The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:05789

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
OCALA

TliRTTi

TEMPERATURES
WEATHER FORECAST
This morning, 45.
This afternoon, 75.
Partly eloudy tonight and Tuesday.
Not ranch change in temperature.
OCALA, FLORIDA. MONDAVI JANUARY 21, 1921.
VOL 27
NO. 19

AK

V M I l I I

1U V JU

ci s e mini

TIE EAST COAST

SAVING MONEY FOR THE CITY

As we have previously proclaimed

in general terms that John Martin
was doing good work for the city, and
putting matters in shape to not only
improve the town but save it money,
we will now point to some of the

Mr. Harding and His Party Stopped he jf do? nd J

uoe can cuounu iu iiiuijr unuum ihic

Today at Roekledge to
Play Golf

by auto.

To begin with, the city owns a

rock crusher, which for some years

bas had an useless and unornamental

place right where a number of- the

women are trying to establish a pub

lic park. About two miles and a half

(Associated Press)
Ormond Beach, Jan. 24 The house houseboat
boat houseboat Victoria, on which President Presidentelect
elect Presidentelect Harding is cruising down the

Indian river, made the first stop of I f rom the rock crusher as a bird can

her voyage at Ormond Beach yester-fjy anj much further as any vehicle

day afternoon and disembarked her I t,nt an airplane can progress, the city
passengers for a two-hour motor ride j own8 a niece of land containing a

along the Florida East Shore boule-jiarge deposit of lime rock. Apart
.vard. I they were of little value to the town;

Taking advantage of perfect weath- j together they are invaluable. They
er, the yacht pushed ahead of her I are together now. Various offers to

schedule and when she tied up for the J bring them into immediate juxtaposi

night she was within a few hours of Ujon for a consideration a consider

Roekledge, where the party expected able consideration were made. Then

to go ashore some, time today for a j came along John Martin and, with the
golf match. I city's own men and machinery and

' MRS. HARDING COMING I comparatively little expense, moved

. t oa TtfM Wai. I the crusher over to the rock. We can

1IEIIT0II SCEIIE
OF A RACE WAR

Home Guards Ordered Out by the
Governor Too Late to Save Two
Negroes from Hanging

ren G. Harding, wife of the president president-eelct,
eelct, president-eelct, arrived in Washington yester yesterday,
day, yesterday, where she will spend several

days -prior to joining Mr. Harding ataS

sec how quickly he would have set

tled the dispute between Mahomet
and the mountain thirteen centuries

St. Augustine, Florida.

WE LOSE SESSOMS

The Star regrets to say that Mar

ion county loses County Agent Ses-

The lime deposit was in the middle

of a field, and the field had a gate,
and every time a truck goes after

rock it has to stop at the gate and
the driver has to climb down and open

the gate, then climb up and drive his

truck thru, and stop and climb down

torn a.

Mr. Sessoms returned yesterday and shut the gate, and then climb up

(Associated Press j

Warrenton, N. C Jan. 24 Warren Warren-ton,
ton, Warren-ton, the scene last night of the lynch lynching
ing lynching of two negroes, is quiet today.
The company of home guards ordered
out by Governor Morrison last night
when he realized trouble was brewing.

but too late to prevent the double

lynching, is still on duty and further
trouble is not anticipated.
The lynching was the culmination
of several days of ill feeling between
whites and negroes of Norlina, four
miles fromhere, which reached its
climax Sunday in a pitched battle
there, in which five whites and three

negroes were wounded.

Thirteen negroes arrested were

lcdged in the jail here. The mob last

night quickly overpowered the jailer,
took Alfred Williams and Plummer
Bullock, two of the prisoners, a mile
outside of town and riddled them with
bullets.
SPIRIT OF UNREST RUNS TO
SIXSHOOTERS
The spirit of unrest among the ne negroes
groes negroes here today resulted in the ar arrest
rest arrest of five. The police said they
found many firearms in their possession.

MEETING OF THE

WOMAN'S CLUB

AWFUL RESULTS OF

A

GAS EXPLOSION

the

Conservation was the subject of
I
Saturday's meeting of the Woman's i
Club, with Mrs. Weihe, chairman of t
parks and driveways, in chrfrge of the I
roc-ram She made a short renort of i

the splendid work which she and her,More thB swe Killed nd

co-workers. Mrs. Walter Hood and'
Mrs. Emily Green, had accomplished i
during the past year in the improve-
ment of Tuscawilla Park.

Then Mrs. Tydings offered a resolu resolution
tion resolution to be sent to" our representatives a

Half

a Hundred Wounded in

Memphis

BAD TREATMENT
OF A COLORED BOY

BUSY DAY IN COURT

J X A A.

frm Unfair -uWo he went to at- ana starl again, vommg out,

tend the deathbed of his- wife's sam cess work had to be done- G-

.nW Mr. L. J. Dawdv. and after- 1n thru at eate twice tooK enouSft

., I,. , . ,. I 1

.mmny H,a remain to Mrs. m aa aimosi enougn gas to arive juage rutcns courx was a Dusy

...j

Dawdy's former home in Maquon, 111., a mue; aiT- martin ngurea on it a;piace mis morning, xour cases coming

where they were laid to rest. iew mmuies- anu now ne 13 uiiaing,w?iore n nonor.

It being impossible for Mrs. Ses- B ,ane irom ine roaa lo ine crusner, aamuei mim, coioreti. was respon respon-soms
soms respon-soms who is caring for her aged 80 trucks will not have to stop at thejsible for two, and his desire to make
fniW to inin him here. Mr. Sessoms eate because the gate won't be there, j tainted money out of whisky was re-

has decided to return to Bonifay, and There wiU be enough time and gaso- sponsible for both. One case cost him

leaves Wednesday nieht. He likes ime savea inere in,s ear lo Pa Ior a nurea ana cosis, anu me omer

- m i m

Marion county very much and dislikes ine Iane Ience ien umes over- . I

to give up his work here, but considers century ago mere was a nmpiu

it his duty to stay with his home and sP"nS at ine DO"om OI .ine ni" m in.e

relatives. He asks the Star to request souine fari OI ine fn' I I
any person who wants any informa- ".. llttle stream, winding through
ticn concerning any of the enterprises rass and trees to a pretty lake at
he has entered on to write to him, if the b0"01" of another hill a few bow-

necessary, at Bonifay. snois away. mere was an inaian v .-

Mr. Sessoms has made an excellent '? near ana me inaians Kept me
I ji 1.1 a i rri

(Associated Press)
Memphis, Tenn., Jan. 24. Possibly
score of persons were killed and

in Congress, urging: th?t our natioaal -fifty or more were injured as a result
parks throughout the country be pre- cf the explosition of a tank car of
seived in all their natural beauty, proline here today, which set fire to
conserving the forest growth and a cow of small dwellings occupied
w?terways, and savins them from mostly by negroes, a number of whom

commercial greed of every kind. This are missing and it is believed

lesolution was heartily endorsed. burned to death.
Mrs. Tydinps also read a paper on Early police estimates place" the
good roads, which gave much inter- number of dead as high as twenty-five,
esting information to her hearers, .while hospital reports indicated at
For the years 1920 and 1921 she re- least fifty were given treatment for
ported that $401,000.000 had been ap-,l.r.ken limbs and other injuries,
j.ropriated for crood roads in the ; The cause of the explosion has not
South alone. !len determined but fire department
Mrs. Weihe next introduced Dr. 'off-cials believe it was due to a flying
Creson, who spoke on parks, play-; spark from the chisel of a workman
grounds and especially on landscape 'caulking the car. The scene ofthe
gardening. He said the latter was explosion, at Main street and Mill ave ave-rot
rot ave-rot a new art, but had its beginning irce, is the center of a densely popu popu-in
in popu-in the early geometrical gardening of lated part of the city and a short dis-

the Egyptians. He traced its prac- tance from the gas plant, which was
tice among the Assyrians and Per- endangered by the fire which spread
sians, later among the Russians and rr.pidly.
in modern times noted a marked ; Twenty frame houses were literally
change in the adoption of the English splintered by the force of the explo explo-method,
method, explo-method, which abandoned the formal if!on and set on fire, while windows

geometric planting and preserved the within a radius of fifteen blocks werej Liverpool, Jan. 7. Lord Lever Lever-beauties'of,
beauties'of, Lever-beauties'of, the natural landscape, ne broken. Two of the three negro work-!halme, one of Great Britain's largest

As Mr. A. G. MacKay of Morriston,
brother of Mrs. EL A. Osborne, was
going home from Ocala Saturday aft afternoon,
ernoon, afternoon, he found John Taylor, colored,
aged about 14 years, lying on the
roadside near a saddle. The first
thought was that he had been thrown
from his horse, but on examining the
boy Mr. MacKay found that it was
evidently foul play. He left the boy
in care of friends and secured a doc doctor
tor doctor from Morriston, who after exam exam-ing
ing exam-ing Taylor found he had been shot,
lie was brought to Ocala and is now
at the colored hospital. Dr. Peek says
h? was shot m the back of his head.
The boy and his father have worked

were i for Mr. Osborne for years and are

good negroes. The boy was sent on
an errand to Morriston, from his
home at Blitchton. The boy, who re regained
gained regained consciousness, said that sev several
eral several white boys came up to him while
he was riding along on his pony and
asked him how fast he could ride and
becoming frightened at the sight of
the pistols, the boy whipped his horse,
and as he was riding away he was
fired upon and struck in the-back of
the head. His chances for recovery
are poor.
The officers have taken the matter
in hand and are searching for the
perpetrators of this cruel outrage.

SAYS PROHIBITION
HAS COME TO STAY

three months hard labor. Consider Considerable
able Considerable of a setback for" Sam.
The third was Mary Nichols, color colored,
ed, colored, who swiped a dress out of a qual quality
ity quality lady's house. Mary was bound
over in $500 to the grand jury and
will probably work out the price of
several dresses for" the state.
The fourth was William Glovei,

county agent, and Marion sincerely

regrets- to lose him.

SCANTY HAUL OF COIN

spring and the stream clean. The colored, stealing a ride on a train. He
white man came, chased the red manlwas given three months, in which time

away, built a town and in time chang-jhe could walk across the United
ed the spring into a mudhole and the .States.

brook into a sewer. After awhile, the

mentioned the parks and playgrounds men caulking the car were killed,
of many American cities, among: them, while the third escaped without in in-New
New in-New York city. Boston, Baltimore, jury.
Chicago and St. Paul. He thought ( Every ambulance in the city was
that in Ocala thre was no need for rushed to the scene and volunteer res res-a
a res-a large park, but advocated the con- cue parties formed to aid the police in
verting of the many vacant lots thru- removing the dead and injured,
out the town into lx'autiful park The fire was broujrht under control
places. before it had spread beyond the dwell-
Mr. Chas. W. Hunter, our newly ii.s in the immediate vicinity of the
elected representative, spoke on the explosion.
reforestation of Florida and urged the ESTIMATE INCREASES
Woman's Club of Ocala to endorse a ,. ... ,
..,.,, I Ten bodies mutilated beyond recog-
bill which he expects to present at the ... j m
' , .' nation were moved a few minutes after
next session of the legislature. ... ... i-
. the explosion, and while the latest
A song bv Miss Pearl Fausett. ac-! ,.
... t p hce estimates place the number of
companied bv Miss Dorothv Lancas- . A vi-j

ter, and a saxophone solo bv Dr. Karl... . ... ,

Weihe, accompanied by Mrs. are.jccm ,ete check h&3 been made
were the very pleasant musical num-:,. fjund four negrQ

L"c f women and one negro baby.

manufacturers, told the Daily Post
representative on his return from &
recent Visit to the United States that

"prohibition in America has come to
stay of that you may be certain."
"The people are settling down un under
der under it," he continued, "and I believe
that if put to the popular vote, 75 per
cent of the electorate would support
its continuance. There is not the
slightest chance that the law against
alcoholic drinks will ever be repealed."

Bandits Held Up a Passenger Train

for Only Nine Dollars
-
(Associated Press)

Louisiana. Mo., Jan. 24. Four ban

dits who "held up a Chicago & Alton

passenger train today got only nine
dollars, which they took from the

fireman. The trainmen locked the
doors of the acrs and the bandits

were unable to enter.

white man needed clean, soft water in

his business, so he cleaned out the
spring, but its water did not go many
yards before it was defiled with the

filth of the town. So it has been thirty

or forty years,

CASE REGARDING TAXES

IS NOW IN COURT

The case brought in the circuit
court several weeks ago seeking to

perhaps longer, and 'enjoin the collection of taxes for .the

The

over a

loiher bodies were scattered

I block.

Many of the fifty injured were se-

House of 1,000 Rooms.
.A mnzi whir-h forms n liaimv hnnt-

lne eround for ml.t.ers. is the house iriously hurt. One of the injured, an

formerly occupied by the ministry of

CAUGHT LITTLE CASINO

Belfast, Jan. 24. Rev. J. A. Irwin,
the Presbyterian minister who spoke

in the United States with Eamon de
Vnlera during the flatter's tour, has

been arrested.

how many people have died of fever
disseminated by that rotten ditch
only the recording angel knows.

The city government ordered tile

to construct a scientific sewer, but the
tile has lain idle month after month
because the ditch couldn't be shaped

to lay it. Martin's men have been

digging vigorously there the past two

purpose of creating a sinking fund

for the payment of certain road
bonds authorized in the Marion coun county
ty county bond election last year, is before
Judge Bullock in chambers today.
Mr. H. M. Hampton is representing

several parties in the suit, while Mr.
E. H. Martin of the firm of Hocker &
Martin, is representing the board of

weeks, and. it begins to look like that ounty commissioners.

CHESTER ROWELL WILL

GO TO CALIFORNIA

( Associated j Press)

Washington, Jan. 24 Chester Row-

ell, of California, has resigned as a

member of the new shipping board,

effective immediately. It was an

nounced at the White House that he is

leaving the board to become a member
of the California railroad commission.

AMERICAN WILL DIRECT

BUILDING OF CHINESE MINT

Changhai,- Dec. 17. (Correspon

dence of the Associated Press). The

first step in an effort toward uniform
ity in ChirVese currency will be under

taken by the building here of China's
first national mint. The work will be

directed by an American mint expert,
Clifford Hewitt, of Philadelphia,
whose services have been loaned to

China by the United States and who

came here a short time ago to begin
his duties. Mr. Hewitt installed the

new mint at Manila, the first estab

lished in the Philippines.

menace to the health of the whole city
will be abolished before the sun of
another summer can' turn the slime

irto poisonous steam.

These be two big works that John

Martin is pushing the smaller ones
are two numerous to name.

In a few days, as soon as the city

plant can give him power to drive the

dynamo for the rockcrusher, he will

pave the northern outlet to Main

street and then the autoists can loop
the loop from up town to the union
station and return.

He hasn't forgotten the young

folks, either, as you can see by going

and looking at how well he is paving

the basketfall field and tennis court

at the high school.

Ocala appreciates men who do

things, instead of eternally discussing
them.

As we go to press the case is still
n progress.

Our old friend, Dr. Kiplinger, from
Miami, is with us again.
Mr. H. J. Pfeifer, representative
from St. Johns county, has been in
the city, looking after business mat

ters.

EXTRA LARGE ORANGE

AND GRAPEFRUIT TREES

Mr. C. L.
city today.

Steele of York is in the

A few extra large, bearing size,

five-year-old buds on eight-year-old

sour stock. For yard purposes and for
filling in groves. Genuine Marsh seed

less-grapefruit and Parson Brown
oranges or sour stock. $5 each for
three or more trees. E. H. MOTE,

22-tf Leesburg, Florida.

Pure grapefruit and orange jelly,
"a Florida product," at the Fort King
Confectionery. Phone 596. 22-tf
Mrs. W. R. Rives of Montbrook,
spent the week-end in the city, visit visiting
ing visiting her daughters, Misses Dixie and

Mary Rives.

war In Vienna, says a correspondent.
The great size of the thousand roomed
house evidently attracts the attention

of thieves and the military and police
seem unable to keep them out. Or Ornaments,
naments, Ornaments, pictures, typewriters, every everything
thing everything and anything, even to the door
knobs and knockers are constantly be being
ing being carried away. When a thief, in
the course of his wanderings, meets
anyone, he simply pretends to have
come on business, and goes on until Jie
comes to an unoccupied room, there
he quickly gathers together anything
he can lay his hands on, and departs.
In many cases the robbers have an
accomplice In the street to whom ar articles
ticles articles are thrown from the window."

unidentified negro boy, who after be

ing blown into the air, fell into a

'nearby creek with both legs, broken.

An early estimate of the property
damage indicated it would not exceed
$150,000.

Cream-Colored Moles.

India's Fertility.

India, more than half the size of
JOurope, has every variety of Surface,
climate and production. The contrast

twtween the level monotony of the

Great plain and the beautiful con

tours of the Milgiri and Pulney bills

is no greater than that between th

arid heat of Jacobabad and the polai

frigidity of the Himalayas; or that

between the palm groves of Cochin and

the wheat fields of Lyallpur.- The pro-

ductivity of India extends over three

It is rather curious to find dead j zones: the tropical, sub-tropical, and

moles lying about dykesldes when temperate; though on account of vary

The friends of Mr. R. S. Rogers of
the Rogers-Wilson Realty Company,

will be glad to hear that he is recov-

ering from his illness of the past few j

weeks.

mole-fur prices are so high, writes a
correspondent from Scotland. I crossed
a field, and at the exft I counted no
fewer than 22 moles In a heap. These
had evidently been thrown there
by a local trapper as useless lum lumber.
ber. lumber. More curious still,- I came on
what may be called the unique In
moles. A gardener had trapped four
of these rodents of a decided cream

color. No .portion of the bodies gave j

signs of normal coloring. The gar gardener,
dener, gardener, said he surmised there were
more on his premises, but he had
failed to catch them at the date he
exhibited the four referred to.

ing elevations these do. not always
comolv with mere considerations oi

latitmle.

Mr. Thomas E. Hutchens and Miss
Nellie Elizabeth Ross of Gaitef have
been before Judge Futch, and were
sentenced to spend a long and happy

life together.

If you wish to know the location,

Try a H-lb. box of crystallized slze or anv otner mrormation about

grapefruit or orange. Youll like it. the zeT Property to be sold at auc-

Ft: King Confectionery. Phone 596. tf Von Januafy 2tn, see our Mr. relton,

Iat me Harrington nan notei, ana ne
will take pleasure in showing you

o Know Aav )rp Kunstnv via. I ever the same. 24-

at the Catholic church in the morning

and evening, and at. Summer-field in! Mr. R, A. Burford Jr. of Birming

the afternoon and confirmed a class ham and Mr. Hall, of the firm of Bur-

of twenty-six at the evening service, jford. Hall & Smith, spent Sunday in

Bishop Curley has many friends here,! the city, guests of the former's par-

and they count his visits as being too ts, Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Burford and

seldom. family, en route to points south

Mr. H. D. Nelson, formerly with

the Daylight Line, now with the St.
Augustine & Palatka Transportation

Company, was in town yesterday,
visiting his numerous friends. He is
as fat and sassy a3 ever.

Continental Camp Rediscovered.
"Connecticut Village," one of the
camps of Washington's soldiers in the
Hudson highlands, the site of which
has long been unknown, has been redis rediscovered
covered rediscovered by members of the New York
Historical society. The unearthing of
a bayonet blade, a grapeshot, buttons
of the Continental infantry and artil artillery,
lery, artillery, bullets, gunflints and other mili military
tary military relics, togther with topographical
characteristics that tally accurately
with records in Confinental documents,
have placed the camp on the farm of
James Smith, about a mile and a half
from Cold Spring village.

Remorseful Ghost.

A pathetic story is told of the ghost

of Blsham abbey. It is said that the

wife of Sir Thomas Hobby was un

naturally -severe with her son. who, it

I seems, had a peculiar aversion to writ

ing, and in his obstinacy would wilful

ly blot his copybooks.. One day hi

mother, enraged at his perverseness,
lost her self-control and beat the poor
boy so unmercifully that he died from

his Injuries. Since then one of the

bedrooms in the abbeyhas been haunt

ed by the specter of the cruel woman,

who glides through the chamber In the

act of washing the. bloodstains from

her hands

It is stated that, some years ago,

when an old window shutter of the six

teenth century was removed, "a packet

of antique copybooks of that period
was discovered pushed into the wall

between the joists of the skirting, and
several of these books, on which young

Hobby's name was written, were cov covered
ered covered with blots."

Sheep Driven to Mountains.
Wild sheep live in small flocks In

rocky, mountainous parts where food

s sparse. Had they been possessed

of such means of defense as the heel

and the speed of the horse, or the
horn- and the strength of the bison
they would probably have congregated
on the plains where food was plenti plentiful.
ful. plentiful. As it was, their only protection

from their natural enemies, the wolves.

lay In their agility In the most inac

cessible spots. The length of time

sheep have been domesticated Is as
nothing compared with the preceding
age when their home was In the
mountains, consequently coming under

the dominion of man has utterly, re reversed
versed reversed their conditions of life. So the

growth of the hoof is out of all pro proportion
portion proportion to the wear on our soft pas pastures,
tures, pastures, and foxtrot supervene. Simi Similarly
larly Similarly the thick coating of wool which

was absolutely necessary at the alti altitudes
tudes altitudes the wiM sheep Inhabited, has. as
far as the sheep Itself Is concerned,
become a nuisance, and rendered It a

prey to ticks and maggots.

POWERS OF EUROPE
CONFER AT PARIS

With Them Japan, to Try mad Settle
Aftermath Trochlea of the
Great War
(Associated Prej)
Paris, Jan. 24. Representatives of
Great Britain. France, Italy, Belgium
and Japan met here today for a con conference
ference conference which seemed second in im importance
portance importance only to that preceding the
signing of the Versailles treaty.
The conference is expected to set settle
tle settle reparations and disarmament of
Germany, enforcement or alteration t
of the treaty with Turkey, relief fori
Austria and policies to be pursued in'
dealing with Russia.
AU are questions on which the dif-
ferent participant nations at the con-1
ference are more or less divided and
the settlement of which is viewed j
with much concern. d

WOMAN DIRECTOR

OF GRAND OPERAl

(Aasoclmtea Ptm

Chicago, Jan. 24. The first woman
to have complete business and artistic1

charge of one of the big American'j

gisuu cumpames, m anon vo nei
the dictator of the enterprise, Maryj
Garden, outlined what she thought!
opera should mean throughout thel
United States. Miss Garden, knownl
in Chicago and in numerous other!
American cities as "our Mary," wasj
appointed to the joint role of a star,jj
artistics director and business man-1
ager of the Chicago Opera Associa-3
ton early this month. ?
Mary Garden's ambition is to makel

opera and herself as welt loved by the

p6ple of the whole United States as

she is by the people of Chicago.

Enthusiasm, fervor, hard work.i

constant supervision, strict economyj
and modern opera rather than the old,
are only a few things that Miss Gar-

c'eji promises to show the people of

America that she has in her and is

capable of producing.

"Music, real music, said Miss

Garden, "is being borne on- the high

tide of popularity, through the mar

velous phonograph and pianola, into
the homes of almost every family In
this country. I hope to take advan advantage
tage advantage of this and by hard work, bring
opera up to the place that it deserves

in the hearts of the people. Wouldn't
it be wonderful, if by doing this I will
have made them love opera and me
as .well as the people of Chicago have
convinced me that they love me?

NEW ZEALAND WILL HAVE
AIRPLANE MAIL SERVICE

How to Enjoy' Walk.

There are road walkers, trail fol

lowers, forest roamers locality and

Rcenenr are matters of taste. The

a (Associated Presa)
New York, Jan. 24. New Zealand
will soon inaugurate an airplane mail
service modeled after that In use by
the United States postoffice depart-'
ment, according to J. B. Murphy, of t
Timarou. New Zealand, who came

here to see demonstrations of various
aircraft. The company with which he

thins is to keen marching, to fill one's

lungs with draughts of Invigorating lis .connected has signed a contract to

air. to banish care and to revel in high Icarry aerial mails tn New Zealand

w

spirits. There should be a top at
every spring, the colder and shyer the
better, -aVi when a landscape Is to he
viewed, some scene that charms and
inspires, it Is a sacrilege If the walker
does not throw himself down on the
grass, or seat himself on a. fallen tree,
to spend a few minutes feasting his
eye on the picture. The true walker
is not one who merely puts miles be

hind him. to vaunt his speed and
durance. Exchange.

added Mr. Murphy.

Sightseeing over Mount Cook In

airplanes also is contemplated, M.

Murphy said. Mount Cook is a major

objective point for touists in that
country.

Origin of Language.
Authorities WHeve that all lan languages
guages languages had their origin la the dialect
of ore common language who? home
is conjectured to have been be between
tween between the Baltic and Caspian seas.
The language spread with migrations
in different places, and separation and
race admixture Increased the differ

ences In the dialects nutll they be

came distinct languages, which in turn

spread and broke up into dialects.

The members of the Ocala Rotary
C?ub attended service in a body at
Grace Episcopal church Sunday morn- (

ing and listened to a well prepared. tnru. wfcha

Cow Gives 42. Tons of MUk.
A British Friesian cow, owned by an
English farmer, gave more than 2.0HO
gallons of milk during 1919. and prom promises
ises promises to repeat the performance this
vear. In the two years her output of

milk amounted to considerably more

more

2 Try a -lb. box of crystallized Mr. Herman Hodges, a popular auto
grapefruit or orange. Youll like it. I man of Gainesville, was visiting his

Ft. King Confectionery. Phone 596. tf Ocala friends yesterday.

and eloquently delivered sermon by
the rector, Rev. J. J. Neighbor, who

is also a member of the Rotary club.

jhan IS tons. In les than six years
Moss Rose has had seven calves and
giyen more than 42 tons of milk.

MARION-DUNN MASONIC LODGE

More Trouble.

Marion-Dunn Lodge No. 19, F. & A. A firm of music r.unnuerS ua,
M.. meets on the first and third duced what they describe as a three-

thursday evenings of each month -at quarter one-step. .w .w-t.oa
t.oa .w-t.oa i m n. wwcfhie to aet a dance without bem;

j accompanied by a professional arith

7:30 o'clock until further notice.

J. R. Dey, W. M.
B. L. Adams, Secretary.

Movie Theaters In Rio.
It Is at the cinema theaters that
the Carlocas (citizens of Rio de -Janeiro)
know real comfort; for, un unlike
like unlike our moving-picture houses,
those in Rio have spacious waiting waiting-rooms,
rooms, waiting-rooms, where you sit, listening to ex excellent
cellent excellent music, until the hour for the

first reel comes round. The pioneer

house of the kind Inaugurated this

custom, and now the people refuse to
stand outside waiting for the even
hour to arrive or to enter after the
film has started. With so much profit profitable
able profitable space taken from the auditorium,
the movies in Rio Janeiro are not as
great money-makers as with us. Tlje
American favorites are popular, quite
outclassing Italian and Brazilian film
6tars. Harriet Chalmers Adaais in Na National
tional National Geographic Magazine

Challenge to Thought.

When you can't do what you want to
Ifs a challenge to think. If you can't
do It, why can't you? The chances are

yon will find It is not right that It
should be dope at all. Or it may be

that you are not the one to do It.

Ton may want to swim the Niagara

lust below the falls so you can boast

of doing what has not been done. Ton
may want to fly to the moon so yon
'can write of experiences never yet

felt by roan. Ton may even want to
olav the Jonah game so you can give

your experiences of a few days In the
deen. But you can't do It. The why

lies In the fact that yon are not made
for such exploits. To attempt any

one of them would be to tempt self self-destruction.
destruction. self-destruction. The crowd might stand

Historic 8tratfordn-Avon.
The history of Stratford-on-Avon
may be traced back for a period of
1.100 years, and as the birthplace of
Shakespeare Is has become a classic
center visited annually by some 50,000
people. The Guard house, where
Shakespeare was born; Shottery,
where he courted Anne Hathaway;
Charlotte park, once the seat of 8!r
Thomas Lucy, whose displeasure
Shakespeare- Incurred by stealing
bis deer; the Shakespeare Memo Memorial
rial Memorial theater, on the banks of the Avon,
and Shakespeare's monument, are all
places worthy of visiting In the old
market town of Stratford-on-Avon.
The Shakespeare hotel; situated la
the center of the town and close to
the Shakespeare Memorial theater,
was erected In the Fourteenth cen century.
tury. century. A few doors from Shakespeare
hotel la the Harvard House, which
waa the early "home of the Harvard
family, founders of Harvard culver-ity.

Potato Flour Mlxd With Whaat.
. A fifty-fifty mlxt-re of wheat flour
from the United State and potato
flour of domestic make has been or ordered
dered ordered by the Netherlands government
for Ita people with the hope of keeping
down the price of bread. Unless some something
thing something ts done to keep down the price
of Imported wheat it wis soon be out

of the reach of the populace, says the

by and watch you make the effort and I Chicago Journal. Potato starch was

used a irvmi yn uutug iu -mai mi
the purpose of piecing out the wheat
flour supply, and It was not generally
acceptable to the people, but potato
four will not be open to the sasse
criticism, and It la anticipated wCS
'cron xaort-calataila.

when you failed they weuld call yon

A fooL When yon cant flo what yon
Want to think. Grit

Make your want known tj adver adver-dring
dring adver-dring them.



" OCALA ETENCCG STAR, MONDAY. JANUARY ti, tfll

Ccala Evening Star

Pakltk4 Every Dmr Eieep Saaday by
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY,
OCALA, FLORIDA.

R. R. Carroll, Prealdeat
p. V. -LvBMd, Srrctry-Treaarr
J. rt. Bajamin. Salter

they wouldn't do if they thought any

body-would hurt you. Come on up
here about watermelon time, and well

teach you to climb barbed-wire fences.

Ocala, or the rather small part of it

that has heard about you, doesn't con consider
sider consider you anything more than a
rather amusing little personage.

Entered at Ocala, Fla.. postof fiee aa

aecond-eiass matter.

TELEPHONES

Daalaeaa Of flee Flve-Oae

Kdltartal Ueyartaieat Tr-Srea
Satiety Reaarter Ftve-0

MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS

""he Associated Press la exclusively

entitled for the u?e for republication of

all news dispatches credited to it or

not otherwise cred'ted in this paper and
also the local news tmblished herein.

All rights of republication of special

dispatches nerein are also reserved.

DOMESTIC SUBSCRIPTION RATES

One year, la advance t.oO
Klx months, in advance 3.00

Three months, in advance . 1.50
One month. In advance 40

ADVERTISING K.viES

Display t Plate 15 cents pr Inch for
consecutive insertions. Alternate Inser Insertions
tions Insertions 25 per cent additional. Composi Composition
tion Composition charges on ds. that run less than
six times 1 ce'ca per inch. Special

position 20 per cent additional. Rates

based on 4-inch minimum. Less tnan

tour Inches will take higher rate,

which will be furnished upon appllca
tlon.

Hemilng 5ot!eeat 5 cents' per line for

first insertion: 3 cents per line lor eacn
subsequent insertion. One change a
week allowed on readers without extra
composition 'charges.
Legal advertisements it legal rates

REFORESTATION OR RUIN

From ancient times, it i3 held, the in

strument used in violation of the- law

lias been subject to condemnation.
Thi3 decision has been expected for

some time, in fact, ever since the
Georgia case was filed in the court.

Under it, the owner of the car must
be careful, if he is not found guilty

himself, that his property is not taken
away from him through the act of an

other."

REPORT OF COUNTY FINANCES, MARION COUNTY,
RIOD ENDING SEPTEMBER 3a 1920

FOR THE PE-

The war- reduced the French popu population
lation population by 4,000,000. How' little, by
comparison, has been our sacrifice.

Because of the absence of crime in
Huntington, Utah,, the jail has been
turned into a public library. We hear
that the jail in a small, dry Florida
county has been turned into a stable.

The Pennsylvania State College
will inaugurate a course in cooking
for men beginning with the second
semester, -February 1. Men are as
good as women now, and some day
may be better.

More people are killed and injured
by tripping, slipping and falling than
from any other cause of accidents.
And we strongly suspect more people
go to hell from slipping up than from
any other reason.

A Nevada man while excavating
for a large gasoline tank in his
garage uncovered a ledge of gold
quartz at a depth of six feet running
' $137.50 a ton. We don't see what a
wan with a gasoline tank wants ith
a gold mine.

The wild rubber plant is now the
subject of experiments in Southern
Arizona. It is hoped the ultimate re result
sult result will have a decided effect in re reducing
ducing reducing the price of rubber. There
would be no use for this if we could
utilize our stock of rubber necks.

Road building experts are endeav endeav-OSrtng
OSrtng endeav-OSrtng to impress the public with the
fact that the old methods of building
roads no longer produce results equal
to the demands for highway transpor transportation.
tation. transportation. If the highways are to be de developed
veloped developed to thejr capacity, there must
be better and better highways.

A young man from a point near
Harrisburg, 111., recently walked fifty
miles to enlist in the United States
army. A Florida darkey walked forty forty-five
five forty-five miles before dinner one day dur during
ing during the war, in order to enlist, and
the Ocala draft board turned him
down because his feet were flat.

A new language "more concise and
forceful than any spoken, composed
of all spoken languages and denomi denominated
nated denominated 'American,' should result in this
country," says a statement by State
Librarian John Henry Newman, of
Columbus, O. The Star thought we
had that sort of a language already.

In reply to" statements that the

motor industry is approaching the

point of "saturation," the Liberty Na National
tional National Bank of New York has publish published
ed published a study of the subject which points
out that there are but 900,000 trucks
and 8,000,000 motor cars in service in
this country to supply the1 needs and
wishes of 105,000,000 people.

For years a growing danger has

teen entrenched in our state a dan

ger that comparatively few recognize

or even think of, but it has so mcteas

ed that unless checked and measures

taken to counteract it, Florida in fif

teen or twenty years more will be a

treeless deser.

When we say reeless, we refer to

the forests; not to the (.r. proves

and orchards and the ornamental

growth that 'inadequately make a

shadow of an attempt to replace the

giants of nature, and which them

selves must perish unless their fallen

guardians are replaced.

Fifty years ago, Florida was 99 per

cent forest. Extremes of heat or cold

and drouths were unknown. Of course
this condition of affairs could not be
expected to continue. Agriculture
and stock raising would not have re

duced the forests with undue rapid rapidity,
ity, rapidity, and agriculture would have part partly
ly partly replaced old trees with new. But

the timber and turpentine industries

naturally began the work that seemed

lying right in their hands and in less
than half a century have destroyed

more than half our forests, with a
prospect that, on account of that con constant
stant constant clearing of land for farms, cut cutting
ting cutting down trees for lumber or box boxing
ing boxing them for turpentine, the remain remainder
der remainder will be destroyed in far less time.
A treeless country is always a
desert country, the reason being that
trees attract rain in moderate quan quantities,
tities, quantities, and temper the climate. In
deserts there are drouths broken at
long intervals by heavy storms, but
moderate rains are unknown. Trees
also temper the climate. Where there
are great forests the weather is not
so hot or so cold as in treeless lands
in the same latitude. Our "Great

American Desert" was once a treeless

weste, where the grass, green and
sustaining a short portion of the
year, was dry as tinder the remainder
of the twelve months. When Lewis

and Clark led their little band across
the country between the Mississippi
and the Pacific, there were not fifty

thousand peopie living in the vast

stretch of country from Dakota to

Texas. These lived on game and only
by shifting from one place to another,
making long journeys from one wa-

tcrhole to the next; and often fighting
bloody battles for the possession of a
little spring that would rot be noticed
in the east. When the pioneers came,
they planted trees and now the prai prairies
ries prairies are dotted everywhere with groves
and orchards, the roads are shaded
and the entire condition of the coun-

i ry is changed, so that in many places
a million live in comfort where once
a thousand could find bare sustenance.

The vast Sahara was once a fertile

country with many cities the people

wasted their timber and their land
became a desert, rolling its waves of
sand down to the coast to meet the
waves of the sea. Now the people,
guided by the French, are planting
trees and digging wells and slowly
reclaiming the country from desola desolation.
tion. desolation. The nations of Europe were go going
ing going the same way, but they found out
what harm they were doing them themselves
selves themselves and most of them checked the
destruction in time. The American
government, realizing the danger, is
tiying to check it with forest re reserves,
serves, reserves, and some of our states are
working on the same line, but here in
Florida and several other states where
the longleaf pine abounded the care carelessness
lessness carelessness and greed of the individual
oerrides the common good, ''our trees
fall by hundreds of acres a day, and

if we don't stop it the sun ere many

years will shine on a stretch of sand

and scrub.

This matter is one on which our

present representatives in the egisla egisla-ture
ture egisla-ture desir.e to consult their constitu constituents.
ents. constituents. Mr. Hunter desires to introduce

a bill by "which reforestation can

SHOULD BE HERE IN

FORCE NEXT SATURDAY

Messrs. Hunter and Mayo "met a

tmall but interested crowd of citizens

at the courthouse Saturday afternoon

and discussed matters of public inter

est with them. Our representatives
were disappointed at not having a
larger attendance, and hope, at the
same hour, 2 p. m., next Saturday, to
meet at least 500 people from all parts

of the county. It's rather unusual for

a representative of a county to call j
after election on his constituents fori

their advice, and the Star hopes the
people of Marion county will encour

age this broad-minded policy by turn turning
ing turning out in good number next Saturday.

The following report of the receipts and disbursements of the funds
of MARION COUXTY for the period ending Sept. ?0th. 1920, with the
balance and amount of warrants outstanding and a statement of the as assets
sets assets and liabilities, and the value of county property, except school of the
said county as reported on the 2mh day of September. 120. by the Board
of County Commissioners and the Clerk of the Circuit Court Is hereby pub

lished undr the provisions of Chapter CS13 of the Laws of Florida. Acts

of lJir. ERNEST AMOS. Comptroller.

GENERAL FUND
Depository balance. April 1. li20
Outstanding warrants April 1. 120
Net deficit April 1. 1920
Receipts for the Six Months:

From Tax Collector, taxes r U.427.22
Comptroller, redemptions 1,039.70
Comptroller, railroad taxes S.4SS.45
Comptroller, telegraph taxes 11.98
Bank, interest 206:48
Clerk, filing fees 1,1525.94

$ 260.31
29.296.14
29,035.81

20.809.7;

BASKET BALL

The Iowa State College has recently
completed tests which show that a
wagon pulls easier when the load is
placed over the rear wheels than when
it is placed over the front ones. The
different in pull is said to amount to
about 100 pounds. That's the reason,
we suppose, why three fat men are
often assigned the rear seat of an
auto.

The territory of Hawaii will pro produce
duce produce enoughs motor fuel for its own
needs within two years. They would
also, be .able to supply the require requirements
ments requirements of the army and navy forces
there, should their bases of supply be
cut off. Commercial manufacture of
fuel alcohol from sugar molasses has
been made, practicable on a large

scale on the island of Mani. However,

there are enough Japs on the islands
to capture them, fuel and all.

The Ocala high school basketball

team returned Sunday afternoon from
Jacksonville, where they played th

Duval team of that city Saturday eve

ning. Altho defeated, they were highly

complimented by heir opponents for

the splendid game they played, and
were most cordially treated by their

opponents. The Times-Union writer

who reported the game highly compli

mented their coach (Miss Callie Gis Gis-sendaner)
sendaner) Gis-sendaner) for the splendid manner in
which she instructed the team; he also
conceded that the Duval team "play
basketball more on the order of the
man's game," which vindicates Miss
Louise Spencer from criticism on the
miinner in which she refereed the
game in Ocala on the 15th. The Ocala
girls have no complaint to make of
the result. They did their best and
were outplayed, and that is all there
was to it. Having tried out each
other's mettle, we expect those two
fine teams to remain the firmest of
friends.
The Times-Union's report appears
on another page.
Duval indeed is a marvelous team
with perfect team work and deserves
much credit. Our girls showed good
training altho the team work could be
better and with a little more practice
they will give Duval a chase for the

championship" in the third game, if

r-either team loses another game. All

of the Ocala girls played well, espe especially
cially especially Miss Annie MacKay, who gave
the Duval forward a hard fight. Fol Following
lowing Following are some of the Ocalans who
accompanied the basket ball team to
Jacksonville: Miss Alice Sexton and
Messrs. Paul Brinson, Homer Agnew
and Cecil Clark.
Ocala plays Gainesville next Satur Saturday
day Saturday in Gainesville. This also promises
to be a very interesting game, and
maybe Gainesville will surprise O. H.
S. and Duval, too.

Making deficit 8,226.04
Disbursements for the Six Months:
Salary of Clerk Circuit Court as Auditor and
Clerk to County Commissioners 1.155.00

i'er diem and mileage of Commissioners
Salaries of Other Officers and Employes:
Attorney for County Commissioners
Supervisor of Registration
County Physician
Repairs to County Buildings:..........-
Furniture and fixtures
Expenses of County Buildings:
Janitors and other attendants
Light, fuel and water -.
Insurance
Care of County Poor:

Allowances made to paupers outside of poor
houses and paid by warrants 1,9
Coroner's Inquests:

Fees of officers, jurors and witnesses
Insanity Inquiries:
Fees of officers and committees
Stationery and Printing:
General stationery blanks, etc
Record books
Advertising required by law, and paid for by Co..

commissions Paid to Orfjcers:
Tax Assessor 2.70S.27

Tax Collector
Postage
Sheriff, general court work
Expenses of election
Hospital account
Contingencies

Dipping vat construction 2.633.2C 17.840.50

717.80

250.00
644.65
350.00
275.00
25.20
770.00
350.31
671.13

;o.66

32.05

104.65
295.89
299.33
364.82

FREE GARDEN SEED

Congressman Clark has sent tho
Star a bag of fine garden seed to dis distribute
tribute distribute among the people. This seed
is expensive, and we don't want any
of it to go into the hands of people
who won't make good use of it. There

fore, farmers and gardeners who want
a package each will please come to

the Star office after it themselves.

MARION-DUNN MASONIC LODGE

commence at once and be sustained

until the sttae is relieved from its

rapidly increasing peril.

Ocala has an ordinance which re requires
quires requires solicitors for magazines and
periodicals to secure a license. It also

insists upon a bond being given to

insure the performance of the obliga obligation
tion obligation undertaken by the solicitors.

DeLand News.

Ocala is receiving a good deal of
favorable advertising on account of

this ordinance, which should be in ef
feet in every county in the state.

If the Pepper. Box ever goes to
Ocala on a visit, he better not divulge
his name. Anyway, I had often con considered
sidered considered spending 'mydeclining years
in their city. -"Red" in the Times Times-Union.
Union. Times-Union. Better take your sense of self self-importance
importance self-importance out and soak it in alum
water, Red, until it is reduced to its
proper' size. You could stay in this
town a week and nobody know you
were here unless one of the Ocala pa papers"
pers" papers" mentioned you, which of course

The Times-Union Washington cor
respondent says: "It makes no differ

ence whether you live in South Caro Carolina,
lina, Carolina, South Dakota, or anywhere else,

if you do not wish your automobile
seized under the prohibition laws do

not let is be used for the transporta transportation
tion transportation of booze. The opinion of the
United States supreme court, a day or

two ago, rendered in a Georgia case,

held that seizure of automobiles or

other conveyances is perfectly legal
under present laws, no matter wheth whether
er whether the owner is guilty or innocent
himself. In the case under considera consideration,
tion, consideration, seizure of a car was made by
federal agents which had been loaned
by the owner to a friend and which
the latter had used for the transpor

tation of intoxicants. The owner con contended
tended contended that he did not know that the
car was to be so used, but the court

would not stand for this, holding that
it was the owner's duty to look into
the matter ar.d ascertain in advance
that his car would not be so used.

Marion-Dunn Lodge No. 19, F. & A

M., meets on the first and third

Thursday evenings of each month at

7:30 o'clock until further notice.
- J. R. Dey, W. M.
B. L. Adams, Secretary.

ODD FELLOWS

Tulula Lodge No. 22, I. O. O. F.,

meets every Tuesday evening at the

Odd Fellows hall at the corner of

Fort King Ave. and Osceola street. A
vmrm welcome, always extended to
,-isiting brothers.
T. C. Carter, N. G.
H. R. Luff man. Secretary.
ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE
OF TRAINS IN OCALA

1.89.82

172.01
869.75
68S.1S
175.00
1.097.82
2.633.2C

Making deficit

Cr. Warrant issued for Certf. of indebtedness:

Home Guard ;

Making defi it
Dr. Home Guard Cenf. of indebtedness canceled.
Dr. Warrant c-ameled bv bond

COO.OO
24.00

26.066.54
600.00
26.666.54
624.00

..Making deficit Sept. "JO. 1&20
Warrants outstanding Sept ;-:o. 1920..

Depository balance.

FINK AND FORFEITURE FUND

Depository balance April 1, 1920
Warrants outstanding April 1, 1020...

Net balance
Receipts for the Six Months:
From Tax Collector, taxes..
Comptroller, redemptions..
Comptroller, railroad taxes..
Suwannee county, refund..
Justice of Peace, fines
Sheriff, fines
L. N. Green, attorney

26.042.54
29.110.59
3.068.05

675.40
301.10
374.50

99

1.736.90
148.56
785.78
223.06
192.50
4.200.30
1,000.00

7.383.01

Making balance
Disbursements for the Six Months:
Cost of Criminal Prosecution:
Sheriff and deputies, cost bills criminal cases.. ..
Constables, cost bills criminal cases
Clerk Circuit Court, cost bills criminal cases.. ..
County Judge, cost bills criminal cases :.
Justice of the Peace, cost bills criminal cases.. ..
Co. Prosecuting Atty., conviction fees
Witness fees
Court Stenographer in insolvency cases
Sheriff's corns, on fines, etc., collected ....
Feeding prisoners t ..
Transportation paid, for, and discharge money
paid to cr.nvicts worked on road ,.,
Pay of jurois in criminal cases, county and
Justice Peace courts
Salary of judge of juvenile court
Contingencies
Leaving balance
Dr. Warrant canceled by Board, 7-5-20. No. 5023....

7,762.30

1.095.74
7.75
14.17
244.92
12.05
80.00
385.60
29.00
147.38
883.30
50.00
138.00
75.00
150.11

3,313.02

Leaving balance Sept. 20, 1920.....
Warrants outstanding Sept. CO, 1920.

Depository halt

4,449.28
1.00
4.450.28
406.44

ROAD FUND

Depository balance April 1, 1920...
Warrants outstanding April 1, 1920.

Net deficit April 1, 1920
Receipts for the Six Months:
From Tax Collector, taxes 27,789.93
Comptroller, redemptions 2,376.35
Comptroller, railroad taxes .... 12,572.44
Board Co. Comrs., refund .... 253.47
Board Co. Comrs., sales 109.00
B. B. Beck, cement 4,00

4.856.72

730.58
56.210.99
55,480.41

43,105.19

1 :55 p. m

3:51 p. m.
4:05 p. m.
2:14 a. m.
2:15 a. m.
1:35 p. m.
1:55 p. m.
4:16 p. m.
4:17 p.m.
1:34 a. m.
1:37 a. m.

Seaboard Air Line
Arrive from Jacksonville.. 2:10a.m.
Leave for Tampa 2:15 a.m.
Arrive from Jacksonville.. 1:30p.m.

Leave for Tampa
Arrive from Jacksonville.
tave for Tampa
Arrive from Tampa
Leave for Jacksonville .
Arrive from Tampa
Leave for Jacksonville...
Arrive from Tampa
Leave for Jacksonville...
Arrive from New York...
Leave for St. Petersburg.

Arrive from St. Petersburg 2:55 a.m.
Leave for New York 3:00 a.m.

Atlantic Coast Line
Arrive from Jacksonville.. 2:31 a. m
.eave for St. Petersburg.. 2:32 a. m

Arrive from Jacksonville.. 3:34 p. in.

Leave for St. Fetersnurg. 3:35 d. m.

Arrive from Jacksonville. .10:12 o. m.

Leave lor ieesburg 10:13 d. h.

Arrive from St. Petersburg 2:26 a.m.

eave lor Jacksonville.... 2:27a.m.

Arrive from St. Petersburg 1:25 p.m.

Lave tor Jacksonville 1:45 p.m.

Arrive from Leesburg.... 6:41 a. n.
Leave for Jacksonville.... 6:42a.m.

Arrive from Homosassa. . 1.25 p. m.
Leave for Homosassa 3:25 cm.

Arrive from Gainesville.

daily except Sunday 11:50 a. m.

Leave for Gainesville, daily

except bunoay 4:45 obi.

Leave for Lakeland Tues

day, Thursday. Saturday 7:25 a.m.

Ar. from Lakeland, Tues

day. Thursday. Saturday 11:03 n.m.

Leave for Wilcox. Monday,
Wednesday and Friday. 7:10 a. m,
Arrive from Wilcox, Mon- j

day. Wednesday. Friday. 6:45 p.m.

Making deficit 12,375.22
Disbursments for the Six Months:
Superintendence and Supervision:
Salaries of road overseers and superintendents ... 1,027.00
Paid to Co. Comrs. for road inspection 395.50
Construction and Maintenance of Roads and Bridges:
Cost of material "." 405.45
Tools and machinery, cost and repairs 3,576.63
Pay of convict guards.. 235.00
Live stock, cost and care and feeding 79.27
Paid for free labor, other than guards 11,069.59
Feeding and care of convicts on roads 1,342.81
Dynamite, fuses, etc 114.05
Gasoline and oil 2,784.10
Paint and repairs of bridges 89.95
Payment to incorporated cities aud towns.
i,2 road tax 8,933.57
Contingencies '. ." 478.06
Bridge tenders anil ferrymen 1.170.00 31,700.98

Leaving deficit
Dr. Warrants canceled by Board
Leaving deficit Sept. H". 1920
Warrants outstanding Sept. "0, 192C.

Depository balame.

. ,

STATE AID ROAD FUND

Depository balance April 1. 1920...
Warrants outstanding April 1, 1920.

Net balance
Receipts for the Six Months:
From Comptroller, 'tr expense Rep. Dixie

Highway.

Making balance
Disbursements for the Six Months:
Repairs to Dixie Highway

Leaving balance Sept. 20. 1920
Marrams outstanding Sept. .10. 1920
Depository balance Sept. CO, 1920
. AGRICULTURAL FUND
Depository balance April 1. 1920
Warrants outstanding April 1, 1920
Net -balance April 1, 1920
Receipts for Six Months:

Making balance
Disbursemnts for the Six Months:
Contingencies..
Depository balance Sept. 30, 1920.,

44,076.20
1.500.00
42.576.20
47.292.65
4.716.45

S414.62
44 00
5.070.62
1.022.64
6,093.26
4,585.20
1.507.94
149.50
1,657.46
46736
None
46736
None
41736
39934
C3.C2

UNITED STATES APPROPRIATION ROAD FUND

Depository balance April 1. 1920 ...
Warrants outstanding April 1. 1920.

Net balance
Receipts for the Six Months:.....

Making-balance.. ".
Disbursements for the Six Months:
Paid Co. Comrs. (road inspection)
Tools and machinery, cost and repairs.
Paid for free labor, other than guards.
Gasoline and oil -.

S.00
270.49
528.00
12132

44.19
9C7.CS
Nose
967.6

92141

Leaving balance Sept.' 30. 1920
Warrants outstanding Sept. 30 49.0...

29.27
44.19

Depository balance Sept. 30, 1920
. SUB-ROAD DISTRICT NO. 1 FUND

Depository balance April 1. 1920..
Warrants outstanding April 1. 1920

82.46

489.01
None

Net balance April 1. 1920..
Receipts for the Six Months:.

489.0S
Noaa

Making balance
Disbursements for the Six Months:
Contract work

4S9.0S
400.00

Depository balance Sept. 30, 1920
BUILDING FUND

Depository balance April 1. 1920
Warrants outstanding April L 1920.

Net deficit April 1. 1920
Receipts for the Six Months:...

Making deficit...
Disbursements for the Six Months:

Leaving deficit
Dr. Warants canceled by Board. 6-9-20.
Net balance Sept. 30. 1920

OUTSTANDING INDEPTEDNESS FUND

Depository balance April 1. 1920...
Outstanding warrants April 1, 1920.

Net deficit April 1, 1920 ...... ....
Receipts for the Six Months:

, From Tax Collector, taxes 6347.46

Comptroller, redemptions .'. 594.12
Comptroller, railroad taxes 3,136.26
Comptroller, telegraph taxes .... 6.84

89.68

- Nona
5,005.00
5,000.00
Nona
5,000.00
None
6,000.08
5.000.09
Noaa

412.77
10.000.05
9,587.25

10.684.6S

- Making balance
Disbursements for the Six Mon-ri:

Contingencies.

Leaving deficit Sept. SO. 1920
Warrants outstanding Sept. 30, 1920.

Depository balance Sept. 30. 1920.... .-
ASSETS AND LIABILITIES

Assets

Fla la nee cash in depositories..

43ZJ

LUbllttes

Warrants outstanding for current sxpenses ... ....
Warrants oitstTdng or other evidence!: of indebt indebtedness
edness indebtedness given for property or more borrowed,
the payment of which is deferred-,

1.097.45
y.ooo.oo
1.500.00
341839
274.00 10.092.t
8.995.54
10.000.00
LOOMS
15.543.70
9.875.4 1
25.4 19.U

Total..

...... .....

- t.370'4
84.633.23
87,00347

VALUE OF COUNTY PROPERTY

Court house t 100,000.00
Jail 65,000.00
Other county property f., 35,300.00
Total 200.300.00

n

THAWS

" AND

KroVSTOI

WHITE 8TAK LINE i

Nczotiable Storaj e IWpU Issued on Cotton, ActaiacbiJep, Etc

LONG DISTANCE UOVTCG
Phone 225

MOVE, PACK, SHIP
LIVE STOCK,
PIANOS. BAGGAGE.
MACHINERY,
FURNITURE. ETC

grgffi

YOUNG-MEKRIM OQ.
CIVIL ENGINEERS AND SURVEYORS
Licensed unJer the laws of the State of Florida
Surveys Plats Reports
Highways Drainage Phosphate
Capt. Edward Drake Is associated
with as and in charge of oar Phos-
pbate Mine and Plant Department.
Offices. 33-31 Holder BIdfj. Pfccae No. 5U
OCALA, FLORIDA

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i Tire Prices Recliicei :

DIAMOND Non-Skid, 30x3. Q-fn m
old price $2000, now..... )4I.Vv

$15,CD

DIAMOND Plain, 30x3,
old price $17.60, now

6,000 Mile Guarantee
FEDERAL, FISK AND DIAMOND TUBES
NEW PRICES Overhauling Ford motor 16.
Overhauling Ford rear end, $5 for time.
- Grinding Ford valves, $3.
DIXIE GAEAGE
JAS. ENGESSER, Proprietor
Phone 258- West Broadway.

i

1 Advertise and &et Eecults

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tax raw

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EPA

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'E HAVE secured the services of Bertram

Ibbetson Company. Chartered Accountants of
Atlanta. Georgia,' who will have a represnet-

atiye in our Bank, during banking hours, from Feb February
ruary February 9th to the 19tb inclusive, to assist our custom customers
ers customers and friends in the preparation of their tax
returns for the year of 1920.
The following is some of the information he will
have to have in the preparation of your tax returns.
What is your income from the sale of land for
the past year? T
What is your income from the sale of hogs, cat cattle
tle cattle or other live stock?
What is your income from wages, if any?
What is your total income from any and all
sources?
The total gross income from any source is what
you have to furnish information about. From this
total there are certain exemptions and deductions.
Here are some of the things that you can get credit
for and you should go through your check book care carefully
fully carefully and see how much you paid on account of the
following things;
1st. The cost ot anything above mentioned that
you sold. The difference is net income on which
you pay tax. v
2nd. Any interest that you may have paid on
notes or mortgages or other debts that you owed
during the year,
3rd, All City, County and State taxes paid by
.you during the year. These are credits on your
total income
4th; Interest received by you on Liberty Bonds
owned by you.
5th. Actual losses sustained during the year.
The above are the principal items of income and
deductions and the gathering up by you of the
figufers on these different things will greatly facilitate
the work on the income tax man.
Tfce period you have to figure the above things
in. is between the first day of January 1920, and
December 31st of that year,
You must make your income tax returns to the
government before the 1st day of March. You have
to pay the tax, if any, according to the terms shown
on the income tax form, but you must make a report
in any event, whether you pay any tax or not, under
penalty of fine and imprisonment.
We suggest that you call on us and arrange the
date and hour it will be convenient for him to assist
you in makiqg out your returns.
Yqu are requested to bring blanks on which to
prepare your returns, as we may not have enough
to go around.
Do not hesitate to make use of our tax expert.
Come in and let him fix up your returns. It is AB ABSOLUTELY
SOLUTELY ABSOLUTELY free:

Tie ''GMmmerdal Bank

Q
Q Q

of Qcala

O
0 0

DEFEATED

DUVAL

The Ocala hih school basket ball
team was defeated in Jacksonville
Saturday night-by the Duval high
school team, the score being 24 to 15.
Although defeated, the Ocala eirls

j played so well that the victorv was

for some time in the balance, and to
elicit the high praise of their oppon opponents.
ents. opponents. Red Davis, who reported the
game for the Times-Union, wrote as
fellows:
Both Tigers and Tigerines placed
their teeth into the basketball last
night at the Duval county armory and
cefeated Waycross and the Ocala
Wildcats in two rip-roaring games of
ball.
The first engagement of the evening
was between the Tigerines and "Wild

cats, and both names are very appro

priate for the sextets. The Tigerines
finally emerged the winners by the
rather close score of 24 to 15.
The victory was a most honorable
one, for the local girls came from be behind
hind behind and passed their rivals during
the last five minutes of play. The hope
of the party, as Bryan would say, was

little Mary Stubbs, and although this

you who witnessed last night's strug struggle
gle struggle must fetl younger this morning
than you did about 9 o'clock last
night. Such classy games as the two
last night would drive many a sane
person beyond control and for your
sakes, and also mine, I hope future
games played by the Tigerines will
b won by a larger score so there
r.eed be no worry like there was last
night.
Below is the summary of the game,
which everyone has the privilege of
looking over:
Tigerines (24) Position Ocala (15)
Sompayrac 2 ? Close 1
Forward.
Morris 6 Wilkes 4
Forward
Brantley . Horne
J. Center
Lena Hyde Dehon
S. Center
Cadger MacKay
Guard
Duval Dozier
Guard

NOTICE

Mr. G: B. Overton is now

our

young lady came into action late in the jf ur.eral director and embalmer. Night

www

Miirptoy Motor Compauniy

Expert Repairs

Tires

Gas and Oil

Accessories Storage i

Main Street, Opposite Foundry - OCALa, FLORIDA

i. 1 1 F 1 -1 til

urai, nau, sne nmsnea tne game in a
blaze of glory. It was glory to our
team and sorrow to theirs.
We Never Knock
The work of the officials seemed sat satisfactory,
isfactory, satisfactory, so those who are looking for
criticism of anyone's work will have
to be contented to road something else
besides "knocks."
The Tigerines and Wildcats entered
this game with nothing but the best
of feeling between the two schools,
and the game itself was a credit to
both schools. It is true that spirited or
heated rivalry, existed before the bat battle
tle battle and during the battle, but that's as
it should be. After the game the
hntchet was buried and everyone wa
satisfied that the best team had won
fairly and certainly, squarely, on the
merits of the team's style of play.
Tigerines Too Peppy

The Tigerines had a few fouls call

ed on them and the writer is frank in
stating that the-Tigerines play basket

ball more on the order of the man's

game and this, while not detrimental

their knowledge of the game, does

tairt them to a certain extent in hav

ing fouls called on them. The. entire
first half of this heated battle was
Ocala's all the way. The Wildcats.

-eaded by Miss Christine Close, the

sextet's star guard, waded through
the first half by a score of 13 to 8.

Everyone must admit that Ocala has

a good team and if there rests a doubt
about their tine machine I'd like to

know where the doubt it.

The sensational work of Mary

Stubbs for the Titrerines brought

home the bacon for old Duval with

out her presence in this game the

Tigerines would have been humbly de

feated.

There never was such a large crowd

of fans present at a basketball game
in this city as last night. Fully eight

hundred rabid fans wailed and rooted

for the red and white teams, and for

while the hopes of victory for the

Tigerines looked mighty slim, but
dark clouds which hune hisrh over

head readily disappeared and a bright
ray of sunshine came creeping in as
the Tigerines were making their
game uphill struggle. The fans wait waited
ed waited patiently'and all of a sudden the

speedy Tigerines started to get into

real action, and during the second half

of play the Wildcats were played eom.
pletely off their feet. Something must

have struck the building during the

second half for the fans and Tigerines

were certainly raising something more
than "Cain."

Stubbs Features
With the sensational Mary Stubbs

coming into form in the second half,
the Wildcats were compelled to how
most gracefully to the charming way

in which she knew how to throw bas baskets.
kets. baskets. Miss Stubbs threw seven field

goals during the second half, and I

mean she threw them.

Lena Hyde, a standing center for

Duval, played a great game, and al

though she had a number of fouls

called on her, she managed to weather

the battle without being put. out.

Mussette Duval and Captain Jennie
Badger also starred for Duval, while
Misses Sompayrac, Morris, Brantley
and Lillian Hyde contributed good

work to the cause.

Ocala, as a sextet, is a most effec effective
tive effective machine, and their coach, who
ever she may be, certainly deserves
worlds of credit for the fine team
which she has developed.
. Estelle Wilkes, at forward for
Ocala, is a real star, and the machine
which she plays on can thank them themselves
selves themselves for this player's presence in the
line-up.
Christine Close, at forward for
Ocala, featured for the Wildcats.
This young lady threw four field goals
and had five foul goals to her credit.
Miss Close is particularly a star at
basket throwing and as for her guard
work, better could not have been ex expected
pected expected of her.
Jess Dehon, at standing center for
Ocala .played a sterling game, and so
did Elizabeth Horne. at jumping cen center.
ter. center. Captain Lytle, of the Ocala sex sextet,
tet, sextet, is another player that" looked

vptv p-ood. Miss Lvtle is a most

furious player "but she managed to

get through last night with only two

fouls being called on her.

The game being over, announce announcement
ment announcement was made that the armory would
be turned over to the visiting teams

for a dance, which all seemed to enjoy

very much. The double victory for
Duval was enjoyed so much that the
entire teams of both schools joined in
the celebration following the battle.
Now that the battle is over, those of

.hone 515, day phone 47.
L5-tf George MacKay & Company.

pation

I took

but

Washington, D. C. t
was a sufferer of constl constl-for
for constl-for about eighteen months.

a good many thlnxs for it

nothing did rne much eood.

I decided to try Dr. Pierce's Pleas Pleasant
ant Pleasant Pellets. If an Dr. Pierce's med medicines
icines medicines are as good as his 'Pleasant
Pellets are for constipation. I think
the world should rnow It." JAME3
A. NELSON. 1631 Sixth St., N. K.
At all druggists, 25c a vlaL

Hush Money.
Caller Well, you are a g.od little
boy. Are you always as quiet as this?
Johnny No; but mother's going to
give me a quarter if I don't say any anything
thing anything about your bald head.

Dr.

Charles Watson M or em en.

Dental Surgeon
Commercial Bank Building, Ocala,
Fla. Office phone 211; residence
phone 298. 7-tf

Celery today at Fort King Confec Confectionery.
tionery. Confectionery. Phone 596. 22-2t
OCALA LODGE No. 2S5, B, P. O. EL

. Ocala Lodge No. 256, Benevolent
and Protective Order cf Elks, meets
the second and fourth Tuesday eve eve-rings
rings eve-rings of each month. Visiting breth brethren
ren brethren always welcome. Lodge rooms
upstairs over Troiler and the Book
Shop, 113 Main street.
C. Y. Miller. E. R.
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS

Ocala Lodge No. 19. Conventions
held every Monday evening at 7:30
o'clock at the castle bH. over the G.
C Greene Co. drugstore, A cordial
velcome to visiting brothers.
Tom Proctor. C. C.
Chas. K. Sage. K. of R. & S.
WOOD3IEN OF THE WORLD

Fort King Camp No, 14 meets at
K. of P. hall at 7:30 p. m. every sec second
ond second and fourth Friday. Visiting sov sov-i
i sov-i feigns are always welcome.
H. B. Baxter. C C
Chas. K. Sage. Clerk.
Pure grapefruit and orange jelly,
"a Florida product," at the Fort King
Confectionery. Phone 596. 22-tf

Sow for a ffloraras Wiii-ip

of this

Jaraary CaraivM Ecoiomy

LAST

IMS

Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Monday
These Days of Splendid Opportunity Still Belong to You
This has been a month of extraordinary merchandising.
JWe have cut the prices of our own merchandise away down to
the lowest expectation of future cost prices and we have brought
into our store many thousands of dollars worth of brand new
merchandise that was offered at a sacrifice by many manufactur manufacturers,
ers, manufacturers, selling the new goods to you, also with scant thought of pro profit
fit profit to ourselves; because all are more eager to keep American
industries going than we are to make profits this month."
But we can't always do business that way, you can easily
realize. We devoted this month. to that public service. But this
big movement has to come to an end, and your opportunity will
expire with the end of the month.
Bet Six Magic Days SHI Remain

IF E A nw

"THE FASHION CENTER"

o.

OCALA

FLORIDA

,,, ,f L- Tx Tll ir m ij mwmr

Ocala Aiifo and Garage Company
Successors to Gates Garage

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(?)

We sell Philadelphia Diamond Grid Batteries
Chandler and Cleveland Automobiles
Look at our Used Cars. All are Bargains and Guaranteed as represented
Tires, Tubes, Accessories and Storage.
Cars Washed 1.00 Cars Polished$1.00

so

STAR JOB DEPARTMENT

ft

PHONE 51

P. O. BOX 606

LETTERHEADS, BILLHEADS, CARDS, CIRCULARS, FOLDERS, FIXE BOOKLETS, ETC
ft ft ft -to ft
r
We never disappoint a customer on a promise.
You get the job when its due.

m
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V
21:
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f
:x:

, v

f



v K
OCALA EVENING STAR, MONDAY, JANUARY 24, 1921

OCALA OCCURRENCES

If you have any
phone to five-one.
society items,
Mr. i. B. Carlisle Jr. spent Sunday
in the city with his wife and family.
If you are not using Federal 4read,
ask your neighbor how she lives it.
then give it a trial. 19-6t
Mr. Laurie Izlar spent Sunday at
Clermont with his parents, Dr. and
Mrs. A. L. Izlar.
Celery today at Fort King Confec
tionery. Phone 596.
22-2t
Federal bread always has th-it
good old home-made taste. Try our
cinnamon rolls, too. 19-0t
Miss Winnie Bell has returned to
Ocala from a pleasant week-end visit
with friends at Kissimmee.
Our box candies are bound to please
anyone. Norris and Crown Log Cabin
rolls. The Court Pharmacy. 19-6t
Mr. G. T. Maughs is visiting Mr,
and Mrs. Arthur Williams and family
of Arcadia for a couple of days.
Fresh vegetables and fruits at all
times. Ft. King Confectionery Yonge
block, cor. Ft. King Ave. and Osceola
St. Phone 596. 22-tf
Mr. and Mrs. Hugo Mcintosh of
Dunnellon spent yesterday in" the city,
guests at the home of Mr. D. E. Mc
Iver.
Delicate toilet waters that milady
will find pleasing and fragrant at the
Ccurt Pharmacy. 19 6t
Mrs. L. E. Yonce has returned
home from a pleasant visit to Jack
sonville, where she was the guest of
relatives.
Just received sea bass weighing
from three to twelve pounds, for bak
ing purposes. City Fish Market,
Phone 158. tf
Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Howard have
returned home from a pleasant auto
mobile' trip to points of interest on
the east coast.
Fresh oysters and full line of fresh
vegetables and fruits at all times
Cook's Market and Grocery. Phone
. 43. 7-tf
The Woman's Christian Temperance
Union will meet at the Presbyterian
church Tuesday evening at 3:30
o'clock.' All members are urged to
be present.
'Berlin-Jones and Crane's box sta
tionery in endless variety at" the
Court Pharmacy. Phone 284. 19-6t
Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Parrish returned
Saturday from their wedding trip
down the East Coast to Key West and
Havana. For they present they wil
be at the Arms House.
. Prompt service and fair prices
cur motto.- Cook's Market and Groc
y. Phone 243. 7-tf
Mr. J. A. Thompson, formerly with
the F. W. Cook Grocery and Meat
Market of this city, but now in busi
ness in DeLand, spent the week-end
in Ocala with his family.
Have your old mirrors re-silvered.
We do it promptly and at reasonable
prices. All work guaranteed. Ocala
Mirror and Plating Works, Walter
onge, proprietor. Phone C04. 17-tf
Miss Belle Andrews of Oxford, Ala.,
has arrived in Ocala to accept a posi position
tion position in the Ocala high school and is
making her home with her reltaives,
Mr. and Mrs. P. W. Whitesides.
Do not fail to attend the auction
sale of the Boozer property next Fri Friday,
day, Friday, January 28th, beginning at 10
o'clock in the morning. 24-
Miss Lula Williams of Sumter, N.
C, is a guest at the home of her rel relatives,
atives, relatives, Miss Josie Williams and Mrs.
P. W. Whitesides for the remainder
of the winter. Before returning home,
Miss Williams, will go to Arcadia to
visit relatives there.
Don't fail to visit the Guarantee
Clothing & Shoe Company. Every Every-hing
hing Every-hing we sell is guaranteed. We're
.ghting for QUALITY not prices, tf
' Mr. and Mrs. Frank Owens and
children of Palatka spent the week weekend
end weekend very pleasantly in the city, guests
of Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Blair and
mother, Mrs. Sherouse. Mr. Owens is
foreman of a branch camp of the Wil Wilson
son Wilson Cypress Co. of Palatka, situated
at Sharps ferry.
1 Meet me at the American Cafe,
Union Station, Ocala, for a regular
dinner family style. Best dinner in
the state for 75c. Eat and drink all
c you want. Time for dinner 11 a. m. to
2:30 p. m. Owned and operated by
Americans. : tf
, Mr. B. Hahn, from Door- county,
Wisconsin, who owns a home five
miles south of town on the Dunnellon
road, is here for the winter. Mr. Hahn
is a Florida booster and has brought
down quite a few visitors. On driv driving
ing driving down Mr. Hahn was forced to ship
his car from Huntsville, Ala., to Jack Jacksonville,
sonville, Jacksonville, as the roads were impassablel

Mr. Hull of Landis, Fish & Hull Co.,

of DeLand, is a visitor in the city.
Mrs. Ida Marsha of Lacota was a
shopper in the city for the day.
Remember when you buy at auction
you jnake the price, we make the
terms, and the high dollar gets the
property. 24-
Mr. H. J. Craft of Summerfield was
a Saturday caller to the city.
Dr. H. S. Cherry of Center Hill was
a well known visitor in Ocala Satur Saturday.
day. Saturday. Fresh vegetables and fruits at all
tunes. Ft. King Confectionery Yonge
iock, cor. Ft. King Ave. and Osceola
St. Phone 596. 2Z-tf
Mr. Chilton, a Bushnell attorney, is
in the city attending to professional
business.
Celery today at Fort King Confec
tionery. Phone 596. 22-21
Miss Blair Woodrow will entertain
the members of the "A" club tonight
t her home on Oklawaha avenue.
Don't fail to visit the Guarantee
Clothing & Shoe Company. Every
thing we sell is guaranteed. We're
fighting for QUALITY not prices, tf
Mr. Troy Hall of Leesburg is a vis
itor to the city. Mr. Hall has opened
aw offices in Leesburg in partnership
with Judge J. C. B. Koonce of Bush
nell and Leesburg. Judge Koonce is
also a visitor in the city for the day.
Mrs. Fred Robinson and aughter.
Miss Lucille Robinson of Mackinaw
City, Mich., are expected to arrive in
the city some time this week to spend
the remainder of the winter. Mrs
Robinson and daughter are regular
winter visitors to Ocala and have
many friends who always give them
a cordial welcome.
Every piece of the Boozer property
must be sold and you will be the loser
if you do not attend this sale. Any
thing you want to know, ask Mr. Fel-
ton at Harrington Hall. He is here
to answer questions. 24-
Dr. L. H. Van Engelken left Sunday
afternoon for Jacksonville to meet his
daughter, Mrs. T. H. Rowntree and
baby of Iowa, who are coming to
Ocala for a visit of several weeks
with Mrs. Rowntree's parents. Mrs.
Rowntree as Miss Marie Van Engel Engelken
ken Engelken was one of Ocala's most popular
young ladies and her many frienda
will be glad to have her home again
snd make -the acquaintance of her
daughter.
Seafood, always to be had fresh at
:ity FISH Market. 9 Ft. King Ave. tf
Salt and fresh water fish, oysters,
Fhrimp, etc.. at CITY FISH MARKET,
Ft. King Ave., phone 158. 27-tf
Mr. Lewis Shephard of Chicago,
spent several hours in the city yester yesterday
day yesterday with his wife's parents, Mr. and
Mrs. F. E. Harris, and family, en
route to Bartow. Mrs. Shephard and
son, Harris Powers will arrive in
Ocala next Sunday to spend the re remainder
mainder remainder of the winter with the for former's
mer's former's parents. In several weeks, Mrs.
Bertha Stevenson of England, Mr.
Shephard's aunt, will come to Ocala
for a month's visit with Mrs. Shep Shephard.
hard. Shephard. To guard against colds and other
infections make a practice of using a
daily gargle. Get an atomizer at the
Court Pharmacy. 19-6t
The many friends of Miss Annie
Benton Fuller will be glad to learn
that she is convalescing after a very
serious illness of over a month. Miss
Fuller is with her sister, Mrs. Wat Wat-kins
kins Wat-kins Estes at Greenville, S. C, and
when she left for South Carolina she
was far from well. Shortly after her
arrival in Greenville the doctors pro pronounced
nounced pronounced her case that of typhoid. Her
friends hope that she will be able to
return home at an early date.
' Don't fail to visit the Guarantee
C'othing & Shoe Company. Every Everything
thing Everything we sell is guaranteed. We're
fishtingi for QUALITY not prices, tf
Tuesday afternoon at the Woman's
Club is hospitality day and the mem members
bers members of the club extend a cordial invi invitation
tation invitation to all visitors to the city to join
them for a social afternoon which can
be spent playing cards, sewing, knit knitting,
ting, knitting, or in other social diversions.
Those desiring to play cards had best
phone Mrs. Mary Perdue, who will
reserve tables, and if refreshments
are wanted Mrs. Perdue should be no notified,
tified, notified, and same will be furnished at a
nominal cost. This is a splendid op
portunity for the visitors to the city
to become acquainted with each other
and the town people and the invita
tion is not only extended to winter
visitors, but to any guests at the ho hotels
tels hotels and boarding houses.
ROYAL ARCH MASONS
Regular conventions of the Ocala
Chapter. Nor 13, R. A. M., on the fourth
Friday in every month at 8 p. m.
II. S. Wesson, H. P.
B. L. Adams, Secretary.
ORDER OF EASTERN STAB
Ocala Chapter No. 29, O. E. S
meets at the Masonic hall the second
and fourth Thursday evenings of each
month at 8 o'clock.
Mrs, Rosalie Condon, W. M.
Mrs. Susan Cook, Secretary.

SAYS FEW READ THE BIBLE

WrtUr Criticise the Present Genera
tion for Its Lack ef Knowledge
of the Scripture.
The bookseller story of the woman i
who demanded to know where in the j
Bible she could find the story of Da- j
moo and Pythias Is called to mind by
r
the recently reported attempt of a pro-
fessor at the university to measure the j
Biblical knowledge of his class in Eng English
lish English literature. The test resulted in a
rather naive display of ignorance con concerning
cerning concerning a book which has been called
"the fountain head of English litera literature,"
ture," literature," and which, with Shakespeare,
invariably heads the list of "best"
books and gathers more dust than any
other.
There are those who, having made
acquaintance with the Bible In their
own youth, and realizing Its poetry,
history and style, agree with Prof. Dal Dallas
las Dallas Lore Sharp that we are a "Bible "Bible-starved
starved "Bible-starved nation." What parent reads
the Bible to or with the children these
days? They get fairy stories or animal
fables. Even the Sunday-school les lessons
sons lessons are given from a leaflet. The Bi Bible
ble Bible has been storyized and expurgated
in the so-called interests of children,
and has shared the usual fate of such
well-meant but unnecessary endeavors.
It is not without occasion that educa
tors are discussing the need and the
methods of increasing interest in the
book.
Whether we regard the Bible as a
sacred book, as a saga of the Hebrews,
or as a collection of stories, legends
and historical fact of ancient origin, it
is so thoroughly a part of our litera literature,
ture, literature, which is so abundant in allusions
and references to Its content, that not
to know their source and application
is to argue one's self unread. Youth
ought to be as aware of Moses the
lawgiver as of Hamlet or King Lear.
Detroit Free Press.
HAD REHEARSAL OF FUNERAL
Curious Notion Held by Spanish Mon
arch Concerning Ceremony 4n
Which He Would Figure.
Charles V, king of Spain and emperor
of Germany in the Sixteenth century
was a pious ruler. Toward the end of
his life he conceived the curious idea
of rehearsing his own funeral, not be
cause he wished to have the event en
off without a hitch when the time
should come, but because he thought
the nerformance of the ceremony
would redound to the credit and well
being of his soul in the after-world
His friends sought to dissuade him
but, deeming it a holy act, the ruler
went ahead with his preparations.
catafalque was erected and the serv
Ice performed. The high altar, the
catafalque, and the entire churcl
shone with wax lights; the friars were
all In their proper places and the
household of the emperor attended In
deep mourning. "The pious monarch
himself was there, attired In sable
weeds," according to the monkish his
torlan, "and bearing a taper, to see
himself interred and to celebrate his
own obsequies." While the mass for
the dead was sung, he came forward
and gave his taper to the officiating
priest as a symbol of his desire to
yield up his soul. Not only once, but
for many years, until he finally died
in 1558. Charles V performed this
strange ceremony annually.
CHRISTMAS DAY IN AFRICA
Pretty Picture of a Charming Abode
in the Hills Above -the Old
Town of Alger.
Christmas day in Africa! And
what a dream of beauty and color,
blue sea, blue sky, groves of eucalyp eucalyptus
tus eucalyptus and olive trees, climbing roses,
white-robed Arab women, closely
veiled, their eyes only showing, bare
brown legs and feet, sometimes a sil silver
ver silver bracelet on one leg, donkey boys
with a nondescript, flowing garment, a
red fez on their heads; color every everywhere.
where. everywhere. Our villa Is charming, stands
In a little wood of eucalyptus trees,
with a big garden, balconies, terraces
and marble steps, large, high rooms
and lovely views on all sides, Mme.
Waddlngton writes from Algiers to
Scribner's. It Is quite In the coun country,
try, country, five or six kilometers from Al Algiers,
giers, Algiers, very high up in the hills. Very
few people li$e in the town and the
whole hillside Is studded with villas.
Moorish almost all, dazzling white, fiat
roofs and narrow windows. Quite at
the top, where we are, there are some
very comfortable Eastern modern
houses. I am writing at my window,
which gives on a terrace, from which
there is a divine view of the sea and
the snow mountains of the Djurjura,
miles away In Kabylle, and from one
corner through the faded drooping
leaves of the eucalyptus I have a
glimpse of the town of Algiers, lying a
long, white streak far below.
The drawing-room is a delightful
room runs all the width of the house,
with windows on three sides, so that
we always have the sun. The furni furniture
ture furniture is sketchy, not much of it. and
what there Is is very ugly, but when
the Paris cases arrive, with a few
tables and chairs and silver, the room
will look very different. There are
some carpets in the house, which are
absolutely necessary, as all the floors
are tiled. However, Charlotte has
done wonders with the meager mate material
rial material she has.
NATION'S DEBT TO PILGRIMS
Their Famous Compact of Government
Rightly Treasured as a Great
State Document.
In the harbor at the tip of Cape
Cod occurred the first birth and the
first death among the Pilgrims in
America. On board the Mayflower, as
she lay at anchor, was born Pere Peregrine,
grine, Peregrine, son of William and Susanna
White. Here was another child for
the ship's nursery, already occupied by
' little Oceanus Hopkins, who first saw
the light of day far out at sea.
The death was that of Dorothy May,
wife of William Bradford, future gov governor
ernor governor of Plymouth colony. She was
drowned.
- First of importance, however, of
ll occurred here, aqfl also In

Ad
r.vkesvUle, Mi "I
health for about un
v.-.is La
bj
L10
fere 1 vory
day ciy
left fiJe. I
taking Dr.
H?r-e's Ta- j
vorite Pre-
scri'.ion urvi I
al5o'tLr;c, 1-
en .Medical
1) i s .? o v i.ry j
bene'itoJ. Alter j
I was veil.
and was greatly
taking six bottles
"I took Dr. Pierce's medicines at
the advice of a relative who uses the
'Prescription' for herself nr. 1 gives it
to her daughter. 1 think tLis med medicine
icine medicine ii good for all vo:rer. ir. a run rundown
down rundown slfkie." MRS. W. BLIZZARD.
Have been sold by druggists for
the past fifty year3.
the sequence of events, was the draw drawing
ing drawing up and siirning of th famous com compact
pact compact of governiiiertf. .rii:iaally desig designated
nated designated by Bradford in his history as "a
combination." And so It was, in the
most literal sense, a combination.
This agreement, made in writing by
a little group of Englishmen who had
been dismissed by their mother coun country
try country as "good riddance to bad rubbish.
is now treasured by the nation in
America, to which they contributed as
much as one of three preat documents.
The other two are the Declaration of
Independence and the Constitution of
the United States.
Begone Dull Facts.
Two friendly little neighbors, atred i
respectively 42 and 5 years, recently
seated themselves on the curbstone ;
near my windows for a religious dis discussion.
cussion. discussion. It seemed they had over overheard
heard overheard some grown-ups repeating a
recent prophecy of a certain sect as to
the Imminent end of the world and
were greatly exercised at the report.
The elder child, a fair-haired skeptic
from a northern state, scornfully de declared
clared declared that he didn't believe the story;
but the swarthy, dark-eyed little Texan
solemnly asserted: "Yes," it's true; I
know It's true; fob this mo'nin 1
read It In man r.lhle." The midget
doesn't know one letter of the alpha alphabet
bet alphabet from another, but he refuse to be
pinned down to vultrar facts when his
spirit wishes to soar. Are children i
of the period brighter than their pred predecessors?
ecessors? predecessors? At his age I am sure I
could not have fibbed with so solemn
and convincing an air. I.os Angeles
Times. i
Malignant Ghost.
Last Christmas, a house In Ietls
was visited by an nmti7.ii)? pliost.
A woman, returning home, went into

Took a RelatiTc's

the kitchen to warm herself at thejerry

fire. Suddenly she was startled to see!
two long white arms emerge from tl
names. Nearer and nearer tr.ey came
until they pripped her arms ahove the ;
elbow.
The touch was like red hot iron, and
she fell faintinc to the ground. When
she recovered she was surprised fo
find that there had been no fire in the
grate. She visited a doctor, who ex examined
amined examined her arms and found distinct
signs of burns. This was afterward
corroborated by another doctor. I,
In-
don Mall.
"The Right Kind of Child."
Give a littlejove to a child, and you
get a great deal back. It loves every everything
thing everything near it, when it is the right kind
of child would hurt nothing, would
give the best It has away, always, if
you need it does not lay plans for
getting everything in the liaise for It
self, and delights in helping people;!
you cannot please It so n.u h as by
giving it a chsutoe of being useful, in.
ever so little a way. John Kukin.
HE HAD LEARNED SOMETHING
Christmas Incident That Shows
Way ot a Modern Maid With
Her Victim.

theil

He was a very nervous young man,
but he was rather nice, and Elsie
thought he was worth encouraging.
She allowed him to take her to tea,
she deliberately chucked the slipper
in his eye at "Hunt the Slipper," and
she gave him a dance or two. Once
or twice she sat down under the mis mistletoe,
tletoe, mistletoe, but he didn't seem to notice
that.
At last when they were
alone In
a corner of a room,
she stood long i
and insistently under tlit? mistletoe j
hanging from a curtain pole of the
bay window.
Then, very nervously, he pecked her
face. She. of cwse. protested mild
ly; but as they seared themselves once
more, nmst respectably on a couple of
chairs, she kept the conversation on
mistletoe.
At !eKgth he ventured: "It is or
a nice Christinas cusiom. hanging up
mistletoe, but 1 wonder why they al-
ways hang it over doors, windows oi
chflndeliers?"
"Hecause it's not necessary to have
any out on the stair? or In any other
dark places," she murmured softly.
Why, of Course. j
Pop Moore, rvhm-s .Lousre. believes!
In telling children the truth, and when!
his youngster heard him read the
weather prediction and inquired how
the weather man knew, IVj laid aside
his raoer and explained the best he
could. He told of th charts, ;
the instruments, the telegraphic re-j
ports, etc. "And that's how he finds '.
out the weather for tomorrow." he
finished. The kid listened intently, ;
sat thoughtful for a few minutes, and j
then earnestly Inquired : "And then ':
does he tell God?"
CYLINDER' REB0R1NG
MACHINE
For All Cars
2FFICIENT WORKMEN,
PROMPT SERVICE
REASONABLE CHARGES
GEO. J. WILLIAMS
Formerly Carroll Motor Company
GarageK Osceola St.
Phone 597 Night 408

ODIUM
EVANGELIST

W. C. HARLOW
at the
CHIRSTIAN
CHURCH
S UND A Y
FEBRUARY 6
Series of meetings will
be heM here for two weeks.
Committee
is j! .:.
it; S - il.i.itl!.
THERE'S A "SLIGHT
i
in
REPAIRING TIRES
PROPERLY
but years of 'experencehave taught
us the trick. When yours give
vou troble call u.
3LAL0CK BROS.
VULCANIZING
Ocala IIouscHIock
PHONE 78
ANNOUNCKMENT TO
COLORED PEOPLE
I have opened a first class under-t.-l
in; establishment in Ocala and
a full line of coffins, caskets and
rubes. Auto hearse and truck service
j to ajj
pails of the county. Your pat-
n.rajre solicited. W. E. HUGHES.
I Licensed Kmhsrmer.
Xext door to Metropolitan Bank.
Phone ."ill, night St. George hotel.
17-4t-mon
Get the habit ot reading the ads.

TEE WINDSOR HOTEL
JACKSONVILLE, KLORIDA
In the heart of the city with Hemming Park for a front yard.
Every modem convenience in each room. Dining room service is
second to nont

ROBERT M. MF.YER,
Manager
IB C. V. ROBERTS, Phone 305

ROBERTS & SPENCER
Funeral Directors and Embalmers
Private Morg ie and Chapel. Personal Service to all.
Motor E juiprr.ent. Coffins and Caskets Delivered.

02ke Phone 350
Ocala,
"an'fl'B 8.
j jfr.
t t j
' 'Hit
;
i '!!:!

' ii

OUR PRICE LIST

Hudnut's Grits and Meal, 7 pounds 25c
Hudnuts Grits and Meal, 15 pounus 50c
Whole grain Honduras Rice, per pound lie,
10 pounds for $1.00
Whole grain Blue Rose Rice, -3 pounds 25c;
G pounds, 50c; 14 pounds $1.00
Polar White Soap, a very fine Naptha soap
ior fine as well as ordinary laundry,
3 bars for 25c; 1 dozen for 95c
Lard Compound, per pound.. 15c
Pure Lard, one pound 25c; 2 pounds 45c
No. 2 Tomatoes, 1 can 15c; 2 cans 25c; 3
cans 35c; one-half dozen cans 65c
Argo Starch, 3 packages for 25c; 1 dozen
packages 95c
All other goods as Low as Good Quality and
and nones! Weights and Heasnres nil! per permit.
mit. permit. The above prices include our delivery
service and acconnis, weekly or monthly,
11 y oar credit is good.
FARMERS' EXCHANGE STORE
Merchants Block Phone 163

HI'
j j
' ptj
j ;!;
in
8
Ii!
; hi
i"H
'ill
!' it
it.
it
iiiii

Geo. Hay 2 Co.
Funeral Directors
and Embalmers
Two Licensed Embalmers
Motor Funeral Cars
Private Morgue and Chapel
Day Phone 47
Night Phone 515
G. B. Overton, Manager

: C. Cecil Bryant:
I Accocnling and Auditing
: PHONE 332
J. D.DAWKINS
ALL KINDS OF
FRESH MEATS, FISH
and OYSTERS
EVERY
TUESDAY and FRIDAY
Phone 519 V
111 W. Broadway
WILLIAM A. TINSMAN
CONTRACTOR
Estimates Given Free
Phone 526 Ocala. Fla,
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTER AND
BUILDER
Careful estimates made cn all co.
tract work. Gives more and better
woik fi r the money than any other
contractor in the city.
Lirr.
FIR I".
A. I.. Ci.RIC
INSURANCE
Ocala, Florida
ACCIDENT AlTOMOniLK
Winter's short days call
..o
- JL-.
.c for much artificial illum-
if-V5 .
wJfc inatinn A a renlt vour
eyes are
taxed rather
severely.
DR. K. J. WE1HE,
Optometrist and Optician
Eyesight Specialist
J. E. KA VANAUGH
Proprietor.
BARNEY SPENCER, Phone 431
Florida
- t?1g?3.:j..e ;s.
217 West Broadway
Vtfl
j I
5 tf

UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEIETfTS
WANTED, LOST. FOUND, FC2
'SALE. FOR BENT AND SIM SIMILAR
ILAR SIMILAR LOCAL NEEDS

i ; Rates: Six lines, maximum, om tirat.
! j 25c; three times, 50c; six'tiaes. Tic;
; one month, S3. Payable in adraaca.
BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES Gilt Gilt-'
' Gilt-' edged proposition for a man of en en-j
j en-j ergy and initiative. County repre repre-i
i repre-i sentative desired. A legitimate and
practical proposition; wil! not inter interfere
fere interfere with present employment.
Write for particulars to Favorite
Manufacturing Co., Tampa Fla.
mon-th-sat
l : LOST Or stolen from .shop, baisted
- sleev to unfinished coat of a brown
; mixture. Reward to finder by re re-!
! re-! turning to Jerry Burnett. 20-3t
;FOR RENT Furnished rooms for
; light housekeeping. Apply at 603
E&st Second street. 21-tf
iFQR SALE Newell Sanders three three-i
i three-i disk light tractor plow; can be
changed to a two-disk; only been
j used two days; cant tell it from
j new, $100. D. N. Mathews, Ocala,
j Fla. 21-t
! WANTED Maid for general house
work. Apply II,m care the Star of office.
fice. office. 21-3t
3IER0-C0LA WOODYARD We ar
prepared to furnish oak or pint
wood for either stove or fireplace
on shoU notice. We deliver your
- money's worth promptly. Give us a
trial order. Chero-Cola Wood yard,
phone 167.. 26-lnt
FARM WANTED Would like to
hear from owner that has farm for
sale in Marion county. Give loca location,
tion, location, description and price in first
letter. Address, "Farmer, care
Ocala Evening Star. 3-18L
FOR SALE We have a surolus of
fifty head of horses and mules for
sale. You ran find stock suitable
for any purpose by applying at the
stables. Anthony Farms, Anthony,
Ha. 18-tf
rOR SALE Five room house and
hath room; large lot; in fine neigh
borhood, Wenona street, near high
school. Price very low. L. M. Mur Murray,
ray, Murray, Holder block. Ocala. 20-6t
rOR SALE Pretty bungalow on E.
Fourth street, six rooms with all
modern conveniences and a garage.
Terms attractive. Price low. L. M.
"Murray, Holder block, Ocala. 20 6t
WOOD Giles Wood Yard. Seasoned
oak or pine wood for either stove or
fireplace, $1 and 2 per load. Yard
comer South Main and Third St.
Phone 112. 1-19-lta
FOR SALE 1917. Ford roadster In
good condition, price $250; 1917
Ford touring car in food condition,
price $350; 1919 Ford roadster In
fine condition with good tires, price
$325. James Engesser, Ocala, 19-6t
FOR RENT Farm containing 320
acres under high state of cultiva cultivation.
tion. cultivation. Six miles south of Ocala on
orange avenue. Frank Moses,
Ocala. J2-3t
FOUND Sum of money. Inquire of
Star. "24-lt
BERMUDA ONION PLANTS $2.00
per 1000, cash with -order. I O.
- Booher, Route A, Box 66. 24-12t
WANTED Two or more furnished
rooms for light housekeeping. Most
be modern and well located. P. O.
Box No. 312, Ocala, Fla. 24-3t
RAILROAD SCHEDULES
Arrival and departure of paasecxei
tra-'ns at OCALA UNION STATION",
Ibe.foHowing schedule figures pub published
lished published as information and not guar
anteed. t
Eastern Standard Time)
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILROAD
Lea- e
:15 am
:55 pm
:17 pm
Att1t
JackaonTflle-NTork
Jackson rilla
Jacksonville
Tarn na-
2:10 i
4:15 pa
2:15am Manatee-' 4:C5
St. Petersburg
:15 am Tampa 2:10 am
2:15 am Manatee. 4:17 pm
:05 pm Tampa-St. PetrsLrc 4:17 pa
ATLANTIC COAST LINE E. B.
Lea re Antra
2:12 pm Jacksonville-NTork 2:43 ta
1:45 pm JksonviJle-GainsTiU 3:S5pa
6:42 am Jksonrille-GnesTille 10:13 pa
2:4L am SLPeUbrjr-LakeUnd 2:12 am
3:35 pm St.Petabrg-Lakeland 1:25 ps
7:10 am Dunne lloa-Wikox
7;2- am DuneUon-Lkeland 113ra
Z:2Z pm Homosasu 1:30 pel
10:13pm Leesburg 6:42 aa
1:45 pm Gainesville 11:50 aa,
Monday, Wednesday, Friday.
Tiif. Thursday, gatorday.
FARM FOR SALE
Farm of 160 acres of good new,
ground containing the rich Scott ;
s ring hammock, situated two miles
from Ocala on hard road, improved'
with dwelling and all out building'
Will sell at a bargain. Address, C
P Howell, Box 188, Ocala, FU. 31-30t
NOTICE
The laws of Florida require all au automobiles
tomobiles automobiles to have a 1921 license num number
ber number January 1st, 1921. All automobile
drivers not having 1921 license tags
on February 1st, 1921, will be prose prosecuted.
cuted. prosecuted. S. C IT. Thomas,
Sheriff, Marion Coutny, Fla.
A smile costs nothing; greet your
neighbor with one often and show
our neighborly interest by te!!Lr j
hthera that FEDH7.AL t-read is
lrt made.



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