The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:05937

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
OCALA

1

1am

weather FORECASl
Local thunders ho we rs
tonight or Saturday.
TEMPERATURES
This morning', 75.
This afternoon, 80.
ill
VOL 2?
OCALA. FLORIDA. FRIDAY, JULY 15, 1921
0. 167
1
LEESGURG GOVS GAVE DOR
HOME TEAM A LICKING
EASTERII QUESTION DESIRE TO CLEAR
. IS JAPAII'S Oil AIM DIFFICULTIES
MUCH FIIIE TRUCK HAS RAISED
THIS SEASO
,11

.14 V 11 4k

LAKE COUNTY'S BASEBALL CHAMPIONS PRESENTED
WITH A BIG BASKETF ULL OF GOOSEEGGS

(By L. T.
The Leesburg- nine had little trouble
in shutting out the Jiome boys yes yesterday
terday yesterday with a score of 5 to 0. Ocala
was oat classed at all stages of the
game and lost her game on the timely
hitting of the visitors and untimely
errors of the home team.
Gordon Epperson, pitching for
Leesburg, held the Ocala players in
the hollow of his hand and only turn
ed them loose once in a while for a
few scattered hits during the game.
He allowed the boys here to secure
seven hits by the score and one addi additional
tional additional two-bagger that had to be taken
away from Liddell because Mr. Ump
said Liddell failed to touch the first
sack as he hastened around the bases.
Many standing by said that Liddell
did touch the bag and that the umpire
wasn't ven looking at the runner but
was waching. the fielding of the ball
in center field. Be that as it may, the
runner was out and the hit was wiped
off the charge account against Epper Epperson.
son. Epperson. Homer Luff man from Sparr started
the game off for Ocala but was not
equal to the occasion and was relieved
in the third by Clements. Clements
did not want to go into the box be
cause his arm was 6ore from the hard
game he pitched for Oak Tuesday but
it was a case of being obliged to use
him, so he was persuaded to try it for
a while. Leesburg ; romped on him
with his sore arm and he had to be
taken out after two innings. Strick Strickland
land Strickland then took the mound and bad a
horseshoe with him for he held Lees Leesburg
burg Leesburg to one hit for the last five in innings'
nings' innings' and they did not score daring
his reign.
. There were v no fielding specialties
yesterday that deesrve any extra men
tion. At bat Rolling with a couple of
two-base hits, Medina with a two two-bagger
bagger two-bagger and a single and Clements with
two singles gave forth the extra shine
for the game. Liddell should possibly
be mentioned in this paragraph for he
really hit a two-bagger and a single,
although his failure to touch first
took his two-bagger completely away
from him, not even allowing him a
single on it.
'First inning: West led off for
Leesburg with a long fly to center
field. Gillespi followed with the same
thing. Rolling drew an error from
. Lufl'man and Wharton got the 'same
sort of reception from Strickland,
making two on bases. Epperson flew
out to first base and retired the side.
Ocala had a .chance to score but didn't
make it. Liddell struck out. Strick Strickland
land Strickland beat out an infield hit. Harris
walked. Wood hit to the pitcher, forc forcing
ing forcing Strickland at third. Clements
fanned for the third out.
Second: Leesburg made two runs
- in this round. Medlin led off with a
two-bagger, Buckles walked and cab-
-baged second. Leavengood threw to
second to try to catch him, although
there was a man on third. Wood made
the play at second too late to catch
the runner but threw back, to the
plate for the man trying to score.
The play was" made like lightning and
there was plenty of time to catch the
runner, but Wood overthrew and the
ru nner scored, Buckles in the mean meantime
time meantime going to third. Carpenter went
out on a fly to Brooks. Allsbrook hit
a long fly to left, scoring Buckles on
theplay. West went out, second to
first. Fred Luffman and Brooks struck
out, Homer Luffman singled but
Leavengood fanned and retired the
side, leaving Luffman on base. Lees Leesburg,
burg, Leesburg, 2; Ocala, 0.
Third: Gillespi led off with a strike strike-out.
out. strike-out. Rolling doubled. Wharton fouled
out to third. Epperson singled, scor scoring
ing scoring Wharton. Medlin singled and got
to second on a wild pitch by Clements.
Buckles fanned. Ocala's big end went
out in regular formation, Indian file.
Leesburg, 3; Ocala, 0.
Fourth: This inning was disastrous
for the home team. Leesburg got on
i. i. .
to Clements pretty bad and a few er-
, ,f, v
i-j er .Ti-v ;i ii.i i. j m
ed off with, a single. Allsbrook drew
an error from Luffman. West singled
and would have scored Carpenter, but
he hurried too much around third and
was called out for not touchiijg that
sack. Gillespi fanned but Rolling hit
a two-bagger and scored Allsbrook
and West. Wharton drew another
error from Luffman but died on base,
when Epperson flied, out to center. B.
Wood led. off with a single. Clements

MARION

I.)
NEGRO KILLED NEAR
ORANGE LAKE
Evidently Crazed with Moonshine,
Ernest Snoddy Went Gunning for
Sheriff and his Deputy
Sheriff Thomas and Deputy Walter
Perkins were compelled to shoot a ne negro
gro negro named Ernest or "Nest" Snoddy
near Orange Lake late yesterday aft
ernoon. The negro, who was evidently
crazed with 'shine, went gunning for
the sheriff. Mr. Thomas started for
him, intending to put him under ar
rest. The negro pulled a gun, but the
sheriff, as usual, got in the first shot,
and fairly blasted Snoddy down with!
a shower of lead. The negro, tho'
terribly wounded, was sitting on the
ground where he fell, had his gun in
his hand and in it two or three loads,
which he was trying to let loose.
Deputy Perkins at this point, shot
the negro right thru the head and he
fell and died instantly. A coroner's
jury exonerated the two officers.
The negro brought his fate on him himself.
self. himself. The colored people had a picnic
at Orange Lake yesterday, and Sher Sheriff
iff Sheriff Thomas and Deputy Perkins went
over there in the afternoon to see if
there were any evidences of liquor liquor-selling..
selling.. liquor-selling.. They saw nothing out of the
way and started home. A short dis-1
tance from the lake they were stopped
by a colored man who told them that
Snoddy was armed and threatening
to kill the sheriff. Mr. Thomas and
his deputy, who were in the sheriff's
car, went to look for Snoddy.'
They soon saw him, stopped the
car, jumped out and advanced on the
negro on foot. Mr. Thomas didn't
expect to have to shoot, but kept his
hand on his1 gun. When they were a
little distance apart, the negro pulled
his gun and fired, but the- sheriff beat
him by a split second. The negro
staggered and went down but kept oh
trying to fire. Mr. Perkins, afraid
that the negro would get one shot in,
and that one do serious damage, fired,
the slug from his .38 special smashing
into Snoddy's brain and killing him al almost
most almost instantly.
The sheriff came at once back to
Ocala and with Judge Futch and Dep Deputy
uty Deputy Gordon returned to Orange Lake
to hold an inquest. The coroner's
jury, consisting of T. C. Wilson, R. L.
Carter, L. E. Long, C. E. Cork, A. B.
Thomas and Burry. Several witnesses
testified to Snoddy's threats, some of
them to his sitting on the postoffice
steps, with his pistol in his hand,
while saying he would kill the. sheriff.
An empty bottle, the smell of which
testified that it had recently held a
full load of shine,. was in. one of his
pockets. The jury brought in a ver verdict
dict verdict of justifiable homicide.
followed with another. Luffman hit
into a double play on Clements and
himself. Brooks flew out to third and
retired the side when it looked as if
we were going to save ourselves from
a shut out. Leesburg, 5, Ocala, 0.
Strickland went into -the box for
Ocala in the fifth and held Leesburg
to one hit and no errors for the rest of
the game. Medlin, led off with a fly
to Liddell. Buckles walked. Carpenter
hit to Strickland who whirled and
threw like a flash to Wood at second
and forced Buckles. There was plenty
of time for a double but Wood threw
wild to first and not only missed the
double but allowed Carpenter to reach
second. Allsbrook went out, Wood to
Brooks. R. Wood and Leavengood
made the first two outs in the fifth and
then Liddell singled, stole second and
! made third on a wild throw by
Buckles, but died on third when
Strickland fanned. Leesburg, 5;
Ocala, 0.
Sixth: Leesburg went out one, two,
, , , T
Clements singled but Fred Luffman
, e, T ,
4 went out, third to first. Leesburg, 5;
; UCaa, U.
Seventh: Wharton was hit on the
arm by Strickland. Epperson sacrificed
hi mto second. Medlin hit a fly to
deep second. Wharton tagged up and
tried to make third on it. Wood threw
wild but Luffman -recovered the ball
and threw to Strickland, who was
covering third and who touched
Wharton out when he slid over the

(Concluded on Eighth Page)

Slant-Eyed Men. with Some Justice,

Insist that They Have, Say so in
Korea, Manchuria and
Siberia
(Associated Press)
Tokio, July 15. The Japanese an answer
swer answer to President Harding's proposal
for a conference on limitation of arm armaments,
aments, armaments, forwarded to Washington,
while accepting the suggestion for an
armament conference, says Jiji Shim Shim-po
po Shim-po today, makes reservations con concerning
cerning concerning general far eastern questions
until more is learned as to the scope
and nature of the questions to be con considered.
sidered. considered.
HAVE TROUBLE AT HOME
Kobe, Japan, Thursday July 1. J
Aroops were cauea out toaay alter
thousands of striking workers in the
dock yards here had charged a police
cordon in an attempt to take posses possession
sion possession of the dock yards and carry out
a project for their control by the
workers. A number of strikers were
wounded and the ring leaders arrested.
AMERICAN LEGION
TRIP ABROAD
Veterans of the A. E. F. Expect
Revisit. Scenes of Their Trials
and Triumphs
to
(Associated Press)
New York, July 15. The 250 mem members
bers members of the American Legion who will
visit France in August and Septem September
ber September at the invitation of President Mil Mil-lerand,
lerand, Mil-lerand, will represent every section of
the United States and all arms of the
fighting forces in the war. Every
state will have' its quota and if possi possible
ble possible every combat division will have
representation, says an announcement
of the legion.
A fixed quota, based on legion mem- j
bership, has been allotted to each j
state. Not all who have asked to be :
included can go, but it is the purpose
of Franklin D'Olier. the former na-
tional commander of the legion who Is
in charge of the pilgrimage, to make
tile party "a cross section of our for-,
mer fighting forces." Selection of the
members is in the hands of the state
organizations of the legion.
The party will sail aboard the
steamer George Washington on Aug.
3 and will return about the middle of
September The principal events of
the visit will be the dedication at
Flirey of a monument to the Ameri-
can army, which is the gift of the
French municipality and the people of
Lorraine, and the laying of the cor-j
nerstone of the new bridge "Pont
Thierry.
President Millerand, Premier Briand
and the marshals of France are ex expected
pected expected to be present at the ceremonies
at Flirey. Flirey is familiar ground
to the A. E. F. It is situated in the
old Toul section which the American
troops took over in 1917.
Another reception of note to the
Americans will Be by the little town
of St. Die in the old Luneville sector,
also long held by Americans. St. Die's
claim to special attention in light of
the legion visit rests on the fact that
in St. Die stands the house in which
the continent of America received its
name. It is the one-time abode of
Waldsee-Muller, the Alsatian monk,
when he wrote the letter suggesting
that the new world take the name of
the Italian navigator, Amerigo Ves Vespucci.
pucci. Vespucci. '
Marshal Foch will be "at home" to
the visiting lesrionnaires. He will re-
ceive them in the house in which he
was born in the town of Taubes in the
Pyrenees mountains. There will be
receptions to the pilgrims at Paris,
Bordeaux, Toulouse, Lyon, Metz and
Strasbourg. At Verdun the party will
sleep in the famous citadel.
At Rheims the veterans will attend
the presentation of the 3,000,000-franc
gift of the Carnegie foundation to the
city library there.
Under the terms by which the legion
accepted the hospitality of the
French government, the expenses x of
the expedition will be borne by the
delegates themselves or by the legion
organization.
Mr. D'Olier says that the proposal
for the visit has been received with
such enthusiasm by the American vet veterans
erans veterans as to constitute a striking and
spontaneous tribute to France as a
former ally.
"The American veterans feel that
the forthcoming expedition marks the

Consultation Between Lloyd George

and d'Valera to Pave the Way for
a Larger Conference
(Associated Pr-iss)
" London, July 15 Lloyd .George and
de Valera resumed this morning the
conferences begun yesterday in which
they made an effort to clear away the
difficulties attending the holding of a
conference which might bring about
a settlement of the Irish problem.
The conversation today was, as yes yesterday,
terday, yesterday, between the two men alone.
No others were present. The confer conference
ence conference lasted an hour and a naif, and
at its conclusion it was announced
the conversations would be resumed
later, probably next Monday.
PRELIMINARIES SETTLED-PER
HAPS
v Those in close touch with the situa situation
tion situation believe the preliminaries between
the premier and Irish leader have been
workd out and that the next step will
be consultations between Lloyd
George and Sir James Craig, Ulster
premier. The official communique on
today's conference merely said the
conference had been held and would
be resumed at a later date, probably
Monday.
! BELFAST HAD ANOTHER LITTLE
OUTBREAK
Belfast, July 15. The miiltary re resumed
sumed resumed control of North Queen street
area here this morning. Acute trou trouble
ble trouble developed last night, several civil civilians
ians civilians being wounded, but the rioting
stopped abruptly at the curfew hour
after two were killed. s
A HERO OF THE
LOST BATTALION
Died Unknown in a New York Hos Hospital,
pital, Hospital, but Full Honors were
Paid to His Remains'
(Associated Press)
New York, July 15. Full military
honors marked the funeral today of
, private John Monson, hero of the
( Battalion," who died in a hos
n5tal hpr flftpr h.: taVpn in
leave of absence from the regular
army. He died Friday and it was
three days before the body was identi identified.
fied. identified. As soon as it became known that
he was the man who on Sept. 28th,
1918, carried a message through the
German lines that reunited the Lost
Battaiicm in the Argonne, scores of
. civilian organizations planned fitting
honors.' At the funerai a coiumn five
blocks long marched behind the
; today.
SHE'S MAKING A FIRST
CLASS SOB SISTER
. (Associated Press)
Cleveland, July 15. Mrs. Kaber
was carried into the court room by
two bailiffs this morning when her
trial was resumed. When seated, she
clutched the arm of the attending
bailiff seated at her side and amid
sobs pleaded he would not leave her.
"Don't leave me, don't leave me, you
won't leave me," she said. 4
Her attorney attempted to quiet
her. "I want to tell them, I want to
tell them everything, but Mr. Corri Corri-gan
gan Corri-gan wont' let me," she sobbed.
MOST EXTENSIVE HAUL
OF FLORIDA MOONSHINE
(Associated Press)
Jacksonville, July 15. Duval coun
; ty deputies reported today as a result
of raids Wednesday -and Thursday
they captured eleven copper stills,
2000 galolns of moonshine whisky and
15,000' gallons of mash in the western
part of the county around Baldwin,
White House and Marietta. Warrants
were issued for the arrest of ten farm farmers.
ers. farmers. This is probably the most ex extensive
tensive extensive moonshine haul in the history
of the state.
i entrance of the legion on the stage of
' international affairs, and that it will
tend to knit more closely, a mutual
understanding among veterans, not
only of France and the United States,
but of all allied countries," he said.
"It shows that in the hearts of Amer Americans
icans Americans who wore the uniform there
surely dwells an abiding affection for
France and the poilu. It is note noteworthy
worthy noteworthy that many applications come
from men who did not see foreign
service during the war."

UNCOMPLETE RETURNS GATHERED BY THE BOARD OF TRADE
SHOW THAT OVER HALF A 3IILLION DOLLARS WORTH
HAS BEEN SHIPPED OUT

In spite of a very bad beginning
brought about by increased freight
rates, Marion county has had a very
successful trucking season. Incom Incomplete
plete Incomplete returns gathered by the Marion
County Board of Trade from the va various
rious various shippp-j points indicate that the
truck crops iof the county have this
season yielded gross returns totalling
well over a half million dollars. The
tomato crop, one of the largest that

has ever been shipped out of the;cumbrs, 60 cars watermelons, 800

county, ana tne watermelon crop,
were the largest of the season. More
than 895 cars of truck were shipped,
not including crate shipments in less
than car lots. The incomplete figures
show that the gross returns were
$584,395. The number of cars of to tomatoes
matoes tomatoes shipped was 215, and the num num-be
be num-be rof cars of watermelons was 555.
pf cucumbers, there were 36 cars
shipped, and of string beans, 28. Due
to increase in freight rates, 'the cab cabbage
bage cabbage crop was almost a total loss, and
lettuce brought very little. Most of
the cabbage was left in the fields. The
gross returns for the various crops as
shown by the incomplete figures were:
for tomatoes, $224,394; watermelons,
$193,550; string beans, $71,326; cu cucumbers,
cumbers, cucumbers, $64,653; lettuce, $12,258;
cantaloupes, $18,215. These -figures
are based on the following average
prices obtained: tomatoes, $2; water watermelons,
melons, watermelons, $350; string beans, $2; cu cucumbers,
cumbers, cucumbers, $3; lettuce, 75c; cantaloupes,
$2.25.
Most of the tomatoes were shipped
from two packing houses in Ocala,
there being 150 cars shipped from this
point. Mcintosh was next with 34
cars. In round numbers, the following
individual shipments were made thru
the packing house of Mr." J. C. John-j
son, of Ocala: 8000 crates off of 40
acres, and 2000 crates off of 20 acres
share cropped; W. M. Gist & Son, 4000
crates off of 40 acres; J. L. Wallace,
3000 crates off of 35 acres; Lee Priest,
2500 crates off of 10 acres: R. A.
Manning, 2000 crates off of 20 acres
J. F. Keen, 2000 crates off of 20 acres;
L. M. Green, 1500. crates off of 15
acres; Douglas & Gaskins, 1000 crates'
off of 10 acres. Mr. Johnson, who sold
his entire crop under contract, re-j

ceived a return of around $15,000 for J MajVGIU McAndrew in Serious Con Con-his
his Con-his tomatoes. His net return was! a;: .4 v,n va

around. $7500. Mr. Johnson is recog recognized
nized recognized as one of the most successful, if
not the most successful, grower of to
matoes in Marion county. In 1920,!
his tomato crop brought him $16,000
from 40 acres; in 1919, $15,000 from
45 acres; in 1918 over $6000 from 20
acres; in 1917, over $7000 from 20
acres, and he had been getting good
returns in years prior to that.
The shipments this year from va
rious points in the county were as fol follows:
lows: follows: Reeddick, 7182 crates, including two
cars, of string beans; 8664 crates, in including
cluding including seven cars, of cucumbers; 15
cars of watermelons and eight cars of
tomatoes.
Orange Lake, 2115 crates of string
beans, 2225 crates of lettuce, 12 cars
of watermelons, 187 crates of cucumb cucumbers.
ers. cucumbers.
Anthony, 1500 crates of string
beans, 700 crates of lettuce, 12,075
crates of tomatoes, including 15 car
lots, nine cars of watermelons, 5000
crates of cantaloupes, including eight
car lots.
Mcintosh, 11,500 crates, including
23 cars, of cabbage; 4880 crates, in including
cluding including 12 cars, of string beans; 6000
crates, including 15 cars, of cucumb cucumbers;
ers; cucumbers; 13,220 crates, including 25 cars,
of lettuce; 13,600 crates, including 24
cars, of tomatoes; 12 cars watermel watermelons.
ons. watermelons.
Ocala, proper, 66,46- crates toma tomatoes,
toes, tomatoes, including 150 cars; seven cars
watermelons, two cars string beans.
Flag stations near Ocala, 52 cars
of watermelons; 4004 crates, including
eight cars, of tomatoes.
. Citra, 3000 crates of string beans,
100 crates tomatoes, 100 crates cu cucumbers,
cumbers, cucumbers, four cars watermelons.
Martel, two cars of string beans.
' South Lake Weir, 97 cars water watermelons.
melons. watermelons. Stations on Oklawaha Valley, 100
crates okra 100 crates string beans,
two cars watermelons.
: Candler, 25 cars watermelons.
Kendrick, 15 cars string beans, 24
cars watermelons, 14 cars cucumbers.
Emathla, 700 crates cucumbers, 1200
crates string beans.
Oklawaha, 300 crates string beans,

150 crates okra, 50 crates cucumbers,
150 crates cantaloupes.
Lowell, 120 crates cabbage, 9774
crates string beans, 200 crates let lettuce,
tuce, lettuce, 150 crate's cucumbers, 1008
cantaloupes, 37 cars watermelons, 11, 11,-648
648 11,-648 crates tomatoes, 340 crates sweet
corn, 36 .crates peas.
Summerfield, seven cars cabbage,

500 crates tomatoes. 100 crates cu-
crates cantaloupes.
Weirsdale, 87 cars watermelons.
Stanton, 27 cars watermelons.
Santos, 1748 crates cabbage, 692
crates cantaloupes.
Weirsdale, 27 cars watermelons.
Stanton, 27 cars watermelons.
Santos, 1748 crates cabbage, 692
crates tomatoes, three cars watei watei-melons.
melons. watei-melons. Dunnellon,-41 cars watermelons.
It should be remembered that com comparatively
paratively comparatively few of the farmers of Mar Marion
ion Marion county are engaged in raising
early vegetables. Trucking is but one
phase of the agriculture of Marion
county. The majority of farmers are are-engaged
engaged are-engaged in general farming.
WASHINGTON SOON WILL
GREET THE WAVES
Third Electric Driven American Bat Battleship
tleship Battleship to be Launched in
September
(Associated Press)
" Washington, July 15. The Wash Washington,
ington, Washington, the third American battleship
with an electric drive, will be launched
at Camden, N. J., early in September,
the navy department announced to today.
day. today. She is the fourth ship in the
navv to bear the name of Washington.-
Jthe first three being sailing vesself
built in 1814, 1816 and 1843. The new
Washington is a sister ship of the
Maryland, which is expected to be
turned over to the navy next month,
and the Colorado and West Virgi:
inia,
all in the course of construction,
will mount 16-inch guns.
All
1 HIS SERVICE TOLD ON BIM
uiiivii i ii ai A t vvt
Army Hospital
fAssoc!a'd Preso
Washington. July 15. Mvior Gen General
eral General James McAndrew, president of
the general staff college ani former
chief of staff for Gen. Pershing in
France, is in a serious condition at
the" Walter Reed army hospital here,
suffering from a general breakdown.
The general entered the hospital nine
months ago as a sufferer from mental
and physical exertions incident to his
service in France.
GREEKS CLAIM SUCCESS
(Associated Press)
Athens, July 15. Greek forces en engaged
gaged engaged in an offensive against Turkish
nationalists are making progress at
each end of the battle line and not en encountering
countering encountering sharp resistance, says a
Greek official statement.
TEUTON DESTROYERS TARGETS
For Gunfire of American Warboata
Off the Virginia Capes
(Associated Press)
Newport News, July 15. The for former
mer former German destroyers 132 and V-43
were to be sunk off the Virginia capes
today by gWfire of American destroy destroyers.
ers. destroyers. The former German vessels were
anchored off the capes last night and
the attack was to begin this morning.
PELLAGRA IS ASSUMING
ALARMING PROPORTIONS
Washington, July 15. A new out outbreak
break outbreak of pellagra, particularly in the
South, is alarming the public health,
service. The situation is considered
serious and preparations are being
made to cope with it.
ONE LITTLE AMENDMENT
Washington, July 15 Taking up
the tariff bill for committee amend amendment,
ment, amendment, the House considered today a
proposal to remove hides from the
free list and impose a dcty cf 15 per
cent ad valorem.



tvto

OCALA EVENING STAB, FRIDAY, JULY 15, 1121

Old Blair's Lucky
Penny

By FREDERICK CLARKE

An Accusation That
Proved False

By HAROLD SINCLAIRE

HIGH GRADE COM-
MERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY

I Farm views, landscapes and home
j scenes Eugene A. Revels, over Guar Guar-j
j Guar-j antee Clothing & Shoe Co., Ocala. 8 tf

(.). Wiiura Newspaper laiO&.

"And to my second nephew, Ronald
Bla ir, as a reminder of his remarkable
powers of memory, I leave the munifi munificent
cent munificent sum of one penny.. As he has
seen fit to imitate my peculiarities In
prirate, so may be copy my diligence,
beginning life oa one cent capital,
whlich is more than I had at the start,
and making his own way in' the
world." ,
The legatee in quegtlon Jistened to
the slow, measured tones "of Lawyer
Jones like one in a dream. The read reader
er reader of the last will and testament of
Jeptbah Blair, stern, practical man as
be was, cast a mournful and sympa sympathetic
thetic sympathetic look at the young man. ; He
liked Blair Immensely, as did every
one else In town, .unless it was Hugh
Telford, seated also In the apartment.
He smiled viciously and triumphantly.
He was safe ashore while Ronald was
floundering in dark waters. The

"Blair plat" was to be given to Tel-j

valued at $10,000.
Ronald left the lawyer's office. It was
cruel, after all his hopes and plans,
and his heart sank like lead as he
thought of Ruth Mason, his fiancee.
Where should he go for comfort
save to her?. It was his privilege, his
right, and half an hour later he was
seated by her on the porch of the
Mason home.
The Blair plat, left to his cousin was
a valuable property. Just before the
death of Mr. Blair a deposit- of rare
and valuable clay .used In stereotyp stereotyping
ing stereotyping and for electrical purposes had
teen discovered. "It was known as
ozocerite, found elsewhere only in
Austria, and Utah.
Adjoining the plat- was a twenty twenty-acre
acre twenty-acre patch of sterile land which had
been left to Ronald by his mother.
It was of so little value that he made
no attempt to have it cultivated, but
atecured a position as an accountant

In a near city. Then he received a
letter from Ruth. It read : "Be patient
.for a year.; I am going away and ycu
vmust not write' to me."
His business went welh The penny
. seemed to bring him good luck. Then
the penny was observed by a loyal old
Scotchman, leading to a friendship

;amd a large amount of business.
It was just a year later when: Ron Ronald
ald Ronald paid a visit to his home town. He
learned that the wonderful ozocerite
vein had run "out. Hugh had pretty

neany aissipaiea an ms reaay muuey.
He boasted, however, that he was en engaged
gaged engaged to Ruth and t- Ronald believed
this after her inexplicable silence.
In later years he never forgot a
sad and moody ramble ending at the
barren twenty-acre lot. In going
over it he stumbled, his watch chain
caught on a bush, and the penny
snapped loose and disappeared down
a great open crack' in the ground.
Ronald had no thought of losing a
token which he sincerely treasured.
He saw a man digging on an adjoin adjoining
ing adjoining farm, went over to him and bar

gained for a careful excavation in

. It took some dilicacy of treatment
to manipulate the dry, crumbling dirt.
At a depth of four feet, the 'bottom
oil the crack, the penny was produced.
"Hello!" suddenly exclaimed the

workman as ne scrapea on nis spaae
"say, if this should be the real
vein!"

"The what?" questioned Ronald
- 1

vaguely. v v--
- v-- "The vein of ozooerite. Look here "I

that's the real stuff," and he took up
a handful of the scrapings from the
spade.. 1
It was "the real stuff ;" that was
piroven within the ensuing two days.
Ronald was standing on the land, a

fiisw evenings later, when a familiar
figure came up over the rise in the
landscape.
V His heart stood still as, she ap approached.
proached. approached. Then a bitter thought
came into his mind Ruth had heard
of his good fortuse.
"The year is over," she said bright brightly
ly brightly as she approached him. "Did tjiey

never ten you? it was tiugn rei rei-ford
ford rei-ford who laid his fortune at my feet,
and my foolish father encouraged his
suit. Finally .it was agreed that I
should take a year to decide, away
from both of you. As if a year or a
thousand could make me forget
you !" ;
And she lifted the old penny from

the hand of her lover, the lucky pen penny
ny penny of old Jepthah. Blair, and kissed
it.

The Beginnings of Mankind.
The Institute of Human Paleon Paleontology,
tology, Paleontology, founded by the prince of Mo Monaco,
naco, Monaco, was recently opened in Paris.
The previous studies of Prince Albert
of Monaco have been along the lines
of marine biology and oceanography,
but he' has also been interested for
more than 20 years in prehistoric man
and he has financed many expositions
which tended to throw light on the
character, art, life and environment
of prehistoric man. The building was
approaching completion when the war
broke oat and it has now been de declared
clared declared open.

So Time Flies.

I Young Soldier I'm a short-timer

now. Only one month more to do.

m Old-Timer Serving a year enlist

ment?

' Young Soldier Yeh.
Old-Timer Say, kid, I could stand
on my head that long and never know
the time passed. Tha Trail.

. IHU Watra Kwspapr CnJoa.)
When David Barry was elected to
the town board, of Creston, everybody
seemed pleased, except John Ward.
For one reason, Ward "also ran."
Twice before he had been elected du during
ring during the past four years, but he had
developed a groacoy. cross-grained
yay tt thinking and acting, and even
Lis friends had become antagonized.
"The Idea of that upstart taking my
place !" railed Ward. Why, he's hard hardly
ly hardly lived here long eneugh to be a cit citizen.
izen. citizen. I'll drive him from Creston, or
go myself."
The homes of the enemies! If such
they may be called, adjoined. t
"He has got on his high horse too
late for me," young Elmer Barry ad advised
vised advised his father one day. "Cecille, his
daughter, is the dearest girl in the
world ; we have becotpa engaged, and
when we get ready we are going to
inarry."
"Yes," assented Mr. Barry, "I do not
know a more estimable young lady. I
fear, though, that you will have some
opposition to encounter."
"What is the m.ter with the man,
anyhow?" questioned Elmer. "I have
no patience with him. Last week he
nearly killed our dog for chasing a ball
ills boy was rolling."
"Perhaps," said gentle Mrs. Barry,
"that strayed son of his has soured his
nature. They say he. has got into all
Kinds of trouble.!
"He drove him away, as 1 get it," ex explained
plained explained Mr. Barry. "If it's anything,
t's remorse."
Ward soon after that found out
about Elmer and Cecille. Then she
was kept practically a prisoner in the
house. ('
Right on the heels of this came a
secret a secret known only for the
time to Mr. and Mrs. Barry. At the
t-ear of their yard was a small, unused
barn. It adjoined the chicken yard.
For several mornings Mr. Barry had
got up early. He made hasty and cov covert
ert covert visits to the barn, carrying a bas basket
ket basket and padlocking the door strongly.
: Ward had been unusually pestifer pestiferous
ous pestiferous of late. f
Two evenings he sat on his front
porch bawling out an Indirect accusa accusation
tion accusation against his neighbor concerning
naif a dozen fane; chickens that were
missing. From his own porch Mr.
Barry t heard him say:
"I've stood it long enough. If those
chickens aren't buck in my coop by
tomorrow I'll digrace Barry, I vow I
will Ill spring a surprise on him
that will give him a startler."
Mr. Barry had just left the dinner
table the next day when a ring came
at the door bell. As he answered it
he ..was somewhat astonished to find
at the door his irascible neighbor and
the town constable.
"I'm sorry. Mr. Parry," said the lat latter
ter latter in a tone almost of distress, ."but
the duty is Imposed upon me of serv serving
ing serving you with a search warrant."
"I think I understand," rejoined Mr.
Barry, with a smile. "You are bound
10 insist that I am a chicken thief,
Mr. Ward?"
"I don't know that, but your ac actions
tions actions are very suspicious."
"Mr. Ward," he said, almost agitated agitatedly,
ly, agitatedly, "I beg of you not to persist in this
uncalled for action of yours."
-Uncalled for, eh"?" snarled Ward.
"We'll soon see about that!"
They made their way to the barn.
With a grave face Mr. Barry unlocked
the door.
Upon a cot supplied with clean, com

fortable bedding lay a thin, wan-faced
young man. He struggled to his feet
weakly.
It was the runway, Bryce Ward. It
would be Impossible to depict the
amazement and then the ungovernable
wrath of the hard-hearted father.
"Why, Mr. Ward," exclaimed the or or-ficer,
ficer, or-ficer, "it is your son! He is wanted
on an otl charge here
"Then da your dv-ly!" roared the
heartless parent. "He has made his
oed, now let him lie in it."
Mr. Barry induced the constable to
accept bail for his prisoner, sent Bryce

away to a new country and a new llte,xJ

paid his forfeited bail bond, and ard
neard of it. ..
That was the final breakdown for
the inflexible old man. When, a montn
later, after keeping ail his kind deeds
to himself as far as possible, Mr. Bar Barry
ry Barry wrote a pleasant note to his conscience-stricken
neighbor, the capping
stone was reached.
It told that he had a fine business
offer in another town and was going
to resign his office. He said he would
not go away until he had helped to
elect his successor. Ward.
Some people learn their lesson late
in life. It was so with Ward, a
changed man through the patience and
humane love of a good man. His first
acknowledgment of his great mistakes
was when he went out as Elmer was
passing the house. He took his arm,
led him through the gate, and then
to the garden seat, where Cecille was
waiting for him.

Ocala Gun Club members

'fi, a and hunters, rroteet vom

AnCk -i-

j4-x eyes with auto glass, rm rm-"A.SC
"A.SC rm-"A.SC v prove your average and
protect your eyes. A fine
selection for a few days only.
DR. K. J. WEIHE,
Optometrist and. Optician
Eyesight Specialist

This is a. StudebaVv year. tf
RAILROAD SCHEDULES
Arrival and departure of passenger
trains at OCALA UNION STATION
The following schedule figures pub published
lished published as information and not guar guaranteed.
anteed. guaranteed. (Eastern Standard Time)
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILROAD
Leave Arrive
2 :20 am Jacksonville-NTork 2 :1 0 am
1:55 pm Jacksonville 1:50 pm
4:17 pin Jacksonville 3:50 pm
2:15 am Tampa
. Manatee-St Petrsbrg 4:05 pm
2:55 am NTork-St. Petrsbrg 1:35 am
2:15 am Tampa 2:15 am
1:50 pirn Tampa-Manatee 1:35 pm
1:05 pm Tampa-St. Petrsbrg 4:05 pm
ATLANTIC COAST LINE R. R.
Leave Arrive
2:27 am JacksonvUle-NTork 2:33 am
1:45 pm Jksonville-Gainsville 3:24 pm

6:42 am Jksonville-Gansville 10:13 pm

z :33 am bt-Fetsbrg-Lakeland 2:27 am
3:24 pm St.Petsbrg-Lakeland 1:25 pm
7:10 am Dunnellon-Wilcox

7:25 am Dunellon-Lkeland 11:03 pm

3:30 pm Homosassa 1:25 pm
10:15 pm Leesburg 6:42 am
4:45 pm Gainesville 11:50 am
Monday, Wednesday, Friday.
Tuesday, Thursday. Saturday.
ORDER OF EASTERN STAR

Ocala "Chapter No. 29, O. E. S

meets at the Masonic hall the second
and fourth Thursday evenings of each
month at 8 o'clock'.

Mrs. Rosalie Condon, W. M.
Mrs. Susan Cook. Secretary.
ROYAL ARCH MASONS

Regular conventions of the Ocala

Chapter No. 13, R. A: M., on the fourth
Friday in every month at 8 p. m.

H. S. Wesson, H. P.
B. L. Adams, Secretary.

MARION-DUNN MASONIC LODGE
Marion-Dunn Lodge No. 19, F. & A.

M., meets on the first and third

thursday evenings of each month at

8 o'clock until further notice.

J. R. Dey, W. M.
B. L. Adams, Secretary.

WOODMEN OF THE WORLD

Fort King Camp No. -14 meets at
K. of P. hall at 7:30 p. m. every sec second
ond second Friday evening at 8 o'clock. Visit Visiting
ing Visiting sovereigns are always welcome.
H. B. Baxter. C. C.
Chas. K. Sage, Clerk.
OCALA LODGE NO. 2S6, B. P. O. E.
Ocala Lodge No. 286, Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, meets
the second and fourth Tuesday eve evenings
nings evenings of each month. Visiting breth

ren always welcome. Lodge, rooms
upstairs over Troxler's md the Book
Shop, 113 Main street
A. A. Vandenhrock, E. R.
G Y. Miller, Secretary.

ODD FELLOWS

KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS

Ocala Lodge No. 19. Conventions
held every Monday evening at 7:30
o'clock at the castle halL A cordial
welcome to visiting brothers.
Tom Proctor, C C.
Chas. K. Sage. K. of B, & S

Tulala Lodge No. 22. L O. O. F
meets every Tuesday evening at 8
o'clock at the Odd Fellows hall in the
third story of the Gary block. A
warm welcome always extended to
nsiting brothers.
TLC. Carter. N. G.
Frank G. Churchill, Secretary.

We have a few; more Ladies' Hats
we are sacrificing. FISHEIS 21

t:';(i,ij,Jj:j,'ii!j'fti.5

at Iff1 I I

Drink

tl FEHTfS D

t(, u V

1

Tint tf rici

" j i, 1 aj 1 ui in ii m jip

Made from Choicest Grains
and Finest Hops
1

TT is the most stimulating, refreshing drink

you have ever tasted. It has a dehgntful tan?

and flavor all its own.
Ambrosia is pure and wholesome beneficial for
every member of your, family. It tastes delicious
by itself or with a bite to eat. Try it today.

ORDER A CASE SENT HOME
- SOLD EVERYWHERE
Moses Grocery Company
Ocala, Florida
' AMBROSIA IS MADE AND BOTTLED ONXY SY
CENTRAL CONSUMERS CO., Louisville, Ky.
Incorporated

Serve
Ice-Cold

tt1bi(gE wei mly

An Understandable Mistake.
Absent-mindedness Is not common in
the young, but the story has reached
us that a young woman who had
dressed herself for a ball looked in the
mirror and absent-mindedly went to
bed Exchange.

First World's Poultry Congress.
Nine countries have already accept accepted
ed accepted invitations to take part In the first
world's poultry congress, which Is to
be held at The Hague next September.

How would you regard your cHsnccs lor profit from the production of grape grapefruit
fruit grapefruit and oranges
If there were only speculative marketing?
Would not the growers of Florida have suffered as much as have farmers in
Other flectfon? during tU fofw1 faflngr-ial rfoprAggirm
If there were only speculative marketing?
Would not the admitted failure of speculative marketing in time of stress make
the outlook an exceedingly gloomy one for the citrus industry
If there were only speculative marketing?
Would there be efficient effort to reduce production costs, to lower freight rates
and otherwise to stabilize grapefruit and orange growing
If there were only speculative marketing?
Would there be worth-while endeavor to increase the consumption of citni3
fruits and to educate the public as to their health and food values
If there were only speculative marketing?
Would there be under way necessary work to open new markets and to provide
wider channels of distribution for Florida grapefruit and oranges
f If there were only speculative marketing?
Would you have your present confidence in the stability of the citrus industry
of Florida, and your faith in the maintenance of existing grove values
If there were only specula tire marketing?

Is not yoar repport the jasi dot of Cat Florid CStros Exchange beets of wha.t it had accom accomplished
plished accomplished to protect trait iiwm tapra xomstiailt gmrtrtrnjrt Tvt talormtction about xaambe

ship consult the manager

m&oagtr at

mr writ to tha buaiaess

1 v m



OCA LA EVENING STAR. FRIDAY, JULY 15. 1921

THREE
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Traveling Outfits
We can supply your needs
for your summer vacation
Official Agents
FOR ?
Boy Scout Outfits
We can supply everything
needed
in
Trunks, Bags and
Snit Cases
Tfte Quality Store Plus Quality Goods

WA

EMM'S

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TPOR one week we are going to give the people of Ocala and vicinity an opportunity of securing some of the
most attractive bargains offered in years. We are placing on sale merchandise that is well-known to be th
very best to be secured and includes brands of standard.quality, and at prices that cannot be duplicated a11
present market price. Sale begins

AND
CONTINUES
THROUGH

o Qvjnj a aim

Scan the items mentioned below, make out your list, then come in and let us help you in picking out your

selections YOUR PROFIT AND OUR PLEASURE.

J. -J )jL G iJ. Jf 1

Children's Shoes
Children's Low Shoes, sizes 5 to 8,
values to $3, jCn
a pair V X OU
Children's low shoes, sizes 8 1-2 to 11,
values to $4, OO 1 C
per pair..
Children's low shoes, sizes 11 1-2 to
2, values to $4, J0 OC
. per pair P-0J
(Including E. C. Skuffers, Barefoot
Sandals and the well known Jack &
Gill and Kamp Tramp lines.
Few specials in patent leather and
ta?aS:!?: ........... $1.00
Boys' oxfords, black and tan, sizes 3
to 5 1-2, values to $6.50, dQ -1 (?
per pair.............. vO.lU

len s Shoes

- v
One lot men's oxfords, black and tan
ies 41-2 to 61-2, d0 OC
values up to $10, at. . .V-dLtJ
Johnson & Murphy Oxfords, values to
. ... $10.00

Eegal oxfords, $10

values, at ..........

Eegal oxfords, $8.50 7tS
values, at U
Waterman's Special oxfords. $12.00
and $12.50 values, per 85

Waterman's Special ox oxfords,
fords, oxfords, $10 values, at .
Waterman's Special ox oxfords,
fords, oxfords, $7.50 values, at
One lot rubber sole ox-'
fords, $9 values, at. .
One lot of Kreider ox oxfords,
fords, oxfords, $8.50 values, at

One, lot white oxfords and high top,
$7.50 and $8 values, QQ
One lot white buck oxfords, $10.00
values, per $7 75
pair . . . . .
One lot white buck sport oxfords,
values up to $12.50, per EJQ
All Straw Hats at
Half Price

ALL OTHER BOYS' SUITS
AT HALF PRICE

Boys' waists,. 75c values
at...;

50c

Boys' waists, $1 values. This lot in includes
cludes includes waists that were formerly'

$1.50. Sale

price.
Boys' shirts, $1.50
values, at

75c

$1.15

Bofts'.??.!h!':f....... $1.65
Boys' union suits, ages 2 to 6, values

to 85 cents,
at...........

50c

$7.75

$7.75
$5.95
$5,00
$4.00

Boys' union suits, sizes 8 to r7XZg
12, $1.00 values, at....
Boys' union suits, sizes- 28 to 36,
values to $1.25, 90 C
Underwear
Genuine Scriven Drawers, 1 OP
at per pair vl iO
Two lots Wilson Bros', and Peter Hill
shirts and drawers, 75c and C
. $1 values, at ......... OUC
Genuine B. V. D. shirts and 7tZn
drawers, each O C

$1.25
$1.00
$1185

Genuine B. V. D. union
suits, at
Wilson Bros, union
SUllrfSy Sit
$2.50 Mansco union
suits at

$1.25

$1.75. Mansco three-quarter quarter
length union Att
. suits, at P1U

$1.50 union
suits, at

$1.50 Porous Knit union 7C
suits at
One lot boys' undershirts and 1 P.
drawers, 50c values at.., XOC
Two lots men's jersey elastic seam

drawers, $1.50 values, VK

f WW

at.

Men's Shirts

All felt hats half price, except
Stetson's, which are' $7 and $10.
For the Boy
One lot boys Palm Beach and Kool
Cloth suits, some with two pair of

pants, values to $12, ;

at...

Boys' suits. Hart Schaffner and Marx,
ft1!!.!?!!!! .. $16.00

$1.25 Shirts at'." ...
$1.50 Shirts at
$2.00 Shirts at ....
$2.50 Shirts at
$3.00 Shirts at
$3.50 Shirts at ........

$4.00 Shirts at .

$4.50and $5 Shirts at
$6.00 Shirts at

S5.00 $6 SUk PonSee-Shirts collar
match, at .....

$7.50 Silk Shirts at ....
$10 Silk Shirts at

v

9 5
..$1.15
..$1.45
.$1-85
..$2.15
..$2.85
$31 5
. .$3-85
..$4-55
to
..$450
. .$5-65
..$8-50

Belts
$3.00 Belts at $2-00
$1.75 and $2 Belts at $1-35
$1.50 Belts at $1.00
$1.00 Belts at 75c
75c Belts at 50c
Rain Coats
$7.50 men's rain (Jr rn
rain coats at J)0Ol
$15 men's rain f ff
coats at VlUtUU
$16 and $16.50 men's 1 flft
rain coats .... J) A A UU
$18 men's rain f "1 Q Q f"
coats, at P1 OmdO
$20 men's A (f
rain coats at Jx""XVH
$4 boys' rain fcO 7C
coats i O
$5 boys' rain d O 7 tZ
coats at J)0 O
$6.50 boys' rain Cf 7C
coats at ..... Jtc0
Umbrellas
$1.50 values at $1-25
$2.00 values at t .$1 .50
$2.50 values at ..: $1-85
$3.00 values at $2-35
$3.50 values at $2.75
$4.00 values at $3-10
$4.50 values at .. $3-25
$5.00 values at $3.95
Children's Wash
Suits, Sizes 2-8
$3.00 values at $2-25
$4.00 values at ....... .$2-85
$4.50 values at $3-35
$6.00 values at ".......$4.75
Children's Suits
$1.50 and $1.75 rompers, Jf Qf
sizes 3 to 5, at . Vl .1
75c children's play (ff
overalls at Q"C
For The Men
Men's socks. 15c two for' 25c
One line good lisle socks v.. 25c
Good lisle sox. . : .35c 3 for $1-00
Pure silk socks at.. 75c
During this sale we are offering

stiff collars at 20c each, $2-35 Pr
dozen. 3
Soft collars 25c grade at. ....... 20c
One job lot collars as long as they
last at 5c
Headlight overalls and J1 7 EC
jumpers J)A0
Headlight one-piece ECO
. overalls vOOU
Morotuck overalls, $1 50
Pincheck pants, $1 25
Khaki pants $1.50 'CO CA
and J)6iUU
Work Shirts 50c, 75c and $1.00
Boys' Headlight one- Ol ETA
piece overalls V A 0 J

Clothing

Genuine Palm Beach Suits, $7.50
$10, $13-50, $14, $17 and $18.
Dixie Weave Coats and Pants $20.
Mohair Coats and Pants, $1750
and $20.
Lot No. l suits, $35 $42 50 and
$45 at $25. This includes Hart
Schaffner and Marx guaranteed
clothes.
Lot No. 2 suits, $35 and $50 at
$30.
Lot No. 3 suits, $40, $45, $55,
$60, $65 at $35.
One lot blue serges with extra trou trousers,
sers, trousers, $50 values $42 50

$15.00

Twelve Sport Coats,
$25 values at

White flannel and serge trousers, $9
values at $7-50; $1 f flfl
$12.50 values at. J A LF JJ
$3 and $3.50 values white fQ PA
duck pants, at...... PfJI

Bath Robes
$16.50 and $18 values $1 A ff
in bath robes at J)1U.UU
Handkerchiefs
$1.00 linen handkerchiefs at..... 65c
75c handkerchiefs at 40c
25c extra fancy handkerchiefs at. 1 5c
50c and 75c silk hanhkerchiefs at 35c
Washable
Neckwear
35c values at .....20c
50c values at.. ..35c 3 for $1-00

Silk Neckwear
50c values at 40c
75c values at 55c
$1.00 values at ...75c
$1.25 values at 95e
$1.50 values at $1-20
$2.00 values at $1-60
$2.50 values at $1-75
3.00 and $3.50 values at $2-25
Odd Pants
Natural color Palm Beach J A tZti
Pants at JxOU
Tan, gray and stripe .Palm ? C EC A
Beach Pants at PUUU
Kool Cloth Pants 4 75
Panama Pants $3 Q0
$16.50 pants, wool and 1 EJ A
worsteds, at... vll OU
t1....:.:.... $10.50
$13.50 Pants g yg
$10.00 Pants
$8.00 and $8.50 Pants jjg yg
$7.00 and $7.50 Pants JjjCJ
$6.00 and $6.50 Pants $r or
at J)0.00
tp.T.. $4.00

Remember
the Date,
of
This Sale

He Place'

EVERY item mentioned above is new stock andip-to-date, and as we are willing to stand back of our reputa reputation
tion reputation as sellers of honest merchandise, it behooves yoii to at least make a visit to our store if for nothing else
than to let us prove to you that real bargains are being offered.

Free!! Free!!
As long as tiey last. To
each lady visiting our store
will be presented an Egg
Beater.

Ocala

"THE HABERDASHER"

Florida

Just Received
Large shipment Trunks, Bags
and Suit Cases. Reduction
during this sale' of 20 per cent'

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I-

OCALA EVENING STAFV FRIDAY, JULY 15, 1921
rocs

1

Oeala Evening Star
Fabliahed Every Dr Ecit Sodr T
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY,

OCALA, FLORIDA

i K. R. Carroll, TKUt
'P. VVLHTtgfNd, Sretry-Trearr
J. H. Bfjimla, Editor

Entered at Ocala,' Fla., postof ftce as
seco mil -class matter.

TELEPHONES
BoIae Of Oee ......... FlT-0e
iCditoi-ial Department Two-STfB
Soeielr Keporter .. .F1t-0
MEMBER ASSOCWflTED PRESS

entitled for the use for republication of
' all niiwg dispatches "credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and
also the local news published herein.
All rlsrhts of republication of special
dispatches herein are also reserved.
4
DOMESTIC SUBSCRIPTION RATES
One year, in advance ...., .00
Blx months, in advance 3.00
ThTee imonths. In advance 1.50
One month, in advance -60

members of bi3 famil7, and before
leaving informed us that they enjoyed
the big picnic very much; that having
read the story of the massacre when
a boy, he had always wanted to visit
the spot. Senator Crosby materially
aided Judge Koonce in getting the ap appropriation
propriation appropriation measure of S5000 passed
by the last legislature."

BOY-

GOUTS

SUGAR SATURDAY AND MONDAY
17 pounds of sugar for one dollar,
with a dollar's worth of other groc groceries
eries groceries for cash, Saturday and Monday
only. Phone 377.
tf II. B. WHITTINGTON.

ADVERTISING RATES
Display! Plate 15 cents per Inch for
consecutive insertions. Alternate inser insertions
tions insertions 25 per cent additional. Composi Composi-,
, Composi-, tion charges on ads. that run less than
six times 10 cents per inch. (Special
position 25 -per cent additional. Rates
based on four-inch minimum. Less than
four inches will take a higher rate,
which will be furnished upon applica application.
tion. application.
Reading Notice Five cents rper line
for ilrst' insertion; three cents iper line
for each subsequent Insertion. One
change a week allowed on readers with without.
out. without. extra composition charges.
Legal advertisements at legal rates.

The (Jhattanooga aeparanem oi ed

ucation! has placed the taboo on silk
stockings, peek-a-boo waists and high

heels worn by the school girls of that
city. Evidently the members of the
department have taken it upon them themselves
selves themselves to crowd Zion, 111., off the front
page. Jacksonville Metropolis.
I We doubt that any department of

I education has the legal authority to

designate how school children shall
dress, but good taste as well as re regard
gard regard for good health should impell
parentsto see to it that their children
are dressed as plainly and comfortable

as possible. If a girl dresses for the

school room like she does for a ball
room she will not help either the

, school nor herself.

(Conducted by National Council of the
Boy Scout of America.)

SCOUT FIRE FIGHTERS

They say that persistent advertis advertising
ing advertising is the force that wins, then friends

why haven't you been in. Even in
time of sales our values are unsur

passed. FISHEL'S, across from Mar

ion Hardware Co. St

We see the Tampa Times' copy of
the Literary Digest came -to hand a
day ahead of our'n.
The republican party's idea of re retrenching
trenching retrenching is to do it at the expense of
the boys who did the trenching. ?
Wonder, if Grover C. Bergdoll was

included in the peace with Germany.
If he was, we protest. Tampa Times.
Peace hasn't been made yet.
Fifteen cents a gallon for gasoline
is predicted by the end of the summer.
But the captains of industry will make
it up on something else.
Most of the money raised for wel welfare
fare welfare work seems to go to the workers.
Few of them are in the business for
their health.

The truth of the matter is the ma:
Jority of the fellows who are supposed
to help make our laws are not capable
of making a decent hoe handle out of
a straight, smooth grained papaw
pole of correct dimensions. Eustis
Lake Region.
- Well, Friend Miller, it's nobody's
fault but that of the people who elect
such fellows. Also, we are suspicious
you are too harsh in your judgment.
Notwithstanding our 1 deficiencies, we
have better laws than any other na nation.
tion. nation.

Have we not been a trifle too indif indifferent
ferent indifferent to the virtues of soap and wa water
ter water in furnishing the melting pot?
Tampa Times.
Consideriitg that the two are. such
good mixers, we have.
, .; ... : .-
"Jazz is dying." It always did sound
that way. Greenville Piedmont.

Too lively for us. Sounds like a
barroom fieht trying to harmonize

with a catfight.

Some of the small nations who
spurn the olive branch might be
brought around by an application of
the hickory stick. Columbia. S. C,
Record.
That would smash the doctrine of
self determination.

T 1 T Tu vn. V n Animiul Vila

first dollar there was no oil on it. He J
does not boast of the ones Ida Tarbell

writes about, however. Clearwater

Sun.

.TnhnHpe and all the rest of the

country have just about T forgotten

there Wa3 ever such a person as Ida
Tarbell.

"Dempsey Draws Color Line"

headline. Khaki and navy blue includ

ed! Jacksonville Metropolis.

His original artist drew him in yel

low.

If the disarmament conference fails
to put an end to alliances it might
just as well never-meet, for what
would be the sense in a nation's dis

arming if two could double their
strength by combining against it?
Times-Union.
We should worry. This is a double double-strength
strength double-strength country all by itself.

Editor Thorn of the Kissimmee Val-

ey Gazette has started a campaign

for the people against alleged graft grafting
ing grafting officials. Here's hoping. Clear Clearwater
water Clearwater Sun.

If the people will support him, he

will win for them.

It will be right hard to contend man
isn't descended from, some sort of an
animal as .long as one-half the world
goose-steps and the other half pussy pussyfoots.
foots. pussyfoots. Philadelphia North American.
The probability is that man is de-

' scended from two animals, some of

them highly, uncongenial.

The Times-Union- very sensibly

says: "Several state newspapers made

note of the fact that there were three
fatal accidents at Pablo Beach on the

fourth of July, but they did not men

titon the fact that there were fifty

thousand people there on that day.'

Says the Sumter County Times:

"Among the visitors who came over

last week was Senator Crosby of Cit
ra. lie was accompanied by severa

f!!CK!E SAYS:

5 veS-VSt fVVi tLJECTfAC MS"fo.

P.WTU VC.O. fcOT YT

Twenty six Cashmere (Wash.) boy
scouts, with their leaders, started In a
big truck for an overnight camp, an
all day trip which landed them In the
beautiful Squakano creek valley, at
nightfall. They erected ''their shel shelter
ter shelter tents, had a big "feed" and
a jolly campflre pow-wow. Short

ly after taps a scout reported
a fire visible down the canyon.
In less than 30 seconds the troop was
In formation ready for action. The
Red Cross patrol under Senior Patrol
Leader Gall Phillips was sent down
the canyon with Instructions to leave
two scouts at the sawmill a mile
away, another two at another point,
etc., so that as soon as the fire was
located a message could be lelayed
back to camp.. Meanwhile two other
patrols were equipped for fire fighting,

and special orders given.
A few minutes later two boys of the
first patrol brought back word that
It was the mill which was on fire, and
that they had left the other six scouts

In the thick of. it One of the assist assistant
ant assistant scoutmasters and a few scouts
were left to guard the camp, as it was
surrounded by valuable timber which
might catch fire.
Scoutmaster Chichester and liLsslst liLsslst-ant
ant liLsslst-ant Braggons arrived a the scene of
the disaster In a short time with an
eager squad of workers The few
men In charge at the mill had about

given up hope of saving anything from

the flames, but the Doys iormea a
bucket brigade from a nearby creek
to the lumber piles, and by means of
wet sacks put out new fires, which
kept starting, while another crew
wrecked the high tramway which was
acting as a fuse and leading the fire
from pile to pile of lumber. By 2
a. m. the fire was under control. The
mill and a large amount of lumber
had been destroyed, but thanks to the

efforts of the scouts, two buildings,
soi- furniture, two or three heavy
wagons, and over 200,000 feet of lum lumber,
ber, lumber, some $3,000 worth In all, were
saved. A weary but triumphant lot
of boys hiked back to camp, leaving
two of their number to patrol the fires

until daylight. They did not climb the

mountain the next day, as had been

planned, but nobody was disappointed,

as the troop had had enough thrills

and hard work for one outing.
The work of the scouts received

much well deserved praise, and the

president of the lumber company
whose property they had saved.-presented
the troop with a $50 check In
appreciation of the remarkable good
turn, a gift that was accepted with
the understanding that the money
would be used to purchase needed
equipment.

NEEDHAM MOTOR CO.
General Auto Repairing
and Storage
Gasoline, Oils and Grease
USED CARS FOR SALE
Cars Washed $1.00
Cars Polished .50
Oklawaha Ave. & Orange St
Phone 252

We are still receiving Ladies' Mid Mid-Summer
Summer Mid-Summer and Sport Hats. Fishel's. 3t

C. Cecil Bry apt
PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT

H Gary Block, Over 10c Store H
S PHONE 332X H

EAT AT THE MAXINE

Best meals in the city for 50 cents.
Twenty-one meal ticket for $7. Phone
260, 310 N. Main street 27-tf
ATTENTION

Want a used car? We have some some-Real
Real some-Real buys. Spencer-Pedrick Motor
Company." 11 -tf

C V. Roberts
Phone 305

Barney Spencer
Phone 431

ROBERTS & SPENCER
Funeral Directors, Embalmers
Private Morgue and Chapel
MOTOR EQUIPMENT
Office Phone 350, Ocala, Fla.

v 217 W. Broadway

14

i
1

" Ask for Day Dream rouge and tal talcum
cum talcum powder at the Court Pharmacy. 6t

LIFE

FIRE

A. E. GERIG
INSURANCE
Ocala, Florida

ACCIDFNT AUTOMOBILE

(5

NOTICE' 011B SDCAB -SPECIALS
FOR SUM 1Y

Good for

SATURDAY and -.-SSONDAY
JULY 16tti and JULY 18th

mi. tt nT?mri? OHnT3T70 CT7T T? dTDn? CTTVPT?Q

ine U-OE.1V V Hi OIUIVIjO CllC -JUIV V JU uivnuu

nTTTTTlSin MOF POPTTT A T? pvprv H a v S

"
& rrr qput? IT CVnJV nAlHTrT'C fl((l (VNV

Ymi will soon learn where the good are located in

W -i -n H 3 4.U4. FTC A nTUACTTDV ffi

5 tnese stores ana you win miu umi u o rnouixu

K5

TO SERVE YOURSELF.

The gun with the three-hundred-

mile range in the hands of jingoes will
cause more trouble than moonshine

with a .two-ton kick in the hands of
bootleggers. Jacksonville Metropolis.

Tt. will cause more trouble to the

jingoes of other nations than to our

own. Trouble with the pacifists is

they think America is the only bel

ligerent country in the world.

Nations and men are much alike.

They seldom appeal to God unless they

are setting licked. Baltimore Sun.

Don't know about that. This nation

appealed to God every minute when
itsboys were going over the top. Now

it seems to be on the verge of forget

ting both God and the boys.

CHEERFUL WHILE ON DUTY

Unfortunately for our industry,

stenninsr on eras doesn't wear out much

shoe-leather. Boston Shoe and Leath

er Reporter.

No. thev don't nut a man's shoes

1
on when they dress him for his coffin.

TVue, vacation comes as a relief to

teacher, but just think what it shunts

back onto mother. Marion Star.

But as the year3 go on, mother

passes the buck to teacher, more and

more.

. Iff osseRve 1 j;
If AFHC RUlS Hi :j
HlL, (i sr.- t f S)
I Hit W
ill fti ""fFvH II
..

Boy Scouts Ar Aiding Traffic Regu

lation in Many Cities.

i ;

' M tor

- i i 1 1 irj

We are always hearing complaint of

our Florida schools, but from all re

ports they are genuine temples of
learning compared with those of the

great city of New York.

Ocala has a Main street, and if
someb'ody will write us a readable

article about it we will put his or her
name under the caDtion. same as "L.

T. I." get his over the baseball write-

ups. That will be honor enough to

I pay for a good article.

A O A is my phone number, and
404 all kinds of HAULING

(whether light or heavy, short or long

! distance) is mv business. Household

j moving and baggage my specialties.

1 T T 1 .-.-tf

33

SCOUT LEADERS MEET.

The Pasadena boy scout council had

tt annual meeting in January in the

new mission patio of the Hotel Vista

del Arroyo. After the meeting the
rfi entertained all the local

scoutmasters and troop committee

with a banauet and "snappy scout

Trnirrara. About one hundred men

were present and voted the affair a

great success.;

;fc.rrss-l.. Jt.. corarev.

ATTENTION

'Want a used car? We have some.

Real buvs. Soencer-Pedrict Motor

Hnmnanv. 11-tf

SCOUT STUDY CONSTITUTION.

Fl. E. Givens of Grit Falls, MonL,

rontis offered five prize? for the

five" best essays written by registered
scouts of Great Falls on the subject

nf "Th' History of the Constitution

of the United States." The contest is

to be made an annual affair. Tais Is

an e:-elleht way of Intensifying in

terest in the histw and government
of our nation. Mr. Givens lead

might well be followed by other pob-UplriU-d
citizens.

I 25 POUNDS GRANULATED SUGAR FOR SI to the first ten k

i customers who buy $5 worth Cor more) of other goods

With other purchases of $1 or more, we will sell 17
noiinds Granulated Sugar for SI. Only one deal to the

customer. Blitter, Flour andFeed not included in sugar specials.
; : ; (p
We vere fortunate enough to secure a small lot of Corned Beef, Roast
Beef and Curned Beef Hash at a, bargain. On Saturday and Monday this lot 0
of canned meats will be put on sale at a BARGAIN TO YOU.
The price will be 17c per tin on all three items.
Some of the Roast Beef is in one pound net tins. Most of the Corned
Beef is Libby's. The Corned Beef Hash is the famous Purity Cross Brand and
is packed in pound (net) tins. We can't include these items in the sugar deals.
: : ; 0
Our Delivery Service
We are delivering goods from these stores now. However, we are inak-
ing a minimum charge of 10c for deliveries. Buy your week's supply at one
time, save money and We the goods delivered for. 10c. You will save the 10c g.
on two or three items; the rest will to velvet.
U-SEMVE STORES I
CASH and CARRY
One east and one west of city square

2S? -r. .o-. rZ .Ci -I-- -T-- -" O- -O- -O- -O-
t -r:(-(r r. w w" w w w '
s" W mmr i'AJf

0
-

X

THE VOGUE

Sugar and Milk have greatly reduced in price.
We can therefore serve drinks and creams cheaper.

i'i'i

Limeade 9c, War Tax lc--.---.10c

5c Milk Shake 9c, War Tax Jc- 10c
5c Malt Milk 13c, War Tax 2c 15c
10c- All Sundays 18c, War Tax 2c. ...20c
-8c All Bonbons 23c, War Tax 2c.-25c
10c AH Parfaits 23c, War Tax 2c..25c

a--

Come to se us. We appreciate your: patronage. THE V0GIE.

4



OCALA EVENING STAB, FRIDAY, JULY. 15. 1521

revs-

v- gs '3 'iwf "Jjs vJx 'Of n& vJL-' w' "-i- Jc "-w "w -C" '1 2 vjy w 'w-' vs"

f; .
5 TTTTTrtT!

win a p

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&

1 OUR
: in our
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FOR $1 f

'

FOND OF THEIR "WEE N1PP1E"

irclaase of a

' Won of tSncr Groceries I

DELIVERY IS FREE
PRICES SECOND TO NONE

$ Maxwell House Coffee, 1 lb. can, . .

It n 4fc -I

Sg Bst Self-rising Flour, 12 lb. bag . : .

'S

No. 2 can Tomatoes, per can

$ .38 I
1.10 I

.65

1.25
.10

v

doz.

1.15 I

Dime Brand Milk, per can
fj Eagle Brand Milk,

.7.

.15

.25 $

TWO PHONES: 162 37

M 1 WIM WMO
iilio iiPb u Ai iiiiU ii ii iiijVuJ 11, MJIY

1

sJJijL'-'M'-.-M'- w v "iT---T----; --C--- r-- w --m m 'J- "2s-"m"-mT---m 'S'-- W

ill!llllllllllllllillllll!lllllllll!lllllili!l!iiill!il!!llllll!lllllllllllllllllllllllllllj!n

t r .

i-4 TTO

Many of th Lower Animal Hav a
Pronounced Fondness for Irv
toxicating Liquor.
Although camels will go for many
days, without water, -they are always
ready to drink whisky, and have been
known to prefer it to their usual bever beverage.
age. beverage. The effect of strong drink upoa
lions Is to render them quite tame.
In 1S99 there was a well-known race racehorse
horse racehorse which was regularly doped with
whisky before the race, owng to its
fainthearted nature. This practice led
to many successes ; but finally the day
came when the jockey was utterly un unable
able unable to make It go faster than an ordi ordinary
nary ordinary walk. After proceeding a few
yards in this fashion, it-leant against
the railings, and subsided upon the
course. ."If I -did my duty." said a
nearby policeman, I should run that
hoss in for being "drunk and incap incapable
able incapable r Dogs ars perhaps the most
abstemious of animals, but eren they
have been known to like the bottle.
A doctor reports the case of a Skye
terrier which suffered from distemper,
and became so ill that port wine -was
administered three or four times every
hour in order to save its life Attr

the dog recovered, his master found

ne nad become a perfect dipsomaniac.
Whenever there was port wine on the
table, he would climb upon a chair In
an endeavor to satisfy his craving. If
you put whisky in pussy's milk, you
would find her raise no violent objec objection.
tion. objection. Cats, like other animals, behave
In an extfiiordinary fashion when inebriated.

EACH MONTH HAS ITS JEWEL

AS EXPRESSED BY FLOWERS
Beautiful Products of Nature Havs a
Language That Once Learned
Is Never Forgotten.
The language of flowers is given as
follows." Arbor vitae, unchanging,
friendship; camellia," white, loveliness;'
candy tuft; indifference; carnation,
white, disdain; china aster, variety;
clover, 4-leaf, be mine; clover, white,
think of me; clover, red. Industry;
columbine, fol!; daisy, innocence;
daisy, colored, beauty ; deadjeaves, sad sadness;
ness; sadness; deadly nightshade, falsehood;
fern, fascination; forget-me-not, fus fus-chia,
chia, fus-chia, scarlet, taste; geranium, horse horseshoe,
shoe, horseshoe, stupidity; geranium, scarlet,
consolation ; geranium, rose, pref preference
erence preference ; golden rod, be cautious ; helio heliotrope,
trope, heliotrope, devotion; hyacinth, white, love loveliness;
liness; loveliness; hyacinth, purple, sorrow; Ivy,
friendship; lily, calia, coquetry; lily,
white, sweetness; lily, yellow, gayety;
lily, water, purity of heart, elegance;
lily of the valley, .unconscious sweet sweetness;
ness; sweetness; mignonette, your qualities sur surpass
pass surpass your charnfc ; monks-head, danger
is near ; myrtle, love ; oak, hospitality ;
orange blossoms, chastity; pansy,
thoughts; passion flower, faith; prim primrose,
rose, primrose, inconstancy; rose, love; rose,
damask, beauty ever new; rose, yellow,
jealousy; rose, white, I am worthy of
you ; rosebud, moss, confession of love ;
smilar, constancy; straw, agreement;
straw, broken, broken agreement;
sweet pea, depart; tuberose, danger dangerous
ous dangerous pleasures; thistle, sterness, ver verbena,
bena, verbena, pray for nie ; white jasmine
amiability; witch hazel, a spell.

I V. "" "' "jA J
J N '"

What Henry Ford Says About
Machine Power Farming
, "In the tractor the farmer uow has a machine in which is. harnessed
one of the most adaptable, efficient, economical sources of power in the world
the internal combustion engine. .
'The "tractor, will, multiply the productive capacity of each individual
farm worker from three to four times over. 5 v
"It will put the farmer on avpar with the city manufacturer. It will put
his produce-producing factory for that is what a farm is on to an efficient
production basis.
It will enable tach worker to earn so much more th3t he can be paid
more and still leave a greater profit for the man who hires him. It wilf enable
the farrrer to work fewer hours in the day, giving him more time to enjoy life.
"I believe the tractor will make farming what it ought to be the most
pleasant, the most healthful, the most profitable business on earth."
TUCKER & SIMMONS

How Toasts Originated.
When John Smith gets up at a
banquet and, lifting a glass of legi legitimate
timate legitimate or Illegitimate liquor, calls out:
"The ladies, God bless 'em!" or, "Rob "Robert
ert "Robert Brown, our honored guest !" or
whatever else comes to his mind,' he
doesn't realize that in thus proposing
a toast he is only going through the
relic of an ancient ceremony.
Originally, when the ancient Greeks
or Komans were at a feast the cus custom
tom custom was to bow before the statue of
Bacchus, the god of wine, exclaiming,
"Be propitious, O Bacchus !" and
pouring a little wine on the ground.
This was also done to other gods.
Emperors, being deified, this honor
"was paid tfcem. Then wealthy io io-ple
ple io-ple and beautiful women were thus
toasted, and the hab'it of toast toasting
ing toasting was established, and later, show showing
ing showing .ense, people decided to drink the
liquid Instead of wasting it.

Ice Made in 1857

OCALA

DEALERS

FLORIDA

llllllIM

LET US DO YOUR JOB PRINTING

, .Early in the development of science
Ice occupied the attention and engaged
the researches of famous scientists.
Galileo In l"l)7 discovered that ice was
lighter than water, but it does not ap appear
pear appear that he made any particular prog progress
ress progress beyond this fact.
Regelation was Observed by Fara

day in 1850, and the investigation car carried
ried carried on by J. D. Forles. by Tyndall
and by Thomson led to the knowledge
that commercialization of ice produc production
tion production might beturned into a great In Industry.
dustry. Industry. ;
Americans came tolhe'fore immedi immediately
ately immediately after. Boston exportation trade
was begun by Tudor in 1806, and in
1857 Harrison perfected the machine
whereby the use of ether and salt wa water
ter water made possible the mass production
of artificial ice.

Ancients Did Not Temper Copper.
The general belief that the ancients
were able to harden or temper copper
to a greater extent than is now possi possible
ble possible is a myth in the opinion of the
United States geological survey, De-I-artment
f t!i Interior. It is well
known to metallurgists that processes
of rolling will Lnrden copper to some
extent and that it can also be hardened
by the addition of other metals. Speci Specimens
mens Specimens of ancient s-cnlled "tempered"
i i r t!-.at !:ave ? een examined have
invariably proved to be no harder than
copper that is manufactured to-day, or
to be simply an alloy of copper and

Almost Universal Belief In Marvelous
Properties Attached to the Va Various
rious Various Precious Stones.
The ancients attributed marvelous
properties to many of the precious
stones. There Is significance attached
to the various, stones In making birth birthday,
day, birthday, engagement and wedding pres presents.
ents. presents. The different months and' the
stones sacretf to them, with their re respective
spective respective meanings, follow:
January, garnet; constancy and
fidelity in every engagement.
February, amethyst ; preventive
against, violent passions.
March, bloodstone; courage, wisdom
and firmness In affection.
April, sapphire; free from enchant enchantment,
ment, enchantment, denotes repentance.
May, emerald; discovers false
friends and Insures true love love-June,
June, love-June, agate; insures long life, health
and prosperity.
July, ruby; discovers poison, cor corrects
rects corrects evils resulting; from mistaken
friendship.
August, sardonyx; Insures conjugal
felicity.
September, chrysolite; free from
evil passions and sadness of the mind.
October, pal; denotes hope sharp sharpens
ens sharpens the sight and faith of the posses possessor.
sor. possessor. November, topaz ; fidelity and friend friendship,
ship, friendship, prevents bad dreams.
December, turquoise; prosperity in
love.

DECLARE QUOITS OLD GAME
Many There Are Who Say It Is
Descended From the Ancient
Sport of Discus Throwing.
There have been "international
matches between quolters and In the
COs wide publicity was' given In the
newspapers to a quoit match between
Billy Hodsbn. the champion of all
England, and Jimmy McLaren, who was
the champion -of the United States.
SIcLaren was s resident of Newark.

N. J and was a Scotchman by birth.

Rut h represented the Stars and
Stripes. The gentlemen played them themselves
selves themselves to a tie and concluded that
neither was the better player.
There are writers on the game of
quoits, and advocates of the game who
are not writers, who Insist that this
game is descended from ancient dis discus
cus discus throwing, and the enthusiastic
quolters who believe that their game
had this classic origin will tell you
that the statue of The Discus Throw Thrower,
er, Thrower, by Myron, copies and pictures of
which you have seen, really repre represents
sents represents a Greek youth playing at quoits
when that game was young and when
It represented strength In hurling
rather than skill In putting.

SUNDAY EXCURSION VIA
, ATLANTIC COAST LING

$0 Of Ocala to Jacksonville and
- return, including- war tax-
Tickets on sale each-Sunday daring daring-period
period daring-period June 19th to Sept 4th, 192L
Tickets limited to return on date ol
sale. Good on trains No. 9 and 37.
For further information call on the
ticket agent. 21-tf

Elberta was the name of a beautiful (
young: lady, the daughter of a Georgia
farmer. This farmer produced one of
he largest yellow freestone peaches
ever placed on the market, specimens
weighing1 13 ozs. We have just receiv received
ed received a fresh supply of these wonderful,
peach esV Quality Fruit Store. Phone
218. 7-15-lt

DAWKLW MARKET
Phone 519
111 W. Broadway

I. mnii.i.i iip,P.i.m ..ii j i ij, ii i,,, ,. i .in,
III I

IF YOU'RE
SEARCHING
for Expert Vulcanizing,
throw your Deadlight
on oor shop. We arc
Experts at this business
and onr work is
GUARA NTEED

3LAL0CK BROS,
VULCANIZING
Ocala House Block

"Rapid Transit" In the Old Days.
An illustration of the more or less
rapid transit facilities between the,
"villages" of Brooklyn and Flushing
as late as 1819 is seep in ? the an announcement
nouncement announcement of the stage driver who
begs "to inform his" friends In the city
of New York and the village of
Brooklyn, Newtown and Flushing that,
notwithstanding the opposition which
has lately been set up against him, he
still continues to run his stage be between
tween between the villages of Brooklyn and i
Flushing in an equal if not superior
manner to that which he has been In
the habit for many years past. lie
has improved his team with an addi additional
tional additional span of very fine horses which
enable him to perform his route In a
space of 90 minutes, being a distance
bf J2 miles. Those who wish seats In
the above-mentioned stage will please

apply at W. E. W. Nichol's store.
No. 8 Fulton Slip. New York; John
Bedell's, Brooklyn, and Samuel Low Low-erre's,
erre's, Low-erre's, Flushing. Fare from Brooklyn
to Newtown. ST1 cents, to Flushing,
oO cents. S

Old Agricultural Implement.
The hoe is probably one of the old oldest
est oldest of agricultural Implements. When
primitive man found a well-formed
limb of a tree with a sharp crook he
had a hoe for' the cutting, and it was
with such hoes as these that the In Indians
dians Indians planted their Inrge fields of
corn, and prepared the soil for the
planting, TheTv probably was not
much "hilllng-up" done and less weed
cutting: There was a litUe, for effort
was made to keep the weeds down
until the corn was high enough to
shade the ground. Hoeing was soon
finished, and the "crop was left to It Itself
self Itself until the ears were filling, when
the children were sent out to the fields
to scare the birds away. Farmers to today
day today know what damage a flock of
blackbirds will do in a cornfield, and
what must have been the strength of
the flocks when nearly the whole con continent
tinent continent was a wilderness?

Boat Excursion
... AT ...
SILVER S 7 RINGS
Every Thursday and
Sunday 5 to 8 p. m.
Fare, SI
Plus 8c V'?r Tax
Bring Youi Picric Supper end
Enjoy theXcol Ereszes
or Scer Riter
For intonnzticn see or phene
W. L Carmiehael
,SUver Springs
Boats Onen for Charter
- At All Times

u

u SASH

door!

I Geo. Hay I Co. I

Oela, Fla.
HARDWARE

'3

XX

H HIGH GRADE PAINT

K SX

Day Phone 47. Night Phone 515
GEORGE MacKAY i CO.
Funeral Directors. Eaibalmers
G. B. Overton, Mgr.
Ocala, Fla.

Naturally IndignanV
Melvln failed to receive much ben benefit
efit benefit from his Sunday school lesson.
His two older brothers took him to
Sunday 'school, and after It was over
neglected to look for him. He was dis discovered
covered discovered crying by a neighbor and taken
home. When he arrived home his In Indignation
dignation Indignation toward his brothers was ter--ible,
to witness. He stamped his foot
and said. "You trok me down there
and losed me;"

'-Famous Greek Letter Society.
The fir-t Greek letter s-ietr was

I'iii Deis Kappa, the letters standing
for n Greek motto which is translated
-ph'iosophy. the guide of life. It was
organized at William, and ilry ?roJ ?roJ-,lee
,lee ?roJ-,lee December .7TC as a secret so so-rial
rial so-rial club and literary societt It has
tiecome an honorary fraternity to
which men and women are elected oa
a basis of scholarship.

o

TAFP

v b m '. "CV sw

lUlVp Monthly pains,

and rheumatic

pains, headache, backache and'
all other aches are quick! v re-
Kilcs' Anti-Pain Pills
Contain no dangerotzs habit habit-forming
forming habit-forming drugs. Why don't you
try them?
Ask your druggist M



OCALA EVENING STAB, FRIDAY, JULY 15f 1921

CIS
'J

FIGURING ON AGE OF EARTH

Geologists GneraHy Agree That Fig-
tires Given in Genealogies of
V Genesis Are Mythical.
Shakespeare in "As You Like It
ays "ithe poor world is almost 6,000
years old," but geologists began to
abandon that Idea two generations

"Chronology," states that the fignres
jgiven In the genealogies of Genesis
of which there are three distinct ver

sions, the Hebrew, the Samaritan and
the Greek are mythical, and the
Catholic Encyclopedia, nnder the same
'caption points out that In tbelyear
4000 Ii, C great kingdoms were al already
ready already In existence.

' The two greatest geologists that this
continent has produced James Dwight
Dana and Sir John William Dawson,
.of McGHl university, Montreal both
f thera extremely devout men, after
starting out with orthodox views on
the subject, made radical changes in
the latest editions of their works.
Geologists are now practically
agreed that man dates fromv the late
Tertiary or Post-Glacial period, hav having
ing having been contemporaneous with ani animals
mals animals long since extinct, at a time when
the configuration of the earth was very
different from what it is at present
"Adam" is the common Babylonian
TWrd meaning "man," and the story of
Adam has come down from the Sumer Sumer-lans,
lans, Sumer-lans, or early Babylonians, through
Hebrew channels. ?

BROWN DEClUttfLY "IN. BAD"

WADE THIEF BETRAY HIMSELF

American) Indians Used Test That Was

Common in Justice Courts of
the Middle Ages.

Certain tribes of Indiana, according

to frrof. Plllsbury,' of the department
f psychology at the University of

Michigan, had a curous way of deter

mining the guilt or innocence of any
member of their tribe accused of theft

"One may observe directly," saysj
Prof. JPlilsbury, "the dryness of the
mouth in the instance of fear or grief.
Strong : emotlnal excitement checks
the flow of saliva and causes this dry dry-Bess,
Bess, dry-Bess, while an Increased flow will be
notices In the various pleasurable
mental states. Acting upon the- as assumption
sumption assumption that the. knowledge of guilt
would engender a feeling of dread in
the mind of the person guilty of the
theft, thus stopping the flow, of
saliva, whereas innocence would excite
no feeling of fear, the Indians gave
the suspected members a quantity of
'dry rice to place in their mouth. The
rice was kept In the mouth for a few

minutes and then spewed out. The
suspect whose rice was still dry was
adjudired guilty of the theft without

farther trial, and punished according

Of Course Rich Uncle Johnson May

Forgive Him, but He Feels
It Is Hardly Likely.

After luncheon in a popular restaur

ant Gibson Brown reached up for his
overcoat to find to his amazement
that it was cot there. Just at that
moment he caught a glimpse of a man

passing out of the restaurant wearing

the coat
"Stoo. thief!" veiled Brown, and

tore after the deDartlng stranrer. He

overtook Mm at the first corner and

gave mm in cnarge oi a pouremiuL

Then, wearing the overcoat again him

self, he went on his way satisfied.

"My dear," he said to his wife on re

turning home from the office that eve eve-nine.
nine. eve-nine. "1 had "an adventure this mid

day

"And I, too, Gibson, have something

to tell you," Interrupted his wife.

"Oh, but let me tell you mine firstj"

protested Mr. Brown.

"No, dear; I must tell "you mine.

Rich Uncle Johnson has forgiven us
for our marriage and has come to stay
with us for a few days. HeU probably

remember us in his will now."

"That's all light" answered Mr.

Brown, interested, but eager to tell his
own story, "but I nearly had my over

coat stolen at lunch to-day," and he

described the Incident

"Oh, Gibson," v moaned the wife,

"what have you done? You did not
wear that coat this morning and I lent
It to uncle when he went out to have

a look around London!"

Brown rescued uncle fiom the police

station, but the old man refused to for

give them the insult London Tit-Bits.

QHlE 0.
AMEDKM
LMQN

CONNER

V .g a

(Copy tor THta Department Supplied tj

the AmerlMin Lejpt n News Service.) I

GOLF OUTFIT FOR PRESIDENT

Mayor BaiUry of Denver, Commander

of Lsgiow Post, One of the First
Contributors.
Presidential golf paraphernalia

enought to last the four-year term
was received Jby President Harding

when Miss Pauline Trumbo entered
the White House bearing golf sticks
and bag and golf balls from many
parts of the country. The sticks and
bag, chosen by "Chick" Evans, open

golf champion, are the gift of the
Fort Morgan (Colo.) post of the Ameri

can Legion to the nation's chief executive.

Miss Trumbo visited twelve states

in the cour:3e of the Journey from
the Colorado city to the national cap-

FOLLOWED "ERIK THE RED"

: Scotland Vindicated.

A golfer dropped into a New York
store to buy a driver. ,'
,Tbls club is off balance," he re remarked
marked remarked to the clerk, as he jiggled a
nice looking brassie.
"That is a special-order club. Let
me have it please!" said the clerk
nervously, piquing the curiosity bf the
shopper. ; ;
. The manager, an old friend of the
golfer happened along" Just then.
"Bill," asked the customer, "what
the deuce Is the matter with this club.

Just heft the darn thing. It's all off

balance." :
Bill looked wise, and he looked all

aroun d carefully, then he replied, in a

stage' whisper: "Pete, that is the best

club In the bag. It holds just two
drinks of hooch. See here, how the

handle is hollowed out"

And Scotland was vindicated. New

Tork World. ;

Colony of Icelanders Settled In Green

land About 984, but Finally
Completely' Disappeared.

Erik Kufus, vulgarly dubbed "The
Red," ran on to Greenland in 98L
Erik's Norwegian father had found

it convenient to go with his family to
Iceland to escape the strong hand of
the law, which was reaching out for
him on account of a murder e had

committea m nis native lana.

Young "Erik had not been in Ice Iceland
land Iceland lopg before he, too, became in involved
volved involved In a dispute with a fellow

townsman,' and with the termination
of the argument Erik's antagonist

was dead. In attempting to escape
the pursuit of justice he accidentally

discovered the coast of Greenland.

Having spent two or three, years in
exploring the country he had found,

h snmphnw nhtnlnwl thp no rrlnv nf

the folks back in Iceland, and de

cided to pay them a visit

He insisted that, in contrast to Ice

land, the new country was a land of

green meadows and rich pastures,

abounding in cattle and every species

of game. His enthusiasm, or his ef

frontery, worked like magic, and he

went back to Greenland, which he had

named himself, with a numerous fol following;
lowing; following; The colony prospered under
Erik's successors it once numbered

2,000, but disappeared completely in

the fifteenth century. Whether the

settlers all perished or were gradual

ly "assimilated" by the Eskimos, no

man knows.

Eg. J

Conner, July 13. Mrs. Paul Fore
and children of Oxford, and Mr. and
Mrs. Harvey Smith of Ocala, spent
the fourth with the family of B. F.
Smith, all picnicking at Salt Springs.

1J. W. Bandall and wife and George
Randall spent Saturday in Gaines

ville, on matters of business.
E. O. Powell and J- W. Dixon went
to Palatka Saturday on a business
trip.
Donnie Randall spent Sunday at
Burbank.
Hull Atwater is back from the east
coast for a few days, on business.
Mrs. C. H. Rogers and baby return returned
ed returned Saturday from a delightful stay of
two weeks with relatives in Daytona

and Jacksonville. She also -stopped in
Palatka and Rochelle.
E. H. Cordrey and wife have return returned
ed returned to Atlanta after a short visit to
relatives at Lynne. Ernest Cordrey
is a Marion county boy who saw serv service
ice service in the world war,' and .is now pre preparing
paring preparing himself for his life work with
the assistance of Uncle Sam.
The B. Y. P. U. will hold a social
on Saturday evening at the home of
Mr. and Irs. E. O. Cordrey.
Married, at the home of the bride,
Saturday, July 3rd, Maxie Marsh and
Pearl Williamson, both of Conner, j

P. L. Durisoe was a visitor to Ocala

Tuesday.

.::-::. 'it : ,7.

w

DIXIE HIGHWAY GARAGE

We Specialize on
Ford and Chevrolet

REPAIR WORK
COOPER Cord Non-Skid Tires, 30x3 1-2,
8000 Mile Guarantee, $18
DIAMOND Plain Tread 30x3, $12.50
POLARINE Heavy Oil. five gallons, $3.50
VVre buy and sell second hand Ford Cars
Jas. Engesser, Prop.
Day Phone 258 Night Phone 533

:lr

III
ft
-
A

NOTICE TO TAX PAYERS

Arrangements have now been com

pleted for refunding the 7-miUs illeg illegally
ally illegally collected on 1920 tax roll. In

order to receive this refund it will be
necessary to bring to my office the

1920 tax receipt. The court also re requires
quires requires me to take your personal re receipt
ceipt receipt for all monies refunded. If all
tax payers will follow these instruc

tions there will be no delay in the dis

bursement of these funds.

W. W. STRIPLING,
7-15-2t Trustee.

'.... t

Farmers' ',

! store.

will sell 'you and deliver

Five gallons kerosene 90c
Lard Compound 1 3c
Pure Lard 2 lbs for... 35c
White Bacon, per lb 18c
Smoked Bacon Squares. ...... 20c
Smoked Country Hams 38c
Octagon Soap 8c 3 Cakes for 21c
Export Borax Soap 1 doz 55c
Cherry Bell Flour 25 lbs... $1.4 5

All former 20c. packages 15c X
Cloverbloom Butter, lb 47c
Three Argo Starch 25c
One doz. Argo Starch 95c $
Evaporated Peaches, lb 1 5c i
Quart jars of Honey 65c t
Quart cans or bottles Syrup... 30c
Pint cans Syrup ; 15c
Syrup drawn from bbl, gal.... 7 5c J

!

'Cheese per lb 25c

c

NOTICE

; The Dog in Scripture.

There are few boy lives or man lives

in which a dog has no "place, and no
. ther domestic animal has so many
contradictory ; characterizations in

literature or in current speech. The

Jewish law delclared the dog "unclean,'

and the most offensive epithet a Jew
could use was to declare a man

a dead dog." Moses refused the of-

ferine of the price of a doe In the

tabernacle, an, early instance of taint

ed money ; while Christ in Revelations.

excludes dogs from heaven in the pas

sage: "For without are dogs, and
sorcerers, . and murderers, and
idolaters, and whosoever loveth and

inaketh a lie. 5 n e recall but one
tolerant expression about the dog in
Scripture "for a living dog is better

than a dead lion."

Mltht Pauline Trumbo.

ItoL In every city and state Yisited

the mayor or governor contributed

an engravea gou Dan ior .rresiaeni
Harding.

The collection of golf balls started

In Denver with gutta percha p4"s
from Governor Shoup of Colorado,

Mayor Bailey of Denver, the com

mander of the Legion post and a

Denver newspaper.

As the law requires trie to close up

i the 1920 tax roll at once, as much as

I regret to do so, I must begin im

mediately to make levy on all unpaid

personal taxes. W. W. Stripling, v

15- Tax Collector.

Cherry Bell Flour 12 lbs 75c

W. Baker's Cocoa half lb 3Qe Old Virginia Dare Wine, large 65

W. Baker's Cocoa 1 lb. .. ..55c
Senate Coffee, 1 lb.., 40c
Senate Coffee, 3 lbs ...$1.15
Reddick Peanut Butter 1 lb... 30c

jrey luups, ouao 4 t.-vt

ouuau i i i v

Old .Virginia Dare Wine, small 40c
Firestone Tires. 30x3 $10-95
Firestone Tires, 30x3H . .$1 3-95
Grey Tubes, 30x3 $2-1 5

t

t

Evaporated Milk,

Uneeda Biscuits ant all
10c. packages .8c 3 for 20c
FARMERS EXC1

Just 'received a niw shipment of

VINDEX and E. & .W. Shirts. At

FISHEL'S. 3t'

Merchants Block

Red Tubes, 30x3 $2-65
Red Tubes, 30x3 li . ... $3-1 0

IANGE STORE
Phone J63

LEGION MEN BURY PATRIOT

"Sargint"

Custer

Flanagan, Last

Laid to Rest in

Dakota.

of

Kansans Hard to Catch.

Cars from Kansas and bearing the

license plates of the state must be

careful In running by a traffic police

man on a low corner of Fifth avenue,

New York, says the Sun of that city.

He is watching for them. .
"You'd be surprised at the different
places from which cars come,'.' said
the cop. "And the funny thing about
It is that I seem to have to call down
out of town drivers all the time., I
suppose It's because they 'don't know
the traffic rules.
"For the last two years I've kept a
recorofof the out-of-town licenses that
I've had- to Jot down to report. Tve
got one from every state In the Union,
except one, and several from Porto
Rico.
"The missing state ls Kansas; I'd
certainly like to complete the list, and
so Tin looking for a Kansas driver.
He'd better watch his step."

) ; Went Bravely to Death.

The nerviest prisoner who ever went

to the electric chair in Sing Sing was

James L. Odell, convicted of murder

according to prison officials. Odell

spent his last hours gazing at the pic picture
ture picture of his baby, born after he had
been sent to the death house and
whom he had never seen. He made no
complaint. "We. all have to pass
through the experience called death,"
he told the keeper.; "I have no fear.
I am merely sorry that my life has
to he wasted in such a manner. He
walked steadily to the chair and was

clear-eyed' and without a pallon In
a clear voice he said : "Good-by, gen gentlemen."
tlemen." gentlemen." He refused any drugs to
bolster up his nerves and held out his
hand, saying: I am as steady as
a strip of steel."
She Wants to Know.
"Husband," said the professor's wife
suspiciously.
"Yes, my dear?"
"Who is this Violet Bay you. are
always talking about r Louisville
Ceurier-JournaL

Bachelors and Children.

Commenting on John Galsworthy's

book on childhood, "Awakening," a

critic remarks that men, and especial

ly bachelors, are the best historians of

childhood. It was Charles Lamb who

wrote "Dream Children." Lamb, by the
way, was scarcely an inveterate bache bachelor,
lor, bachelor, as he would have married Ann
Simmons if she had been willing, and
there was also "Alice W." as well as

Fanny Kelly, the actress, who refused
fifm ft was the lonely liarrle who

wrote "Peter Pan." And few descrip descriptions
tions descriptions of children not dream children
or Peter Pans, but of actual child life
- can surpass the pictures drawn by
E. ZS'esbitt (Mrs. Hubert Bland) In
"The Treasure Seekers" and "The
Phoenix and Carpet." Exchange.

LLJ

J a me 8

Scouts,

North

Indian fighter, veteran of the 6ivll

war ana araent pairioi, oargmt

James Flanagan,
eighty-four years

old and actually

the last surviving

scout of General j
Custer's Seventh

cavalry, massa-H

cred on the Little

Big Horn, was
laid to rest by

the American Le Legion
gion Legion in 'Mandan,
N. D in one of

the most unique

and imoressive funeral ceremonies

ever witnessed In the northwest.

Veterans of five wars participated j
In1 the ceremonies. A faltering but

nroud trio of Grand Army survivors

carried at the head of the cortege the
same colors which the old sergeant

for years had borne as a color guard.
Stalwart young veterans of the World
war sent the funeral volley crashing

over the patriot's grave.
"Sarglnt" Flanagan was a native

of Greenfield, Mass. In the mid-fifties j
he Joined the mad rush to the gold
fields of California. He drifted back
to Ohio aad joined the 11th Regiment

of Ohio Cavalry, serving through the"
Civil war! Later he enlisted In the
Seventh-cavalry at Fort Lincoln

V (I I''

TQlFft

T

'TT

Now Selling at the Lowest
Price Level in Tire Histoiry

Explaining "Bo-Pee p."
Bo-Peep has quite a "curious history,
and it is not about a shepherdess, ac according
cording according to a writer in Pearson's Week Weekly.
ly. Weekly. In the old days the people of Eng

land gave a great deal of money to
the begging friars, whom they dared

not refuse, but when the power of the
monasteries declined they grew bold bolder
er bolder and jeered at the friars with the

Bo-peep rhyme. Bo-peep or Boo-peep

was a slang term for the holy men,
and the words, "Boo-peep has lost

his sheep," referred to the falling off
of the spiritual flock, though of course,

in later years Bo-peep was turned Into

POPULAR SIGNAL CORPS GIRL
Helen Hunt Csrly Carries Off Honors
at Chicago With Actress as

( Opponent.

Motion picture actresses are allur

ing to Chicago members of the Amer

ican Legion, cut
when it comes to
. I

a a snow UOWIl tmrj

' 4 vote for their ex-

comrades.

r

5 -9ttm

service

4

t .

V j mis was aeuiou-

j strated when Miss
7 Helen Hunt Carey,

a rormer siguiu
corps girl, was
voted the most
iopular girl in
Chicago at the
Legionnaire club
show.

Miss Carey's total of votes was 46, 46,-254.
254. 46,-254. which was 8,000 more than her

nearest riTaL a well-known movie ac

tress, got, When Miss Carey returned
from France, after serving 14 months

In the A. EL F she was elected com

mander cf SIg-Yeo post of the Amer

ican Legion, composed of former sig

nal corps girla and feomaaettes,

30x3
32x4
34x43

$24.50
46.30
54.90

(And Other Sizes In Proportion)

Tiro repair men. nr&o judge rabies beet, class theae tires
ksi&3 the sturdiest carcase mmde. Forty-eeren hil
rxacitt car maaafacruiers use them as standard equipment.

fbey are the qumty chotce of cord users

This new low price is made pocaiUe by strictest economies
and specialized production.
Plant No. 2 was erected for the sole purpose of making
3 0x3 34-inch Non-Skid fabric tires. With a dairy capacity
of 1 6,000 tires and 20,000 tubes, this plant permits refined
production on a quantity basis. J
All materials used are the best obtainable. The quality is
uniform. It is the best fabric tire ever oilcred to the car
owner at any price.

Farmers' Exchange store
Auto Sales Company

George MacKay & Company
Tucker &. Simmons

:

npnia Hpadauartcrs For

FIRESTONE TIRES
AUTO SALES COMPANY

Mack Taylor

North Main Street

Telephone 313



OCALA EVENING STAR, FSIDAY, JULY 15. 1921

SEVEN

TAX 3EQCAMZATM?r NOTICE
Notice in fcerdby riven that the Board
of County Commissioner of 'Marion
, -county, OTJori'da, ritttisg as a tooard ior
the equalisation of taxes, b&s increased
the raiue fixed y the county assessor
of taxes f Marion county, on certain
real: estate and personal (property
therein; that the owners of such 'prop 'prop-erty,
erty, 'prop-erty, descriptions nereof and the in increase
crease increase in raKies of asme feeing as here-'
inafter Indicated:
Owner Description Value Value
Fixed toy Fixed by
'Assessor Board
i of Co. Com.
Heirs o:f II. O Price: All of ex w
of sw, U, 12, 20, 60 acres, from $200
to 1600. "
airs. X. C. rWait! Blk 28 Orange Lake,
21, 12. 21, (from S430 to $800.
a Giiitsklll: HVz of sec 30 12, 21,
320 acres, from $1300 to $1500.
R. B. Fmnt: e of w4, 35. 13, 19, 40
acres, froisi $130 to $200.
V James illiants: of ne!4 of e!,i
24. 13. 20, 10 acres, from $60 to $80.
Henry tSchonekl; N of ne of seH.
: 24. 13, 20. 10 acres, from $60 to $80.
J. iM. ileffert: Com at ne cor thence
w 42.50 cits s 39.93 cha e 21.25 chs s 22
chs e 21.21! ens n 62 chs, 218 acres, from
' $700 to $800.
p. W. Williams: B?i of of e,
26, 13. 20, 30 acres, from $100 to $250.
Jackey Barnard: E of se of e4.
28, 13, 20, 20 acres, from $60 to $100.
Jessie Jenkins: &e4 of se4. 13,. 14, 20,
40 acres, ifrom $100 to $150.
(Mrs. Bell Howard: NeH neli and
i of e of e, 14, 14, 20. 60 acres,
from $130 to $240.
airs. P. T. Wilson: Se4 of sw, 36,
- 14, 24, 40 (acres, from $30 to $40.
V. iA. Pritchett: Cam 3 chs n of sec
cor onwildy thence e to lake. 12. 14, 26.
n'3 chs -wr to w fljdy of sec s 3 ohs to p
o tb. 15 acres, from $40 to $60.
J. O. HJgrhtower: (EVi of swV and all
of lot 3, 12. 14, i6, 142 acres, from $300
to $400.
J. O. Higntower: of lot 1 and all
of lot 2, 13. 14, 26, 96 acres, from $220
, to $250.
G. !F. Gliomas: of lot 1 and ne4
of Tiw'A, 113, II, 26. 67 acres, from $150
to $180.
J. G. Chlldsf Ne of nw, 10, 15, 24.
40 acres, irom $60 to $80.
. U. O. Cordrey: Nw 4of nwJ4, 10. 15,
24, 40 acres, from $60 to $80.
W. H. Ieas: KeVi of neii, 10, 15, 24.
40 acres, ifrom 70 to $80.
W. M, I'eas: Xw4 of ne, 12, 15 ,24,
40 acres, Jrom $60 to $80.

James Wilson: e Vt, 28. 15, 24, 16"

. acres, trom $300 to $4uo.
T. H. iBa.rber: 3ieM of sw4 and nwU
of sw4. 28, 15. 24. 80 acres, from $150
to $200.
Unknown: Ne4, 28. 15. 24. 160 acres,
from $320 to $450.
Jjynne N. (S. 1C0.: E4 of sw4 ex 1
acre An siw cor, 26. 15, 24, 79 acres, from
$150 to $200.
lake Bryant Fruit Growers Cam Cam-ipany:
ipany: Cam-ipany: Nw:i4, 19, 15, 25, 160 acres, from
$250 to $320.
;' H. M. Sellers: Lots 2. 3. 4, sec 29, 15.
25. 153 acres, from $200 to $250.
Lake Bryant Fruit Growers Oom-
jvany: Lots 1, 2, 3, sec 31, 15, 25, 124
acres, from $200 to, $250.
Oole and Revelle: Lots 4 and 5, sec
31, 15, 25, 132 acres, from $250 to $400.
Juniper tHunttnigr Club:, All of Arre-
donda Grant, tip 15, 26, 10,418 acres,
from $3000 to $15,000.
E. L. Martin: Com at se co rof sec 16.'
16. 24. thence n 30 chs w 14 chs s 57 leg
to river, se with river to ip o T, 70 acres,
from $200 to $400.
Unknown: IS6 of se w of river, 16,
16 24, 30 acres, trom $150 to $180.
Unknown for 1920: Si of seM w'of
river. 16. 16, 24, 30 acres, from $150 to
4180.
G. IL Biflbard: iAll of 18. 16. 24. 640
acres, from $900 to $4500. r
Ocklawatva Xe-v. Co.: Sw'A of nw4,
and n of sw& and nw of se VI, 22,
16. 24, 160 acres, from $500 to $1000.
Ockla weha tlev. Co.: W of n w 14
. a-nd eVa of sw ex of se of se4
of wl4 and eU. sec 25, 16, 24,.' 315
acres, from $700 to $1500.
H. P. Grtgrgs: E of 4 of bw, 18.
16, 25, 60 acres, from $120 to $200.
Clark, Ray, Johnson Company: iAll of
except lota assessed tin Leroy, 23, 16,
20, 600 acres, from $1200 to $1500. $1500.-;
; $1500.-; T. V. Billard: Cam 5,24 ohs e of nw
cor of lot 5 Evan's stub 18, 17, 23, thence
. e 4.75 chs s 5.85 chs rw 1.75 chs s 5.73
Chs -w 8.25 chs n 5.72 chs e 5.25 chs n
5.73 chs, 747 acres, from $130 to $200.
H. C. Groff: Lot 2 Mayo's add to Sum Sum-merfield,
merfield, Sum-merfield, 17, 18, 17 23, from $150 to
. $200.
R. iA. iSimmons: S' of lot 5 Mayo's
add to iSunmeTfleld, 17, 18. 17. 23, from
$50 to $200.
J. W. avis: Com 42 rds e of sw cor
of n.wV4 18. 17. 23, thence n 210 ft e 310
ft s 210 ft: w 315 ft, 1.50 acres, from
$130 to $300.
(Alice B. Hope: 10 chs sqr in ne cor lot
3. 25, 17, 23, 10 acres, from $100 to $300.
1 C. Denny Hope: Part of lot 3 sec 25,
. 17. 25, 49 -acres, from $300 to $500.
Alice B. Hope: Ei of w of sw4
and com at ne cor of sw4 25, 17,. 23.
thence w 20 ohs s 25 chs e 10 chs s 15
chs e 10 chs n 40 chs, 105 acres. froTn
$700 to $3000. ,v
E. C. Atbertson: N4 of se. ex 50
rds e and w on e side of ex 1 acre to
school and 10 chs e and w by 15 chs n
and s in aw cor of lot 6, 25, 17. P8
acres, from $3000 to $5000.
Miss iNellie Stevens: W of lot 4 and
e of swi of s of lot 4, 25. 17, 23.
22 acres, from $80 to $200.
iW. F. Milholland: Part of lot 3. 25, 17,
23. 37 acres, from $130 to $400.
Mrs. A. W, Kelsey: 9.60 chs e and w
on w side of lot 4. 19, 17, 24, 33 acres,
from $250 to $300.
L E. Albertson: E of of swV
of nw. 29, 17, 24, 10 acres, from $80
to $500.
Heirs of Lawrence Jones: Part of lot
2, 19, 17,' 24. 14 acres, from $600 to
$1500. -
T ,B. Snook: Se of ne, 30, 17. 24,
40 acres, from $3000 to $4000.
L. iA. Miller: Vi of ne& and n of
swVt.ex 2 acres. 31. 17 24, 158 acres,
from $550 to $2000.
. Personal Property
'Anthony Farms: 300 head sheep to
400 head.
R. H. Holly: 100 nead cattle to 150
head.
E. O. Cordrey: 30 head cattle to 100
head. .
John Si. Martin: 75 head cattle to 100
head, an i other personal property from
$140 to $300-
E. L. Martin: 50 Stead of cattle to 100
head, and other (personal property, ex except
cept except auto, from $40 to $300.
L. D. Beck: 15 "head of cattle to 50
head.
T. "Williams: 350 head of cattle to 500
head.
J. I. Williams: 250 head cattle to 350
head.
R. H. Redding: 800 head of cattle to
1000 head.
.Edwards Bros.: Six (head of graded
cattle to 50 head.
Oca la Telephone Co.: Personal (prop (prop-.
. (prop-. erty, f rom $12,000 to $15,000.
Moses Grocery Co.: Personal property
. other than au-tos from $12,000 to $19,000.
R. W. Fergruson: Personal sproperty
other than autos and live stock from
$1000 to $1500.
Taylor. Printing Co.: Personal prop property
erty property from $700 to $1000.
Harrington Hall Hotel: Personal
property from $4000 to $5000.
Ohero-Cote. 'Bottling .Works: Personal
other Uian autos from $1000 to $2500.
Coca-Cola Bottlinsr Works: Personal
(property other than autos from $2000
mto $2500. ;
1 S. Malever: Personal .property other
than autos from $4000 to $9000.
(The owners or agents of the owners
of eald (property are hereby notified
that the said iboard of county commis commissioners
sioners commissioners will meet in the county com com-andssicners'
andssicners' com-andssicners' room of the Marion county
court house in Ocala, Fla.. on
Monday the 1st day of Anjrust, 1921
for the purtpose of i earing- any reason
that stuch 'persons may desire to ive.

wthy "the atoove valuations fixed 4y the
said Bxard snouid ibe chanzed. and of
heurimg' complaints of owners or
"ujfents of any real estate or personal
property m aia county, the value of
which has -been heretofore fixed 5y said
assessor of taxes of said county or
ohanred toy said Iboard. and for that

purpose the said toard will sit as long
as it may oe necessary.
BOARD OF COUNTY COitinSSIOX-

f ERS OF MARION COUNTY. FLA..
By R. B. MEFFERT, Chairman.
Attest: T. D. LANCASTER JR., Clerk.
XOXICE OF 1XTEXTIOS
TO APPLY FOR CHARTER
Notice Is heretoy given that the un undersigned
dersigned undersigned will apply to the Honorable
'W. S. Bullock. Judge of the Circuit
Court of Marion county, at his office in
Ocala, Florida, at ten o'clock, a. m.. on
the
ISta day f Aapit, 1931r
or an soon thereafter as the same can
be 'heard, for an order incorporating the
Mount Moriah Baptist church of Ocala,
under the charter proposed which is
now on file In Marion county. Florida.
The charter and object of the cor corporation
poration corporation to be formed is the organiza.
tion of a church for public (worship, the
dissemination of the gospel and such
other matters as are customarily car carried
ried carried on v churches of similar charac character.
ter. character.
Witness our hands and seals, at
Ocalai FKrida. tikis the 6th day of July.
1921.
D. W. WEST (Seal).
: iK. L. (AHDEBSOX (SeaL)
. L. A SAUXItai a I SeaL)
S. J. JOHNSON (Seal.)
M. J. STEPHENS. (SeaL)
The undersigned, .members of the
Mount Moriah Baptist church of Ocala.
Florida, desirintg -to incorporate their
said church and to organise the same
into a body politic for the (best interest
f its members, hereby associate them themselves
selves themselves together under the name and
style of the Mount Moriah Baptist
Church of Ocala, the same to he organ organized
ized organized under the followinisr proposed
cnarter:
1. The name of the corporation shall
he Mount Moriah Baptist Church of
Ocala, and the corporation, shall "be
located at Ocala. Florida.
2. The general nature of the ofoject
of the organization is to organize a
church for piubllc .worship to the end
that its members may 'be formed into
a toody politic; puolic worship, the dis dissemination
semination dissemination of the ,gospel, the sending
of missionaries to foreign fields, and
suoh other things as are usually done
and performed 4y churches of like
character and denomination he ires the
objects to be attained by this corpora corporation.
tion. corporation. 3. Any person of sound mind over
the age of eight years shall 'be eligible
to membership, and they shall (be ad admitted
mitted admitted upon a vote of the majority
present at any meeting, provided fnat
no person under the age of twelve
years shall oe entitled to -vote upon the
admission of members.
4. This corporation shall exist for a
term of .fifty years.
0. The names' and residences of -the
subscribers are as follows:
D, WT, West.- Ocala, Florida.
, E. L. Anderson, Ocala. Florida.
L IA. iSaunders, Ocala Florida.'
5. J. Johnson," Ocala. Florida.
M. J. Stephens, Ocala, Florida.
6. The affairs of the corporation are
to he -managed by a president, vice vice-president,
president, vice-president, a secretary and a treasurer,
and a hoard of ten trustees. These of officers
ficers officers shall he elected at the first meet meeting
ing meeting of the subscribers and members of
the church aforesaid after the charter
is obtained, and the annual meeting
shall .be held annually thereafter on the
second Tuesday in July.
7. 'Until the first meeting of the sub subscribers
scribers subscribers and members of this church,
the followin'g persons will manage all
of the affairs, towwit:
D. W. West, president.
E. L. Anderson, vice-president.
I j. A. Saunders, secretary.
45. J. Johnson, treasurer.
No iboard of trustees will -be elected
until at the first meeting, as no duties
are to toe performed Iby them before the
organiusstion meeting.
8. The by-laws of the corporation
shall be adopted, altered or rescinded
by a majority vote of the members
present at a meeting called for such
purpose, provided that no member un under
der under the age of twenty-one years shall
have the privilege of voting upon the
adoption of an amendment to the by bylaws.
laws. bylaws. 9. The highest amount of indebted indebtedness
ness indebtedness or liability to which the corpora corporation
tion corporation may at any time subject itself is
$40,000, provided that such amount is
not greater than two-thirds of the
value of the property of the corpora corporation.
tion. corporation.
10. The corporation may hold real
estate, subject to the approval pf the
circuit judge of Marion county, up to
the amount of $100,000.
In witness whereof the incorporators
have hereunto set their hands and af affixed
fixed affixed their seals this the 6th day of
July. 1921.
T. W. WEST. (Seal).
E. L. ANDERSON. Seal). n
L A. SAUNDERiS, (Seal.)
S. J. JOHNSON, Seal).
M. J. STEPHENS, (Seal).
'STATK OF FLORIDA,
COLTNTY OF MARION.
Personally appeared D. W. West, to
me known to be one of the subscribers
0 the foregoing proposed charter, and
vrho, being duly sworn by me, acknowl acknowledges
edges acknowledges and says that it is intended in
good faith to carry- oat the purposes of
the foregoing charter a? set turth
therein.
jSjvorn to and acknowledged before
me this the 6th day of July. 121.
(Seal) iE. K. SYLVESTER.
FRI 7-16-5t- Notary Public.
FIRST AID TO
Ul
DISABLED
.SHOES
We make your old shoes as good as
new. Don't wait until the sole is worn
entirely through, but when you see
the outer sole becoming thin, let us
renew it for you. We use only the
best of material and guarantee out
work. All work called for and deliv delivered
ered delivered promptly. ."
OCALA ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP
114 S.; Magnolia St Phone 143
Bring us your
WELDING
and Aulo Repairing
' Satisfaction Guaranteed r
-AUTOGENOUS" WELDING C0
' OcMawahd Ate.
, & Orange St. ,1
Best' grade Homespun cents at
FIS EEL'S. 3t

m &d L

YOUNG UNSUNG PITCHING STARS
EASILY ECLIPSING OLD-TIMERS

A 1 (V; -- ) i
f'M) X-

Old pitching bones have had a lot of tough going this season.
Youngsters, unknown and unsung, are slipping into the regal robes of
the old kings of the mound.
"Lefty" Cooper, Fred Toney, "Babe" Adams and "Red" Faber are the
only veterans showing anything close to their old, form.
Alexander tlie Great is doing bench duty for the Chicago Cubs with a
sore arm and Jim Vaughn; his big teammate, isn't delivering as expected.
Dutch Reuther, sensation of the 1919 pennant dash of the Cincinnati Reds,
is a disappointment in Brooklyn and his old staff mate, Hod Eller, it out of
tne game under suspension.
Burleigh Grimes. Sherry Smith and in fact all of Uncle Rob's All-star
pitching staff cracked and Brooklyn is falling down in the pennant race.
Ferdy Schupp and Bill Doak of the Cards are out of form. Scott Terry
has fallen by the wayside with the Athletics. Boh Shawkey has been use useless
less useless to the Yankees and Tris Speaker is having his trouble with his stars,
Coveleskie, Bagby and Malls.
Arthur Nehf, the $35,000 beauty of the New York Giants, hasn't been as
effective as Bill Ryan, a rookie pitcher, from the International league.
Walter Johnson's work with the Washington Senators makes it seem that
the old star is almost through. Joe Bush hasn't shown anything for the
Boston Red Sox and George Daus has done the "Tigers very little good. Dick
Rudolph, had to give up after a braye effort and is now working with the
Braves as a coach.

Heard at Ball Game:
r
t
i
i
i
i
i
i
t
"A man on first and third." said
he,
"Here's where we work the
squeeze."
"Oh, Charlie, dear, not right out
here,
"It is so' public, please!"
Proofs, Pittsburgh, Ta.
H in t
"Three balls n, yelled the um umpire.
pire. umpire. "Now's your chance to soak it,"
shouted the excited pawnbro pawnbroker's
ker's pawnbroker's clerk to the batsman.
Boston Transcript. '"
Tolnette Why
was
that
player put out?
Tony Off his base!
Toinette Oh. crazy Rut Rutgers.
gers. Rutgers. "Sir, when you eat here you
needn't dust off your plate," the
indignant restaurant keeper said.
"Beg pardon,' just force of
habit," said the baseball um umpire.
pire. umpire. Washington Times.
Speedo Babe Ruth is sone
batter, muh-boy.
Peppo-T-Yes,. he takes the bat batter
ter batter cake. Rutgers.
First Fan That girl reminds
me of a bush league pitcher.
Second Fan Howzat.
First Fan Lots of speed, but
no control. Columbia Jester.
Father Willie, are you and
Bob in mischief again?
Willie Oh no, we're all right ;
we are just playing ball with
some of the egsrs the grocer left.
New York Daily News.
He (explaining the game)
You see that man stole second.
His Girl Well, what did he
do first?
Baseball
Notes
Ty Cobb was the first major leaguer
to score 50 runs this season.
Urban Faber is the first big league
pitcher to win ten games this year.'
There Is still more money in base baseball
ball baseball than pool, according to Heinle
Groh.
Homsby and Hellman are the "IT
leaders of the major leagues with the
stick.

Old Jack Warhop is pitching In the
Virginia league. He can throw them

! underhand as well as ever.
Jim Clancey. who has been signed
by the Giants, was a Swarthmore
pitcher during recent years.
The Union Printers' National Base Baseball
ball Baseball league tourney will be held in
Detroit July 31 to August 6.
Pitchers who admit that the ball Is
lively have probably been In there
when Babe I'uth was exercising his
wrists.
Boston fan3 are beginning to fake
notice of Fred Mitchell's Braves.
However, they haven't claimed the
pennant yet.
.
Umpiring is becoming simpler.
When a ball is hit all the amp has
to do is to wait until the ruaner cir circles
cles circles the bases.
Chet Thomas ought to take up golf
or something equally good for surplus
weight reducing. His midriff is a bit
too aldermanic.
The Baltimore Orioles have bit their
pre-season dope stride. They're over
100 'points to the good and still widen widening
ing widening the breach.
The St. Louis Cardinals have
shipped Catcher George Gilham to
Syracuse and Outfielder Walter Ir Irwin
win Irwin to Durham.
Charles Palmer of Chicago was
elected captain of next year's base baseball
ball baseball team at Northwestern university.
Falnier i? a pitcher.
The Pittsfield club made room for
Pierotti and Whittaker, new pitchers,
by releasing Anderson and Durgin.
The latter signed with New Haven."
Gold baseballs' have been awarded
to the 14 members of the University
of Illinois ball team which won the
championship of the western confer conference.
ence. conference. Tommy Thompson, the Toronto ball
player who refused to pitch because
he had to sleep In an "upper" the
night before, has been railroaded to
the bench.
.. Frank Fahey. former Catholic uni university
versity university star, who had won a trial with
Connie Mack as a pitcher, has been
signed by the Waterbury club for a
trial In the outfield.
Aside from remarking that he Is
one of the best left fielders In the
game and that he is going to knock
his old home-run record Into a cocked
hat. Babe Ruth has nothing t sy.

-.J". 3

VLY 'CLEARANCE 1

S A

A clean-up of all remaining summer
Ready-to-Wear and Dry Goods
at price's from

25 to 50 less

r
Lower prices on Sheets, Pillow Gases,
V
Towels, etcJ
V Millinery at half price
i
Sale will continue lor the balance of
the month.

F R

A

"The Fashion Center"
OCALA, FLORIDA

Hvl': OUR. SPLENDID 7
none :;3i32g aiahy
4AKD80Z SEID CU0STER3
JDWMELL -WRVGWT tft.
LEWIS-CHITTY COMPANY, I
111 Wholesale Distributors, Ocala, Fla.

' FIRE
PROOF

WHITE STAR LIP3E

.

Negotiable Storage RecVicte Isnjrd on Cotton, Automobiles, Etc
I BIT -move.-packship L0XG DISTANCE MOVING
M LiVE STOCK, I
ij .ACt- Phone .296
III. FIRMTURE.ETC

THE WINDSOR" HOTEL
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
In the heart of the city wita Hemming Par for 'a front yard.
' : -,. ...
Every modern convenience In each room. Lhning room erie t
second to nooc

ROBERT Ai. MEYERS
Manager.
SUGAR SATURDAY AND SIONDA
17 pounds of sagar for one dollar,
w.th a dollar's worth of other groc groceries
eries groceries for cash, Saturday and Mondaj
only. Phone 577.
wky-tf H. B. WHITTINGTON.

1K M e- m

Li
in
N IC S
J. E. KAVANAUGH
Proprietor.
Meet me at the Union Station
Restaurant for a regular family iyle
dinner Best dinner in the state for 75
cents. Eat and drink fill you want.
Dinner 11 a. m. to 2:30 p r-.. oned
and operated by 100 Axer.a.a.

STORAGE



i t
0CAXA ETZSOSC F2IDAY. JULY 15. 1921

m mm

It jou have any society items for
t&e Star, pk&s call five-one.
Mrs- E. H. Hkksofl' of Mieanopy,
spent the day in Ocala, shopping.
Get a sample of Day Dreampowder
xt the Court Pharmacy. 6-tf
Mr. and Mrs. Bradford Webb of
Kendrick have returned from a very
pleasant outing at Pablo Beach.
Hot Boston baked beans and brown
bread for Saturday night supper.
Carter's Bakery. ..." 24-tf

Ask your grocer for the best bread.
He knows you mean Federal bread. 6t
Hats left in the shop over thirty
days will be sold for charges. J. Melin,
Hatter. 13-tf

Mrs. Godfrey Moyers of Tampa is
. ej peeted in Ocala in a few days fos
a short visit with Mrs. Emily Green.

There's no extra charge for clean cleaning
ing cleaning your fish at the City Fish Market.
Phone 158- tf

Mrs. W. Lv Scott and Miss. Mary
Scott went to St. Augustine yesterday
for a week's stay.

Overland, 5-passenger touring, Al
shape. A buy at $175. Spencer Spencer-Pedrick
Pedrick Spencer-Pedrick Motor Co. 11-tf

Mrs. T. M. Moore is expected home

tomorrow from Tallahassee, where

she has been the guest of her daugh
-ter, Mrs. Eugene Rivers.

PROGRAM OF THE CONCERT V
BY THE BEANTOWN CHOIR
We give below the program which
the Beantown Choir will present this
evening (Friday) at the' armory the theater.
ater. theater. You will note the variety, the
quantity and the quality. Most of the
members of this choir are our tried
and proven musicians and a couple of
them are just little school girls, home
for vacation, but they will each and all
give of their best.
The Beantowners are also interest interested
ed interested in Ocala. They like it and so do

you. it will do us all good to hear
them sign "The Ocala Rooster.' Come

and hear it crow. Please bring this
program with you tomorrow evening
and be there by 8:25 as the concert

will begin at 8:30, sharp

Program

Chorale Handel
The Choir
Solo Selected
Miss Delia Livingston
The Ocala Rooster Sung by the
, Gerigs and the Choir
Danny Dever...Kipling-Damrosch
Mr. Lucas
Summer is a Comin In Choir
Solo Selected
Miss Willie May Lang

Old Black Joe. The Choir
Air, the Magic Flute. .... .Mozart
Mr. Gernant
The Lass vith the Delicate Air
(Hayden) Mrs. Hampton j
John Brown's Baby... The Choir

The Heavens are Telling. .(Hay-

den) The Choir 2t
Children, half fare.

LEESBURG BOYS GAVE
HOME TEAM A LICKING

(Continued from First Page)

bag. Ocala did nothing of note. Lees Lees-burg,
burg, Lees-burg, 5; Ocala, 0.
Eighth: Buckles singled. Carpen Carpenter
ter Carpenter sacrificed him to second. Alls Alls-brook
brook Alls-brook hit to short who threw to first,
catching All sb rook. First then threw
to third and caught Buckles who was
trying to gain a base on the play.
Ocala took the quick route back to the
field. Leesburg, 5; Ocala, 0.

Knows Every Soul In
Dixie Sveet Breams

This Great Mosquito Remedy Boasts
Many Friends
It is the policy of Sweet Dreams to
hold its friends after making them,
and the wonderful efficiency of this
mosquito remedy makes this possible.
Sweet Dreams represents a mos-

b uu-itv a. 'bu-ivt v iuii J iceboat viiv
Ninth: Leesburg went out one, two, j
three' Ocala's firsftwo went on perimental stage. For seven years

1.
2.
3.

5.
6.

7.
8.
9.
10.
11.

three. Ocala 's firsftwo went out.

Luff man singled but Brooks, fanned
and ended the game. Leesburg, 5;
Ocala, 0. x
The Box Score

Leesburg AB R H PO
West, If . ..5 1 f 2

Gillespi, 1st 5 0
Rolling, 2nd 5 1
Wharton, 3rd 3 0

Epperson, p 3 0
Medlin, ss 4 1
Buckles, c 2 1
Carpenter, rf ..3 0
Allsbrook, cf 3 1

0
2
0
1
2
1
1
0

5
3
3
0
0
14J
0
0

SUGAR SATURDAY AND MONDAY

, Overland, 5-passenger touring, Al
shape. A buy at .$175. Spencer Spencer-Pedrick
Pedrick Spencer-Pedrick Motor Co. 11-tf

17 pounds of sugar for one dollac,

fnth a dollar's worth of other groc-

ries for cash, Saturday and Monday
rly. Pnone 377.
vky-tf y H. B. WHITTINGTON.

Mrs. William Franklin has returned
home ''after a month's visit with
friends and relatives in Tampa and
Sarasota.

; Panama hats cleaned and reblocked,
7 5c. Royal Cleaners, J. Melin, Hat Hatter.
ter. Hatter. N 13-tf

Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Gary and two
children returned yesterday from Tie Tie-Land,
Land, Tie-Land, where they have been attending
the Baptist Assembly.
The first time Ocala ladies have
had an opportunity to get DAY
DREAM face powder. It's at the
3ourt Pharmacy. 6-tf

33 5 6 27
AB R H PO
.4 0 15,

Ocala
LiddtU, cf

Strickland, ss-p....4 0 1 1
Harris, If . ..T. . .3 0 0 2
H. Wood, 2nd-c . .'.4 0 1 4
Clements, rf-p 4 0 2 0
F. Luff man, 3rd 4 0 1 3
Brooks, lst-2nd ....4 0 0 8
H. Luffman, p-rf ...1 0 10
Leavengood, c 3 00 4
R. Wood, rf-ss ....2 0 0 0

A'
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1
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0
2
0
2
0
1
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,0
0
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E
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this remedy has stood tryout after

tryout and for seven years tales of
its wonderful performances have been
related by its users.
Sweet Dreams became the standard
mosquito remedy the morning the
first bottle was made. It has. become
the accepted remedy everywhere and
it knows every soul in Dixie.
Your druggist (no matter where

( you live) sells Sweet Dreams. Adv.

. SEE HE FOR
Everything in the BdUbtg line
My Wcrh is GcarcrJetd
F. A. TINSL1AII
'The Stereo Man" Fkcne 52$:

hTmTiYmYmYmYmYTYi

For
Fres
Meats and
Groceries
Call
Phone
243

33 0 7 27 7 7

Telephone Us.
Jast ask us over the telephone to suggest
a cut of meat for your dinner. We
study your wants and our every en en-deavor
deavor en-deavor is to please you. This careful

srrvice, icith our prompt delivery, is zj:

what has given us prestige in the rresh :;:
Meat business.
: COOK'S MARKET & GROCERY

A
A
:I:

BASEBALL SCHEDULE

The sugar deal being offered by the
U-Serve grocery stores in their ad. in
today's paper is worth reading and
taking advantage of. A representative
of one of the largest jobbing houses
in the state says that there is no
doubt about the price of sugar taking
a big jump within the next few weeks.
This, if sugar is bought today at the
regular price, makes i worth while to
lay in a few weeks' supply at this
time.

.021 200 0005
.000 000 0000

Our. fresh meats as well as our gro groceries
ceries groceries are the best in the land. Prompt
delivery anywhere in the city. Main
Street Market. Phone 108. 28-tf

; Mr. Glyndon Hall, a popular young
druggist of Atlanta, is in the city
visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J.
F. Hall, and sister. Alma, for a few
days and greeting his friends.

I The talk of the town among the la ladies
dies ladies who know is the complete line of
Day Dream toilet articles now to be
liad at the Court Pharmacy. 6-tf
The friends of Mrs. Wilkinson, Mrs.
A. P. Canova's mother, will be glad to
know that she is improving after a
serious illness.

Everybody likes KEDS on account
of their good wearing qualities. We
have just received a new shipment.
nSHEL'S. 3t

Don't accept a substitute for Fed Fed-'.ral
'.ral Fed-'.ral bread. Insist on having the best.
It costs no more than the other
land. 15-6t

. Score by innings:
Leesburg ......
Ocala

Summary: Two base hits, Rolling 2,
Medlin; sacrifice hits, Epperson, Car Carpenter,
penter, Carpenter, Allsbrook; stolen bases,
Buckles, Liddell; struck out by Ep Epperson,
person, Epperson, 13, by Clements, 3, by Strick Strickland,
land, Strickland, 2; hit by pitcher, by Strickland,
1; base on balls off Luffman, 1, off
Epperson, 1; earned runs, Leesburg,

3. Time 1:40. Umpires, Freeble and
Connell. Scorer, L. T. I. Attendance,
341 whole and 24 half tickets.

Tuesday, July 19 Inverness .in In Inverness.
verness. Inverness. Thursday, July 21 Winter Garden
in Ocala.
Tuesday,' July 26 Open.
Thursday, July 28 Leesburg in
Leesburg.
Tuesday, August 2 Open.
Thursday, August 4 Leesburg in
Ocala. 4
Tuesday, August 9 Open.
Thursday, August 11 Leesburg in
Leesburg.

Straw sailor hats cleaned 50c. Royal
Cleaners, J. Melin, Hatter. 13-tf
REDDICK

FIRST POLO HATCHES
PLAYD IN LONG AGO

CLASSIFIED
ADVERT1SS11TS
V ANTED. LOST, t'OUND, FOR
SALE, FOR RENT AND SIM SIMILAR
ILAR SIMILAR LOCAL NEEDS

FOR RENT Three or four furnished
rooms for light housekeeping. Ap Apply
ply Apply Phone 87. 5-tf

GUAVAS Fine Lake GrifSn guavas
for sale in crate lots. Suitable for
jellies. Price $1.50 crate f. o. b.
Leesburg. Order NOW to be sure
you get them. F E. Wetherbee,
Agent, Leesburg, Fla. 7-5-tf

A

English Team Brought to United
States in 1886.

FOR SALE Five room house and
small lot at Stanton, Fla., near Lake
Weir. See Mrs. Bishop, Weirsdale,
Fla. 7-7-tf
FOR RENT Large office room over
Fishel's. Apply T. A. Blake, over
Helvenston's. 8-tf
FOR SALE 1920 Buick. Can be
seen at Nichols & Cobb's stables stables-First
First stables-First class mechanical condition. A.
L. McKay. 8-6t

Dr. Charles L. Collins, pastor of
the First Baptist church, has returned
home and will conduct the services at
that church next Sunday.

The Ocala party of eleven people
who have been in DeLand for the past
week attending the tenth annual ses session
sion session of the Florida Baptist Assembly

returned o Ocala Thursday and re-i

port that the assembly was a huge
suaeess. The enrollment was nearly
700, over 600 coming from outside of
DeLand, representing all parts of the
state from Madison to Miami. Dr. C.
L. Collins, pastor of the local 'Baptist
church, was re-elected -assistant regis registrar"
trar" registrar" Rev. E. M. Henderson of Jack Jacksonville,
sonville, Jacksonville, a former Ocala boy, was
elected president for the ensuing year.

" Miss Alice Cullen of Ocala arrived
in Lakeland Saturday afternoon to
visit her friend, Miss Margaret Jewett
of South Florida avenue. Lakeland
Telegram.

Day Dream extracts and toilet wa

ters, a full line, just received at thet

Court Pharmacy. 6-tf

If you trade. with us come in and
get one of our. Japanese Reed Fans.
FISHEL'S. 3t

Yes, those delicious sandwiches she
werved the other day were made of
Federal rolls. Theytare always fresh fresh-baked
baked fresh-baked twice a day. 156t

Let us deliver your-grocery order
''with your fresh meats each morning.
.Main Street Market. Phone 108. 28itf

Mrs. J. H. Mason and little Miss
Susan Stovall motored to Clearwater
Beach yesterday, where they will en enjoy
joy enjoy a visit of several days and will be
guests at Roux Hall at that delight delightful
ful delightful resort. They were accompanied
by Mrs. Mason's mother, Mrs. M. H.
Stovall, of Ocala, who will spend sev several
eral several days with- them at the beach.
Tampa Tribune.

Mr. L. H. Chazal is in Jacksonville,
attending a meeting of officers of the
Florida branch of the American Le Legion.

At' Judge Futch's office yesterday
afternoon, the judge officiating, Miss
Nana L. Anderson was married to Mr.
Wallace J. Markham, both of this city.

Judge Futch.-yesterday issued a li license
cense license to marry to Mr. Thos J. Regis Register
ter Register of Ocala and Miss Verlee E. Mims,
of Ola, S. C.

Miss Robert Olive Kruse of DeLand,
is a guest of Miss Julianna Collins at
her home on East Third street, for a
few days."

W. K. Lane, M. D., physician and
furgeon, specialist eye, ear, nose and
throat. Office over 5 and 10 cent store
Ocala, Fla. Adv. tf

Miss Mabel Akins is spending the
second week of her vacation with rel relatives
atives relatives in Georgia, going direct to her
Georgia destination from DeLand,

evening, i where she attended the Florida Bap-

At the Ocala House this

friends of Miss Mabel Tobleske willitist Assemhlv

1 -J
jgive that charming young lady a :
3party in honor of her birthday. I This is a Studebaker year.

tf

Mrs. H. S. Wesson and Miss Anr.a Anr.a-belle
belle Anr.a-belle Wesson have returned, home
from Chattanooga, where they have
been spending the past two months
with friends and relatives.

Mrs. S. F.' Mainer of Bushnell is
spending the week in Ocala, having
been called here by the illness of her
daughter, Mrs. James Nicholson.

NOTICE

Why buy a sewing machine that
has no reputation and you know noth nothing
ing nothing about, when the SINGER is sold
on its reputation and backed by Singer
service as long as it exists. Easy
terms. Phone 542.
Singer Sewing Machine Co.,
317 North Magnolia St.,
7-12-tf Ocala, Fla.

Reddkk, July 12. Mrs. H. G.

Yongue and three children, Elizabeth,
Mary and Catherine left Monday for

South Carolina, where they will spend
the summer with relatives.
Miss Evelyn Ferguson left Sunday
for her home in Tampa, after spend spending
ing spending a few weeks vacation with her
grandfather here.
Misses Janet and Inez Roux left
Sunday for their home in Floral City,
after spending some time with their
reltaives, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. DuPree
Mrs. J. W. Core received the sad
news Thursday of the death of her
sister, Mrs. Greene at Gardner. Mr.
and Mrs. Core and daughter, Ethel
left immediately by auto for Gardner

to attend the funeral.
Messrs. S. L. Fridy and E. D. Rou
and families are spending the sum summer
mer summer at their cottages on St. Augustine
Beach.
Messrs. C. J. Fridy- and Walter
Bishop and Misses Ida Mae Cain and
Agnes Bishop spent the fourth with

Mr. Fridy's family at St. Augustine
Beach.
Mrs. J. S. McCullough and Mrs. b.
M. Williams with their children, of
Boardman, spent Tuesday here as the
guests of Mrs. Mary E. Rou and Mrs.
J. W. Core.
Mrs. E. F. Hart and Mrs. H. Gat Gat-trell
trell Gat-trell Jr. exptct to leave this week for
a trip down the East Coast, going to

Pompano to visit their gi-ar.dparents, j

Mr. and Mrs. L. bmoak.
Mr. and Mrs. J. C. DuPree left Fii Fii-day
day Fii-day in their new Buick for a trip down
the East Coast. Taey expect to visit
reltaives in Cocoanut Grove and Mi Miami.'
ami.' Miami.' WifeTy Requirement.
The Spaiv'T-'ts have, a s)in that a
vrlfe should I'nnWe tbr- thins, s, hdi!
j'Qjt difler frw these same !tigs.

First, she -'ulJ be like .n:ii. Inch
llwaj.s gi;8'i4. Its Lou i se

hMiil ui urrj th Lous- vi!l
ivht'iivver f jroes ut. :.-ih!
5houiI be i'.'w nn eriio. .h c'ii -;
jnly aftev ih o'her is :h:ishe--she
shnul.t t.t M'vnys b :r thv
word, and hist. .-h- shoul-I -e Hkt

town !c! i-j''h jiiwar
tours witl- n"''n': -. ritv. bi't

DOt south a !; ii tin T t!i- wIiOU- tOD
shall bear it.

Member of Hurltagham Club Writes
Interesting Letter Describing In-
itial Contests for Interna,
tional Title.
In 1886 John Watson brought an
English team to the United States to
play the first matches for the Interna International
tional International polo cup. What comment that
visit caused! Americans were eager
to see the game and everyone knows
with what avidity It was taken up
when-society said it was good to look
upon.
The following letter, written by a
member of the Ilurllngham team, who
played in those games, will be read
with interest, even though the writer
has begged not to have his name made
public. The letter, follows:
"American polo in 18S6 was not, as
far as team play went, up to the
standard of first-class English polo.
The American rode very handy ponies
I believe mostly Argentines. They
were not so well bred or as fast ponies
as ours. The American team did not
play well together and thought too
much of their individual play. They

had not then mastered the backhander
and did not try to keep the hall up
and down the middle of the ground.
The English teams had learned their
polo to start with mostly in India,
where there were full-sized grounds
(300 and 200 yards), and no boards.
It was. therefore, necessary to keep
the ball in play by playing up and
down the ground.
"The Hurlhigham team was cap captained
tained captained by Mr. Watson, one of the best
players of his day. When playing a
practice game before the matches he
over-balanced himself and fell off his
pony. His horsemanship on this ac account
count account i was much criticised by the
American press. He was, however, a
very strong and good horseman, which,
I think, the Americans realized in the
matches. We were to have played
several matches In the United States,
but as the Hurilngham team beat the
best team the United States could

then produce in two consecutive
matches, the other matches fell

through.
The ground at Newport was very
good and well kept, but much too
small even for ponies of the height
then p!.yed. The game In the United
State was commenced by placing the
ball in the middle of the ground. The
No. Vn started fr m behind the line
and noi.! for the bll. This rule
was decidedlv tc cur fldv.T'tasre.

WANTED To hear from owner of
small farm. Give location, descrip description,
tion, description, best price and terms. Address
Farmer, care Star. 12-3t

FOR SALE Seven passenger auto automobile,
mobile, automobile, run less than 10,000 miles.
Will trade for real estate or accept
Ford as part payment. See G rover
Griffin, at 119 S. Magnolia. 12-3t

FOR SALE Strand wood, split pine"
and oak, f 3 and $3.50 per strand.
Leave orders at Jirash Grocery.
Phone 413. 13-12t

WANTED To hear from owned of
cilty property for sale. Best price,
cash or terms. Address "G," care
Star, Ocala, Fla. 13-3t

FOR SALF, Interest bearing note
due on or before July 1, 1923, at 8
per cent interest. Secured by first
mortgage on city property. See Gro Gro-ver
ver Gro-ver Griffin, 19 S. Magnolia St. 3t

FOR SALE rThree quarter Jersey
cow, gentle and dehorned, with fare
x heifer calf three weeks old. Milk
cows for sale at all times. Anthony
Farms, Anthony, Fla. 13-6t

FARM FOR SALE First class 320 320-acre
acre 320-acre farm six miles from Ocala on
hard road. One well finished 8-foom
' house with wide verandas; also 3-'
room house; good deep well with
gasoline engine and pumping outfit;
good barn, smokehouse, sheds, etc.
All under good wire fence; half un under
der under cultivation; uncleared land has
valuable timber. Pasture has never never-failing
failing never-failing pond. Horses, cattle hogs,
. etc. Everything ready to go to work.
This is a real bargain at the price,
$17,500. Can be handled for $7500
cash, with liberal terms on balance.
If interested write me and I will be
' pleased to "show you." "Owner,"
care Star. Ocala, Fla. 13-3t

Lor
sV
but
rst
the

can is the
ihe si ould

' Easy.
! A distliiuliLf.l Loudoa rierfjiran
! LAs two n:i;d. li'M t urned fT.-ite. One
;! a V)!,nev 't;- a S -'f. The

i C:

'l!-iiv.".i'sli;i:

f! two

iwlved bv the eaT method of calling

O)

l !!- !H!

'lift l.iilt
I-'- t i':'iifi

Tb"S i Sftnt.-bak-r vnr.

No
tf

Your competitor advertises. Do you.

WANTED Have from $500 to $1000
to invest in some paying business.
What have you to offer? Prefer a
mercantile business. P. H.. Bufkin,
Kola, Miss. 14-6t

FOR SALE Dandy little 15-acre
farm; four-room house, deep well
'with pump; barn, smoke house;
young mare; cow, yearling; farm
tools; three acres sweet potatoes;
eight acres peanuts; some hogs. All
go with plaec at a very low price.
S. S. Savage Jr. 14-t

WANTED Some one to turn over
25 acres of land with tractor. Land
was planted in tomatoes this season.
Apply to P. O. Box 445 at once. 12t

RcliStntJ tnC'FQlTllly k was wrong 6n nts mathematics fun

"PIsher

uNcwe tneKiN vou

Vt.w. Tt Qrtrfc.'

IT f MP IT TWKt

-ur rs DO IT J V

. I l I . i r - 1 I .

- r I VT wwvw L I 0 v-- t 7. J ii i

I f tuiVTS 1 I tM I I f r Tr THE. WOW vtwu m PlEMrt line J i 1

x V j i- ecru vy j v l c0 V 'I

s .i t i v i i ill 'i ii r i

1 S s II I m I Tl. I I ' I i 1 (

53S

FOR SALE Five acre tract 1 1-4
miles from Ocala on Anthony road;
all cleared and fenced; three-room
bungalow; good well; fruit trees.
Also Ford truck. Price $800. Henry
Bernhardt, care Star. 14-t
FOR SALE Iron water tank, in
good order, GOO gallon capacity,
with 40 or 50 feet of pipe. Apply to
Star office or write to box 404,
Ocala.

L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CONTRACTOR
AND BUILDER
Careful estimates made cn allccn allccn-tract
tract allccn-tract work. Gives more and tetter
work for the money than any other
contractor ia the city.

Mohammedan Oath.
The Mohammedan taSes an oath wtift
his forehead reverently resting epea
the open Koran. Taking the booiT
his bands te steps, slowly bewinfij
fcead until It touches the bock.

-4

v
...

0



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