The Ocala evening star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:05921

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
OCALA

EVEN

T T TV

r -v sr i t a r ii "v

TEMPERATURES
This morning, 75.
This afternoon, 95.
WEATHER FORECAST
Generally fair tonight
and Tuesday.
VOL. 21
OCALA, FLORIDA. MONDAY, JUNE 27, 1921
NO. J51
OAnnV OVER STOCKS ERNEST LAWRENCE
E AY
HUT OF
VITAL INTEREST
11 OCALA
SHOULD
SUDDENLY INSANE
fffl

S 1 AM

DISABLED VETS 10
! MEET III BELAUD

V

A OR

A

F H II

ADDEST DEADBEATS

HAVE A flEA

Harding Asks Cabinet Officers to In Investigate
vestigate Investigate Credit -Facilities
in the South

(Associated Press)
Washington, June 27 President
Harding has requested Secretaries
Melton and Hoover and Managing
Director Meyer of the War Finance
Corporation to conduct an investiga investigation
tion investigation into the credit facilities in the
South with regard to carrying over
present cotton stocks until they can
be marketed in an orderly way.
HARDING WILL PRESIDE
President Harding will preside at
a meeting Wednesday of all govern government
ment government ; officials dealing with the pre preparation
paration preparation of. estimates of expenditures
' for Congress. The meeting was called
today at the direction of the president
by Charles G. Dawes, director of the
budget.
INCREASE FARM LABOR FUND
Legislative action on the Curtis Curtis-Nelson
Nelson Curtis-Nelson bill to add about $25,000,000
to the capital of .federal farm loan
banks for long term loads to farmers
was completed today with the accep acceptance
tance acceptance by the Senate of the House re reduction
duction reduction from $50,000,000 to $25,000, $25,000,-000.
000. $25,000,-000. The bill now goes to the presi president.
dent. president. CONTROLLER McCART
; . J. Raymond McCart, of Nebraska,
- secretary of the .republican congress-
- ionat campaign committee, has been
nominated comptroller of the United
States, a position, created by the new
budget law.
WHITE AND COLORED
POPULATION OF FLORIDA
Associated Press)
Washington, June 27. The popula-
m ni .f.i .s
xion oi rioriaa as recently announced
by the census bureau is 65.9 per cent
, white and 34 per cent negro. In 1910
The negro population which was
308.153 in. 1910 advanced to 329,487
. in 1920, an increase of 6.7 per cent.
The, white population in the same
period increased from 442,634 to
638,153, or 13.8 per cent.
: 'The white population consists main mainly
ly mainly of native Americans born of native
American parents, the total native
White of -native parentage being 532,-
resented by 43,000 foreign born
whites, 35,751 native whites who had
foreign born parents and 27,099 who
. had one parent foreign born, the
other being native. The total popu
lation includes also 518 Indians, 181
Chinese, 106 Japanese and 25 "all
other."
In almost every county the percent
age of negroes ha3 decreased and in
28 of the 54 counties there were also
a decrease in the number of negroes.
The percentage of negroes in the
total population of each county in
.1920. and 1910, in each instance the
first figure being that for 1920, fol follows:
lows: follows: Alachua, 46; 55.7; Baker. 25.3; 24.1;
Bay, 24.2; Bradford, 27.9; 28.3; Bre
vard, 29.2; 29.7; Broward, 30.5; Cal-
nn a. no n. jo j r.
Clay, 36.9; 40.1; Columbia, 49; 47.5;
Dade, 29.7; 35.1; DeSoto, 17.1; 16.6;
DuvaL 42.3: 49.6: Escambia. 30.8:
39.7; Flagler, 39.2; Franklin, 46.7;
w f 9
47.8; Gadsden, 62.9; 67.4; Hamilton,
43.2;. 46.8; Hernando, 40.1; 55.7;
H31sborough, 18.8; 21; Holmes, 8;
10.3; Jackson, 42.7; 47.8; Jefferson,
72.5; 76.2; Lafayette, 17.8; 20.3;
Ajaae, jou; oo.i; j-.ee, j.o.i; xi.y; ueon,
- 67.4; 75.8; Levy, 39.9; 45.6; Liberty,
44.8; 44.9; Madison, 51.4; 55.6; Man
atee,- oi; z4.o; xnanon oo.o; ou.o;
Monroe, 22.1; 27.1; Nassau, 44.3; 52.8;
Okaloosa, 19.7; Okeechobee, 9.9; Or
ange, 27.5; 39.8; Osceola, 15.6; 16.8;
Palm Beach, 29.5; Pasco, 23.8; 32.7;
Pinellas, 16.1; Polk, 24.2; 30.7; Put
nam, 46.3; 52; St. Johns, 36.1; 41.3;
"St. Lucie. 24; 21.2: Santa Rosa, 20.8;
28.4; Seminole, 45.9; Sumter, 28.3;
33.7; Suwannee, 40.2; 42; Taylor,
?40.5; 37.9; Volusia, 35.1; 39.9; Wa Wakulla,.
kulla,. Wakulla,. 46; 49.6; Watlon, 20.1; 30.4;
Washington, 25; 30.3.
SPECIALS IN TABLE
riiTTHS AND NAPKINS
50 doz Mercerized ready for use
napkins at $1.75 the dozen; five dozen
Mercerized Table Cloths at 45 cents;
five dozen Mercerized Table Cloths at
55 cents. These items are 50 per
cent below regular prices.
27-tf RHEINAUER & CO.

Aa Result of Injuries Received Years
Ago, Killed Three Families and
Committed Suicide

(Associated Press)
Mayfield, Ky.. June 27. The county
authorities today were working on
the theory that Ernest Lawrence
murdered ten-persons in his farm
home near here Saturday night,
drenched the house with oil, set it on
fire and then killed himself. Lawrence
several years ago was clubbed by a
Mayfield policeman when he resisted
arrest on a charge of intoxication.
Acquaintances today told the sheriff
that Lawrence shortly after that event
had suffered wha they called spells,
which led the office today to reiterate
his belief that Lawrence's illness sud sud-denly
denly sud-denly developed into insanity during
which he wiped out his own family;
the family of his brother-in-law and
his brother-in-law's brother. The
charred bodies of two women, three
men and six children were so badly
burned that physicians were only able
to gues3 ct how they were slain.
STRIKE AT SUMMERFIELD
( Associated Press)
Summer-field, July 27. The crate
mill here is running short handed as
the resutl of a strike of workers over
disagreement regarding the working
hours.
ANOTHER CUT IN PRICE
OF GRANNLATED SUGAR
I Associated Press)
New York, June 27. The Federal
Sugar Refining Company- made an
other 10 point cut today in their price
for refined sugar to the basis of 5.30
for fine granulated.
CADETS KILLED WHEN
THEIR AIRPLANES CRASHED,
Sacramenta, Calif., June 27. Fly
ing Cadets Harold Page of Union
City, Mich., and Joseph Weathesby,
of Fort Davis, Texas, were killed to today
day today when their airplane crashed near
Visalia.
LOUISE HAMMACK
Louise Hammack, the bright and
pretty 13-year-old daughter of Mrs.
Bessie Hammack, died this morning
at five o'clock at the home of her
grandmother, Mrs. G. E. Thompson,
East Fourth street. The many friends
of this family deeply sympathize
with them in their sorrow. Funeral
services will take .'place from the
house tomorrow afternoon at four
o'clock.
OCALA SCHOOLS THIS YEAR
WILL OPEN EARLY
For the benefit of those taking va
cations and desiring to return to the
city in time for school, we are asked
to announce that the high school will
open the 12th of September and the
primary' and grammar school depart department
ment department will open two weeks later, the
26th of September.
CORONER'S JURY SAID
IT WAS MURDER
The coroner's jury, in the case of
A. L. Parker, who killed Canington
near Orange Lake Saturday morn
ing, pronounced, the act a murder.
Parker's preliminary trial will be
held as soon as possible.
BARACA-PHILATHEA MEET
IN JACKSONVILLE NEXT YEAR
Jacksonville, June 27. This city
was awarded the annual convention
of the world-wide Baraca-Philathea
Association for 1922 at the closing
session of this year's convention in
Detroit last night, according to ad advices
vices advices received here. The date will be
A MERRY OCCASION

The members of the Business Wom Woman's
an's Woman's Club are anticipating a merry oc occasion
casion occasion for the 21st of July, which will
be a boat ride down Silver Springs
run. This will be the third Thursday
in July. Many of the members are
inviting some business woman or girl
who are not members to take the trip.
Tickets are on sale at the Court
Pharmacy, and the fare is $1 for the
round trip.
Your competitor advertises. Do yon.

All
(Associated Press)
Detroit, Mich, June 27. Detroit
today hung out the "welcome sign"
to American soldiers wounded in the
world war.
From every part of the country
veterans were arriving to take part
in the opening sessions tomorrow of
the first meeting of the Disabled Vet Veterans
erans Veterans of the World War.
Perfection of the national organiza organization,
tion, organization, discussion of questions vital to
the welfare of wounded soldiers, and
selection of next year's convention
city were among the matters to come
before the gathering before the final
adjournment on Thursday.
Today was devoted to registration
of the several thousand delegates and
to issuance of credentials. Tonight
the wounded men will be guests of
the border cities of Canada at an en entertainment
tertainment entertainment at the Windsor Jockey
Club.
Tomorrow forenoon, addresses of
welcome will be given by Governor
Alex J. Groesbeck and James Couz Couz-ens,
ens, Couz-ens, mayor of Detroit. The report
of Judge Robert S. Marx of Cincin Cincinnati,
nati, Cincinnati, national president, alos will be
given.
Among the speakers on the pro program
gram program tomorrow morning are Jules
Jusserand, the French ambassador and
Chaplain Michael Aaronson of Balti Baltimore,
more, Baltimore, who will speak on "Victory
over Blindness."
The afternoon tomorrow has been
set aside for a uniform parade of all
the wounded soldiers. Features of
the parade will be a float drawn by
six jet black horses, in honor of the
nation's' soldier dead, and a jet black
horse with invested boots' and a crepe
rosette on the saddle pommel, escort escorted
ed escorted by a detail of six men with in-
erted boots, in memory of Colonel
Frederick Galbraith, late commander
of the American Legion, recently
killed in' an automobile accident. Col.
Galbraith was to have taken a promi prominent
nent prominent part in the convention.
Speakers for Wednesday include
Ralph Herr of Seattle, Wash., who
will speak on "The Disabled Ameri American
can American Veterans in the West, their Prob Problems
lems Problems and Achievements," and Charles
H. Miller of Imperial Valley. Calif.
The business sessions on Thursday,
the last day of the convention, will
V. ammaW 4--v nHAnfinn fT o Tl ofl T 11- I
tion. selection of a permanent head-
quarters and the next convention
city, and election of officers.
TRYING TO GET TOGETHER
(Associated Press) -London,
June 27. The belief that
Eamon d6 Valera, president of the
Irish republic, will accept Premier
Lloyd .George's invitation to come to
London for a conferencs with the gov government
ernment government and Premier Craig of Ulster,
designed to bring about a settlement
of the Irish problem, was expressed
today in a majority of the reports re received
ceived received from Dublin.
BASEBALL'S ALLEGED ;
CROOKS TO THE BAR
(Assocd&ted Press)
Chicago, June 27. With a special
venire W prospective jupors ready for
examination, the case of eighteen
baseball players, alleged gamblers
and others indicted in connection with
the 1919 world series baseball scandal
was to be called for trial today in the
criminal court here.
FLORIDA'S NATIONAL
GUARD ORGANIZATION
First Infantry Regiment
Company A, Daytona.
Company B. Miami.
Company C, West Palm Beach.
Company D, Sanford.
Company E, Live Oak.
Company F, Jacksonville.
Company G, Starke.
Company H, Lake City.
Company I, Tarpon Springs.
Company K, Orlando.
Company L, Wauchula.
Company M, Brooksville.
Platoon, Company M, Marianna.
Service Company, Hastings.
Platoon of Company E, Branford.
Headquarters Company M, St. Pe

Welcome Sign Hung Out for
American Soldiers Wounded
in the World War

tersburg.
Motor Transport Company,
sonville.
r -
This is a Studebaker year.

Jack-

People Who are Using Public Street
aa a Grandstand and Seeing Ball
Games Without Paying

(L. T. I.)
The police of Ccala' have indeed
struck a 'stump in the performance
of their duty. The mayor recently
issued an order to the effect that all
persons attending the ball games
should pay admission and detailed a
special policeman to enforce this
order. The first game or so after the
order went into effect the increase in
gate receipts was very noticeable but
it soon began to fall off again. At Attention
tention Attention was called to the fact that
many cars were parking over on
South Orange street along the outside
of the baseball park and that this cut
a considerable slice out of the gate
receipts. Repeated effort has been
made to collect from those occupying
these cars but to no avail. Finally
the special policeman was asked to go
and suggest that they either pay or
move on. Much to the officer's sur surprise
prise surprise they told him that they were on
a public street and that they would
stay there until they got good and
ready to move on, and that they would
not pay one cent towards helping out
the team that they liked so well (to
see play. Doesn't that beat all you
ever heard of? Arent you surprised
to hear that Ocala contains such peo people?
ple? people? Do you know who they are? If
you don't, just take, a look at them
next time we have a game. They
will be there for the, police cannot
move them. If you know any of
them go over and speak to them and
tell them that you hope they enjoy
the free game.
Ocala Will Play at Home on the
Fourth
After considerable trouble and
work,1 Jake Goldman has succeeded in
getting a game in Ocala for the 4th
of July. The Tarpon Springs boys
liked Ocala so well the last time they
were here that they want to repeat the
dose. We liked the Tarpon boys, too,
so Jake told them to come and play
two games with us, one on the fourth
and one on the fifth. You wont need
to leave Ocala on the fourth for a
ceelbration. A good suggestion for
a large day is to take your dinner and
go to the springs in the morning,
Have a swim and eat your lunch in
the shade, then return to town about
f . ; L
I. wi avm Kaw wrh t rvsvstsl omaa I a MVTl
gave us last time, so there is no need
making any big talk about that. Just
bear in mind that we are going to
pay these boys $150 to amuse Ocala
fans on the fourth and fifth. Dont
fail to come out and be amused and
incidentally pay your 50 cents to
wards raising that $150.
Ocala Team Will Play in Eustis
.Thursday
The management was unable to se secure
cure secure a team to play in Ocala this week
but has accepted a challenge from
Eustis to play on their diamond for a
$100 guarantee with privilege of tak
ing 60 per cent of the gate receipts
if we win. Under these circumstances
we will win. of course. Our team has
to pay its own expenses down there,
so we want cars to take the team as
they did on the Winter Garden trip.
It will be a good trip. It is only 53
miles to Eustis and after getting to
Weirsdale the road is fine. Eustis is
a pretty town and those who have
never been there can have a nice out outing
ing outing as well as see a good ball game
and help the team bet there. It is too
far for the boys to walk and then
play ball and we have not money
enough to hire the cars. Let's get to together
gether together and make it a big day. It is
only a matter of about two hours to
drive to Eustis. Let's all go. Re Remember
member Remember the day, Thursday, June 30th.
AUTHORESS ILL
Associated Press)
New York, June 27. Mrs. Mary
Roberts Rinehart, the novelist and
playwright, who underwent an opera operation,
tion, operation, is reported in a satisfactory con condition
dition condition today. Physicians- said .she
passed a fairly comfortable night.
SPECIALS IN LADIES
- SHOES AT RHEINAUER'S
$6.00 Value Black Kid Comfort
Slipper, $3.75; .$6.00 value in Black
Kid and Brown Oxfords, at $3.75; an
odd lot of White Slippers at $1.39. tf

None of Its Members Should be Ah.

sent from the Meeting of the
Board Wednesday Night
An unusually important meeting of
the Marion County Board of Trade
will be held Wednesday night at 8
o'clock. At this meeting the mem members
bers members will be asked to consider what
items the city and county should b
asked to place in their budgets for
the next year. The city and county
make up their budgets next month.
This year the city made an appropria appropriation
tion appropriation of $500 toward the booklet fund
of the Board of Trade, and an item of
$800 for band concerts was placed in
the city budget. The county the last
two years has Veen unable to make a
contribution to the publicity fund of
the Board of Trade for the reason
that there has been no legal provis
ion for this. The present legislature,
however, passed a bill authorizing the
county commissioners oi Marion to
appropriate not exceeding $2000 for
publicity purposes.
At the meeting Wednesday night,
the Board of Trade will be asked to
consider organizing a presidents' and
secretaries' committee to be composed
of the presidents and secretaries of
the various civic organizations of the
city. The purpose of this committee
would be to meet from time to time to
compare programs of the several or organizations
ganizations organizations with a view to preventing
a duplication of effort and expendi
tures, and for the purpose, therefore,
of securing more economy and conser
vation of finances among the organi
zations.
MRS. MARY BLAKE
Mrs. R. G. Blake received a tele-
gram this morning conveying thejj
sad news of the death of her mother-
in-law. Mrs. Mary Blake, which oc-
curred yesterday morning at Talla-
hassee. Mrs. Blake with her husband,
Rev. R. L. T. Blake, resided in Ocala
many years ago. Rev. Blake being
patsor of; the Methodist church. The
family has many friends here who
will regret to learn of this good wom woman's
an's woman's death.
OCALA APPRECIATED
And Dr. Karl Weihe Records the Ap
preciation in Peermanent Form
Dr. Karl J. Weihe, with his usual
thoughtfulness, has made it possible
to preserve for years to come the
pleasant memories of the recent meet-

ing of the state optometric xonven-
tion in Ocala. .SCOUTS FROM GAINESVILLE
To begin with he gathered up j AT SILVER SPRINGS
copies of the resolutions passed by the f t
appreciative optometrists, and for- J The Pine Tree patrol of troop three,
warded them to his brother, Fred : Gainesville Boy Scouts, will leave on
Weihe, in Newport News. Mr. Fred J Monday for Silver Springs, where
Weihe is an artist is drawing script, (they will .spend two weeks on a camp,
and he copied each resolution in rib- j The boys will take the train as far as
bon letter on fine strong psper, and Evinston and will push their trek cart,
returned them to Dr. Weihe, who dis- J a small vehicle that is faed by the
tributed them. Copies of each go to scouts for carrying their equipment.
Mayor Anderson for the city, L. H. J the rest of the way. The boys plan to
Chazal for the Board of -Trade, to the j spend their time at the springs in va va-Ocala
Ocala va-Ocala House, to the Florida Optical rious practical studiea such as tent

I Company, Jacksonville, to Dr. Weihe,
to Dr. F. M. Hadley, president of the
Florida State Optometry Association,
Jacksonville, to Dr. H. J. Tlppett,
president Alabama State Optical So Society,
ciety, Society, Dothan, Ala, to Dr. J. I. Pascal,
director of the American Institute of
Optometry, New York, to Dr. H. E.
Loueh of Tampa, and to the Ocala
Evening Star. TW are all handsome
and well worth keeping, and the Star
will frame its copy and hang it on its
office walL
UP ABOVE THE WORLD SO, HIGH
Los Angeles Men Hope to Swiftly Fry
(Associated Press)
Riverside, Calif, June 27. David
D. Davis and Eric Springer, of L"
Angela., left March field here at six
o'clock this morning on an attempted
transcontinental non-stop aerial
flight. They plan to land at Mineola
field, Long Island, in thirty hours.
Well on Their Way
Yuma, Ariz, June 27 Davis and
Springer passed over Yuma at 9:C5
this morning flying at a high altitude.
Meet me at the Union Station
Restaurant for a regular family style
dinner Best dinner in the state for 75
cents. Eat and drink all you want,
Dinner 11 a. m. to -2:30 p. m. Owned
end onerated bv 100 Americans, tf
Increase your salea, JLdrscUsa,

AU Interested ia this Practical

Profitable Indratry Shovld be at
the Board of Trade Room at Four"
O'clock Wednesday Afternoon,
To all farmers and business men of
Marion county who are interested in
the project of a creamery, I wish to
send this call to a meeting to bo held
in the Board of Trade room in Ocala,
Wednesday, June 29th, at 4 'o'clock
sharp.
For the farmers this enterprise
will mean a regular steady income;
some creameries pay for milk every
some every iwo weeu. It mill
mean a' market for your feed crops
through the product f romV the cows.
A lot of roughage and grass that now
go to waste will be utilised. It will
mean better soils. Most of the ma ma-nurial
nurial ma-nurial value of feed is kept on the
farm. A ton of butter fat contains.
only about 30 cents worth of fertilix-
mg elements. It will mean better
crops on these richer soils. It will
mean an increase in the value of your
farm. It will mean a growth in the
value of your herd as the heifers
come on. Best of all, it will mean
more of the best kind of food for
your families.
To the business men of this con con-m
m con-m unity it will mean more trade.
Farmers are good spenders when
they have money to spend. No other
enterprise can be brought to Ocala
that will carry so large a pay rolL It
will mean more cash sales. It will N
mean more money in bank. It will
mean a better feeling between the
town and country.
Thes things will come if the cream creamery
ery creamery comes and is properly supported
and managed. This meeting is called
for the purpose of getting things nn-
I ...
I n 191' a creamery was started at
Selma' Ala $2000 investment
m crery machinery. In 1920, this
same company had $300,000 invested
in creamery equipment, and another
creamery had also been started. They
paid out to the farmers that, year
$2,450,000.
This matter is up to you. Talk
will not build it.
K. C. Moore, County Agent.
SPECIALS IN BED SPREADS
50 Dimity Spreads at $T0.
25 Crochet Spreads at $1.85.
25 Sateen Spreads at $3.90.
These items are 50 per cent below
regular prices. RHEINAUER'S. tf
pitching, camping in general, nature
study, swimming, life-saving, first
, aid, etc On the fourth of July they
will give a demonstration for the vis-
. t a.
ltors at tne springs, snowing scout
life and methods. The patrol is com composed
posed composed of the folowing scouts: D. S.
V nnir. T 1 CtV
ragan, suue our&c, uwip ouuw,
Marcus Edelstein. Willie Edelitein,
Marion O'Kelley, Nathaniel O'Kelley
and Maxie DelL Gainesville Sun.
The boys came in at 12:45 today,
perspiring a good deal, but walking
with a springy step that proved them
to be good hikers. They are a fine fine-looking
looking fine-looking bunch of youngsters, and we
hope they will have a good time at the
springs. t
SWEEPING REDUCTION
IN RAILROAD WAGES
(Associated Press)
Chicago, June 27 The United
States railroad labor board today ex-"
tended its wage reduction order effec effective
tive effective July 1st to nearly ''every largo
railroad in the country. There was
no cha.ig efrom the average 12 per
Af MTvti'nn ffrantMt t) l&l Pr.
riers on June 1st. The board's order
! today covered 210 roads. The new
wage decision wfll make a reality of
1 the estimated four hundred million
j dollar annual savings expected when
the cut is applied on all road known
as class one.
Attractive ads. pay big diviienda.

Easd the want ads.



MOKDAY, JUNE 27. 1921

OCALA EVENING STAB,

Ocala Evening Star

Published Every Day Except Snaday fcy
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY,
OCALA, FLORIDA

1 R. K. tarr.ll, Prealdeat
P. V. Ieareajcood, Seeretary-Treaaarer
J. H. HeaJamlB, Kdlt.r

Entered at Ocala, Fla.,
second-class matter.

postofflce as

TELEPHONES
Baaiaena Of flee ........ Flve-Oa
Editorial Oepartmeat Two-Sevea
Society Reporter Ftve-Oae

' MEMBKIl ASSOCI-WED PRESS

The Associated Press is exclusively
entitled for the nse for republication of
ail news dispatches credited to It or
not otherwise credited In this paper an4
aJso the local news published herein.
All ritrhts of republication of special

dispatches herein are also reserved.
DOMESTIC SLBSCRIPTIOX RATES

One year, in advance $6.00
Six jnonthrf, in advance 3.00
Three months, in advance. 1.50
One month, in advance 0

ADVERTISING RATES-

Displays PI ale 15 cents per inch for
consecutive Insertions. Alternate inser

tions Za per cent additional. Compos!

Hon charges on ads. that run less than

six times 10 cents per Inch. Special
position 25 per cent additional. -Rate
. based on four-inch mlninnrm. Less than
four inches will take a higher rate.

which will be rurnlshed upon applica
tion.

ReadlBK NoiU-est Five cents per line

for first insertion; three cents iper line
for eacn subsequent insertion. One

change a week allowed on readers with

out extra composition charges.
Legal advertisements at legal rates

Ihe early bird catches the worm,

but if all birds were early the stock

of worms would soon give out.

Secretary of War Weeks is greatly
wrought up over the deaths of so
many daring young men who lose
their lives in the aviation service. It's
bad to lose the boys, but mighty good
for the country that there are so
many ready to take the risk.

support. All the support the boys
want is good attendance at the games.
There is generally a fair-sized attend

ance at the Thursday games, but on

other days a deficit is the rule rather
than the exception. One handicap our

team has is there is too large a free

list. There is a big gap in the Or Orange
ange Orange street side of the ball park fence,

which is taken advantage of by a

considerable number of people well

able to pay. Nobody would complain
of boys with little or no money seek

ing a vantage point from which to
view the game, but this gap in the
fence is taken advantage of by people
who come in cars and are therefore
able to pay. In last week's game, the
home team was short about $40, but
during the two games there were
enough people out on Orange street
to have made up the deficit and then
some if they had paid. We dont see
how anybody can be so stingy and
lacking in self-respect as to so impose
on both the ball team and public public-spirited
spirited public-spirited fans who help to support it.

We. think it is up to the police to keep
these deadbeats- away. We under understand
stand understand that at the last game the police policeman
man policeman detailed to watch the game tried

to make deadheads move, but they

told -him it was a public street and

they- didn't propose to move. These
people are very much mistaken, as
they would have found, if the officer,
instead of giving up to them, had
collared the first one who resisted

him and taken him to the lockup, and

then gone back after the other.

There is both law and authority to
scare these birds off if the officers will
act.

STATE BOARD OF HEALTH
HAS TO CUT. ITS WORK

GOOD

"He hasn't anything else to do," Is
the reason often given for putting
men in charge of certain important
work that is not done because a busy
man was not selected, one who knows
the value of time and energy. Times Times-Union.
Union. Times-Union. We will learn better in the next
three or four hundred years.

We'll wager those aviators who so

easily put the U-117, former German
sub, out of commission yesterday

would have found is an altogether

different job had it been on the off ens
ive. Orlando Reporter-Star.
They would have worked it some
how.
.

Since a little light has been shed
on that Sims affair in England there
appears to be a question to say the

least as to whether Sims might not

have been right after-all. Tampa

Citizen.

The more light shed, the more un unhyphenated
hyphenated unhyphenated Americans agree with
Sims.

The following from the Summer Summer-field
field Summer-field Chronicle is timely:
"With regard to the coming Mar Marion
ion Marion County Fair next November, this
is just a reminder to our farmersvand
others to begin now to prepare their
exhibits. Help make the next fair a
bigger success than the last. The
county fair is one of the biggest ad advertisements
vertisements advertisements our county can have.
Don't forget, the poultry exhibit and
it is hoped a good exhibit of turkeys
will be made."

There will be no ball game here
next Thursday, the Ocala team going
on that date to Eustis, to play the
highly efficient team at that place. On
July 4 and 5 the Tarpon Springs team
will be here for games. These are
clever boys and our people should
turn out en masse to see the games.
The Ocala team is furnishing good
sport and is a fine advertisement to
the town, but if it is going to pull
thru the season it must have better
MICKiE SAYS

UMO& Or tM "TV WkPfc A
j I -ft CONKS VJMVWEAWVWk 1
' -V ACS,rS QJEWUN "tVf MOQrf C
jjdujcov- arc -tW KNoer rot j

Charges of extravagance against

the legislature are not sticking. Sat

urday, Governor Hardee fixed the
state tax levy for 1921 as 10 mills,
approved as follows: General revenue,
5 mills, pensions, 3 mills, school tax,

1 mill, state prison fund, -mill.

state board of health, -mill, and

state road fund, 1 mill. Last year's

levy was 11 mills. If what are styled
as "Hunter's oil bill" and "Hunter's
occupation bill" had become laws, the
millage would have probably gone
down to 8 cents, and it was no friends
of the people who prevented their
passage.
Mayor Anderson has appointed
Miss Nettie Camp to represent Ocala
at the celebration of the opening of
the new bridge across the St. John's
at Jacksonville an event of the
greatest importance not only to Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville but all the state. Misa Camp
is the third daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Clarence Camp of this city, and is a
cultured and charming young lady.

All her friends ; will congratulate her
on the honor, which they know she
will most gracefully uphold.

(Gainesville Sun)
The state board of health at its

meeting held in Jacksonville on the

16th was confronted with the un unpleasant
pleasant unpleasant task of reducing the scope
of work formerly carried on by the
board in order to keep the expenses
within the sum that was alloted them
by the legislature.
It will be recalled that the last leg

islature reduced the millage one-half

and that reduction was made without

an investigation of the needs of the

board.

' After consideration of the needs of

the state it was felt necessary to dis discontinue
continue discontinue the bureau of venereal di diseases
seases diseases which has been conducted for
the diagnosis and treatment of chan chan-chroid,
chroid, chan-chroid, syphillis and gonorrhea at
clinics at widely separated parts of
the state. There were known as gov government
ernment government clinics, and at all of them
indigent cases were given free treat treatment
ment treatment for the above named diseases.
The bureau of child welfare was
discontinued for the present to be
reorganized with the opening of
school in the fall. This, however, does

not affect the work of the crippled
children, which will continue as at
present.
It noes not seem possible that if an
examination as to the needs of the
stae had been made by the last legis

lature and what could be done by

this department they would have
made the reduction.

There is not a section of the
state that has reached the point
where all needed health work has been
done and it, should be remembered

that "prevention is better than cure

and far cheaper."

A PICTURE OF THE OLDTIME

A very interesting picture was be

ing shown on the streets Saturday

morning by its owner, Sarah Goin,
colored. The photograph was taken
of the Ocala House between 43 and

50 years ago. The hotel at that time
was a two-story, frame affair with

porche son the front, upstairs and
down just as they are arranged now.

In front of the hotel was a row of
large oaks. The street didn't look
like a street but more like a vaacnt
let, and right about the middle of it
was a large stump. All the tenants

of the mercantile houses in the block

and many of the guests of the hote

were standing in front of the building
when the picture was taken. Among

those recoernized was the father of

Judge W. S. Bullock.

Says the Punta Gorda Herald: "As
Dr. Blanchet was walking along the
sidewalk on a popular street, Sunday
night, a dog ran out of a private yard
and bit him on the calf of the leg,
tearing his flesh as well as his
clothes. Dogs that are disposed to
bite persons, should be kept securely
confined or muzzled. This is of vary
great importance, for there is no tell telling
ing telling when hydrophobia may appear
here, as it did in Fort Myers only a
short while ago. Add to this the fact
that our girls are wearing short
dresses that leave their calves unpro unprotected,
tected, unprotected, and the best of reasons for
confining vicious dogs is given."

RAILROAD SCHEDULES

Arrival and departure of passenger
trains at OCALA UNION STATION.
The following schedule figures pub published
lished published as information and not guar guaranteed.
anteed. guaranteed. (Eastern Standard Time)
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILROAD
Leave Arrive
2:20 am Jacksonville-NTork 2:10 am
1:55 pm Jacksonville 1:60 pm
4:17 pm Jacksonville 3:50 pm
2:15 am Tampa-
Manatee-St Petrsbrg 4:05 pm
2:55 am NTfork-St. Petrsbrg 1:35 am
2:15 am Tampa 2:15 am
1:50 pm Tampa-Manatee 1:35 pm
1:05 pm Tampa-SL Petrsbrg 4:05 pm
ATLANTIC COAST LINE R. R.
Leave Arrive
2:27 am Jackaonville-NTork 2:33 am
1:45 pm Jksonville-Gainsville 3:24 pm
6:42 am Jksonville-Gansville 10:13 pm
2:33 am St.Petsbrg-Lakeland 2:27 am
3:24 pm St-Petsbrg-Lakeland 1:25 pm
7:10 am Dunnellon-Wflcox
7:25 am Dunellon-Lkeland 11:03 pm
3:30 pm Homosassa 1:25 pm
10:15 pm Leesburr, 6:42 am
4:45 pm Gainesville -11:50 am
Monday, Wednesday, Friday.
"Tuesday. Thursday, Saturday.
NOTICE
The annual meeting of the stock stockholders
holders stockholders of the Clarkson Hardware
Company will be held at the office of
the company in Ocala. Florida, on
Tuesday, July 5th, 1921, at 8 o'clock
p. m. F. E. Wetherbee,
22-10t Secretary and Treasurer.

Ask your next door neighbor what
she thinks of FEDERAL rolls. She's
been using them a long time and is a
competent judge- 21-6t

This is a Studebaker year.

(otot clothing) mmd ro will

for trial. Poatac prepaid.

MSMO HTCrXPCIC-FASHIOJI dSTTTUTE
Dpt.H ZllnriacriK KiM

ROADS

GRAVEL FOR ECONOMIC ROAD
Summary of Important Point Brought
Out In Recent Addr r 'tf imemn
sin Engineer.
O ravel roads are given a stronc rec recommendation
ommendation recommendation as economic highway by
A. R. Hirst, Wisconsin state highway
engineer. Not only so, but he li ef

the firm opinion that the eeosemic

service of a gravel road la proportloo proportloo-ate
ate proportloo-ate to Its worth. In other words. If a
gravel roadway 16 feet wide has a life

or service of three to ive years then
the addition of 10 feet will Increase

Its serviceable life to six or possibly
ten years.

"These figures are not definite,"

says Mr. Hirst, -iney merely expres
the comparison which It Is sought to
emphasize. Moreover this comparison
does not hold true, nor Is aay rsd
assertion of the worth of gravel roads
quite true unless there Is continuous

maintenance. Wherever gravel roads
are giving notable service good main

tens ace Is as, much the reason as is
good construction In the first place."
Mr. Hirst recently gave an Import Important
ant Important address on this subject and the
following Is a condensed summary of
the main points in his discussion:
1. The prime factor in determining
the relative service valve of highways
Is whether they serve traffic effective effectively
ly effectively and Inexpensively.
2. Preliminary traffic censuses are
valueless as aids in pavement type se selection.
lection. selection. 3. Traffic counts have value only in
giving information upon traffic
changes, and operation costs over
varying pavement surfaces.
4. What has been Is no indication
of what will be.
5. States must adopt uniform loads
to be borne by roads of varying classes
of importance.
6. All highways cannot be made 15 15-ton
ton 15-ton highways every day in the. year.
7. Expressed in terms of real serv service
ice service value, type means little unle e-

Store v

will sell you and deliver

Boy Scouts of America
A. R. Cassil, Scoutmaster
Meets every Friday night at the
Library, at 8:30 o'clock. Visiting
Scouts are always welcome.

-v of

June brides take care

your eyes, the win

dows of the soul.

DR. K. J. WEIHE,
Optometrist and Optician
Eyesight Specialist

FOR THE LADY WHO CARES

The exact thing you want you will
find at Hooper's Milady Beauty Par Parlors.
lors. Parlors. We are now equipped to furnish
you any line in cosmetics that you
are looking for. Our cosmetician is
able to give the very best in skin and
scalp treatment, manicuring, sham shampooing,
pooing, shampooing, etc. Electrolysis work done
in all forms; also hair restoring made
a specialty. Phone 272, 112 Fort King
avenue. The shop where the children
like to go. 27-tf

Say it plain when you ask your
grocer for FEDERAL bread, and in insist
sist insist upon having it. 21-0t

j V Tj
: v,.8-- ; v : :t ;

Five gallons kerosene... 90c
Lard Compound 12e
Pure Lard 2 lbs. for 35c
White Bacon, per lb.... 17
Smoked Bacon Squares 22 Ji c
Smoked Country Hams, ,38c
Octagon Soap 8c 3 Ck for 21c
Export Borax Soap 1 doz 55c
Cherry Bell Flour 24 lbs $1.55
Cherry' Bell Flour 12 lbs 80c
W. Baker's Cocoa lb... 30c
W. Baker's Cocoa 1 lb...55e
Senate Coffee, 1 lb .40c
Senate Coffee, 3 lbs.... $1.15
Reddkk PNut Butter 1 lb 30c
Evaporated MillC tall....l5e
Evaporated Milk, small... 7c
Uneeda Biscuits, and all
10 c. pkgs 8c 3 for 20c
FARMERS EXC1
Merchants Block

All former 20c. pkgs.... 15c
Cloverbloom Butter, lb.. 40c
Three Argo Starch 25c.
One doz. Argo Starch . .1 5c
Evaporated peaches, lb.. 15c
Prunes, per lb... 20c
Qt. jars Honey 65c
Qt. cans or bot. Syrup .30c
Pint cans Syrup ..15c
Syrup drawn from
barrel, per gal....... 75c
Cheese per lb 25c
Firestone Tires, 30x3. $10.95
Firestone Tires, 30x3 i 13.95
Grey Tubes, 30x3 $2.15
Grey Tubes, 30x34.... $25
Red Tubes 30x3 ......$2.65
Red Tubes, 30x3tt $3.10
Sugar, 14 pounds .... $1.00
IANGE STORE
Phone 163

o

0

o
o

o
o

Attractive ads. pay big dividends.

Proper Maintenance Given to This
Road.
lection ef it la supplemented by proper
design and layout.
8. The road problem is not to build
a few boulevards but a transportatlsij
system.
0. We have thought too little about
the basic function of highways the
offering, of facilities for travel.
10. A striking feature of highway
construction, reconstruction and main maintenance
tenance maintenance has been an almost total dis disregard
regard disregard of comfort, convenience and
economy of operation In the Interests
of the traveling public.
11. The one permanent thing about
road work is" proper gradrdg on cor correct
rect correct locations.
12. The highway user knows little
about pavement economics; but he
does know where and when he broke
the last spring.
13. We have used too much mathe mathematics
matics mathematics and too little common sens.
14. Our owners dem service aad
service they must be given.
15. Maintenance Is the keystone ef
the entire structure of pavement service.

REMOVE1 BLOTS ON HIGHWAYS

National Association of Gardeners
Passes', Resolution Concerning.
Use ef Billboarde.
The National Asoclatlen of Gar Gardeners
deners Gardeners passed a resolution at Its last
meeting concerning the use of bill billboards
boards billboards on highways and private prop property.
erty. property. Let's hsve more of these resolu resolutions
tions resolutions and more action against these
blots -on our landscape. Why net re remove
move remove all material that litters the
fences and trees near hese? Le Boy
Cady, associate horticulturist. Univer University
sity University farm. St. Paul.

MOTORTRUCK IS BIG FACTOR

Anything That Will Make Intern rbaw
' Transportation More EfMent le
Advantageous.
Motortruck operation Is at beglnr
ning to make Itself felt as a factor la
lowering food prices, and everything
that will make truck opera tion more
efficient, especially for interurban
transportation, will be of. a decided
advantage-to all of us whe have to
eat.

DIXIE HIGHWAY GARAGE
Wfe Specialize on
Ford and Chevrolet
REPAIR WORK
COOPER Cord Non-Skid Tires, 30x3 1-2,
8000 Mile Guarantee. $18
DIAMOND Plain Tread 30x3, $12.50
P MARINE Heavy Oil. five gal Ions, $3.50
We buy and sell second hand Ford Cars
Jas. Enocsser, Prop.
Day Phone 258 Night Phone 533

I YOUNG-MERMN CO.

CIVIL EUGINEERS AND, SURVEYORS
Licensed under the laws of the State of Florida

Surveys
Illlihways

Plats
Drnlnaoe

Reports
Phosphate

Capt. Edward Drake is associated
with us and in charge of our Phos Phosphate
phate Phosphate Mine and Plant Department

Oltices, 33-34 Hclder CIdg.
t OCALA, FLORIDA

Phone No. 543

ks

1

Bertram Ibbetson & Co.;
Chartered Accountants
of Atlanta, Georgia,
Will open an office in the Commercial 'Bank Balding
of Ocala, Florida, effective July 1st, 1921, for the
practice of Accounting, Sjttemctidng, Income Tax
Consultation and Preparation of Returns.
' y
ATLANTA OFFICE
250 PEACHTREE STREET

S3

KINDTS MUSIC STORE
Pianos and Organs Phonographs and Records
Sewing Machines and Supplies
Expert Repairing of Phonographs, Setting Machines,
Organs and Pianos
CASH OR TERMS
Thank you for your patronage 306 N. MAGNOLIA ST.

n:
m m
III
hi
Ml
ill
m
III

A REAL BABGAIX

A good six-room cottage on corner
lot, on one of city's best streets,
close to town and very hands to both
primary and high schools. All modern

conveniences and connected with city
sewer system. For qnkk sale will
take $1700, $1000 cash, time on bal balance.
ance. balance. One of the best real estate
banrains in town. Address, Box 609,

city.

24-et

C



OCALA EVENING STAR, MONDAY, JUNE 27, 1121

DA1MNSV ftlMEET
' Phone 519
111W. Broadway

LIFE
FIRE
A. E. GERIG
INSURANCE
Ocala. Florida
ACCIDENT AUTOMOBILE
E
Extra
Trousers
a Fortunate purchases
of surplus woolens
, make possible this
money saving offer.
! HandTdiloring
is trie lowest tor teed
Ha
.1 t
high quality line in
'k j 3 9 -vr
'diner country iou
-if Ant tVio liirft-iAe siiiol.
liy ac lowest prices
and in addition
Extra Trousers
FREE
on a large number
of attractive Pure
Wool Fabrics.
Gome in early see
these attractive fabrics.
We an art situfisd uImi yea srs"
J. A. CHANDLER
120 S. Main Street
(Upstairs Chase Bldg.)
IF YOITRE i
SEARCHING
for Expert Vulcanizing,
throw your Headlight
on cor shop. We are
Experts at this business
and oor work is
GUARANTEED
BLALOCK BROS.
VULCANIZING
' Ocala House Block
Day Phone 47. Night Phone 515
GEORGE MacKAY & CO.
Funeral Directors, Em balm era
' G. B. Overton, Mgr.
Ocala, Fla.
C. Cecil Bryant
PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT
Gary Block, Over 10c Store
PHONE S32X
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CONTRACTOR
AND BUILDER
Careful estimates made on all con con-tract
tract con-tract work. Gives more and better
work' for the money than any other
contractor in the city.

BIRTHDAY PARTIES

There were two delightful birthday
parties Saturday afternoon and de despite
spite despite the fact that just about the ap appointed
pointed appointed hour for these happy occas occasions
ions occasions there occurred a downpour of
rain, the invited guests for both par parties
ties parties arrived O. K. and jolly times
never were more in evidence. Of
course, the first real enjoyment at
both parties. wiis the presentation of
of gifts from the guests to the hon hon-orees,
orees, hon-orees, which consumed at least an
hour for the many different remem remembrances
brances remembrances were not' only admired by
the receivers but by the givers.
These two parties were given by
Mrs. W. T. Gary in honor of her
daughter, Frances' twelfth birthday,
and took place at the Gary home on
Fori King avenue, and the other one
was given by Mrs. T. M. McLean, in
celebration of her son. Theodore's
sixth birthday. The children were
entertained at the McLean home on
East Fort King avenue.
. The following were Frances' guests:
Dasibel and Louise Clements, Mary
Willis, Virginia and Barbara Ware
Johnson, Mary Lena Hayes, Frances
and Helen Overton, Marguerite and
Audrey Condreyj Dorothy Cappleman,
Elizabeth McCully, Lucretia Hocker,
Anita Chazal. Marguerite Sexton, Ed Edward
ward Edward and Margaret Helvenston,
Hazel Livingston, Laurie Savage,
Martha Preer, Alice Miller of Tampa,
Marianna Neighbour, Mary Troxler,
Ethel Mae Rogers, Frances Drake,
Marguerite Roberts, Harry Clarkson
and Arthur Cobb.
Mrs. Gary was assisted in enter entertaining
taining entertaining the guests by her daughter,
Maude, and Mrs. E. T. Helvenston.
Punch was served during the playing
of all sorts of indoor games such as
fruit basket, button game, etc. The
observation game which was in the
f6rm of giving the contestants only a
few minutes to observe many articles
on a table, after which they had to
leave the room and, write from mem memory
ory memory the different things on the table,
there being fifteen in all. As so many
were successful in naming every one,
Mrs. Gary had them draw for the
prize and Anita Chazal proved the
successful one, winning a box of
candy.
Ice cream cones and cake were
served and in conclusion the guests
repaired to the living room, where
upon a table prettily decorated in
pink and white, was placed a birth birthday
day birthday cake with thirteen candles, the
extra one for the coming year.
Assisting Mrs. McLean in enter entertaining
taining entertaining her son's playmates were
Mrs. E. G. Peek, Mrs. Peek's mother-in-law,
Mrs. Felton Mrs. Wilburn
Brbwn, Mrs. M. F. Johnson, Mrs. W.
D. Cam and Miss Irene' Cam. As the
guest sarrived, Mrs. Charles More More-men
men More-men served them punch from a tastily
decorated punch table which was
placed on one side of the porch. Merry
games, such as dropping the handker handkerchief,
chief, handkerchief, raising the gate, etc., took
place, but probably the most excit exciting
ing exciting of the games was pinning the
tongue in a funny old man's face,
drawn on a large sheet and pinned on
the wall. The one most successful at
this stunt was Mary Cam, who was
rewarded with a box of candy. Ice
cream cones and cake were served in
the late afternoon and during this
time the beautiful birthday cake which
contained six candles was cut. The
biggest present that Theodore receiv received
ed received was a bicycle from his uncle- and
aunt of Jacksonville. Mr. and Mrs.
Sam Mathews,; the latter before her
marriage being Miss Marcelia Mc McLean.
Lean. McLean. The biggest gifts are not al always
ways always .the most acceptable but in this
case it was, for young Theodore has
traveled many miles since receiving
his bicycle.
The following were the young folks
presetn at this party: Mary Louise
Shephard, Laurie Hampton. Adelaide
Duval, Thelma Reynolds, Virginia
Peek, Harriet Turner, Leonora and
Margaret Taylor, Harriet Armour,
Helen Watt, Dorothy Darden, Ra Ra-mona
mona Ra-mona Ragland, Mary, Catherine and
Gertrude Cam, Martha Gates. Eliza Elizabeth,
beth, Elizabeth, Mary Newton and Wilmet
Green, Edward and Margaret Helven Helvenston,
ston, Helvenston, Margaret Mickle, Margaret
Anne Walkley, Walter Press, Buss
Reynolds, John Preer Jr., Marion L.
Johnson, Junior Peek, Jay. Armour,
Bennie Borden, Johnnie Moremen,
Clifford A'yer, Wilbur Ragland. Clif Clifton
ton Clifton Hocker, James Jackson, John
Newton Green, Edward Turner and
Billy Buhrman.
One Thing After Another.
It Is many years since man was te
be cured of all his Ills by the removal
.of a largely superfluous appendix
When the magic of that operation be be-sian
sian be-sian to pall pyorrhea became-the chief
c riminal and the substitution of "den "dentures"
tures" "dentures" for the unruly teeth ef nature
the elixir of life. But man's health
was still Indifferent and the discovery
of the "dead tooth" in all -Its peril
promised a pathway to centenarian
vigor. Passing by-monkey glands, we
now come to the nerve centers of the
spine as tne seat of all trouble and
to a delicate combination of osteopa osteopathy
thy osteopathy and massage as the infallible re recipe
cipe recipe for perfect health. Louden Ex-

NOTICE, MASONS

A special meeting of Marion-
Dunn Lodge, F. & A. M., will be
held this evening at the Ma-
sonic home at 8 o'clock. Grand
Master Chas. H. Ketchum will
be present. It is desired that
all be present.
A. C. Blowers, W. M.
GOOD
HIGHWAYS
IMPROVED ROADS ARE URGED
Permanent Highways Will Turn Tide
to Rural Sections and Increase
Production of Food.
"Propaganda urging a change of the
present method of federal aid in tL
construction of good roads has mad
its appearance," said Thomas J. Co Co-sack
sack Co-sack of Merlden. Conn., to Washington
Poet reporter. "It Is now propo?d to
establish a national highway system,
to be wholly constructed and main maintained
tained maintained by the national government. It
Is doubtful I. such a change would
ever be advisable, but It Is certainly
not expedient at tills time In view of
the condition of the treasury.
"It Is desirable to have a system of
hard-surface roads throughout the
country, and this result can be ob obtained
tained obtained under the present system.
Highway use is very largely a local
matter. The fcTowth and development
of a community is greatly increased hy
tb,e construction of permanent roadf
In r nUa-nt Mier'M. N svxtin
A standard Dump Truck for Road
Building.
should be adopted that would benefit
a few at the expense of the many. For
that reason the local communities
should contribute their share of the
expense of the construction.
"We are told by competent authority
that freight can be transported cheap cheaper
er cheaper on short' hauls by motor trucks
than by rail, but on long hauls the
cost of transportation by truck is pro prohibitive.
hibitive. prohibitive. "In April, 1917, the declaration of
war caused all road building to cease.
Ail boad issues that had been voted
for road construction were held in
abeyance, and nothing was undertaken
until after the signing of the armistice
to resume construction of highways.
The war awakened the people to the
necessity of permanent road building
and demonstrated that It would be
necessary in the futnre to build roads
that would withstand' the heavy truck
traffic.
"The present system of federal aid
as not been given a fair opportunity to
demonstrate Its merits. It bean
operation under abnormal conditions,
which grew worse. The road to be
Improved must be a 'rural post road.'
as denned In the law,' to be any public
road, a' major portion of which Is now
used, or can be used, as a connecting
link not to exceed ten miles in length
of any road or roads now or hereafter
used for the transportation of the
United States mails.
"Nothing will turn the tide of hu humanity
manity humanity back to the rural communities
more effectively than the construction
of permanent highways. Nothing will
eucourage the production of food prod products
ucts products more than roads that can be
traveled all the year."
STATE ROAD HELP OLD IDEA
First Money Paid for Highway Im Improvement
provement Improvement Made by Kentucky
75 Years Age.
It Is often said that the use of state
money fer the construction; of rWds
Is of quite recent origin, says a bulle bulletin
tin bulletin from the American Highway asso association.
ciation. association. The New Jersey state aid
law of 1801 Is sometimes referred te
as the first instance of such use of
state funds In this country. Aa a
matter of fact, state money was spent
fer such purposes more than 75 years
ago. Kentucky paid out over 2jOOO, 2jOOO,-000
000 2jOOO,-000 for road Improvements between
1820 and 1840 under the direction ef a
state highway engineer, whe drew a
salary of $5,000 a year, a very large
sum for those days.
The roads built then were 24 to 80
feet wide between the ditches. The
surfaces were constructed of broken
stone, and the bottoms were of large
stones wedged together to make what
road builders call a telford foundation.
About 1S50 business conditions In the
country became bad and this work
stopped. When it was resumed In
1908 such a long period had elapsed
since the" earlier state aid work that
1908 is usually fixed as the beginning
of state road work In Kentucky.
This is a Studebaker year. tf

CAMILLA

By MOLLIE MATHER.
. 121. Wntwi Xawappr L'lloi.)
This is the story .of a model sort ef
Cinderella and her step-sisters. There
it not a doubt that Camilla was so
sweetly charming that the step-sisters
above mentioned had little chance
of attention while In hei company;
masculine attention especially. Not
that Camilla put herself forward In
any way, or tried for the admiration
that was Invariably her"s. Rather, It
came to her naturally, as one bends
to Inhale the fragrance of a flower
which was. after all, Camilla's secret.
Her very personality was all fragrant
with unselfishness and charity and
friendliness toward others; you felt
this Instinctively as you talked to her
or looked Into her crystal clear eyes.
And If you were a man. weary of pre pretense
tense pretense perhaps, or too much Insincere
coquetry, you appreciated Camilla's
truth, when you met her. But the
step-sisters could not understand.
Camilla's mother had died when she
was born, -which had in a measure
placed her under her sister's control.
However, as time passed and the
Thornton finances dwindled. Camilla,
who had not been fitted either by re relationship
lationship relationship or advantage for the social
life that Grace and Gwendolen en enjoyedtook
joyedtook enjoyedtook up cheerfully the neces necessary
sary necessary tasks of the household and fell
heir to garments discarded. Frocks
and furbelows for Grace and Gwendo Gwendolen
len Gwendolen were all, and more, than the
driven father's purse could manage.
Camilla secretly and laughingly as assured
sured assured h!m that she didn't r.dnd a bit.
As Grace was taller than she, and
Gwendolen fatter than she there was
always material enough in the castoff
dresses to insure remodeling. And
Camilla was very clever In the re remodeling,
modeling, remodeling, so much so, that ihe sis sisters
ters sisters gazing In wonder at the disap disapproved
proved disapproved one, clad In some charming re reincarnation
incarnation reincarnation of united blue and gold or
perhaps of dainty pink and lavender,
would forbid emphatically the young younger
er younger girl's presence at parties.
"We are sorry, Camilla," Grace
would remark decidedly, "and proba probably
bly probably your own time will come later.
But just now you must not reflect up upon
on upon our hard-held position by appear appearing
ing appearing In that very apparent made-over
affair. Tou will oblige us. In this will
you not?"
And again, Camilla did not mind. In
fact her elder sister's Impressive lan language
guage language never failed In It i purpose of
Imbuing her with that same Idea of
superiority to which she had been
raised. After all, what did she want
with their high flown company? she
confidently asked old father. And the
two would sneak off gleefully together
to a hammock far back in the garden.
And sometimes, to sit on the grass
beside the hammock, came the man
from next door.
He was a serious, humorous. Inter Interesting
esting Interesting sort of man this, who had moved
there in order to complete the writing
of his great book. Father told het
this, on one of their happy talklng-things-over-together
evenings. And the
man was great, too, father said.
Though still young, his name was
known across the country, because of
his last success.
Camilla was Joyously excited about
It. She told the man, as he, and fa father
ther father and she, sat out under the star starlit
lit starlit trees together, how very glad she
was that his earnest labor had won
success. And the man was pleased J
and gratified that she recognized the
element of labor.
"Most people," he told her smiling,
"regard literary success as mere
lucky- chance."
'And as the evening hours beneath
thf trees grew into regular and ex expected
pected expected meetings, the man of letters
looked forward gratefully to the re respite
spite respite and Inspiration, while Camilla,
listening to the music that came from
her household, felt no envy or desire
for aught .beyond her own small world.
The sisters were giving a tea one af afternoon;
ternoon; afternoon; they told her about It. Ta Tables
bles Tables were to be laid ?n the lovely old
garden. A celebrity was coming whose
presence was always difficult of at attainment.
tainment. attainment. The celebrity positively re refused
fused refused to be lionized, so they had
gained his consent by the assurance
that the tea was merely a family af affair.
fair. affair. They were, therefore, too busy
to be curious, when Camilla informed
them that she was going that 'after 'afternoon
noon 'afternoon for a drive.
"Leave everything ready before yon
go," Gwendolen admonished, "and
have flowers on all the tub! si.'
"And Camilla," Grace reminded her,
"if you come back before six, do not
pass through the garden; your old
straw hat is too shabby for public
display. Later, you may have mine."
It took painstaking planning after
that for Camilla to fashion a lace pic picture
ture picture hat, out of Gwendolen's old lace
waist, bat the hat was a delightful
success, with a golden rose that Grace
had discarded for garnishment.
You see, Camilla had to come Into
the garden. In fact it was necessary
that there she should be the very cen center
ter center ef observation.
Clyde ilammerton had Insisted that
upon their return from the drive their
engagement should be announced.
And Clyde happened to be the celebri celebrity
ty celebrity whom her sisters were so trium triumphantly
phantly triumphantly entertaining. And what fa
ther bad confided beaeath the tres j
was quite true; his name waa really
known across the world.
Camilla was very happy.- "But,
then." she radiantly told her lover,
"this always has been a beautiful
world."

VMS

-after y

. y

fl I rasriS

f tn in at w

The H
Flavor j
Lasts i

THE WINDSpR HOTEL
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
In the heart of the city with Hemming Park for a front yard.
Every modern convenience in each room. Dining room service la
second to none

ROBERT M. MEYER,
Manager.

WHITE STAGS LINE
Negotiable Storage Receipts Issued oo Cotton. Automobiles, Etc

MOVS, PACK, SHIP
LIVE STOCK,
PIANOS, BAGGAGE.
3IACH1NERY,
FURNITURE, ETC.
C V. Roberts Barney Spencer
Phone 305 Phone 431
ROBERTS & SPENCER
Funeral Directors, Embalmers
Private Morgue and Chape!
MOTOR EQUIPMENT
Office Phone 350, Ocala, Fla,
217 W. Broadway
SASH
DOOR
Geo. MacKayS Co.l
Ocala. Fla. I
HARDWARE
HIGH GRADE PAINT

Every Mccl
liiiiiiiiuiiiiuuiiiimiT
Next time yoo E
want to conccn- E
trate on a piece
of work lust sHd E

astlckofWRIGLYS
between your teeth. E 1

It's a wonderful belp
In dally tasks and
sports as well.

I

Hazards 5.
disappear E
and bard
places come easy E
for WRIGLEVS E
lives you comfort E
and poise it adds E
the zest that E
means success. E

A great deal
for5c
SEALED TIGHT
KEPT RIGHT

J. E. KAVANAUGH
Preprieter.

TRANSFER
AND
p'roofSTOCSAGE

LONG DISTANCE MOVING
Phone 296
Bring us your
WELDING
and Auto Repairing
Satisfaction Guaranteed
AUTOGENOUS WELDING 0.
Ochlawaha Ape.
& Orange St.
NEED HAM MOTOR CO.
General Auto Repairing
and Storage
Gasoline, Oils and Grease
USED CABS FOR SALE
Cars Washed tLOO
Cars Polished &
Oklawaha Ave. & Orange St
Phone 252



OCALA EVENING STAB, MOSDAr, JCXE 27, U21

UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS
ILAK LOCAL NEEDS
WANTED, LOST, VOUND, FOB
SALE, FOR RENT AND SIM-
ADVERTISE
7
IF YOU
Want a Cook
Want a Clerk
Want a Partner
Want a Situation
Want to Sell a Piano
Want a Servant Girl
Want to Sell Your Auto
Want to Sell Town Property
Want to Sell Your Groceries
Want to Sell Your Hardware
Want Customers for Anything.
Advertise DAILY in This Paper
Advertising Is the Way to Success
Advertising Brings Customers
Advertising Keeps Customers
Anvertising Insures Success
Advertising Shows Energy
Advertising Shows Pluck
Advertising Is "Biz"
Advertise or Bust
Advertise Long
Advertise Well
Advertise
At Once
IN
THE EVEI1G STAR
FOR SALE Gentle goat, broke to
harness, $3.50. Apply to J. Chas.
Smith, Ninth St., or phone 491. 3t
H A U L I N G Having secured a
large truck, I am now prepared to do
moving and heavy hauling on short
notice. L. E. Cordrey. Phone 434. lm
FOR SALE Four-foot wood, both
oak and pine, delivered anywhere
in the city. L. L. Home, phone
108. 15-15t
PRIVATE LESSONS in piano, vio violin
lin violin and voice. Terms reasonable. For
further information call Cevie Rob Roberts,
erts, Roberts, phone 305. 16-12t
FOR SALE Three registered Poland
China pigs, two sows, one male, five
months old. Address, William Veal,
Cotton Plant, Fla. 20-12t
FOR SALE Several dandy milk
cows, gentle and heavy milkers, all
fresh. Prices are reasonable and
cows can be seen at my residence,
' 715 Lime street. Phone 378. U. A.
Holloway, Ocala, Fla. 21-tf
FOR RENT Lovely big bay front
rooms elegantly furnished and all I
modern' conveniences; also large 1
home on 'bay completely furnished,
either by week or month at summer
rates. One of the most desirable
bathing beaches in Florida. Come
to Clearwater for your vacation.
Address Box 831, Clearwater, Flor Florida.
ida. Florida. 23-12t
FOR SALE Two iron beds with
springs and mattress; mission din dining
ing dining room set. Call phone 529 after
7 p. m. 23-3t
FOR SALE Registered Jersey bull
calf of a high producing strain,
cheap. Parker Painter, P. O. Box
522, or telephone Anthony line. 6t
STRAYED From' my place at Pedro,
Saturday, June 11, 6-year-old Jer Jersey
sey Jersey cow, marked crop, split, upper
and under bit in left ear; corp, un under
der under and upper bit in right ear. Had
on leather halter. Notify W. H.
Crigler, Summerfield, Fla. 24-4t
SALESLADY WANTED For Sat Saturdays
urdays Saturdays and Mondays. Apply at
Fishel's. 25-3t
WANTED By automobile mechanic,
work in -or out of city. Capable,
steady and sober. Can handle fore fore-manship
manship fore-manship or management of repair
shop. N. E. Allen, dormitory,
Ocala. 25-3t
WANTED Carpenter work by com competent
petent competent mechanic. Phone 305; 25 3t
FOR SALE A pair of good young
mules, $400. O. M. Gale. Belleview,
Fla. 27-6t
FOR RENT The lower floor of my
home at 503 Wenona street, consist consisting
ing consisting of five furnished rooms and
' bath. Telephone 418. J. H. Ther Ther-rell.
rell. Ther-rell. 27-5t
TAKEN UP Yellow and black spot spotted
ted spotted sow and pigs taken up Friday.
May.be had by the owner paying
expenses and damages. Apply to
, Mellie Ward. 802 Madison street,
west. 27-3t
WANTED At once, a good second
hand ice box or refrigerator, ice
capacity not less than' 150 pounds;
rather have 200 wounds. Colonial
x Hotel. 27-tf
FOR RENT Modern five room fur furnished
nished furnished flat, whole or in part; con conveniently
veniently conveniently located. Adults. P. O
Box 848. 20-t

OCALA OCGURREHCES

If you have any society items for
the Star, please call five-one.
Mr. H. C. Jones and daughter, Miss
Violet Jones left yesterday for St.
Petersburg to visit the former's chil children,
dren, children, Herbert and Edith, who are
spending the summer at that place
with their grandmother during the
absence of their mother at Porto Rico,
the guest of her daughter, Mrs. Mit
chell Tucker.
Hot Boston baked beans and brpwn
bread, for Saturday night supper,
Carter's Bakery. 24-tf
Mrs. P. V. Leavengood is in Jack
sonville, enjoying a visit with her
mother, Mrs. DeVane.
' Hot Boston baked beans and brown
bread for Saturday night supper.
Carter's Bakery. 24-tf
Mrs. Mamie Hall left yesterday
afternoon for a combined business
and pleasure trip to Jacksonville.
Street paving operations will begn
shortly, but no need waiting for that
to use FEDERAL bread and rolls. 6t
Mrs. B. E. Raysor's friends will be
glad to learn of her improvement
after a very serious illness at her
home at Lowell.
Mr. and Mrs. T. D. Lancaster Jr.
returned last night from a delightful
two weeks' wedding trip which they
spent in New York city. They will
be at home to their friends at the T.
E. Bridges residence on Sanchez street
and they are being given a most cor cordial
dial cordial welcome.
Hardy Croom, who had a difficult
operation performed on his leg sev several
eral several weeks ago, is steadily improving.
He is at the hospital yet, but was
able to go out for drives two days in
succession last week.
Born to Mr. and Mrs. James Nich Nicholas
olas Nicholas at the hospital this morning a
sturdy, little son, who may some day
become as smart a keypounder as his
daddy.
Miss Frances Mclver. who has
been at school in the north for over
a yearr'has returned home, and will
be heartily welcomed by her friends,
by whom her absence has been keenly
felt.'
Mr. W. A.. Hendrix, formerly of
Morriston, now making his home in
Birmingham, is here for a few days.
He brought his charming wife, to in
troduce her to his many friends. Mr.
Hendrix has been with the Quaker
Oats Company for years. While he
was in the army, they heldhis posi position
tion position for him, and he is now as busy
selling their product as he was send
ing supplies to the front.
The many friends of Mrs. J. R
Sales, whom she made during her
several visits to the city, a guest at
the home of her sister-in-law, will be
much grieved to learn of her death,
which occurred last Thursday at her
home, Newton Highlands, Mass. Mrs
Sales was a charming and brilliant
woman and besides two daughters and
one son and other relatives she has
scores of friends to mourn her death,
' Mrs. Andrew Turner of Dunnellon
is a guest at the home of her sister,
Mrs. Walter Hood.
The house party which took place
at the Meffert cottage at North Lake
Weir ended yesterday. Mrs. J. M.
Meffert and Mrs. Dora Crawford act acted
ed acted as chaperones to the following
girls, all of whom enjoyed the out
ing very much: Misses Emmie Miller,
Mea Dozier and Genevieve Hafle, Cor Cornelia
nelia Cornelia Dozier, Marion Meffert,- Dorothy
Crawford, Lillian Livingston and
Rosaline Williams of Gainesville.
Miss Onie Chaza will entertain
the regular weekly meeting of the
A" club at her home tonight.
Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Carlton return returned
ed returned home this afternoon from a pleas pleasant
ant pleasant visit with relatives at Tampa and
St. Petersburg.
Miss Lillian Marsh returned hony;
yesterday afternoon- from a pleasant
visit in Tampa, a guest at the home
of her brother, Mr. R. L. Marsh.
Mr. and Mrs. L N. Green and chil children
dren children left yesterday for Tallahassee
and Washington, Ga. Mr. Green ac accompanied
companied accompanied his wife and children as
far as Jacksonville on their way to
Georgia, after which he went to Tal
lahassee.
Mayor R. L. Anderson leaves this
afternoon for Tallahassee to attend to
professional business. He will return
by way of Jacksonville, where he will
be met by Mrs. Anderson, and they
will attend the bridge celebration.

COLLENS-PARKER

The many friends of Miss Maude
C. Parker and Mr. Edward W. Collens
of Summerfield will be interested to
learn of their marriage which occur
red in Gainesville on June 18th. Mrs.
Collens is the eldest daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. M. Parker of this city. She
is a pretty brunet and by her pleas pleasing
ing pleasing personality has made many
friends. Mr. Collens is a stjrdy young
business man of Summerfield. Mr.
and Mrs. Collens will make their
home in', Summerfiejd. The many
friends of this young couple wish
them eevry happiness and a long mar married
ried married life.
SPECIALS IN TOWELS
AT RHEIXAUER'S
50 doz. Huck Toweb at 10c. each.
50 doz. Huck Towels at 15c. each.
50 doz. Turkish Towels at 12 c. ea.
50 doz. Turkish Towels at 39c. each.
These items are 50 per cent below
regular prices. 27-tf
The Tuesday evening auction club j
will- meet tomorrow night with Miss i
Margaret Jackson. ;
SPECIALS IN DRESS
VOILES AND ORGANDIES
Newest patterns in Voiles. $1.00
quality, at 5,0c; newest shades in Im
ported Organdies, at 50c.; newest
patterns in fash color Ginghams at
25c. RIEINAUER'S. 27-tf
Wilbur Gary leaves Thursday for
Camp Sapphire, N. C, where he will
spend the summer.
Mr. Clarence Camp and daughter,
Miss Nettie Camp will leave Wednes
day afternoon for Jacksonville to at
tend the bridge celebration, at' which
Miss Camp will represent Ocala.
Mr. G. H. Mortland has returned
home from a business trip to Palatka.
Mr. and Mrs. Trusten Drake and
sons, Trusten Jr. and. Wm. Hocker
Drake, left yesterday afternoon for
New York city, where they will spend
the summer. The first of the month
Trusten Jr. and William will go to a
boys' camp for the summer months.
Misses Onie Chazal, Margaret
Jackson and Marian Dewey and
Messrs. Dick Dewey, Cecil Clarke and
Robert Blowers comprised a congenial
party spending the week-end at Blue
Springs run. They took their own
tents and cooking utensils and report
a most delightful outing. Either Dick
Dewey had a better time or was mis mistreated,
treated, mistreated, for he failed to report at his
post at the bank this morning. We
are told he is "some" blistered.
Mrs. Raoui Allemand has returned
to her homain Jacksonville. Her hus husband
band husband will remain in the city for a few
days longer. They came to Ocala to
attend the funeral of Mr. Allemand's
father, which took place the early
part of last week.
Mr. Norton Davis returned home
yesterday from a two weeks' business
trip to New York, Boston and other
cities. His father, Mr. D. W. Davis,
who also went north on this trip, will
remain in New York city for a few
days longer.
Mr. arid Mrs. R. A. Burford' and
daughters, Misses Mary and Agnes
Burford will leave Tuesday for Wash Washington
ington Washington to attend the funeral of their
son and brother, Wiley Burford,
which will take place Thursday at
Arlington cemetery.
AKI'.IVAL AND DEPARTURE
OF TRAINS IN OCALA
) Seaboard Air Line
Arrive from Jacksonville.. 2:10a:
.eave for Tampa 2:15 a.
Arrive from Jacksonville.. 1:30 p.
Leave for Tampa 1:55 p.
Arrive from Jacksonville.. 3:51 p.
jvb for Tamna 4:05 p.
m
m
m.
m.
m.
m.
Am'va from Tarana 2:14 a.
m.
m.
m.
m.
m.
Leave for Jacksonville.... 2:15a.
Arrive from Tampa 1 :3ft p.
Leave for Jacksonville.... 1:55 p.
rrive from Tampa... 4:16 p.
ave for Jacksonville. ... 4:17 p.
m
Arrive from New York 1:34 a.
Leave for St. Petersburg.. 1:37a.
m.
m,
m
Arrive from St. Petersburg z:ooa.
ave for New York 3:00 a.
Atlantic Coast Line
Arrive from Jacksonville.. 2:31 a.
iava for St. Petersburg.. 2:32a.
m.
m.
m.
m.
Arrive from Jacksonville.. 3:34 p.
Leave for St. Petersburg.. 3:35 p.
Arrive from Jacksonville. .10:12 p.
m.
m
Leave for Leesburg iu:i3p.
Arrive from St. Petersburg 2:26 a.
leave for Jacksonville.... 2:27a.
Arrive from St. Petersburg 1:25 p.
Leave for Jacksonville 1:45 p.
Arrive from Leesbure. .. 6:41a.
-n.
m.
m
m
in
ns
m
Leave for Jacksonville.... 6:42a.
Arrive from Homosassa... 1.25 p.
Leave for Homosassa 3:25 p.
Arrive from Gainesville,
daily except Sunday 11 :50 a.
Leave for Gainesville, daily
except Sunday ,..4:45p
Leave for Lakeland Tues Tuesday,
day, Tuesday, Thursday. Saturday 7:25.
An from Lakeland. Tues Tuesday,
day, Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday 11 :u3 p.
Leave for Wilcox. Monday,
Wednesday and Friday.. 7:10a.
Arrive from Wilcox. Monday-
Wednesday. Friday. 6:45 p.
m.
m.
re.
m.
m.
m.
m.
m.

DEMAND FOR SAFE ROADWAYS
Some Kind of Protection Should Be
Provided to Ksep Car From
Skiddins Off Dirt Road, j
What value do we place on a human
life? To Judge by some of" the roads
over ti e country It Is not much. Uvea
are lost many times where a few dol dollars
lars dollars or a little extra time would make
a road safe enough so that taking a
ride along tbem on a rainy day in an
auto would not be such a hair-raising
experience as is often the case now,
says a writer In Successful Farmer.
Recently a friend of mine was driv driving
ing driving along a road within a half mile of
a small town and ran Into a ditch six
feet d-ep, upsetting his car and smash smash-ing
ing smash-ing things up generally, though he es escaped
caped escaped unhurt, and had no one with
Lim. Many complaints had been made
about that road, but nothing was done
by anyone. On either side the ditch
came within less than two feet of the
roadway, and there was not even a
ridge or anything to ward the wheels
on and keep them from sliding over.
When hundreds of automobiles are
owned In every part of the country
and It Is Impossible to always keep
off roads when they are slippery. It Is
not morally right and should not be
legally ri-ht to leave them In a condi condition
tion condition that would make an accident un under
der under ordinary conditions possible. Dur During
ing During the last two years I have been
riding aruund considerably and we
have been in places where it was very
dangerous driving, and often cam up upon
on upon such places with no chance at all
to avoid them. In one-case we crossed
a bridge after a light shower, and on
tlie Tar side found that It had caved
away to within six Inches of the read,
though that was solid. For a rod the
ditch was not two feet from the road,
with nothing to check a slide into It.
A very steep hill began Just beyond
the bridge. Our car could not make
the hill, and we stalled, and had to
back some. The least bit of skidding
would have been certain to have cer-
v : v
ft
.5531 it
112 V
Properly Protected Road.
rled us over the bank and for several
minute it looked like we were to go
down six or eight feet Into a creek.
It' i not always that such places
are on unimportant roads. Jn fact the
first place mentioned was on a main
traveled road between county seats,
and automobiles used it oo long dis distance
tance distance traveL In the main it was a fine
road well kept, but there were two er
thretf blaces that were really danger dangerous,
ous, dangerous, tlfcugh this was the worst of alL
Wherever there is a place at the side
of a dirt road that has much travel,
that is deep enough to upset a car
that went down Into It. some kind-of
protection should be made to keep care
from skidding off. We are not consid considering
ering considering the quick dash to one aide from
careless driving or going too fast in
mud. but the unavoidable skid that Is
bound to occur now and then. Our
roads should be safe in muddy weather
as far as we can make them for often
at such times we have to use them
with our cars.
UNITED STATES' GOOD ROADS
Work Is in Progress In Every Section
to Give Country Suoerlec
Highway System.
The time Is rapidly passing when
the bad roads of America can be pelnt pelnt-ed
ed pelnt-ed out as a reproach. In every section
of the country work la In progress te
give the United States a systeat of
roads which will compare favorably
with those of other countries. Roads
are being built at 2.985 different
points. Fully 30,000 miles of road have
been approved by the secretary of ag agriculture.
riculture. agriculture. It Is estimated that this
construction will cost the country near nearly
ly nearly J400.0U0.000. At the end of June,
1920, the government reported that 2, 2,-116
116 2,-116 different projects, or a total of
16,000 miles of roads, had been completed.-Roys'
Life.
NEW CHARACTER OF TRAFFIC
Most of Existing Highways Wore Not
Constructed to Support Heavy
Loads Now Imposed.
- l
Most of our existing roads were not
designed with a view of carrying the
heavy loads now Imposed upon them,
and In new roads it would seem the
builders cannot realise the present
changed conditions and the new char character
acter character of the traffic ; In any case the

LOVE AT SIGHT

.By HELEN F. MACDIALO.
Of all the sickfuing bromides
'Love at First Sight' is the worst worst-it's
it's worst-it's an illogical platitude, never hat
meant anything, and never will. Pro Propinquity,
pinquity, Propinquity, mutual .Interest, loneliness
with the fleiuiut of tiiue, will al
prompt love, let this immediate rap
ture that seize peop'.e U of a sud suddenoh.
denoh. suddenoh. It's delieiously humorous.
Judith Barnes pauscJ. a little breath breathless,
less, breathless, and looked rhallengingly aruunc
the group of her dearest friend friend-Anne
Anne friend-Anne Rogers, Nancy Staples and Dot
Blair, all of whom were apparentl)
taking the popular side of the argu argument,
ment, argument, "love at first eight vs. lov
after a 'series of sights."
"But Judy." said Anne, "look at
Dick and me; you know bow terribly
undecided I was about things before
I took that trip last summer and met
him why, I loved him from the first
moment I saw him. I'm sure of that" j
and gentle Anne patted the shining
solitaire on her left hand as if to
protect it from Judith's verbose on onslaught.
slaught. onslaught. "Take Polly's case" Nancy Jumped
up for emphasis "didn't she marry
Ned after knowing him only three
weeks, and didn't he go to war and
come home and aren't they two of the
happiest people you know,
Doesn't'
that prove that people are sometimes
predestined to love Immediately upon
meeting?
Nancy's velvet brown eyes flashed
storm signals of indignation at Judith's
disregard of such tried and true tradi-j
tion.
"Well, girls," broke in Dorothy, the
ever-ready diplomat of the quartet. "I
move we adjourn, if we're going to the
dance tonight Judy has evidently got
to have much stronger evidence pre
sented thst citing examples of the
lives afld loves of mere people. Let's
wait until she falls in love herself,
and then make her tell as accurately
,tbe moment the 'grand passion'
claimed our Judith," and Dot dramat dramatically
ically dramatically appealed to heaven to witness
the pact.
But Judy, the Image-breaker, threw
a pillow at the actress, and the girls
dispersed for the day.
It had been an unusually gay winter.
The annual charity ball had started
the season auspiciously early in Nov
ember, and now April bad come with
its Easter weddings -to prepare for.
Pour happily excited girls, sitting
around Judith Barnes' boudoir, were
eagerly discussing color, groupings,
bouquets, and all highly Important
items which would render them worthy
to attend on their royal highness,
Judy, at the occasion of her marriage
to the prince of her heart at high
noon, the following Saturday.
"And to think. Judy." Dot's excited
treble broke In on the general con conversation,
versation, conversation, "you haven't seen Don since
Christmas, Just before he sailed for
Jspss); and then you had met him
such a vry short time before It must
have taken you almost a week to fall
in love with that highly attractive
naval offlter. h'm. dear?" Dot paused
and, diabolically winked at Anne and
Nancy. "And. Judy-, apropos of being
in love, do you remember our little
discussion of s few months ago on th
subject?"
"Oh, yes," demure little udy hap happily
pily happily smiled on the bridesmaids-to-be
"wasn't it something about love at first
sight, and haven't Don and I proved
to your entire satisfaction that such a
things exists?"
And then Judy got the first taste of
her bridal confetti.
Ocean's Path of Light.,
Jhe night before the Islands were te
come In view the sea was lit by a
phosphorescence so msgnlflcent that
even my shipmates, absorbed in es es-carte
carte es-carte below, called to one another to
view It The engine took us .alsng
at about six knots snd every wr.ve
that broke over us wss a lamp of
loveliness. The wake of the Morn Morning
ing Morning Star was a milky-pathway lit with
trembling fragments of brilliancy and
below the surfacee, beside the rudder,
wss s strip of green light from which
a billion sparks of fire shot to the
sir. Far behimi, until the horizon
closed upon the ocean, our wake was
cur!?iily mindful of the boulevard
of a great city seen through a mint,
the lights fading in the dim distance,
spsrkllng still. It was as If
lightning played beneath the waves
so luminous, so scintillating the water
and Its reflection upon the ship.
"White Shadows In the South Seas."

' HEALING-
FOR SOUL AND BODY

Special Meetings are now in progress in
THE CHRISTIAN CHURCH
For Salvation and Healing
Contacted by BEV. EDWIN L COWYER. cf Cleveland, 0.
Mr. Boajtr has had a vide experience as an EvangtUst,
and brings a unique message in bath sermon and song for SICK
AND SUFFERING humanity, hating himself been healed in an answer
swer answer to the prayer of faith when given up by specialists to He of
mmnKmmt cancer of te stomock. Services every m'zht cl 8

o'clock and Toes., Wed., Thurs.

NOTICE

Notke is hereby, iven that the
Board of Public Instruction for Mar Marion
ion Marion county will receive applications
for letting the dormitory another
year at its regular meeting July .5,
1921. Anyone wish to make applica application
tion application may appear before the board and
presetn their proposition.
27-7t H. G. Shealy, Sec'y.
EAT AT THE MAXLNE
Best meals in the city for 50 cents.
Twenty-one meal ticket for 7. Fhone
360, 310 N. Main street. 27-tf
I T :
W. K. Lane, M. D, physician aai
jurgeoa, specialist eye, ear. nose anj
throat. Office over 5 aa4 It ceat start.
Ocala, Fla. Adv. tf
Nothing- better than Danish Pastry
for an afternoon social event. Federal
Bakery.
Education.
By adenc wisiam a rul Is made
to individual reflet. iu, truth ars-4
not accepted na authority alone;
but all are at liberty t..tet then;
nay. In many case, the pupil it re required
quired required to thiuk out hl twu wnelo
Ions. Every step in a scientific roa roa-eluslon
eluslon roa-eluslon Is submitted to his Judgment.
He is not asked to admit It wltbHit
seeing It to be true. And the trust
to his own powers thus produced Is
farther Increased by the couwancy
with which nature Justifies his on
elusions when they are correctly
drawn. From all which there flows
that Independence which Is a moot
valuable element In 4iaracter. Her Herbert
bert Herbert Spencer.
There's no extra charge for clean cleaning
ing cleaning your fish at the City Fish Market.
Phone 158. 4 tf
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that on the
4th day of July, 1921, the board of
county commissioners of Marion coun county,
ty, county, Florida, will meet with the tax
assessor of the said county, in the of office
fice office of the clerk of the said board, for
the purpose of hearing complaints
and receiving testimony as to the
value of any property, real or per personal,
sonal, personal, as fixed by the said county as assessor
sessor assessor of taxes, and .for the purpose
of perfecting, reviewing' and equalix-
jing the assessment of taxes in and
for said county, baid session or the
said board will continue from day to
day as long as may be necessary.
The Board of County Commissioners,
Marion County, Florida.
T. D. Lancaster Jr., Clerks,
ByJEdna Walker.
6-14-tf Deputy Clerk.
ATTENTION, MEMBERS,
AMERICAN LEGION
Marion County Post No. 27 is giv giving
ing giving a boat trip and moonlight picnic
down Silver Springs, run on ThursV
day, June 30, at 3:30 p. m., returning
about 10:30 o'clock. A cordial invi invitation
tation invitation is extended to members of the
auxiliary to be present as, our guests.
We would like to ak each lady to
prepare lunch for two or more. Each
legionaire can bring a lady friend or.
ex-service man as his guest without
any extra charge.
Come one fellows, get ready to go
and have a real good time.
Get your tickets from the entertain entertainment
ment entertainment committee. 21-3t-eod
NOTICE OF SALE OF
SCHOOL DISTRICT BONDS
Notke is hereby given that the
board of public instruction for Marion
county, Florida, will receive bids up
to 3t'clock
Jaly 4, 1921,
for the purchase of one or more of
the ten one thousand dollar bonds to be
issued by the Reddick Special Tax
School District No. 6, Marion county,
Florida, said bonds bearing five per
cent interest, payable semi-annuallsv
maturing as follows: J
One bond due and payable July 1st,
1924.

One bond due and nayable July 1st, ,1c

1928.
One bond due and payable July 1st,
1932.
Three bonds due and payable Jul
1st, 1936.
Four bonds due snd payable July

The board reserves the right to re- I

ject any and all bids. All comunka comunka-tions
tions comunka-tions should be addressed to II. G.
Shealy. Ocala; Fla.
' By order of the Board of Public
Instruction, Marion county, Fla, this -4th
day of May, 1921.
27-tf H. G. Shealy, Sec'y.
-
and Fri. at 10 a.m. CCHIj

i

t

r



Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8 standalone no
fcla fda yes
!-- Ocala evening star ( Newspaper ) --
METS:mets OBJID UF00075908_05921
xmlns:METS http:www.loc.govMETS
xmlns:xlink http:www.w3.org1999xlink
xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance
xmlns:daitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss
xmlns:mods http:www.loc.govmodsv3
xmlns:sobekcm http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcm
xmlns:gml http:www.opengis.netgml
xmlns:lom http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcm_lom
xsi:schemaLocation
http:www.loc.govstandardsmetsmets.xsd
http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss.xsd
http:www.loc.govmodsv3mods-3-4.xsd
http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcmsobekcm.xsd
METS:metsHdr CREATEDATE 2014-07-31T16:35:05Z ID LASTMODDATE 2009-04-29T15:57:01Z RECORDSTATUS COMPLETE
METS:agent ROLE CREATOR TYPE ORGANIZATION
METS:name UF,University of Florida
OTHERTYPE SOFTWARE OTHER
Go UFDC FDA Preparation Tool
INDIVIDUAL
UFAD\renner
METS:dmdSec DMD1
METS:mdWrap MDTYPE MODS MIMETYPE textxml LABEL Metadata
METS:xmlData
mods:mods
mods:accessCondition This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
mods:genre authority marcgt newspaper
sobekcm newspaper
mods:identifier type OCLC 11319113
ALEPHBIBNUM 2052267
LCCN sn 84027621
sn 84027621
mods:language
mods:languageTerm text English
code iso639-2b eng
mods:location
mods:physicalLocation University of Florida
UF
mods:note dates or sequential designation Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
funding Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855
mods:originInfo
mods:publisher Porter & Harding
mods:place
mods:placeTerm marccountry flu
mods:dateIssued June 27, 1921
marc point start 1895
end 1943
mods:frequency Daily (except Sunday)
marcfrequency daily
normalized irregular
mods:recordInfo
mods:recordIdentifier source UF00075908_05921
mods:recordCreationDate 841027
mods:recordOrigin Imported from (OCLC)11319113
mods:recordContentSource University of Florida
marcorg NPU
FUG
OCLCQ
mods:languageOfCataloging
English
eng
mods:relatedItem original
mods:physicalDescription
mods:extent v. : ; 61 cm.
series
mods:part
mods:detail Enum1
mods:caption 1921
mods:number 1921
Enum2
June
6
Enum3
27
27
lccn 84027622
oclc 11319138
mods:titleInfo
mods:title Ocala weekly star
mods:subject SUBJ651_1 lcsh
mods:geographic Ocala (Fla.)
Newspapers
SUBJ651_2
Marion County (Fla.)
Newspapers
mods:hierarchicalGeographic
mods:country United States
mods:state Florida
mods:county Marion
mods:city Ocala
mods:nonSort The
Ocala evening star
uniform
Ocala Evening Star
alternative displayLabel Other title
Evening star
Star
mods:typeOfResource text
DMD2
OTHERMDTYPE SOBEKCM SobekCM Custom
sobekcm:procParam
sobekcm:Aggregation FDNL1
FDNLN
NDNP
sobekcm:MainThumbnail 0006thm.jpg
sobekcm:Wordmark UFPKY
NEH
CHRAM
sobekcm:bibDesc
sobekcm:BibID UF00075908
sobekcm:VID 05921
sobekcm:EncodingLevel #
sobekcm:Publisher
sobekcm:Name Porter & Harding
sobekcm:PlaceTerm Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
sobekcm:Source
sobekcm:statement UF University of Florida
sobekcm:SortDate 693595
sobekcm:serial
sobekcm:SerialHierarchy level 1 order 1921 1921
2 6 June
3 27 27
DMD3
GML Geographic Markup Language
gml:FeatureCollection
gml:featureMember
gml:Point label Place of Publication
gml:Coordinates 29.187778,-82.130556
METS:amdSec
METS:digiprovMD DIGIPROV1
DAITSS Archiving Information
daitss:daitss
daitss:AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT PROJECT UFDC
METS:techMD TECH1
File Technical Details
sobekcm:FileInfo
METS:fileSec
METS:fileGrp USE reference
METS:file GROUPID G1 JP21 imagejp2 CHECKSUM d7d0b7accd81a09eed2915bc7cc91bad CHECKSUMTYPE MD5 SIZE 6559116
METS:FLocat LOCTYPE OTHERLOCTYPE SYSTEM xlink:href 0681.jp2
G2 JP22 be70efb1290307886127de8521ce91ae 6481564
0682.jp2
G3 JP23 6115bfa2cc317a5b63697629c7062158 6528774
0683.jp2
G4 JP24 bcdc01a829e9ad269168b7a9f6ae371d 6591864
0684.jp2
archive
TIF1 imagetiff cfe10acf4470530bafe7e0b8e269c29a 52447173
0681.tif
TIF2 79f5b46c1ddd109a9e49b4806116b6fc 51826383
0682.tif
TIF3 22f4f1444d4b78ff3fb1b4c7bee2f993 52221107
0683.tif
TIF4 d8d08e4683f38f8b649a18d4d6f7819b 52717191
0684.tif
ALTO1 unknownx-alto e698adc7ed55b7a3344574eaecb05651 762354
0681.alto
ALTO2 c3239a705d59525cf7c709d6f2ad4457 615357
0682.alto
ALTO3 06e611d747da96757224c26cad7264a5 562122
0683.alto
ALTO4 460d3d3aec93610599e2d1caef5adf06 819776
0684.alto
TXT1 textplain b3ea8b6ea72e4b2a4215716e4681ac96 24486
0681.txt
TXT2 4413e40e611400a1672c41392b2ee0fb 19642
0682.txt
TXT3 c311c17aaf5720b8965ddee423185827 18733
0683.txt
TXT4 82236ab7f72550d22991e097899d9c45 26376
0684.txt
METS1 unknownx-mets e673430e86398cc40f042c26d68a7c3f 9854
UF00075908_05921.mets
METS:structMap STRUCT1 physical
METS:div DMDID ADMID The ORDER 0 main
PDIV1 Main
PAGE1 Page
METS:fptr FILEID
PAGE2
PAGE3
PAGE4 4
STRUCT2 other
ODIV1
FILES1