The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:05850

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
OCALA

EVENING

STAR

TEMPERATURES
This morning, 60 degrees.
This afternoon, 85 degrees.
WEATHE2 FORECAST
Generally lair tonight and Wednes Wednesday;
day; Wednesday; little change U temperature.
VOL. 27
OCALA, FLORIDA. TUESDAY, APRIL 5, mi
NO. SO

OFFICERS DF THE
ASSEMBLY ELECTED

President W. A. Mac Williams Williams-Speaker
Speaker Williams-Speaker Frank E. Jennings
Were' Chosen
and
(Associated Press)
Tallahassee, April 5. The House
caucus which began at 8:30 last night
continued until nearly four this morn morning.
ing. morning. PRESIDENT AND SPEAKER
Senator W. A. MacWilliams of St.
Johns county,- was chosen president
of the Senate and Representative
Frank E. Jennings of Duval county,
was selected for speaker of the House,
nrnrr rnn a uimrtv rniTVTY
MAN
The first few hours of the ses session
sion session were devoted to naming minor
officials. Richard Ervin of Marion
county, was selected for engrossing
clerk; E. C. Johnson, of Daytona,
sergeant-at-arms; Rev. J. E. Mickler,
DeLand, chaplain, and R. J. Davis of
DeSoto county, janitor.
ONLY $3,000,000 ASKED
Tallahassee, April 5. Preliminary
to the meeting Monday of the state
board of -control a committee of that
body will meet Saturday to examine
the budget prepared for state institu institutions.
tions. institutions. The committee will confer
Monday with a committee from the
educational board regarding appro appropriations
priations appropriations to be sought from the leg legislature.
islature. legislature. The various state institu institutions
tions institutions have asked appropriations total totaling
ing totaling 3,000,000.
FISHERMEN WANT A HATCHERY
Tallahassee, April 5. A large dele delegation
gation delegation representing the fishing inter interests
ests interests arrived here today to urge Gov.
Hardee and members of the legisla legislatures
tures legislatures support measures for the es establishment
tablishment establishment of a fish hatchery to re restock
stock restock the salt and fresh waters of
Florida.
ORGANIZATION COMPLETED
Tallahassee, April 5 The first ses session
sion session of the legislature was perfunc perfunctory,
tory, perfunctory, being devoted to the administer administering
ing administering of the oath of office to members,
in the caucus last night a.nd receiving
the governor's message.
VAUGHN SEEMS TO
HAVE BEEN A
TRIPLE-DYED VILLAIN
(Associated Press)
Tampa, April 5. Mrs. T. A. Earl,
held in connection with the arrest of
her husband in Port Tampa yesterday,
confessed, the police said, that her
husband," T. U. Vaughn, is wanted in
South Carolina. Vaughen escaped
from the South Carolina asylum,
nrhere he was, committed after being
sentenced to death for assaulting four
girls three years ago. He has, been
Assistant superintendent of schools in
Fort Tampa for four months, coming
from Plant City, where he had been
teaching school. He went to Plant
City from Canada, where he fled after
his escape. Vaughn tried to kill him himself
self himself three times last night after his
arrest, the police said, and his wife
also tried to commit suicide.
AMERICANS INCONSISTENT
(Associated Press)
London, April 5. American conten contentions
tions contentions for equality of treatment for
citizens of all nations in mandated
territory is held by the British gov government
ernment government to be "scarcely consistent"
with the attitude of the United States
toward American oil interests in
Mexico. The British view was ex
pressed in a long reply to Secretary
Colby's note of last November. K
DADE COUNTY TAX
PAYERS WANT DELAY
(Associated Press)
Miami, April 5. The Miami cham chamber
ber chamber of commerce telegraphed Gover Governor
nor Governor Hardee today asking him to issue
an executive order postponing publi publication
cation publication of the delinquent tax list until
proposed revision tax measures are
brought before the legislature.
'
JOHN S. WILLIAMS ON
TRIAL IN GEORGIA
(Associate Press)
Covington, Ga., April 5. John S.
Williams, the Jasper county farmer,
charged in the confession of a negro
farm boss with having caused the
murder of eleven of his negro farm
hands to prevent evidence against
him for alleged peonage, faced trial
in the circuit court here today on the
charge of murder of one of the slain
negroes. There was a large force of
deputies in the court room to preserve
order and arrangements were made
for a capacity crowd. A motion for
postponement of the" trial on the
ground of insufficient time in which
to prepare his defense was overruled
by the court.

TERRIBLE STORMS
REPORTED FROM TOKIO

(Associated Pre)
Tokio, April 5. There was great
property damage and thirty lives
were lost during a terrific storm off
the southern coast of Japan Sunday
night. The wires are down in the
southern part of the empire,- Tokio is
still in darkness and a number of
houses were destroyed here. Two
steamships went ashore in Yokohama
harbor. A naval cutter capsized near
Nagoya and eight bluejackets and one
officer were drowned.
APT IMITATORS
(Associated Press)
Dallas, Texas, April 5. Anony Anonymous
mous Anonymous letters were received by local
newspapers and the sheriff today stat stating
ing stating that an organization of negroes
has been formed here under the name
of the "Black K. K, K.," to retaliate
for the whipping of a negro Friday
night by the K. K. K. The letters
molest the negroes. The'L
-
:.. u a,a w
eiiciiii iu iic uiu uvi icgaiu liic ot otters
ters otters seriously.
AVIATOR LOST CONTROL
OF HIS AIRPLANE
(Associated Press t

Buenos Aires, Anril 5.-Eight per- UI" ? are now uu, OI couree, ing uni
sons were killed and many injured at!OWned hJ f dlyls," of the sat f v-jform m all the counties The valua-
La Paz, Bolivia, Sunday, when Lieut, j eJnmef?t' to"w,t: the stat0 hoard ofitl0nS, f "? vaus, counties
, education. are determined bv the officials of each
Baudron, a French aviator, lost con-! T .. ,, , .,
, , . , I believe the time has arrived when; of the counties. So long as our ores-
trol of his airplane during -an exhibi-i , A, . ...
j i j . we should adopt some plan for their : ent system obtains, that of having

tion night and plunged into
L Hi? l
oge I
j
crowd. Boudron was among
killed.
OLD VINZANT
ON
THE JOB AGAIN
(Associated Press)
Jacksonville, April 5. The first
order of William D. Vinzant, Sr., the
new chief of police here, appointed to
suceed Roach, prohibits smoking in
the police station by men while on
duty.
ALAS! POOR CHARLIE
THEY PUT HIM OUT
(Associated Press)
Budapest, April 5. Former Em-
v .
Ai.otrian border, this morning, on hisi
j way out of the country.
STATE GOLF TOURNAMENT
(Associated Press)
ri 1 i w. a mi I I 111 A li-r .i i r iAiinHo
l ti -j x x

in liic: 1'iuxiua stake Kvix I'juiitamciii. .....
. , , ,AO year to year. And when this accu
are being Dlaved here today with 102 .. . ,
entrants There are 54 local players imulat,on of securities and cash equal
" j t i -ii a v'the bonded indebtedness of the state,

liiinua anu Jcn-Ksuu vine seiiuing uic
next largest delegations.
JACKSONVILLE WILL TRY
TO GET SOUTHERN. COLLEGE
-s3j33b uy 'Q IHV 'siltAuosjpBf
sive campaign to secure for Jackson Jacksonville
ville Jacksonville Southern College, the Methodist
denominational institution of learn learning
ing learning which recently was removed to
Clearwater temporarily as a result of
the burning of its libudings at Suther-

:n u I l l a. l
minitsers of the local Methodist
cnurcnes, prominent mymen ana me
i i i i i
the
cnamDer oi commerce, a meeting to
discuss me situation ana to wnicn me
puDiio win De invuea, is expectea to
be the first step,
Rev. Ira Barnett, pastor of the
Riverside Park Methodist church here
is a member of the special committee
chargedby the trustees of the col college
lege college to receive proposals from cities

mnu, u, ue .auncneu nere next j be taken by your at this sePSion j sources from which the state can legi legi-under
under legi-under plans now being formulated by i- nrfW tW f, fl -f ua-,afi UimnW r mmim will

which desire to obtain the college., The deficit at the Industrial School
The committee has received invita- for Boys at Marianna amounted to
tions from Lakeland. Orlando, Tampa, .$41,784.52. The board of commission-

Clearwater, St. Petersburg and Suth
erland.
LUMBERMEN WILL SAVE
LARGE SUM OF MONEY
Jacksonville, April 5. Lumbermen
of Florida, South Georgia and Ala
bama will be saved a freight increase,
of at least $500,000 annually under a
decision of the Interstate Commerce
Commission in upholding original wa
ter competitive rates, lumber mag-
nates here state.
What are known as "water compe
titive rates" are rates based on less
than normal rilroad rates, although.
they are somewhat higher than those
which could be obtained on an all wa
ter shipment. On the other hand, it
ic coirl tho mil trnrcrrrtAtinn nffprs

many advantages. It is possible to are largely involved financially, and j on the rolls should be greatly raised J commissions do not feel any obliga obliga-ship
ship obliga-ship in smaller units while in water especially is this true regarding the! in value. If all the property which tions for the various departments of

shipments it is necessary to make up'
a ful lcargo.
W. E. Gardner, traffic manager for
the Georgia-Florida Sassgjill Associa Association,
tion, Association, declares there are at least 20,000
car sof lumber shipped from this dis district
trict district annually to eastern and north northern
ern northern ports. If the rate incerase had
gone into effect it would have involv involved
ed involved an average of $25 a car.
Advertise tn the Star.

WBUUTC

MESSAGE JO IHE
LEGISLATURE

Long Document but Ably Written
Concerning Affairs of Most
Interest to Our State
Gentlemen of the Senate and House
of Representatives of the Florida
legislature:
Section 9 of Article 4 of the consti constitution
tution constitution of Florida is as follows:
"The governor shall communicate
by message to the legislature at each j
regular session, information concern concerning
ing concerning the condition of the state, and rec recommend
ommend recommend such measures as he may
deem expedient."
In keeping with the forearoinj pro-
IVISlnn tfVT Our cnrctltntinn T Kv Via
, V, I
(honor of submitting to your consid-

ration the following information., to-j readily ascertainable through a perus perus-jgether
jgether perus-jgether with such recommendatifrn.s as al of departmental reports.

would seem appropriate at this time: j The maintenance of the state gov gov-In
In gov-In a general sense, the financial concernment largely depends upon ,the
dition of the state is spund. The state j levy of millage for state purposes
has no bonded indebtedness except the against the property of the state

r ff jm rn' i. 1 1
j
retirement. The fact that the bonds
are now owned by a branch of the j
isiaie government; aoes not mean mat ;
the state need not concern itself
about their retirement. They are, as
stated, owned by the state hoard of
education, and the constitution re
quires that the funds held by said
board of education shall remain in inviolate,
violate, inviolate, except that the interest on the
fund is distributed to counties. The

bonds must eventually be retired, and familiar with theories of taaxtion.
we should now adopt a plan of retire-; However. I believe that there is no
ment which will make their payment ; Pan which is feasible, except that
easy. which places authority in some arm
I recommend that an act be passed f the state government, who shall
creating what might be called a sink- have power to determine and to en en-ing
ing en-ing fund commission, composed of the force a uniform basis of assessment,
governor, state treasurer, attprney This cannot be left entirely to the
general, secretary of state and state"" county officials themselves,' because it

superintendent of public instruction,
I who shall direct the state treasurer

to open a sinkinjfund account for,Quate assessment in their own coun country
try country retirement of the bonds, all the ties, rather than run the risk of sub sub-interest
interest sub-interest paid by the banks on state jecting their, people to the danger of

I deposits to be credited to this fund.
The commissioners should have the.
: i t e i i.;v .i i
..bonds as they may accumulate from
.
with the power of substituting the ac-
cumulated securities and cash for said
state bonds at which time the state

bonds may be retired. Throueh thisinaade for appointment by the gover-

method their payment may be easily
accomplished and can be brought

about in nine years, or perhaps a lit- and to devote his whole time in co co-tie
tie co-tie earlier. operating with the various county of

There is another item touching the
state's financial condition to which I
feel it my duty to call your attention, i
inflsrrmrli na annrnnriato -itiAn nmcf
-ft 1 cv.....
referred to mav hp tnk-pn Mro nf
During the year 1920 an appropria-!
i
tion by the legislature of i919 for the
clin71A n v, tt,i t -u t
I ouyyvi tt uiic aiuc)JiLai J I 1 1 1 Stl lit;
at Chattahoochee, and an appropria-I
tion made for the support of the In-
dustrial School for Boys at Marianna,
were insufficient to take care of the
large expenditures of these in stitu-
tions. The deficit at the Hospital for
the Insane amounted to $177,623.20.
ers of state institutions, under the ad administration
ministration administration of my predecessor, ar arranged
ranged arranged with certain financial institu-
tions to carrv the deficit above rP-
j f erred to at an agreed rate of interest
of six ner cent Der annum. That the
credit and good faith of the state may
, be maintained, it will be necessary for
the present legislature to care for the!
obligations of the state in this regard,!
and it will also be necessary to pass,
'as speedily as possible, an emergency
appropriation to provide funds for the
above institutions until the funds un-
er the general appropriation bill may
be available.
Apart from the items above refered
to, the financial condition of the state
;is sound. I cannot say as much, how-
ever, for the individual counties of the
ctato A profit manr nf thp onnntJp
county boards of public instruction. It
will perhaps be necessarv dunnjr the
present session to adopt measures
authorizing the county school boards
of the various counties to issue serial
obligations to care for much existing
indebtedness. The present law au-
ithorizes county boards of public in
struction to borrow SO per cent of
their adopted budget for the 'purpose
of maintaining their terms of school.
This provision, while in a measure

necessary, has in many instances been
abused to that extent that many of
the counties now find themselves very

seriously involved. I believe that un under
der under no circumstances should the limit
thus imposed by law be exceeded, and
should the legislature, through proper
authorization, provide some method
by which the counties may care for
their present current obligations, then
it must be the policy of those boards
to keep their expenditures within ab absolute
solute absolute limits imposed by law.
Suggested Subject for Legislative
Action
I am crediting you with much in initiative
itiative initiative in matters of legislation, and
am pleased to note in the member member-shrp
shrp member-shrp of both branches of the legisla legislature
ture legislature so many men who are familiar
with the needs of the state, and who
have so much ability to be of real
service to the people. I shall, there- j
fore, content myself with recommen
dations of only what appears to be
some of the more urgent matters re-
quiring your attention.
Neither shall
I burden this messaere.
or tax your
flmo kr cnk, t.'.. J-i-M 11
' V matters or
intricate columns or figures, which are
, . : 1 1
o
uniform millage for state purposes
levied upon all classes of property
running mrougnoui tne state, it nec-
, essarily follows that there must be
j uniform assessments as between the
v arious counties, else much injustice
'w'H be done by the county whose as-
sessment is upon a higher basis than
its sister counties. Various plans
looking to a cure of this situation have
Keen suggested by men more or less
frequently happens that the local offi-
cials are disposed to maintain inade-
paying more than their share in the
expenses of the state.
I recommend the creation of a tax
commission composed of the
gover-
' i . .
, nor, the comptroller, the state treas-
I A. T.
,urer and the attorney general. It will
I be noted that the membership of the
j 1 m
cabinet, is identical with the railway
assessment board, with the exception
of the governor. Provision should be
nor, of a capable assistant, versed in
matters of taxation, to prepare data
ficials, looking toward the assessment
of property upon a uniform basis
throughout the state,
T am surp that xnmp nMitinnnl
-
(sucre'est themselves to vour considers.
tion. I especially want to call your
-
attention to the advisability of a
'email ov fV. ;nfan;MA
onion toh uyvu k v. ttivuiig av
erty of the state. Under the law as
it now stands, the assessment of in
tangibles is impracticable because of
that provision which requires all
property to be assessed at its full
cash value. I recommend an amend
ment to the constitution which, if
adopted, will permit the assessment
flf intangible property upon a reason
able basis. It is the purpose of the
present administration, in co-opera
tion with the tax assessors of the
state, to secure a more general basis
of assessment of property. Much
property is now avoiding assessment
I because not placed upon the tax rolls
I recommend the passage of a law
'which, under appropriate penalty, will
require the property owner to give in,
under binding oath, all of. his property
'to the tax assessor. I also invite your
attention to the necessity for a more
efficient system in the collection of
revenue. But my immediate concern
as chief executive is to secure the best
possible administration of the laws
we already have. Our greatest prob-
jlem is in getting all the property as-
sessed. I want to see the property
; nowexcaping taaxtion placed on the
. tax rolls, and much of it that is now
ought to bear its burden of taxes was
on our rolls at aTeasonable value, we
could reduce the millage for state and
county purposes nearly 50 per cent.
If you create the commission suggest suggested
ed suggested and also pass a law compelling ev every
ery every individual to give in hi taxes un under
der under binding oath, and penalizing their
value to do so, then we can, in my
opinion, have a more effective enforce enforcement
ment enforcement of the laws in this regard. It
might be well also for you to provide

for adequate punishment for the indi individual
vidual individual who makes false returns on his
property to the assessor.
Economy in Expenditures
I believe the people of the state, as
a rule, will not object to paying reas

onable taxes if thev are convinced
that the funds which are thus contrib contributed
uted contributed by them will be properly and eco
nomically administered. Every dollar
collected from the people should be
made to perform a dollar's worth of
service. It Cannot be made to do so
unless there is intelligent oversight
on the part of the legislature regard
ing appropriations which you are
called .upon to make. I can conceive
of no manner in which the members of
the legislature can thoroughly famil
iarize themselves with the various
appropriations and the necessity for
such appropriations, except through
a carefully prepared budget to be
submitted to them sufficient time in
advance of their voting, in order that
they may fully prepare themselves .to
vote intelligently on suggested appro appropriations.
priations. appropriations. Thirty-nine states of the
Union have in the last few years
adopted what is known as the budget
system, the purpose of which- is fully
to acquaint the legislature and the
ptople with the detailed expenditures
authorized by the legislature.
I recommend the passage of a law
operating a board to be known as a
budget commission, to be composed of
the governor, the comptroller, and the
state treasurer whose duty it will be,
within reasonable time for the con
vention of each legislature, and m
conference with the various heads of
the different departments of the
state, to have prepared for submission
to the legislature, in the first days of
its session, an itemized budget of all
suggested departmental appropria
tions, salaries to be paid, work to be
done and all necessary data used in
ascertaining the amount required for
the maintenance of the different de departments
partments departments of the state. Copy of said
budget should be furnished the indi individual
vidual individual members of the legislature, as
well as the state press, in order that
they may consider, and vote intelli
gently, a"hd that the people generally
may know for themselves how the
money which they are paying each
year in taxes is expended.
Back to the Constitution
The constitution, in creating the
different departments of the state,
placed at the head of each depart department
ment department a constitutional officer, and'
clearly contemplated that the various
activities of our government should
be largely placed under cabinet offi officers.
cers. officers. 'Of course, we have departed
from the principles of the constitu constitution
tion constitution in this regard, and have entered
upon a policy of creating outside
commissions, when clearly in most
cases, the duties performed by such
commissions should be performed by
the cabinet officers. Like many of the
other states of the Union, we are fast
becoming a "commission ridden" peo
ple. I wish to call upon you to .adopt
the policy of "back to the constitu
tion." In your creating of such com
missions as you may deem wise and
expedient, let your creations be carv
ed out of the cabinet elected by the
people. It is the sworn duty of a
cabinet officer to devote all of his time
and thought to the interests of the
state.
There is nothing in the argument,
so often advanced, that the cabinet
officers are too busy to give attention
to the various matters that are placed
undertheir charge. They are at the
seat of the state government all of
the time, ready and accessible for
frequent meetings and conferences. In
their accessibility and their constant
meetings there is the greatest advan
tage of being able to give attention
to departmental matters incident to
the various state activities, readily,
speedily and without delay. The cab cabinet
inet cabinet members are advised as to the
various needs of the state and there
fore can conduct different phases of
the state government in harmony
each with the other, whereas when
outside commissions are created,
those commissions only too often ar
mtrnte to themselves the power of
caring for the particular matters un
der their charge, independent of the
other departments of the state and
without knowledge as to what may be
the requirements of the state in-de-nnrtmpnt
other than their own, fre
quently paying salaries out of all pro proportion
portion proportion to salaries paid for like serv
ices in those departments not under
their control. The creation of outside
commissions not only makes for in inefficiency,
efficiency, inefficiency, but it makes for extrava extravagance
gance extravagance in exnenditures. As a rule, the
the state other than their-own, ana
too often we find them possessed with
the idea of getting all they can out of
the state treasury for their own de departments,
partments, departments, irrespective of the needs
and requirements of the -various de departments
partments departments of the state not under
them.
I believe that laws, rules and regu regulations
lations regulations can be more adequately en enforced
forced enforced when under the jurisdiction of
cabinet officers. There is more re

spect for such laws -and regulations

when so administered; not that gov
ernment officers are superior men but
because the people see back of them
a constitutional office not subject to
change or v perhaps abolition by the
caprice of public opinion.
There has been tendency in the
past to create too many 'offices and
positions. It has resulted in the du duplication
plication duplication of work, in lessened efficien efficiency,
cy, efficiency, and the needless expenditure of
money. We have more traveling in
spectors than necessary, and some de
partments of the state can well be
combined with others. There is much
work for you to "do at this session.
along this line, if you would give to
the people that economical adminis
tration of affairs to which they- are
entitled. I suggest the appointment
of a committee with membership from
each the Senate and the House, who
shall very thoroughly examine into
the matters suggested. Let the ex
animation be exhaustive, and not
superficial or perfunctory. This also
should be done and report made dur
ing the early days of the session.
I will be pleased to assist the com
mittee with all information obtainable
and with such suggestions as may
seem proper. We need less legisla legislation
tion legislation and more co-operation. There
should not be a single office created
or continued for political purposes in
the state of Florida. Politics and bus
iness do not mix to the benefit of the
state. Every unnecessary position, or
even those necessary, where the du duties
ties duties can be performed by some other,
should be abolished.
Fish and Game Department
The game and fresh water fish con
stitutes one of the state's most val valuable
uable valuable assets. They should be pre preserved
served preserved for the use of the people of the
state, and Jor those in other parts of
the country who are attracted to Flor Florida
ida Florida by them, who are willing to pay a
proper license for the sport. There
must be intelligent conservation,
which can be had only through reas reasonable
onable reasonable regulations governing the use
and enjoyment of this, one of the
most important natural resources of
the state. I am clearly of the opinion
that we cannot depend upon the pres present
ent present laws or the method of enforce
ment to properly protect our fish and
game. I recommend the passage of a
measure which will provide reason reasonable
able reasonable revenue and which will place the
administration of the law under a
game commissioner. I suggest that
this game commissioner should be
identical, one and the same, as the
shell-fish commissioner, who is now
charged with the administration of
our oyster and salt water fish laws.
The fish and game are natural re
sources belonging to all the people of
the state and certainly substantial
revenues should accrue to the state
through -the use and enjoyment of
this resource.
' Local Bills
Before the. legislature has any
right to pass any bills, local in nature,
it is. required by the constitution that
notice of the introduction of the
measure should be published in the
county affected by such bill, for sixty
days before its introduction. This
plain provision of the constitution is
quite often ignored. If the journals
of the legislature fail to show the
publication of such notice, our courts,
in the absence of an affirmative show
ing, indulge the presumption that
such notice was given as required.
The effect of this construction of the
law has been that each session of the
legislature is flooded with local bills,
and practically no consideration can
be given them by the legislature. As
is well known, they are passed as a
matter of course, sponsored and un
derstood only by the members of the
legislature of the county affected by
them. This practice has grown to
such an extent that-it has become a
real menace. Not only does it require
a. great deal of time of the legisla
ture, but oftimes legislation not local
in nature is hurried through the
session without that due consideration
which the questions involved justly
deserve. Apart from the above sug
gestions, the people of each commu
nity are entitled to be advised in ad advance
vance advance of the nature of the local bill
which will be introduced in the legis
lature. There is no way for a prac practical
tical practical handling of this, question except
through an amendment to the consti
tution. If the governor should veto
the local bill, because it might appear
from outside sources that the notice
had not been given, it would be easy
for the membership, nearly all of
whom have local bills in which they
are interested, to pass the measure
over the governor's veto. Besides, if
the courts indulge in the presumption
that the required notice was publish publish-ed,
ed, publish-ed, is not the governor within his
rights in doing the same thing?
I recommend an amendment to the
constitution requiring the publication
of notice of all local "measures before
the introduction, of at least thirty
days. It would seem' that thirty days,
instead of sixty days, as is now re required,
quired, required, would be sufficient. But the
publication of such notice, the certi-
(Continued on Page Two)

IK HOT
' III A HURRY
Doesnt Seem Inclined to be Too Pre-
dpiCate '-About 3IaMng Peace
with Deutachland
(Associated Press)
Washington, April 5, President
Harding is not committed to any defi definite
nite definite program in regard to a congres congressional
sional congressional detenninatio nto declare the
war with Germany at an end. It is
understood he feels there is no tx?cas tx?cas-ion
ion tx?cas-ion for precipitate action.
MAKING INQUIRIES ABOUT TOE
EX-SERVICE MEN
Washington, April 5. President
Harding today asked his special com
mission headed by Charles G. Dawes.
of Chicago, to make diligent inquiry
of government department heads to
find out just where government agen
cies are lacking in authority, neglect neglectful
ful neglectful of failing in caring for disabled
service men. He also asked that an
investigation be made of abuses that
have developed.
MARINE PLANES HAVE
ARRIVED IN HAVANA
Washington, April 5 Marine corps
planes en route to the Virgm Isles,
arrived 1n Havana at four o'clock yes yesterday
terday yesterday afternoon from Miami in ex excellent
cellent excellent condition, according to navy
department advices. y
THELMA HANDLEY
Thelma. the little two-vear-old
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Hand-
ley, died in this city this- morning.-
Mr. and Mrs. Handley have made
their home in Ocala for several years
and have many friends here who syna-
n.thi.s rfk 4 V. : 11...'. 1
mm uic nun meir Bereave
ment. They left with the remains
of their little girl this afternoon for
Rochelle, Ga, where interment will
take place tomorrow. Robert &
Spencer were the funeral directors in
charge.
MR. AND MRS. TAYLOR
WILL HAVE A NEW HOME
- Of the many real estate deals that
have taken place in the last few
weeks, one of the most important was
closed Saturday by which Mr. Geo. L.
Taylor of the Taylor Printing Co.,
became the owner of what is known
as the Pearson place on East Fort
Kong avenue. The place is in one of
the best residential sections "of the
city. Mr. and Mrs. Taylor expect to
move into their new home about the
15th of the month. Alterations and
improvements will be started immed immediately,
iately, immediately, thereby making the property
one of the most up-to-date and attrac attractive
tive attractive homes in the city. Mr. Taylor
purchased the place from Mr. T. J.
Wilson, who now occupies it. but who
expects to return to his former home
at Fort McCoy.
MEETING OP' BUSINESS
WOMAN'S CLUB
The Ocala Business and Profession
al Woman's Club will hold its. regular
business meeting at the club rooms
this evening at 8 o'clock. The follow
ing is the program for the evening:
Reading the constitution.
Election of delegatesfto the state
conventjon.
What the Business and Professional
Woman's Club can do for Ocala.
Some slogans for the modern busi business
ness business woman.
Music by Miss Fausett, Miss Cap Cap-pieman,
pieman, Cap-pieman, Miss Akin and Miss Pyles.
Review from the "Independent
Woman.'
The program ia a very interesting
one and all the members are urged to
be present-
COUNTRY SMOKED MEAT
For sale, hams 30c a pound; sides
25c pound, and shoulders 20c. pound.
W. M. Shockley. LowelL Fla. 30-t
Former Judge Wm. E. Smith has
his new office aeatly and elegantly
fitted up, in the Gary block, and has
settled down to a steadily increasing
law practice. When it comes to pa
tience and. intelligent persistence,. no
rn?n in our county can excel "Billy
Smith."
TLf r mnA Mn Oin. J. Dnmu. after
a delightful two months in Ocala as
guests of their son, Mr. J. W. Dumas
and wife, left this afternoon for
Gainesville, where they will be the
guests of Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Hamp
ton." Accompanied by Mrs. Hampton,
tney mil visit Augusune, ana
then Mr. and Mrs. Dumas will leave leave-for
for leave-for their home in New York. They
have been pleasant visitors to Ocala
and made many friends. Mr. Dumas
is a veteran newspaper man -and the
Star is indebted to him for much
skillful assistance while he was here.
We hope he and his estimable wife
will revisit Ocala next winter.

ID



0

OCALA EVENING STAB, TUESDAY, APRIL 3, 1921

Ocala Evening Star
!'.illlthc! Kverjr Day Except Saadajr bf
..STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY,
OCALA, FLORIDA.

GOV. HARDEE'S MESSAGE
TO THE LEGISLATURE

(Continued from-Pagf Oi:c-

It. It. Carroll. Prealdeat
lavrBgiMtil, Seereary-Traarer
J. II. lteajamla. Editor

Kjrere-J at Ocala, Fla.. postofflce as
-conJ -class matter.
TELEPHONES
HuhlneMa Office Tve-Oae
t:diluria1 Department ......Tw-S
tlety Itrporter ....FlTe-Oae

HCMnCIt SSOCIATKD PKESS
"ist Associated I'ress la exclusively
4-ntitle'l for the use for republication of
aU Dews dispatches credited to U or
not otherwise ered'ted in this paper arid
alKO the local news publisfted hereiu
All rights of republication of special
Mimcfits herein are also reserved.

DOMESTIC SL'HSCHIPTIOS KATES
One year, in advance JS.OC
Kix months, in advance 3.00
Three months. In advance 1.60
Or.e month, in advance .: 0
ADVERTISING KaiES
. DUplayi Plate 15 cents pr Inch for
consecutive insertions. Alternate-Insertions
25 per cent additionaL Composi Composition
tion Composition charges on ds. that run less tnar,
six times ce.-ts per Inch. Special

position 20 per cent additional. Kates

based on 4-iuch minimum. Less tnan
lour inches will take higher rate
which will be furnished upon application.

Kt-aiMnz otleeai 5 cents per Una for

rtrst insertion; 3 cents per lfne for each

subsequent insertion. One change a
week allowed on readers without xtr

composition charges.
Iegal advertisements it legal rates.

fied copy thereof, should he spread
upon the journals of each biar.-h of
the legislature. In other -,vord.- the

egislative journals themselves should

be required to show affirmatively ihct

the required notice was riven. If af

firmative evidence .of th publication

of notice is required to l-c spread

upon the journals, we will have- a c ure

for the dangerous practice i.u'v prevailing.

State Prison Farm
I believe that a state pri.-on farm

is necessary, and we nave at i;aiior.J.
in Bradford county, an institution
which, if properly handled, can be
made to efficiently serve the pjrpo-c
of its creation. We have 17.1) ."3 acres

of land and nearly 4000 acres of
which are now under cultivation, the

remaining acreage being largely pas pasturage
turage pasturage and woodland. The mainte maintenance
nance maintenance of such a farm, in my opinion.

Everything else is cut down or side

tracked today to give place to GOV.

Hardee's message.

Resisting vaccination is nothing

more or less than superstition.

Four justices of the supreme court
of the United States are ready to re

tire.

Is St. Petersburg to be the fountain

of one of Florida's pipe lines of

booze?

If the skirts get much shorter and

the girls continue to wear silk hos

iery we may look for an epidemic of

"kneemonia."

Bouquets are pretty but they do

not pay bills. Times-Union.

The lady would rather have a box

of candy, anyhow.

Elsewhere we print the address to

the legislature of Cary A. Hardee,
who in our opinion will be the best

governor Florida has had since Geo
F. Drew.

The Ocala Star seems to be plum

sot against the no-fence idea for
Florida. Yet the Star would deny
vociferously' that it was. against pro progress
gress progress along' agricultural lines. Tam

pa Tribune.

The Star is "plum sot" against

abuse and misrepresentation of a
large proportion of 'our people by a

newspaper that should know better,
The Star doesn't have to deny nor af

firm anything. The people it has
lived among and worked for, for al almost
most almost twenty-six years, know what it

stands for.

Times-Union Short Talks .tells the
following about one of Jthe enterprises

of our townsmen, Clarence and Jack
Camp:' "The new phosphate elevator

and drying plant of,. C. & J. Camp,
which -will be operated by the Florida

Terminal Company, is ready for ope

ration and rock will begin to move in

.and out of Fernandina at an early
date," says the Nassau County

Loader. "The city has experienced
some little difficulty in supplying the
necessary electric current but this

trouble will be adjusted and things
will go forward at a good rate very
.soon." The Leader adds that .ten or
twelve cars of wet rock arrived last

week to go into the bins of the dry

ing plant, which will use crude oil to

supply the necessary heat. The
Leader also tells of progress being

made at the coaling station, which is

a plant operated by the same com

pany. The -work 'is now employing a

lot of hands and'.when completed wil:
mean greater prosperity for Fernandina.

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tingui;hed from the localities of the
state. However, the board should, and
Jam advised that they will do so, use
every effort to have designated as
fed era laid projects roads which tra traverse
verse traverse those counties which have con contributed
tributed contributed funds to the state road de department.
partment. department. The only funds at the
command of the department is the
.mill tax, which will provide little
more than $700,000; the tax on gaso gasoline,
line, gasoline, which provided last year about
50,000; al?o 15 per cent of the auto automobile
mobile automobile licence tax, same being used
for the maintenance of the depart department,
ment, department, 85 per cent of state automobile
jli. en.-e tax being apportioned by the
state to the counties.
Another source of revenue which
can be used by the state as a credit
for its 50 oer cent of all federal aid
projects is the actual work performed
joy the convicts. But of course it re re-qunes
qunes re-qunes an immense sum of money to
; equip, feed and clothe the convicts
.hiie at work.
The department is seriously handi handicapped
capped handicapped on account of funds. You are

requested to consider

very seriously ways and means for

is necessary in order mat some place respectfully

may' be provided lor the convicts,

and tnose aged and decrepit wno are provldin more funds for its use j

not pnysicauy nt to periorm r.ara rec0mmend an increase of the tax on

manual labor. This is the only rea-: ?a?oline also tax on oil j reCommend
son for the maintenance of such an:u0 nm,isT f tfco fwrt-;n 1

institution. .The people of Florida j T rc.conimend, also .a more economical

very justly feel that the convicts who;and c.fficient handling of the affairs of
are physically fit should perform ; tnp nartment. resulting not onlv in

... . ... : J -"

manual labor, and certainly no fetter- sn-r nf w

j- f t t. i n J

piace ior tne penormance oi wen a-, ed road building as well. The mem-

bor can be provided than upon our : her? of the denartment as now ronsti

11" T j!

puDiic roaas. in tne im-antiir.e, we;t ? (J t th necessitv for

should require those not able to worK more efficiency and economy, and I

on me pumic roaas, mar me m a ,elieve can be trusted to inaugurate

, 1 "I

large measure sustain themselves on; t f th elimination of much

the. state farm, without the financial ne(.des3 expense and for the accom

plishment of much work. What we

, lai-gely need is a proper administra-

burden to the state which it has borne

in the past.
mi A.A.A 1 T 1 1

ine institution at .nauoui na,. ,u f th alreadv in existence.

grovn to sucn proportions tnat it re-, rather than too many additionaI and

quires a large percentage ci convicts
there to maintain the farm, resulting

in a burden upon the swite finance?,
which I believe should not continue,
feach year there is a large deficit in

to do 'so I fell you should consider
very seriously the following recom recommendations:
mendations: recommendations: 1st. Reduce the number of first first-class
class first-class convicts to be kept at the farm,
which is now by law at 75, keeping at
no time more than 10 or 12 or such
convicts at the farm.
2nd. Very carefully regrade the
number two convicts and place upon
the public roads a large percentage of
this class.
3rd. Put into effect a rigid system
of economy on expenditures.
I hope the legislature will reduce
the number of number one convicts
as suggested, and will also give the
governor discretionary power in ris rising
ing rising second class convicts under pro proper
per proper rules and regulations for work
upon the public roads.
By drawing in., rather than -spreading
out; by sticking to the migi'ial
idea in the creation of the faim,
rather than placing the state in the
attitude of entering private industry;
and by practicing strict economy in
its operation, I believe the farm -ari
be made self-sustaining.
Public Roads
The creation of the state ioa l de department
partment department by the legislature of r.'15
was necessary if the state would
utilize its share of the fund? which
the national government has appro

priated for road construction,
creation was essential then; its

tinuance is necessary now. It has not

vancement of the Everglades, the
further protection of the works con

structed, and for regulation and con controlling
trolling controlling matters of importance. relat

ing to the drainage project. Then? ;

will be presented to the .legislative

body of the board of commissioner

of Everglades drainage district.

which board is composed of tr.e gov

ernor of Florida and four of hi cat CcSi

met members, certain measures fur
your consideration, looking to the

advancement of this great reclama

tion enterprise on which the state ha
embarked.

Agricultural Experiment Station for
the Everglades
The Everglades is essentially an

agricultural territory. ihe entire!.

the assumption that the sod. when
drained, will become valuable agri agricultural
cultural agricultural land. The entire problem of

reclamation will not be completely
solved until agriculture shall have

been placed upo na sound and pro?.- ffz

table basis. The solution of the prob- Sri

lem insofar as the removal of water

from the land is concerned is

out further question, ihe establish

ment and conduct oi an agricultural

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Foot suffering is needless!

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Let the Dr. SchoO
Foot Specialist
demonstrate to you
that you can gain
complete loot com
fort immediately

experiment station in the Everglades

for the purpose of studying and deter

mining agricultural needs becomes of

vital importance to the development

and advancement of this const ruetive
enterprise. There will be presented

to your body a proposed measure re

commended by the drainage board for

life
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A foot expert

the establishment of an agricultural 1 V

experiment station in the Everglades. 7v7

Our board recently made an in- i
spection trip through the Ever- I
glades, and we were deeply impre-sod JA;

with its possibilities, its progress and
the amount of work accomplished.
governor, I do not feel that I can ini-

coming to our store
April 11th, 12th and 13th

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Fire
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Ocala, Florida

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(Geo.UayUo.

i cumbersome legislative enactments,
i The Everglades

! In. 1830 Congress passed an act

! known as the "Swamp and Overflow

ed Land Grant Act." Through this

the expenditures over the income de- i act there has come tQ this gtate mQre
rived from the receipts of the farm.jth 20.000.000 acres of swamp and

ine operation ior eacn year oi its ex-, overflowed land among which are the
istence show a large deficit-that of i Evcrglades. 0ne of the conditions of
1920, approximately 100,000. The j fhe was. (That the Eroceeds of
state cannot operate an institution of j caM andi whethe; from sale or by
this character with the same economy dim.t approI)riation in kind, shall be

as an muivmuai. in laci, uae p,.nt. ;applied exclusively, as far as neces

purpose oi tne xarrn wa, not to .auiien ; sary for the purpose of reclaiming

tne state out into private enterprise; jd and

m compeuuon wun me eue. uj. ; For the past 14 years the state of

worK tnere snoum ue om mciuei.uu, F iJa h b actively and ener.

as a mean, ui laKing eaie ui i..e Fetically engaged in construction
oners who are not physically able to !(rainaffe work in the EvergladeSf thus
perform manual labor upon the pub-: doveloping one of the state8 greatest

nc roaos. ine operation is. upon IOOiraturai resources
large a scale and the more convicts ; The j legislatures have en

retamea upon ix, tne moie mu ue ;acted-iaws bv rtue of which the
expense of the people of the state m ; Evcrgladeg drainage district was
maintaining it. This institution can;creatpd and through which the drain drain-possibly
possibly drain-possibly be made self-sustaining, but. xv, ,.n mndp nossiWe. The

'.vork thus far accomplished is repre

mtcd in principal part by the open

ing of .361 miles of main drainage
canal; the construction of twelve
locks and dams the survey of one

million acres of hitherto unsurveyed
lands into townships, ranges and sec sections,
tions, sections, and other undertakings of an
incidental though important nature,
involving an expenditure to date of
approximately six million dollars.
The Everglades drainage district
comprises a land area of four and one one-half
half one-half million acres, or larger than the
states of Rhode Island and Connecti Connecti-cut
cut Connecti-cut combined. Where, a few years
ago there was an unbroken watery
waste there are now. in those sections
of the Everglades where drainage
work is most advanced, thriving com com-i
i com-i : unities and productive farms. The
holdings of the state in the Ever Everglades
glades Everglades are represented by a million
and a quarter acres of land.
The money for carrying on the
drainage work is supplied by drainage
taxes? levied by the legislature upon
all the lands included in the Ever Ever-vkidvs
vkidvs Ever-vkidvs drainage district, but upon no
other lands. The drainage project,
therefore, supports itself on its own
merits alone. In fact, it has con contributed
tributed contributed large annual amounts to the
state's treasury through taxes, but
Iv!-; rpipivfH nr funds from the state.

5.The amount of drainage district taxes
con- ., i i i :

is neierniineu anu ie icu vy ine legis legislature
lature legislature from time to time as need
require. Based upon these drainage
taxes, Everglades district funds, au authorized
thorized authorized by the legislature have been
issued by the board of commission commissioners
ers commissioners of the Everglades drainage dis district
trict district to provide immediate funds for
the work. To meet future construc construction
tion construction expenses additional funds will be
needed, making necessary a further
assessment of taxes, accompanied by
authority to the drainage board for
the issuing of such additional bonds
as may be advisable. This will re require
quire require legislative action.
There will also be needed measures
whose purpose will be the geenral ad-

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Funeral Directors
and Embalmers
Two Licensed Embalmers
Motor Funeral Cars
Private Morgue and Chapel
Day Phone 47
Night Phone 515
G. B. Overton. Manager

"Kodak films developed, printed and
enlargeu High class : work only.
Blake's Studio, over Helvenston's. 12t

performed in the past as effect ivcly
and efficiently as the people have de desired,
sired, desired, and whether it will do so in the
future will depend largely upon the
personnel of the department and of
the policies which they adopt. As is
well known, the federal government
will pay fifty per cent of the cost of
any road which has been designated
as a federal aid project, and provided
that the construction is in keeping
with regulations prescribed by the

national government. Xo funds are

received whatever from the national
government except for work upon
federal aid projects, and then only as
the work progresses. The state of

Florida has not utilized the appro appropriations
priations appropriations of the national gowrr.mort
to any considerable extent. 'There is
to the credit of Florida nea:lv tki ec
million "dollars now held by the na national
tional national government for road cor s: ruc ruction
tion ruction in our state, none of whx-h. h.w-
r

ever, is avauaiue e.ueui iu; 'jir,
roads designated as fedeu:I ail projects.-
and only then when th-.' state
contributes a like amount as the na national
tional national government. It is re?.d:iy ap apparent
parent apparent that if we are to utf.ir? the

above funds from the r.atroruu gov government,
ernment, government, then we must take steps to
raise considerable money for the
state road department. And the state
road department will be obliged to
expend the funds so raistI up n the
federal aid project. Evidently, the
work must be largely centered upon ;
the roads approved as federal aid

projects, and which will connect the
different sections of the state "us dis-

press on your honorable
strongly the jmportance

within your power to foster and en encourage
courage encourage this great enterprise. For
the proposed bill to establish an ag

ricultural experiment station, and for
other proposed measures on behalf of
the Everglades which will be present- j
ed by the drainage board. I bespeak i
... i

your very earnest consideration.
The National Guard of Florida
The entire National Guard of Flor Florida
ida Florida entered the federal service at the
beginning of the world war. During
the past three years there has been
piactically no guard in existence.
About a year ago steps were taken to
reorganize the National Guaid of
Florida. This reorganization has
-one steadily ahead; and at this time
the entire regiment allotted to Flor Florida
ida Florida has practically been organized
and equipped and is in fine condition.
More troops will be allotted to Flor Florida
ida Florida each year and the organization,
will proceed until the entire allotment
will be organized by the end of
The total allotment to Florida will
amount to 4S00 men and will consti constitute
tute constitute a splendid force for the protec protection
tion protection of the state and the United
States.
The necessity for maintaining a
strong, well-equipped National Gua'd
in the state of Florida ,as well as in
all other states of the Union must be
apparent to all thinking people. It
would seem desfrable that a regular
army be maintained of sufficient size
to guard our borders, garrison our
insular possessions and form the nuc nucleus
leus nucleus for the organization of a large
army in case of 'war, but it appears
now thai the policy of Congress is to
cut the regular army establishment
down to a minimum. This being true,
the organization of a strong National
Guard is more urgent than ever be before.
fore. before. It is certain that the National
Guard will have to be relied upon in
any sudden national emtrgncy, as
well as emergencies arising within
the states.
The fine record of the Florida
troops is well known. They have
served efficiently in all wars, in the
face of adverse circumstances. And
they have always responded to any
call to assist the civil authorities in
preserving the peace of the tate.

tl:. i i i

nils luree can uivsas ue- leuc-u ujhjii i .i,
in any emergency where the civil au- j jtjj
thorities are in need of help, and this j

fact has often been an important fac factor
tor factor in preventing trouble that might
have arisen otherwise. All assistance
possible should be given the National
Guard of Florida by the legislature.
Riparian Rights
Along our streams, coast lines and
other navigatble waters, Florida has
an attractive and valuable asset in
her water front, or what we general generally
ly generally speak of as her riparian property,

a large portion of which has passed j
into the hands of property owners, j
The legislature has from time to time j

enatced laws which affect certain cf
these riparian properties, and of late
years some misunderstanding has de-

He is a member of the staff of Dr. Wm.
M. Scholl, the recognized authority on all
foot troubles, and is here for the benefit of
our patrons and others. All who come to
him will have their cases carefully studied
and will be advised how to eain

immediate relief and complete
foot comfort.

Examination and advice free
We want everyone with bother bothersome
some bothersome feet to take full advantage
of this opportunity. Come in any
time vhUe Dr. Scholl's Foot
Expert is here; heknows just what
is to be done and will tell you how
to have easy, comfortable feet.

To itrtngtken the fallen
mrth and to prevent the
forming of bunions. Dr.
ScholT s Foot. Eazer has
teen especially designed.
Light, springy, comfortable

No matter whether the trouble is corns,
callouses, bunions, weak arches, flat foot,
cramping toes, "rheumatic" foot and leg
painsweak ankles or something else, Dr.
Scholl's Foot Expert can demonstrate to you

on your own toot the proper cor corrective
rective corrective appliance- to give relief
and ultimate correction.
Improve foot appearance
Dr. Scholl's Appliances actually
improve the grace and beauty of
the feet. No oddly shaped shoes.
Wear the kind vou like in per perfect
fect perfect comfort. t)on't wait until
the last minute and maybe lose
your chance to get foot comfort.

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Don't forget the dates come in sure
Little's Shoe Parlor

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What are you paying for Lubricating oil?
Until April 15th the following prices will apply on Texas Motor Oil:
Medium Heavy Extra Heavy
Barrels $ :65 gal. $ .75 gal. $ .90 gal.
One-half Bar. .68 gal. .78 gal. .93 gal.
Five Gallon Cans 4.00 can 4.50 can 5.00 can
With any 5-gallon can bought I will wash out th? motor free.
Free! me Everyreafly .HashOgM
with any of the following purchases:
One whole barrel Texas Motor Oil.
One tire and tube, U. S. or Firestone.
One Willard Battery.
I am sure you can make no mistake in laying in a supply of Texas
Motor Oil at this time. Come and see me and let ustalk the matcer over.
A COSTLY MISTAKE
That is, thinking that you can pay a good price for a good automobile, feed
it any old sort of oil, and expect service and satisfaction from your car.
Do you realize that over 75 of motor breakdowns and engine trouble is
traceable directly to flint, or hard carbon? Would you not believe a man crazy to
deliberately place a handful of gravel or broken glass in the cylinders of his car?
Naturally you would. Yet you place oils in your motor that produce carbon flinty
enough to cut any metal surface, no matter how hard it is. This is expensively
foolish. You did not understand it before, but:
If you will bring your car to us, we will have your engine washed out at
no cost to you, fill it up with Texaco Motor Oil Extra Heavy, and if you do not
immediately get more mileage per gallon of gas and per quart of oil, and notice
an improvement in the performance of your motor, we will give you the six quarts
of oil necessary to fill up your car.
TEXACO MOTOR OILS CANNOT MAKE A FLINT CARBON
Therefore, by using it you eliminate imperfect lubrication.
Remember: A "Cheap" oil does not mean an "Inexpensive" oil.

AUTO SALES COMPM

MACK TAYLOR

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(Continued on Fage Three!

Garcia de Ora, that mild Havana Nux and Iron Tablets will tone up

filler; 10 cents all dealers. 25-1 m the sytsem and give you strength.

Bottles of 100 at one dollar each at

Kodak films developed, printed and
enlarged. High class work only.
Blake's Studio, over Helvenston's. 12t

Gerig's Drug Store.

tf

Sen till a Cigars sold everywhere, m

FREE! FREE!

Get your motor washed cut FREE
with any five-gallon can of oil pur purchased
chased purchased at Mack Taylor's Filling Sta
tin. 31-t

Raising the Family- r.e ism Aum sopr.

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A



OCALA EVfiKlNG STAB. TUESDAY, APRIL 5. 1921

................. .A.AAAAAAJll"JL I

Special for

omorrow and

Thursday

T

5f
Fine

A Special Purchase of
Muslin Night Gowns
For Ladies and Misses

Lace and Embroidered Trimmings,
pretty designs of fine quality Long
Cloths and Batists, worth regular
$2.00
For Tomorrow and Thursday Only

SAD)

1 J

GOV. HARDEE'S MESSAGE

TO THE LEGISLATURE

Continued from Page Two)

vt-Ioped in regard to the effect of

these acts on such ownership.
As a geenral proposition, the beds
of all navigable waters, including the
place between ordinary higti and low
water marks, are what as known as
soereignty lands and are held by the
state for the benefit of all its citizens.
This principle has come down to us
from the early common law and the
civil law, and, as I understand, is the
prevailing rule of this country.
The trust with which these lands
and water bottoms are held being
governmental in its nature, in that

thev are for the common use and in

heritance of all, should not be dis distributed
tributed distributed or any way impaired. I

would, however, recommend the pas passage
sage passage of an act, or acts, that would
elarifv the situation and Dut the nub-

No more than 4 gowns to a customer.
NO TELEPHONE ORDERS

FRANK'S
"THE FASHION CENTER"

At Last! The Super-Comedy the whole world's waiting for!

k

and ) mm09w

in it l3y

Written
Directed

Charles
Chaplin.

You're going to yell when you see
Charlie Chaplin wander through the
trials of "motherhood." You're go going
ing going to laugh and laugh and LAUGH
as you follow the humorous pair
through the comedy on which the
world-famous comedian worked for
a year. (Edna Purviance is in it, too;
and the kid is Jackie Coogan, the
funniest youngster ever seen on the
screen.
6 REELS OF JOY

FIRST

NATIONAL

ATTRACTION

CHAPLIN'S

EVERY Ml NIT.

Temple

TO D

Children under 12, 15c

Theatre

Y

:o and riparian owners on notice as

to what constitutes tne legal ngnt 01
ach and all in the premises.

Education
I assume that it will be very read readily
ily readily agreed that the education of the

children of the state is our most im

portant activity. The achievements

of today had their foundation laid in
tie past. We are moulding and
1 uilding today the kind of citizenship

we will have in the future, and this
process of citizenship-making must

be largely left to the schools. Every
child in the state of Florida should re

ceive a good common school educa

tion.

We have in our educational institu institutions
tions institutions of higher learning a most valu valuable
able valuable asset. They must be adequately
supported, and I trust you will give
them the. needed financial assistance.
Our greatest problem, however, is

with our elementary schools. It is

the common schools where the great

bulk of our future citizenship is be being
ing being trained for the duties of life.

These common schools, many of them

ituated far out in the country, are

playing a large part in building up

the social life of the community. The

elevation of farm life to the highest
standard it deserves will come only

through proper education, and I be

speak for our common -schools your
very serious consideration. I would

like to see our schools, as far as pos possible,
sible, possible, divorced from politics. School
officials should be chosen not because

of "political Dull." but because of

x
their ability to deal sufficiently with

educational problems.

The fathers who framed our con-

cHf-nmn thnntrht PnOUPtl OI tne im-

nnrtanee of education to create a de-j

partment of education, and place at
its head a cabinet officer, the state
superintendent of schools. I am leav leaving
ing leaving to him the specific recommenda recommendations,
tions, recommendations, and I trust you will carefully
consider such recommendations as he
may make to you looking to adoption
of forward-looking policies along edu educational
cational educational lines.
Apportionment of the Legislative
Membership
The constitution limits the mem membership
bership membership of the Senate to 32, and that
of the House to 68 members. It re requires
quires requires a reapportionment of the mem membership
bership membership at ten-year intervals. The
framers of our constitution, looking
down the years, saw the probability
of more rapid growth of resources and

increase of population in different sec sections
tions sections of the state, and they wisely

provided that those sections showing
increase of populations should be
equitably represented in the legisla legislature.
ture. legislature. We have in one senatorial district
a many as six counties, with large
aggregate resources and a population
of nearly 100.000. which is rapidly in increasing.
creasing. increasing. This particular territory
comprising six counties has but one
senator, and each of the counties one
the lower house.

There are other instances which might
be called to the attention of the leg legislature,
islature, legislature, almost as striking, whereas
there are many other counties in the

state, with relatively smau pupa pupations
tions pupations and resources, which now have
one senator and two representatives.
Apart from the plain mandate of the
constitution, requiring reapportion reapportionment
ment reapportionment every ten years, it is just and
fair that the membership of the leg legislature
islature legislature should be more justly and
equitably distributed. I recommend
that the legislature pass a reappor reapportionment
tionment reapportionment measure, giving to the va various
rious various counties of the state a just ap apportionment
portionment apportionment of its membership in the
Inw-makine body.

Viniculture and Live Stock

! We "have about thirty-five million

i acres of land with only a very small

percentage of it under cultivation.
TbPre is no state in the Union which

! can grow profitably so large a variety

I f rmns as Florida, we are especial

! ly adanted to the development of the
Ilive stock industry. Our climate in

! this respect is ideal, and nutritious
grasses for pasturage grow abundant abundant-j
j abundant-j ly. The real need of the fanner is to
i be found in marketing facilities. We
lean grow the crops, but not always
1 dispose of them to the best advantage.
! There is but one successful method of
; .mino' nericulture. It is to make

I pi vtuvmci, o

and staple crops. We should stabilize
the marketing of these products, and
distribution should be as direct as
possible. I recommend full and ade adequate
quate adequate support of the marketing bu bureau,
reau, bureau, and feel that by so doing we
will receive very practical results.
The work undertaken by the state

live stock sanitary board in co-operation
with the national government,

looking to the eradication of cattle
tick, should continue. The state Is
now practically shut off from all out outside
side outside markets forjts cattle, by quar quarantine,
antine, quarantine, and the "eradication of the
cattle tick is now an absolute neces necessity
sity necessity if we would have access to out

side markets. Do we want our farm

ers and cattle men left entirely at the

mercy of buyers wholly in the state of
Florida ? Ours is essentially a produc producing
ing producing state, and markets for live stock

must be opened up to our people, else
the industry will shrivel to one of

small proportions. As fast as phys physical
ical physical means for dipping cattle can be"
provided, then in such locality we
muts have laws insuring the dipping

of all cattle. By this means even eventually
tually eventually our state will be rid of the cat

tle tick, a pest which has cost the
people of Florida untold sums of

money through its injury to our cat-!
tie. Whether you favor the dinning

of cattle or not is now hardly perti pertinent
nent pertinent to the issue. The action of other
states in their quarantine of Florida
renders the dipping of cattle abso-

utely essential, and there is no other

alternative for us.

Conservation of Natural Resources
Under a separate head I have dis

cussed the importance" of conserving
the game and fish of the state, and
have Suggested the policies which I

believe will be of profit in preserving
to the pcorle for all time these gerat

resources. There is anothr natural
resource, the conservation of which
must receive our attention. I refer
to the timber supply of Florida. As

a state, we have been specially rich
in timber, and we have seen it rapid rapidly
ly rapidly depleted, and no policy whatever
has been attempted in the past re

garding its proper use or intelligent

conservation. We are face to face

with a very increasing demand for

timber products, being an agricul agricultural,
tural, agricultural, trucking and citrus fruit pro producing
ducing producing section; on the other hand, we
are confronted with an ever decreas decreasing
ing decreasing supply. It must suggest to us
the inauguration of a policy of con conservation
servation conservation as well as the encourage encouragement
ment encouragement of re-growth of forest through

adequate reforestation. The national

government, through its forestry bu-

reau. is calling upon us ior active

co-operation in this regard. I sug

gest the passage of a law giving the

assent of the state to the acquisition

and maintenance by the national
government of national forests, guar guaranteeing
anteeing guaranteeing to them proper control and
administration of lands so acquired.
Second, I favor the passage of a law
which will limit the size of timber
to be boxed by the producers of naval
stores. I favor also the passaga of a
law which will control, as far as pos possible,
sible, possible, the spread of forest fires. I
also invite careful study on behalf of
your forestry committee of the ques question,
tion, question, which is a vexed one, looking to
the creation of a department which

shall be charged with the working out
of a svstem for forest protection, as

well as reforesting of cut-over lands.

Public Health

I am sure there is no one subject of
more direct public concern than the
health, physical, and mental, of our

people. Our progress in the future
will depend very largely upon the
virility of the citizenship of the state.
That section is usually dominant and
progressive where the individual citi citizen
zen citizen is of strong body and sound mind.
In this respect the state board of
health must play a very important
cart. Its work must be educational,

teaching the people not only the im importance
portance importance of good health, but likewise
instructing them how it best can be
secured and maintained. We have a
board of health, composed of three
lit

members, who employ a state reaun

officer, who is charged with the ad

ministration of those policies, means
and measures which may be prescrib prescribed
ed prescribed bv the board. I feel that its work

in the past has been highly conducive
to the best interests of the people, and

that the department snouia De aae

notAw maintained and the state

health officer naid an adequate salary.

There should be an act passed at the

present session of the legislature de-

finine- most especially the autnomy

of the state health officer, ana sucn
an act should provide for his appoint

ment by the governor. At present ne

is neither an official elected by tne

people, nor one appointed by the gov governor.
ernor. governor. We should provide for the ex examination
amination examination of the children of the pub public
lic public schools, providing sufficient funds
for such examination, or for the co co-oneration
oneration co-oneration of counties and cities in

such examination for the expense
thereof. A bureau of vital statistics

if 'W1IEN you open a bottle 6f delid-W-
If vv ou Fehrs Ambrosia, a most :
N agreeable surprise awaits you. Every
II drop is liquid joy.
rP FEHPJS r
?l delightfully gKd and remarkably t V, f
b"5fiCl'4i- Try it today by itli or with V--tVCS 7
a blte to eat sen ice cold.
glgg: Cass Ssat Htm f?$ i

M .....

MOSES GROCERY CO., Oeala. Florida

I

CENTRAL CONSUMERS CO, Louisville, Ky.
Incorporated

X

WE HAVE TOE TIRE YOU WANT
WHEN YOU WANT IT
"SERVICE" Oar Motto
UNITED STATES TIRES HOOD TIRES 4
ACCESSORIES
SINCLAIR MOTOR OILS
CARS WASHED AND POLISHED
KUMBAK SERVICE STAHON

ShS)-S- )--S)Sks)

Special to Introduce
WILSON'S OLEOMARGARINE

W ME IE

One 10 ounce package of
Certified Oleomargarine
when bought with one pound Wilson's
Nut Oleomargarine at 28c a? pound, and
one pound Wilson's Certilied Oleomar Oleomargarine
garine Oleomargarine at 33c a pound. This gives you
two pounds and ten ounces at the price
ol two pounds.

I U-SERVE STORES
Cash and Carry
I: One East and one West City Square
v4

SSI

J. H. SPENCER

should be very carefully maintained,

nd all thvBicians should, under pen

f law K. rnn5red to make

ail. j vi f 1
nromnt and full reports to such bu

reau. We should also require, by
that all diseases, declared

ithe farming pay. Some system of co- notifiaWe by the state board of health

Adults 35c

W. K. Lane, M. physician and
urgeon, specialist eye, ear, nose and
. throat. Office over 5 and 10 cent store
(Mala, FLa. Adv. tf

Sen til la the mild cigar.

10-ra

Just in ROADWAY Coffee, ones
and threes. Include a can in your next
order. Cook's Market and Grocery,
Phone 243. tf.

This is a Studbaker year. tf

ionprative marketing would no doubt

prove beneficial. Co-operative selling
i agencies have been successfully tried
hn other sections. The proper sup sup-Iport
Iport sup-Iport of the bureau of markets is a
i practical way by which the legislature
I may aid in this great work.
I Florida produces a greater variety

vn m-n nk-avs ct fresh or salt'nf nmdacts than any other state,

water fish, oysters, shrimp, etc., at j which makes our marketing problems

the City Fish Market on Fort King
avenue. Phone 153. tf

Smoke SentBla. Best 10c. cigar, m

gTeated than any other section. We
produce more than 30,000.000 crates

of perishable products per annum, to
say nothing of our live stock, poultry

should be promptly reported thereto

We should also have adequate super

vision bv the state board of health

for cuack institutions, as well as the

advertisement and sale of quack nos nostrums
trums nostrums and remedies, the use of which

undermines the health and energies oi

the people rather than afford a cure.

We should have a more enecuve
svstem for examination and licensing

of medical practitioners. This is not
only for the protection of the high and

(Concluded on Fourth. Page)

AGENCY

Full line of
AUTO ACCESSORIES

W. B. PEDRICK

All Buick Cars Equipped With
Cord Tires and Alemite
Oiling System.
We Make a Specialty of Parts
for the Buick and the Prices are
Consistent with the Cost of Same
GOODYEAR and U.S. TIRES
and TUBES
' Exclusive Agents for
"VESTA" BATTERY
18 MONTHS GUARANTEE
An Up-to-Date
Battery Service Station
We maintain an up-to-date
garage with expert workmen, at
all times, assuming prompt and
efficient service.

GASOLINE, OILS and GREASE

m

SPENCER PEDRICK MOTOR CO.

PHONE 271

Ocala

Florida

i

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1



OCALA EVENING STAB, TUESDAY, APRIL 5, 1921

OGALA- OGCURREHCES

If you have any society items for
the Star, please call five-one.

. Mrs. F. T.
for a week's
leesburg.

Schreiber leaves today

visit with f nends

in

MrsvT.'J. Nixon of Tampa is ex expected
pected expected today for a visit to her sister,
Mrs. George Taylor.
Sentilla Cigars will suit your taste.

A parcels Jocker is one of the latest
conveniences added to the waiting

room at. the union station-

Mrs. Ella Ervin is here from St.

Petersburg', visiting her, daughter,

Mis3 Ruth, and other relatives.

Earl Hall has feet out St. Augustine

grass in bordered beds and otherwise

improved the grounds around hi3

service station until it i3 much pret

tier than many of the residence cor

ners in town.

Rev. C. L, Collins went to Eustis

yesterday, expecting to return today.

Mr. Collins visited Eustis in the in-
v
teerst of the new Baptist church

which the members of that congrega-

tio nare contemplating building.

The story of Ruth in playlet form
will be given at the armory Friday
night, April 8th, at 8:30 o'clock, for
the benefit of the building fund of the
Methodist church. Price of admission
will be 50 cents. 5-2t

If you smoke cigars why not get
the-best? Call for Garcia de Ora;
10 cents all dealers. 25-lm

"Mr. O. K. Kelsey of Riverside, Cal.,
who is visiting his mother at Lake
Weir, spent several hours in Ocala to today,
day, today, renewing old acquaintances. For
many years Mr.' Kelsey has been an

ardent reader of the Star, and natur naturally
ally naturally we were glad to greet him again.

n
2

s

Mr. Charles Lawrence, who went to
Atlanta a day or so ago, expects to
return soon with a carload of fine
mules.

The Catholic ladies will hold a cake
and candy sale on the Ocala House
porch Saturday afternoon at two
o'clock.

Policeman Wiggins, formerly of the
Ocala force, now helping to keep
guard over Lakeland, was in thecity
Sunday.

Mrs. E. L. Fry of Stockton, Ga.,
and Miss Ferrell of Leesburg, are the
guests of their mother, Mrs. E.
Goolsby.

A new lot of Powder Puffs
at Gerig's Drug Store.

just

Messrs. Randolph Chalker, Albert
Berry and Bill Whisenant have re returned
turned returned from week's fishing trip to
Salt Springs.

The Odd Fellows will meet in their
new quarters at eight o'clock this

evening. Meeting time until October

first is 8 p. m.

All Garcia de Ora cigars wrapped
in tin foil: 10 cents all dealers. 25-lm

Mr. S. T. Sistrunk, who spent Sun

day- with Mrs. Sistrunk in Jackson

ville, reports her very much tetter

and steadily improving.

Air. u. A. Kichardson, who nas a
farm out on the Shady Grove road,

has a field full of cantaloupes almost

ripe enough to pick.

Nuncally's and Liggett's Candies
educed to ONE DOLLAR the pound,
Jt Gerig's Drug Store. If

-Mr. W. K. Zewadski is ably repre representing
senting representing the interests of his Levy

county clients at Bronson, where cir
cuit court is in session this week.

Mrs. Robert Adams went to Or Orlando
lando Orlando yesterday for a short visit with
her daughter. Miss Dorothy Adams,
who is attending the Cathedral school.

Mr. and Mrs. B. L. Hooks and Mr.

and Mrs. James Phillips leave for

their home in Butler, Pa., tomorrow,

after spending the winter with their

daughter, Mrs. Paul Durand. We are

glad to learn Mr. and Mrs. Durand

will emain in Ocala during the sum

mer.

As a strengthening tonic there "?
nothing better than Nux and Iron
Tonic Tablets, $1 per bottle of 100
tablets at Gerig's Drug Stcre. Guar

antied or money back. tf

Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Clyatt have
recently purchased what is known as

the Tuck residence on Fort King ave

nue, just east of Mr. W. D. Taylor's
home and plans are being drawn for

an attractive six-room bungalow, the

construction of which will begin immediately.

MVs. Vaughn Sims of Anthony ex expects
pects expects to return home today after a
short stay in Ocala with her brother,
Mr. H. G. Shealy. Mrs. Sims brought
her small son in Friday for medical
attention, the child having been bitten
by a dog that was thought to have
rabbies. We are glad to say that the
little boy is considered out of danger,
but will remain in Ocala longer for
treatment.

You will be more than delighted
when you try a box of our delicious
Log Cabin Candy, and our Martha
Washington Cady. THE VOGUE is
at your service. Phone 580 or 558 for
quick delivery of our QUALITY ICE
CREAM. 29-tf

Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Heerdt and son,
Emmett, and Dr. and Mrs. Chas. A.
White, of Stamford, Conn., who have
been spending some time at Miami
and West Palm Beach, and journeying
home by auto, stopped in Ocala for a
visit to Mr. and Mrs. Elmer DeCamp.
Mr. Heerdt and Mrs. White are
brother and sister of Mrs. DeCamp.
Mr.and Mrs. DeCamp, Miss Katie
Mae Lee, Mrs. R. T. Weaver and the
visitors will have a party and fishfry

vat the springs late this afternoon.

Get your candy at the old price of
one dollar per pound at Gerig's Drug
Store. Nunnally's and Liggett's. tf

Dr. Thompson of Dunnellon, at the
hospital, was operated on yesterday
for appendicitis. The operation was
successful, and the doctor is steadily
improving.

Mr. J. K. McNeil, who went to
Jacksonville last week to attend the
funeral of his brother, has" returned
and is again at his post in the Com Commercial
mercial Commercial Bank.

The. story of Ruth in playlet form
will be given at the armory Friday
night, April 8th, at 8:30 o'clock, for
.the benefit of the building fund of the
Methodist church. Price of admission
will be 50 cents. 5-2t

Mrs. M. G. MacNevin and her
mother, who have been spending the
past two months at the home of. Mrs.
T. II. Johnson left today for their
home in New' York.

It is reported around the court courthouse
house courthouse that Lou Green has taken a
vow on a copy of the constitution of
.Florida that he never will crank an
auto for a lady in distress again.

There's no extra charge for clean-

ng your fish at the city fish market.

one 158.

tf

Dr. C. B. Ayer, who has been quite
ill lately, has been removed to the

hospital for treatment. It will be use useless
less useless to call him up either at his office

or his home until further notice is

given.

The Seaboard has built an elaborate

cinder, path from the A. C. L. cross

ing to the tank, at the union station.
The trains are pulling up all right,
but accidents .will happen, don't you
know ?

Parker Painter caused a ripple of

excitement on the courthouse square
about noon yesterday. Parker, hav

ing delivered all his milk, was auto-

ing merrily homeward. Just about
twenty feet southwest of the Ocala
House corner of Main and Broadway,
a bottle fell out of his car. It wasn't
a milk bottle, either, but a bottle with

a long neck and a gorgeous label.

Alas! when it hit the pavement it

cracked into a dozen pieces, and a

dozen bystanders rushed for a piece
apiece. Wonder why they put up

mineral water in bottles with such
gaudy green seals.

Unclassified ads. gets results.

C. Cecil Bryant
PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT
Room 22 Holder Block
PHONE 195 OR 332

s

FORD
Magnetos Recharged
Makes lights better and starting eas easier.
ier. easier. Takes ten minutes to charge
and magneto is good for life cf car.

ADAMS

THE FORD SPECIALIST
Phone 584
Jefferson Street and A. C. L. R.

R.

OOK'S

MARKET
and
GROCERY

FINEST
Florida and
Western Meats
v FANCY
: GROCERIES
A Complete Stock
One of the Li vest
Stores in the City
PHONE 243

THIS IS A STUBEBAKEK YEAR
VISIT
Our Splendidly Equipped Repair Shop
See How Well We Are Prepared to Fix Your Automobile
MURPHY MOTOR COMPANY;
Main Street, Opposite Ocala Iron Works - OCALA, FLORIDA

UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEUEOTS
WANTED.' LOST, FOUND. F02
SALE, FOR RENT AND SIM SIMILAR
ILAR SIMILAR LOCAL NEEDS

GOV

HARDEE'S MESSAGE
TO THE LEGISLATURE

J (Continued from Third Page)
honorable members of a great profes-
sion who, through the outlav of much
time and expense have prepared them themselves
selves themselves for practice, and who should

be protected against the unscrupulous ) 'ys

and linnrprvnrpH man hnt tha ni-ntA I 'Jf

stion of the public, against the unpre unprepared
pared unprepared and uninformed practitioner, is
jof primary importance. It is for the

protection of the people primarily
which causes me to invite your atten attention
tion attention to the necessity for a more ef effective
fective effective system, looking to the issu issuance
ance issuance of licenses to practice.
Law Enforcement

i
I- -1

IS v 1 1

'Zf

ftla an mit matter simply wet a spaas
with Bosart'a Wonder Aat Poison aacf
place it where an ta appear.
They eat Bogarf m
Wonder Ant Poison

v

Of

n A T71 T71

Regular Meals 50 Cents
Prompt Short Order Service
Sea Foods in Season
JOHN METRE, Prop.
' Next door to Anti-Monopoly Drug Store
South Magnolia Street

Rates: Six lines, maximum, one tine,
25c; three times. 50c; six times, 75c;
one month. $3. Payable is advance.
WOOD Giles Wood Yard. Seasoned
oak or pine wood for either store or
fireplace, $1 and $2 per load. Yard
corner Sou'h Main and Third Sts.
Phone 112. 2-22-tf

FOR SALE Tomato plants, 15 cents
per'lOO; 100,000 improved Porto
Rico sweet potato slips ready to
plant now, $1.50 per 1000. Send
orders to a Y. Miller, 124 South
Tenth St., Ocala, Fla. 15-tf
""" 1 " r """" 11 1 ---

FOR SALE Genuine Porto Rico

plants, 8 to 12 in. long, government
inspected; no wea'vels or disease.
Guaranteed immediate delivery.
$1.75 per thousand, express collect.
Write for prices on vines. C IL
Cooner,-746 Wyominia St," Ocala,
Fla. Phone 3S9. SO-tf
FOR RENT One house with garage
and two furnished or unfurnished
rooms. Phone 221. or call at 607 Ft.
King Ave. 31 -6t

I am not undertaking to suggest : ()5?s0iSi0 MC9jSJ
many and varied laws for y our con- v- w w c 'v&v5f vt.'v&'vT' i v

sideration,. dealing with criminality j TT7!"!?""TT'.-jrr,",""TfE?!1?!???
ior methods for its suppression. Out ....KZKfrj, & &&&&&J&&GsJ&Zs
of the collective experience of this;' w -3 v?.- -2-- -3- -Z- O" Zs t-"i"i--jA

QoicUr carry It to their aeata. In Wislature I am surp thrP will rw '.)

hnnrt vnu'll baa ahaAhilMt nd Aaa I ----- -.-

i

many measures uhich j ftc

i i i

a -x. j a tc :

emtbottu. I f h can' t tup- snouid engage your attention

and : .-.art

ply ioa im will do to on ,..u:v, .;n i, .

"-'fcaa ww aaa aIU V A. K k Wl. V I1A V ( V V 111 vll b

PRICES REDUCED

WANTED Rags; must be well laun laundered.
dered. laundered. No sewing room scraps. Old
table or bed linen or underwear pre preferred.
ferred. preferred. Four cents per pound. Star
office. 31-6t

1 m

receict of 30 cent.

r. n V. Z 1 1 aL.X

incDOgart company la uuscrvauun nas wen inai

. v c: iitrcu mure eiiecLive Hniorrcmpnr

- i

Fla.

Fla-

i Of Statutes alreadv in pristine Tt i

jhas been said that "we do not need!.)

m mm m

Auto KeDairinoi ..t rLrit

ML "eVaw -...vvim.uVl a ass bl UC I lltX t tlU- i

ALL CARS
CYLINDERS RE-BORED AND
WELDING
2FFICIENT WORKMEN",
PROMPT SERVICE
REASONABLE CHARGES
GEO, J. WILLIA1V5S

enforcement

jministration of the law in this respect
; A j i. i

j o, ui biiuuiu ue4 nie main consiuera-
! tion. Unfortunately, we have had in
the last year or two an apparent in- s-
; crease of crime, much, of it of very j ()
: serious character. Perhaps the most i (5fi
j flagrant general violation of our i
I criminal statutes is found in the dis-'

-6cv x uivisc piuiiiuiiiuii measure's

$ 2.00
2.50
15.00
4.50
3.0Q

FOR EXCHANGE Six horse -Peerless
boiler and engine, for three three-or
or three-or four-horse gasoline engine. J. M.
Fennell, Box 30, Route B. Ocala,
Fla. 4-l-t

Carbon removed (4) cylinders
Cnrbon removed (6) cylinders
Ford Motors overhauled
Ford rear ends overhauled
Ford valves ground and carbon removed.

The above labor on all other cars in proportions.
We have mechanics for Fords and mechanics for Packard.
A Trial Will Make Yon a Regular Customer. SERVICE FIRST
OCALA MOTOR CO.
Main St., Union Depot, c E. simnonds Phone 71

?;FOR SALE A piano cheap for cash.

."J Phnna Rtfi mftor Ann. 1

6

RAILROAD SCHEDULES

l-ormerly Carroll Motor Company ..rx .O. .O. Cs s?.
Garage, Osceola St. against the manufacture and sale of; V'irvitr "rl'rZ
nnnvy r.Q7 x;u. .na intoxicating liquors. I believe that if

.;

Isn't it worth while to

, offenses of this character were placed j yyj r-v..
i in the jurisdiction of the circuit court :"Z&&:& v&"A"i"

. ear glasses if they will

r;jEfei& free you from headache?
DR. K. J. WEI HE,
Optometrist and Optician
Eyesight Specialist

Quickly
Relieves
Constipation

Don't take purgatives for Con Constipation
stipation Constipation tbey act harshly
they overstrain the delicate
membrane aria leave the
Bowels In a worse condition

than before. II

you are
troubled
with Con Constipation,
stipation, Constipation, SIckllead.
ache In Indigestion,
digestion, Indigestion, SourStom-

CARTER'S

ITTLE

IVER

ach, Dizziness Biliousness,
Nervousness, or loss of Appe-tite-Don't
hesitate-Get a bottle
of CARTER'S LITTLE LIVER
PILLS take one after each
meal and one at bedtime. A
few days treatment will put
Stomach, Liver and Bowvelm in
normal condition.
Genuine mast bear signature 1jfel5r
Small PHI Small Dose Small Price

: it would make for better enforcement
;of the law. The inquisitorial powers
of the grand jury could then be utiliz utiliz-ed.
ed. utiliz-ed. Apart from this, there is some-
how, in the breast of the criminal,
t more wholesome respect for the high high-ler
ler high-ler court. Of course this would only

be applied in those counties which

have not established criminal courts jjt

! of record. J

Conclusion
Some of the legislatures of the past
jhave apparently acted on the theory
I that they could best made a creditable
i record by the enactment of a multi-
plicity of laws. I am sure the people

have the conviction, in which I share,
that enactment of fewer laws, but
with more consideration of the value
of such measures in dealing with
specific problems, would be of much
greater value. I wish to urge, there therefore,
fore, therefore, that such measures .you may
consider and pass shall be of that
charatcer only needed for the ad advancement
vancement advancement of the higher interests of
the state. I shall not, during my ad administration
ministration administration as governor, neither will
you as legislators, be able to achieve
the impossible, or all of the possible,

but we should endeavor, day by day, j
to do the day's work. Thus may wer

hope to execute, with ieasonable sat
isfaction, the high and responsible ob
ligations which we have assumed.

'..a

a
f

Bertram Ibbetson &-Co.,
Chartered Accountants
of Atlanta, Georgia,

Will open an office in the Commercial Bank Balding
of Ocala, Florida, effective July 1st, 1921, for the
practice of Accounting, Systematizing, Income Tax
Consultation and Preparation of Returns.
ATLANTA OFFICE
250 PEACHTREE STREET

Our Specialty Is

Rebuilding

Od Ohoets

MAZ0N&C0.
Ltween Ten Cent Store and Gerig'a
Drug Store

This is a Studebaker year.

tf

.
t

STOP! LOOK! LISTEN!

a

cala Express Scrace j

That oil in your oil pan, when was'

it drained out and fresh oil put in?
This should be done every 1000 miles
to get the best results from your
motor. We are going to do it free
for you at Mack Taylor's Filling Sta Station.
tion. Station. 31-6t

This is a Studebak'er year.

NOTICE

tf

Notice is hereby given that the 1 0
Board of Public Instruction, Marion jj
County, Florida will receive bids f or
putting new roof- on Citra High i J
School building, Citra, Florida? April
5, 1921. Bids should state kind of

material to be used by the bidder.
Board reserves right to reject any or
all bidsx By order of Board of Public

Instruction, in its regular meeting

PHONE 434
TrunksTransferred To or From the Depot
to Any Part of the City
25 Cents
All kinds of Light Hauling promptly attended
to. If you want good service and want it in a
hurry CALL US. Phone 434.
L. E. CORMfcEY,
Manager
Phone 434 Phone 434

Arrival and departure of passenger
trains at OCALA UNION STATION.
nrv n : i i-i a i

xnc luiiuMiiiir stneuuie ukrures dud

lished as information and not guar guaranteed.
anteed. guaranteed. (Eastern Standard Time)
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILROAD
Le Arrive
2:20 am Jacksonville-NTork 2:10 am
1:55 pm Jacksonville 1:50 pa
4:17 pm Jacksonville 3:50 pm
2:15 am Tampa-
Manatee-St Petrsbrfc 4:05 pm
2:55 am N'York-St. Petrsbrg 1:35 am
2:15 am Tampa 2:15 am
1:50 pm Tampa-Manatee 1:35 pm
4:05 pm Tampa-St. Petrsbrg .4:05 pra
ATLANTIC COAST LINE R. B.
Leave Arrir
2:27 am Jacksonville-NTfork 2:33 am
1 :45 pm Mksonville-Gainsville 3:24 pm
6:42 am JksonviUe-Gansville 10:13 pm
2:33 am St.Petsbrg-Lakeland 2:27 am
3:24 pm St-Petsbrg-Lakeland 1:25 pm
7:10 am 'Dunnellon-Wilcox
7:25 am Dunellon-Lkeland 11:03 pm
3:30 pm Ilomosassa 1:25 pm
10:15 pm Leesburg 6:42 am
4:45 pm Gainesville 11:50 am

Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday.

L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CONTRACTOR AND
BUILDER
Careful estimates made on all cOi.
tract aork. Gives more r and -better
work fr the money than any other
contractor in the city..

NEEDHAM MOTOR CO.
General Auto Repairing
and Storage
Gasoline, Oils and Grease
USED CARS FOR SALE
Cars Washed L00
Cars Polished 0
Oklawaha Ave. &. Orange St
" Phone 252

FOR QUICK SALE

One
$g5o.
hotel.

second hand Dodge touring.

See John Johnson, at Colonial
2-t

SPRING CLEANING

Get your motor washed out and new
oil put in at Mack Taylor's Filling
Station. 31-6t

in March. H.
d 22-29-5.

G. Shealy, Secretary.

Advertise and get Results

NOTICE

Owujg to unavoidable circum circumstances,
stances, circumstances, the Daughters of the Confed Confederacy
eracy Confederacy are unable to present the Kir Kir-mess
mess Kir-mess as planned, and wish to express
their thanks to allthose who so kindly
responded,
.Mrs. Raymond B. Bullock
Pres. Dickison Chapter, U. D. C

The story of Ruth in playlet form
will be given at the armory Friday
night, April 8th, at 8:30 o'clock, for
the benefit of the building fund of the
Methodist church. Price of admission
will be 50 cents. 5-2t

Mrs. J. M. Bryan Jr., after a brief
but pleasant visits to her parents, Mr.
and Mrs. W. W. Stripling, returned to
her home in Tampa Sunday afternoon,
accompanied by Miss Meme Davis.?

2XJ

FAL BARGAINS M USE

CAES

One, 1916 Buick, A-l shape, newly painted,
good tires, $350
One, 1919 Ford Truck, A-l shape, extras
amount to about $150, for $550

One, 1914Tord Truck
One, 1914 Buick "4"
One, 1916 Studebaker Truck

$150
$100
$350

O

DEALERS IN DODGE BROTHERS MOTOR VEHICLES

OCALA, FLOHIDA



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