The Ocala evening star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:05847

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
i

OCALA

WEATHER FORECAST
Fair tonight and Satur Saturday;
day; Saturday; cooler tonight.
TEMPERATURE
This morning, 66.
This afternoon, 74.
OCALA, FLORIDA, APRIL FOOLS DAY. 11)21
VOL 27
NO. 77
STATE EDITORS III
WHAT IIAPPEIIED El
III 1SHIIIGII!
EX-EMPEROR KARL 1'IEIIT DOl'lll1 OFF
IDE M ERROR! P0II1LS0II
MAUY YEARS BEOIIIO
- OCALA IS
THE GULF

IGLISH M1UERS -STRIKE
IS OH

V

V

At Least a Hundred Journalists En Enjoying
joying Enjoying the Far-Famed Hospi Hospitality
tality Hospitality of Tampa

(Associated Press)
Tampa, April 1. Approximately J
00 editors were
present when the I
jiress convention opened? this morn morning.
ing. morning. Mayor Brown told the visitors
to make themselves at home. Presi President
dent President Leach replied, "We always feel
at Mmp. here
Mi-WhortAr of the Tamna Tribune, l
spoke in opposition to class and sec,
tional legislation in discussing free
range abolishment. Walter Haynes,
of Sanford, was the last speaker at j
the morning session,
and discussed
the Franklin printing list..

Pencil pushers are
gathering in tampa

(Associated Press)
Tampa, April 1 In response to the
admonition of the committee in charge
that "you owe it to yourself and to
your profession to be present," pencil
pushers descended upon Tampa last
night from all parts of the state to
attend 'the annual convention of the
Florida Press Association, which be began
gan began this morning.
With the weekly papers for this
week off the press and nothing to do
until next week, representation of the
country press was large. Editors of
some of the smaller dailies were loud
in their contention that they had neg-
wt.H business back home to attend'
the convention but they were unani-
mous in declaringthat when business
interfered with tneir arcenaance aw
the annual Catherine business must!
be put aside until they could return I
to it. s j
Subjects of vital importance to the
puBHsneru we tu uc
rouna-taDie taiK is eipreww w
cover every phase ol tne Dusmess t
from the employment of labor to cir-j
culation of papers after they are off
the presses.
Entertainment features have not
been 'neglected and the social side of
the convention is expected to equal
ff nnf anrnAsa that of anv held in
wae since manv
persons engaged in making arrange.!
persons CHgageu ill iuanm6
ments. have for some years partici-
pated in preparations for the annual
K.flVfs f the Rotarv Club
here, an event which has attracted na
-nt which has attracted na-'
tion-wide attention.
on n-crv rami nrvn. i si
I
IS BEING HELD UP
building is being held up here because
bf the failure of local building trades
unions to agree on new wage scales
for the ensuing year. Carpenters re recently
cently recently agreed to reduce their scale
from $1 an hour to 87 cents but the
other unions have not announced re reductions
ductions reductions and declare they will not do
so until the carpenters actually sign
a contract making the new scale ef ef-fective.
fective. ef-fective. fJSderal field station
will be at hastings
k Hastings, April 1-A temporary
field station of the federal depart department
ment department of agriculture will be establish established
ed established here April 4 to operate during the
potato shipping season. The station
.will issue daily bulletins which will
Include renorts on the number of
carloads moved, their destination, the
demand in the various markets and
the current prices.
:, 'v
HE MIGHT SOON NEED
A COFFIN HIMSELF
(Associated Press)
St. Petersburg, April 1. Sam Har
ris, representative from Pinellas
county, today announced the sale of
his undertaking business here and his
retirement from business for a year
to recover his health.
WHO'LL SELL US A GOOD
DELIVERY WAGON CHEAP?
(Associated Press)
Miami, April 1. J. K. Dony who
drove a delivery wagon here fifteen
years ago, today leased one of his
business buildings for 99 years at an
fViual rental of $18,000.
y
English peas, yellow squash, string
fjis, celery, strawberries, apples,
Wtges and bananas just arrived at
ality Fruit Store, rnone ax

During the War to Cause Such an
Outbreak Three Years
Later?

(Associated Press) -Jerome
Arizona. April 1. Mrs.
Clarence Hopkins, wife of a mining
engineer, rushed to the Prescott coun-
ty jail today to avoid violence against
her following the throwing of avid j
into a school teacher's face. Mrs. j
Hopkins entered a restaurant where
the young woman and another teacher
were eating and, witnesses say, seized
the girl by the hair, pushed her hat
back and poured acid into her eyes,
rubbing it in with her hand, which
was severely Durnea. uunng ine war
the teacher; Miss Lucille Gallagher,
Mrs. Hopkins husband and another
teacher were in Washington doing
war work.: ". V vVv.;,:.;
WASHINGTON PALMS
" SET OUT TODAY
Will
be a Great Improvement to the
Looks of the Union Station
The Washingtonian palms purchas purchased
ed purchased by the Woman's Club for the park
spaces, at the north end of Main
u cu1D j
tion plaza, were set out today by the
street department under the direction
of Mr. John Martin. There are eight
of these palms and they will add
greatly to the approach to and f rom
me station, ine ciyuuucii- piuviu
,
;eu me two parn spaces ,t nic cuu ui
Ma?T1 at of the Woman'a
Club fo the decision J of the

a to open the gtreet th h to the TV
4n. .that America, England and Jap

gUrbg" around the spaces and has
paved the roadway with limestone.
X
. VTiTV QTII.I.MAK
GOOD-SIZED ALIMONY
Courts Have Finished with the Latest
Society Scandal
.
( Associated Press)
Poughkeepsie, N. Y., April 1 Tem-
porary alimony of $7500 a month,
counsel fees of $35,000 and $12,000
for expenses were fixed today for Mrs.
Anne StiUman by Supreme Couit
.Justice Morschauser in the suit for
divorce instituted against her by
James" Stillman, president of the Na
tional City Bank of New York.
The justice ruled out of the divorce
suit as confidential and, privileged the1
jaiiegeq coniession letter, written to
Stillman by his wife, tie also ruled
out letters alleged to have been wit wit-ten
ten wit-ten to Mrs. Stillman.
DRIVING WAGES DOWN
Law of Supply and Demand Going in
r--s Force Again
(Associated Press)
Washington, April 1 The shipping
board today tentatively approved a
reduction of wages of seamen employ
ed on American vessels on the Atlan
tic and gulf coasts.
MIAMI WANTS THE
VETERANS NEXT YEAR
- ":' ( Associated' Press), .
Miami, April 1. Local delegates
leaving for the state encampment of
the Grand Army of the Republic at
Tampa are carrying an invitation for
the veterans to hold their next meet
ing here.
NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that the tax
assessment roll for the city of Ocala
for the year 1921 is completed as same
will be presented to the city council
of the said city. The said tax. roll
will be open for inspection during of
fice hours at the city clerk's office
from this date until the second Tues
day in April, being the 12th day of
said month, on. which date at 8 o'clock
p. m the city council will sit as an
equalization board to hear complaints
against assessments as made by the
city tax assessor and to correct as
sessments of value o f property.
All complaints must be made to the
city council in writing on or before
the' date aforesaid.
This the 1st day of April, A. D.
1921. H.GSistrunk,
City Clerk and Assessor of Taxes of
the City of Ocala, Fla. It
Sentilla Cigars wd suit your taste.

'Nearly All Work in the Coal Pits of
j United Kingdom Ceased at
I' Midnight Last Night

Associated Press
London, April 1. All work ceased
in the coal mines of the United King
dom at midnight with the exception
of a few districts and approximately
1,200,000 miners are idle as a result
of the controvery over wage issues.
YUKIO OZAKPS PLAN
MEETS WITH FAVOR
Tokio, Feb. 25. Correspondence of
the Associated Press). Large audi-
ences greet xukio uzaki everywhere
as the celebrated parliamentarian
tours the country to awaken public
support for his project of an interna international
tional international agreement in naval and mili military
tary military curtailment.
The Osaka Mainichi notes that he
big crowds at the Ozaki meetings y
Kobe, Asake and Kyote show how
earnest the public is to learn some
thing, about the big question at issue.
Fees are charged for admission to the
lectures and the Mainichi thinks that
'the large attendance despite the en entrance
trance entrance charge is -an "important sign
t of the time and indicates which way
the iwind is blowing,
. .
The mony raised is to be devoted to
educational objects among students.
Interviewed after one of the meet
ings by a reporter of the Japan
Mn 0zaki said
a great
many of his student auditors wanted
, , .
tobow .how he proposed to make
nT!?
re-
was
an
f ou.ld er into a plan !l th re:
uuv irivii vrx aiiiiaiiiciibo aim iivivu
that America would make the first
proposal within the next few. months.
In the event that the United States
fails to make this proposal, then Mr.
, Ozaki believed that Japan should take
the initiative.
"When the agreement is made." he
(added, "it will be kept. Besides, ac-
cording to the eighth article of the
league of nations covenant, all nations
have promised a reduction of arma-
ments and this must be
carried out
through the leagued
w nai reason am ine memDers oi
the house of representatives give for
'turning down' your proposal for re reduction
duction reduction of armaments?" he was asked-
'
urm j a. i
I iney aia not give any real reason;
they said that the time was not ripe.
Some army men stood up and made
speeches which I could see no mean meaning
ing meaning in. Afterwards some of the mem members
bers members came to me and said that their
ideas were the same as mine, but still
they voted against me. Their senti
ment of hating me seems to be
stronger than their sentiment of love
of country."
; The interviewer mentioned that it
appeared that a large proportion of
the taxes were expended for military
purposes.
"Would you like me to give you the
exact figures?" Mr. Ozaki exclaimed.
"Our direct taxes total 750 million
yen and the amount for the present
fiscal year which we are 'spending on
the army and navy is 760'million yen
or 10 million more than our direct
taxes amount to." Direct taxes are
not of course, he" explained, the gov government's
ernment's government's only means of revenue;
there are in addition the railway,
postoffice and telegraphs, tobacco and
salt monopolies. With reference to
his recent expulsion from his party,
Mr. Ozaki stated that this had been
done because he had been "naughty
from a party point of view," or, as the
French say, "he was an infant terri
ble."
Boys' Kickapoo shoes. H. A. Wa
terman. The Haberdasher. l-2t
Pearl necklaces for
THE BOOK SHOP.
the
BABY at
l-3t
Hot Boston baked beans and brown
bread for Saturday night supper at
Carter's Bakery.
l-2t
By the day or hour will cut and fit
work to be finished at your home.
Especial attention given to childrens
clothes. Appointments made. No. 313
Oklawaha avenue. Phone 262. 23-t
Will it RAIN tomorrow? Ask THE
BOOK SHOP. l-2t
Unclassified ads. gets results.
" AdTartu la tkm Ctev

When he Thought the People of Hun- f

gary were Calling Him Back
t to the Throne
(Associated Press)
Paris, April 1. Resolutions pro-
testing.'against the restoration of for
mer Emperor Charles in Hungary and
warriinl the Hungarian government
the consequences in such a, vent would
be disastrous, were adopted by the
councif of ambassadors here today.
The resolutions were presented by
Jules Cambon, representing the
Frenclf government.
BUDAPEST QUIET
French
officials in Budapest tele
graphed today they were unable t
confirm reports of Hungarian troop
movements, adding that Budapest was
calm. s
' ARMY AGAINST CHARLES
Vienna, April 1. Official informa-
tion has
Charles,
been received
who attempted
here that j
Sunday to i
effect a coup detat in Hungary,
would leave that country. The Hun Hungarian
garian Hungarian legation assured callers that
the. bulk of the Hungarian army is
T t A. A J 1 TT Ll 4.1 J.
luyai iu Aamirai xionny, me regent.
CHARLES' CONDITIONS
Stennamanger. April 1. Charles

declared here today that his departure j
from Hungary would be conditioned j Tavares, April 1.--Citizens of dis dis-upon
upon dis-upon permission to issue a proclama- tricts 3, 4 and 5 of; Lake county are
tion to the Macvars exDlaininir that determined to have tthe highway sys-

unfavorable circumstances compelled I
his withdrawal 'and saying he tem-
norarilv confirmed the ree-encv of Ad-
TT-fw
111 11 cai nut bllje'
STRIKE ON ATLANTIC
COASTWISE TOWBOATS

, Associated Preset explaining wnai is coniempiaiea.
New York. April 1. The strike of Citizens at the j meeting here en en-employes
employes en-employes aboard the coastwise tow- dorsed the project, which embraces
boats became effective today after!133 miles of highways, and signed a
failure of agreement between union-' petition asking th county commis commissi
si commissi employes on wage questions. isioners to bond tlie special tax dis-
' tricts.- New" roadi would be -con-
AMERICAN LEGION WILL lfi" fTT"
RAISE FUND TO DECORATE f andu fonds WOU!d proV,d. J
GRAVES OVERSEAS ikeep them m repa,r for a o
, y five years.
'f The work contemplated includes the
(Associated Press, following new rUds: Altoona to
Indianapolis, Ind., April 1. A call Asto. Clermont-fGroveland-Auburn-for
all members of the American Le-dale road; Eustis jo Tavares and Ta Ta-gion
gion Ta-gion to contribute ten cents to a Me-.vareJJ tQ Mount DJra; tQ known a8
monal Day fund for the decoration of the Shore Eustia to
American graves overseas was sent Sorrento to Messina; Mm-
out today in a bulletin from national neoja alonff north gide of Lake Min Min-headquarters
headquarters Min-headquarters of the legion here. neola to Qerrnqnt-Groveland road,
A majority of the bodies of-Ameri- from Gnws BIuff bridge

cans
killed m tne world war nave
Wn rttriTrtA to A mpr5r hut "thon-1
sands of our comrades still sleep on
foreign soil in compliance with the
desire of relatives that they rest for forever
ever forever where theyfell," the legion bul bulletin
letin bulletin says. "Few of the relatives of
the fallen can go to Europe to lay a
memorial wreath on the grave of the
dear departed. As last year, the Am American
erican American Legion will perform this sac sacred
red sacred service."
Committees have been formed m
France and Great Britain, composed
aregly of legion men. Posts in Eng Eng-and,
and, Eng-and, France, Belgium and Germany,
co-operating with these committees,
will see that every overseas grave of
an American soldier is as fittingly
decorated as if all the fallen slept in
the 'soil of the homeland, the an
nouncement adds. Frankii D'Olier,
of Philadelphia, past national com
mander of the legion, heads the com
mittee on memorials overseas for Am
erica, and assisting him are promi
nent men from twenty-one states of
the Union.
There will be instances in which
relatives will wish to contribute ex
pressly for a particular grave, wish wishing
ing wishing an individual scheme of decora decoration
tion decoration carried out, the bulletin says.
Legionnaires are charged with trans transmitting
mitting transmitting such requests to the memo memorial
rial memorial committees, through national
headquarters, that every desire of the
bee raved families may be complied
with.
Last Memorial Day the American
Legion decorated 75,000 graves of
Americans in Italy, Spain, France,
Belgium, Luxembourg and Germany.
MEASLES HAVE BROKEN
OUT NEAR MIAMI
(Associated Press)
Miami, April 4 An epidemic of
measles has developed in the southern
portion of Dade county. The Red land
farm life school has closed. Illness
is reported in twenty families.
SeatiUa the mild cigar.

Steamer Rammed aind Sunk Near

Port Towns nd, Wask, but
Crew Probably Saved
(Associated Preutj
Seattle, April l.---The passenger
steamer Governor, eii route from San
Pedro, Calif, to Seattle, was rammed
by the freighter W st Hartland and
sunk off Port Wilson, near Port Town Town-send,
send, Town-send, Wash., at midnight last night;
according to a message received here.
A later report said all passengers
were saved. The collision occurred
during a heavy fogi The Governor's
(crew numbered 126 inen.
, TEN ARE BUSSING
Seven passengers and three' mem members
bers members pf the crew of the Governor are
missing, according to a radio from
;the West Hartland, uhich is bringing
!the survivors to Seattle.
BOILERS LET GO
The boilers of the Governor blew up
shortly after the criish. Some mem
bers of the crew wa re injured by es escaping
caping escaping steam and tjie impact of the
collision. The Governor earriet 172
passengers.
LAKE PROPOSES ,TO
BUILl) MORE ROADS
tem of those distncj improved and
at a mass meeting! here last week
votei to urge the floating of a bond
issue of $600,000 to (provide funds for
the work. Meeting!; are being held
this week throughout the territory af
fccted, the good raids boosters ad-!
.dressing gathering!, of citizens and
! a j iaJ
ntk. a ;n-o..
from their present width of 15 feet.
The new construction would be of
sand-clay, of which material there is
plenty along tide of the roadways.
County Road Superintendent Heller
has made a comprehensive survey of
the proposed route sand stated that a
15-foot sand-clay road can be con constructed
structed constructed for an average of $6000 a
mile, which wculd meet the require requirements
ments requirements of the federal aid appropria appropriations.
tions. appropriations. ? ;
PARIS ISLAND TO DAYTONA
Expected Flif ht to be Made by the
Mariae Planes Today
(Associated Press
Pans Islamd, S. C, April 1. The
marine corps planes en route from
Washington 1 to the Virgin Islands
were still at the marine field here at
1:30 this morning. They were mak
ing preparations to leave during the
day and expect to spend the night at
Daytona, Fla.
LUE GIM GONG HITS
THE BULLSEYE AGAIN
L
t (Associated Press)
DeLand, April L Lue Gim Gong,
noted horticulturist, whose estate
near here is one of the show places
of Florida, has produced another re
markable variety of citrus fruit, a
perfumed grapefruit which when
placed 'in a room permeates the at
mosphere with an odor unlike that of
any other member of the citrus fam
ily. The horticulturist has one bee
of the variety in bearing.
Lue Gim Gong is the originator of
the Lue Gim Gong orange, named aft after
er after its propagator, and on his estate
has several trees of this variety with
oranges which have been on tne threes
from one to three years.
; ?ux and Iron Tablets will tone up
tho sytsem and give you strength.
Eottles of 1 100 at one dollar each at
Gel Drss Storm, - tf

The Magic City Has to Call a Special

Election- in Order to Name
Ita Street
(Associated Pres)
Miami, April 1. The council last
night ordered a special election within
sixty days to vote on the adoption of
a new system of street naming and
numbering.
DIRECTORS FLORIDA
CITRUS EXCHANGE WILL
MEET IN MAI MI
Tampa, April 1. Next month's
regular meeting of the board of direc directors
tors directors of the Florida Citrus Exchange
will be held in Miami instead of at
the headquarters here, the departure
from the usual custom having result resulted
ed resulted from the fact that the annual con convention
vention convention of the Florida State Horti Horticultural
cultural Horticultural Society will be held in Miami
April 12-15. All officers and direc directors
tors directors of the exchange are members of
the horticultural society and will at at-tendThe
tendThe at-tendThe convention. It will be the
first 'time the board has met away
from Tampa since the exchange waaV
organized twelve years ago. .-
JACKSONVILLE WILL TRY
FOR BAPTIST CONVENTION
Jacksonville, April 1. Baptists of
Florida and Jacksonville will make a
determined effort to secure for Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville the 1922 gathering of the
Southern Baptist Convention, which
this year will be held in Chattanooga,
Tenn., in May. Local Baptists, the
chamber of commerce and other civic
organizations already are planning to
send large delegations to the Chat
tanooga convention to extend an invi
tation and to wage an active cam
paign in behalf .'tf Jacksonville's se selection.
lection. selection. The local delegation will be
headed by the Rev. Mr. W. H. Hob-
son, pastor of the First Baptist
church. -- v .
SHORT SKIRTS
PREVENT ACCIDENTS
Jacksonville, March 31 Some folks
object to short skirts, but the Jack Jacksonville'
sonville' Jacksonville' Traction Company is in favor
of them, for they prevent accidents.
11 tne corporation's statistics for the
last several years prove anything. J.
S. Harrison, claim agent for the com company,
pany, company, announces that figures for 1914
showed 180 accidents here that year in
which womfn were involved while
boarding or alighting from street
cars. Statistics indicate that such ac accidents
cidents accidents decreased in number as the
women followed Dame Fashion's 'de 'decree
cree 'decree and made their skirts shorter,
for in 1920 when they were At "the
heighth of fashion," the total 'was
only 73. The records show that the
greater number of accidents to worn
en in leavingi and boarding cars re
sulted from long skirts, in most in
stances the heel of the shoe catching
in the hem. -'Few of them caught in
'920, however, Mr. Harrison declares.
WILL OPERATE AIR LINE
ST. PETE TO HAVANA
SL Petersburg, April 1 The Aero-
Marine Engineering Company, which
this winter has been operating large
seaplanes between. East Coast cities
and Cuba and the Bahamas, has an announced
nounced announced that a line between St. Pe Petersburg
tersburg Petersburg and Havana will be estab established
lished established next winter. The planes will
make the trip from here to Cuba in
four hours and in addition to the crew
will have accommodations for a dozen
passengers and light baggage.'
ST. AUGUSTINE MASONS
MAY BUILD AUDITORIUM
SL Augustine, April 1 St. Augus Augustine
tine Augustine will hive an auditorium with a
seating capacity of approximately
2000 if plans of local Masonic bodies
mature. The organization has obtain
ed an option on the Vafl block in the
business district, of which a part now
is two stories high, and if the. pur purchase
chase purchase is effected it is proposed to add
a second story to the remainder and
build a third floor oyer the whole.
The entire second floor would be con converted
verted converted into ah auditorium.
PROGRESS THE SLOGAN
f OF ST. PETERSBURG
(Ajssociated Press
St. Petersburg, April Lr BuiMmg
permita here in March, totalled man
tJiaa $277jCCl.

'

V



V

TWO
OCALA EVENING STAR, FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 1J2:

NOTICE

DKSl'RirTfON OF LAXIS

S T U

J

Notice la hereby driven that the following lands 1n -.the City of Ofali will
tie sold at public auction on ..'. r j
MO.DAV, THE F.COXD DAV OF M.I.Y, 1K1 1

at the City Hall, in Ocala, Marion County. Florida, or so much thereof as may
foe""!nece'sary to xaj the amount due for city taxes herein liet opposite the same,
together with the costa of such sale and advertising:

DESCRIPTION OF L-VX

iVS j S j

R

tO ft e and w ty 120 ft n and
-.-. in ne cor block 13 Old Sur Sur-vey
vey Sur-vey .... ..................
.Ijot 4 fclock 19 Old Survey....
WVt except 10 ft off n end lot
" 3 block 27 Old urvey
VfVz lot 4 also it e and w -by
112 ft n and in se cor lot 3

block 27 Old Survey v.,

(W V4 of block" 32 Old survey..
33 ft e and v.- by 100 ft n ajvi
in se cor lot 3 block 34 Old
Purvey
Com 25 ft s of Tie cor lot 4
.; 4ock 45 Old 'Survey, thence s;
29 ft w 126 ft n, 59 ft e 70 ft
r- 30 ft 119 ft
Com- 78 ft s of se cor block 48
Old Survey w 105 ft s 49 ft
e 105 ft n 49 St ......
60 ft e and w by 100 ft n and s
i Sn nw cor lot 2 blk 4 Old
' Survey ". ...
58 -ft e and w by 224 ft Ti and
a on west side of tlock 47
Old Survey
S3 ft n id s on n side lot 2
tlock 49 Old Survey

B lot 4 block 49 Old Survey

tot 3 and 4 block 51 Old Sur
vey

W4. of eVt lot 2 block 55 Old

Survey ..
Corn 73 ft n of se cor block 57
Old Surve. w 18 ft n 24v ft w
ft n 3 ft w 29 ft n 29
' ft e 89 ft s 56 ft....
' Lioi 10 Holder's sub m block
' f-7 Old Survey
-fW. of lots 2 and 3 block 69
. OH Survey
Ijot 1 block 15 K 8 8
-Lots 1 and 4 block 16 N S S.
HVi lot 4 block 18 N S S
3 block 18 N S
. 8V- lot 1 block 19 NB S......
..BV- lot 3 bkck 19 N S 45
40 ft e and w on w side lot 1
., 'block -23 N 6 S
AJ1 iot 2 block 23 N S S
' IsOl 3 -block 23 N S South . .
NVi lot 2 block 25XS6 ..
Com 87 Vi ft e of sw cor block
"t N S iS ti 112 ft e 90 ft a 112
ft w 90 ft

E Vi of block bounded s by l

et e by Potiq st .
Nv V; of block bounded n by S
6th st m by. Pond st. .
V K-e of block 7 N 8 N .......
'NVi lot 3 block 14 N 8 N ....
Oom 165 Xt n of se cot lot D

Dunn's Central add thence w;
TH.ft n 198 ft e 231 ft s 1981
fi. taxes 1919 and 1920
Iiot" 5 and 6 Weston's Central!
O ty Lots
Com at se cor lot 10 block C
Alired's addition thonce e 60'

ift n 120 ft w 60 ft s 120 ft..
"Lot 10 block H Allred's add..
. fH lot" 3 block I Allred's add.
Uots 5 and 6 block 2 sub block
Q Allred's addition
'Ijot 2 tolock I Allred's addition
Lts2 3 block 4 Allred's add.
'Liot 3 block 6 Allred's addition

JJots 5 and 6 block 3 sab of I

blocks 3 and 4 lAiired s addi addi-'tion.
'tion. addi-'tion. .

Uots 9 and 10 block 3 sub!

block 3 and 4 'Allred's addi addition....
tion.... addition.... ......
Com 50 ft v of ne cor lot 1
block 5 iAIlred's add thence w
50 ft s 105 ft e 50 f t n 105 ft

'H2 ft e and w by 105 ft n and si
in nw cor lot 1 "block 5 iAll-1

red's add
;lxt I and jiMi lot 2 block

15

15122
15122

152J

1

f
3115!:

I

I

8!15!22 I

I
t

6! f

t

r i
t l

8115122

f I

Allred's add .r. ...I 8115122

Liot 31 sub of blocks 1 and 21 I 1
IAIlred's add ... .! 8!15!22
'Ijots 36 and 49 inclusive sub! I
of blocks 1 and 2 'AllTed's! I

addition ... ... ...IS'
Xots 7 and 10 lo7ck 108 All-!
red's add ...;........,.....! I

'liot 8 Seymour's sub block 108!
r AllTed's add . I
liots 5 -aid 12 f4ymourc. subl
tlock 108 Allred's addition..!
ilots 1 3 4 5 Clyatt's sub ....!

liot 4 block 1 Allred's addition'
JjOts S and 8 Smith and Iauffh-f
' ertys add ... t ;
lxt 26 "Smith and TJoughtery'sl
odd ... t
'tJU. lot 38 65mtth and Doush-f
,erty's add .'
liot. 47 rd s. of lot 48 iSmlthl
1 and Dwsrherty's rdd
tiVt lot 6 Reardon's Mlddle-I
town Lots ...I
Com at se cor 'lot 1 Rflrdon'sl
Nfiddletown Tots e ft til
' 162 ft w 69 ft s 16? ft .....I
Jjo-t 2 Caldwell's adltWm
'It 4. CM wall's ddltlrn. . . f
lot 6 Cwlde-U's dlitIon '.
Com at 5" or lot 10 Caldwell"'
axld n 148 ft w 56 ft h 9 ft .w
48 ft s 13 ft 104 ft
K t and w bv 105 itt n and!

b In se cor swi 4ot 24 Cald-
well's addition .
t9 ft and wlby 133 f r t and si
i fta b cor -lot 36 Caldwell's!
.addition ......
!Cbm 210 ft e rrf bw i or lot 29!
; tCaMwell's addition ie 70 ft.nl :
" v7t9 ft w 70 ft a 70 f? ........I
Corn 70 ft w of ne cjor lot 29!
.wBOaMwell' addition w 70 ftl
140 ft 70 ft -f4o ft..:. I
yrV lot 1 su-blot 33 Caldwell's!
nAition ....... ..L ... ...I

JLot 2 j"'b of lot 53 Caldwell's!
addition. ..i ... j
liOt 6 and 3? ft n atd s on si j
lde lot 4 Bntbn's lot 341 -1
Oiiidwll'H Addition .

13$ ft nd w on e Fde lot 35!
(Caldwell's addition . . . J
212 ft and vw bv 21Q ft n adl
s in se cor cor lot 36 Cad-J
well's addition J
70 ft e'and w by 120 lt n and s!
in nw cor lot 37 Caldwell's!
addltioT ?;
Com. 70 ft e of nw rcr lot 3
- Caldwell's addition e 70 ft s!
' s 120 70 ft n 120 ft ..
TJot 3 b'ock 1 Ten1smins yib'
: (blocks 40 and 41 (aldwell'sj
addition .... j
Ijot 6 (block 2 Benjamin's sirbl
. blocks 40 and 41 C'aMwell'Bj
"'addition........ ..J ... ....
liot 7 block 2 Benjamin's sub
Jots 40 and 41 :aldwell'sl

VTU -except 150 ft -e nd w byl

oor lot 46 Caldwell's addition! J I
Com 90 ft w of se or lot 47 j I

I
I
l

I I
I 1

1
I
I

l

f

1

NAME Oi OWNER

iTaxes
and
Cost

Caldwir. addition iv 60 ft nl J

226. ft e 60 fit s 226 Tt . . .. J
Com at sw cor lot 52 Cald-! j J
well's addition 220 ft a j J
1S0V4 ft 15 ft n SJ1 it wj J j
tlP23R ft s 462 ft ..:.........-.; J, J
liot 6 Bnffum's ?irb lofts 52 and! I J
fi5 r'aldwclt'a Addition I

'itot 12 BfffTrm's suh "lots 52' J
vA k r.Mwir.i addition. I

Ijp 3 Tearue's resnrrov of lotsj I
"... 59 and 60 CaWLwl ll's eddl-l 1 I
1R1-S lot V? CaMweill addition! J -J
Ixt 63 Caldwell's addition.... ,J
it In tA v Iftn w srtoSel I I

? Vt 7 Cald wall's' tdditlon... I J
,11 1 nd 11 tnif ive exwpt
lots 9 10 Fort Kiftr Helehts j

Tjoto i and 41 iFort K-tngi
Tetehts
Llrvt. i 17 36 37 IFort Kin
Helsrht -ii
V ohs e of m cor lot 39
fldw4r addition "1.69UI
9 .48 chs w, t.69 chs nj
3.48 chs
Com at e ntT section otj
3rv'th and Wat" streets ej
75 ft s 13 ft -w 71 ft n 123 ft
y. 100 -ft w of -v? intersec-'
Wat" la 119 ft w 66 ft n
11 t e 6 t

Com on e fwe i "J,, aM U
165 ft n of (boondaTT......

s 125 ft e to S A LfT nortn-
easteTlr -with saM r r.to j I
Stot e of toeitmlng w to! J

J. R. White

Grace Ooh ?man

Annie E. Jluth . ;
i
L E. Carjy
Mrs. Lena. Pedrick

i

J

jS. C. McMuffy

l-Carmtchael and Son

Carmichael and Son

F. E. Hart -id
F. E. Harris

George GI ies

c. 15. -Ben? ton

Mrs. E. H Bailev .

T. H. Fatlo

C. B. Bert ton

Unknown .

LnKnown

Sallie Grallen
Folly Grallen

Clara Cartnfce

J. Lv Bto ks

PAID

Carmichael nnd Scm
Fannie Ay-er
C. H. Stevrart ....

J. I. Broolta

I'AID

Toint of .brzinning also com! i
on e side of ateoiu t 10 ft: i I
n of s boundary j 8! 15 :ii
e to S .-. L, r r whence south-1 i
westerly to Osceola st n to (
point of besrinning j
Com 76 ft s of nw cor '1715
s 80 ft e 105 t n 80 ft w 305,' I j"
tt i t
Com 333 ft n of a ioint 40; ft! ? I ;
w of cor 7 15 I
t 200 ft s 210 ft e 300 ft I S

4-01 e oi and adj block 72 Old)
purvey ex 104 n and s by 57
e and w in se cor
Com at ne cor t a i u-.n'-l i

$24.68 addition -w 49 ft s 127 tt r

13.05 1 9 ft 130 ft e 250 ft n 257H1 I

In........
Cora at aw cor lot A Caldweiri
additionn 290 ft e 470 ft
290 ft w 470 ft ......
13.65 (Lots 1 2 Magnolia Place
50.85 iLots 13 14 and 13 Masmolia

laee

14.80Lots 64 65 Masrnolia Pl"

Ltots 71 and 72 Magnolia Place
Park2 3 4 5 ,Wock 1 Imetto

143.10 !Lot 5 block 2 Palmetto" Part'

Lot 1 block 7 Palmetto Park..
Lot 9 Bullock' b-ivH -..1

158.55 lots 3 4 block 4 Hlli4-r

tCom 40 ft w of mw or block

Miisview w 105 ft s 180 ft
e 105 ft 180 ft

!

19H5I22

1

E. H. Mat tin ....
Heirs -Com Smith

H. P. Bitning
Edna FHnfrnen

Carmichaer'l and Son

Carmichael and Son

i

Unknown .

Lottie Jai-vis

Farley Mtirdock ..
Mrs. A. Y.. Strunk
J. R. Rod! lenberry
Sam Vaug hn
Frances Bj oyd

Sam Vaughn.. ..

Mary Priast .
.. I
Mrs. J. B. t Hayes

Unknown.

Mrs. CRidard

Unknown

O. C. Peteison

Louise Booe

!
t

Com 2621 ft and 318 ft "n'o'fl

w cor or ne4 1 1 9 : 1 al"'
408f W 408 ft 8 10 ft'"'

4.38 .Com at nw cor of to of neVi lilisU

220 ft n

Com 90 ft w of e cor'iot86!

"rr aaainon w 40 ft n'
115U ft e 40 ft s 115' ft..
Com 45 ft w of ne cor lot 88!

"ary addition w 45 ft s 11
ft e 45 ft n 112 ft
Com 90 ft W of Tlf. pnr Int fiS

. Gary addition w 45 ft s 112!
ft e 45 ft n 112 ft
45 ft e and w by 112 ft n and!
s .in se cor lot 88 Gary's add 1 1
tlon -m j
Com 45 ft w of w cor lot '88
Gary's addition n 112 ft ,w 45!
tt s 12 ft e 45 ft
40 ft e and w by 112 ft n and!
1" nw r lot 89 Gary's!
addition . j
Com 80 ft e of nw cor lot 89!
, Gary's addition s 112 ft e 50!
ft n 112 ft w 50 ft
Lot 89 Gary's addition ex 40 ft!
e and w by 112 n and s in nwl
cor and ex com 80 ft e of nw
cor s 112 ft e 50 ft n 112 ft'
iw 50 f t
112 ft n and s bv 45 ft e "and!
w in sw cor Kt 88 Gary' ad-1
d'ltion
70 ft e and w bv 112 f t n and!
in- .n-e cor lot 92 Gary's ad-1
dttlon. . tf ... ; . .. f
Com 70 ft w of ne cor lot 921
Gary' addition w 70 ft s 1121
f t A 7ft tt n 1 t I

lb.su I 10o Gfr-s addition w 50 ftl

ne it e oo rt n 112 Tt
Com 135 ft w of se cor lot 100!
Gary addition w 90 ft n ll't
ft e 9ft ft s 112 ft I

Tot 5 block 4 T Incoln H-elghts"
Lot3 6 block 3 Ditto' Revls-I

40.4;

19.35
39.13

64. 3".
118.88
79.50
6 .75
22.50
12.26
47.70
22.50
13.05
5.49

' 16 20

8.33
13.05

16.
32.25
16.50
12.00
16.20

725.85

8.93
3 60
9.90

i i r

!

I

4

Unknown ....

W. P. Chlker

Mrs. C. mJ Todd

Ed Hill

Ellen McClaln..

EAED
.

5.48
3 60
2.97
1.40

12.28

3.63

1.84

,2.63
4 68
2.01

7.35

. 3 .90

R. W.

bald
!
Fliui

A. B. Savage r

Carmichael and Son

J.-'H Snenser

IF. iE. Harrij
IS. 1A. aroses

W. A. Moorfhad .
-
M. C. Landers . .

;tIJ., H. Stephetisi

Carmichael audi Son'....

. y
pxir

G. BJ Stein .1..

Citizens Investment Co..

i

U W. Ponder J. 4

i
PAII

F. E. Harris .:

10.20
10.20
9.90
8.33

19.20
3.90
40.13

39.83
31.95

I
! I

!

I I
.! I

I

ed plat plat book i. pasre 143'
152 ft e and w ibv 63 ft n nd!
s in Te "cor lot 1 E. G. Smith!
addition . j
Com 50 ft e of sw cor lot 6 E'
G Smith's addition 50 ft n!
00 ft w 50 ft s 100 ft I
Ea of lot 15 K. G. Smith,' ad I
ditlon. : 1
to 8 smb of kt 18 E. G.I
Smith's addition
"ot 7 Mitchell's Revised plat.!
tot 23 Mitchell's Revised plat I
l ot 29 Mitchell's Revised plat I
lot 59 Mitchell's Revised nlat!
Tot 21 block 8 West Ertd I
Lots 9 11 1"? 14 15 16 ?4 block 9'
West End I
Lot 18 block 9 West End
Tots 1 3 5 7 'block 10 West End!
lts 11 18 Mock 0 Wet End.!
tot 12 block 10 -West End
Lots 14 16 block 10 West End!

Lots 19 51. Mock 10 West End!

I
I
I

I

Lot 1 sub bIocks 27 and 28!

West End ....... ...
T.ots 8 9 10 11 13 14 15 16 17 18T
1 9 20 21 blook 29 (West End . t
Lot 2 block 30 West End .... I
Iot 4 block 30 West End
lots 13 14 15 16 block 30 Wt'
End l
Tot 9 block 2 Western add I
Lots 3 4 block S Western dd.f
Ixrts 3 5 Iblock 5 Western add. I
T.ot 1 block 6 Western add..!
Lot 10 Reardon's Tue West'
Lots
Lands described In revised plat!
of lots 1 to 16 taic Columbia!
City .... ...I
ftV4 lot 9 Cline's addition

.jJ-IJ'lflt'll Cllnes addition

fill A i If .
Cllne addition ;. .. X..
NeVl lot 20 Cllne's addition ..I
Sw-Vi I04 20 'Cllne's addition..'

N-3 of Vt lot 21 triine aaan

I I
I I
1 4
I I
I I
I I
I t

I !

i I
I I
I I
I
! I

!

1 j
i8!ir,

M. W. Lloyd

C W. Hunter

Mrs. Pauline WVlllams

Unknown

Unknown .

Unknown

F. W. Ditto

Unknown.

O. B. flows ......... .,
's. 'A. Moses i

f Unknown. .. .. ...
V :
Ih." 'NL' "Hampton ........
IC. B." Ayr
IE. 11. Mote ......
I Ed wards and Thompson
lL Prank i...

16.80

10.50

48.30

32.53
7.05
32.23

24.38

43. ?

32.55

8.93

10.56
48.30

64.

..I 13.7?

190.33

..!

...I
...
...I

.1

tlon .

Lot 22 CTlrne's addition..
Ijot 27 Cllne's 'addition .
Tots 2 nd 3 Tncker Hill
Tot 10 -Tucker Hill-
Tot.l Dunn's X W addition

107 ft n amd s bv 70 ft and w

in nw cor lot 13 Dunn's N W! 1
addition .'.-.
NrwU lot 1 Dunn's N W addJ! J
- tion : ....
Lot's 2 4 7 9 Mock C Dunn's Nl J
W addition.;- I
Lot 6 block C Dunn's N W ad-l J
. .Attlrvrt I l

Lots 6 8 9 10 block D Dunn's! J

N Tv add
Iot 5 7 JWock E Dunn' N WJ J
ddltlOT I I

Lot block E Dunn's N W ad-l J
ditlon
Lot 13 block E Dunn's N Wl J

add ...
All block H Dunn's N W addi

tion

C. Jackson.

iC. Carmichael

J. W. Pearson..

Paul Simmons

J. H. Spencer

.... I
I

39.13
4.69

105.00
31.95
28.0?

12.-12.57

2.01

,. 32.25

87.88

.55

17.10

Tot block J "Dunn's N W ddf

Lots 1 2 14 dkck P uunn s
W add
Lot 1-2 3 4 6 8 10 block Tvt
Dunn's N W add ... ....
Lot" 11 13 Iblock T Dunn's N

W add..
Xt4 lot 2 Iblock I range .1!

Gosas tedd
Lot 19 block I range 1 Goal
add
f (K.lj.V 9 ra-nmt 1 Com Add I

f 1 .. 1 V"V n v -
N, of tnVt lot 1 block 2 range

Lot 2 3 block 3 range Z Goss
add ... ... i -I J
W4 lot 1 block 2 rang 4; I 1

Tot 2 block 2 rang 4 Gpss dd
94 ft and w on w side lot 4
Mock 2 range 3 Gos add... I

i!

1 I

315 ft n and Jy zit rx e Tjy- j
w In se cor lot 5 ub nw4
of nwu
Lots 5 to 12 Inc except lot 11;

Lot 11 sub lot 6 rub nwi of' '
nw 11115.2?

NAME OF OWNER

Taxes
I and
i Costs I

Citize

i

Stephen
I

Hodge

I

Co 34.95 j

I,
. 10.50

;G. D. Washburn.
I

32.85

P.
I
I

E. Harris

,.l

56.18

The
Leg

M

ion

B. H. Sanders 4 50

R. H. Zanders ..
Unknown
funktiown : ...
,l"n known

I B. Mc Ken lie
Mrs. Cora. MoUlalne

;F. E. McClaine
Unknown
J- W. Lucas
j Kla Central Land
llrene B. Jeff coat

Co.

M Hurst

R. R. Tucker

Willie Lake

Libelia Williams

Annie Bell.

Ed Blackshear.

60.90
3 60
14.93
2.82
3.60
3.60

Here and TJiere Among
the World War Veterans

(Copy far TUs Depanmera Suppbed by NatxW Hcadquvtan of Am AmtncaA Lagioii)

TELL3 OF LEGION'S PROGRESS1 Protect joor fcomes from disorders.

ror wnico you win not te responsi-

National Commander O'OIier Makes
- Clear Wonderful Work Accom Accom-r.
r. Accom-r. plished in Only On Year.

! Addressing
' memh

36. 8
2.03
9 A

16.20 : .J.-'V .Xjh.

1

10.50

Lydia Bville I 2 63

J. D. Duffy

PAID

Joseph Dawkins.

I n known

A. E. Jones

Luclnda Jackson.

H. .Mclntosn.

.63

2.63

9.5:

4.20

16.80

.T. D. Nelson I 3.42

Unknown ....
Andrew Scott.
Emma Haines.

G. W. I-isterllngr..

L. D. Davis
Unknown

T. Gallman

J. C. Vosrt
Mrs. M. E. Fox

!g. C. Mullens

Albert William.. ..

Ell Burney.i

J. Smith .. .,
Sallle Williams
Carmichael and 3on

S. M. Mlddleton. .
Lucy Hall
Ed Mathews

IH. M. Williams ..

Ell Burney

3.4?
2.03
13.35

2.63

.1 4.20

....!

iGlbbs Orumpton.
iBirch Oneal .. .,

Wm. Williams..
.T...J. Waters..!..
J. G. Fori peon
Ed Tklack

! Henry Gillum...

S. Simmons

Unknown.. ..

S. H. Had ley.
Unknown ....
IS. H. Kadley.

.1

!

trn known.

PAID

'Unknown

'Dennis Roberts
lTJuene- Dixon.
T. J. Redding
(Andrew Scott ..
Unknown . .
1 PAID

Unknown. ... -.

Unknown.... ..
C. M. Livingston
Unknown .... .

Unknown .....

H. Mitchell
Unknown ........

I
tAnna B Savage..

- "v.

2. S3
2.0S
2.03 1
1.23

1.23
4.39

16.
5.1
2.0rt
, 5.18
2.03
8.33
6.7?
2.33,
15.
9, 90
8.33
13.35
.93
2.03
6.'
. 1.71
2.33

2.63
1."
2.03
3.60
3.12
J.60
3.90
6.75
3.69
5.18
1.24

5.6
3.90
2.32
2.33.
?
2.01
list

leatherette -Sable ...

I James Howard.

1.38.

Grace Coleman.-.
I

(Carmichael and Son

lc. L

C. M. Livingston

I) Annie James ..

,.l

I
....I

13.
,1.
t.
S.

.1

Annie Marshall
Hubert Ellis 1

Unknown . .
Unknown..
Unknown.....

I Unknown
lunknown . .

I Unknown

John McGee..
Unknown
Annie Marshall

as
s
90

2.01
i:i
i.90
1.24

3.90
1.54
.0
1.24
1:.4
1.24
; 1
4t2f

.C3

1.51

W. W. CL.TATT,
City Tax (Tatteetor,
City f Ocala.

a larse audience of
the Anierian Lepion
and tbelr friends.

is Indianapolis
recemly. Frank

lin dOller Na National
tional National roinidand roinidand-er
er roinidand-er of the Arcerl Arcerl-enn
enn Arcerl-enn I-ejrion. gave
flt following ei ei-planntiott
planntiott ei-planntiott of the
orptttlzjitloii and
purr'' of the
legion :
It was only a
little over a year

apt. Ui frame, tlut alf were asking
what kind wt a veterans oreanjzaliou
we should tore, rorrespondlngi lo the
O. A. It. and the Confederate Veterans.
We had all seen ihe wonderful spirit
of those In the service and we thought
It would be more than unfortunate If
that spirit "were allowed to die out.
It. therefore, was decided to form a
great veterans' organization to which
every person would be eligible who
was In service, regardless of whether
he were an officer or enlisted roan, and
whether he served lo this country or
France.
Tbe movement was started on the

Cfiwnth of March, last year, only a
year ago. In a year's time from that
small beginning It has become an or organisation
ganisation organisation with an active organization
In every state of the Union, with some
'&00 posts and a membership well
over a million.
Why la It that the American Legion
In snch a short time has grown so rap rap-Idly?
Idly? rap-Idly? The tea son Is simply this: That
It -wa formed for the purpose of
keeping alive that spirit of service
which we -all know about And thai
spirit of service is service to our coun country
try country and service to our comrades.
When we were over there, we saw
ourselves the radical tendencies In

FYs nee. We Beard from officers com coming
ing coming from England of the radical ten tendencies
dencies tendencies In England, and we beard
"there was some concern lo this coun country
try country as to what might happen when
over four mill loo men were demobil demobilized.
ized. demobilized. We made np our minds the first
service we should render to our- coun country
try country as civilians would be to see to It
that this government, this country

tuat we were protecting against the
enemy, we would protect against the
fo within.
' Too have beard a great deal about
the Stand of the American Legion for
law and order. That stand for law
and order has done more for' our coun country
try country than runsi of ns realize.
I wn talking a 'short time ago to a
member of a foreign embassy and he
wn discussing the' American Legion,
nd be sald-r

I "Do you realize, most of the dlsor
dei mimI iawleKoeM in our country Is
caused by ex-service men. whereas In

your country you nave your ex-serv-'
Ice neo' potting down lawlessness and
disorder?" .
:,Mwas talking. In .Washington, la the
offlca of (Stbjr military lotelllgeoca ot
the war department which Is connect connected
ed connected with the attorney general's office
and they both told me that the great greatest
est greatest central factor In curbing the actlr actlr-trie,
trie, actlr-trie, of the reds and the radicals who
would orertorn oor government by
f.n-e was the American Legion. fTboss
who would overturn oar, government
by force know they can only do so by
force and the only,. great group of cit citizens,
izens, citizens, wI)o recognize folly the power
f force are the ei -service men who
were fighting force with. farce. And
when tbey appreciated the fact that
there were 8.500 posts throughout the
country and not a locality of any size,
but whs t bad an American Legion post,
and that It, wot a rallying point around
.which the- ex-servlcs men can gather
In case of lawlessness, and that
through the legion all serVlca meri
would stop tba attempts of tha rad radicals
icals radicals that ; baa ; turned tha tide and
made an Improvement since last son
ojer j- ... vr ,.-,,,.
Let me give. yoa an Illustration of the
soundness of '.thlr'.jwlgment. When
the steel, strike 'began toa town, In
Obio. tba 'post ealled'a toeetis n3
they offered their eervicee to tba may may-er.
er. may-er. '- The maor Immediately iwere In
about two. hundreds one. hundred be
held to feerre nd tha other bnndred
he put rtrUag tbe residence section.
,TJe next taj the" labor anion called

a meeting; far the purpose of denonao
tef the legion for trlke breaktag.; Ine

SUGAR SATURDAY AND MONDAY

11 pounds of sugar for one dollar,

with a dollar's worth of other groc groceries
eries groceries for cash, Saturday and Monday
only.- Phone 377.

tf H. B. W H11T1NGTON.

SPRING CLEANING

Get your motor washed out and new
oil put in at Mack Taylor's Filling
Station. 31-6

STOP! LOOK! LISTEN!

That oil in your" oil pan, -when was

it drained out and fresh oil put in?

This should be done every 1000 miles
to ret the best results from your

motor. We are going to do it free
for you at Mack Taylor's Filling Sta Station.
tion. Station. 31-t

hie we are trying to protect your
bomes as well as our own."
As a result of this very frank .state .statement
ment .statement by the post commander the meet meeting
ing meeting of organized labor approved the
action of the legion, and there was no
'disorder whatever in that community.
This Is a small thing and yet.lt
shows Just what the American Lej
Is trying to Jo." Vou need have no
fear about the stnn I of tin American
Legion for law uiH order. That .Is one
point upon which every meuiVrr, of
the American Legi.m is pledgeuSand
Is one thing c which we aree unani unanimously,
mously, unanimously, the maintenance of law and
order In this country, and In that
way we hope to serve our country.
In addition we are going to servs
our comrades through mutual helpful helpfulness.
ness. helpfulness. We fcvill see that the dependents
of those who made the supreme sacri sacrifice
fice sacrifice are taken care of that those dis disabled
abled disabled physically are properly ared teg.
Unfortunately, although a year haa
elapsed since the signing of the ar armistice,
mistice, armistice, congress had not done what

It should have done for the disable

men. The American Legion called a
meeting In Washington last December,
and explained what they thought was
'fair treatment to the disabled men,,
'that they might not be objects of
charity of a private character, and
legislation which we considered Mon Monday
day Monday morning was actually passed by
both houses by Saturday afternoon,
because what the American Leglo
asked waa fair and Just, snd congress
knew It bad the support of the entire
country. And as a result a man can
now live on the .compensation be re receives
ceives receives from his government where, he
has become physically disabled.
, We are now asking congress to do
something for those of our comrades
handicapped financially because of
their service In the army or navy. We
have been criticized for doing this oo
thi basis that we were putting a price
on our patriotism, due to the fact that
anyone making that statement does
not appreciate the situation.
I understand it Is a historical tact
that George Washington, the father
of our country, received a grantJ

several thousand acres or land rrom
this country. In recognition of his serv service
ice service daring the revolution. No one has
ever criticized the father of our coun

try aa having put a price on his pa

triotism.

- Referring to a recent Illustration;

When tils country appreciated what
Admiral Dewey had done, by popularj
subscription they presented him will
a house, and oo one ever said that!
Admiral Dewey bad put a tfrlce, on blx
patriotism.
The ex-service men In what they arc
asking for beneficial legislation Is tha
this country shall merely help, thee:1
overcome the disadvantages Incidental,
to their military and naval service'
We have suggested a four-fold optlorr
al plan, covering land settlement,
. home aid, vocational training, and. f
those who are not able to avail the

selves of -any one of those three.,,
adjustment in tbelr .' compensjiflol
based on length ef service. ( Tb
.American Legion every, time It, refer j
; to .rbrs legislstlon has asked t -ooeres
.to make It ea. libera I as U coriitstec
with the welfsre of the country, an:
no one Ik in position to take excepting
to a ststement tike that. j
; The American legion .knows the
while we were In France. our strengtj
In the face of the enemy was not tb-

strenetb of the two million men I;

France, .or the strength ofj rw
minion men In the states BuVt wn
the MrencTti of the hundred rellllo
Anurlran 'lisrk of fhOM four rafMlo

of u In service. We were tin-
point: th hundred million patriot!;
' Americans back of us were the haf
and h strength . f
The Amican .legion realize tut;
.Its, future nsefulness for good In rh
cwjniry will .depend on the n,3rj
land approval, we get from the hnn4re
t million other" Americans, and we kno
cwe could do nothlnr without your ur
port, and yoo may rest assured In a

acts we shall see to It that w

our

keep cmTar.Hy in mind the one hz

iflred million other Americans who

ar'

t

Just as patriotic and Just aa loyal f
we are. . .
Sherman Waa WroBfl. f
TTeT night the armistice waa algae
was a Wad ooe-ln.Parla. rAil restrl
'Cons were off' Pvery;eoe- waa hapr
and salated every one else Freoca faz
loa as they met on the boclevards. I
American aoldlera were kissed to th

hearts .content, Suttooa and.rrerat

I cape were -stolen. It.' P, aouvenlrtr

bead of the American Legion' poet hap- I ma4einotseaee.' Along toward taldal;
pened to' be a union man and ha went j p ; the Boulavard dea Ztallens at?
U the meeting and he explained Just gered a big blacx colored bey.

what ther were dotnc that i coat was open to me oreez, &u i

exactly

If you smoke cigars why not get
the best? Call for Garcia de Ora;

10 cents all dealers.

rhey were Ukingno part whatever la
the wulioreisy and were simply Inter
ested In ihe protection of their bomes
and those of the union workers.
Too are loyal patriotic American
citizens. So are we. We are Inter Interested
ested Interested to the same things, and there therefore,
fore, therefore, this meeting which" yon have
called for the purpose of denouncing
the American Legion when you under-

25lm stand what we are trying to do, to

buttons gone, and his head bare, r

oentiy ms cap naa son gone ut -.,

As be turn

some one's collection.

one corner, two chic

Tabbed him. fie kissed

vri

msder?lsell,

hi Hn n!

cheek and one on the otheri

too much for the darkey, i 1
both arms In the air, he erlec
ly: -O Lordyi what Mlstah
said about war's a liel Dl

be hebbenr



J

OCALA EVENING STAB, FRIDAY, APRIL I, 1921

sr.

9

Out
Br RALPH HAMILTON

"An insufferable old bore!"
' "Yes, and looks and acts like a beg beggar.
gar. beggar. Thought .from his talk when he
went out West a t year ago, he was
going tf come back with a fortune.
Looks to me as if he has about blown
In all he has on that wild flower fad
f his."
"Yes, and he wants to find some
place to store his rubbishy staff. He
wont turn this place into a warehouse,
I can tell your . i
Thus Abel Dallas, Dan Porter and
Nat Wells. They were discussing their
Id bachelor relative, John Bristow,
' an odd, generous old fellow who had
old out ejiite extensive property hold--ings
in Evenden and had gone to the
ItTPacIflc -coast to speculate. They had
built high hopes upon his return, for
j Bristow was a natural born trader and
t had quite some capital. Naturally ;
sorrve one "of them would inherit his
foRone. Blast eu anticipations changed
to sullen disappointment after Bristow
' had made the rounds of their various
homes, at the first a welcome guest.
-Following him came a lot of -cases
which he had temporarily stored In a
. local warehouse. Their contents were
soon revealed.
"I suppose," announced Bristow,
"that I hare brought back with me the
finest and most complete collection of
-the flora f the Rockies ever gathered.
I nought it from a man who had de de--
- de-- voted twenty years toward i assem assem-f
f assem-f bling them. Thinks I, there isn't much
' I have done for my native town, and
, here's the -opportunity to make a ten
strike. What I'm going to do is to get
at the collection, classify It, put it In
permanent exhibition-cases and present

It to the public library for the enter-
talnment and enlightenment of
-community.
the 1
At whlf"t 11m ufrtlv
Enipkrrt
Tn nthmW th rfnnatlnn linrfpT
his breath and Nat covertly sneered.
in,. i-t ti, ,mi. nhro o
strnlln riroDosltlon. noorlv suDDort- l
d and housed la small, gloomy quar-
ters In the half attic of a rickety old
rickety oldg.
store' building. '. j-y
The inevitable resulted. The Dallas,
the Porter and the Wells families, find finding
ing finding that there was no opportunity of
getting anything out of "the old fel fellow,
low, fellow, began to turn the cold shoulder
upon him. One by one the three
families ceased their coddling tactics.
He was no longer the honored, wel welcome
come welcome guest and, one day when Bristow
stated that he must find permanent
living quarters and a place to keep his
-floral treasures, not a voice gainsaid
his decision. It was while seeking his
new refuge that one day Bristow' met
Nellie Tracy. Her sincere greeting
warmed his lonely heart. She was his
half niece, had recently married, and
Invited Bristow to her home. There he
met her husband, about as fine a young
man as he had ever known. Both Ar Arnold
nold Arnold Tracy and his wife were nature
lovers. The second visit resulted In
Bristow taking np his quarters at their
home. They apportioned 'to him two
rooms, so he could have his collection'
ready at hand to arrange and cata cata-logue,
logue, cata-logue, making a minimum charge for
the accommodation because they were
really interested in his specimens and
liked him, and nearly every evening I
took an honest delight in helping him
in his work of classifying the floral
collections. v
John Uristow was certainly an ar ardent
dent ardent devotee of his engrossing fad. He
talked flowers to' everybody, announc-

J big that when Judge Pearsons return-,
' ed from a visit to some relatives In
the East, they would begin to plan as
", to getting the collection in charge of
the public library. This Mr. Pearsons
. was an ex-Judge, a great friend of
Bristow, and had been the main mov mover
er mover In establishing the Evenden li library.
brary. library. 7
Meantime the Dallas and the Porter
Jr and; the Wells families barely rec rec-,
, rec-, JCnlze'd the old man when they passed
him on the street. Bristow went about
In shabby attire and they attributed
' this to a lack of money. They sneered
. at the kindly co-operation of the
Tracys. They derided the philanthropic
Impulses of Bristow: There being no
evidences that he had not exhausted his
former means, they regarded him as

unworthy of any consideration.
And one evening Judge Pearsons
walked Into the Tracy home and there
was a great confab. He commended
the worthy motives of the old man, and
dilated upon the pleasure and the ed education
ucation education the floral collection would give
to students and nature lovers. :
It seems a shame to place such
treasures in the poor, common quarters
we now occupy," he remarked.
"Oh I wanted to see you about
that," exclaimed the enthusiast in a
lively tone. "Ton see, Pve been wait waiting
ing waiting to have you help me plan out a
new building for the library
' "A new building !" repeated the Judge
vaguely.
"That's what I am going. to do.'
"But theost the money T"
"Oh, Tve got plenty for that," quite
craftily chuckled the old man. And
then he directed a queer, affectionate
smile at Nellie and Arnold. "Judge,"
ha said,' "soon as we can get together
for a good talk, I want you to make
cat the papers for a ten thousand dol dol-v
v dol-v donation to the new library, and as
-h more for these two loyal friends,
ve etool by me like Trojans,
Mng if I had only a dollar or
" thousand of them, which
jsents what I made oat

V

Pie
Day V End
By ALDEN CHAPMAN

Lesbia Travis arrayed herself as if
for a state occasion. Her gowns were
few, and not strictly elegant, but she
looked pretty as a picture as she left
her room, pausing to bestow a light
but loving kiss upon the engagement
circlet upon her finger, only a few days
bid. Then its presence seemed to act
as Incentive and reminder. She opened
a drawer in the bureau and from a
faded, time-worn velvet Jewel case re removed
moved removed a ring with an old-fashioned
setting surmounted by a brilliant white
diamond.
Her eyes were tender and misty as
It reflected a light rivaling the pure
Intensity of her own bright eyes. Mem Memory
ory Memory was sen tinea t and pervading. "In
honor of Alanf she whispered devout devoutly.
ly. devoutly. Surely he Is worthy, and It Is our
last meeting for a long, long time.
The ring was about all in the world
of value that Lesbia possessed. Her
mother had bestowed it upon her a
few days before she died and Lesbia
bad cherished it a sacred memento.
Alan Rawlelgh looked like an artist,
and was one. The delicate refinement
of his face attracted even those of
coarser mold. Art had been his pas passion,'
sion,' passion,' and the scope and encouragement
of a small inland city had become too
narrow for his ability, his ambition
and his genius.
Sadly the day 'was dying "before
eventide it shall be light! ,Alr and
sky were In harmony with a subdued
sentiments In the west the last rays
of the sun formed a fanlike splendor,
while a mellow hyacinthine hue, ex
quisitely diversified, formed a curtain
of loveliness and spread ever, the
canopy to the east. Lesbia found
Alan on the porch, half-reclining. in a
hammock, his poetic glance fixed on
the fr glowing horizon.
"The aj" emlf he nTOTinared SOft-
s LesM 3lne hIm-
"How beautiful r she said In an
awe1- yt enraptured tone, and then,
her hand resting In his own, they sat
mutely engrossed under the spell of a
silence that was eloquent. Soul spoke
to soul, but better thus, for the holy
calm of the hour seemed to lift them.
Into a higher sphere. They watched
the shadows come, the radiant sky col
ors fade and darken. Then one glow
Ing star came out, only one.
"I shall think of you "whenever I
gaze at that star, spoke Alan, "and
that. will be every eventide. Oh, my
precious one! this hour of happiness
Is the supreme moment of our exist existence.'
ence.' existence.' ' -:
That star, that one evening. Les-
bla's presence, the uplifting soul ful fulness
ness fulness of all nature molded their eternal
fibers inseparably into the warp and
woof of Alan Rawleigh's career. After
he had gone to the city, weekly
a letter came to Lesbia, always cheery
and full of optimism. He had found
studio room with a veteran portrait
painter, one Giles Larne, and his
friendship and co-operation had
brought a new Joy tnto Alan's life. He
had Introduced Alan into advanced ar
tistic circles, had found him some
stock picture work that afforded him a
living, and had encouraged him to
make an effoft for recognition from
the art institute.
And oh 1 Lesbia." wrote Alan, "my
very being Is enwrapt in a picture, the
theme of which is the end of that
beautiful day when last we saw one
another and oar souls seemed to merge
into a new world of sweetness and
beauty. The Day's End' it shall be
the effort of my life and the one star
may shine on us to illumine our paths
to fame and fdrtune."
, It was a little after when a letter
written In an unfamiliar hand came te
Lesbia. It was signed "Giles Larne,"
and It told the anxious and alarmed
Lesbia that her fiance bad broken
down from worry and overwork and
was in a serious condition. At once
Lesbia arranged to go to the city. An
aunt resided there; she went to her
home and then to Giles Larne, who in informed
formed informed her that Alan was in a hospi hospital
tal hospital and. according to the doctors, in
for a long siege of sickness.
Jsbia stood spellbound, as for the
first time Larne took her to the studio
and showed upon the easel The Day's
End." The tears would come as she
recognized how Alan had imbibed and
expressed the soulful beauty of that
eventful eventide. And there In the
far west was the star their star!
"That is where Alan broke down,"
explained the faithful old veteran.
"He tried all kinds of paint to get the
glow and sparkle of .the star and
failed. The picture goes to the art
exhibition, however."
"Oh, Sir. Irne'" burst forth Lesbia
Impetuously, "I have a thought, a
grand thought!" and she spoke words
that caused the old artist to quiver
with the rarest excitement.
When Alan Rawlelgh was convales
cent It was Lesbia who announced to
him that not only had his picture
taken the first .prize but a rich connois
seur had offered a fabulous price for
it. He was spellbound as .he viewed
bis work in the- grand gallery.
The shining star seemed fairly to
pierce his vision. It was that unique
emphasis that had charmed thousands.
"Mother's diamond Inserted in the
canvas," whispered Lesbia, and Alan
Rawlelgh understood.
. Another was substituted before the
picture was sent to its purchaser, for
the original one that had brought fame
and fortune was worn by Lesbia on
their wedding eve,

The Secret
Phone
By Ottilia FrancM PfeiftVr

"If I do what yon ask me. and the
company finds It out. Ill lose my Job.'
"Then I will get you a better one.'
- "I know you pretty near run things.
admitted Mark Seaton, telephone line
repairer, "but you are asking me to
break the rules of the company."
"Ill mend them up later." airily de
clared Jasper Worrell. "If It ever does
get out the men will call It cleverness,
and the ladies will hail yon as a loyal
emissary of the love god. Cupid."
Jasper Worrell, manager of the local
telephone line, had got the devoted
Seaton his position, but he was asking
his humble pensioner to do a good
deal for him. Jarvls had directed him
to tap a wife leading into the home of
Robert Brooks, to carry it to a certain
secluded closet in the house, and put
la a receiver, all the time posing as
a workman engaged in testing and re repairing
pairing repairing the regular phone wire.
Here was the situation: The father
of, charming Blanche Brooks had been
defeated in the local mayoralty con contest
test contest the year previous by Jasper's
father. Bitterly Brooks had resented
the success of his political rival.: He
refused to speak to any of the Worrell
family. When he heard that young
Worrell and his daughter had been
seen together on the street, he com commanded
manded commanded her forthwith to have no fur further
ther further communication, with the son of
his enemy, Blanche was a dutiful
daughter. Jasper was all but engaged
to her. Blanche met him Just once
and sorrowfully advised him that their
dream of happiness was blighted.
'Never, no ; abandon the thought !"
declared Jarvls In his forceful, con confident
fident confident way.' "Leave it ail to me, dear
Blanche. I've won you, undeserving
as I am to be so blessed, 111 win over
your father, too. Don't talk over that
rubbish of patiently waiting two years
until you are of age. Leave it all to
me. Within two months I shall be
coming to see you three times a week,
with Father Brooks smiling a wel
come."
"But never to see you for eight
whole 'long, weeks!" murmured
Blanche. "Never to talk with you!
"Dismiss that erroneeu inipres- j
sion," directed Jarvis buoyantly. "We,
shall have the sweetest, coziest, most
blissful chats every evening of our
lives and four times a day. if. you
wish," insisted Jarvis, "and here's my
plan."
It was a daring one, and it quite
scared Blanche. A secret telephone
was to be installed in a secluded room
next to, and communicating with
Blanche's own apartment. All the art
and science expert Mark Seaton could
employ was to be utilized In having a
phone with no bell call. A mere click
would call Blanche at the other, end
of the line at an agreed on time. The
only caution to be exercfsd was to
be certain that in talking to one an another
other another no one should overhear them.
And so Mark Seaton. selecting an
occasion when Mr. Brooks was absent
from home, duly installed the secret
telephone, and alt Blanche had to do
wasto lock the door of her room, go
into the next apartment, give the sig signal
nal signal and in low-voiced converse those
two revelled in renewed love making
and tenderness.
All this brought them no closer in
actual contact, nor did it seem t
Blanche that her stubborn, determined
father was being made more approach approachable.
able. approachable. "Don't worry on that score,"
encouraged Jarvls one afternoon. "I'm
working hard on that end of the prop proposition.
osition. proposition. B at the phone at 3 o'clock
to the minute this evening, and IU
be ready to announce the program
that is going to win over Father
Brooks in a Jiffy."
' Through the misadventure of a de delay
lay delay at the house of a girl friend taken
suddenly ill Blanche did not get home
by 8 o'clock that evening. At Just
that hour Mr. Brooks, passing through
the 'upper hall, noticed an open win
dow in her room' and the rain blow-)
ing in. He entered' and closed it, and
Just then a suspicious sound directed
him to the unused apartment beyond.
A series of clicks echoed, then indis indistinct
tinct indistinct sounds; as of some one speaking
in. a low" tone.
A "Hello!" ejaculated Mr. Brooks In
amazement, as, tracing the sound, he
discovered the secret telephone behind
an old wardrobe.' He picked up the
receiver. At once the words were
swept to his startled hearing!
"It's all right, Blanche. I've fixed
everything. My father declines to run
again for mayor. I have got in my
work with the fusion people on a com compromise
promise compromise candidate. As I can swinf
all our workers I can elect Fathet
Brooks. Tm one of the committee
coming to apprise him of the situa situation
tion situation in the next hour. Kiss youi
Jarvis, dear. Good by."
"Father Brooks! KIss your Jari
vis V The audacious young reprobate."
And there Robert Brooks smiled. H
rather chuckled as he discerned the
cleverness of this irresistible son of
an enemy who Imd undermined hit
ridiculous obstinacy.
He was smiling sdll as Blanche, hur hurrying
rying hurrying and breathless, nearly ran Intc
hlmjn the next room.
"Oh, father !" she gasped.
"ph. father!" chortled her sire
"And, Oh'Jarvis! As possible fa
tare mayor of this thriving municipal
lty. I think I shall make that devei
nnT man my priise minister P

MIR

What are you paying for Lubricating oil?
Until April 15th the following prices will apply
Medium Heavy

Barrels
One-half Bar.
Five Gallon Cans
With any 5-galIon
Rre
with any of the following

me

- One whole barrel Texas Motor Oil.
One tire and tube, U. S. or Firestone.
One Willard Battery.
I am sure you can make no mistake in laying in a supply of Texas
Motor Oil at this time. Come and see me and let us talk the matter over.
A COSTLY MISTAKE
That is, thinking that you can pay a good price for a good automobile, feed
it any old sort of oil, and expect service and satisfaction from your car.
Do you realize that over 75 of motor breakdowns and engine trouble is
traceable directly to flint, or hard carbon? Would you not believe a man erary to
deliberately place a handful of gravel or broken glass in the cylinders of his car?
Naturally you would. Yet you place oils in your motor that produce carbon flinty -,
enough to cut any metal surface, no matter how hard it is. This is expensively
foolish. You did not understand it before, but:
If you will bring your car to us, we will have your engine washed out at
no cost to you, fill it up with Texaco Motor Oil Extra Heavy;4 and if you do not
immediately get more mileage per gallon of gas and per quart of oil, and notice
an improvement in the performance of your motor, we will give you the' six quarts -of
oil necessary to fill up your car.
TEXACO MOTOR OILS CANNOT MAKE A FLINT CARBON
Therefore, by using it you eliminate imperfect lubrication.
Remember: A "Cheap'' oil does not mean an "Inexpensive" oiL
AUTO SALES COMPANY

1
ii il nil "1"?ljLS!r." "M'

Moses Grocery Company
Ocala, Florida
i MADE AND BOTTLED ONLY BT
CENTRAL CONSUMERS CO., Louisville, Ky.
Incorporated

WHDTE STAR LONE
Negotiable Storage Receipts Issued on Cotton. Automobiles, Etc

MOVS, PACK, SHIP
LIVE STOCK,
PIANOS, BAGGAGE.
MACHINERY,
FURNITURE, ETC

CAES -'WM3S

$ .65 gal.
$ .75 gal.
v
.68 gal. .78 gal..

4.00 can 4.50 can 5.00 can
can bought I will wash out the motor free.

Ewcryreaiy
purchases:
MACK TAYLOR
Made from Choicest Grains

and Finest Hops
Your guests will greatly enjoy a
bottle or so of delicious Ambrosia
strve it ice-cold with or between meals
Order A Case Sent Homo

Ambrosia is sold at Restaurants, Hotels, Clubs,
Fountains, Drug and Grocery Stores

2

TRANSFER
AN

LONG DISTANCE. MOVING
Pluonc 296
0
O

When you feci nervous, tired, irritable;
when you're ill with any disease caused by

A disordered nerves, don't give up until you try

V

nTHTxrHtHtulHlHtHl
on Texas Motor Oil:
Extra Heaw
m
90 gal.
.93 HaL
MasMfflM
UK
Make your home more attractive by
having your spotted mirrors re re-silvered.
silvered. re-silvered. Auto headlights re-nickeled.
All kinds of Electro Plating.
i
Ocala hTirror and Plating Works
Yonge Block, Ft. King Ave. Fhocs 604
LIFE
FIRE
A. E. GpRIG
INSURANCE
Ocala, Florida
ACCIDENT- AUTOMOBILE
DAWK1W ftWRKEr
Phone 511
ill W. Broadway
The Wireless Signal
of Distress
Ii you are in Distress
don't tail lo sltjnai ns
We arc always on
the fob
BLALOCK BROS.
VULCANIZING
Ocala House Block
PHONE 78
A new lot of Powder Puffs just ia
at Ceng's Drug Store. tf

pj : n
I .They ma BogartTa
jj Wonder Ant Poison
Amm9' A 9m ttS
TKmkpi 30 cam.

Tm-



FOUXl

OCALA EVENING STAR, FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 1821

Ocala

Evening Star

:
PsblUhetf Evit Day Eseept Sssdsy hy
. STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY COMPANY-OCALA,
OCALA, COMPANY-OCALA, FLORIDA.
IU R. Carroll. Presldeat
P. V. Iavesgod, SeCTetsry-Treassrer
J. H. Beajamta. Editor
Entered' at Ocala, Fla, postoxflce
second -class matter.
TELEPHONES
Baalaeaa Office .Flve-Oa
editorial Ueaartaieat . . .fw-Sefe
Society Reporter . .. . .Flre-Oaa
HEHBCII OCIATD FttE
ie Associated i'ress 1st exclusively
entitled for the use lor republication of
all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise cred'ted In this paper ana
Uo the local news published herelu
All rights oi rt publication of special
U.SDStcne herein are also reserved.
DOMESTIC SUBSCRIPTION RATES
One year. In advance . ....IJ.jO
tttx months.' in advance ......... .0
Three months. In advance ...j, l-JJJ
Ose month, in advance
ADVERTISING K.viES
Displays Plate 15 cents pr Inch for
consecutive insertions. Alternate Inser Inser-tious
tious Inser-tious 25 per cent additional. Composi Composi-tioa
tioa Composi-tioa charges on 4s. that ruff less tnar.
six times ce-s per inch. Special
position 20 per cent additional.' Bates
Laved on 4-Inch minimum. Less tnan
tu.ir inches will take higher rate.
i.icb will be furnished upon applies
fteattas; Xstleeat 5 cents per line for
nitt insertion; 3 cents per line for each
t.i i. sequent insertion. One change a
i( fck allowed on readers without extra
c ..iposition charges.
Legal advertisement? t; legal rates.
PUBLIC AFFAIRS MADE PUBLIC
There will probably be brought be-
lore me legisunuie u no m""6
session a bill which will make it obli obligatory
gatory obligatory on each town, city or county
in the state to publish in some paper
the minutes of its official meetings,
reports of its revenues and expenses
and ..all other things pertaining to
their public anairs tnai tne peopie
should know.
There are many advantages and
so 2 disadvantages in this bill. The
gi-.ntest advantage is that it will tend
to keep the people well informed of
all their public business as they can
be informed in no other way. Such
i v,,u .,ft
repviis ate x gicai urem VIi fe 1 v
and reckless expenditure. At pres present,
ent, present, there are buried in the records of
probably every town ana county re
ports of many things that would not
'have occurred if the men who put
them, over had not been reasonably
sure they would not have been found
out until too late for prevention or
w.?n1 M j-k T A- J 1.1. tiro XT TAVi
the people to obtain anything like an
accurate report of their business. It's
true that the records are kept in ev every
ery every courthouse and town hall, but few
except officials and abstract men ever
consult them.
Florida is behind a good many
northern and western states in this
policy. Papers in these states publish
official reports of all public proceed proceed-ings
ings proceed-ings and accounts, and the people are
considerably, better posted on their
state and county affairs than they are
" here.
The principal drawback .to this of official
ficial official publication in Florida might be
that officials might use the patronage
v!, wv
little public printing to so complete-
as a bribe, we nave otten Known a
li u MC 7 BU1 rr
that they could noLpossibly tell r:ght
from wrong Also in a county or a
1.. .I... ... I

ww 14 nucic Lucie is mine luau uhcijj i .

sometimes be bought with the patron patronage,
age, patronage, or the public printing can be
buried out of sight in the pages of a
paper with scanty circulation, or
friends of the officials can start a pa paper
per paper on no other capital than the pub public
lic public printing. :
It is possible, however, to frame a
law to do away with these evils. If
there is only one paper in a town or
.county it would of course be read by
most of the citizens, and among them
would certainly be enough to discover
and expose intentional errors." If
there are two papers, the publication
should be divided between them, pre preventing
venting preventing either from becoming "the"
official paper. There are in the state
four cities Jacksonville, Tampa, Mi Miami
ami Miami and Pensacola in each of which
are several papers, but the printing
should be given only to the two of
largest circulation. It would be too
costiy to divide the public printing of
a city or county between half a dozen
papers, and such printing should not
be given to a paper of small circula circulation
tion circulation as long as there is one of large
circulation on the ground, because
such an arrangement would be unfair
not only to the other paper but to the
taxpayers.
. Size and circulation' should .be .taken
into' consideration of course, because
men and firms that have the ability to
build up big newspapers are likely to
- iuku. llJ
can carry on only small ones.- Also, i
no paper should be given public pa pa--
- pa-- tronage, unless .it was the enly one in
a town or county, until it has been in
. publication at least a year.
There has been an informal but
wrv mod arrangement between the
two naDers in this county for a num-1
ber of years. They have divided the ;
printing1 and profits the latter rather 4

small of th; county printing:: They
receive legal rates for the delinquent
tax lists and some other publications
and small pay for printing the county

school board and commissioners miu-.
utes. The city, however, does' not!
publish anything except the most nec- j

essary legal' advertisements and coun-idraw

cil proceedings, the latter being print--read

ed free. At present this town and j
county hare accurate and conscien-,
tious clerks, but the entire state is not j
so well off, and the wirepulling to ob-i

tain printing and flattery, suppres-jway

hold it in some papers is most detri detrimental
mental detrimental to- the public interest and dis disreputable
reputable disreputable to journalism.
It is possible for the legislature to
pass law that will 'enable the lead leading
ing leading newspapers of the state to supply
their readers with official news at a
decent remuneration, without goug gouging
ing gouging th taxpayers, and if it does so
the Star will be glad to see it, tho', the
truth is, if this paper had been obliged 1
to depend on official patronage for a I
living it would have been dead years
ago.
-OVERFILLING SMALL MOUTHS"
For a long time the Star has declar declared
ed declared that one of the chief reasons why
the cost of education was so high was
that the schools tried to teach too
much that wasn't necessary, shouldn't
be taught, or if taught at all should
be taught at home. We are glad to j
find the following confirmation of ;
much we have written, in the Times Times-Union:
Union: Times-Union: A very common and highly oppres oppressive
sive oppressive comment, frequently made con concerning
cerning concerning people who undertake too
much, and fail, is that they have
"bitten off more than could be chew chewed,"
ed," chewed," and this may be the reason for
some of the disappointment felt by
the long-faced pedagogues and pre preceptors
ceptors preceptors who bewail on the housetops
the ignorance in America, and won wonder
der wonder why every child, put through the
regulation course of sprouts, is not
an infant prodigy and every youth a
genius and storehouse of information.
The fault with the young folks, how-1
ever, comes not so much from the de-
sire to take a big bite, but lies chiefly!

with the ambitious heads of educa-jwill

movfths to bursting, and then marvel j thing vital to America's good name
that mental indigestion is produced, jfor Mr. Daugherty to accomplish.
" The American public school sys-! Here is his chance to prove that Pres Pres-tems
tems Pres-tems appear more like forced draught j ident Harding is a good judge of men.
furnaces every day and the wonder is J New York Tribune. x
that such a considerable percentage j The foregoing from the Tribune is

of children really acquire rudimentary
knowledge while being drilled, coax-
ed, cajoled, threatened, hurried and
hauled through the remarkable list of
studies and suggestions in the cur curriculum
riculum curriculum of the grammar and high
schools.
It is possible that the much dis discussed
cussed discussed proposition of federalizing
the schools may become a fact the
tendency to centralize the .govern .government
ment .government after the Prussian method is
strong with a' certain element, and if
such a thing should happen it might
be possible to simplify the education educational
al educational schedule. Then again the govern-
ment directors might wish to add to
jthe already multitudinous divisions of
j scho days for younff children. There!
is even talk of an eight-hour school
d uh h Mu an? H
about ei ht hourg flnd ma d
Speaking of the country, rather
than any particular schools, it may be
said that there seems to be a steadily
increasing effort on the part of educa educators
tors educators to relieve or deprive the par parents
ents parents of children from all responsibil responsibility;
ity; responsibility; to set for the children standards
of thought and action, and insoTar as
possible make them into a stenciled
form, as nearly alike' as sheep in a
flock. ;
With a few added hours and the in incorporation
corporation incorporation into the' primary grades
of electrical engineering, theosophy,
political economy, toe-dancing and
thorough-bass, it will only be neces necessary
sary necessary for mothers to dress their six-year-olds
and get them to school by
8:30 o'clock, and then put them to bed j
at 8 p. m., when they return from, the
school house, all other details of their
"raising" being attended to by the
state; As matters now stand parents
see very little of their children and
RjSlnCI the Family
Vr

sfil tei lsasy, WrW-.r .v 0

sVVSMSSw r M m I m I s '-bssbbsbI Tfc aSSW . C I sW -slBBBBK J

-have but little influence over them,
Some will be quick to say that this is
a good thing and others perhaps,
will sigh for the other days when

children were taught to honor their,
parents, and learned to play games
and maybe to dance and sing and
pictures and cut paper dolls and i
story books, and think, at horns
-Problems discussed by educators
now and alwavs have included the
possibilities of handling the "dull
students, with the bright ones and a
that might help out would be to
children for acquiring that essential
to all knowledge language. More
now than ever children need and de deserve
serve deserve to be taught to read and write
English and to acquire the rudiments
of arithmetic. Every child is entitled
to this much and few would fafl to
secure this necessary foundation if
given a fair chance and by this it
meant time enough and fewer compli-
cations.
l
LET THEM CLEAN THEIR
OWN BACKYARDS
The Alcovy is a less storied river
than the Rhine, but on it there is a i
real, not a fake, horror one in which J
negroes, so far from being the ag- J
gressors, are victims. The chained and
weighted bodies that have been drag- I
ged from the Alcovy and neighboring!
Georgia waters are those of colored
men who were
tically slaves.
peons" that is, prac- j
When they became
"bigoty" or wanted to leave, their
master, another Legree, had only to
say to his-executioner, "Clyde, I'm
scared of that negro," and anotfter
peon was butchered and tossed into
the Alcovy. Though no threats of a
lynching party are reported from
Jasper county, there are signs of ac-
tion on the part of the state's attor
ney general. The murders will, per perhaps,
haps, perhaps, from their very enormity be of
assistance to the department of jus
tice in its task of freeing Georgia and j
other states of the peonage curse, i
Some of the disabilities under which
negroes labor canont be removed by
any national means, but slavery un:
jder another name can be stamped out.
The law-abiding citizens of the South
surely assist the government to
about as fair to the South as a re.
rpublican paper ever gets to be. The
Tribune does not go far enough to in insinuate
sinuate insinuate that Georgia and the whole
South are implicated in an outrage
that occurred, in an out-of-the-way
corner of one southern state, but it
insinuates that the South as a whole
is, not regretful of an event that has
slightly reduced the, republican 'vote.
There are nearly three million peo people
ple people in Georgia, the most of whom are
as good as any in the world. They
hate murder and oppression, and will
heavily punish the criminals in this
case. But Georgia is a big state, and
there are many wide spaces in it.
where such thing? can go on for a
time without officials or good citizens
knowing of them. When they learn,
they act; and quickly.
There are a great many outrages
on white people in New York, tho' its
ten or eleven million people are pack packed
ed packed in an area less by twelve thousand
miles than that of Georgia. There
was more crime in New York city in
a few nionths of the last fall and win winter
ter winter than in Georgia in two or three
years. There is more work for the
department of justice in that city to today
day today than there has been in any south southern
ern southern state in' twenty-five years. The
Tribune and. other New Yorkers
should clean their own house before
they interfere with that of, another
state.
You will be more than delighted
when yon try a box of our delicious
Log Cabin Candy, and our Martha
Washington Candy. THE VOGUE is
at your service. Phone 580 or 553 for
puick delivery of our QUALITY. ICE
CREAM. 29-tf
Smoke Scntilla. Best 10c cigar, m
The "house beautifur ts a good Idea but

lllllIII!lllillllllilllllllllll!llIIIIIIilllllHIIIllIl!llill!lllil!lll!Iillllll

YOUR OPPORTUNITY?
What the President of the Ford Motor Company says chovt PRICES.
We have received the following from Mr. Edsel Ford, president of
the Ford Motor Company:
"There is no change in the present Ford Car and Truck prices,
which already are at the lowest possible figure, and now with
rock bottom reached on the Tractor price a further reduction in
price in either the car, Truck or Tractor is out of the question: in
fact the big price cuts have been made in anticipation of continu continuous
ous continuous maximum production and increase may be necessary before
long if a large volume of new business is not obtained. Therefore
present prices of Ford products cannot be guaranteed against pos possible
sible possible increase."
While there is an actual shortage of Ford cars in other sections,
due to the closing down of the factories, we have been able to se secure
cure secure a few extra cars for Spring trade and can make-immediate
delivery of a limited number.
BUY NOW WHILE THE PRICES ARE DOWN AND THE CARS ARE
AVAILABLE. DELA Y MAY EE BOSTLY TO YOU.
TUCMER & SIMMONS
DEALERS

s
ss
SEE
SEE
j 5
SEE
jSS
EE
I EEE
j
EEs
-
! t?s
OCALA

lllllHIIIlllllIIHlllllllllllllIllllllllIllIIIIlliHllllllIIIlililil

I ORDER OF EASTERN STAB
Ocala Chapter No. 29, O. E. S S-meets
meets S-meets at the Masonic hall the second
and fourth Thursday evenings of each
I month at 8 o'clock.
Mrs. Rosalie Condon, W. M.
Susan Cook. Secretary.
Mrs.
WOODMEN OF THE WORLD
Ocala Lodge No. 19. Conventions
held every Monday evening at 7:30
o'clock at the castle hall, over the G.
C. Greene Co. drugstore. A cordial
velcome to visiting brothers.
Tom Proctor, C. C
Chas. K. Sage. K. of R. & S
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
Fort King Camp No. 14 meets at
K. of P. hall at 7:30 p. m. every sec second
ond second and fourth Friday. Visiting sot sot-reigns
reigns sot-reigns are always welcome.
H. R. Baxter, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage, Clerk.
OCALA LODGE No. 285. B.J O. E.
Ocala Lodge No. 286. Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, meets
the second and fourth Tuesday eve eve-rings
rings eve-rings of each month. Visiting breth brethren
ren brethren always welcome. Lodge rooms
upstairs over Trailer's and the Book
ihop, 113 Main street.
s C.,Y. Miller. E. B..
ODD FELLOWS
Tulula Lodge No. 22. I. O. O. F,
Meets every Tuesday evening at the
Odd Fellows hall at the corner oi
Fort King Ave. and Osceola street A
warm welcome always extended to
sisiting brothers.
T. C. Carter, N. G.
H. R. Luffman. Secretary.

Miuurptoy MdPtoiP CdPiiimpsiimy
ONE OF FLOMDA'S BEST GARAGES V
Expert Repairs Tires Gas end Oil f-
Accessories Storage c
Main Street. Opposite Foundry - OCALa, FLORIDA

.
it ton useful!

TilE UNIVERSAL CAD
I
i Used Car
Bargains
1 Model 39 Overland
Five Passenger
1 brand new Spacke j
Perfect Condition
These cars to be sold for
repair charges
: DIXIE HIGHWAY :
: GARAGE
I J. S. Engesser I
I 21 W. Broadway Ocala
C. Cecil Bryant
PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT
' Room 22 Holder Block
PHONE 195 OR 332
Ask your grocer for the famous
BUTTERNUT breadthe best you
ever ate. Made by Carter's Bakery. 6t
All Garcia de Ora cigars wrapped
in tin foil; 10 cents all dealers. 25-lm
0&S"S-00SS)00

: : :

Fisner
"i 1 i i

All

3.
FLORIDA
ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE
OF TRAINS IN OCALA
Seaboard Air Liae
Arrive from Jacksonville.. 2:10a.m.
Leave for Tampa 2:15 a. m.
Arrive from Jacksonville.. 1:30 p. in.
ij-eave ior larapa 1:55 p. ra.
Arrive irom Jacksonville.. 3:51p.m.
Jtave lor Tampa.. 4:05cm.
Arrive from Tunpa 2:14 a. mj
T m r i ...
inve ior w sc Kaon vuie. .. z:iot.n.
Arrive from Tampa.: 1:85 p. ra.
Leave for Jacksonville.... 1:55 pJ-u
Arrive from Tanma 4:lRn7i
Leave for Jacksonville.... 4:17p.m.
Arrive from New York.... 1:34a.m.
Leave for St. Petersburg.. 1:37a.m.
Arrive from St Petersburg 2:S5 sum
Leave for New York 3:00 a.m.
Atlantic Coast Line
rrive from Jacksonville.. 2:31 a. m,
-eave for St Petersburg.. 2:32a.m.
Arrive from J arksonvQle . 3 :34 p. m.
Leave for St Petersburg.. 3:35p.m.
Arrive from Jacksonville. .10:12 p. ta.
Leavt for Leesburg 10:13 p. tx
Arrive from St Petersburg 2:23 a.m.
eave for Jacksonville.... 2:27 a. m.
Arrive from St Petersburg 1:25 p.ra.
Leave for Jacksonville.... 1:45p.m.
Arrive from Leesburg.... 6:41a.m.
Leave for Jacksonville.... 6:42a. m.
Arrive from Homosassa... 1.25 p. e3l
Leave for Homosassa 3:25 p. cf
Arrive from Gainesville, I
except ounoay. . .iizou a. r
Leave for Gainesville, daily
except Sunday ....4:45 p m.
Leave for Lakeland Tues
day, Thursday. Saturday 7:25 a. ra,
Ar. from Lakeland. Tues
day, Thursday, Saturday 11 :ti3 p. n.
Leave for Wilcox. Monday,
Wednesday and Friday.. 7:10a.m.
Arrive from Wileov, lion-day-
Wednesday. Friday. 6:45 p. n.
Garcia de Ora. that mild lis vans
. ss
00000-0000-SS--

i j

J



OCALA EVENING STAB, FRIDAY. APRIL 1, 1921

fi
i-J
II
is

3S

i:at home with

MRS. HARRY CLARKSOX

Mfaciw Prices

ON

TO

TMTTTU)

IT MJIUM
FEE!

H7W

UO

We have really an
attractive price on
flour, bran, shorts,
wheat, cow feed,
laying mash and
scratch feed.
We are baying these goods in
car load quantities now and ate
baying them so we can sell to
VERY BEST ADVANTAGE to
oar customers.

if

Armour's Fertilizers
Hay and Cotton Seed Meal

FARMERS5 EXCHANGE STORE

Merchants Block

Phone 163

MURDER OF YOUNG WY'ATT

The elegant home of Mrs. H. B.
iClarkson on Tuscawilla street, was
'the scene yesterday of one of the
! largest and prettiest "at homes" ever
! given in Ocala, when Mrs. Qarkson
and Mrs. Frank Wetherbee entertain entertain-;ed
;ed entertain-;ed in honor of the tatter's sister,. Miss
; MiUer of Denver, Colo.
The guests were welcomed on the
porch daring the first hour by Mrs.
William Hocker and Mrs. C. R. Ty-
dings, and during the second hour by
Miss Marshall and Miss Lillian Clark Clark-;
; Clark-; son. The porch was screened in at
'one side by vines and jasmine and in
the bower thus formed fruit punch
( was served during the afternoon. The
punch table was dainty in its arrange arrangement
ment arrangement and decorations of pink roses
and ferns. Serving here were Mrs.
, W. A. Miller, Mrs. Ed Martin, Misses
Susie Lou Ellis and Lucille Robinson.
Two dainty little girls, Virginia Car Car-michael
michael Car-michael and Leonora Taylor, made a
charming picture in their sheer white
.dresses. The carried long handled
I baskets in which the cards of the call callers
ers callers were placed.

j In the entrance hall during the aft afternoon,
ernoon, afternoon, Mrs. L. W. Duval, Mrs. Fred

Kobinson and Mrs. J. K. Chace re

ceived. As the callers entered the

music room they were met by Mrs,

James Hill and Mrs. Walter Hood,.ty.

i who presented them to the hostesses

11 of the afternoon, Mrs. Clark son and

Mrs.- Wetherbee and their guest of

If honor, Miss Miller. With them re

el ceived Mrs. Albert Birdsey of Sa

vannah and Mrs. Burdette.

The guests were set at the entrance

.to the dining room by Mrs. J. C,

Following is a more detailed report
of the murder of Mr. Wyatt, brother
of Rev. C E. Wyatt, which was refer refer-ed
ed refer-ed to in yesterday's taper:

The murder occurred about two

weeks ago while Mr. Wyatt was rid

ing on his daily route from West
Point, Ky., to Louisville. ; Mr. Wyatt
was stopped by two men who asked
for a ride into Louisville. They had
probably not been in the car long
when one of the men struck Mr.

Wyatt over the head and knocked him

unconscious. Presumably a few min minutes
utes minutes after a doctor happened along
and the men stopped him, reported an
accident and asked the doctor to carry
them to Louisville, to which he read readily
ily readily agreed. At the first "phone station

the men offered to 'phone for an am?
balance, which they did and then im immediately
mediately immediately disappeared. The doctor
didnt suspect anything until after Mr.
Wyatt was taken to the hospital. He
was conscious for a few minutes, and
made the remark "He hit me hard.
Mr. Wyatt died not long after. The
men were later found and arrested.
It is thought that as Mr. Wyatt was

a rural mail carrier, the men sup supposed
posed supposed he carried money. Mr. Wyatt

is a brother of Mr. C E. Wyatt, who
lives in DeLand, but was formerly
pastor of the Christian church in this

SPECIAL FOR

Saturday
April 2

and Monday
and April 4

FLOYERED CRETONNES
pretty designs, worth 50c a yard
Special for Saturday and Monday
yard

FRAN

"The Fashion Center"

i

j Johnson and Mrs. E. H. Martin. The

CITY CAFE
Regular Meals 50 Cents
Prompt Short Order Service,
Sea Foods in Season
JOHN METRE, Prop.
Next door to Anti-Monopoly Drug Store
South Magnolia Street

2

t ; dining room was in charge of Mrs.

; Charles

Marshall and Mrs. S. R.

iWhaley. The color scheme of this

room was in pink and white. The
I round dining table was covered with
W a beautiful lace cloth in the center of
Vt"' which was a larce vase of ttink tiod-

pies. On the serving table, sideboard,
china cabinet and on the mantle were
placed bowls filled with pink roses,
while asparagus fern was artistically
arranged on the wainscoting and com combined
bined combined with the flowers,
j During the afternoon ice cream and

5f j cake was served, and on each elate

(5) were sweet pea blossoms. The fol-

WOM AN'S CLUB MEETING

The annual election of officers will
be held at the Woman's Club Saturday
at 3 p. m. Board meeting at 2:30. All
members are urgently requested to be
present. Louise Harris Clark,
Recording Secretary.

INSTRUCTIVE EVENT
AT THE UNIVERSITY

Epecial Exercises Which Should be
. Attended by High School
Students
The military department of the
University of Florida has arranged
an extensive program for the enter entertainment
tainment entertainment of the high school students
at the next annual high school field
and track meet, scheduled for April
8th and 9th. On the first day of the
meet the four companies of the cadet

battalion wil lengage in a military

Wetherbee, Olive Whaley, Edith Ed-

TiFe Prices Reduced

$17.00

$15.00

DIAMOND Non-Skid, 30x3.
old price $20,00, -now......
DIAMOND Plain, 30x3,
old price $17.60, now.....

6,000 Mile Guarantee
FEDERAL, FISK AND DIAMOND TUBES
NEW PRICES Overhauling Ford motor $16.
Overhauling Ford rear end, $5 for time.
Grinding Ford valves, $3.
B I XI E G A M A G E
JAS. ENGESSER, Proprietor
Phone 258 West Broadway

i

i

i wards. Cornelia Dozier, Jess Dehon
j and Ethel Home.
j Mrs. William Bullock was in the
living room and with her received
Mrs. Lewis Shepherd, Mrs. Paul Sim Simmons,
mons, Simmons, Mrs. Hendricks, Mi's. R. S. Hall,
Mrs. W. F. Creson and Mrs. Ware.

Mrs. E. L. Carney stood at the door
and received the adieux of those who

gjK flowing young ladies were serving dur-j field meet. Such events as tent pitch pitch-Sir
Sir pitch-Sir tL. i. n r: -cm: i. i i vi z a

sjiig me aiicuiuuu. misses iuiix.auvi.il ing, aepioymg lor comuai, going mw

action, close order drill, equipment
race, and wall scaling will be run off.
It is expected that these events will
begin about 10 a. m. and will be con concluded
cluded concluded at 1 p. m.
On Saturday morning, April 9th,
there will be a demonstration illus illustrating
trating illustrating an attack on a machine gun
nest. In this demonstration all the
infantry weapons will be used. These
weapons include the three-inch Stokes

mortar, the one-pound cannon, the
machine gun, the automatic rifle, and
rifle.
There will be no admission charged
to either of these demonstrations and

members of the visiting teams and
their friends are cordially invited to
attend. A safe place" will be provided
for the spectators in the attack on the

machine gun nest so that hey can see
exactly how the attack is conducted
and at the same time be in no danger
of bullets or shell fragments.

called during the afternoon. The en-

. tire lower floor opened en suite, was
J I most beautifully-decorated. Quanti-
j ties of Easter lilies were placed in the
; entrance hall and music room, while
j asparagus fern was used most effec effec-J
J effec-J tively on the stairway and over the
J windows in the living room, which is
; finished in brown Nasturtiums were

GFOcery Specials lor
SATURDAY and MONDAY, April 2 and 4
12-pound bag Gold Medal Flour 85c N
Clover Bloom Butter, pound.... 58c
Sugar, pound . ...
We offer you a big saving on our entiae line of
Groceries. Give us a share of your ratronage. Be
sure and get Community Silverware Coupons FREE with
every 25-cent purchase.

WmMmmm

1UMG-MEEIP
CIVIL ENGINEERS AND SURVEYORS
Licensed under the laws of the State of Florida

Surveys
Highways

Plats
Drainage'

Reports
Phosphate

Capt. Edward Drake is associated
with us and in charge of our Phos Phosphate
phate Phosphate Mine and Plant Department.

Glftces, 33-31 Bolder DI2g.
OCALA, FLORIDA

Pbone No. 513

placed about the rooms in bowls and
vases.
From four to six a musical program
was rendered and thoroughly enjoyed.
Mrs. H. M. Hampton, Mrs. S. J. Man Manly,
ly, Manly, Mrs. L. E. Futch, Mrs. Harrison
Black and Miss Musie Bullock sang,
accompanied by Mrs. C. W. Moremen.
This party was one of the largest of

the Easter affairs and was beautiful-4

ly carried out in every detail. The
many ladies who called were delighted
to have this opportunity of meeting
Miss Miller. Although Miss Miller
lived in Florida when a. girl, she has
for some years made her home in
Denver, Colo., where she has made
a notable success as a teacher and
educator. About one hundred and
fifty ladies called uring the afternoon
and had the pleasure of partaking of
Mrs. Clarkson's and Mrs. Wetherbee's

hospitality.

SUGAR SATURDAY AND MONDAY

VJE DAVE TOE TIRE YOU WANT
WHEW YOU WAOT 'TT
"SERVICE" Our Motto
UNITED STATES TIRES HOOD TIRE
ACCESSORIES ,
SINCLAIR MOTOR OILS
. CARS WASHED AND POLISHED

I KUMBAK SERVICE STATION

11 pounds of sugar forgone dollar,

with a dollar's worth of other groc groceries
eries groceries for cash, Saturday and Monday

only. Phone 377.

tf H. B. WHTTTINGTON.

MARION-DUNN MASONIC LODGE

Marion-Dunn Lodge No. 19, F. & A.
M., meets on the first and third
thursday evenings of each month at

7:30 o'clock until further notice.
J. R. Dey, W. M.
B. L. Adams, Secretary.

Read the "Ads. You Will Find Many Bargains.

ROYAL ARCH MASONS

Regular .conventions of the Ocala

Chapter No. 13. R. A. on the fourth

Friday in every month at 8 p. in.

XL S. Wesson, H. P.
B. LI Adams, Secretary.

As a strengthening tonic there is

nothing better than Nux and Iron
Tonic Tablets, $1 per bottle of 100
tablets at Ceng's Drug Store. Guar

antied or money back. tf

Cinnamon rolls. Federal Bakery. 6t

DEFINED.
"Pa. what's meant by rJ Insou

ciance' r

"Did you ever see a man In a motor

car Dearly ruo down a pedestrian In

the streetr
"Yes, puT
"And did you notice how the motor

ist acted when the pedestrian shook

his fist at him V
"Oh, yes, pa."
"Well, that, my son. Is a very com common
mon common example of gay Insouciance."

PRICES REDUCED

Carbon removed (4) cylinders .....-$ 2X)0
Carbon removed (6) cylinders 2.50.

Ford Motors overhauled : 15.00
Ford rear ends overhauled .1 4.50
Ford valves ground and carbon removed.. 3.00
The above labor on all other ars in proportions.
We have mechanics for Fords and mechanics for Pochards,
A Trial Will Make You a Regular Customer. SERVICE FIRST
OCALA MOTOR CO.
Main St., Union Depot, c z. simnonds Phsse 71

Cass ef Necessity.
"A friend In need is a friend In Indeed."
deed." Indeed." smilingly said a pawnbroker
as he reached for a client's time timepiece.
piece. timepiece. Tm no friend of yours, Scrogge,"
said the needy one.
"Mebbe not," chuckled the other,
"but the fact remains that you're
putting up with me."
Higher Mathematics.
"Is there any such thing as squar squaring
ing squaring the drcIeT"
"I don't know," answered the busy
campaigner, "but Tm going to try IL
When the opposition candidate has
swung around the circle. I'm going to
follow him up and see If I can't square
it for our party."

1 s jff

ALU ALIKE
Y say your sister's waiting tor
"She's waitln fer some ftlUr. Yen
look Ilk an easy mark so I guesa
you're the one.

Special tto MFOitace
IVILSOBl'S OLEOMGAliM
IF IEEE .'
One 10 ounce paeliege of
Certified Oleomargarine
when bough! wltti one pound Wilson's
Nat Oleomargarine at 28c apound and
one pound Wilson's CcrtlUed Oleomar Oleomargarine
garine Oleomargarine at 33c a pound This glvesSyou
tivo pounds and ten ounces at the price
cl tivo pounds.
U-SEEVE STOKES
Cash and Carry
One East and one West. City Square

:::

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OCALA, STAR, FRIDAY, APRIL 1, 1521

NOTICE

An Invitation

By BETTY K. KENDALL
"Don't say another word about the
dance, I beg of you," said Alice. "I
simply can't bear to hear any more
; about it." : r.-
8ince when are such subjects too
frivolous for your ears?" queried Bes Bessie,
sie, Bessie, raising her' eyebrows and look looking
ing looking up 'from her fancy work. "Espe "Especially
cially "Especially when in all your finery and glory
you most likely will lead the grand
march with Frank."
"Nothing of the kind, answered
Alice In a I-don't;care-wbat-bappens
tone.' '
"Didn't you have a new gown for
the occasion?"
fTes, nd 111 wear it If only to show
some people that I can't be stunned by
their audacity."
' "But If you're not going with
Frank, who Is?"
"Bella Johnson'
"Bessie, when a young man talks
to you about a dance and asks your
pinion on all details, and then at the
eleventh hour asks another girl, do
you think he can ever Justify his con con-tuctT"
tuctT" con-tuctT" asked Alice.
"No, and I simply can't understand
it," admitted Bessie.
; "Are you sure?"
"Positively. Bella and I met Frank
on the street He came towards us In
his usual cordial way, and stopped to
say to Bella, Tin going to take you
to the "Entre Nus" affair.' Bella
must have had some Inkling, as she
didn't appear surprised, and only said :
1 thank you; what time will you call
for pet
V "For a moment I felt the keen Insult
that be should invite her In my pres presence,
ence, presence, and then I said : Tm going with
Edwin Upton.' You know Edwin is
always pestering me to go with him,
so I knew I could rely upon his taking
me. We left Frank at the corner,
and though I was the one to be offend offended,
ed, offended, he doesn't even bow to me when
we pass each other by."
"Edwin Is much shorter than you ;
don't you feel like a-giantess when
you're with him?" V
Well," said Alice, "It" came to me
like a flash that I wouldn't give either
one of them the satisfaction that
I couldn't go, and anyway a little man
with loads of money is better than no
man at all."
"That's philosophical enough, my
dear, but don't get a bad case of
glooms over It If Frank is so fickle
and? changeable in his affections, It's
better to know it now than later."
After Bessie left the words, "It's
better to know It now," kept ringing
in Alice's ears. She hated to face the
-truth that any man could so lightly
throw her friendship aside after all his
professions of sincerity.
"m not have any one's sympathy,"
she determined. "At the dance Fll be
the gayest of all."
"Why, Alice," exclaimed her friend
few days later, "how much better
you look than the last' time I saw
you; you are fairly radiant It must
be your hat It's so becoming."
A faint color rose in Alice's cheek.
Don't blame It all on my hat," she
tald; "give me credit for a portion of
my good looks."
- "I Just saw Bella and she failed
completely to appreciate Frank's
Charms," continued Bessie, "and she
sever was so bored in all her exist
ence, that she was the only girl whose
partner did not send her a corsage'
bouquet and be never even was con
cerned whether '. her program was
filled or not In fact she said there
was no pleasure to go with a young
man who was constantly noticing an
other girl. .Why do you think he asked
her and then was so rude?"
Alice smiled.
"Promise you'll never telL"
"He was an unwilling victim. To Toward
ward Toward the end of the evening Frank
came up to me saying: 'Hope you en
joyed yourself.'
"Oh, Immensely," I replied.
"Doesn't your back ache fromdanc-
. lng with that midget?" he asked in a
maddeningly sympathetic way.
"Not a bit" I answered. Edwin Is
a splendid dancer."
"Then you prefer that dwarf s atten
tions to mine Phe exclaimed In a Jeal
ou$ rage. ;
"Just as much as you prefer Bella
. to me," I replied.
But I don't and never will," he pro protested,
tested, protested, looking at me tenderly. "I
asked you for tonight, not her."
"Yon asked me? How can you de
liberately say thattwhen I heard you
Invite her?"
"Didn't I look at you. when I said
'I'm going to take you to the dance?
"Then I laughed and laughed. until
I could not laugh any more."
."Until that moment I never thought
.ribout it. He's cross-eyed, and when
he looked at Bella in his own heart
and soul he was in reality staring at
'me.' That's where all the trouble came
; up."
" "Oh, how disconcerted Bella would
be if she knew."
"She never will. The best part of
our quarrel was the reconciliation."
"It's always been my pet aspiration
to see you two married," said Bessie.
"Well, your wisn win soon come
: true."
-Alice," asked Bessie, "won't It be
dreadful after you are married If
Frank should say loving things to you
and look at another woman?"
"I won't mind that ever again," de declared
clared declared Alice vehemently. "Because
frank says all other women look alike
frtrs txeest mv Se thamf

The Indelible
Clue

- "Landing the counterfeits is all well j
and good, but where does it get us if
we don't know who made them?"
The speaker, William J. Burns, then
connected with the United States
secret service, glanced up from his
!
!
examination of a large sofa which his i
on the point of being shipped from
New York to Costa Rica a sofa which
was stuffed, not with wool or hair, but
with $2,000,000 worth of counterfeit
Costa BJcan money, destined to finance
a Latin-American revolution.
So far as the men who had been
working on the case had been able to
discover, there was no way in which
to trace the shipment It had been
brought to the dock In an ordinary
dray which, having unloaded its bur burden,
den, burden, had driven off, to be lost among
thousands of Others of Its kind In the
streets of New York. Of the men who
had shipped the sofa, the men re responsible
sponsible responsible for counterfeiting the cur currency
rency currency of a friendly nation, there was.
no indication whatever.
But Burns made a careful, almost
microscopic, examination of : the bur burlap
lap burlap with which the furniture had been
wrapped. Down In one corner, half half-obliterated,
obliterated, half-obliterated, he discovered a peculiar
mark the numerals "2 XX 64" which
the detective rightly presumed re referred
ferred referred In. some way to the manufac manufacturers
turers manufacturers of the fabric.
Inquiry through trade channels
brought the information that burlap
of that kind, bearing the "XX" mark,
was sold by only one concern In the
East But even that discovery didn't
bring Burns much closer to his quarry.
-for the books of the firm in question
showed that more than 2,000 dealers
had purchased "XX" burlap within the
past year. One by one these dealers'
were eliminated, until only six re
mained. Among these was a furniture
house in Long Island City and when
that store opened for business on the
following morning a square-jawed,
stockily-built man of medium height
entered and asked to see the manager.
My name is Burns," he stated, flip
ping back the lapel of his coat In such
way as to afford a glimpse of his
secret service badge. "I would like
to have the opportunity of looking at
the stock of burlap which you have
on hand at the present time, In order
to assist the government in running
down a case of considerable impor
tance."
But right there the man who solved
many mysteries ran into a" snag. None
of the burlap bore the "2 XX 64" mark.
The "XX" was there, but the nuraer
als were all different r
"When did you get this stock In?"
asked the detective.
"About a month ago," was the reply
"Have you any of the former mate
rial on hand?"
The manager was inclined to think
not but a careful search of the ware
house brought to light a single piece
of the former supply and there, in the
corner, was the clue that Burns had
hoped to find the Indelible "2 XX 64."
"Now," snapped the secret service
man, "if you will let me see your
books for the past three or four
months, I won't bother you any
longer."
That same afternoon Burns and two
of his associates rang the bell of a
house In-Brooklyn 'occupied by a Mrs.
Loni. who was, according to the clerk
who had made the sale, "a Spanish
woman who Insisted upon buying, a
sofa of a certain kind, well padded
and heavily stuffed." The sofa an answered
swered answered the description of the one
which was being held at the wharf,
and the very fact that the purchaser
had been Spanish added the final con
necting link. But in order to avoid
any possible slipup, Burns located the
expressman who had taken the furni
ture, from the Loni house to the dock
a feat which was far from difficult
once he had a clue to the location of
the home of the counterfeiters.
As he had expected, Mrs. Loni dis
claimed any knowledge of the ship shipment
ment shipment and fell back upon a professed
lack of understanding of English to
bolster up her position. To her amaze
ment the detective replied In fluent
Spanish, Informing her that he had all
the facts In the casetie statement of
the clerk who had sold the sofa, the
expressman who had carted It to the
dock- and the fact that he had seen
with his own eyes $2,000,000 in coun counterfeit
terfeit counterfeit bills taken from the piece of
furniture.
"This house is surrounded," con
cluded Burns. Tve got my hand on
my gun and I'm going to stay right
here until I land the men who made
that money If It takes me ".'but' It
didn't take as long as he had expected,
for. as he spoke, the woman's son-in-law,
RIcardo de Requesans, stepped
Into the room' and 'admitted that he
and another Spaniard had been re responsible
sponsible responsible for making and planting the
counterfeits. ;' v
"The next time you. try to pull off
anything of the kind," Burns said as
he took them Into custody, "be careful
of the markings on the burlap you use.
Overlooking details of that kind Is
likely to cost you several years In the
penitentiary I"
In the Movies.
"We had a fine old lady to repre-'
sent Barbara Frtetchle, at least we
asked her to help us out But she
lacked the spirit of the original Bar Barbara."
bara." Barbara."
"How so?"
"Didn't want u to shoot" Louis Louisville
ville Louisville Oourler-J ouxcsX

Relatives

By CLARA BARTON
"Helen, how dared you refuse Mrs,
Smith's invitation in such an ungra ungracious,
cious, ungracious, abrupt manner?" asked Elsie In
astonishment
"Didn't you hear her Intimate that
she'd treat me just like one of the
family?"
"Isn't that the height of hospitality,
to make guests feel as if they were
at home?"
"There's no place Just like home,"
answered Helen emphatically,- "and I'm
rather glad of It Who wants to be
treated when she's visiting with that
easy familiarity and the realisms
showered upon a relative T
"I haven't done much globe trotting
and my experience has been rather
limited," said Elsie, "but what hat
made you so cynical?"
"When I visited my aristocratic cou cousins
sins cousins the Sterlings, I was received with
cordial greetings and had visions of
a very gay week-end, until Cousin Jane
announced, 'Put your wraps and bag
anywhere; the maid is out I hope
you're not hungry 'as we have only a
light lunch. We're not going (to make
any fuss over you, but treat you Just
as though you were one of us.'
"Didn't yoo have enough to satiate
your hunger?"
"Hardly. A simple repast served on
gorgeous dishes la no more sustaining,
even if a butler stands in back of you
and picks up your napkin, than if you
are served on premium dishes that
come with a pound of coffee. We were
hardly through ,when the baby com commenced
menced commenced to whine. "We'll have to stay
with her while the nurse goes on an
errand. said mv hostess. The next
hour was spent in' entertaining the
youngster, who broke my eye-glasses
and then laughed with joy."
"I suppose you had to meet all of
your cousin's friends and be on ex exhibition
hibition exhibition the rest of the time," said
Elsie sympathetically.
"No such luck. As the Infant could
not be trusted alone he was left in my
charge for the greater part of the af
ternoon while Mrs. Sterling enter-J
talned company. Upon the departure
of her visitors, my aristocratic cousin
'said In her most charming manner,
Dearie, Mrs. Johnson can't attend the
meeting of the U. S. L., so I1 have to
write a paper to read In place of hers.
Will you assist me? You're so clever.
It will be real quiet here tonight I
knew you'd prefer spending the eve evening
ning evening with us rather than by being
bored by strangers."
"How selfish. Didn't you meet any
young men?"
"Not that you could notice It. We
labored over the Intricacies of the suf suffrage
frage suffrage question until I crept to my room
weary with the words, 'Votes for
Women,' ringing In my ears. Hardly
had I fallen asleep when a thundering
knock at the door awakened me. Has Hastily
tily Hastily dressing I rushed downstairs to
inquire what the trouble was. My
host accosted me with a smile. 'We're
early risers, he said. 'Usually our
guests have their breakfasts In their
room, but as you're Just like one of
the family, we thought you'd prefer
to Join us. Didn't you rest well? You
look rather 'tired.' I assured him I
felt splendid, and then sat down to
listen to family arguments and com complaints
plaints complaints about the high cost of living,
extravagant wives, and sarcastic re remarks
marks remarks about husbands who were grow growing
ing growing too stout"
"Rather. Interesting," commented
Elsie. "You're usually so tactful 1
presume you had eyes that didn't see
and ears that didnt hear family squab squabbles.",
bles.", squabbles.", f
"Just so."
"Did you go motoring often?"
,No. I was compelled to refuse an
Invitation as my cousin' said It was so
rarely she had anyone whom she could
trust to tell how a gown would fit
that If should go with her to the dress dressmaker.
maker. dressmaker. Do you think It was any great
pleasure to go to the florist's and to
the caterer's to order flowers and
French pastry for a dinner to be given
after I left?"
"At any rate, you didn't have any
expense," said practical Elsie.
"You forget the tips for the serv servants,
ants, servants, and the presents for the children.
Then Mrs. Sterling forgot her gold
bag and had to borrow mine, saying,
There's no one 'I'd rather ask than
you. Evidently five dollars Is a mere
trifle to her, for she didn't return the
her,
I left
money I left 1n It and I never had the
courage to give her a gentle reminder.
That evening I was requested to show
the cook how to make a fish timbale
with mushrooms."
"Did they compliment you on your
culinary ability?"
"Not nearly as much as they be bemoaned
moaned bemoaned the fact that I burnt one of
the cook's favorite pans, and that -she
threatened to leave because strangers
came Into her kitchen."
"Did you remain long?". Interrupted
Elsie In a sympathetic tone.,
"Too long. I was persuaded to tele telegraph
graph telegraph Carl that It was an utter Im Impossibility
possibility Impossibility for me to keep a theater
engagement with hfcn."
"Whyr
"How could I refuse my cousin after
all her kindness to. me, when she had
such a bad headache and I was the
only one who was able to decorate the
table for her birthday dinner the next
day? Carl didn't believe my excuse
and took Grace."
"Why, I saw Carl and Grace to together
gether together again last night"
"Tee, I know he's been taking her
ever since. Do you blame me for not
tjrepfitag Mrs. SalUt'e mvltmtloaT

town m

I HELPSJ

FOR 'THE CITY BEAUTIFUL"
Writer Has .Some' Things to Say
Which Should Appeal to All Lovers
of Their Town.
.
In an interesting article in the
Ladies' Home Journal recently Jane
Leslie Klft made the following perti pertinent
nent pertinent remarks:
"The number of hopelessly shabby
little towns Is appalling. Almost every
town, be It large or small, has a wo woman's
man's woman's club, and the women of these
organizations set the standards, and
the rest of the community make a
more or less successful effort to live
up to them. So It Is to the club wom women
en women of America that I make the appeal
that they exert every effort to further
The City Beautiful' movement
"The word 'city Is used in Its broad broadest
est broadest sense and embraces all towns. Ir Irrespective
respective Irrespective of their acres or the number
of their inhabitants. Each community
has its own problems that must be
worked out along Individual lines, and
this thought has been kept in mind
when the plan presented on this page
was made. While It Is definite. It is
sufficiently elastic to admit of the nec necessary
essary necessary changes to make It adaptable
to any community. (
"All clubs, such as new century and
civic clubs, have a garden committee.
This committee should be given the
work of managing the campaign for
The City Beautiful; and the re remainder
mainder remainder of the club should lend It their
whole-hearted support The size of
the committee is not of paramount Im Importance,
portance, Importance, but a committee of twelve
makes a good working number. Too
many members cause confusion, and
too few means that some will be over overworked."
worked." overworked." CURB BILLBOARD NUISANCE
Boston Plana Drastic Restriction That
Shall Apply to All Forms of
Outdoor Advertising.
Authority and Instructions having
been given to the division of highways
of the state department' of public
works by the legislature, the division
will give a public hearing for the pur purpose
pose purpose of drafting rules to govern the ap appearance
pearance appearance and location of .billboards.
Restrictions are wanted and the fol following
lowing following regulations are to be submitted
at the hearing:
o outdoor advertising shall be per permitted
mitted permitted on any location within 500 feet
of town or city parks, playgrounds.
metropolitan parks, parkways, state
reservations or public buildings.
No outdoor advertising sign shall
exceed an area of ten square feet If
within 500 feet of any public highway.
No outdoor advertising sign,
wherever located, -shall exceed an area
of 100 square feet and all such signs
shall be rectangular In form.
No outdoor advertising shall be per permitted
mitted permitted upon any rock, tree or natural
object of beauty.
All fields and backgrounds of out outdoor
door outdoor advertising shall be of neutral col colors,
ors, colors, and the fields, backgrounds and
letters thereon shall not be discordant
with surroundings, and nothing shall
be placed thereon except letters of the
alphabet and numerals.
No outdoor avertlslng shall be al allowed
lowed allowed within the area between Inter Intersecting
secting Intersecting streets and within a radius of
350 feet from the point where the cen center
ter center lines of the streets Intersect
The structure and the materials of
all outdoor advertising signs shall meet
the approval of the department of pub public
lic public safety of the commonwealth of
Massachusetts as regards all questions
of fire .hazard. Boston Traricrlpt"
. Garden Cities for England.
-London Is trying to work out Its
housing crisis by building little gar garden
den garden cities about 20 miles outside Its
limits. These experiments In whole wholesale
sale wholesale home construction are being car carried
ried carried on by the enterprise of private
capital backed up with the generous
government subsidy that la being given
to ail borne construction projects.
The profits of the promoting com com-nanv
nanv com-nanv will be limited to seven percent
of the investment the proceeds over
and above this amount going back into
town improvements.
- The Ideal house so much talked of
in England, that resulted from the
Daily Mafl competition, will bo given
a practical tryout In this new city.
The name of the place when completed
will be Welwyn Garden City.
War on Weeds.
- Weeds like the poor, will always. be
with us, to be sure, but that should
not necessarily mean that we have tc
tolerate them In wholesale quantities.
The early fall is the time to get after
them before they sow their seed for a
more abundant crop next year. Much
labor can be saved the coming season
to flower and vegetable gardens, lawr
and orchard by pulling up and burn burning
ing burning these pests. They furnish a hiding
place for injurious Insects. They take
the nourishment from the soil and
make a yard look neglected. Thrift
Magazine.
Amen!
w don't care now much he waves
the flag, any man who knocks his hom
town is a darn poor American. Ex
change. --

W U 1 U U ."StT'o

mem u

" 1 1

Takes His Choice.
Mrs. Stjtes 1 want one of those new
military bonnets, dear.
Mr. Styles How much are they?
"About $35. I believe."
. "I can't afford that end, besides, 1
dont see why you want a military bon bonnet
net bonnet You're not going to fight ere you,
dear?"
"I am If I don't get that bonnet"
No Good, Anyway.
Mrs. Fussy body I think It's an out
rage that Mrs. Kaynyne should keep
those four mangy dogs when so many
people are doing without meat
Her Husband Ob, weU. the mutts
are old and tough enough and proba
bly no one would care to eat 'em, any
how.
Different Procedure.
"People don't shove their money
over the bar for drink the way they
used to."
"No," agreed Uncle Bill Bottletep.
"Instead of shoving the mocey ever
the bar you have to give It to the
cashier for a bunch of soda water
tickets."
Inferential Greatness.
"Senator Sportsworthy made an Im
pressive speech."
"A masterly effort."
"While he didn't go so far as to say
he wrote the DetJaration of Independ
ence, I Inferred from his remarks that
If he had been living 144 year ago he
might have written It"
His Pretest.
En peck I told you before, madam,
to lay off trying to make me eat rasp raspberry
berry raspberry preserves.
Mrs. Enpecfc Why don't you culti cultivate
vate cultivate a taste for It insect?
En peck I look and feel seedy
enough already.
At Par.
The Pretty Applicant Pre dose a
good deal of chorus work and small
parts. Would you care to see my
press notices?
The Producer Never mind the press
notices. We take the girls at their
face values.
BACKWARD IN Hl$ STUCTtS
"How's ysr boy down at cellegef"
"Not very good, I fveee. He wrote
he was halfback an new he telle we
hie f allbeek,"
Proef.
A true phUooophor U one.
Who lives his sloomy d7 or twe
ad bears his bit ef trouble la
Ths way be says you oug-bt to do.
Defined.
Willie Paw, what la the difference
between an engaged girl and a mar married
ried married woman?
Maw A married woman personally
attends to the work of putting on her
rubbers, my son." -
i
Such e Pity.
"Say, look! I believe that chsp Is
drowning V
0h, this is too bad I, Here Pre just
used the last film in my camera on
just medium pretty glrll"
Of the Chavanrvts 8chooL
Dauber1 This Is my last picture,
"Wood Nymphs." What do you think
of It? -Critic
Best Imitation of wood X
ever saw.
Mental Reservation.
She How could you truthfully tell
that sharp-tongued Miss Gabby that
she reminded you of a flower?
Be So she did, but I didn't men mention
tion mention it was a snap-dragon.
Stimulation Avoided.
"Do you want any hair tonic?"
asked the attentive barber.
"No," replied Mr. Growcher. "If my
hair grows any faster. I wont be able
to afford to have It cut"
' Nothing Lacking.
"So you've started shaving yourself,
eh? Dont you miss the barber's chat chatter!"
ter!" chatter!"
"Not at sIL Ton see, I set ray
phonograph going during the process."
Heard at the Movies.
She (viewing film) Isn't that dog
the cleverest thing? Wonder whet pay
he gets?"
- He Oh. a couple of bones a day, 1
guess.
She I hope, dear, the ring yon yost
gave me Is net a cheep Imltatien,
He No, darling. MTs the saest O
rqlstittea 1 111 fci J

To the Honorable Board of Public In

struction, Marion County. Florida:
We the undersigned residents and
taxpayers of the Grahamville. Indian.
Mound,. Key Pond and Lake Bryant Bryant-schools,
schools, Bryant-schools, respectfully petition your
honorable board to call an election for
the purpose of creating a special
school district, to be known as Gra
hamville special tax district No. 43,
and shall include the following de described
scribed described territory, to-vit: Commencing-
at the intersection of. the north line
of township 14, south, range 24, east,
and the Oklawaha liver, thence in a
southerly direction along the east
bank of said Oklawaha river, to the
south line of section 25, township 15,
south, range 23, east, thence east to to-the
the to-the water'a edge of Lake Bryant,
thence following th-i south water line
to the intersection cf the east line of
section 3L township 15, south, range
25, east, thence south to the south-'
west corner of section 8, township 16,
south, range 25 east, thence east to
the southwest corner of section 9,
township 16, south, range 25, east,
thence' south to the southwest corner
of section 33, township 16, south,
range 25, east, thence east to the
southeast corner of section 36. town township
ship township 16, south, range 25, east, thence
norm 10 ue norineasi corner ox sec section
tion section 1, township 16, south, range 25,
east, thence east along south line of
township 15, south, range 26, east,- to-
township 15. south, range 26, east,
thence north along said Marion coun county
ty county line to the intersection of the north
line of F. M. Arredondo grant, thence
westerly along said F. M. Arredondo
grant to the intersection of the north
line of township 15. south, range 26,
east, thence west to the southwest
corner of section 31. township 14,
south, range 26, east, thence north to
the northeast corner of section 1,
township 14. south, range 25. east,
thence west to point of beginning, all
of said land lying and being in Marion
county, Florida.
The above petition will be present presented
ed presented to the Board of Public Instruction
on Saturday, April 9, A. D. 1921
C. H. Rogers, E. S. Reinhard, E. P.
O'Cain, E. O. Cordrey, W. H. Mason,
W. H. Fore,'E. M. Griggs, Horace 1
Hurst, L. B. Griggs, H. H. Perkins, L.
W. Wilson, J. B. Gore, C E. Mason, S.
L. Manning. Mrs. E. F. O'Cain, Mrs.
H. H. Perkins, W. H. Cordrey, Mrs. W.
H. Cordrey, Mary Reichaxd. W. C. Co Co-zon,
zon, Co-zon, Wm. Deas, W. B. Roberts, W. D.
Koberts, U. Holy, pnncess Fort
Rogers, Jas. P. Mays, R. C Fort. The Theodora
odora Theodora Perry Fort, N. A. Fort, F. C.
Smith, W. O. Gore, W. E. Tucker, Mrs.
G. F. Holly. Marion Holly, C Stana Stana-land,
land, Stana-land, J. A. Reynolds, H. G. Reynolds,
R. G. Long, Alonzo Long, P. T. Ran Randall,
dall, Randall, W. C. Mall, M. E. Mason, E. k
Mills, Cora Mills, Helen Wellhoner,
Jack Wellhomer, W. (X West, W. A.
Moorman, P. L. Durisoe, IL P. Heine Heine-nemann,
nemann, Heine-nemann, ft. M. Graham, Josie E. Ran Randall.
dall. Randall. W. A. Meadowa. Mrs. B. L Hick Hickman,
man, Hickman, Mrs. Martha Daniel. E. L. Mills,
T. W. Randall, Victoria E. Randall,
Annie Long, I. P. Stevens, John Gore,
W. A. Hogans. Wyatt McDonald. B. P.
(Smith, Geo. Yar bo rough, 0. E. Yar-
bo rough, R. J. McDonald, J. A. Gore,
W. T. Howard, Jim Gore, C. IL Ho Hogans,
gans, Hogans, J. H. RandallW. D. Werth, C
B. Gore, P.O. Kelly, W. C Henderson,
Lynne, -Fla., S. L. Manning, Lynne,
Fla Mrs. S. I Manning, E. O. Powell
Mrs. E. O. Powell, Mrs. W. a Wall,
W. S. Wall. J. N. Stevens, Mrs. J. N.
Stevens, J. A. Hicks, IL A. Hicks, tf
.NOTICE
Of
Application for Leave to Sefl
Minor's Land
Notice is hereby given to aH whom
it may concern, that Mary Etta Will Williams,
iams, Williams, as guardian of Aurie Ersel Wil Williams,
liams, Williams, minor, will on the
20th day of April, A. D. 1921.
apply to the Honorable L. E. Futch,
county judge in and for Marion coun county,
ty, county, at 10 o'clock, a. m.. or as soon
thereafter as the matter can be heard,
for authority to sell, at private sale,
the following described real estate,
in Marion county, Florida, to-wit:
Lot number nineteen, as shown
upon the map of Snow's Addition,
East Lake, Florida, as recorded in
plat book "A," page 184, in the office
of clerk of the circuit court in and for
Marion county, Florida.
Said land belonging: to the estate
of George F. Williams, deceased, and
to be sold for the best interest of said
minor. f ,.
Dated March 18, A. O. 1921.
Mary Etta Williams.
3-18-5t-fri Guardian.
cjJ5JIsnt it worth while, to
. jrear glasses if they win
5tc-" free you from headache T
v.nu'
DR. K. J. WEIHE,
Optometrist and Optician
Eyesight Specialist
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CONTRACTOR ASD
BUILD E2
Careful estimates made on sS
tract work. Gives more and better
work fir the money than any other
contractor ia the city



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OCA LA EVENING STAB. FRIDAY, APRIL 11 1921

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A TRUCE DECLARED
WITH HIGH PRICES
Notwilhstanding the fact that our
profits have always been figured
down to the very last penny of safe
store-keeping, dnring the present
extraordinary disposal they are ;
practically erased. Could any offer
be more 'liberal at the time when
fine clothing is in greatest demand.
This is an opportunity for old friends
to beneiit splendidly and a good
time for yon whose patronage we
have not yet enjoyed to learn of our
open methods of doing business.
Many a good bank
account can be started by
the very real savings now to be made

Electrifying Values
That will pack this store
to ciapacity

Standard A.C.A. Feather Ticking.

.Jost.fhe .brand is self 'explanitory

f a nodd honsekeeners.

Golxig at, per yard

Extra line Matr ess Ticking
The closing out price, per yd.

IUIIIV1 J
35c

17c

Boy's B V.Dstyie union suits,, JJal-
n&-3WnTnr aIca PAme If nil An l Ihp

be,st Jjarqains.liitea 1l)r
Each plecr daf lag this sale sl 7W
J.P, Coals Spool legion 4Cri
;150 yards to tbe spool, each tJw
Aproa Ctsgssis. Aacskeg 3jgsraxir
rtetd fast cblorsm27 teaes -ir
wide,' going af-perard Ifl2v

SUCCUy mil fwiutu uua uautj9
Eleedied ssd mbleeched 2Qn
Sale price nowtper yard v 7 v

YMit'tfirftnl d&iy ?qaallty
SslrTiriceeryard

; $5 valaes going at rvfLyu

;f iaby 'Drtss .$iagliaiasc&i prefer;'

.plains, dafaty stripes ana solid colors
absolutely fast colors v 97r
'271nches wlde;saleprice a y&.LLi

22c

1

I

OVQtALLS

ItzsX crae-exlra fesayy;Dc2la over-

Krcll Klothes.and Carhart Braad.

I

PANATtlATIATS

Men's Genuine Panama Bats, all CC
styles and best valaes Now tjjf)

Sffl s

rm

n nnn
Li UVL

These Dry Goods Reductions
IX Extra Fine Sheeting, 36 inches wide
Now selling for 10c a yard.
Bleaching, yard wide and no better
made, only 15c a yard.
Indian Bead. There is only the one
kind, the genuine. 36 Inches wfde, now
reduced to 28 i-2c a yard.

These Boy's Suits
Prices Smashed
Kool Kloth, up to the minute styles.
Colors to please the boys and prices to
sell quickly. All sizes $6.50
Genuine Palm Beach.' Colors Tan and
Green. They look nice, are made right
and can't be beat for correctness in
style and workmanship $7.93

the Uuderwear Snaps
Men's Balbriggan, extra quality union
suits, 31 fo 41, 98c
Men's B.V.D. style Denim check union
suits, sizes 31 to 41 75c
Ladies Rib Gauze Unions, short length;
summer styles, Only 49c
Ladies' Ganze Vest, something worth worthwhile,
while, worthwhile, a bargain at 29c

SATURDAY BETWEEN THE HOURS OF 9 AND 12 A. M. WE WILL SELL
10 YARDS OF 25c BLEACflING FOR $1.00

. MEM SAVE HERE
$1.75 dress shirts, going at S1.19
50c wash ties, during this sale .29
$3.50 Pajamas, a real bargain, sale price 2.49
25c sox. High jgrade seamless, per pair .19
25c coll ors, Ide 8c Slidewell, each ..' .19
.
75c B.V.D. style, drawers and shirt, per garmemt .50
12lAc handkerchiefs, extra special .05
20c sox; fine values, sale price per pair .10
$3 Soisette shirts with collor, size 14 only 1.00
$1 blue Chamhry work shirts, bargain of bargains .50

WOMEN SAVE HERE
$5 Tricolet Blouses, about 25 of these wonderful
stylish blouses at only $1.98
$1.75 Middies, good quality Galitea,' unsurpass-
. able values, now selling at 1.00
$1.50 Bungalow Aprons, light and dark Percales
' s extra special at .98
$2 Ladies Thread Silk, seam back, black, white,
cardovan and gray, per pair 1.00
$1.25 Ladies', Lisle Thread, seam back, black,
... white and cordovan, per pair .69
-25c black, fine hose, extra special, per pair .10
15c and 25c linen and extra quality lawn' Hand-
kerchiefs, your choice, e3ch v .09

$1.69 gowns, Lady Ydrk,;Battice. 3 wonderful
$1.69 petticoats. Lady York, Battice. bargains
$1.69 chemise, Lady York, Battice. each

a,

'i

.9-

Men's and Children's Shoes. Come get fitted now while the

prices are low. Come see for yoarself

Men's Elk Skin, scout last.
also Veal Calf Btucher, go go-;ing
;ing go-;ing at $2.95.BQy,s dress'gun
metal, semi English last, a
'good shoe for. the money,
$2.95. Ladies Vici high tops,
military heels, black and
mahogany, .32.95. Ladies
Vici .oxfords, brown. v. kid,
medium low heels, very prac practical,
tical, practical, a gobd housesh6e$2.95
ladies' brown calf, high top,
military: heels, also, a jpair of
rubber heels complete $3.49.
$ Ladies' Herrick xomfort ox ox-rfords,Qa
rfords,Qa ox-rfords,Qa soekerof comfort de-

: light, flexible .but : quite, neat
strictly all leather 53.49
Men's Tan K r oth e K a l f
Blucher anddoger tongue,
'dandy plow shoes $3.49
Men'Tan Elk Scout, balance
of eight pair left; will be sold
in this lot for $3.49
- Xadies' patent leather Pumps
Walk Overs, covered heels,
plain tie and with buckles.
. The dressiest seasons offer offering,
ing, offering, now ; going at : a' pair $7.50
Men's dark brown Oxfords.
Goodyear Welt, semi Eng'ish

'last, sold 'for $7.50, duririg ''Men's oxfords. Russian caff
this sale f6r. only cCiO.- Iquiarterdxfords, : lfe s?t

opt. iuimi, i au t -! ,i

mm m mm

Men's tan leather solesmule

. Am U lt Ah AAA A.AA ... ...... ft

'wears'like-a shoe ought -to
wear, C2.45.Boy's sizes same
-as above $2.45 -
Meu's high toe, ; light tan
. Blucher oxfords, sold for $9
Yes, Walk, Overs, now CG5
Men's Walk Over high heel
: shoes, brown calf skin, semi
English ; last, $12.50 values
.' now selling for, $8.95

black and brown "kid, novel novelty
ty novelty in russet and nobby calfc
college heels "and solid
leather. Regularly ; spld for
$10,now'goingat:$749
Ladies WalkJOvers, high top
shoes; black and brown kid,
also mag. calf college or mil military
itary military heels, we have none
.better, going at $3.49

NO LET ;UP,;R1CH

OAHElllEUTCnONS

. Men's genuine Palm Beach
suits, none genuine, without
Ithe lable. Iegttlary sold for
$17.50.; -going at $120
Men's serge suits, blue all
wool, ;conservatave models,
skeleton lined. Dandy ,sum ,sum-mer
mer ,sum-mer Weight 'suit, regular
price $40. closing at $240

, For siauahcr
$1.50 Table Damask 64 ins.
wide, excellent grade a yd 83c
52LTable bmask 72 inches
wide, high grade, a yd. IL19
'$1:45 sheets, full, size, best
quality $1 J9. 35c'Rllow case
size 42x36 extra' special 19c

"Forest Percales f36 inches
:wide," dandy; .shirting strjpes
and-"dx'ttenist:19e?a'yd.
; Lenox v prand Hickory in
' broWn and blue 19c a yard

tcBungaldw Cretone
beautiful designs 25c a yard
Pajama check, 36 ins wide
Inone better, 17c per yard

,Red StarDiaper Cloth, in 10
yard sanitary packages, ": per
package .
Gingham, pretty plaids, nice
summer weigh at 12 l-2c a yd
EIEN'S ODD PANTS
r Blue Serge, g o;o 4 quality.
'$7.50 values, -going at ,y.ou
wouldn't believe it price SU9

Why Pay More?'
OCALA, FLORIDA

e

Ml

Why Pay More?"

OCALA, FLORIDA

SEVE

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OCALA EVENING STAB, FRIDAY, APRIL 1. 1921

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Wo Beffer
Tailoring at
Any Price

m OMIEIICES

If you have any society items for
the Star, please call five-one.

Mr. and Mrs. Phil Robinson of In Inverness,
verness, Inverness, left today for Miami to at attend
tend attend the state golf tournament.

Boys' kool cloth suits, $4
Waterman, The Haberdasher.

H. A.

l-2t

Pure Wool Fabrics
Hsssd tailoring to measure at the price you want to pay
Shayne Brun Hand Tailoring
For spring and summit, is reasonably priced.
You have a choice of over 4C0 fabrics and you are sure to
be satisfied. Hand tailored suits made to your individual
measurer at the fdlcsing prices
$24, 828, $30, 835,
v $38, $40,$ 44, $48, etc.

This guarantee is your protection
We are not satisfied unless you are

April Victor records at THE BOOK

SHOP. l-3t

Kodak films developed, printed and

enlarged. High class work only.

Blake's Studio, over Helvenston's. 12t

Mr. T. M. Kilgore, who was in the

navy over ten years, has been award awarded
ed awarded by the department a medal for

merit, a decoration that no man re receives
ceives receives except for efficient and faithful

service. His friends congratulate Mr.

Kilgore, who is making as good a

citizen as he was a seaman.

Kodak films developed, printed and
enlarged. High class work only.
Blake's Studio, over Helvenston's. 12t

Ask your grocer for Federal bread
and accept no other. If he doesnt
furnish it, tell the Federal Bakery. 6t

There's no extra Cnarge for clean cleaning
ing cleaning your fish at the city fish market.
hone 158. tf

The Florida Library Association

will meet in Oca la April 13-14. A
most interesting program will be
given, which wilj be published later.

You can buy the famous BUTTER

NUT bread in 10 or J5-cent sizes. It's
made at Carter's Bakerv. 28-t

One ol the interesting features on

Buick, 5 passenger, new top, good Ith e program to be given tomorrow at

tires, a real buy. Spencer-Pedrick Pe Woman's Club will be a talk by

Miss Elizabeth Miller ol Denver. Miss
Miller's talk is being looked forward
to with pleasure, as she has made a
notable success of her profession as
a teacher. Her subject is "Woman

A HIGH LIVER
-Every time I meet BUI Plodder
he's got his pockets full of handouts
and a cigarette In his face."
"Believe me, Sammy, dat guy It
livin beyond Ms means."

UNCLASSIFIED

ADvnmsErjMTS
WANTED, LOST, FOUND, FOR
SALE, FOR RENT AND SIM SIMILAR
ILAR SIMILAR LOCAL NEEDS

Rates: Six lines, maximum, one time,
23c: three times. 50c: six times. 75c;

one month, S3. Payable is advance.

Motor Company, Buick Dealers. tf

Mr. and Mrs. LaLonde and family,
who have been living in the Yonge
nrmrtmpnta nn Vnrt TTfntr m nMrfm

today into Mrs. M. E. Layne's house Suffrage," with which she is thorough

Unlovely Object.
A bbab must love his wetlert weQ
If he will never leave ber,
But case with love Into her face-
When ehe has sot hay fever.

WOOD Giles Wood Yard. Seasoned
oak or pine wood for either stove or
fireplace, $1 and $2 per load. Yard
corner South Main and Third Sts.
Phone H2. 2-22-tf

Least Danger.
Young Did you buy that hat for
your wife?
Creak I did.
I "Well. It makes her look fierce."
"Well, she would 'have' looked ft

good deal fiercer If I hadn't.'
don Answers.

FOR SALE Tomato plants. 15 cents
per 100; 100,000 improved Porto
Rico sweet potato slips ready to
plant now, $1.50 per 1000. Send
orders to. C Y. Miller, 124 South
Tenth St, Ocala, Fla. 15-tf

WANTED To buy light one-horse
wagon. Must be cheap for cash.
Address G. G. Maynard. Ocala. 17-tf

on Alvarez street.

Our special loaf of BRAN bread is

the kind recommended by your doc doctor.
tor. doctor. Carter's bakery. 28-6t

ly conversant, as she has voted since
she was 21 years old.
Just received, dress shirts for $1.25.
H. A. Waterman, The Habadasher. 2t

Call at my oBce Friday and Saturday, April First
and Second, and inspect this beautiful Rne of pure
wool fabrics in all colorings, shades and weights.

Roe shad and king mackerel now in

at the City Fish Market. Fort King

avenue. ' l-2t

J. A. CHANDLER

OfRce 120 S. Main St. Ocala, Florida
Upstairs, Room No. 1 Ch&se Building

iviBvv&?2!v&ttv!Kv&lj irvHvKHCVMVTvT

THE WINDSOR HOTEL
JACKSONVILLE, ELORIDA
In the heart of the city with Hemming Park for a front yard.
Every modern convenience in each room. Dining room service la
second to none

I

ROBERT M. MEYER,
: Manager.

J. E. KAVANAUGH
i
Proprietor.

C. V. ROBERTS. Phone 805

BARNEY SPENCER, Phone 431

ROBERTS & SPENCER
Funeral Directors and Embalmers
Private Morgue and Chapel. Personal Service to all.
Motor Equipment. Coftins and Caskets Delivered.

Office Phone 350

Ocala, Florida

217 West Broadway :

. Tee Lata.
Busband Ton told me to buy

thing for yoa on my way from the of office,
fice, office, but I couldn't remember what It
was.
Wife (bursting Into tears) It la toe

late new ; neither can L

W. K. Lane, M. D., physician and

nrgeon, specialist eye, ear, nose and

throat. Office over 5 and 10 rent store

Ocala, Fla. Adv. tf

Mrs. B. M. Hunt, who has been ill

for several weeks, is slowly recover-J

ing, and is able to be up, but cannot
leave the house yet. Her friends hope

to soon see her out again.

Why fret over a warm stove mak

ing pastries when you can buy a pan

of cinnamon rolls at the Federal Bak Bakery
ery Bakery for only fifteen cents? 28-t

Obeying Orders.

"Ton are using gestures In your

speeches more freely tnan you usea
to."

"Yea," answered Senator Sorghum.

"The doctor told me I'd have to take

more exercise.

The following expect to leave this

afternoon to attend the April fool

.11 dance, which will be given at the
I rft ?11

university in uainesviue; misses jess

Get your candy at the old price of Eehon' Gissendaner, Ethel

Clark, going in the Dehon car; Misses

Loureen Spencer, Marian Dewey, Cor

nelia Dozier and Mrs. H. C. Dozier in

Mrs. Dozier's car. All expect to re-

Nunnally's and. Liggett's Candies

educed to ONE DOLLAR the pound.

it Ceng's Drug Store.

one dollar per pound at Gejig's Drug

btore. Nunnally's and Laezett's. tf

Feminine Determination.

"I forbid any further extravagance

In this housefurnlshlnc business.

want you to understand, madam, that

I put my foot down en any new car-

nets."

"All rient. John, dear: theyH be

there tn put It down on."

The following were among the out
of town visitors in town triAa-o- f r

H. F. Warren. Miss C. F. Redding and tu tonight after the dance.

Mrs. Hanbury of Inverness, and Mrs.
C. P. Davis, Summerfield.

We are showing the best line of
bathing suits made, "Bradley's." For
ladies, misess, boys, little boys and
men. H. A. Waterman, The Haba Habadasher.
dasher. Habadasher. l-2t

Boys' kool cloth suits with extra
trousers, $6.50. H. A. Waterman, The

Haberdasher. l-2t

FORD

Magnetos Recharged

Makes lights better and starting eas

ier. Takes ten minutes to charge

and magneto is good for life of car.

ADAMS

FOR SALE Or lefse for Ion pened

of years, 25 acres of land on South
Orange avenue road, two miles
from Ocala. If sold will take good
car in exchange. Address, describ describing
ing describing make and condition of car, Lot Lottie
tie Lottie M. Matsler. 1744 Market St,
Jacksonville, Fla. 2S-t

IX) ST License tag to an auto. No.

27658 B. Fla. Return to H G.
Shealey and receive reward. 25-tf

BOARDER WANTED $6 per week.

Apply to 926 S. Lime St. 28-t

FOR RENT Furnished apartment at

1129 Ft. King-Ave. Phone 207Y. 12t

FOR SALE Genuine Porto Rico

plants, 8 to 12 in. long, government,
inspected; no weavels or disease.
Guaranteed immediate delivery.
$1.75 per thousand, express collect.
Write for prices on vines. C H.
Cooner, 746 Wyominia St, Ocala,
Fla. Phone' 389. 30-tf

FOR RENT One house with garage
and two furnished or unfurnished
rooms. Phone 221. or.call at 607 Ft.

King Ave.

31-6t

WANTED Rags; must be well laun laundered.
dered. laundered. No sewing room scraps. Old
table or bed linen or underwear pre preferred.
ferred. preferred. Four cents per pound. Star
office. 31-61

Spring weather has arrived for

good and now's the time to eat cin cinnamon
namon cinnamon rolls. Federal Bakery. 21-6t

THE FORD SPECIALIST
Phone 584

Jefferson Street and A. C L. R. R.

Mrs. James Bryan Jr. of Tampa, is

visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W.

W. Stripling. Mrs. Bryan expects to

return to Tampa Sunday and she will
be accompanied by Miss Meme Davis.

Just in ROADWAY Coffee, ones
and threes. Include a can in your next
order. Cook's Market and Grocery,
Phone 243. ' tf.

Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Turner, who
have been occupying Mrs. M. E.
Layne's house on Alvarez street, mov moved
ed moved today to the Dr. J. W. Hood cot cottage,
tage, cottage, corner South Third and Sanchez

streets.

iWI'l

Burn

Beadage Che spot with plenty of

Coots aad heals gently d arheyticwffr

FREE! FREE!

Get your motor washed out FREE
with 'any five-gallon can of oil pur-r
chased at Mack Taylor's Filling Sta Station.
tion. Station. 31-6t

You can always get fresh or salt
water fishi oysters, shrimp, etc., at
the City Fish Market on Fort King

avenue. Phone 158. tf

Sentilla Cigars sold everywhere, m

SUGAR SATURDAY AND MONDAY

11 pounds of sugar for one dollar,

with a dollar's worth of other groc groceries
eries groceries for cash, Saturday and Monday

only. Phone 377.
tf H. B. WHTTTINGTON.

COUNTRY SMOKED MEAT

. For sale, hams 30c. a pound; sides

25c. pound, and shoulders 20c. pound.
W. M. Shockley, Lowell. Fla. 30-6t

Jeff Daniels, who killed Jim Will Williams,
iams, Williams, another negro, near Reddick

one -night last week, has given him

self up and is, in the county jail." He

claims self defense. He made his ap

pearance at the home of his employer,

Mr. G D. Boyles, a farmer .of the
Sparr section this morning, and Mr.
Boyles brought him to town. The
sheriff is inclined to think the negro's

plea of self-defense is true, as other

wise he would not have given himself

op-

Cinnamon rolls are just the thing

for your midday luncheon these spring
days. Get the Federal Bakery kind. 6t

NEEDHAM MOTOR CO.

General Auto Repairing

and Storage
Gasoline, Oils and Grease
. USED CARS FOR SALE

Cars Washed .J 1.00

Cars Polished .50
Oklawaha Ave. fit Orange St

Phone 252

Hot Boston baked beans and brown

bread for. Saturday night supper at I

Carter's Bakery. l-2t

The Star hopes that the Ocala High

School will be able to send a team to
attend the annual high school field

and track meet at the state university

at Gainesville next Friday and Satur

day. A description of the event will
be found elsewhere.

1918 7-passenger Buick. Just paint

ed, new top; 90-day mechdnical guar

antee; good tires; $1050. Spencer-

Pedrick Motor Go., Buick dealers. 28tf

The Long List of Fremises.
So their honeymoon Is or erf

"I fancy so. She's started In to
remind him of all the wonderful things
he promised to de for her If she would

only marry him.
Guesa Wha.

Friend rve seen a tall man going
to your studio every day for a week.
T h ulrtin for Tout

Impecunious Artist No; he's laying

for me.

Geo. Hay 2 Co.
J Funeral Directors
' and Embalcers
Two Licensed Embalmers
Motor Funeral Can
Private Morgue and Chapel
Day Phone 47
Night Phone 515
G. B. Overton, Manager

FOR RENT Completely furnished

three-room apartment for., light
housekeeping. Apply "B" care the
Star office. 31-3t

FOR SALE Sweet peas. Apply to
Mrs. T. M. McLean, Fort King ave avenue.
nue. avenue. Phone 220. Box 85. 31-3t

WANTED Several hours bookkeep bookkeeping
ing bookkeeping work -to do at night. W. B,
Britt, city. 31-3t

FOR EXCHANGE Six horse "Peer "Peerless"
less" "Peerless" boiler and engine, for three three-or
or three-or four-horse gasoline engine. J. M.'
Fennell, Box 30, Route B. Ocala,
Fla. 4-l-t-

Mr. and Mrs: H. M. Stafford of

Cleveland, Ohio, who have been spend

ing the winter at the Goodwin cot cot-take
take cot-take at Woodmar, are leaving today

for home. Mr. and Mrs. Stafford

have made many friends in Ocala dur during
ing during their stay who hope they will re return
turn return next winter.

Different.

"Did vou ssv the leading man of the

company was overcome with the heat

laet nlrht?"

"No. I didn't. I said he collapsed at

this morning's roast"
Advice.
-Revenge Is sweet."

- "I know, but the surest way to
failure, is to neglect your own busi

ness while you waste your time try

ing to get revenge.

Auto Repairing
ALL CARS
CYLINDERS REBORED 'AND
WELDING

EFFICIENT WORKMEN,

PROMPT SERVICE

REASONABLE CHARGES
GEO. J. WILLIAMS
Formerly Carroll Motor Company
Garage, Osceola St.

PHONE 597 Night 408

.

RAILROAD SCHEDULES

Arrival and denarture of Dassenjrer

trains at OCALA UNION STATION.
The following schedule -figures pub

lished as information and not guar guaranteed.
anteed. guaranteed. .
(Eastern Standard Time)
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILROAD

2:20 am JacksonviHe-NTork 210 am
1:55 pm Jacksonville 1:50 pm
4:17 pm Jacksonville 3:50 pm
2:15 am Tampa-
Manatee-St Petrsbrg 4:05 pm
2:55 am NTTork-St. Petrsbrg 1:35 am
2:15 am Tampa 2:15 am
1:50 pm Tampa-Manatee 1:35 pm
4:05 pm Tampa-SL Petrsbrg 4:05 pm
ATLANTIC COAST LINE R. R.
Leave Arrive
2:27 am Jacksonville-NTork 2:33 am
1:45 pm JkBonville-Gainsville 3:24 pm

6:42 am Jksonville-Gansville 10:13 pm
2:33 am StPetsbrg-Lakeland 2:27 am

SLPetsbrg-Lakeland 1:25 pm
Dunnellon-Wilcox

"Dunellon-Lkeland

Homosassa
Leesburg

4:45 cm Gainesville

Monday, Wednesday, Friday.
Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday.

3:24 pm
7:10 am
7:25 am

3:30 pm

10:15 pm

11:03 pm
1:25 pm
6:42 am

11:50 am

. AJ A? AmAfA A.- "A

mm-
:i::i:
::i:
:i::j:
:i::i:

SOME HEAL

B AEG 'AIMS
Ml UEP CAES

11916 Buick
A-l shape
Newly Painted
Good Tires
1 1919 Ford
Truck

350

550

A-l shape
Extras amount to
about $150

1 1914 Ford
Truck

- - .- -

1 1914 Buick
"4"
1 1916 Stude Stude-baker
baker Stude-baker Truck

$150

100
350

v?t

Dealers In

oilfle Bros, filof or VcMeles
OCALA, FLORIDA

mm
SlSf
X!f I

W Si 1 i ; 9 V
... aaAAAA.AAAlLAMA i!lS
at lra'r"', .-...'-.



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