The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:05734

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
A

1"
D
Weather Forecast: Generally fair
OCALA, FLORIDA, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20. 1920
VOL. 2G, NO, 279
, tonight and Sunday; warmer in the.
. northwest portion tonight.

OCA

A

f7

A 1

ARE STAHDIMG
ELBOW TO ELBOW

France and Great Britain, Declares
Lloyd George, Remain
Firm Friends
(Associated PreM)
20. Premier
Lloyd
Paris,
. . ia eor-
George in an interview -respondent
of the Petit Parisian, de de-SSSllS
SSSllS de-SSSllS -nces beeen Great
Britain and France do
a quarrel and views did not prejudice
the alliance created during the war.
Regarding PK
declared England would stand elbow
to elbow" with France, but he insist insisted
ed insisted the amount that Germany should
be called onto pay should be fixed.
LIGHT SENTENCE K
FOB PASCAL THE CRANK.
Norristown, Pa., Nov. 20-August
Pascal, "The Crank," was sentenced
to life imprisonment on a plea ox
guilty of kidnaping Blalcely CoughUn,
the 13-months-old son of George H.
Coughlin. The sentence was wspend wspend-ed
ed wspend-ed on a second degree murder charge.
RAVENS BBTOIlNnjG ft?TS
TO THEIR BOOSTS
(Aioclated Pre)
Athens, Nov. 20.-It is reported the
-v;- 0rmv command will be given to
aj,- brother of former
irince ftiiuii
King Constantine.
EMBEZZLEBS LET OUT
Tallahassee, Nov. 19-The state
board of pardons yesterday announc
ed that former Senator
SLlT .td in Hillsborough
county of grand element and
sentenced to five years m
prison November 1918. had been
granted a conditional pardon and im immediate
mediate immediate releave from prison. J.C,.
Black, former tax collector of Liberty
county, was granted a conditional
pardon, also., Mr. Black was convict convict-ed
ed convict-ed of grand embezzlement, April lb,
1919, and" sentenced to four years m
the state prison at Raiford. Times Times-Union.
Union. Times-Union.
Will be open until 9 o'clock Thanks Thanksgiving
giving Thanksgiving morning. Phone (243) your
order? early. Cook's Market and
Grocery. u"4t
i- a 1TSV.S A SITUATION
THAT IS CRITICAL
(Associated Press)
Paris. Nov. 20. The premiers
of
Great Britain and France are expect expected
ed expected to hold a conference to consider
the near east situation created by the
defeat of Venizelos in Greece.
"Arrow" and Ide stiff collars $2.60
wllrlpv & Barnett.'
" Tl. T.NESS OF THE EX-
M EMPRESS INCREASES
; (Associated Press)
Doom, Holland, Nov. 20. The con
dition of the former German Empress
is considered worse.
V. K. Lane. M. D- Physician and
Surgeon," specialist Eye, Ear, Nose and
Throat. OfSce over 5 and 10 cent store,
Ocala, Fla, u
INTEND TO ESTABLISH
MARKET IN LOS ANGELES
(Associated Pres)
Los Angeles, Nov. 20. The Inter-
EStioaal Cotton League of the west
'has voted to establish a spot cotton
market here by the first of the year.
r W. F. Blesch wishes to inform the
y public that he has added another skill skilled
ed skilled barber to his force and is better
able than ever to promptly serve his
ihomers. 17-6t
Miss Tillie Pasteur and her father,
Mr. John Pasteur, returned yesterday
afternoon from a two weeks visit to
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Pasteur in Miami
They were accompanied home in their
:' car by Mrs. Annie M. Perry, who has
been with her sisters and daughters
in Miami for several months. Mrs,
Perry will spend some time at the
home of her daughter, Mrs. R. N.
Dosh. f
Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Blowers and
Mrs. C. JE. Simmons returned last
. night from Jacksonville, where they
spent several days. Thursday night
they heard Billy Sunday and were
favorably impressed with, him, as
" seemingly are the people of Jackson Jackson-t
t Jackson-t ville, for crowds throng to hear all
this sermons.

ilkiii

TROUBLE AG Al
Brother-in-Law of President Wilson
Named in Connection with
$40,000 Bribe
(Associated Frees)
New YorkTNov. 20, R. W. Boiling,
brother-in-law of President Wilson, is
named in connection with the $40,000
bribe alleged to have been paid by the
Staten Island Ship Building Company
to procure unusual favors from the
shipping board in testimony before
the congressional investigating com committee.
mittee. committee. Tucker Sands, former vice
president of the Commercial National
Bank, Washington, said the money
was to be split between himself and
Boiling, Lester Sisler, former ship shipping
ping shipping board secretary, and John Craner
of Richmond.
PRIVATE RANDALL'S FUNERAL
The remains of Private Randall ar arrived
rived arrived late yesterday afternoon and
were taken to MacKay & Company's
chapel, where they remained until
9:30 this morning, and then accom accompanied
panied accompanied by a number of relatives and
friends were taken 'across the river
to the Oklawaha cemetery, where they
were laid to their final rest. Owing
to the shortness of the time between
the reporter's return and press time,
it is impossible to write a proper re report
port report of the ceremonies until Monday.
TURNING THEIR UTTENTION
TO EASTERN SIBERIA
(Associated Press) ;
Pekin, Nov. 20.The bolsheviki
have resumed their attacks against
the anti-bolsheviki in eastern Siberia,
capturing Borgia.
MUST HAVE HAD MANY
LETTERS TO MAIL
(Associated P-ess)
Nashville, Nov. 20. The postoffice
at Dresden was blown open by rob
bers, stealing stamps.
TEXAS SENT AN Al TURKEY
Tl. T Oi C.i x T X I
m v i
IS ot Gone Back on Woodrow
Wilson
(Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 20. The first
Thanksgiving turkey arrived at the
tlTito Wnnco nAtfT T- trrnirrVio -f ViiTf Tr
eight pounds and came from the
chamber of commerce of Cuero, Tex.
Flower bulbs at
the Ocala Seed
6-tf
Store.
HERE'S WHERE IE

KEY'S WORTH AT THE FAIR

The comic mule races will be the
A number of swift steiminsr mules
nifty racing cart and a good (lath)
f,.- tt an annliAatl'nn n-f
- M-
n:ent, which will no douht make them
prominent drivers .will be, proud of
Known recoru-ureaii.iug muxes ure oi

The prize for the winner each day will be a stovepipe hat.
The following are the names of the drivers and their mules:

Name of Mule
MKnock-Knee Bill"
"Flying Wizard
"Easy Money? .........
"Hard Tail Jim"
"Merry-go-Round" .
"Slow Down Lightning"

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

"Greased Lightning" Frank Harris Jr.
"Shake the Dust" ..... ....Louis H. ChazaL
"Dinner Horn" James Taylor.
"Home Run Pete" Charlie Simpson.
"Laughing Boy" ......... .. .... .............Bob MacKay.
"High Life Dick" Holmes Walters.
. THURSDAY
"Go Yonder Gal" R- L. Anderson Jr.
"Pumpkin Center" Norton Davis.
"Buick Baby" ... Carlisle Izlar.
"Walk Over Mike" '. . .Bob Van Osten.

"Honest Deal" ..
"Rabbit Chaser"
Names of Mules
"Hensley's Runt"
"English Goat" .......
"Shephard Boy" ......
"Eeckie"
"Liberty Bell"
"Price to Souter" .....

18 NODE TOftll IT

. . i
ISIHTHi
Socialist Labor Party Had Money to
Buy
Import' When the Cam Campaign
paign Campaign was Over
(Associated Press)
Washington, Nov. 20w The social-J
ist labor party reported campaign re-J
ceipts of $18,099 and expenditures of
$16,146.
SUDDEN DEATH OF
MR. ROBERT MARSH
The town was greatly shocked early
this afternoon to hear of the death
of Mr. Robert Marsh. Mr. Marsh had
been attending to his usual duties aa
superintendent of the street depart-
nient all the morning, and had gone
home at noon to dinner. He had not!
ben home long when he was stricken!
with apoplexy, which ended his life
in a few minutes.
Mr. Marsh was a good citizen and
held in high esteem by all who knew
him. His death causes sorrow to his
friends, who join in sympathy for his
bereaved family.
The funeral services of Mr. Marsh
will be held at his late home, 335 East
Broadway tomorrow afternoon. Pyles
& Perkins have charge of the arrange
ments.
THE RED CROSS NEEDS YOU
Renew your membership Mondav. I
Tuesday or Wednesday. There will
cause for th mminc? Tour Vow mom.
cause for the coming year. New mem
Ders are solicited.
r Mrs. J. H. Taylor,
c Mrs. D. S. Woodrow,
20-3t Committee.
Special sale on boys' suits. Walkley
& Barnett.
20-2t
CLOSING THE NAVY
RECRUITING STATION
The navy recruiting station in this
city will be closed temporarily. E.
Adkins and family left yesterday aft-
ernoon for Jacksonville, and will take
passage in a day or two for Brook-
:Ivn Mr. I. M. Dono-las Imvps Rimlaw
'
afternoon. He is zoine to Philadel-
iio tt ii. u: j
He is leaving his wife
baby here until the winter is over.
BREWERS NOW KNOW
WHAT TO EXPECT
Washington, Nov. 20. All brew
eries manufacturing beer containing
more than one-hal f of one per cent of
alcohol will be seized, the internal
revenue bureau indicated today.
GET OUR
laughing event of each day at the fair,
have been secured, together with al
whip. Each mule will be put in per-
A P. Cfa famfma MWJcrh TJ-f Hnl-
establish rueh records that their
their steed, as well as these world-
wjcu uaiuea.

T. D. Lancaster Jr.
. ................. .Clarence Bleffert.
............. ..Ear! Hall.
.'. .......Buck Howse.
, .. ..... ;". . . V. . .Laurie Izlar.
W. B. Gallagher.

Fred Hocker.
.. Whit Palmer.

FRIDAY

School Boys
Nat Mayo.
.'.Roy Priest.
Robert Hail,
Harold Smith.
(
, Wyckliff e Steele.
, Homer Agnew.

ILL THE II

WANT AMERICA!
Felt Like the Council Will Not be
Complete Until the Place Due
United States is Fined
(Associated Press)
Geneva, Nov. 20. Italian Foreign
Minister Tittoni, addressing the
league of nations assembly, declared
that hope was held that "without too
much delay" a way would be found
for the entry of the United States
into the league. He said it would
never be a league of nations until all
nations, without exception, were in-
eluded in it.
BAD BREAK MADE
BY JOHNNY BULL
(Associated Prees)
Washington, Nov. 20. Great Brit-
ain has extended virtual de facto rec-
logmtion to the Russian soviet govern
ment in a proposed trade agreement,
the state department believes.
MRS. L. A. GABEL
Ocala seems full of sad events to
day. Shortly after the noon hour,
Mrs. L. A. Gabel died at her home on
South Sanchez street.
Time is too short to pay fitting tri
bute to this wife and mother, who will
be sadly missed by her husband, chil children
dren children and friends. The date of her
funeral has not been decided, but can
be ascertained later this evening by
calling Psles & Perkins, who have
Icnarge of the arrangements.
carSe
A PROBLEM FOR
MENTAL ARITHMETIC
Cape Girardeau, Mo., Nov. 20. Do
you know the number of your license
tag that hangs on the front and rear
of your flivver? You do. well tell it
to me. Just as I thought. It cant be
done. Such is the experience of a
local newspaper man who made the
rounds of the business district the
other day putting car owners to a
mental test. Their average grade
was a great big zero."
"Superexcellent" may be a biz
Unr if aeKoo no
serve our customers fresh every day.
Federal Bakery. 16-6t
Don't fail to visit the Guarantee
Clothing & Shoe Company. Every
thing, we sell is guaranteed. We're
Thtir.jr fnr OTTATJTY not prices, tf
"Howe's" Cape Cod cranberries,
xlra fancy, 18c. a pound, two pounds
or 35c. W. A. Stroud:- It
Special sale on suitcases and bags.
Valkley & Barnett. 20-2t
Fresh and crisp, with just enough
sweetening to make it palatable
makes Federal Bread the best to be
had. 16-6t
Have your mirrors re-silvered." All
vork called for, delivered and guar
anteed. Ocala Mirror. 1 and Plating
Works, Yonge block. Fort King
avenue, phone 504. '9-tf
Did you know our girls' dresses are
selling ridiculously low? J?isners. uai
I
lav aaaA M a a A
L JT2
' -J". TSto an absolnU
expert free. Little's Shoe Parlor. 6t
Don't fail to visit the Guarantee

r Clothing & Shoe Company. Every Every-Name
Name Every-Name of Driver!.. A mnVI OMT,aa T7aS

We're
ighzing for QUALITY not prices. If
RAILROAD SCHEDULES
Arrival and denarture of passenger
trains at OCALA UNION STATION.
The following schedule figures putv
lished as information and not guar guaranteed.
anteed. guaranteed. (Eastern Standard Time)
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILROAD
Leave Arrive
2:20 am Jacksonville-N'York 2:10 am
1:55 pm Jacksonville 1:30 pm
4:05 pm Jacksonville 4:05 pm
Tampa-
2:15 am Manatee- 4:05ptn
St. Petersburg
2:15 am Tampa 2:15 am
1:50 pm Tampa-Manatee 1:35 pm
4:05 pm Tampa-SL Petrsbrg 4:05 pm
ATLANTIC COAST LINE R. R.
Leave ;" Arrive
2:12 pm Jacksonville-N'York 2:48 am
1:45 pm Jksonville-Gainsville 3:35 pm
6:42 am Jksonville-Gnesville 10:13 om
2:4Sarf StPetsbrg-Lakeland 2:12 am
3:35 pm St.Petsbrg-Lakeland 1:25 pm
7:10 am Dunnellon-Wilcox
7:25 am Dunellon-Lkeland 11 :03 pm
3:25 pm Homosassa 1:30 pm
10:13pm Leesburg 6:42 am
4:45 pm Gainesville 11:50 am
Monday, Wednesday, Friday. I
Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday.

1T0 REVISE THE

PEACE TREATY
Assembly of the League of Nations
Will Put Covenant in Bet Better
ter Better Order
(Associated Press)
Geneva," Nov. 20. The first formal
step toward revision of the league of
nations covenant was taken by the
assembly of the league when the Dutch
foreign minister introduced a resolu resolution
tion resolution for reconsideration of the article
dealing with registration of treaties.
CONGRESSMEN
WANT MORE COIN
Washington, Nov. 20 A movement
is on foot to increase the congression congressional
al congressional salary, now $7500, to $10,000 or
$12,000 per annum. The latter figure
naturally is the most attractive.
When the matter was under dis discussion
cussion discussion in cloakrooms last session
cne member said the people might
object to such a big jump. He was
told they would not "cuss" any.more
for that sum than for $10,000. Some
members would like an increase to
$15,000.
For the 531 members of the House
and Senate combined the increase of
$5000 in salary would reach the total
in one year of $2,655,000. The total
annual salary would be approximate approximately
ly approximately $7,000,000 or $1,000,000 more
than the appropriation for enforce enforcement
ment enforcement of prohibition.
Members have complained invari invariably
ably invariably about the high cost of living in
Washington and the failure of the
present salary to keep pace. The
duties of members have been increas increasing
ing increasing constantly, and they think woman
suffrage will make their work harder.
The present salary was fixed about
two years ago. J
Cabinet officers, too. have found it
difficult to get along on $12,000 a
year. Several employes in the gov
ernment departments, some of them
experts, have found their salaries too
small and have resigned.
rp, . ,
does not want an increase in his sal
ary.
He is Representative Thomas Lf. ;
Bianton, democrat, of Texas. He said
today he would fight the movement.
FIERCE FIRE ON NEW
ORLEANS WATER FRONT'

New Orleans, Nov. 20. Damagejj And in Order tO Stay at

j estimated at $2.-000,000 was caused by
a water front fire which is believed to
have started
sparks.
from switch engine
SUPPLY GREATER THAN
DEMAND FOR SUGAR
New York, Nov. 20. All six refin refineries
eries refineries of the American Sugar Refining
Company have been closed as a result
of the slight demand for the commodi commodity,
ty, commodity, officials announced. They said
they had ample stocks and are pre prepared
pared prepared to make prompt delivery.
Prices on silk shirts cut in half.
Walkley & Barnett. 20-2t
MILLER BROS. SHOWS AT
MARION COUNTY FAIR
Sunday the two special show trams
of Miller Bros. will roll into Ocala.
They have the largest carnival show
in Florida this year, comprising 20 big
attractions and numbers of smaller
ones. Everything to please, nothing
to offend. All the latest in outdoor
attractions; fun galore. The recom recommendations
mendations recommendations from Fairmont, W. Va.,
Middleport, O., Rome, Ga Johnson
City, Tenn'., and several larger cities,
where this gigantic carnival has ex
hibited lately should be enough guar
antee that Ocala is having the very
best in amusements here.
A few of the principal attractions
are Miller Bros. Wild West, where
you will see cowboys' and cowgirls
from all parts of the globe; then
comes OTlarity's Animal Show, the
big Athletic Show, "Europia," Harry
Dickinson's twenty big features, con containing
taining containing 30 cages of animals, trained
degs and ponies, high diving dogs;
Miiles Bros'. Colored Minstrel, con containing
taining containing 30 real performers, including
its own orchestra. Four monster rid riding
ing riding devices, Sam Harris the "Fat
Man," weighing' 715 pounds: "The
Congres sof Midgets," two uniformed
bands, three hundred and fifty people.
Band concerts and free acts daily.
If you appreciate high class, moral at attractions
tractions attractions and up to the minute shows,
come to the Marion County Fair all
next week.
Prices on silk shirts cut in half.
Walkley & Barnett. 20-2t

IPRESIDEIiT'S DEALT

S IMPROVING
Hoped that He Will be Able to Ad Address
dress Address Congress in Person
When it Meets
(Associated Press
Washington, D. C, Nov. 20. Presi President
dent President Wilson's health has so improved,
White House officials said, it was pos possible
sible possible he might address Congress in
person when it convenes in December.
CONTROLLER'S CALL
The comptroller of the currency is issued
sued issued a call today for the condition of
all national banks at the close of bus
ness Monday, Nov. 15th.
INCREASE AND DECREASE
v Racial populations announced by
the census bureau show increases in
the negro populations since 1910 in
Memphis and Knoxville and a decrease
in Nashville.
THE BLESSED DAYS
OF CHILDHOOD PASS
' TO COME NO MORE"
The toddler today the man of to tomorrow.
morrow. tomorrow. So the world moves on.
Days pass quickly weeks" grow
into years and the childish prattla
that has been so dear to us is gone gone-Only
Only gone-Only memory brings back to mind the
happy days when the baby face ra radiated
diated radiated sunshine and flowers into our
very soul.
Would you rob yourself of the
pleasure of keeping the baby face be before
fore before you always?
- A photograph taken now will be'
prized by you in years to come, and'
seep before you m all vivid reality
those God-given days of childish in innocence.
nocence. innocence.
Make your appointment for baby's'
sitting now.'
EUGENE A. REVELS,
High Grade Portraits,
14 N. Magnolia St., Ocala, Fla. It
L.I'Howe's" ?aPe Cod cranberries,
W ia P?na o pounds
t. jn.. oiroua.
It
'
: Price Reductions
Are Fashionable
the top in fashions we
on all of our READY
TRIMMED HATS, many
of which have been in
only a few days:
All during Fair Week
we will sell &t the fol-
lowing prices:
$20 Hats for $15
m
$15 Hats for $12
: $10 Hats for $7 :
Also many pretty Hats I
at only $5 each
I The Elite Shop
Ocala House Block I
I Opposite Court House
"'See Me;:
For all Classes cl
Stone, Brlclx, Wood
and Concrete
Building;
j.J. D. IcCasIiffl
I Contractor
Z Phone 44S- 723 Wenona St. t
WM. A. TINSMAN
CONTRACTOR
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
Estimates Furnished Free
Phone No. 526, 215 W. 5th St, Ocala
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTER AND
BUILDER
Careful estimates made on all con contract
tract contract -w ork. Gives more and Tsetter
work ftT the money than any cthsx
contractor ia tia citj.

i



OCALA EVENING STAB, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1929

TWO

HIGH WAGES STILL
PAID IN

NEW YORK

SYNOPSIS OF THE GAME LAW

(Associated Press)
New York, Nov. 18. Average
earnings in this city's representative
trades in September, 1920, were dou double
ble double what they were six years ago and,
generally, $2 a week higher than they
were a year ago, according to a re report
port report prepared by the industrial bu bureau
reau bureau of the merchants' association.
The report declares that, while the
city's industrial activity has receded
somewhat from the high water mark
established during the war. there is no
indication of a general slump in
wannfapturinj?. Charts giving the

average weekly earnings of workmen,
combining both office and shop em employes,
ployes, employes, for September, 1914, 1919 and
1920, show, for the above named years
respectively:
Stone, clay and glass products:
$13.06, $26.58, $35.11. Metals, ma machinery
chinery machinery and conveyances, $14.58,
$27.21, $30.67. Wood manufacturers,
$12.49, $24.26, $28.42." Fur, leather
and rubber goods, $11.77, $27.09,
$26.43. Chemicals, oils and paints,
$13.67, $24.79, $27. Printing and pa paper
per paper goods, $15.58, $27.36; $31.38. Tex Textiles,
tiles, Textiles, $9.72, $21.03. $24.79. Clothing,
millinery, laundry, etc.,, $12.40, $27.68,
$26.46. Food, liquors and tobacco,
$11. CO, $23.40, $26.04. Water, light
and power, $15.79, $30.91, $35.59.
The general average for these in industries
dustries industries for the three years runs:
$13.06, $26.17 and S28.44.
INVITES AMERICAN CAPITAL

In view of the fact that hunting

licenses are now on sale by the county
judge, we print the following synop

sis of the game law:

The title of all wild birds and game
is vested in the various counties of
the state.
The following only are game birds:
Swan, geese, brant, ducks, rails, coots,
mud hens, gallinules, shore birds,
plovers, surf birds, snipe, woodcocks,
sand pipers, tattlers, curlews, turkeys,
grouse, pheasants, quail and turtle
doves.
It is a $50 fine to catch, kill, or ship

m hftvfi in nosscsftion any game bird.

plumage, skin, eggs or nests inereoi
except as provided by law.
November 20th to

Marrh 1?t following, for deer, squir

rolst xtnlr! fii tVpvs. cruail. doves, swan,

rails, coots, sand pipers,

curlews, snipe, duck3 and plover. Un Unlawful
lawful Unlawful tn kill sauirrels in any public

or private park at any time. Nov.
9nv. a rw 20th following, for

MVw v -

.tAi cants smA erouse.

It is $25 fine to kill mud hens, galli gallinules,
nules, gallinules, limicolae, commonly known as

shore birds, and woodcocks at any

Tt is a $25 fine to capture, kill or

iniure anv crame bird or animal by

pitfall, deadfall, scafford. cage, snare,

' -

ealt-iirlr. blind nen. baited HOOK.

Berlin. Oct. 21. Deputy Schlitten

bauer, a member of the economic com-

bait 2d field, drus, poison, chemicals,

e.nlosives or similar device

It is a $25 fine to catch, hunt or kill

anv frame bird or animal between

dark and daylight the following day.

It is a $25 fine to kill more than

one deer, two turkeys, twenty quail or
twenty-five birds of any other species

mission of the Bavarian diet, sug- jin any one day. It is a $bUU line to

gests.that participation of American khi more tnan inree ueer, ii i

capital in the Ruhr district should be

invited in order to circumvent any
French attempt at occupying this re region.,
gion., region., ,,'t ,-.
He proposes that this German in industrial
dustrial industrial district should be organized
into a single economic unit, in which
American capital should be given a 25
per cent interest. Such American
holdings, he states, would suffice to
head off any French invasion.
IMITATION FOUND AMONG ;
. BRITISH CROWN JEWELS

London, Oct. 31 Sir George Young Young-liusband,
liusband, Young-liusband, keeper of the jewel house at
the Tower of London" has just reveal revealed
ed revealed the 5 fact that one of the British
crown jewels, of which he is custo custodian,
dian, custodian, is an imitation.' The stone was
, believed to be a magnificent equama equama-rine,
rine, equama-rine, but proved on examination to be
only a piece of colored glass. Tt figur figured
ed figured first in the crown of King James

II. The mystery" of when the imita

tion was substituted for the real

stone has not been solved.
NOVEMBER 25 "LOAN

DAY" IN FRANCE

cr three hundred of any other game

bird "species m one open season.
It is a $25 fine to barter, sell or of

fer for sale anv erame bird or animal.

It is a $100 fine to hunt outside ol

your voting precinct without a license It IS

and a $25 fine to Change or alter a igjj
license. .. US

It is a S25 fine to transport within 5

.....

or without this state any game witn-

out a proper license. It is a $100 hne

for anv common carrier to receive

such game for transportation.

The witnesses furnishing evidence

to convict for any violation of the

game laws shall have half of the fine

imposed.

Persons residing in the state

twelve months, and a bona fide resi

dent of the county, may, on payment

rf si frt t.hfl r.mmtv iudge. receive a

"resident county license," a non

raoilonf onnntxr license" for S3 and a 11

, ; I

Siori-resident hunters license" ior

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Paris. Nov. 1. November 25th has

been decided upon by the presidents

of all the chambers of commerce of
Paris, as "Loan Day." On that day,
the chambers of commerce have re-

solved an tne receipts taKen oy us- appoint deputies in each
ineea hnnsaa in Pane chflll hp lTlvestPfl I v,c" "-ff r

$15. No license good except in coun county
ty county issued. No license required of res

ident Confederate veterans.

County judge to have 25c, 50c. and

S1 .resnectivelv. for each license is

sued. Balance goes to county school

fiinHI

All grades of licenses shall be of
different color, contain a synopsis of
the- pame law printed ; on the back.

and shall be good only for the open
season or fraction thereof immediate

ly following their issue.

in the new six per cent loan.

"Apart from payments for goods
sold previously you shall bring to
the state in exchange for loan certifi certificates,
cates, certificates, all the money spent by the pub public
lic public that day, whether for nourishment
or for amusement, for clothing or for

lodgings or for purchase of any ob object
ject object on sale in the stores of the cap capital,"
ital," capital," the resolution reads.
THE HOUSING PROBLEM
IN CAPITAL OF SPAIN

1 1

precinct

ANTHONY

Anthony, Nov. 18. Mr. J. M. Hill
man wtnmftd home Mondav from Ho

rr.osassa, where he spent several days. 1
Mr. H. O. Haymaker, who has been :f-

A

:x:

:x:

Madrid, Oct. 31. A gigantic effort
to settle the housing problem of the
Spanish capital by the inrush of
thousands of country folk to the city,
is in progress in the northern 'section
adjacent to the suburb of Cuatro Ca Ca-minos.
minos. Ca-minos. A private concern has acquir acquired
ed acquired an enormous tract of land and has
begun building what for. Madrid are
skyscrapers of ten tsories. Each of
these buildings is to contain 400 flats
and 40 stores. The new model is to
be in all respects modern. Engineers
are now eneraered in la vine out a

boulevard running through its center

over half a raile long and 130 feet in
'width, with two carriage ways and &
centraj. promenade lined with trees.

1921 Auto Tags
Now Ready

in Winter Haven for some time, spent ;?

Sunday at home.
Mr. C. W. Turner was a business
viaitnr in Orlando last week. Ill

Mr. James Fielding spent Tuesday J;

of this week in Gainesville. ;

Mr. and Mrs. DeWitt Griffin and 22

HT AlViH-. firiffm fit Oeala were in 1 .1:

Anthony Sunday.

Mr. B. K. Padgett made a business

trip to Carolina this week. Mr. C. O. 2;

Cook of Sarasota had charge of the

depot during Mr. Padgett's absence.

Several car loads of tine stocK iromirr

l-hi AntVinnn Forms lo-ff i'Wonpertn'V I SsJ

M TnAlrffSinYTllla fair UToaCrQ I 1

C. Beuchler and D. H. Priest have m

charge of the stock. 1 f

Mr. J. w. Holman is m lieorffia ior :

- w- - 1 w

- -1. L -X lil

a suuru stay. I

Mr. Arch Shealv of Ocala spent Mil

. j, i - ir 1 nr.. 1

Sunday at ine nom oi tev. anu juis. i jjj
M P! PInTYimPT. I

. Mis3 Evie Mae Blalock of Coleman

is the cuest of Mrs. B. K. Padgett.

Mr. D. J. Post and daughter. Mrs.

J. W. Odom of Lakeland, were guests

at the home of Mr. Post's son, Mr.

For the convenience of the public
applications for registrations of motor
vehicles for the year 1921 MAY BE
FILED NOW, if accompanied by re remittance.
mittance. remittance. THE 1921 TAGS WILL BE
SENT OUT ABOUT THE MIDDLE
OF DECEMBER for all applications
filed up to that time; and thereafter
as fast as applications in corect form
reach this office.
Before mailing your appliaction
please see that all questions are an answered
swered answered and vour name and address is

printed or written plainly to avoid

errors. The law requires you to ex execute
ecute execute the application before a Notary
Public or some officer using a seal.

Taers canont be issued until a duly ex

ecuted application is filed in this of-

fice. ;

Blanks may be secured from Banks,
Justices of the Peace, Notaries Public,

and County Officers, or the Comp-

troler.
ERNEST AMOS,
State Comptroller,
2c Tallahassee, Florida. 17-20

a:

f
it

D. H. Post and family for several! SI

. I T.--T

aays last wees, ISIS

iiir. xveenev aim ijtmiiy. iu.ra.

ters and Mr. Claud Edwards, wife and
1 AW

Anthony Thursday of last week tox:

spend the wmter. They are pleasant- 71

iv located at the Swindell nome. mr. u

Keeney and family made their homeJ

in Anthony a number of years ago and 1 HI

have many friends here who welcome

their return. Mrs. Edwards was for

meriy Miss Grace Keeney.

KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS

i

3c-

Ocala Lodere No. 19. Conventions

held every Monday eveninff at 7:30

o'clock at the castle hall, over the G.

C. Greene Co. drugstore. A cordial

welcome to visiting brothers.

J. W. Akin, C. C.

Chas. K. Sage, K. of R. & S.

WOODMEN OF THE WORLD

Fort King Camp No. 14 meets at
K. of P. hall at 7:30 p. m. every sec second
ond second and fourth Friday. Visiting sov sovereigns
ereigns sovereigns are always welcome.
J. C. Bray, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage, Clerk.

A

eeKin

November 22nd to 27th Inclusive

Thanksgiving
AND LAST, BUT NOT LEAST,

1

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Special Fair Week
attractions will
be of the greatest
and of most
importance to our
many patrons from
the city and the
country.

The PRICES
that we have
arranged for
Fair and
Thanksgiving
Week
will astonish
you.

This selling will make it
possible for every woman
to have a distinctive new
Suit, Coat or Dress for it offers
hosts of desirable garments at sub substantially
stantially substantially lowered prices. The fab fabrics
rics fabrics are good looking and long wear wearing,
ing, wearing, and there are a wide range of
color to select from.

As a SPECIAL ATTRACTION we will continue our

T o n
InsedDiiu

" .' ..... ,K
on every piece of yard goods in stock, Silks, Woolen and all kinds of
Cotton Fabrics will be sold at 25 discount from the regular price.
- To our many patrons and friends from out of town
we extend an invitation to make this store your
headquarters during Fair Week and all other weeks.

IF

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The Fashion Center

Ocala

Florida

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OCA LA EVENING STAR, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1920

tuui

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Marion

Conn

tv Fai

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isitors

Don't fail to visit our Booth while attending the
fair. Here we will have on display a number of

fin

T rr "n o

with courteous attendants in charge and we will do our
best to make your visit worth while. We will will play
for you the latest songs and will do our utmost to make
you feel at home.

Let Us Put
A Pathe in Your Home
We want to place a Pathe in
every house in Marion County and
are making this special offer as an
inducement. Don't fail to visit the

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$25.00 Worth of Records
Absolutely Free!
Our special proposition to give
$25.00 worth of records of your own
selection is also open to the winner
of the certificate at our booth, the

same as any other
purchaser of one of
these machines.

Bom9!! FoFgett Ho EegjlMeF
Upon entering the booth you will be asked to register
your name opposite a certain number, which will entitle
you to a chance on the $25.00 certificate to be applied
upon the purchase of one of the Pathe machines to be
drawn for on Friday evening.
m ip fihJi mm a w -why pay more-

ifl)o UH Wlh lilJ MA tAl Ocala ...

ifi!

WHAT WOULD YOU

IF DISASTER

1411 Vtilif ii

till IUUU 1U

nmt i

33,000 Victims of Sudden Disasters-

Helped Last Year by j
Red Cross

Florida

LEGION DAY AT
THE COUNTY FAIR

Friday, Nov. 26
The athletic meet will be for all
school boys and girls up to and in including
cluding including 20 years of age.
The events for the girls are as fol follows:
lows: follows: .
Sack race.
. Potato race.
Three-legged race. i
Relay race. '"

(I Or UVya up aim. im,iuuu0
years:
One hundred yard dash.
"Pnfflf.ft Tap.fi."

Sack three-legged race4
' Obstacle race.
Shoe race.
Boys up to and including 20 years:
Relay race, half-mile, four men to
team.
Hurdle race.
100-yard dash.
Shot put.

Half-mile run.

Broad jump.
High jump.
The hour and minute for each of
these exercises will be announced
later. r ; - .,..,.
The foregoing program of the races
that will take place at the fair Fri Friday,
day, Friday, November 26thwas arranged
especially for that dfite to afford eve every
ry every school pupil the opportunity of en entering
tering entering as the schools will have a holi holiday
day holiday that day. This feature of the
fair promises to be one of the most
interesting and unique of the week,
and it is hoped there will be a large
number of contestants. Thi3 is a
splendid start in the direction of ath athletics,
letics, athletics, which are as necessary for the
deevlopment of the body as the study
"courses are for development of the
mind. There will be two grand prizes
given the winner of the greatest num num-.ber
.ber num-.ber of points and to the best all-

around atniete. xnese prizes wm ue

in the jorm or. snver ana Dronze
medals.

.rJacn event win net nve pomxs 10
the winner, three points to the second
best and one point to the third. In
addition to the grand prizes there
will be prizes awarded for each in individual
dividual individual event, which will be well

worm iryms ior, uebiuss us xuu
and experience to be gained by en entering
tering entering the contests. :
Boys and girk should make en entries
tries entries with their teachers, to whom let

ters have been sent by R. L. Van Os-

ten, chairman of committee in charge
of athletic events.

NOTICE
Notice is hereby given that under
final decree of the circuit court for
Marion county, in chancery, in the
case of Rodney V. W. Vandervoort,

complainant, vs. David E. Allen, et al,

defendants, rendered April 24th, lyzu,
and under supplemental;, decree ren rendered
dered rendered October 18th, 1920, the under undersigned,
signed, undersigned, as special master, in chancery
appointed by the court to execute the
said decree,, will on
Monday, December 6th, 1920,
between the hours of eleven o'clock
a. m. and two o'clock p. m., offer for
sale and sell to the best and highest
bidder for cash; at the west door of
the court house in Ocala, Florida, the
following described personal and real
property, to-wit: v
The undivided half interest of the
cross-defendant, Frank K. Vander Vandervoort
voort Vandervoort in and to all of the personal
property, including farm tools, ma machinery,
chinery, machinery, utensils, etc., live stock, etc.,
formerly belonging to the partnership
of Vandervoorst & Allen;
The" undivided half -interest of the
cross-defendant, Rodney V. W. Van Vandervoort
dervoort Vandervoort in and to all those certain
tracts or parcels of land mentioned
and referred to or described in a cer certain
tain certain deed of conveyance dated October
21st, 1913, from David E. Allen and
wife to Frank K. Vandervoort, re recorded
corded recorded in Deed Book 153, page 402,
of the public records of Marion coun county,
ty, county, Florida.
The said personal property will be
sold first, and if sufficient is not
realized to satisfy the amount of said
decree, the real estate will be next
offered for sale and sold.
All of said property being sold to
satisfy the said decree and costs.
S. T. Sistrunk,
11-13-sat Special Master in Chancery.

NOTICE OF MASTER'S SALE

FOR SALE
LARGE LUE GUI GONG
ORANGE TREES.
Will Deliver and Plant for
$5.50 EACH
The Large Trees.
WARTMANN NURSERY CO.,
Ocala, Fla.

1 10-14, deod-tf
I

Under and by virtue of a final de-J
cree issuing out of the circuit court
of Marion county, Florida, dated Oc- j
tober 19th, 1920, in that certain suit

AAA J AAKf f TWUU&Aft,
Henry Gatrell is complainant and
William Jacobs is defendant, I as
special master will offer for sale at
the west door of the court house in
Ocala, Florida, on
Monday, the 6th day of December,
- 1920,
between the hours of 11 a. m. and 2
p. m. of said day,' the following land
situate, lying and being in Marion
county, Florida, to-wit: the west half
of the southwest quarter of the south southeast
east southeast quarter of section thirty-four in
township, thirteen south, range twen twenty
ty twenty east, said land to be sold to the
highest bidder for cash to satisfy
said decree and cost3.
S. T. Sistrunk, Special Master.
W. K. Zewadski,
Complainant's Solicitor. 11-6-sat
ABSURD NAMES WORK HARM

mignt not De induced toocafe there
because of the attractiveness or prom promise
ise promise for. nil in the name.-' Ohio State
Journal, v

May Be Witty, But They Too Fre Frequently
quently Frequently Tend to Put Community
In Disrepute.
Freakish and absurb names flven
to communities, villages and counties
by some waggish wit In the primitive
times, have a way of persisting, ding dinging
ing dinging to the ; community, so that It is
most dlf2cult to get rid of them when
a new people have succeeded to resi residence
dence residence there. Some of ; these absurd
names are so ridiculous they harm the
community, tending at all times to put
It in disrepute, make It a jest and
byword.
All over the country are to be found
places where the old-time wit left his
contribution of harmful levity, against
which the community struggles. In
the northern part of Missouri was a
little community that was given, in
the days before the war, the rather
startling name of Burnshirt The
name grew out of sin iaeUent that
took place when some blg-gtme hunt hunters
ers hunters were encamped at the settlement.
The name appealed to the risibilities
of the community and for two genera generations
tions generations it was compelled to bear, that
name. It 'had a small dejrreo of coia coia-fort
fort coia-fort from the fact that a lesser com community,
munity, community, hard by, had won the name
of PInhook, Hooppole township In
Posey county, Indiana, is quite the
most widely known of any township
in the Jloosier state, vet atrajxa-ara

LIKE RAINBOW IN THE SEA

Gloriously Tinted Water That Washes
Bermuda's Shores Is an Ever Ever-Fascinating
Fascinating Ever-Fascinating Marvel.
Hundreds of miles from any coast,
surrounded on every side by the rest restless
less restless surges of the great Atlantic a
mere speck In a waste of sea lies
Bermuda. .While not strictly one of
the West Indies," yet its fauna and
flora. Its products and Its formation,
are so similar to many of the Antilles
that we may well ? consider it as a
West Indian Island gone astray, and
set down -or rather pushed up-1 a
thousand miles and more from Its fel fel-lows.
lows. fel-lows. :i
If the ship arrives at Bermuda by
daylight there Is ample opportunity
for the visitor to view the Island as
the vessel steams slowly along the
northern shores and threads her. way
through the tortuous channel between
sharp-fanged reefs toward Hamilton
Perhaps nowhere else In all the
world Is there such gloriously tinted
water. Indigo where deep, azure and
sapphire nearer shore, opalescent tur turquoise
quoise turquoise in the shallows, and marbled
with royal purple and amethyst where
reefs and corals dot the white sand of
its bed, the sea that laps Bermuda's
shores is an ever-changing, ever-fascinating
marvel ; a thing of wondrous
beauty Impossible to describe in words
or to reproduce in pigments. A. Hyatt
Venill In "The Book of the West
Indies."

Atlanta, Ga., Nov. What would

your town do tomorrow, were it sud-!

denly stricken by disaster?

The question is not as foolish as

it may sound to people who are living
today In safety and happiness and

who no more anticipate disaster to

morrow than they do the end of the
world. .
For no one knows when or where
disaster .will strike.
There was no warning of the San

Francisco earthquake and fire. One
moment the people of that mighty city
were bustling about their business,
utterly devoid of fear or premonition;
the next their entire world was tum tumbling
bling tumbling about their ears.
One morning two miles of the city
of Atlanta, Ga., were swept by fire
la less than four hours.
Wall street never expected a bomb
explosion until it came and killed
more than thirty people and maimed
scores of others in less time than it
takes to read this paragraph.
Even gathering storms and rising
floods, such as the south has known
on its coasts and at river cities like
West Point, Ga., give scant warning

before homes are inundated and people

forced to flee for their lives.

To any one at any tune, tornado.

fire and storm may bring peril and suf

f ering. So the question is asked

again:

"What would your town do tomor

row if disaster- struck?"

It is to provide an answer to that
question that the American Red Cross
baa been in existence for years and
years. It is the recognized official

agency for disaster relief, and it has

lived up to its responsibilities in a

wonderful way.

: That is one reason way the Red

Cross deserves the support of every

one o& its Fourth Roll Call to mala

tain it so that, when disaster strikes,
the stricken will always 'have a help

ing hand to turn to, the American Red

Cress.

The disaster relief part of the Red
Cross organization has been, so thor
ouzhly perfected that It can answei

calls for help in the briefest possibli

time.

People of the south well remembei

how promptly the Red Cross respond

ed to the need during the West Point

flood last year, the Corpus Christ:

storm and several other southern dis disasters,
asters, disasters, while fresh in the- memory oj
the entire country is the fact that

Red Cross doctors and nurses were
"first on the scene" at the Wall street
explosion.
In addition to furnishing such
prompt relief as this, practically ev every
ery every Red Cross chapter has a per permanent
manent permanent disaster relief committee,
which has made a survey of resources
in their respective communities 4 and

is prepared to act promptly with the
means at band when disaster occurs.
Illustrative of the genuine need for
just such preparedness as this in the
United States i;; the fact that, last
year alone, tlie Red Cross aided C0,
300 persons in 164 communities, all
victims of 73 separate and distinct dis disasters.
asters. disasters. -; ''
In the accomplishment of this re re-,ief
,ief re-,ief work 140 Red Cross chapters were
called upon to assist, the sum of $9C0, $9C0,-000
000 $9C0,-000 in cash and supplies was expend expended.
ed. expended. Thirty temporary hospitals were
called into existence, twenty-odd mo motor
tor motor corps were organized, seven spe special
cial special relief trains were sent out and
110 special representatives and nurses
were furnished In addition to the aid
given by the local Red Cross workers
in the community visited by disaster.
In these 73 disasters, including .19
tornadoes and cyclones, 2 hurricanes,
2 cloud bursts, 1 bail storm, 2 earth earthquakes,
quakes, earthquakes, 1 landslide, 15 fires, 1 explo explosion,
sion, explosion, 9 floods, 10 shipwrecks, 1 train
wreck, 4 riots, 1 motor accident and
2 droughts 850 persons were killed,
1,500 were injured, 13,000 (approxi (approxi-lmately)
lmately) (approxi-lmately) were rendered homelesi
while property valued at $5,000,000 was
destroyed.
The largest and most destructive
disaster.. CJUtha Tear was at Corona

Cnristi, Texas, in 5eptemDer; 1919.
Approximately 400 were killed and 4, 4,-000
000 4,-000 made homeless. The Red Cross
division director with a staff of 33.
assistants administered a fund of $100
000. giving aid to 3,600 families and
four towns and rural districts and suf sufficient
ficient sufficient supplies to each family to en enable
able enable it to stand on its feet.
Because of tornadoes, the Gulf and

Lake Divisions were called upon to
send emergency relief with trained
workers to nearly SO communities. The
two droughts in Montana and North
Dakota gave abundant opportunity for
trained workers from the Northern Di Division
vision Division to help the Red Cross chapters
demonstrate their usefulness, while a
number of shipwrecks proved the read readiness
iness readiness of the Atlantic Division and the
New York Metropolitan Area Commit Committee
tee Committee to assist in that line of work.
The record of last year emphasizes
the need of abundant preparedness
along the line of disaster relief, and
has resulted in the organization oi

Disaster Preparedness Committees by

about 400 chapters and the setting

aside of a special emergency fund by

the National organization of $5,000, $5,000,-000
000 $5,000,-000 in addition to the regular annual
appropriation for this purpose made
in its budget.

Irving in England.
It Is a pleasing sight, of a Sunday
morning; when the bell Is sending its
sober melody across the quiet fields,
to behold the peasantry in their best
finery, with ruddy faces, and mod modest
est modest cheerfulness, thronging tranquilly
along the green lanes to church; but
it is still more pleasing to see them
in the evenings, gathering about their
cottage doors, and appearing to exult
In the humble comforts and embellish embellishments
ments embellishments whieh their own hands have
spread around them. Washington
Irving.

Color-Blindness.
It may come as a surprise to many

to learn that fewer than fifty-five peo people
ple people In every thousand are more or
less color-blind- The commonest form
of color-blindness Is not as is usually
supposed the inability" to distinguish
red and green. That affects one per person
son person in fifty-five. The most usual
symptom Is to get mixed between blue
and green. One person In sixty can-,
not distinguish between brown and
green. Color-blindness Is more com common
mon common among educated than among un uneducated
educated uneducated people, and Is far more usual
among men than women. Only abouf
one woman In a thousand is badly
color-blind. A very odd fact is that'
musicians are more liable to this affec--tion
than any other class or profes--slon.
niness may cause color-blindness.
There Is a case of a woman
who became entirely color-blind after"
a form of ear disease, while a signal signalman
man signalman who had suffered from lock-jaw
or tetanus became equally unable tir
distinguish color, i

Real Sea Serpents.

The Indian ocean and the waters
of the tropical Pacific are inhabited
by a great number of wholly aquatic,
veritable sea serpents that possess
deadly fangs, and sometimes swim In
schools of count! 083 thousands. These
snakes have a paddle-like tail, to as assist
sist assist them In swimming. An offshoot
of this species is the sub-family con containing
taining containing the formidable cobras and their
allies, according to Raymond Dltmarz,
curator of reptiles at the "New York
zoo, who are treacherously deceptive
In appearance. All of the very large
serpents are members of a single fam family
ily family the Boldea. None is poisonous,
and the members of this family kill
their prey by constriction.

Ants Guard Trees.
The Cecropias are remarkable trees.

; very widely distributed throughout the

tropics. Their slender trunks are
crowned with four leaves at the ends

i of the branches. A few active ants

run continually along the .branches
and leaves, but if the tree is. shaken

j slightly an army of ants rush out by

, small apertures, ready for a savage as as-J
J as-J sault on the Intruder. This is the
j most terrible guardian that the tree

t bas retained to protect it from its

most formidable enemy the "leaf
cutter" ant The defenders rarely
leave tbeir retreat, whore they live on
. small wliitisi egg-shaped bodies about
one-twelfth of an inch long, known as
Mueller's corpusHeg.
The Horse of -Thirty-Five.
Study of the relation between the to total
tal total length of life and the time required
to reach maturity has brought out an
Interesting comparison between men
and horses. A horse at five years old

is said to be, comparatively, as old as a
man at twenty, and doubtless may be
expected to behave, according to
equine standards, after the manner of
the average college student following
human standards. y A ten-year-old
horse resembles, so far as age and ex experience
perience experience go, a man of forty, while a
horse that has attained the ripe age of
thirty-five is comparable with a man of
ninety.- New York Evening Post.

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y- 651! vrfirr?TirKTrr II TVcrm 7-

At Marion County Fair

Big Athletic Events for School Children

?: Boys and Girls see your
& SCHOOL TEACHER
A
ht For Lis! oi Events, Prizes an 3 Entries
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OCA LA EVENING STAR, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1920

Ocala Evening Star
Published Every Day Except Sandar l7
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY,
OCALA, FLORIDA.

It. R. Carroll, President
P. V. Learengood, Secretary-Treasurer
J. II. Benjamin, Editor

staff have traveled around a right

jsmart. When a railway or hotel por por-Jter
Jter por-Jter does them efficient and cheerful
service, they like to give him a tip.

When he doesn't they don't. They see
no reason for an anti-tipping law.

Entered at Ocala, FLa., postofflce as
second-class matter.

Bnlnesa

TELEPHONES
Of flee Five-One

John Mitchell, formerly president of
the United Mine Workers of Amer America,
ica, America, left an estate valued at a third
of a million dollars, but he earned the
money as a labor agitator and not as
a workman. :

At the beginning of his first term,

Editorial Department Two-Sere a Mr. Wilson refused to recognize gOV-
Seefetr Reporter Fire-One -.-.. w nCQac;T,afiATi in .Mexico.

At the end of his last term, he refuses

MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS
""he Associated Press Is exclusively
entitled for the use for republication of
all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and
also the local news published herein.
All rights of republication of special
Aisoatches herein are also reserved.

to recognize government by terror terrorism
ism terrorism in Russia. He is right in both
cases.

Herbert Hoover wants means v to
keep three and a half million children
of Central Europe from starving this

winter. Wonder if Mr. Hoover has

DOMESTIC SUBSCRIPTION RATES
One year, In advance ............ .16.00

T:iA JUUULUBi 1X1 &U IBHLC ......... fit

Three months, in advance 1-50 'ctn the dispatch that says the Indians
One month, in advance . ,60f . , , . -,
of Alaska are threatened with star-

.DVERTISI.G RATES
Dlupiayt Plate 15 cents per inch for
consecutive Insertions. 'Alternate lnser lnser-tlont:
tlont: lnser-tlont: 25 per cent addittonaL Composi Composition
tion Composition charges on ads. that run less than
six times cents per Inch. Special
position 20 per cent additional. Kates
taso:l on 4-lnch minimum. Less man
lour inches will take higher rate,
which will be furnished upon applica application.
tion. application. Iteitdlngr Notice t 5 cents per line fcr
first Insertion; 3 cents per line for each
sube-iuent insertion. One change a
week allowed on readers without xtra
composition charges.
JL:al advertisements it legal rates.

vation.

After -all the argument about the
uniforms of the ex-service men, it
appears that of those that remain
few will go on the men they belong
to. Most of the boys have filled out
considerably since they came back
from France.

Wonder if those who insist on hav-

ing the United States reorganize the

The political record of Mayor Hy-Irish '"Public would have us send
lan smells to heaven-or the other rooPs .a.cross thf ocean. to make the

i recognition good. Times-Union.

You can bet they would, but they

place.

police declare that drunkenness and
the crimes that usually are caused by
drunkenness have been greatly re reduced.
duced. reduced. And we can't understand why
:t is that if liquor is so plentiful
fc.ound us, we can't obtain a drink
occasionally.

Six men and one woman have been
eected to the Hall of Fame of Co Columbia
lumbia Columbia University and to the Hall of
Tame for great American Women.
The list comprises Mark Twain, James
Buchanan Eads, engineer; Patrick
Henry, William Thomas Green Mor Morton,
ton, Morton, discoverer of ether; Augustus St.
Gaudens, Roger Williams, founder of
the Rhode Island colony, and Alice
Freeman Palmer, educator.

NATIONAL ADVANCEMENT
TnRU SOUTH'S RESOURCES

Err n

lour d

ccess is

Out

UCCSS

Huntng season opened this morn morning,
ing, morning, and the poor little birls are
falling in flocks.

would remain oer here themselves.

If the public business was half as
well attended to as private business,
the taxes would be cut in two.

Several elections in our beloved
country, prove that "vox populi, vox
dei," is an unfounded assertion. X J

If Cox had Only run like Tom JSYat JSYat-scn
scn JSYat-scn lKissimmee Valley Gazette, i
He ran faster, but in the opposite
'direction.

.From shirtsleeves to shirtsleeves is
three generations, but from cotton
shirts to cotton shirts has been only
three years. ;

The Siberian prison camps yet con contain
tain contain thousands of German and Aus Austrian
trian Austrian captives, many of whom, it is
said, are dying of hopelessness.

The Lakeland Telegram most truth truthfully
fully truthfully says: "The world will never be
what it should be until it learns to
distinguish between those who do good
.and those who merely refrain from
. doing evil."

Wonder what the manufacturers
have been palming off on the public,
the last three years or so, for silk
shirts. It has been proven that there
was not half enough silk to supply
the demand.

It is reported that Mr. Harding

wanted a request from Mr. Wilson to

stop in Mexico, to look over affairs in

that country as the accredited repre

sentative of the United States. The
report was pi obably unfounded, but

if it was true it was unreasonable.

,Itj ifi;said that "moonshine" makes
a good anti-freeze solution for autos
in cold weather. And the autos can
ctand it better than can the average

human stomach. Orlando Reporter Reporter-Star.
Star. Reporter-Star. r-:;;.-:?-r:t:J.-v-.,-.-:

Do you want to promote flivver-

stealing? V;' V;: : ;...

There is not much danger that
Japan will have any backing from the
League of Nations if she declares war
cn America. True, Japan belongs to
the League of Nations and America
does not, but the league is not bound
to support one of its members in an

offensive war.

Secretary Daniels' threat that he
will dismiss a thousand or so of
cadets from the Naval Academy is
another proof that he is a sissy. Real
boys at college always haze each
other, and the conduct of the boys at
Annapolis may be safely left to the
officers in charge of the academy.

The Star ha received a paper de devoted
voted devoted to denouncing the custom of

tipping. Lots of people want a law

against it. The Star is opposed to jpart of Floridathe circuit judge, the
any such law. The members of its state attorney, the sheriffs and the

Newspapers whose editors miss
theifviiooze are continually telling
how much more drunkenness there is
now than before prohibition went into
effect. We don't know how it is in
other parts of the country, but eve

rybody in a position to know in this

(Manufacturers Record)
In the natural resources of the
Southern states the nation has a
source of almost boundless wealth-

creating potentialities.

No one should for a moment think
of the resources of the South in soils,
in minerals, in timber, in water pow powers,
ers, powers, in granites and marbles, and sul sulphur,
phur, sulphur, and oil, and gas, and in soil and
climatic advantages as possessions
simply of the South, or of the people
of the South. These resources are a
part, and a very large proportion of
the nation's resources.
Nearly one-third continental Unit United
ed United States is in the South. Three-fifths
of its coast line is in the South.
Practically all of the cotton produc producing
ing producing capacity of the country is in the
South; and cotton, unlike every other
crop, is so largely exported that in

jour international trade balance it be

comes far more important than wheat

or corn or other agricultural pro products.
ducts. products. No one should think of the coal re resources
sources resources of the Southern states as

purely a Southern asset. They are a
national asset, and their fullest de development
velopment development means the increase on a
large scale of the financial strength

and the power of this country.

The South have five times as much

coal area as all of Europe, excepting
Russia; and twice as much even in

cluding Russia: The coal area of Eu

rope outside of Russia is about 17,000
square miles, to which Russia adds
85,000 square miles. West Virginia
and Kentucky each have twice as
large a coal area as England. Ala Alabama
bama Alabama has almost as large a coal area

as England.
Every ton of coal that can be min

ed, every iron ore property that can

be profitably developed, every water
power utilized or to be utilized, every
acre of timber land, every acre of soil

which can produce cotton or food

stuffs, wherever to be found in the

South, is a part of the nation's assets,
and must be inventoried in summing

up the nation's resources and the na
tion's capacity for expansion.
During the war this country de

pended wholly upon the South for its
sulphur supply, without which we
could not have produced explosives.
It depended entirely upon the cotton

of the South for all the varied rami

fications of trade into which cotton

enters, whether for the tented battle

field, for 'explosives, m the hospital or

for clothing.

In the natural advantages of the
Southern states the United States has
resources of such dazzling potentiali potentialities
ties potentialities for the creation of employment
and wealth, and for the strengthening
of this country in any time of stress,

that every patriotic American should

look with full appreciation upon these

wnWnnnnnnMnnnnnMMM,M'M aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaawaaaaaaMaaaaaaaaaaaaaaasssaassssaaawBBaBBBBafcaaaaaaM
"7Iv J PVLES & PERKINS ,o& You enjoy the frl
! P C&0 RrVfirifS at the Fair a great deal
CIl EM y dill. Faaeral Directors & Embalmcrs c 411? -deal more if your eyes
ACCOimf ingand Auditing PARLORS OPPOSITE POSTOFFICE -tSfwt are properly corrected.
PHONE 332 Two Hearses. Grey Hearse for White DR. K. J. WEIHE,
.- ? People Only. Optometrist and Optician
CITY TAX NOTICE Phones 555 and 225. Open All Night. Eyesiglit Specialist
.t A .. OCALA. FLORIDA
City taxes and licenses due. . Have your mirrors re-silvered. All
A discount of 2 per cent allowed on Miss Margaret Rogers and Mrs. B. work called for, delivered and guar-
city taxes if paid in November. The D McDonald left Wednesday for anteed. Ocala Mirror and Platins
tax rate slightly reduced. j: Jacksonville, where they will be until Works, Yonge block, Fort Kir-
. i7f : Sunday, attending tbe state fair. 'venue, phone 04. 8-tf
4-tf City Tax Collector. 1 v

TT HAS ALWAYS been the policy of this bank to
A manifest a friendly, personal interest in the wel welfare
fare welfare of depositors. We do not merely wish for the
success of our depositors; we work for their success,
realizing that their interests of the bank are closely
bound up with the welfare of its customers.
WE STRIVE to meet the requirements of our cus customers
tomers customers in a manner consistent with right bank banking
ing banking principles.

Munroe & Chambliss National

Bank

national assets and rejoice in their
utilization.
Every coal mine opened in the
South adds to the nation's coal sup supply;
ply; supply; every acre added to the produc production
tion production of foodstuffs or to the raising of
livestock increases our ability to feed
ourselves.
Every water power developed is a

source of new wealth to the country.

lation to the broadest nationalism and
Americanism, and safety of the coun country
try country through all the coming years, the
Manufacturers Record invites the at attention
tention attention of every reader, North, East,
or West,' as well as those of the
South. The future of the nation is in inevitably
evitably inevitably bound up with the South. It
has resources of a kind not possessed
by any other part of the United

"TTnweV fJaue Cod cranberries,

extra fancy, 18c. a pound, two pounds

fo? 35c. W. A. Stroud. it

Ask your dealer for FEDERAL
Bread, and accept no other. There's
none so gdod. 16-t

Every furnace fire lighted enlarges States. Without these resources the

the output of iron and enables us to

carry on the further d evelopment of
our metallurgical interests.
The South, therefore, must be stu studied
died studied by the Northern and Western
man not from the geographical or
sectional point of view, nor from the
political standpoint. It must be
studied wholly with relation to its
strategic advantage to the upbuilding
and the strengthening of our country.
We know t not what problems the
United States may have to face in
coming years. We know not what
may be the revolutions in commerce
and trade. We know not what dan dangers
gers dangers we face in the inevitable strug struggle
gle struggle for world supremacy which is be before
fore before us, nor when we may sometime,
perchance, be threatened by that ever
present danger of the. yellow races
seekine supremacy over the white

progress of the country would be lim limited
ited limited in prosperity and handicapped
unto certain defat in war. Its cotton
and it n sulphur and its oils, its min minerals
erals minerals and its other products are fac factors
tors factors of safety without which there
could be no safety in time of stress.
Well might every banking house and
every manufacturing enterprise, eve eve-ly
ly eve-ly statesman and every business man,

whatever may be their political opin

ion, whatever may be their predictions
of the past, give sincere and hearty
co-operation to all the forces that
make for the uncovering, of these
great resources and their fullest utili utilization
zation utilization in this broader scheme of na national
tional national advancement.

Meet me at the American Cafe.
Union Station, Ocala, for a regular

! dinner family style. Best dinner iv

- . ; . fho (tata fnr 7!v Est ana rtrink All

races or tne worm, uut we ao Know: - ;
that everything which strengthens the I want Time or dumer11 m U
business and the commerce and the fc:S0 P
wealth of our land, whether it be pro-1
duced on the Pacific coast, in the fac-1 Make your wants known tj adver-

tories of New England, or the iron'tising them.

and steel works of the Central West,

in the mines and the shops of the
South, in its cotton fields or grain
fields, helps to round out our national
life and deepen and broaden the foun foundation
dation foundation on which it is being built.
To the study of the South and its
resources from this standpoing in re-

Our celebrated triple coated cinna cinnamon
mon cinnamon buns are not equaled anywhere,
federal Bakery. 16-6t
Prepare for FAIR -WEEK. Get a
nice STREET HAT. New lot just re received
ceived received at FISHEL'S. ll-3t

WEAK; JIUSl-DOWi
Carolina Lady Get So Sks Ccdi
Jast Drag. "C21M Edit Us
Up," She Declares.
Kernersville, N. C In an Interest Interesting
ing Interesting statement regarding Cardui, the
Woman's Tonic, Mrs. Wesley Mabe, of
near here, recently, said: "I have
known Cardui for years, but never

knew its worth until a year or so ago.
I was in a weakened, run-down con condition.
dition. condition. I became draggy didn't eat or
6leep to do any good; couldn't do any anything
thing anything without a great effort. I tried
different remedies and medicines, yet
I continued to drag.
"I -decided to give Cardui a trial,
end found it- vras Just vrhat I really
needed. It made me feel much strong

er soon after I began to use it. l De De-gan
gan De-gan to eat ngjre, and the nervous,
weak feeling b;gaa to leave. Soon I
was sleeping good.
"Cardui built me up as no other
tonic ever did.
..."I. used Cardui with one daughter
who was puny, felt bad and tired out
all the time. It brought her right out,
and soon she was as well as a girl
could be. We think there is nothing
like CarduL"
Do not allow yourself to become
weak and rundown from womanly
troubles. Take CarduL You may find
it Just what you really need. For
more than 40 years it has been used cr
thousands and thousands, and tormd
Just at Mrs. Mabe describes.
At your dxuiisist's. NOH3

5 5A3fw5i

rrnn

Statement of the Condition of

(

"VftrVt"TTTTs mam

iU(B

MDim

X

Of Ocala, Florida

At the Close of Business Monday, Nov. 15th, 1920.

Condensed from Report to the Comptroller of Currency

Marion County Warrants, Loansf Discounts, Bonds and
. Securities..-,-....:. --------------
Liberty Loan .Bonds, W S. S., Victory Notes and U. S.
Treasury Certificates - : . . ..... ..... .
U. S. Bonds to Secure Circulation.. ...j:..
Stock in Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta ... .
Banking House, Furniture and Fixtures .
Other Real Estate Owned. I . ........
Overdrafts ... 1. ..... .... . ...... ....
Due from Treasury U. S. ...v.....
CASH: On Hand and Due from Banks.... ..........

TOTAL .... ... .... ...... .$ 1,071,336.53

$ 584,488.23
243,808.62
75.000.00
2,700.00
37,000.00
2,233.62
430.49
4,950.00
120,725.57

Capital Stock, fully paid in ... -. - ....$
Surplus and Undivided Profits earned.
Circulation ----- ------ - ------ - -
Due to Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta
DEPOSITS.--

75,000.00
30,774.29
75,000.00
30,000.00
880,562.24

i
a
la
mi
m-
in
r
.

ill
iti
hi
in
MS
m
m
In
Hi

TOTAL

- S 1,071,336.53 hi

Deposits Nov. 15th, 1920 $860,562.24
Deposits November 15th, 1919. $ 764,456.78
Increase, One Year 8 96,105.46
On the Merits of the Above Statement We Invite Your Business.

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OCALA EVENING STAB, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1920
Five
i
RECEPTION AT THE
MyvE- c- c-. .-c. o -c. tr- o c--
W W rfrfWWW W ? W
BAPTIST PASTORIUM

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J

IH2 40Ewl 1 99

We are striving to give the very best service that can possibly be given
to our customers and friends.
The officers of the Bank are anxious to talk oveT the conditions that con confront
front confront us, and help you to plan your finances, so as to make a success of your
business.
Call on us when in need of advice or funds. We fully realize the import importance
ance importance of lending money, as well as accepting deposits.
THE OCALA NA TIONAL BANK
Resources More Than a Million.

The reception for the members of
the Baptist church which was held at

iafi ; the pastorium yesterday afternoon

jjS f rem 3 to 5 o'clock and in the evening j
rZ frrm Q 4--n "1 A Irksir woe iw avaaaiI- I

"fc".'y ueugniim auu iiuurinaj an air.

:z:

ft

'$

a:

STAR JOB DEPARTMENT

PHONE 51

P. 0. BOX 606

LETTERHEADS, BILLHEADS, CARDS, CIRCULARS, FOLDERS, FINE BOOKLETS, ETC
. ft ft ft ft ft
We never disappoint a customer on a promise.
You get the job when its due.

S T. O R A G

J

For your Automobile

Have your Cars and Trucks
Cleaned, Greased and Oiled
AT NIGHT

- GARAGE ALWAYS OPEN DAY AND NIGHT
MURPHY MOTOR COMPANY

Ocala, Florida

w
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Several months ago this beautiful
residential property was purchased by
the Baptist folk for their pastorium,
and they are justly proud of it, for

there is not one in Florida that can

surpass it and probably none that can
comypare with it. The transaction
was made by the deacons of the
church and they had t6 act quickly,
therefore the purchase of the property
v.as left entirely in their hands. They
were confident that the members of
th church would approve of the
property and they were right in their
conclusions, for seemingly every mem member
ber member of the church is convinced it was
a splendid business deal.
Rev. and Mrs. C. L. Collins have the
home comfortably arranged with their
furniture and it was the general com comment
ment comment of every caller at the home yes yesterday
terday yesterday that it looked as tho the house
was built for them. There emanated
from every room an atmosphere of
informality and cordiality. The en entire
tire entire house was thrown open to allow
the members to see for themselves
their new pastorium. Flaming poin poin-scttias
scttias poin-scttias and other bright flowers add

ed to the home-like air and the many
callers spent a pleasant time which
was largely due to the cordial and
gracious hospitality of Rev. and Mrs.
Collins and their attractive daughter,
Miss Ruth Collins.
Vocal and instrumental selections
were rendered during the reception
hours and at the evening hours the
young folks had an exceedingly mer merry
ry merry time singing in chorus many of
the popular songs.
During the reception hours several
different ladies and girls, members of
the church, assisted in serving ice
cream and cake.
At least one hundred and fifty peo people
ple people called during the afternoon and
evening and all expressed themselves
&s being delighted over the purchase
of the pastorium property, which
enables the Ocala Baptists to furnish
their pastor and his family with an
elegant home.

Our Specialty Is

building

Id Shoes

i

Ik.

YOU SAVE MONEY
Cn your shoe bills by having us re rebuild
build rebuild your old shoes. Our charges are
moderate, and we guarantee satisfac satisfaction.
tion. satisfaction. '
HAZOMGCk-.-
Between Ten Cent Store and Qeris's
Drn;j Stare

0:

His Kind to
which Barney
trusted Ms
life

II Barney Tresis Them
YOU CAN

DAVIES, The Tire Man
Vulcanizing
Phones 438-76.

CHING-A-LING DANCE

The members of the Ching-a-Ling
Club gave their second dance last eve evening
ning evening at the Woman's Club. There was
an unusually large number present,
many from out of town, and until a
late hour this younger society set en enjoyed
joyed enjoyed a gloriously good time. Music
was furnished by the Davis orchestra.
Coffee and delicious sandwiches
were served during intermission and
dancing was then resumed and con continued
tinued continued until midnight.

REST ROOM FOR VISITORS
AT THE FAIR NEXT WEEK

Ttreadsand iRubb

sr.-

Threads, because they pro.
vide an easy path for passage
of current from plate to plate.
Rubber, because that is the
ideal insulating material for use
inside a battery.
Ask us about Threaded Rub Rubber
ber Rubber Insulation the kind that"
has been selected by 152 build builders
ers builders of trucks and passenger cars.

Oca la Storage Battery Co.
20 N. Main St.
Ocala, Florida

The managers of the fair have each

year seen that there was a rest room

fcr all visitors to the fair, but they
have surpassed themselves this" year
in arranging for the comfort of their

visitors.
Mr. E. C. Jordan of the furniture
house of E. C. Jordan & Co., donated,
delivered and put in place all the fur furniture
niture furniture and furnishings to be used in
this room this year. Mr. J. J. Gerig,
proprietor of Gerig.'s drugstore, who
has always been so liberal in provid providing
ing providing the ladies with the best of toilet
accessories, assures them that he will
have for their use this year every everything
thing everything necessary for their comfort and

convenience.

Besides the regular maid, there will

be nurse in attendansce for the

children, which will enable mothers to
attend the fair accompanied by their
children.

AT THE CHURCHES TOMORROW

Episcopal
(John J. Neighbour. Rector)
The Sunday Next Before Advent
7:30 a. m. Holy communion.
9:45 a. m.- Sunday school.
1 la. m, Morning prayer and ser

mon.

No evening service.
We extend you a very cordial invi-

tatio nto worship with us.

Baptist
Rev, C. L. Collins, D. D., Pastor
9:45 a. m. Sunday school.
11 a. m. Public worship with ser

mon by Dr. Collins. Subject, "Grow
or Die."

6:30 p. m. Junior and Senior B.

Y. P. U.

7:30 p. m. Evening worship. Ser

mon subject. "Who's Your Friend."

FAIR TICKETS ON SALE
AT THE COURT PHARMACY

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Community Silver Week
I have on hand a large stock of
"COMMUNITY SILVER" which I
will offer at unusually attractive
prices for the balance of this week.
Also have just received
a complete line of the
very latest styles in
ladies' MESH BAGS in
gold and silver.
A large stock of high-grade Jewelry
You are invited to come in and look
over my stock and get my prices,
whether you are ready to buy or not.
"GIFTS THAT LAST"
j. cms. mm
JEWELER

Ki Hi l vi Hi mmL aU v w w

To Fair Visitors

In line with our usual custom; we will
have an exhibit at the Marion County Fair
this year. Our exhibit will consist of the
Latest Improved
Farming Implements
and will be in charge of experts who will be
pleased to explain and demonstrate them.
We will be located just east of the Agricul-
tural Building, where we have exhibited for
the past few years.

CLARKSON HARDWARE
COMPANY
Ocala - - Florida

j.n. SPENCER

Si

AGENCY

We Make a Specialty of Parts for the Buick and
the Prices are Consistent with the Cost of Same.

GOODYEAR AND U. S. TIRES AND TUBES

Exclusive Agents for "VESTA" CATTERY, 18 Co. QzztzzIiz
An Up-to-Date Battery Serrics Station
We Maintain an Up-to-Date Garage with
Expert Workmen, at all times, Assuring
Prompt and Efficient Service. .

GASOLINE, OILS AND GREASE

SPEKCm-PEBMK LI0TGH CO.
PHONE 271

Ocala

Florida

erra fzr r rvil rsa

FIHE
PROOFS

u A Li i

;

Si

Tickets to the fair are now on sale
at the Court Pharmacy. Remember,
the fair commences next Tuesday,
Nov. 23rd, and it is expected to be the
best one yet.
Ask for a pan of Federal Rollsi
they're delicious. Federal Bakery. St

Negotiable Storage Receipts Issued on Cotton, Automobiles, Etc

MOVE, PACK, SHIP
LIVE STOCK,
PIANOS, BAGGAGE,
MACHINERY,
FURNITURE, ETC

lOaG DISTANCE

EI

OVL'iG

W. R. PEDRICK I

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OCALA EVENING STAR,' SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1920

- V: i

MICKIE SAYS

hUS EVA tVYJfe fioua-l

BOCN PASS --CVVSA. &C?&&R.V

2JC&

DURIED MONEY
NEVER FOUND

sExcavation in Kansas City Re Recalls
calls Recalls Civil War Story.

laiEST IS MADE CUSTODIM

Fearing Raid Citizens Draw1 Money
Out of Bank and Force Priet to
Take Charge of It He Burled it In
Cemetery and Many Hours' Anxious
Digging Later Failed to Unearth the
Hidden Treaeure.
Standing a few days ago at Twelfth
and Broadway, I watched the work workmen
men workmen engaged in making an excava excavation
tion excavation for a new building on the south southeast
east southeast corner, and a story of the old
CSrU war days connected with the

spot flashed into my mind a mystery
f troried treasure that remains un unsolved
solved unsolved to this day and I wondered if
a chance shovel of dirt might not then
and there reveal the sequel. It is a
story that was often told to me by
the pioneer priest. Father Bernard
Donnelly, whose resignation In his ex extreme
treme extreme old : age as pastor of the old
church at that corner was mentioned
recently in the Star the Rev. William
J. Dalton writes In the Kansas City
Star. ; -i-,:-;-'
It was the eve of the battle of West
port in the fall of '64. V Panic was in
the air. Sterling Price of the Confed Confederate
erate Confederate army .had won a victory over the
Union troops under Mulligan at Lex Lexington
ington Lexington and rumors of the approach
of his victorious army to attack Kan Kansas
sas Kansas City and Westport flew thick and
fast. Before leaving Lexington, it was
learned, he had seized on the money
In the local banks and the fear was
widespread that he would do the same
ihing when he reached Kansas City.
There was a rush' on the banks, ac accounts
counts accounts were checked out by hundreds
of people and the money taken to
their homes and concealed In various
places. Then the thought occurred
to many of them that perhaps their
homes would be looted, too, and they

began to look about for:more secure
hiding place. At that time Father
'j Donnelly was Kansas City's "Vicar ot
Wakefield," known and trusted by ev everybody,
erybody, everybody, Catholics and Protestants
alike. He was known to be an old
acquaintance of many of the Confed Confederate
erate Confederate leaders, and a friend of Gen.
Price, personally known, and respect-

ed by his soldiers as well. He had
lived at Independence and Kansas

City ever since the eariy forties. Y

erougnt Money xo tries.
It was known, too. that orevlous to

his coming sto Missouri his life, after
leaving Ireland,' his native country.

had been larsrely south of the Mason

nd Tlt-ran Hn TTo hart been an Irish

patriot, too. In the homeland, and that
1Y1PAY1 t a rohei: As a matter of fact.

his natural sympathies were with the

South. So the belief grew that Fa Father
ther Father Donnelly i would be one man that
would be immune from search by the
invading army and the one man who
could be trusted to conceal securely
the threatened funds. n
The afternoon before the battle of
Westport hundreds of his own coun countrymen
trymen countrymen and church members, as well
as a large number of ; others, came
singly and In twos and threes up
through the woods' and the ravine that
lay adjacent to the pastor's' residence
and church, bringing money in cans
and bottles and purses and asking Fa Father
ther Father Donnelly to take care of it for
them until the trouble was over. They
felt certain that Price would not mo molest
lest molest him. They knew that his minis ministrations
trations ministrations as priest would be in. demand
for the dying and the wounded of
both armies and that his person and
his property would be held sacred, by
even the worst of the marauders.
He often told me that he Lad shrank
at first from the great responsibility

thrust upon hhn as caretaker of other
people's money in those troublous
, time.sr-T-that he tried to convince the
people that war was no respecter of
XKirsous.when .array needs were Dress-

fug atia mat a contingency might arise
in which he might be no more Immune
than the Vest of thern. The women
wept and the men pleaded and be
finally yielded to their wishes. They
came like so many depositors In a
bank. He opened 'up a memorandum
book. He entered the names and
amounts. The darkness of the eve evening
ning evening was. growing. Ills only light was
a small candle in a bottle that threw
a fitful glimmer around the room. He
had been a schoolmaster- before he
had become a priest and the method methodical
ical methodical habits of his teaching days clang
to him he had to dot and cross and
to stop frequently to read a name over
to see if he had spelled it right.
The Treasure Buried.
The waiting crowd grew nervous and
restless-Price was at the edge of
town- he might be at their doors in
a few hours. Many of the women,
anxious to get back to their homes and
little ones, threw their pocketbooks
on the table, simply saying: "Here,
Father Donnelly, there are so many
dollars there. You know our names
and where we live. Put it away for
us. We must get back home." When
the crowd had finally departed Father
Donnelly said there were bundles of
money left there without any name
attached and impossible of Identifica Identification
tion Identification by memory of the words or faces
of those that had left them. The
reader may Judge what an unbusiness unbusinesslike
like unbusinesslike jumble it all was both for people
and priest. But they were In the midst
of the panic and terror of war and
heads were not cool. It was a choice,
they thought, between saving some something
thing something or losing all.
When left to himself Father Don Donnelly
nelly Donnelly was shocked by the f oolhardiness.
A thousand misgivings went through
his mind. How would he get the mon money
ey money out of harm's way? Where would
he find a secure hiding place? Then
the thought came to him : "Dead men
rest untouched in the graveyard 1
will bury the people's money in the
cemetery." The cemetery was two
blocks west of his residence on Broad Broadway.
way. Broadway. It ran along Pennsylvania ave avenue
nue avenue from Twelfth to Eleventh streets
on the east and west about 150 feet
from what is now the west line of
Jefferson street. The gravedigger
lived near by. Carrying the money in

a large wooden box. Father, Donnelly
went in the dead of night to the sex sexton's
ton's sexton's house, aroused him and told him
to get a wheelbarrow, a spade and a
broom.. Together they entered the
graveyard and soon found a plot of
grass growing in a pathway. The sod
was carefully removed, a hole dug and

the box buried. Then the sod was re replaced
placed replaced and the loose dirt carefully
swept away.' r::-:..x:;'-:-
Sexton's Tonflue Waoged.
The next night word came to Fa Father
ther Father Donnelly, that Tom, the old sex sexton,
ton, sexton, under the influence of a few
drinks, had divulged the secret to a
crowd in a saloon at Main and Eighth
streets. After a hurried consultation
four trusty men, armed with shotguns
and led by. Father Donnelly, went to
the cemetery, dug up the treasure
again and buried it anew back of the
little brick church. After the guard
retired the priest began worrying
about the security of his new hiding
place and before daylight he went
alone, with no prying eyes and no one
to be burdened with the temptation of
his confidence, dug up the box a sec second
ond second time and gave it another burial
in a remote spot some distance north
of its second hiding place, pacing the

distance between them ; and marking

down as he thought, the accurate meas measurements
urements measurements and landmarks of the new.
depository, ;' ..
, The battle of Westport came on.

The three days that the battle was
waged from ; the Kansas state; line
through Westport toward what is now

Swope park were busy days for Fa Father
ther Father .Donnelly., His good offices as
priest and. nurse were In constant de demand.
mand. demand. The dead and dying filled the
homes all along the country side ad adjacent
jacent adjacent to, the battle ground. When
Price retired south the priest returned
to continue his Samaritan work in the
improvised hospitals of the city. It
was a month before he was able to
resume his duties in the church again.
When he was able to return to his
own house his first thought was of the
buried treasure. He thought it would
be best to transfer the box to his
house and call upon the owners to
come and get their money. Taking a
spade he went out under cover of
night and dug In the spot where he
was sure the box had been hidden.
An hour's labor brought nothing to
light With anxious forebodings he
went back and measured the paces he
had counted from the angles of the
church and dug again: moved a few
feet further and dug again then a
few feet further northward but there
was no box. Daylight found hhn still
fruitlessly digging. The next night
was a repetition of the previous one,
followed by the startling conviction
that he had hidden too well or some
one bad spied too .keenly. The box
was never found. .,
. Father Donnelly, when he had aban abandoned
doned abandoned all hope of recovering the buried
money, went to a friendly banker,
made an estimate of the sums that had
been placed I in his hands and bor borrowed
rowed borrowed the money necessary to repay
them, giving a mortgage on some farm
lands as security. As the claims were

J presented he paid them off.

Ten years afterward Father Don Donnelly
nelly Donnelly was stricken with fever. There
was no hospital here then and no pro professional
fessional professional nurses, lie was cared for
by. his aged sister and two nieces in

his home and the good sisters of St.

Teresa's academy lent their aid. One
night he seemed ranch improved and
his relatives and the sisters felt that

ho. could pass -the night without at.

renuance. we' nad "toJd them so ana
begged them to go to their homes.
Early the next morning the sisters
went to his door, found it open and
the patient gone. An alarm was
spread and after some time spent in
anxious research tT.e "venerable prief

was found, in sr-e attire, digging ini

the graveyard. In his delirium he had
fancied'that the iost treasure had been
moved back to its first hiding plate.
A few years again and Father Don Donnelly
nelly Donnelly was himself carried to the ceme cemetery
tery cemetery and, like his wooden box and its
enforced trust, some time later he was
taken up and buried in another grave
in the basement of the new cathedral
where, "after life's fitful fever he
sleeps well."
To the last days of his life the
buried treasure was on his mind. Its
disappearance was a mystery that has
never been explained. Whether in
. the excitement of the times be had
forgotten the real hiding place or
whether some one else had discovered
It and removed the box during his
absence was never known. If it still
remained in the earth perhaps by thij
time It has moldered Into dust or per perhaps
haps perhaps some digger's spadeful of dirl
will reveal the secret.

".JJr-S'-jrM'- i'I'-'m' 0 1. -O. .w. -0. k. .:' "m"--Cs- fZ- Z'- O O -'X"- -Zj5?u'

A

All

fit
mm at

7rmTTf

1. -i

H(Tpj

ii MVS ii WL

h

r.

f

i

hi H
h 1 1

i

I Hi u v

--- ...- :- ." : ..,. --
Must Scores of Little Orphans, Homeless

High Wind Carried Schoolhouse Away.
During a heavy storm at Sherman
Ky a schoolhouse, with the children
in it, was blown into a field. No one
was reported killed In the town, bul
there were 30 or 40 persons Injure
: and great property damage done.
About the Same.
"My father occupied the chair of ap applied
plied applied physics at Cambrldge.M
"Dat's nuttin' : mine occupied the"
seat of applied electricity at Sing
Sing." Massachusetts Tech. Voo Doo.

Ventilation.
Through persistent education the
why and wherefore of this great health
necessity has been explained; still te
the many, air Is air, and that is all
there la to it.
, Ventilation does not simply mean
"open wide the windows," but It
should be done scientifically, especially
In a sick room. To properly ventilate,
the air must be kept in motion. The
entrance opening for fresh air should
be larger than the one for exit If
these openings are directly opposite,
the motion will take place without
doing the room any good. If there
are two windows In the room, one
should be opened from the top and
the other from the bottom. For the
general daytime room the temperature
should be 68 degrees and at night 65.
A bathroom should be kept at 70. For
the sick room of pneumonia patients
and several other diseases, of course,
the temperature should be kept as low

as possible without having the patient

In a draught.

Worse Than Modern Drill.

In ancient China a man suffering

from toothache proceeded in this wise

He repaired to the Chinese doctor, who
was armed with a lot of sharp

needles of various sizes and lengths,

ana nis method 01 treatment was
and still is known as acupuncture.
This operation consisted of the insert
tion of these needles into various parts
of the body, the choice points of se selection
lection selection being 26 for toothache and six

others for inflammation of the gums,

The depth to which the needles were

inserted is said to have been an Im-
"s

portant point In the operation. This

puncturing was associated with cau cauterization.
terization. cauterization. ;

' "'.

and Helpless Children, (from Tiny Babies on up) be
TURNED OUT INTO THE STREETS

in Florida, Because the Good People of Florida Have J
WEARIED OF WELL DOING ? S

Bees Swifter Than Pigeons.
There is a story to the effect that
a farmer in Westphalia laid a wager
that 12 bees of his, released at a dis distance
tance distance of three miles from their hives,
would travel as rapidly as a like num

ber of pigeons -over the same course.

The first bee, properly powdered for
purposes of identification, did, as a
matter of fact, arrive at Its hive a
quarter of a minute before the coin coining
ing coining of the first pigeon to its cote; and
there were three other bees that came
In before the second pigeon arrived
; Birds That Speak.
Ravens, crows and magpies are all
better speakers than parrots. They
are not so versatile and the sounds
they utter are less varied, but their
Tolces and articulation are far more
human. A crow's talk in the next
room may easily be mistaken for that
of a person. Parrots are the best im imitators
itators imitators ; that Is to say, they mimic
whistling and other noises, particular particularly
ly particularly laughing, to adoration. It has been
remarked that tOr voices In speaking
are like that of a crazy person.

The Milkweed.
The milkweed, a plant that has ft
much longer name than that, but one
which would not be nearly as attrac attractive
tive attractive for us to use. Is especially well well-known
known well-known In America. In the autumn
when the pods have opened and there
is a brisk breeze,'- the wind carries
their seed3 far and near. j Then the
downy seeds are seen flying like tiny
airships almost everywhere, in search
of a homelike growing place, where
they may appear in the spring as tall,
slender stalks.

Lucky Woman.

Mrs. Gasaway The judge's wife is
the most fortunate woman in the
world.,
'Mrs. Ussen What's the reason for
all the envy?
Mrs. Gasaway Her husband sen sentences
tences sentences all" the tramps that come under
his notice to beat her carpets and help
with the cleaning.

The Children's Home Society of Florida "Florida's Greatest Charity
a State-wide and undenominational work for homeless and needy children,
with State Headquarters at 428 St. James Building, Jacksonville, Florida in
spite of the Most Urgent appeals for financial aid during the past two months
has failed by several thousand dollars to secure funds enough to provide for
More Than a Thousand little ones that have received the aid and care of
the, Society during the Past Ten Months and RigM Now is in a very
Critical Condition, for not a dollar can be borrowed, and unless more funds
can be secured the great work Must be Discontinued. This would mean
that Scores of Absolutely Helpless little children from tiny babies on up--would
have to be Turned Out Into the Street for every other children's
home and orphanage in the State is crowed now
Hundreds of last year's contributors to this great work have not sent in
their contributions as yet and thousands of men, women and business firms
all over Florida have never given a dollar to keep these little orphans from
starvation and death.
Something Must be Done About This Matter, and it Must Be
Done Eight Now if this absolutely necessary work is to go on. What will
you do about it, friend today? Every Dollar will help a Whole File.
Please send it to R. V. Covington, Treasurer, 428 St. James Building Jackson Jacksonville
ville Jacksonville Today Without Fail.
And Listen We are in Desperate Need of children's wearing apparel,
of every Kind, Size and Shape and will warmly welcome Staple Provis Provisions,
ions, Provisions, Vegetables Fruits Canned Goods Jellies Preserves Sir Sirup
up Sirup or Chickens Meats and a Turkey or two for Thanksgivimg. All such
articles should be sent to 1944 Riverside Ave., Jacksonville.
And Listen Again Can't you get Your Church. Sunday School, or
Day School, or Your Club or Lodge or Society, to take up a special offering
for our little ones and get up a box or barrel, or Parcel Post package of child children's
ren's children's clothing, provisions, etc., lor us? Won't You ask them to do it?
And Don't Forget We have dozens of fine little homeless boys and
girls just waiting eagerlv for a good home for Thanksgiving or Christmas. Can't
You and Your wife take one or two?

Mow Bon'! be like .'flic P.

amci ; read this and pass
SAMARITAN and

Fiest ahd flie Levif e-

t Hi miff no a fiaEMai

' a a."-: fcPw yvl

for our Little Youngsters in Distress and BIee

Earnestly Pleading for Some Aid from -Yen TcSay
We are your fellow workers
Doing Your job.

Tiie Clite

o TTTT : ; IP!
ms .-loiic

ft is

11

tliMT3TInli

11 MM liUiii

i 428 St. James Building
, JUDGE W. H. BAKER, President R. V. COVINGTON, Treasurer
MARCUS C. FAGG, State Superintendent
5
1 nTb. Your own Thanksgiving Daywill be Much Happier if you show
yourApprecialion ol Your Blessing, by doing Something for the little
ones who are absolutely depending on Your aid and support.
X f 'S-f "Z Z r si vi sir- v U -" '- :w v. vU .. w

So

".
.-.
..

JUL



OCALA EVENING STAB, SATURDAY, NOVEMBER '20, 1820

I

liATIONWIDE FIGHT
AGAINST DISEASE

American Red Cross Will Have
Health Centers in All Parts
of United States.
The American Bed Cross has launch launched
ed launched upon a nation wide campaign of
fighting disease and physical defect
-among the American people. A new
and unique' hea lth Institution has come
Into being as the result of several
months study by the Red Cross Health
Service Department at National Head Head-.
. Head-. quarters,
Officials In charge of the department
predict that before long this new health
-activity will be In actual operation all
over the country, and that the sign
-American Red Cross Health Center"
will become as familiar to the peo-
r.Tn amrhra am ar now the sifmS Of
the telegraph companies.,
, Busy Long Before War.
. The Interest of the American Red
Cross In the fight against disease is
not, nowever, oi recem origin. -, mjuS
before the war the organization began
this health service through its medical
. m a. 1 T m
units In disaster relief work and Its
department of Town and County Nurs Nurs-'
' Nurs-' Ing. During the war and following
the armistice thousands of American
Red Cross officials have been fighting
disease In the war-stricken countries.
At the same time tens of thousands of
local Red Cross officials have been en-
- A. Al l A-l Jf 4-n
"bly during the Influenza epidemics.
The American Red Cross has "de "determined
termined "determined that all this valuable experi
ence in health service abroad and at
home shall not go to waste. So long
as there are a half a million people
dying yearly In this country from pre preventable
ventable preventable causes, and so long as more
than one-third of the American chil children
dren children an young people are victims of
physical defects, the Red Cross recog
nizes the urgent need for continued
Red Cross health service at home. '-
' How Organization Works.
. .The Red Cross Health Center Is
governed oy pusiness principles, ap applies
plies applies business methods, and, in Its
'more simple form, 'can be established
and conducted by lay people.
n proceeds upon me cemonsxraiea
fact that health is a ommodlty that
;can be bought and sold like brooms
and soap. Therefore, It establishes lt-
seir in a storeroom in tne principal
business section of the community. It
dlsjtavs itseoods In the form of at
' Ki-ni

tractive neaitn exhibits in its snow
windows. It advertises constantly aod
extensively. And it uses every busi business
ness business and socinl device to attract cus customers.
tomers. customers. -'r.
The Red Cross Health Center Is of
service to the sick in that It gives out
reliable and complete Information
about existing clinics, hospitals, sana sanatoria
toria sanatoria and other Institutions for the sick
and the defective; about available
nurses, both trained and practical ;
about when to consult a physician and
why to shan the quack and his nos nostrums.
trums. nostrums. .-:-'
Teaching Disease Prevention.
The Red Cross Health Center Is.
however, of even greater service to the
well. It teaches people how to pre prevent
vent prevent sickness and disease. This is done
In many interesting and attractive
ways first of all, by the distribution
of popular health literature and
through health lectures Illustrated with
lantern slides or with health motion
picture films. Then special exhibits are
given, one after the other, on various
health subjects. Practical demonstra demonstrations
tions demonstrations are made ; also health playlets by
children to Interest and instruct them themselves
selves themselves and their elders. Classes are
organized in personal hygiene, home
care of the sick, first aid and in food
selection and preparation. nealtb
clubs, both for younger and older peo people,
ple, people, are formed ; also Little Mothers'
Leagues. Nutrition and growth clinics
are conducted for children.
Already more than a "hundred of
these Red Cross Health Centers are In
actual operation throughout the;coun the;coun-try.
try. the;coun-try. Many -of them also conduct med

ical clinics, but the one chief, out-
standing feature of the American Itedj
Cross Health Center Is its health edu education
cation education service which teaches well peo;
pie how to' keep well.
FRENCH PRAISE FOR
OUR RED CROSS WORK
Lauding the work accomplished by
American philanthropy for war war-stricken
stricken war-stricken France, Andre Tardleu, form former
er former high commissioner from that na nation
tion nation to the, United States, in;: recent
article widely commented on through throughout
out throughout the French press, says :
"The American Red Cross has ac accomplished
complished accomplished a work which calls for
the heartfelt gratitude of every true
Frenchman.! lot 1918 this ; great relief
organization spent In behalf of France
nearly 87,000,000 francs, and In 1919
Its expenditures on charitable projects
in our country attained the tremen tremendous
dous tremendous total of 171,000,000. It has re recently
cently recently turned over to the French relief
organizations huge i stocks of sup supplies
plies supplies whose value must be counted In
tbaJmadredsf, thousands of francs.
FT7T
1 I

i.1,B.,.iiW,MMiil.,.uiWi..tiJiMuiu...,u..u.i.iiul. ... ,i..m.1.m,l.LiH,llli.,i .....liii, jw.ui.1 .ii -l,i.il.li.iil.m,liL.l.l... I 1iii,.ii.i.ii..ii,Iu....1iII1Ji.U..,I...iIiM.ui :mm.m. mi t -M- -. """ ""'"''I
.,..,.,,,.,,.1, m i rum,.- .-Mm..1.,1,ii.iri.Mirwi.i.ll..,ri.iirairiniil iiini.,.ir ti -niirwiim nm in i n.ii mi wii.niii 'iiibii nw i. tHmnm .. i r.i n i iil.ini.. .. irn i mi in" mi nn nnmmm, 1.1 i n nr. m t
(O) iS. iLi j&s.

Pi!

oveinm Ijgdcbip

UjhlliNXUnjju) L

lore : Conmiiiiiity Esliililts. -v More Collective Apicoltural Exhibits.

Biggest Exhibit

Kaees Wall MsfSom Cooinifiy

M

"Tr'tnpn mimon American noys nu
girls, banded together in the Junior
Hed Or o.s.-s of America, are back of a

movement to establish the closest ties!
between themselves and France's
younger generation through the char charitable
itable charitable works they have financed and
are now carrying out among our little
war sufferers.
" The bond3 of friendship between
France 'an d America Is cemented with
mutual Hourarton, reipect and grati gratitude."
tude." gratitude."
on't Wait
fer workers tt come and ask you
or a renewal of your member membership.
ship. membership. Send in your dollar t the
nearest local chapter of the
American Bed Cross. Welcome
the opportunity and privilege of
repledglng yrur fellowship by
promptly answering the
Fourth Roll Call
NevestW 11-25, 1929
LINKS WITH HISTORIC "PAST
Interesting to Trace the Names of
Streets and Lanes In City of
Boston Today.
; ( The names of the streets and lanes
of Boston are closely linked with the
historic past. Others there are which
could be connected with Boston only,
such; as Tremont street, a corruption
of "Trl-mountain," by which name
Boston was known to the early ; set settlers
tlers settlers on account of the three high hills
that serve as a background to the pen peninsula.
insula. peninsula. This replaced the name
"Shawmut," given to it by the Indians.
Mary Harrod Northend writes In the
Century Magazine that the streets of
this quaint city in the East were laid
out by straying cattle.
After the Revolution the names-of
many Boston streets "were changed.'
Queen street became Court street, and
King street the State street of today.
School street took Its name from a
school that was erected there. Dark
alleys, leading off the principal streets
on every side, were named after path pathways,
ways, pathways, usually depending on where they
led to. Creek lane originally led to the
-old creek. It was In tavern days that
this ,was the center of stage-coach
life.' The old custom house once stood
on Flag alley. Corn court took its
name from the fact that the corn mar market
ket market was at one 'time situated there.
Summer street was once know as "Sev "Seven
en "Seven Star Lane.0 It is now one of Bos Boston's
ton's Boston's busiest streets.
1

IPlElIIUi

;0f Swiie. Boys'

mo. s hue u:niu .cjiuiwws. mm viimu uuvssu.
SPECIAL ATTEACTIONS EACH DAY

E

mm

HOW THEY MAKE
REAL AMERICANS
Boys' Summer Camp Inculcates
High Ideals.

WHAT IT DID FDR OilE BUY
Foreign-born Lad Learna That His Fa Father
ther Father Was Wrong and That America
Means Something Besides a Dollar
Mine Chums With Son of Father's
Employer and Imbibes True Democ Democracy.
racy. Democracy.
By NORMAN W. GREGG.
In the fifteenth year of his existence
something happened to Steve which set
several of his inherited .views at
naught and changed the entire cur current
rent current of his life. Steve had been born
in a land of dreary, endless plains and
long, cold, snowbound winters, where
his parents and kinsfolk lived color
less, monotonous lives embittered by
hatred of the mythical noble who
owned the estate they tilled.
Steve's family emigrated to America
a short time before Europe was plunged
Into the chasm of war. They went at
once to a section of a great city where
their native language was about the
only one heard.
; The head of the house secured em employment
ployment employment In a great factory and con continued
tinued continued to read newspapers printed in
characters queer and undecipherable
to an American boy. Very often after
supper, in spite 0f the fact that his
daily wage was more than he had
earned in a month in his home land,
the father would denounce; in hoarse
gutturals the men who owned the for forest
est forest of smoking chimneys among which
belabored. -Making
a Real American.
It was at this time that. an oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity to spend 'a summer at Camp
Roosevelt was given Steve. With boy boyish
ish boyish celerity he had mastered English
fairly, despite the foreign atmosphere
of his home, and his keen, alert little
face impressed one of the officials of
the great corporation who offered to
pay the nominal cost of the outing.
His father raged.- He would not have
his son contaminated with militarism,
but the parish priest said It was good
and the mother pleaded for the life In
the big, happy out-of-doors; so at last
he cave a reluctant consent. Stve
TTT
n
Club Exhibits.
Morses Oiuly.

OTILMW

6T)

I W IFW

EM

was nappy.
With hundreds of other boys, he
boarded a great lake steamer and. af after
ter after several memorable hours on Lake
Michigan, landed with the rest of the
cadets at Muskegon. Many cars were
waiting to transport them to Camp
Roosevelt, and Steve found a place in
a big motor with another lad no older
than himself. Their inexpensive khaki
uniforms were exactly alike and the
fact that his new friend's name was
the same as the owner of the factory
In which his father worked meant
nothing at this time.
Ted and Steve, arriving together,
were assigned to the same company,
and naturally they gravitated to cots
alongside in the same squad tent T
suppose we're bunkies now," said Ted
when they had disposed of their few
simple belongings and had a brief
breathing spell. "Me, I am satisfied,"

returned Steve, and a friendship which
endured through eight happy weeks
began. After mess, Steve named the
great institution where his father was
employed. "Mine works there too,"
said Ted, and with this mutual bond
their social status was established. It
was not until many days afterwards
that Steve discovered that Ted's father
was the employer of thousands of men, men,-but
but men,-but by this time the virus of Ameri Americanism
canism Americanism and democracy had taken hold
in his boyish soul. Not even his fa father
ther father could talk about his "bunkle" or,
his, "bunkle's" family and get away
with It . ,. ..
, Life Works Wonders.
The, well-regulated out-door life
worked wonders In both. : They took
on pounds and added Inches. They
grew brown and hard and what the
army officers who drilled them called
"snappy." Steve learned to swim and
shoot and Ted, who knew all about
wrestling and boxing, had the delight
of seeing his protege scrap his way to
regimental lightweight champion.- :
He was further dumfqunded to find
that the camp commandant Capt F. L.
Peals, U. S. A-, Instead of being a ter terrible
rible terrible czar, was a kindly, approachable
friend, quite as interested in his joys
and sorrows as Ted :i 'fit ;
. In his new life the Stars and
Stripes had cometo be a symbol of
something big and splendid, something
-which Ted and Captain Beals and all
the other boys loved. All at race he
realized that his father was wrong;
that America meant something besides
a dollar-mine. Camp Roosevelt the
boys national camp at Muskegon;
MldC had added" a citizen to the na
tlon;: ., ..... i ... ...
' Steve and Ted are going back this
year together. And Steve is bringing
MIchaeL his fjjurteeifcyear-old brother.
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Mike, howWer, "wui nave mutn less w
learn, for Steve's patriotic propaganda
has had results. Even the taciturn fa father
ther father has felt It
It was a holiday and Steve and his
father stood watching a paratle. Steve
clutched his father's sleeve excitedly.
"See, father, it Is a flag like what I
carried at Camp Roosevelt. It Is our
flag. Take oS. your hat All we Amer Americans
icans Americans do it" He stood rigidly at tht
salute while his father, a little shame shamefacedly
facedly shamefacedly perhaps, lest some of hl3 ex ex-countrymen
countrymen ex-countrymen witness it uncovered and
the starry emblem swept pajjt
Vaccination's Power.

According to a recent report re
dnation is rapidly dying out Tel
there Is nothing like vaccination ta
bring a fellow up to the scratch.
Exchange.
Mending China.
Broken china after mending shouX3
be allowed to "set" in a bcx of saw sawdust
dust sawdust Place In any deslrel position
and Its own weight will hold the pleca
steady until the cement hardens. :
The Victim's Pfelt
For our part, whenever we see a
woman with 51.000 worth of fur ca
we wonder who her husband skinnci.
Dallas News.
'.. Inverse Ratio.
Jud Tmnkins has noticed that as th
contents of a package grow smaller
the bragging on the label gets bigger.
Precious Wood Carefully Preserved.
.The rarest of all precious woods is
said, to i be the calamander, a tree
which grows in Ceylon, where it is
held in reverent awe. Tht wood, is
beautifully 1 mottled In velnlng when
polished, but its almost priceless value
is .due a good deal to its rarity. At
one time the trees were quite plenti plentiful
ful plentiful in Ceylon, but only a comparative comparatively
ly comparatively few specimens remain, and all thesa
are numbered and jealously guarded
by the government
.- Lead and Stsel. :
r' ZezZ la eald to act like steel tt o
Gaary temperatures la liquid alrf H'
will serve as a helical spring, for cr cr-ample.
ample. cr-ample. This behavior of soit. nonas nonas-tic
tic nonas-tic metals Is Interesting. "It shows how
very important "temperature is. r Just
as Iron is soft and Inelastic at, a hlgb
red color, so lead is dull and soft at
ordinary temperatures, for it la well
its way tot 9
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XXGCT

OCA LA EVENING STAR; SATURDAY. NOVEMBER 20, 1920

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At IQU Prices!
We have a car load of Bananas on the Seaboard
Team Track which are being sold
Come early as they will not last long
at the prices.
WHOLESALE OH RETAIL

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Visit f12 fJarion County Fair Nov. 23-27

Gifts That Last

Diamonds Watches
Cut Glassware
Gold Bracelets, Lava!liers,andr Necklaces
Alarm Clocks Sterling Silver
Ivory Sets and Odd Pieces

If you have any

phone to five-one.

society items,

Temperature thi3 morning, 48; this

afternoon, C8.

Let us bake your turkeys and fruit

cakes for your Thanksgiving dinner.

Carter's Bakery- 20-3t

. Double recleaned seed oats and rye.
Ocala Seed Store. 6-tf

Don't fail to visit the Guarantee
Clothing & Shoe, Company. Every Everything
thing Everything we sell is guaranteed. We're

ighting for QUAUTY----not prices, tf
Let us bake your turkeys and fruit

cakes for your Thanksgiving dinner.

Carter's Bakery. Z0-3t
Mrs. Annie Van Deman will leave
Wednesday for Jacksonville to. spend
Thanksgiving "with friends. V
$1.50 silk socks for $1 a pair at
Walkley & Barnett. 20-2t
We have delicious pies, such as
lemon, cocoanut, apple, peach, mince
and pumpkin. Carter's Bakery. 20-4t
Celery and cranberries. Cook's
Market and Grocery, phone 243. 17-tf
Mrs. Jack Camp returned yesterday
afternoon from a brief visit with Mrs.
Charles Lloyd in Jacksonville.
Misses Ruby Cappleman and Edna
Sipple left this afternoon for a few
days visit with the former's relatives
in Jacksonville.

WILL CLOSE THANKSGIVING

If you need any advertising cards
for your exhibits at the fair next
week, don't wait until Tuesday morn morning
ing morning to place yon order. Let's have it
now.

Everything I have advertised this
week is here and more of it will come
in every day until Thanksgiving. W.
A. Stroud. 20-lt
Special sale on boys' suits. Walkley
& Barnett. 20-2t
After, several days visit to Ocala
friends, Mrs. L, E. Benjamin return returned
ed returned Friday evening to her home in
Jacksonville, v

A

Realizing that the Marion County
Fair is a home institution of which
all our people should be proud aad aad-one
one aad-one that deserves the undivided sup support
port support of the business men of Ocala and
Marion county, we the undersigned
Ccala merchants will close our places
of business all day Thursday, Novem November
ber November 25th (Thanksgiving Day) in order
that our employees may fittingly
celebrate the occasion and attend the
fair. We invite our friends and pa patrons
trons patrons to attend the fair any day and
make our places of business their
headquarters.
FRANKS, INC
H. B. MASTERS CO.
E. T. HELVENSTON.
RHEINAUER & CO.
H. A. WATERMAN.
WALKLEY & BARNETT.
H. A. DAVIES.
BLALOCK BROTHERS.
MARION HARDWARE CO.
CLARKSON HDWR. CO.
CRESCENT GROCERY.
U-SERVE STORES.
WALTER MARSH
O. K. TEAPOT .GROCERY.
JTOASH GROCERY.
H. B. WHrnTNGTON.
COOK'S MARKET.
GEO. MacKAY & CO.

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UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS
WANTED, LOST, FOUND, FOR
SALE, FOR RENT AND SIM SIMILAR
ILAR SIMILAR LOCAL NEEDS

Rates: Six lines, maximum, one time,
25c; three times, 50c; six times, 73c;
one month, $3. Payable in advance.

WANTED To buy small farm be between
tween between Ocala and Bartow, Fla. A.
E. Nix, Clem. Ga. 19-2t
FOR SALE 1017 model Ford tour

ing car, or will trade for real es estate.
tate. estate. S. S. Savage Jr. 19-6t

FOR SALE Seed cane, $12 per thou thousand;
sand; thousand; two large mules, $450 for
the pair; one fresh jersey cow and
three weeks old calf, $75. Apply
to N. W. Harison, Oklawaha, Flor Florida.
ida. Florida. 19-12t

FOR RENT My entire home v.hich
can be used as two apartments, ca
Orange avenue. For further partic particulars
ulars particulars see me or call Mrs. Martha
Williams at the home of Mrs. R. 3.
Hall, Fort King avenue. 19-tf

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Agency
Paramount Phonographs
and Records

J. E. Allemand
THE JEWELER
Harrington Hall Block Ft. King Ave.
OCALA, FLORIDA

Visit the Marion County Fair Nov. 23-27

lit

Just in, a barrel of Black Twig
apples; also, extra fine California cel celery.
ery. celery. Main Street Market, phone 108. 2t
Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Tucker of Ocala
were among the out of town visitors
to Tampa yesterday on a combined
business and pleasure trip. Tampa

Tribune.

When you get ready for your

SWEATER and LONG COAT, re

member your dollar goes furthest at

FISHEL'S. ll-3t

Mrs. Harry Walters is entertaining

three tables of auction in honor of
Mrs. Hugh Futch of St. Petersburg
this afternoon instead of yesterday,

as the Star announced last evening.

We have delicious pies, such as

lemon, cocoanut, apple, peach, mince
and pumpkin. Carter's Bakery. 20-4t
The monthly social given by the
Woman's Auxiliary of the Presbyte Presbyterian
rian Presbyterian church will be held at the home

of Mrs. ohn Taylor Monday, Novem-

er 22nd, from 3 to 6 o'clock. A cor-

ial invitation is extended to all, and

especially the men.

Citron, marble, fig, fruit, pound,

raisin and walnut cakes. Also angel

and layer cakes for Thanksgiving.
Carter's Bakery. 20-4t

Mr. and Mrs. I. W. Perkins Oak,

and Mrs. Frank Dupuis, Mr. Garvin
Moore, representing the F. A. Hardy

Optical Co. of Atlanta, Miss Lila

Frances of Hawthorn and Mrs. W. H.

erry and son of Alachua, were busi

ness visitors and shoppers in the city

his morning.

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BOOKS! BOOKS! BOOKS!
TOE SPECIALTY SHOP
Has on display the prettiest line of BOOKS ever
shown in Ocala
Books for grown-ups.
Books for Boys and Girls.
Juvenile Books of every description.
See our line before buying.
A. E. (SEEIS

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Christmas Greeting Card

OF TOE CETTE KEiD
Our new line of Steel engraved
Greeting Cards in exclusive de designs
signs designs is now ready for inspection
Samples 2nd Prices submitted upon request
J. P. STEVENS ENGRAVING CO.
ATLANTA, GEORGIA

film - ; ; L 1

FOR SALE Having to return north,
must sell my tourist's "palace on

wheels." Equipped for cooking, eat eating,
ing, eating, sleeping and traveling. A fine
outfit. To be seen at the camp
grounds. 19-2t

FOR SALE Ten acres of land in

Marion county, near Belleview.
Write owner, Geo. J. Hummel, 219
Marie Ave., St. Paul, Minn. 19-6t

FOR SALE Four pure bred Rhode

Island Red cockerels. Mrs. Z. C
Chambliss. 12-Ci

FOR SALE Fifty acre farm V:."z

miles from Ocala. Apply to owners.

Collier Brothers.

JO-tf

WANTED Boarders at 704 North

Magnolia street. Rates, $3 per
week or $2 per day. Mrs. J. E.
Stilley. 17-7t
FOR SALE Florida BLACK RYE,
. at $3.25 per bushel. J. P. Smith,
Ebb. Fla. 15-12t

WANTED A good farmer to fana
on shares. Also would like to plant
ten, fifteen or twenty acres of oats
on shares. I have good land near
town. W. D. Cam. 15-tf

'ABBAGE PLANTS Protected from
frost by overhead irrigation. Char Charleston
leston Charleston Wakefield, Early Summer,
Lupton's best Long Island seed,
$1.50 per thousand; special price ia
large quantities. Parcel post or-
ders 25 cents per thousand extra.
J. R. Davis Farms, Bartow, Fla. tf

j; NEEDHAM MOTOR CO.

; General Repairing,
I Storage; Gasoline, Oils and Grease.
I We use genui ne Ford Parts. Cars washed, $1.00
AGENTS FOR
I SCRIPPS -BOOTH SIX
X Phone 252 Cor. Oklawaha and Orange
Used Cars for Sale

WOOD When you want wood, phone

566; oak or pine, stove or fireplace.
Broadway Woodyard, L. A. Sand Sanders,
ers, Sanders, Proprietor. ll-12t

WOOD Oak and pine, cut to any
length; delivered on short notice.
Phone Mrs. E. L. Howell, Oak.
(phone charges paid.) ) 11-tf

FOR SALE: Motorcycle; Excelsior,
twin cylinder, thoroughly overhaul overhauled;
ed; overhauled; Bosch magneto, new tires, new new-painted;
painted; new-painted; looks and runs like new. A
qpick sale for $125. Will give dem demonstration
onstration demonstration if you mean business.
Write J. E. Knight, Citronelle Flor Florida.
ida. Florida. ll-16-6t

Mrs. E. A. Osborne leaves tomor tomorrow
row tomorrow afternoon for Jacksonville to at attend
tend attend the meeting of the executive

board of the professional : and busi business
ness business women's clubs, of which she is a
member. This convention meets Mon Monday,
day, Monday, Nov. 22nd, with a banquet at the

Seminole hotel Monday night and i indulged in for several hours, after

Special sale on suitcases and bags.

Walkley & Barnett. 20-2t

The Auto Sales Company scarcely

get its Dodge cars unloaded before

they are sold. The three following

gentlemen are purchasers of Dodge

touring cars this week: E. E. AI AI-bertson
bertson AI-bertson of Lake Weir, R. L. Carter of

this city and the Hodges Motor Co

of Gainesville.

the other two days of the meeting will

be profitably and enjoyably spent.

"Arrow" and Ide stiff collars $2.C0

a dozen. Walkley & Barnett. 20-2t

Everything I have advertised this

week is here and more of it will come
in every day until Thanksgiving. W.

A. Stroud. zu-it

Just in, a barrel of Black Twig

apples; also extra fine California cel celery.
ery. celery. Main Street Market, phone 108. 2t

Discriminating buyers will be de

lighted with EVERWEAR HOSIERY.

FISHEL'S. ll-3t

Miss Thelma Bullard and her class classmates,
mates, classmates, Miss Miriam Connor of Lake

Weir and Miss Gus Wynn of Kisim
mee, who are atending Stetson Uni

versity at DeLand, are expected to

arrive today for a few days' visit with

Miss Bullard 's parents, Mr. and Mrs

W. M. Bullard. Gainesville Sun.

The members of the Thursday auc auction
tion auction club held their weekly meeting
yesterday afternoon with Mrs. F. H.
Logan, meeting Friday instead of
Thursday on account of other enter entertainments.
tainments. entertainments. The regular two tables of

players were present and auction was

vhich the hostess served dainty re refreshments.
freshments. refreshments. The two high: scorers

were Misses Minnie Gamsby and Em

ily Stotesbury. Mrs. L. R. Chazal
will be the hostess of this club next
Thursday afternoon.

Apalachicola oysters every day.
Cook's Market and Grocery, phone
243, North Main street. 17-tf
We always strive to please you at
FISHEL'S. 11-St

FOR SALE 25,000 stalks improved
Japanese seed cane, at $2 per hun hundred.
dred. hundred. May o-Lyles-Cau then Farm,
Summerfield. ' 10-tf

WANTED House to rent or pur purchase,
chase, purchase, five or six rooms, in good
locality; all conveniences. Address
House, box 606, Ocala. Fla. 15-3t

WOOD FOR SALE $1 and $2 loads
of oak and pine wood. Phone S22,
residence. E. Bomolini. 18-18t
FOR SALE OR TRADE One second
hand 2-hp. International engine,
one new steel bur cornmeal mill;
will trade for anything. D. N.
Mathews, 609 Second St.. Ocala. 6t

FOR SALE One five-room cottaga
with garage; desirable location;
- large lot 90xll2. Also one two two-story
story two-story residence with modern con conveniences,
veniences, conveniences, close in. Address Owner,
postoSice box S03. 20-lra

Double recleanea seed oats and rye.
Ocala Seed Store. 6-tf

$1.50 silk socks for $1 a pair at
Walkley & Barnett. 20-2t
Citron, marble, fig, fruit, pound,
raisin and walnut cakes. Also angl
and layer cakes for Thanksgiving.
Carter's Bakery. 20-4t

i

MMa Gifts

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J.lnlersh? in the Florid Ck Exchange rcqnirct
ot the abSity to cnpi. N iftisioB feet,
no nieiobeKp chte. For information, consult th
manager erf ftrert aocktioa r l-exchaage, or
vrrite to the busiaeu manager at Taxnpa.

J .... jr

KVll



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ALTO6 213211fb9089b512220d442f6d0228e1 633493
0534.alto
ALTO7 7b2b34fcb3c16a5daca5196a6d69be55 495264
0535.alto
ALTO8 c579a7be28449efd3cb3706ff36e0e00 418775
0536.alto
METS1 unknownx-mets 5e5d735efd488d096eba6d8f1d975458 11515
UF00075908_05734.mets
METS:structMap STRUCT1 physical
METS:div DMDID ADMID The ORDER 0 main
PDIV1 Main
PAGE1 Page
METS:fptr FILEID
PAGE2
PAGE3
PAGE4 4
PAGE5 5
PAGE6 6
PAGE7 7
PAGE8 8
STRUCT2 other
ODIV1
FILES1