than the
great, rich, progressive, powerful and
enlightened America -which we justly
boast today? Who would have it less
a figure in the world than it has beem
in these years of crises and disaster?
What friend of civilization, of Chris
tianity, of human advancement, would
have wished our part less than it has
been Who among us all is not proud
that we were able to participate very
notably in the rescue of humanity in
the struggle which menaced its very
existence? Who would have us relin relinquish
quish relinquish now our service for a better
civilization?
Surely, we will go on, developing
the nationality that has given us faith
Home Town
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ard weight and power for the tasks of
the past, knowing there are other
tasks in the future which will demand
the utmost we can contribute to them.
We have learned, along with the rest,
that mankind must go forward or
backward as a whole; it is not to be
expected that some sectors shall ad advance
vance advance as others retire. Either the
race will advance or it will retro retrograde;
grade; retrograde; it will not stand still.
It has had a tremendous lesson, and
I am one of those who firmly believe
that this lesson will be analyzed, test tested,
ed, tested, scrutinized, and made to afford us
2t last a direction for future effort.
It i3 not possible to believe that all
the lessens cf all the yesterdays will
have gone in vain. The increase of
education, of the studious habit, of
social consciousness, can not but bring
us rearer to agreement about some
f"w fundamentals.
I believe, for instance, that every
family which has lost a member in the
struggle to-save mankind from abso absolutism;
lutism; absolutism; every citizen-soldier who has
given years and sufferings to that
cause; every gold-star mother or

maimed veteran, will agree that peace
ia preferable to war, and that to train
a world in the ways of peace is better
than to prepare it for war. I would
not have you misconstrue. I believe
it vTiruy consistent to preach peace
ana its urunripns in tnat convincing
sincerity which an unselfish nation
con n-ar.ds and yet make sure about
our proper defense.
Manifestly, mankind is disposed to
try that experiment. If, trying it,
nations shall fail, it will be no fault
of the United States of America. We
are ready to offer a helping hand in
the new pact. We have tendered our
invitation, and the cordial acceptance
vrreh has come from every quarter
If ae'.3 to earnest hope for good results.
We Americans have learned the les
son, on Docn the national and world
scale. We fought our war of sections
and system?, and decided forever in
favor of peace and unity. Our own
experience has taught us that we may
hope that a like decision will be reach
ed by. a world reasoning amid the con
victions which follow in the wake of
a traeredy supreme.
It should not be needful for me to
repeat that, in whatever contribution
we can make to the establishment of a
better order, we shall not surrender
any of our national independence
America will be for America first;
but it will never be a merely selfish
America, imagining to prosper by the
misfortunes of others. It will stand
for the co-operations, the mutual
helpfulness, the wide perceptions
which mankind needs to cheer and
speed it on the way to the brighter
and better realm of peace restored
and effectively assured, of progress
resumed, and righteous aspirations
impelling ever greater achievements
and ever higher attainments.
ESTIMATING THE DAMAGE
TO THE CITRUS CROP
A complete survey of Marion coun
ty shows no storm damage at all to
the citrus crop. Th rains, following
the prolonged dry spell, will cause
some cf the crop to drop and split,
but thia damage willnot be very
large.
The greatest damage to the. citrus
c;oo in the stale is in Pinellas county,
where it is estimated the crop has
been injured about 50 per cent. In
Manatee county the damage is prob probably
ably probably about 25 per cent; in Orange,
Polk and DeSoto counties about 15
per cent. Lee county cannot as yet

Paper Week, November 7-12

over to coa-
VcTf TilEyHME
TriATS NEWS
To ME

r

i I"-

estimate its citrus loss, as communi communication
cation communication has been difficult, but its loss
has been heavy, not only to the' fruit
tut some of the groves have been in injured
jured injured by salt water.
Conservative estimates place the
total damage to the whole citrus crop
in the state at not over 20 to 25 per
cent.

ROAD DEPARTMENT PASSED
THE REQUIRED RESOLUTION
Tallahassee, Oct. 28. The road de department
partment department passed a resolution this
morning, authorizing the chairman to
sign a contract insuring the comple completion
tion completion of our Dixie Highway.
Hunter.
CUMMINS ADMITS MERIT
OF BURR'S CONTENTION
;
Chairman of Florida Railroad Com-
mission Showing Up Mistakes of
the Interstate Body
(AMOdatea -res)
Washington, Oct. 28 Further com complaints
plaints complaints against alleged usurpation by
the Interstate Commerce Commission
of state powers of railroads were
made today to the Senate interstate
commerce committee on behalf of the
National Association of Railway and
Utilities Commissioners. R. Hudson
Burr? chairman of the Florida rail-!
road commission, told the committee
that many state rates prescribed by
the interstate commission were ridi ridiculous,
culous, ridiculous, and. after a statement of de details,
tails, details, Chairman Cummins of the com
mittee observed, "It is quite apparent,
so far as Florida is concerned, that
the Interstate Commerce Commission
did not consider any actual case of
discrimination."
The commodity rates mentioned by
Mr. Burr were those on cotton, phos phosphate,
phate, phosphate, sand and gravel. The commis
sion, he said, "actually compelled the
Florida carriers to make rate ad
vances they did not desire." The com
mission, he said, compelled Florida
railroads to put advances into effect
although they had not asked for
them. y
Mr. Burr complained vigorously
against the Interstate Commerce
Commission order permitting aban
donment of the three-mile railroad
between St. Andrews and Panama
City, Fla. The commission's order,
1 : j j:j a. i At i
ue saiu, uiu noi set lortn me actual
traffic facts and probably, he added,
was never reviewed Dy tne commis commission
sion commission but by some inexperienced clerk.
State commissions, he said, should
have exclusive authority to decide
whether railroad tracks within a state
should be torn up.
SHIP WAS LOST
BUT PEOPLE SAVED
Japanese Steamer Fukui Maru Sank
Off the Pacific Coast
Last Night
(Associated Press)
Seattle, 'Oct. 28. The Japanese
steamship Fukui Maru, sank 400
miles off Cape Flattery at midnight
in a hurricane but all her passengers
and crew were picked up by the
freighter West Ivan, according to a
wireless received here." The West
Ivan is bound for Japan and will con
tinue to the Orient, the message said
Hallowe'en novelties will be found
at Gadson's. Come in and get ready
for your fan. 27-2t
D
VJHEH DIP
iHbSEPIT
THAT JOHNSOKS'
PUT ON

ORDERED THE STRIKE

LA

Alter a Long Debate, Railway Union Men Decided
Not to Walk OuL

Chicago, Oct. 2S. The rail strike
scheduled for October was averted
last night when leaders of the switch switchmen,
men, switchmen, trainmen, conductors, enginers
and firemen ,at a joint meeting adopt adopted
ed adopted a resolution withdrawing authori authorization
zation authorization of a walkout and officials of the
railroad telegraphers' organizations
announced they would take similar
action. These were the only unions
which had authorized a strike.
The vote calling off the strike was
unanimous by organizations, W. G.
Lee, president of the Brotherhood of
Railroad Trainmen, announced. The
official wording of the resolution
adopted was that "the strike be de declared
clared declared not effective."
The vote in the individual unions
was unusually close, however, the
firemen particularly holding lengthy
arguments before agreeing to cancel cancellation
lation cancellation of the strike order, the labor
chieftains said. In some of the groups
the ballot was described as "the clos
est in history on a similar question."
Al lof the differences were ironed out
by the different unions, however, and
the final showdown found all of them
casting their ballots for "no strike."
OFFICIAL DECALL SENT OUT
Chicago, Oct. 28. Official recall of
the railroad strike orders issued by
the switchmen, trainmen, conductors,
engineers and firemen was dispatched
today when leaders of the big five
flashed code messages to their gen general
eral general chairmen. Similar orders prob probably
ably probably will be dispatched today by the
telegraphers.
While these orders are being circu circulated
lated circulated the labor board today will an announce
nounce announce its findings as a result of the
public hearing Wednesday at which
the union leaders and railroad execu executives
tives executives testified.
SATISFYING NEWS
Washington, Oct. 28. Word that
the leaders of the five railroad service
unions had withdrawn authorization
for the railroad strike to begin Sun Sunday,
day, Sunday, was received in official circles
here with undisguised satisfaction.
Officials directly interested, however,
decided to withhold comment until
later.
MESSAGES IN SECRET CODE
Cleveland, Oct. 28. Secret code
messages concerning calling off of
the strike were sent out early today
from the general offices here of the
brotherhoods. "Art is long, life is
short," read one message. Some ol
the others readi "Pretty heavy for
such light work." "Where there are
tees tnere is noney. "bmitn is a
mighty man." "Your accounts have
been audited and found correct.'
"More enduring than bronze."
NONE SENT JO TEXAS
Chicago, Oct. 28. It was learned
today that the code word calling off
the railroad strike had not been sent
t the International and Great North North-urday.
urday. North-urday. Calling off of their strike has
em trainmen who went out last Sat Sat-been
been Sat-been deferred pending determination
of their opportunity to return to
work.
FIRST DANCE OF THE SEASON
The Eight O'clock Dancing Club
formally opened the social season last
right with a large and brilliant dance.
There were about eighty present, in including
cluding including friends of the members. Be Besides
sides Besides the dancers, there were a num number
ber number who came to enjoy the dance
without participating. The music was
excellent, being furnished' by the
Hartzell orchestra, from Orlando.
The dance was formally opened by
Mr. Robert MacKay, vice president of
the club, dancing with Miss Nettie
Camp. During the intermission light
refreshments were served. Those who
attended give enthusiastic reports of
the good time they had and are look looking
ing looking forward with the keenest pleasure
to the next dance.
The following from Gen. W. E.
McGahagin, now attending the Con
federate reunion in Chattanooga, was
received this morning: "We are hav
ing a full reunion. Weather is fine.
I visited Missionary Ridge and Chick-
amauga Park yesterday, and Lookout
Mountain thi3 morning. The old boys
are getting feeble but manifest a
rood deal of patriotism yet. Will
come home about Saturday."
Mrs. Gladys Fox, who has been in
Jacksonville with her mother, Mrs.
Frank Drake, has returned home,
Mrs. Drake is improving and by the
first of next week hopes to return
home.
Test our delivery service when you
want FRESH meat. Just call phone
ICS. Main Street Market. tf

BE
HOT EFFECT!
ED
OFFICIAL SHAKEN UP
Postmaster General Hays in a Rail Railroad
road Railroad Collision in New Jersey
This Morning
(Associated Press)
New York, Oct. 23. Postmaster
General Hays and a score of other
passengers on the midnight express
cf the Pennsylvania railroad for
Washington were badly shaken up
early today when the express crashed
into the rear of a local train at the
Manhattan transfer in New Jersey
during a heavy fog.
TAMPA RETURNING
TO NORMALCY
Plucky People of the Gulf Metropolis
Repairing Damages Made by
the Recent Storm
(Associated Press)
Tampa, Oct. 28. With the streets
clear of debris and trolley and elec electric
tric electric service throughout the greater
part of the city restored, Tampa to today
day today is rapidly becoming normal.
There are large supplies of building
and roofing material here and this is
being distributed where needed for re repairs.
pairs. repairs. The main highways to nearby
cities have been cleared and bus traf
fic resumed on resrular schedules.
HARDING RETURNS TO
THE WHITE HOUSE
After a Four Days Trip in the Sunny
South, President is in Wash Washington
ington Washington Again
(Associated Press)
Washington, Oct. 28. President
Harding returned to Washington at
11 o'clock today from Atlanta.
REED CALLS UP BONUS
The" way was paved today by Sen Senator
ator Senator Reed, democrat, to force a vote
cn the soldiers' bonus bill which the
St-nate recently laid on the table at
the request of President Harding.
Senator Reed introduced an amend amendment
ment amendment to the tax revision bill provid providing
ing providing that certain taxes be set aside as
a special fund to pay bonuses to for former
mer former service men. The amendment in included
cluded included the McCumber bonus bill, re reported
ported reported by the Senate finance commit committee,
tee, committee, providing five-way benefits.
GAME PROTECTORS
Last night at the Board of Trade
room a few of our sportsmen met to
organize the Marion County Fish and
Game Protective Association. Those
present at the meeting were Messrs.
J. A. Talton, W. M. Davidson, S. C.
M. Thomas, G. W. Brant Sr, G. W.
Brant Jr., IL Rogers, N. A. Fort,
A. B. Halsell, D. N. Mathews, IL A.
Meadows, E. D. Priest, R. F. Rogers,
G. A. Waters, O. Squires and J. J.
Taylor.
J. A. Talton and W. M. Davidson
were elected temporary president and
secretary of the association. Plans
for the association were discussed.
All were in favor of doing something
to put a stop to the wholesale disre disregard
gard disregard of the game laws which now
exists. These repsentative citizens
feel that it is not justice to them for
law breakers to kill out all the game
before the season opens while those
who abide by the law miss the best
shooting.
Mr. Davidson was instructed by
the meeting to write various ether
similar associations over the state
and secure copies of their constitu constitutions
tions constitutions and by-laws in order that it
may be easier to draft a set for thi3
association. The next meeting 13 call called
ed called for Thursday night, Nov. Srd. Each
man present last night pledged him
self to bring five additional members
with him to the next meeting.
Regular officers will be elected at
the Nov. 3rd meeting and further
plans for the association will be
adopted.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. John D. Wil Williams
liams Williams at the hospital this morning a
pretty little boy, who his proud par parents
ents parents will name Edwin Boyd, after his
grandfather. Mr. Williams is the
efficient young man who is now ia
charge of the Marion Farms.
' Sugar cookies, oatmeal cookies, ap ap-pie
pie ap-pie and peach pies, cocoar.ut layer
cakes, the best you ever ate, at tha
Federal Bakery. 21-Ct
This is a
Studetaker year.
Try Federal Bakery sweets. 21-'

TO



I

OCALA EVENING STAB, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1921

Oeaia Evening Star
Published Every Day Kxeept Soadaf by
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY,
OCALA, FLORIDA
R K. CarroU,-" President
P. V. It?Wooi1, S.e.cretary-Treaaarer
II. Ueajanira, Editor

Entered at Ocala, Fla.. postofflce a3

ecorrl-class matter.
TELEPHONES
Haafae Office ......... Jlre-Oae
hUlltarial Department Two-Sth
feoefety- Reporter ... i..Fie-Oie
MEMHEIt ASSOCIATED PRESS
Tbe Associated Press Is exclusively
entitled for the use for republication of
all news dtspatcnes credited to It or
not otherwise credited in this paper and
also the local news published herein.
All. xijfhfs of republication of special
dispatches herein are also reserved.
DOMESTIC STJIISCBIPTIOY RATES
One year. In advance ........... .$6.00
Elx .months, in advance ........... 3.00
Three months, in advance.. 1.50
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ADVEUTISIXO TtATES
Dlnalays Plate 15 cents -per Inch for
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tions Insertions 25 per cent additional. Composi Composition
tion Composition charges on, ads. that run less than
ix times 10 cents per Inch. Special
position 25 -per cent additional. Rates
based on four-Inch minimum. Less than
four Inches will take a htgrher rate,
Which wilt"te furnished upon applica application.
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for first Insertion; three cents iper line
for each subsequent Insertion, One
change a week allowed on readers with without
out without extra composition charges.
Legal advertisements at legal rates.

Every worm has a turn coming to it.
The hurricane went to sea and
never came back to tell what it saw.

According to the Orlando Sentinel
the storm missed Orlando by a mile
only, but that mile was straight up.

Japan has 2,000,000 more men than
women. Who could blame that nation

for wanting to fight ?

a bargain sale, it is the rule among
home merchants to advertise very
little hut -ue goods. Many people
send tQ-Kew York or Chicago for
articles that they could and would buy
at home if they knew they could ob obtain
tain obtain them at home. The mail order
house reminds them of the existence
of these things, and the home merch merchant
ant merchant doesn't.

The following paragraph is from
the Times-Union's report of the good

roads meeting at White Springs:

"Mr. J. M. Ashley, secretary of the
Valdosta chamber of commerce, and

Mr L. IL Chazal, of Ocala, secretary

of the Marion County Board of Trade

both spoke briefly but earnestly in
favor of as much work as possible to

bring to early completion road No. 2,

Mr. Chazal stating that Marion coun county's
ty's county's money, some hundreds of thou thousands
sands thousands of dollars, is in a bank await awaiting
ing awaiting investment in the road construc

tion."

A CROOK THAT CHUMMED

WITH SPORTY OCALANS

Charles of Austria can tell you the
difference between throne and thrown

with his eyes shut.

One of the worst things about next

year is that during the front half of

it we are going to have yto have a

primary election.

People can pay ,their poll taxes and

other taxes on the first of November,

but most of them will defer action un

til the last of March.

The Kissimmee. Valley Gazette tells
of a darksome plot being doped out
by the wholesale grocers of Tampa to
freeze out competitors and corner the

grocery business of South Florida

They no can do.

Many of our good roads workers
will agree with the foHowinjt from
the Tampa Tribune: "To the aver average
age average man it looks as though the state

has ljeen bent upon building roads and
giving them to the counties which will

not tax themselves for roads, and let

ting the progressive counties which

have bonded heavily go hang."

The attempt by Representative

Mondell of Massachusetts and other

partisan republicans to expel Con

gressman Blanton of Texas from the

House of Representatives failed by

eight votes. Blanton has- been active
in trying to make the government
printing office an open shop and it is
more than likely that Mondell was

trying to make political capital than

that his sense of decency was shocked

Representative Mondell said "un

speakably vile, foul, filthy, profane,

blasphemous and obscene," alLin one
sentence. It is evident that the gen

tleman from Massachusetts never has
any need for cuss words to express
his feelings.- But as blasphemous and
profane mean the same thing, and
vile, foul, filthy and obscene also prac practically
tically practically mean the same thing, he is
prodigal in his language. Vile and
profane would have been enough. ;

Like most other newspapers, the
Star is opposed to people patronizing
mail order houses instead of home
merchants. It must say, however,
that until the merchants are as sys systematic
tematic systematic about r.dvertising as the mail
order houses the latter will continue
to do a big business. A mail order
house advertises everything it has and
the price- of each article. Except in

M1CKIE SAYS

PLEASE ER GOSH AXE.

OOWT WAAY OU- V GCT

OME EWMELDPS UEPT BEFOREJ

tfs. ORDER KAOaH WE Ktkl

GrtT -SOME OW RVTE OPP,
BUT SVMTIMES UESURE

CcY FED VJP OU "RUSH

a

. r

1 GrtT -SOME OW RVTE OPP. J

BUT SVMTIMES UE SURE
1 GrtT FED V)P QU "RUSH JOSS
,.;m? tip 1 suaa

Several of our "good sports" recall

with regret that last winter they sat

in a few games with a pleasant ap

pearing old gentleman, who painlessly

separated them from their coin when

he won and was a good loser when

he lost.

The reason, for their regret is that
he is one of the master crooks of

America. He was convicted in a
Pennsylvania court thirty-eight years
ago of murder and sent to the peni penitentiary,
tentiary, penitentiary, t)ut was pardoned out in two
years, since which time he has spent
over half of his life in prison. He

showed no trace of prison life while

in Ocala, however, but put up at the
best hotels and mingled with their

patrons, apparently as good as any

body. He was known in Ocala as

Jeffries or Sherwood.

The man's original name is Thoma3

Jefferson Sharum, with a string o

aliases as long as his arm. He is best

known in the criminal world as "Little

Jeff." Confidence schemes have been
his specialty. He is believes fo be

the chief schemer among the bunco
steerers who took a million dollars in
easy money away from the credulous
tourists to Florida last season. He
seems to have been the leader of the
gang of sharps that fleeced the Pont-

zers ou$ of $25,000 in Ocala last win

ter. He was nabbed by agents of the
postal department in- Glen Falls, New

York, this month. Following is his

record:

Criminal record- of Thomas Jeffer

son Sharum, alias "Little Jeff," alias

Jeff Schram, alias T. J. Sherwood, etc
October 14, 1891, Jeff Sherman, No,

914-B, G. P.

Sept. 19, 1905, Thos. J. Mason, No.

3302, for East St. Louis, Mo.

Oct. 2, 1882. Jeff Shearns, Michael

McGrogan, St. Louis, Mo.

Oct. 25, 1898, Charles Wilson, alias

Little Jeff, Philadelphia, Pa., profes professional
sional professional thief, discharged.
April 5, 1883, Thos. J. Sherman, No

1329, four years in Chester, Penn..

for murder from St. Clair county; par

doned Aug. 5, 1885.

Oct. 9, 1886, J. E. Jeff, No. 2470,

four years in Chester penitentiary for

burglary from Alexander county; re

leased Aug. 1, 1891, expiration of sen

tence.

Nov. 28, 1891, Frank -Williams, sen

tended to Alabama penitentiary.

June 20, 1892, re-arrested at Chi

cago, 111.

March 17, 1899, Charles Wilson,

sentenced to four and a half years in
Sing Sing for burglary; released July

1, 1902.

July 12, 1902. John Smith, G. P.,

fined $25 and costs, Pittsburg.

September, 1902, assault; fined $100.
Sept. 12, .1902, J. A. Morris. Mil

waukee, Wis., discharged.

September 1903. J. A. Morris,

Meadville, Pa., PP.; escaped Oct. 1,
18903, from jail.

April 1905. Jeff Sherman, Albany,

N Y.

April 28, 1906. Richard A. Benton,

Chicago, 3529, forgery, to Joilet, 111.,

penitentiary, No. 9746; paroled July

15, 1910.

March 11, 1913, Jeff A. Morris,

Cleveland, O., fugitive, turned over
to United States for forgery money
orders.

July 12, 1913. Jeff Sharum. Chica

go, 111., sentenced in U. S. court to

three years in Joilet. 111., peniten

tiary, No. 3009. forgery of United
States money orders; escaped Aug.

27 1913. :

July 16, 1914, returned to Joilet,
1L, penitentiary and discharged May

29, 1916, and turned over to the Unit

ed States. :

May 29, 4916, delivered to the Unit-

ea States for forgery of money ordefs

at Boston, Mass. i

July 13, 1916, John Ryan, Balti-;

more, Md., larceny, PP. 1

Aug. 2. 1920, Thomas Sherwin, alias

Jeff Sharum, Colorado Springs, Colo.,

investigation, suspected bunco.

Respectfully, H. N. Graham,
Postoffice Inspector.
Postal Inspector Graham describes

the operations of "Little Jeff" and his

pals as follows:

Would you believe that a member of

the banking fraternity a winter visi visitor
tor visitor from the north lost over $100,000
to confidence men operating in Flor Florida
ida Florida last winter?

An extensive investigation shows

there was such a case among the
many discovered, and that for years
confidence men, in increasing num numbers,
bers, numbers, have swindled winter visitors in
Florida out of sums 'aggregating -in
excess of $1,000,000 yearly. Individ Individ-usUosscs
usUosscs Individ-usUosscs run. from $5000 Jo $150,000.

Florida bankers in tourist towns, but
I will review it because in almost ev every
ery every case it is necessary for the confi confidence
dence confidence men to send the victim to a
bank in the city where they stage the
play, to get his check or draft col collected
lected collected by mail. The collection of thi3
check by mail gives the United
States power to prosecute the confi confidence
dence confidence men and all who knowingly .aid
them, under sections 215 and 37 of the
penal code.
The victim is met in Florida by one
of the gang, who in some cases ac accidentally
cidentally accidentally stumbles across. a pocket pocket-book
book pocket-book containing valuable papers and
money, which leads to an introduction
to the second member of the gang,
who pretends to have advance infor information
mation information of either a speculative move movement
ment movement in stock or of the result of a
horse race, and who illustrates his
claim by winning a small sum of
money for the victim as a reward for
the return of the pocketbook. After
winning a larger sum of money and
receiving payment in "confidence"
money, it is recalled by the "mana "manager"
ger" "manager" of the fake brokerage, club
house, or exchange, to which the vic victim
tim victim is lured, and which is elaborately
furnished with fake instruments, quo quotation
tation quotation board, cashier's desk, etc., who
says that mistake was made by the
cashier in accepting the check of the
second confidence man and that it
must be verified before payment can
be made. Thereupon, the second con confidence
fidence confidence man confesses to the victim
that he drew the check for more than
he had funds, and pleads with the
first confidence man and the victim to
come to his assistance to make good

the check. The victim has seen the
"money" (real bills, covering pack packages
ages packages of stage money), and believes he
sees a good opportunity, and is easily
induced to go home and raise his
share. Returning to the scene of the
play with a check of his own bank, he
is induced to go to a bank, invariably
selected by the confidence men, for
reasons satisfactory to themselves,
and to deposit his check for collection.
As soon as the bank notified him, aft after
er after lapse of several days, that the
check has been paid, he draws out all
or the proceeds in currency and is
carried to the fake brokerage office,
where the confidence men stage an another
other another bet or speculation, causing loss
of his money by pretending to have
made an error. The second man pre pretends
tends pretends to assault the first man for his
blunder, causing a disturbance, to
quell which a call to the police is
threatened. They induce the victim to
leave the city at once and to meet the
second confidence man in a remote
city on the pretext of making good
his loss at another brokerage office.
Failing to meet the second confidence
man as agreed, he finally realizes he
has been swindled, and returns to his
home.
The earmark of this kind of fraud
is the demand of a stranger to the
bank, who invariably comes not iden identified,
tified, identified, for the payment of the entire
proceeds of collections in currency as
soon as he learns the bank has ob obtained
tained obtained transfer of his funds. The
confidence men are always outside the
bank watching the victim and the
banker. Very respectfully,
H. N. Graham,
Postoffice Inspector.

f

i Cash special Saturday and Mondav.

16 pounds of sugar for $1.00 with
SI. 00 worth of other groceries.
CRESCENT GROCERY CO. 28-lt

The first thing some people want
when they get a little money is a car;

land then the first thing they want

when they get a car is a little mon money.
ey. money. Chicago Lumberman.

Complete assortment of the genu genuine
ine genuine Parker Lucky-Curve Fountain
Pens at Anti-Monopoly Drug Store
rrry TT1 W

i ine tiaisema investment (Jompany

is to build a large plant in Jackson Jacksonville
ville Jacksonville for the Jacksonville Sash and
Door Cqmpany costing around $25,000.
The building will be constructed on
Eighth street.

Try our jelly rolls, poppy seed rools
and cinnamon rolls once and youll

want no others. Federal Bakery. 6t J

L. M. Miller will in the nearfuture
erect a new hotel at .St. Petersburg.
It is planned to have it ready for the
tourist season.

It goes without saying that
you may be very sure of
any Dodge Brothers used
car you buy here.
We now have available
several Dodge Brothers
used cars which are ex exceptional
ceptional exceptional values.
Come in and see them.

Mack Taylor

Phone 348

OCALA, FLA.

Our SEEDS Like
Oar DRUGS
Are Always Fresh and
Reliable
G. C. GREENE
Phone 435. Opposite
Postoffice.
OCALA - FLORIDA

'if

U;1 M:

'W7
i

DRESSES

For Dancing
and Evening

W ear

Many delightful new modes in all
prevailing shades and materials, in including
cluding including Taffetas, Lace Combinations
and Exquisite Sequence Robes. As Astonishingly
tonishingly Astonishingly low prices for these at attractive
tractive attractive frocks.

Rheinauer & Co.

Second Floor

Ocala, Florida

9

UNION- MAD E

FOR MEN AND BOYS

rXK fT?T2 A I I Q Best "Indigo" Denim; roomy and
VJy HtLL-0 comfortable ; with double-stitched
seams that will not rip; wide suspenders.

jroUT With new im

proved drop-seat,
easily and quickly

let down; buttons concealed and so
placed as not to touch the body. Most
comfortable one-piece work garment
vermaae. PANXS.
Closely wows

material in seat aerriceable
pattern! ; good-fitting and long long-weariDg.
weariDg. long-weariDg. Ask your dealer for
' "Panama'.' Garments- sold nader
iron-clad guarantee. Look for
the trade-mark.
KJm Kf g. Co, Mobile, Ala.

L3JMJ IS biMly

f

! -THE- PEERLESS TIRE

r 6000 miles guaranteed U

30x3 nonskid $.9.00
30x3 nonskid $12.00'
We Specialize on
Ford and Chevrolet
REPAIR WORK
DIXIE HIGHWAY GARAGE
Jas. Engesser, Prop.
Day Phone 258 Night Phone 533

Smoke Don Rey. That good cigar. This is a Studebaker year.

End of Month
BARGAIN DAY

SATURDAY
OCTOBER, 29, 1921

M O.N IB A Y
OCTOBER 31, 1921

$1 SPECIALS IN ALL DEPARTMENTS

27 inch Outing, dark and l&ht patterns, 22c values
6 yards for $1
36 inch Outings worth 30c a yard
5 yards for $1
One lot odds and ends Georgette Blouses values to $7.95
fo close out, $1
63 and 72 inch mercerized table damask, $1.50 value
$1 a yard
27 inch Flowered cretton
4 yards for $1
36 inch paercales! light and dark
5 yards for $1
27 inch Ginghams
4 yards for $1
36 inch cotton serge, values 50c a yard
3 yards for $1
. Huck Towels, 25c values
5 for $1
Large size Turkish Bath Towels, value 50c each
3 for $1
Ladies and Missies Ribbed Union Suits, value $1.50
for $1
t Muslin Gowns, embroidered and lace trimmed
for $1

Many other items not advertised

"The Fashion Center"
Ocala, Florida

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OCALA EVENING STAR, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28. 1921

SASII

DOOR r

Geo. MacKayiB Co.

Ocala, Fla.

HAIIiWARE
HIGH Gil Ah E PAINT

Fifteen Years Experience

RIALirO CAFE
Up-to-Dale Lunch Counter
and Dicing Room
OPEN MY AND NIGHT
Sea Foods, Vv stern
Meats, Delicatessen
and Vegetables.
American, French, Spanish and
Italian Cooking
JOHN JSTTRIE
Propneior
108 South Magnolia St.

Day Phone 17. V- ;ht Phone 515
GEORGE Mack AY & CO.
Funeral Directors, Embalmers
G. B. Oveitcn, Mgr.
Ocala, Fla.

SEE ME FOR
ALL KINDS OF BUILDING
My Wort is Cv.aranteed
W, A. TINSMAN
"The Stcc-'IMan"
Phone 39 212 Orange Ate.
NEEDHAM K0T0R CO.
Auio Rc pairing
Gasoline, Oils arid Grease
Large line of Elcctrial Part
We use genuine pirts in our
FORD REPAIRING
Oklawaha Ave. &. Orange St.
; Phone 252

ANNOUNCEMENT
Beginning Monday, October 24
we will have
FREE DELIVERY
for cash only
Ft. King Confectionery
L. S. Mason, Prop.
Phone in your order for fruit and
vegetables: PHONE 596

PLANT
Orange Trees
PINEAPPLE, PARSON
BROWN, VALENCIA
LATE AND LUE-GIM.
GONG ORANGE AND
TANGERINE TREES
Two and Three Year Old Trees
Ready for Immedite Delivery
WARTMAIW NURSERY CO.'

OCALA, FLA.

AUCTIONEERING

When you want your house,
furniture, stock or goods of
any Vind sold, he will auction
it off for you, and get full
market value. Consult him if
you have anything to sell.
J.S.CRAMER
P.O.Box 340 Ocala, Fla.
Telephone 419

3
H

ii

5

n

a V. Roberts
Phone 305

Barney Spencer
Phone 431

ROBERTS & SPENCER
Funeral Directors, Embalmers
Private Morgue and Chapel
MOTOR EQUIPMENT
Office Phone 350. Ocala, Fla.
- m 217 W Broadway

vmmfi :m "hhw wmi nu if imp. ii.tewthilh mn rr$'wwfpmi''t!i-

THEFT THROUGH FLATTERY.
The meanest kind of thief is the man
who steals another's good judgment by
flattering him. Some people are so sus susceptible
ceptible susceptible to praise that, like stroked kit kittens,
tens, kittens, they Just lie down and roll over
'whenever they are offered a compli compliment.
ment. compliment. The difference between the
flatterer and a friend is that the for former
mer former wsjits te buy something with
pleasant words, and the latter wants
to share his mind with you. There has
been altogether too much dependence
on "smooth talk" in business. If mon money
ey money had depreciated in value as much
as words have, there weuld be very
little business done. A man's word ef
praise ought to be as sound and as
good as his word of promise, and that
ought to be as good as his bond, says
Dearborn Independent. Hie only thing
that justifies a compliment these days
Is that it be detached from any form
f self-seeking.

To live in too dry an atmosphere Is
unhealthy and adds to the doctor's bilL
Statistics show that about one-third of
all deaths in this country have been
due to diseases of the threat and
lungs. Fresh, clean, pure, humid air
as found out of doors is the treatment
generally prescribed for such ailments ;
and until people understand the need
for the proper kind of air in the home,
specially during the seasons when the
doors and windows are kept closed, the
recurrence of such discomforts are to
be expected,, says Farmers Bulletin
1194, recently published by the United
States Department of Agriculture.

No economic situation in which
waste Is a factor can be satisfactory
or profitable. It makes no difference
whether It is a waste of capital, as In
the bad management, or in a waste of
labor, as in a case of reducing the
capacity of capable men to the ca capacity
pacity capacity of the least capable. All such
waste goes Into the price of the prod produce
uce produce and not only makes it high for
popular consumption, but, remarks
Eprlngfield Union, in the case of manu manufactured
factured manufactured products, handicaps their sale
abroad in competition with others.
Only a rash person would undertake
to prophesy regarding the outcome of
the present revolt in Russia against
Bolshevism,, but It is safe to say that
Mr. Lenin wishes he never had made
peace with his outside enemies and so
given discontent within a chance to
come to a head.

A man in Delaware has got the
better of the Income tax. He has 23
children, and with, the exemption of
each one, with that allowed him as a
married man, he figures out that the
government owes him money. He
ought to be put on exhibition in the
National museum.

The United States army has gassed
rats along Important waterfronts, Is
gassing locusts in the Philippines, and
is preparing to gas boll weevils In the
South. It was an ill wind that carried
the first gas wave across No Man's
land in France, but it may have blown
a little good.

The papers are saying "the crisis is
past and business is on the upgrade."
That's giving the situation a sort of
"psychoanalytical treatment." But
what the world needs Is a goed sweat
superinduced by hard work. Then
there will be no crises.

The strangest thing about reform is
Its failure to tackle the chewing gum
habit. Isn't it liable to make us a
prognathous nation. Or, by giving the
jawbones constant employment, does
It really enceurage gabby people to be
silent?

Our doughboys hebnalled army
shoes damaged the Hotel Crillon, Paris
claims, but it should not be forgotten
that they also trampled all over one
Wilhelm Hohenzollern, who was
threatening to use Paris as a door mat

"You can trust a red-haired woman
in everything save temper," says th
Washington Post Our notion is you

can also implicitly trust her temper,
says Houston Post It is her throwini
arm that is unreliable.

TALKING BIG.
When the companions of the Chicago
boy who stole $772,000 were asked
about his ways, they said he had
"talked pretty loud about what be
could do." They searched their mem memories
ories memories t think of anything out of the
way. It struck them as worth men mentioning
tioning mentioning that he had talked loud. Trust
boy Instinct te detect the false note
In a comrade. They knew what his
job was; they thought he talked big?er
than it came to. They -probably did
nothing more than smile at him. To
each other they remarked-that It had
gone to his head. We all know the
man or the woman wh talks big about
what he or she has done or seen. If
they are lucky, they are laughed down
to the standard of ordinary folks. But
some get the habit, and the talk has
to get bigger. Presently there is a
dilemma; either give up being believed
or do something to make good. What
a safety valve it would be if we could
only listen in as an outsider to our
own talk, says Milwaukee Journal. We
should pretty soon say, "Here Is some
ene on the road to becoming a first first-class
class first-class liar." Big talk is a danger signal
In an ordinary world.

The Philadelphia North American
prints a two-column editorial on "What
the Sunday School Lacks." Any boy
could have told the elitor that It lacks
a place where a fellow can go fi&hing
In the summer or skating in the winter.

"College education is not the gate gateway
way gateway to heaven. There are other things
just as valuable, if not more so. There
are many types of men whom college
education does not benefit." Such was
the sentiment expressed by Dr. Frank
D. Slutz, principal of the Moraine
Park school at Dayton, 0 who talked
on "The Creative Impulse in Educa Education"
tion" Education" at the Friends' Central school.
"There Is toomuch family and racial
pride and tradition forcing our young
men Into colleges these days," he said.
"No beneficial results can accrue when
the man is unsuited for college." Doc Doctor
tor Doctor Slutz spoke of the creative Impulse
as one of the greatest things in education.

Since May, 191S, o less than 26 men
have been killed in the government's
aerial mail service. The mileage of
that service was 1,600,000 miles. This
is a pioneer service and the hazards
are great. Compared with the tragedies
of the, railway mail It Is like a death
sentence. But it is being extended, im improved
proved improved and made safer and In another
season or two will be established where
and how it can serve its greatest
good. Those who have "fallen have
blazed the way for permanence.

The Supreme court says evidence
obtained in raids by revenue agents
without a search warrant cannot be
admitted in court proceedings. Since
a search warrant must describe what
the officers propose to search for, this
decision must almost kill prohibition,
says Houston Post. For who could de describe
scribe describe the kind of hootch in circulation
nowadays?

A woman specialist who is giving the
girl pupils In one of our high schools
some instructions in the care of the
hair includes this in her typewritten
instructions: "When ends of hair are
dry, clip them when the moon is new
and brush a little hair oil on ends."
Ain't education 'grand

Buy your Hallowe'en outfit from

Gadson. Prices to suit you.

27-t

The Philadelphia mint has resumed
the collage of silver dollars and, while
they are a nuisance, the fact that they
can be kept clean entitles them ta
imt degree of favor over the paper
that has been circulating recently.

Dancing Is an instinct like eating
and fighting, says a Harvard profes professor;
sor; professor; and there Is quite a large school
of moralists who feel justified in ex exhorting,
horting, exhorting, "Beware of your Instincts I"
Anyway, watch 'em.

Well, the cash and securities in the
United States treasury amount to $13, $13,-BS3,819,S26.36
BS3,819,S26.36 $13,-BS3,819,S26.36 2-3. And everybody Is
going to be more curious about that
two-thirds of a cent than about all
tho?e billions.

The trouble we are encountering in
adjusting the rnixups the war has left
us is. the impulse to play the hog is
so strong that it is difficult to act with
good common sense.

"Nothing," says a traveler, "grows
higher than a table in the Falkland
Islands." And then he omits the In Interesting
teresting Interesting information of how high a
table grows there.

There has been a drop in gasoline,
and another is coming, the papers say.
So who cares if the rents do remain
high? Summer is coming, and the
roads are good.

rNow 75 the inwto
boll aftefyovxnait
Daihlsc of

A stimulating refreshing
tonic promotes present
hair groivth and arouses
a state of hair-health which
may save you years of worn
.later on in life. Does not
discolor bbnd or white hrir
MILADYBEAUTY PARLOR
1 12 Ft. King Ave.
Ocala, Fla.

AUTO REPAIRING
Acetylene Welding
Generators Renewed
Cylinders Rebored
Brakes Relined
All work done by experts
and every job guaranteed
Geo. J. Williams
Phone 597

USEP

One reason for thinking that typhui
fever will not get very far In thii
country Is that the people of the Uni United
ted United States are not, as a whole, in inclined
clined inclined to be hospitable to the crittei
that carries it.

The cables carry the news that wivei
are now selling for $1.85 each in Tur
key. It is evident that deflation cam
too rapidly and the bottom dropped on
of the market.

Paris announces a new cure for con
sumption, but tubercular patients wil
keep right on with the fresh air curi
until the new one proves its case.

A Connecticut court decides tha
dental bridge work Is a part of thi
human anatomy, but that a woodei
leg is not. Well, what's a toupee?

Millions of Housewives
by more Chefs
by more Railroads,
by more Restaurants
and by more Hotels
than any other Brand

:

L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CONTRACTOR
AND BUILDER

Careful estimates made on all con contract
tract contract work. Gives more and better
'worTc for tr9 utoDy than any other

Sometimes tha things a man buys m
sal are cheap; sometimes thethlaa
cits only maks; fcia feel c&aap.
Look this list over: Celery, lettuce,
cranberries, peppers, eggplant, cu cucumbers,
cumbers, cucumbers, tomatoes, squash, apples,
oranges, tangerines, grapefruit, co co-coanuts,
coanuts, co-coanuts, chestnuts, assorted nuts,
limes, lemons. Phone your order and
we will deliver. Fort King Confection Confectionery,
ery, Confectionery, phone 596. 27-3t

Gadson has the Hallowe'en- novel

ties, viz: Masks, horns, lanterns and
party decorations. Come in and sr?t

OT MA1C BY A TWST

mwi
V CotrrcMTS it.

It's moderate

ET SAKtwa P8" s

in price and
never fails
A pound can of Calumet
contains full 16 oz. Some
baking powders come in 12
oz. cans instead of 16 oz.
cans. Be sure you get a
pound when you want rt

0 '9 ij

ADAMS & MORRISON GARAGE
Magneloes Recharged. Cars Washed and Polished
Repair Work, Accessories, Gasoline,
Oils and Greases
Corner Oklawaha Ave.fand Osceola St.

Telephone 584

Ocala, Florida

A Chkago judge holds tha the city
of Chicago has the right to sue the
Tribune for 110,000,000 llbeL says
Houston-Post But no suit of that kind
will ever explain to the outside world
how It could be possible for any news newspaper
paper newspaper to libel Chicago.

It certainly is gracious of the In Internal
ternal Internal revenue department'to warn In Income
come Income taxpayers against calling In the
services of experts to make out their
returns. Where ignorance is bliss it
is folly to consult the wise.

If D'Annunzlo gets killed, he will
have a chance to be Italy's hero cf
song and legend for a thousand years,
and in time become a solar "myth. If
he doesn't well, there are still the
comic operas.

A book 700 years old, just placed In
the University of Pennsylvania library,
is valued at 1100,000, another striking
example of the Increase there has
been in white print paper.

An optimist is one who Insists that
things are better when he knows they
are not, and things' are better, even if
they are not. If you are working to
make them better.

Fire losses fall upon everybody. The
insurance company merely collects
money from the people and distributes
it to the losers. The community pays.

Smoke Don Rey. That good cigar.
TAFFY
A best seller, by S. C. Standley,
author of Peanut Brittle, Mints, Di Divinity,
vinity, Divinity, Fudges, etc Quality Fruit
Store, next to Masters'. 21-tf

TO THE PUBLIC
I am running two woodsaws. John
Hatchell and Arthur Willoughby are
operating them. See them or phone
368 and your wood will be cut on short
notice.
D. N. MATHEWS

$100 CASH
And $15 Per Month
Will buy nice four-room
cottage just finished and
painted inside and out.
On big lot just outside
city limits ( no city tax-

ff es). Large garage.. See

L C. JORDAN,
OWNER
OFFICE OVER
JAKE'S

8

FARMERS' EXCHANGE STORE
Merchants Block Phone 163 Ocala, Florid
uiici ty uvii as gGCi cs cny z-j (gss in pn-ce

UNEED.S and all former O
10c pkgs. Crackers... OC
Three packages on
for UC

All former 20c pkgs.
Crackers
Tall Pink
Salmon
Campbell's Soup
per can
Campbell's Soup,
four cans for
Octagon Soap,
pr bar
Octagon Soap,
three bars for
Export Soap,
per dozen
Cherry Bell Flour
24. lb sack
Sauer's Self Eising

24 lb sack

. 15c
15c
.. 12c
. 45c
... 8c
. 21c
.. 55 c
$1.35
SI. 20

Sauer's Self Rising PA
121b. sack OUC

30c
30c
40c
75c

Walter Baker's Cocoa

half pound tins..;.
One pound of
good Tea
Senate Coffee
per pound
Senate Coffee,
two pounds for

Senate Coffee, CM "f r

three pounds for.

Argo Salmon,
per can
Argo Salmon,
two cans for
Virginia Dare .Wine,
large, per bottle....
Virginia Dare Wine,
small, per bottle
F.eddick Peanut Butter
per pound
Evaporated Milk,

large

Evaporated Milk,
large, per dozen

Evaporated Milk,
small
Evaporated Milk,
small, per dozen....
Three packages
Argo Starch
One dozen packages
Argo Starch...
Quart jars
of Hone
Quart cans
of Syrup
Pint jars or
Bottles Syrup
Bulk Syrup
per gallon :.
Bulk Syrup
per quart

$

40c
75 c
65c
40c
30c
15c
1.70
7c
80c
25c
95c
65c
30c
15c
60c
15c

Pcrlna Feed lor Cows, Chickens and Dorses. Free Delivery

I COOK'S MARKET & GROCERY
i Everything To Eat
MATS AND GROCERIES,- FRUITS AND VEGETABLES V
I Oysters! Oysf ers2 P
if: Telephone No. 243
& ;J

THE WIMBSOM MOTEL.
! v.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
n the heart of the city with Hemming Park for a front yard.
Every modern convenience in each room. Dining room servks is
second to none

ROBERT M. MEYER,
Manager.

J. E. KAVANAUGII
Proprietor.

Tired Feet

or lmu. iiis Passage gently with soothing

tnemfialatam
Cools, rts and refrethe

1

IF o if "cel.

(O)

r-

i r
r 4

X

- : A

1 1
"--

What Henry Ford Says About
Machine Power Farming
"In the tractor the farmer uow has a machine in which is harnessed
one of the most adaptable, efficient, economical sources of power in the world
the internal combustion engine.
"The tractor will multiply the productive capacity of each individual
farm worker from three to four times over.
"It will put the farmer on a par with the citv manufacturer. It will put
his produce-producing factory for that -is what a farm is on to an efficient
production basis.
"It will enable each worker to earn so much more that he can be paid
more and still leave a greater profit for the man who hires him. It will enable
the fanrer to work fewer hours in the day, giving him more time to enjoy life
"I believe the tractor will make farming what it ought to be the most
pleasant, the most healthful, the most profitable business on earth."

7

OCALA

SE l SUM

DEALERS

FLORIDA



OCALA EVENING STAR, FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1921

UKCLASSIFIED

ADVEKHSEilENTS

FOR SALE Home of seven rooms, U

pantry ana oam room in nne ioc'
tion. All modern conveniences. Ga
rage for two cars. Terms if desired.
jNeednam liros store opposite nar
rington Hall hotel.
30-tf I
FOR RENT Second and third floors
of Baptist Witness building; 30x82
ft.; suitable for offices or storage;
splendid for business college. In
first class repair. Apply to B. F.
Condon, on premises, phone 129. 6t
GOLDENACRE Paper shell pecan
nuts. This year's crop now for sale.
Leave, your orders at Geng's.Drug ter
store, wnere samples can ne seen,iS
or drive out to the grove and get
yours. Two sizes, 75c. and 50c. per
pound. 17-tf
LOST Somewhere between Masonic
home and Lake Weir, open face
gold watch. Gmen works. Mono Monogram
gram Monogram L. II. C. on case. Generous
Louis H. Chazat, Marion County P
Board of Trade, Ocala.
18-tf
BAXTER TRANSFER CO. When in
need of any kind of hauling, give
us a trial. Satisfaction guaranteed.
Charges reasonable. Phone 169 and
117. 28-tf
FOR SALE OR TRADE Stock,
poultry and farm implements con-
listing of horses, cows, hogs, wag-
ons, buggy, mowing macrmne,
plows, cultivators, harrows, etc.
See Abner Pooser at B. Goldman's,
Ocala, Fla. 21-tf
WANTED-Any yie having any sec second
ond second hand bedding, comforts or
quilts, or men's clothing for medium
sized man, will please notify any
member of the King's Daughters as
they are in need of it for the desti destitute.
tute. destitute. Mrs. Bittinger, president,
Mrs. G. C. Sheppard, Sec'y.
WANTED Boarders in
T
a Dnvate l
rT.LtLrmillfAVt
11 x.
iiumc o.jic incau. j. .iuc -xiu ui
Apply 18 M Watula bt. 2Z-7t
FOR SALE Gas
cheap if sold at
phone 360Y.
stove for sale
once. Apply to
22-tf
ATTENTION Man and wife who
want a comfortable home, furnish
ed, phone 429 for proposition, be between
tween between 6 and 8 p. m. Reference
wanted. 24-6t
FOR SALE Jersey cow with young
calf. Can. be seen at Mathews'
, grist mill, 21 West Fort King ave-
' nue. Phone 368. D. N. -Mathews.
25-6t
, t ; :
FOR RENT Extra large and well
ventilated rooms, furnished or unfurnished,-
hot and cold water in
bath. Larerest and best rooms in j
town for the monev. Call at the
Dormitory or phone 305. 26-tf
REWARD Lost, near the postoffice,
Thursday night, pair automobile
gloves. Return to Star office and
receive reward.
28-2t
LOST One brown Jersey, smooth
crop, split and under bit, smooth
crop, split and upperbit: with bell,
, if j j
halter and dragging piece of trace
Reward if returned to E. Bomolini,
phone 322, North Ocala. 28-6t
MULES Ten pair four year old
matched mules, will weigh 1000
pounds when grown; sound; price
three hundred and fifty to four hun-
dred and fifty a pair. Anthony
Farms, Anthony, Fla. 28-tf
You Get a Run
lor yonr money at our
Plant. We are hot after
your trade, and will sere-'
ly make it of interest to
yoa to deal with us.
WE Insure a Long Run tor
Your Tires.
blalock"bros.
.-.vulcanizing
Ocala House Block
OCALA, FLORIDA
I can now give you the
& v very latest, u-iu-uaw;
the
most careful
and
thoro service.
OR. K. J. WEIHE,
Optometrist and Optician
Eyesight, oecialist
Cash special Saturday and Monday,
16 pounds of sugar for $1.00 with
$1.00 worth of other groceries.
CRESCENT GROCERY CO. 28-lt
Mrs. W. T. Gary went to Alachua

i

m OCCURRENCES

If you have any society items f or I
e star," please call five-one.
Mrs. B. D. Blackburn, who has been
Quite sick for gome time, is slowly
Smoke Don Rey. That good cigar.
Mrs. J. Vann of Dunnellon, spent
yesterday in Ocala, en route to Mad- j
ison for a short vacation.
For fresh meat call phone 108. Mala
Street Market tf
Little Miss Ellen Thomas, daugh- j
pf.Mr. and Mrs. S. C. M. Thomas, j
visiting her aunt m Jacksonville
There's no extra charge for clean-
irg your fish at the City Fish Market,
'hone 158. tf I
Mr. and Mrs. Leon Humphry re-
turned last night from Largo, where
they have been viisting Mrs. Hum-
.
Smoke Don Key. Yhai good cigar.
The item in the Star yesterday
stating that Mrs. J. J. Gerig had been
sick, was an error. It should have
read Mrs. J. J. Guynn.
Our orangeade machine is again on
the job at the fountain, and we have
just received a lot of nice sweet or-
anges. Court Pharmacy. 22-tf
Mrs. J. L. Crosby, connected with
the Ford agency, is spending her va vacation
cation vacation at her former home in Bax-
ley, Ga.
W. K. Lane, M. D., physician and
surgeon, specialist eye, ear, nose and
throat. Office over 5 and lucent store,
ucaia, ia. Aav.-ti
Mr.
iierDert menaee, iormeriy oi
mw Vnrt Knf nrw rri tno -fa mil fir M 1
K.? gh school, U be at the I
' J j
residence oi'jvir. ana jvirs. x. ai
Moore for the winter, taking his meals
at the Arms House. V
j We can make you specially attrac
tive prices on house furnishings for
the fall and winter season. Theus
Eros. Phone 19. 10-11-tf
Mr. and Mrs. Leon Mason, who have
had an apartment at the home of
Mrs. H. C. Jones, have taken rooms
at the Arms House and will move
Monday.
A good iine of wood heaters. We
put them upl Roberts & Spencer. 12t
Our orangeade machine Is again on
the job at the fountain, and we have
just received a lot of nice sweet or-
anSes.
Court Pharmacy. 14-6t
I i- r r ii i
ev- J- J; -Neighbour, who has spent
tnis weeK m savannah, is expected
home tomorrow. While in' Savannah
Rev. Neighbour has been the guest
of Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Jewett and
family.
New bed room, dining room, parlor
and kitchen FURNITURE of all
, -nT-,i i 'u i
kinds. Will take your old in exchange
if you
19.
desire. Theus
Brots. Phone
10-12-tf
Mr. W. V. Newsom, who has been
spending the past two weeks in
Ocala with his mother, Mrs. W. V.
Newsom, has returned to Jacksonville,
Goldenacre paper shell pecan nuts,
This year's crop now for sale. Leave
your orders at Gerig's Drug Store,
where samples can be seen, or drive
out to the grove and get yours. Two
sizes, 75c. and 50c. per pound. 17-tf
. Mrs. ju. ii. Mote oi J-ieesburg, is
spending a few days in Ocala, the
guest of her sister, Mrs. William
Hocker.
Chiropractic is no longer a theory,
but a practical demonstrated fact.
You can be speedily restored to per perfect
fect perfect health by having the cause of
your ailment removed. Dr. Kiplinger,
Ocala, House. 22-tf
Get your cucumbers, beans, lettuce,
celery and bananas, apples, oranges
andavocado pears at the Dixie Fruit
Store, netx to gas office, in Harring
ton Hall building. ,28-3t
Best dinner in the state for 75c. Eat
and drink all you want. Union Station
Restaurant. 100 per cent sanitary.
Ask the hotel inspector. 22-tf
Get your cucumbers, beans, lettuce,
celery and bananas, apples, oranges
andavocado pears at the Dixie Fruit
Store, netx to gas office, in Harring
ton Hall building. 28-3t
Get your cucumbers, beans, lettuce,
celery and bananas, apples, oranges
andavocado pears at the Dixie Fruit
Store, netx to gas office, in Harring
ton Hall building. 28-3t
Come to uadson s and buy your
blankets and comforts, and do not
forget that we specialize in coats, coat
suits and dresses for the stouts. Give
us a look over before going else
where. 27-2t
The large sign over the front of
the J. G. McCrory store has been down
for the past few days undergoing re repairs.
pairs. repairs. The boards composing the bot-

them. The letters on this sign are
raised and it was quite a job to re remove
move remove them and replace the founda

tion boards, but it has been very suc-
cessfully done and now only awaits a
few coats of paint to complete an ex excellent
cellent excellent job.
Abou fifteen members of the B. Y.
P. U. of the Baptist church composed
a merry party that called on Mr. and
Mrs. D. Niel Ferguson last night,
giving them a surprise party. Mr
and Mrs. Ferguson were taken en-
tirely unawares but a most delight-
ful evening was spent at their home,
at the conclusion of which the
pa$" served lemonade, cake and
fudge. Mrs. Ferguson has already
made numbers of friends since com-
big here and this was a very pleasant
way of welcoming her to this society,
Mrs. Paul Simmons will entertain
tomorrow afternoon at 3:30 o'clock in
honor of her small daughter, Mary
Elizabeth and her little nephew. Mas
ter Simmons Futch. The occasion for
the big celebration is their third
birthday, both. being born on the same
day, so they have invited their young
friends to help them fittingly cele
brate.
lhe authorities pulled two more
dust v travelers from last nieht's
trains. These were more fastidious
tourists and were riding the passen
ger trains, and, strange to relate,
were headed north.
ATV W f T"lo i7i r? crTi tf Vi o TTn inn
station Restaurant, reports quite a
dcughnut party at his popular feed
station last night after the dance.
SUMMING UP RESULTS
OF THE STORS
I he Jacksonville Metropolis sums
up the results of the storm as follows
Hillsborough, Pinellas, Polk, Man
atee and county citru3 crop oss
tonnnnnn
Kev West Hich winds, no damasre
T .ui,vMt,KU
. ..
loss; citrus crop, loss z5 to ou per
ent'. damage to buiIdings, ?5000
Leesburg Damage in Lake county
slight, to citrus fruit about five per
cent; young vegetables hurt.
Inverness Hardwood valued at
several thousands ruined; egg plant
fields destroyed; houses wrecked.
St. Augustine Two piers damag damaged,
ed, damaged, several pleasure boats sunk, fire
loss about $5000; dory Dolphin with
four men aboard still out. Truck
gardens stood up well.
Brooksville Damage to citrus crop
in Hernando county 25 per cent; dam damage
age damage to turpentine industry heavy;
damage to farm crops about 50 per
cent; Tampa Northern tracks under
water.
Ocala Very little damage in city
or vicinity.
Daytona Total damage not ex
ceeding $10,000 mostly in .bridges
weakened. Citrus crop little hurt.
Tarpon Springs The electric light
plant out of commission thirty hours;
fruit trees shed practically entire
crop; packing houses badly damaged.
Clearwater Power and ice plant
badly damaged; houses smashed and
small boats wrecked; private docks
swept away, churches and stores
damaged. Fruit trees hurt.
Orlando Damage in city and vi
cinity about $35,000; loss to citrus
crop 5 per cent.
iSradentown racking house un unroofed,
roofed, unroofed, many roofs blown off private
homes.
Cedar Key Passed through storm
unhurt.
Gainesvilte Very slight damage "of
any kind done.
Largo Packing house blown down
and fruit badly damaged.
Fort Myers Damage to groves
and farms between $1,000,000 and
$2,000,000 in Lee county; city wires
prostrated. Estero Island with Cres
cent Beach and Seminole Sands badly
damaged.
Miami Little damage to citrus
c:op, but avocado ear trees injured.
Clearwater Beach Evacuated by
Southern College students. Believed
badly damaged.
Plant City Houses damaged and
fruit trees suffered heavily. City
used as outlet of Tampa and Tampa
papers publishing small editions here
DeLand No damage from blow.
Fruit trees unhurt.
litusviile Dixie hotel pier was
destroyed; several small boats sunk.
Tavares Heavy rainfall, but little
damage.
Wauchula Truck crop reported de
stroyed.
MEETING OF THE W. M. U.
The Woman's Missionary Union of
the Marion Association of the Baptist
church. held a very successful annual
meeting with the Ocala Baptist
church Wednesday of this week, in
spite of the very inclement weather.
Dr. S. B. Rogers, secretary of the
state convention and missionary
beard, was present and made a very
fine speech and Mrs. Peelman, sec
retary for the woman's work, made
several splendid talks and also ad
dressed the prayer meeting Wednes
day evening.
At noon the ladies of the Ocala
church served a very bountiful and
delicious dinner in the Sunday school
rooms from a- long table tastefully
decorated with flowers. On account
of the illness of the president, Mrs.
L. W. Duval Mrs. S. A.- Standley,
president of the Ocala society, was
chosen to preside. Many splendid
talks were given by various workers

I of. the, association .on r questions of pe-

The following officers were elected
for the new year: President, Mrs. T.
N. Strange, Dunnellon; vice presi president,
dent, president, Mrs. N. A. Fort, Lynne; secre

tary and treasurer, Mrs. W. T. Gary,
Ocala; and district superintendents:
Ocala, Mrs. John Rogers; Inverness,
Mrs. ueorge Scofield; Wilfiston, Mrs.
E. Burnett; Mcintosh, Mrs. J. K.
Christian; Y. W. A., Mrs. C. L. West,
Ocala; Sunbeam Band, Miss Ada Wil
ls, Crystal River.
Quite large delegations attended
from Dunnellon, Inverness, Oklawaha
and other towns.
The funeral of Mr. Charles Pfeifer
was held this afternoon at 4 o'clock
rom the residence of Mr. and Mrs. P.
G. B. Weihe. Rev. W. F. Creson, of
he Presbyterian church, officiated.
The body was laid to rest in Green Greenwood
wood Greenwood cemetery, the following acting
as pall bearers: B. F. Condon, H. W.
Tucker, Max Fishel, B. L. Adams,
Lester Lucas and H. M. Hampton.
Sam R. Pyles & Company had charge
of the funeral arrangements.
Collier Brothers took a wet trip to
Li-ke Helen yesterday, when they
moved Mrs. M. S. Whitman from
Eastlake to that place. Mrs. Whit Whitman
man Whitman had most of her belongings
stored in Ocala, but the remainder
were at Eastlake and moving them
gave Collier Brothers the opportunity
of driving over the roads just after
the storm and they report that awful
is a mild description of the. road this
side of the St. Johns river" after you
leave Altoona.
Mr. Benjamin Redding of Tampa,
spent Wednesday and Thursday in
Ocala with his grandmother, Mrs. E.
J. Redding. Mr. Redding has .just
been appointed to the responsible po position
sition position of buyer for the city of Tampa.
Mr. W. T. Anderson of Norwich, N.
Y., otherwise known as "Major," ar arrived
rived arrived yesterday" to spend his fifth
winter at the Colonial Hotel.
Mr. N. W. Harison was in town to today
day today and reported no harm done by the
storm at North Lake Weir.
The inimitable and irrepressible
Pat Murphy is greeting his numerous
Ocala friends.
Talk about pre-war prices; $2 less
than" we have ever put them on. The
Ocala Wagon Works is putting Tord
tops on for $10.50; roadsters, $9.00.
Other cars in proportion. Prices sub subject
ject subject to change. 10-l-30t
This is a Studebaker year.
tf
In the county judge's office yester
day, Judge Futch officiating, Mrs. An
nie E. Hill of this city was married
to Mr. W. B. Wheeler of Texas. Mr
Wheeler likes Ocala and will make his
heme here.
Mrs. C. C. Balkcom and infant
daughter have returned from the
hospital and are now at the home of
Mrs. Balkcom's mother, Mrs. W. M
McDowell.
EAT AT TnE MAXINE
Best meals in the city for 50 cents
Twenty-one meal ticket for $7. Phone
260,' 310 N. Main street. tf
i '. H
Sun shone today, first time since
Saturday.
Trains
running again, almost on
time.
LOCATION AND PHONE NOTICE
Dr. F. E. McClane is now located
m Commercial Bank building. Offi
phone 211 two rings; residence
phone 151. 15-tf
A Story Which Smacks
of the Rolling Waves
and Salt Air
TVT
HI
eat
1
By J. ALLEII DDIffl
Practically all the action and
there is a world cf it takes
place at sea. The "adventures
will appear personal to you.
So
If ycu don't mind being shang shanghaied
haied shanghaied with a young San Fran Francisco
cisco Francisco newspaperman; if you'd
er.jcy a feold-huntirg expedi expedition
tion expedition to t c Arctic in a stout
sealing ship manned by a Bol Bolshevik
shevik Bolshevik crew of sailors and seal
hunters, captained by the girl's
father, and financed by the
smoothest villain you ever met
then you'll have a wonderful
time with "A Man to Hi3
Mate."
A Serial for These Columns
Which Ycu Must Not Miss!

n

4.1 I

w

SYNOPSIS OF THE
STATE GAME LAW

Following is a brief synopsis of the
1921 game law:
Persons residing in a county for
12 months may obtain a resident
county license permitting them to
hunt in that conuty alone for $1.25.
Persons residing in a county for
12 months may obtain a license to
hunt in another county for $3.50.
Non-residents may obtain a hunt hunting
ing hunting license for $25, which is good for
hunting only in the county in which
it is issued.
All licenses are good only during
the open season allowed by law and
in the counties in which issued.
Open season for wild turkey, quail,
turtle doves, swans, geese, brant,
ducks, rails, coots, sandpipers, cur curlews,,
lews,, curlews,, snipe and plover, November 20
to February 15, inclusive, and fixed
penalty for killing any of such birds
out of season is not less than $20 and
not more than $500, or by imprison
ment for not more than six months.
Open season for pheasant, Novem
ber 20 to December 20; penalty $25.
No trap, snare, dead fall, scaffold,
cage, net, salt-lick, blind pen, baited
hook, baited field, or any similar de
vice, or any drugs, poison, chemical
or explosize may be used for the pur
pose of injuring, capturing or killing
birds or animals protected by the
game laws of this state; penalty $50
Hunting between dark or daylight
of one day and daylight of another
day is prohibited; penalty $25.
Open season for turkey and deer
November 20 to February 15; penalty
$50.
Open season for squirrels, Novem
ber 20 to February 15 penalty $25.
Limit: One deer, two turkeys, 20
quail and 25 other birds in one day
party of three, two deer and five tur-
eys; penalty for exceeding this, $500.
Limit for season, one person: Two
deer, five turkeys, 300 of any other
game bird spcias; penalty $500.
Contracts have been let to the
Southern Ferro-Concrete Compony of
Atlanta for the various additions and
improvements of the Florida State
Coollege for Women at Tallahassee.
The contracts aggregate around
$10,8,760.
The board of directors of the Day
tona Golf and Country Club have let
the contract for the erection of the
$40,000 club house at Raytona. Work
is to start very soon.
The power plant of the state which
being built at Chattahoochee for
the state hospital is practically com completed
pleted completed and ready for. operation. It
will be tried out in a few days.
A reformer says he will move heav
en an dearth to enforce prohibition.
The real problem, however, is to find
some was to move the Bahamas.
Baltimore Sun.
LIFE
FIRE
A. E. GERIG
INSURANCE
Ocala, Florida
ACC1DFNT AUTOMOBILE
ilHS SCHEDULE
Arrival and departure of passenger
trains at OCALA UNION STATION
The following schedule figures pub
lished as information and not guar
anteed.
(Eastern Standard Time)
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILROAD
"Leave Arrive
2:20 am Jacksonville-N'York 2:10 am
1:55 pm Jacksonville 1:50 pm
4:17 pm Jacksonville 3:50 pm
Tampa-
2:15 am Manatee-St Petrsbrg 4:05 "jm
2:55 am N'York-St Petrsbrg 1:35 am
2:15 am Tampa 2:15 am
1:50 pm Tampa-Manatee 1:35 pm
4:05 pm Tampa-St Petrsbrg 4:0opm
ATLANTIC COAST LINE R- B.
Leave Arrive
2:27 am Jacksonville-N'York 2:33 cm
1:45 Dm Jksonville-Gainsrille 3:24 pm
6:42 am Jksonville-Gansville 10:13 pm
2:33 am St Petsbrg-Lakeland 2:27 am
3:24 pm St Petsbrg-Lakeland 1:25 pm
7:10 am Dunnellon-Wilcox
7:25 am Dunellon-Lkeland 11:03 pm
3:30 pm Homosassa 1:25 pm
10:15 Dm Leesburg 6:42 am
4:45 Dm Gainesville 11:50 am
Monday, Wednesday, Friday.
"Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday.
SCHOOL HOUSES FOR SALE
Notice is hereby given that the
board of Dublic instruction. Marion
county, Florida, will receive bids on
November 8. 1021, for purchase o
Dallas school house, near Summer-
field, also old Kendrick school house,
ircludine- one-half acre of land at
Kendrick. Board reserves the righ
to reject any and all bids.
By order of the Board of Public
Instruction. H. G. Shealy,
27-fri-mon-wed-sat Secretary.
NOTICE
The registration books of the city
of Ocala will be open from this date
until the second Saturday in Novem November,
ber, November, 1921, during office hours at the
office of the city clerk.
This the 6th day of October, 192L
H. C Sis trunk,
City Clerk and Ex-OfSdo Supervisor
of Registration of the City of
Ocala. 7-t-fri

We have always given to our gar garments
ments garments that expression of merchant
tailoring distinction which is at all
times appreciated by men who enjoy
fine things. Distinction is not style
alone, nor is it dignity, but the com combination
bination combination of these with pure wool fab fabrics,
rics, fabrics, hand tailored to your own meas measure
ure measure with the skill and art of expert
craftsmen. These result in the dis distinction
tinction distinction so much desired. Be proud of
your next suit and overcoat. You can
by ordering from this line, and at
prices that represent the greatest
values. Have your measure taken to tomorrow,
morrow, tomorrow, Saturday, and we will deliver
your suit before the fair.

I J. A. CHANDLER
I 120 South Main Street
lA Upstairs in the Thompson Building, Room One.

Removal

I AM NOW having the interior to the store
room located at 107 Ft. King Ave. on the
south side Harrington Hall Hotel, thoroughly
done over and by Saturday of this week will have
my entire stock, now located in the north window
of Jake's store, removed t tny new location and
will be fully equipped and better prepared to take
care of the needs of my friends and patrons.
i take this method of thanking all my custo customers
mers customers for their patronage in the past and cordially
extend an invitation to visit me in my new hjotne.
Yours for service

J. CHAS. SMITH
JEWELER
107 Ft. King Ave. Ocala, Florida

Cash special Saturday and Monday,
in pounds of sugar for $1.00 with ;
$1.00 worth of other groceries.'
CRESCENT GROCERY CO. 28-lt
:
During the recent storm, another of J
the big trees on the north side of the j
courthouse square was blown down. It j
was one of four which up to a fewj
years ago formed a row along that!
side of the square. All four of these
trees were rotten at their hearts; one
went down in a storm two or three
years ago, and Tuesday another fol-j
lowed it. It's only a matter of time!
before the other two are broken down,';
and as they stand they are a menaee.
The county commissioners should ',
have them cut down and healthy trees J
set out in their places.
Smoke Don Rey. That good cigar.
Pompano and Spanish Mackerel at
the City Fish Market. tf
1
Not the least of the improvements
to the city recently is the new ar- i
rangement of the lights over thej
faces of the courthouse clock. These
lights now cast their rays directly on j
the figures, and not only the people in
town but some distance Out in the ;
country can see them. The lighti also ;
make an additional illumination to our
already well lit up public square. j
This is a Studebaker year. tf j
Smoke Don Rey. That good cigar.
A small-town telephone manager
protests against the accusation that i
his operators read novels on duty. ;
They don't. They don't have .to.
Chicago Journal of Commerce.
While kid gloves cleaned free with
ladies work at the Royal Cleaners.
Fhone 443. 18-tf
CASH SPECIALS
Our cash specials for last week will
be continued through this week.
25-3t O. K. TEAPOT GROCERY.
One of our friends wants to know
why we are so down on politicians.
Well, it is mainly because we are so
Up on politkians.-Coluirl la Record.
Salt iwllet, already scaled, at the

A.
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$30 $32.50 $35
THESE PRICES
REPRESENT
A line of men's" clothes
of all wool material in
staple paterns in shades
BROWN, BLUE, GRAY
new and conservative
models
RHEINAUER
and Company
Men's Department
Call phone 108 when you want groc groceries
eries groceries in a hurry. Main Street Market.
NOTICE
Notice 13 given that the city coun council
cil council of Ocala, Florida, will en the lr'k
day of November, 1921, 7:C0 oV
p. m., receive tid3 for drill :r '
sewer well, same to l& d:'u'.' -with
wrought ircn f'" f'"-mz
mz f'"-mz 12 inch, inside c- .r r 10 :: :
to be sunk and cr.ri to r;.,.
cient to carry tIT :1 ,w c ?
Addre-a Li 's an! re

if



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