The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:05723

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
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"Weather Forecast: Generally fair
OCALA, FLORIDA, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 8. 1920
VOL. 2G, NO. 2GS
tonight and Tuesday.
WILSON'S LAST
lAVIi BLAME 0!! COOPED UP
HARDING TO HAVE
A REAL VACATION
CORK'S HUNGER
STRIKERS CQflSTANT
RS. ALEXANDER'S
THE LITHUAIIIAIIS
THE CRIMEA
LEGAL RIGHTS

AM

ANNUAL MESSAGE

5t

Hi
0!
.
v

Constructive Legislation Will be Rec Recommended
ommended Recommended by the President
to Congress

(Associated Press)
Washington, D. C, Nov. 8, Presi President
dent President Wilson is working on his annual
message to Congress, which he will
transmit at the opening of the next
Congress. It is understood h,e will
recommend the enactment of a num number
ber number of reconstruction measures which
he recommended at the la3t Congress.
This week the president receives dip diplomats
lomats diplomats from San Domingo, Guatemala
and Costa Rica.
MANY CHANGES EXPECTED
The different government depart-
rnents are preparing estimates for ap appropriations
propriations appropriations by Congress and since
the republicans have a majority many
' sharp changes are expected. The pres present
ent present political situation is the same as
it was eight years ago but the. eco eco-t
t eco-t tf romic situation is different.
SOLD FIFTY-ONE-SHIPS
The shipping board announces that
fifty-one merchant ships of all types
were sold between August 1st and
October 30th for a total of twenty twenty-four
four twenty-four million, six hundred and seventy seventy-six
six seventy-six dollars.
AIR PILOT KILLED V
John P. Woodward, an air mail
pilot was killed when he flew into a
Wyoming mountain side during a fog.
GEORGIA LAW DENIED
The constitutionality of the Georgia
tax equalization act-of 1913 has been
denied by the supreme court.
SUPREME COURT REFUSES THE
SEABOARD
The supreme court has denied the
request of the Seaboard Air Line for
an in junction, restraining the Inter Interstate
state Interstate Commerce Commission from en enforcing
forcing enforcing certain tariff regulations.
REMAIN AT REST IN ENGLAND
The bodies of 550 American soldiers
who died -in England will remain
buried there permanently by request
of their relatives. Others will be re returned.
turned. returned. RIGHTS OF OWNERS OF REDEYE
Liquor lawfully acquired by a per person
son person for personal use may be stored in
some place other than his home and
that transportation of lawfully ac acquired
quired acquired liquor from a waroehouse to
his home does not constitute trans transportation
portation transportation in the meaning of the en enforcement
forcement enforcement law, under a supreme court
ruling.
MAGNIFICENT MEMORIAL
FOR GENERAL GRANT
Washington, Nov. 8. Eighteen
years in the making, a memorial to
General U. S. Grant is nearing com completion
pletion completion "here and probably will be un unveiled
veiled unveiled before the end of the year. It
is in the form of a magnificent eques equestrian
trian equestrian statue of bronze, the second
largest of its .kind in the world,
mounted on a granite pedestal and
flanked on the left by a casting of a
group of cavalry and on the right by
a group of artillery, both groups done
in bronze. Two huge lions in stone
at the foot of the pedestal complete
the memorial. 0
The equestrian figure stands 16
feet high, weighs 10,700 pounds and
cost $250,000. The memorial is locat located
ed located in the Botanic Gardens at the foot
of the capitol and Congress has ap
proved the removal of a section of the
iron fence on -the east front, of the
gardens to admit the statue and to
provide space for spectators at the
unveiling ceremonies
Authority for the creation of the
memorial was given by Congress on
February 23, 1901. The competition
for the statue was held in 1902 and
the award was to Henry M. Shrady, a
noted sculptor, of Elmsford, N. Y.,
whose design was selected by a jury
consisting of Augustus Saint-Gaudens,
Daniel Chester French, Daniel H.
Burnham and. Charles F. McKim. The
pedestal was designed by Edward P.
Casey of New York, associated with
Mr. Shrady, and was completed and
put in place in 1906.
The equestrian statue has just now
been finished, however, and was ship
ped here in sections by motor truck
from New York city.
AN OCCASION FOR
SUMMARY VENGEANCE
Gastonia, N. C, Nov. 8. Posses
are searching for two negroes who
killed John Ford, of Lincolnton and
attacked his two girl companions aft after
er after holding up their auto three miles
from here.
SCORES OF INDICTMENTS
IN THE WINDY CITY
(Associated, Press)
Chicago, Nov. 8. Indictments are
expected to be returned against
scores of saloon keepers and others as
a result of the investigation into the
alleged Chicago whisky ring.

Polish General Says that His Men
nave Only Countered an Un
expected Attack

(Associated Press)
Warsaw, Nov. 8.- Fighting has
been resumed between Lithuanian
tioops and the Polish volunteer army.
Polish General Zellgouski said the
Lithuanians without replying to the
proposal for negotiations attacked the
Poles, driving them back and they
launched a counter attack.
RED CROSS WORK IN
PUBLIC HEALTH HOSPITALS
Atlanta, Nov. 7. So successful has
been the work of the American Red
Cross in United States public health
hospitals during the past year, and so
dependent upon this work has the government-become
that, at the request
of the surgeon general i of the army,
the Red Cross will continue its work
at these pqblic health hospitals until
July, 1921, at least, it was announced
here at southern division headquar headquarters
ters headquarters of the Red Cross.
Red Cross service in United States
public health hospitals is a little
known but tremendously valuable
factor of the Red Cross peace pro program.
gram. program. In it the Red Cross is carry carrying
ing carrying out to the last detail its determi determination
nation determination to "see the boys through."
After the armistice, the govern government
ment government established its public health
hospitals where soldiers and sailors
who had contracted disease during the
war might be treated after their dis discharge
charge discharge and brought back to health
and strength.
Seven of these were placed in the
Eouth, at Greenville, S. C, Biltmore,
N. C. Osteen, N. C, Savannah, Ga.,
Memphis, Tenn., Key West, Fla., and
Atlanta, Ga. In addition, the govern government
ment government has a number of contract hos hospitals:
pitals: hospitals: that is, private hospitals
where a certain amount of space has
been secured by the government for
its ex-service patients. In the south
there is one at Sanatorium, N. C, and
one in Davidson county, Tenn.
When these hospitals were first
founded, the Red Cross was requested
by the surgeon general to place its
workers at them. This was done, the
Red Cross undertaking to provide
recreation, to attend to the personal
troubles and problems of the patients,
to furnish them certain supplies such
as pajamas, tooth brushes and the
like, not obtainable from the govern government,
ment, government, and to keep in touch with their
homes'.
While all phases of this work prov proved
ed proved intensely valuable both to the pa patients
tients patients and the government, it was the
last named that has become almost
indispensable. "Medical social serv service,"
ice," service," as it is called, consists in this
case of finding out about a patient's
home conditions, where he will have
to go when he is discharged; what his
chances of further recovery will be,
whether he will possibly further in infect
fect infect other people; also, to find out
whether his people are encouraging
him to get well. 1
Since so many of the cases in the
public health hospitals are tubercular
patients, wnere tne mental attituae
of the patient has much to do with his
recovery, the service of the Red
Cross has become almost as impor
tant as the medical treatment. To see
that a boy's family keeps him cheered
up, to help the home folks so he will
not get "blue letters" and. discourag
ing news; to keep in touch with him
after he is convalescent and discharge
ed such matters as these the Red
Cross has done.
That the Red Cross has done well,
is evidenced by the fact that. the sur
geon general has made his request
that the work be continued. This con continuance,
tinuance, continuance, it might be mentioned, is
cne of the phases of Red cross work
which the fourth roll call will finance.
Messrs. Louis Lang and Grady
Reynolds, while out in the scrub Sat
urday, slew a bear. Bruin was some
bear. He weighed 400 pounds, and
when the boys first saw him they
thought he was a cow. His size failed
to cow them, however, and they laid
him low. They have handed one of
his paws over to Pyles & Perkins to
be mounted. The -slaws of said paw
look like the teeth of a steel rake.
Late Sunday afternoon,. while Mr,
Webber was in charge of the news
stand conducted by Mr. N. L. Will Williams
iams Williams 'next door to Hayes & Gunn's
store, three negroes came in and made
some purchases. While Mr. Webber
was waiting on one of the negroes at
the peanut roaster, one of his com companions
panions companions rifled the cash drawer, taking
$17 in bills therefrom. Mr. Webber
beard the money rattle and called to
the man to stop, but he made his
escape. The other two negroes were
arrested and are in jail, but the real
culprit has not been located.
Get the habit of reading the ads.

Fearful Winter May Severely Try the

Fortitude of Gen. Wrangel's
Forces
(Associated Press)
Constantinople, Nov. 8. General
Wrangel's anti-bolshevik forces are
still holding the keys to the isthmus
loading from the Crimea to the Rus
sian mainland. The impending winter
is dreaded in the Crimea,, where two
million people with little food, money
or clothing are gathered.
ARMENIA GIVING UP
Constantinople, Nov. 8. Armenia
i3 reported passing under bolsheviki
control, the Armenian troops surren
dering and fleeing for other countries.
SEMILNOLES WILL MOVE
TO THE WEST COAST
Palm Beach, Nov. 8. Led by their
chief, Tony Tommy, the remaining
largest single group of Seminole In
dians, soon will move from their old
haunts in this part of the state to a
new reservation on the .Florida west
coasts about 40 miles from Fort My Myers.
ers. Myers. The new home of the Seminoles will
consist of a reservation of approxi approximately
mately approximately 21,000 acres, completely fenc fenced
ed fenced in and including a portion of the
Everglades. Although part of the
reservation is under water, the arable
portion is sufficient to support the
Indians with land to spare.
The Seminoles in their new home
will be provided with schools and
they have agreed to submit to com compulsory
pulsory compulsory education laws.
CONTEST IN THE
FOURTH IS CLOSE
(Associated Press)
Memphis, Nov. 8. An official can
vass will be made to determine the
congressional election in the Fourth
District where Hull, democrat, claims
to have beaten Clouse, republican, and
m the Eighth district, where both
Browning, democrat, and Scott, re republican,
publican, republican, claim the election.

JJHE- AMERICAN RED CRPSS.Qr
frfe ltd PFArp timp HP m

IN PEACE TIME

Eastern
A

lilllll llH li I III MM

Americans wh contribute to the Red Cross would feel amply repaid
far their generosity if they could see what It means t hundreds of thousands
(Of war weary sufferers In the Balkans. Here Is a widowed Roumanian mother
(With her five children just after a visit to a Red Cross relief station. All 'are
barefoot and the boy at the left is wearing clothes made of scraps from tho
battlefields. They have Just received winter clothing, food and condensed
xallk for the baby. Similar work is being done for Russian refugees driven
from home..

ft, &.
CIRCUS DAY DRAWING NEAR
"Mother, please! please! just
enough for the show and some pea peanuts
nuts peanuts for the elephants and
For in a week will come that time
when the small boy and the small girl
will talk fast to their parents. A
week and there will come the scream screaming
ing screaming calliope and the fast playing cir circus
cus circus bands. One more week and
Spraks circus will be in town Tues

1 wo Weeks of Hunting and Golf in An
Old-Time Texas Neighborhood

(Associated Press)
On Board Haring's Special Train,
Nov. 8. Coming to the remote village
of Point Isabel, Texas, President-elect
Harding plans to plunge into a real
vacation, hunting in the morning and
playing golf in the afternoon, for two
weeks.
WILL RETURN IN DECEMBER
New York, Nov. 8. Mr. Harding
sails from New Orleans Nov. 18th for
Panama, aboard an United Fruit. Co.
steamer. Returning he S will land at
Norfolk Dec. 4th. I
'
FROM MR. PICKETT
To the Voters of Marion County: I
wish to thank all those who voted for
me on the second day of November
for county commissioner from district
No. 1, and though I. was defeated I
am still with the people of Marion
and will work for the interest of the
people of the county. I hope to see
standard for good roads and public
schools in Marion county advanced
to be the equal of any county in the
state. Respectfully,
- A. S. Pickett.
CONVENTION IN CHIEF
CITY OF NORTH CAROLINA
(Associated Press)
Asheville, N. C, Nov. 8. Delegates
are arriving for the convention of the
United Daughters of the Confederacy,
opening tomorrow for three days.
MEXICO HAS SWAPPED
REVOLUTIONS FOR STRIKES
(Associated Press)
Vera Cruz, Nov. 8. Striking steve stevedores
dores stevedores and dock- workers refused to
accept settlement terms and called a
general strike, and expect to be sup supported
ported supported by a railroad men's strike.
Make your wants known by adver advertising
tising advertising them.
Europe
.-Hrj
t
day, November 16th, for two per
formances at the fair grounds. This
means a day that "Big Zulu" and the
rest of the two elephant herds will eat
innumerable peanuts and the lions will
roar as only full grown healthy lions
read. Clowns? Well, nearly half a
score will be on hand to dispense joy
throughout the entire performance.
Of course there will be a parade. It
is nearly two miles in length and is
scheduled for 10:30 a. m. on the
morning of the exhibition in this city.

For Three Long Months, Not One of
Them Has Tasted Any
Food

(Associated Press)
Cork, Nov. 8. The nine remaining
hunger strikers are declared in a pre precarious
carious precarious condition on the ninetieth day,
when they still refused food.
MRS. FRANK CAHOON
Saturday at Homestead there oc occurred
curred occurred an automobile accident, the
particulars of which we are unable
to ascertain, but its results were most
serious. Mrs. Frank Cahoon, former formerly
ly formerly of Oak, was killed immediately and
her daughter is in a very precarious
condition from the wounds she re received.
ceived. received. The body of Mrs. Cahoon will be
brough to Marion county for burial.
The interment will be at Anthony.
Mr. and Mrs. Cahoon and family
for many years lived at Oak and
prior to going to Homestead to make
their home, they lived in Ocala and
made scores of friends who will learn
with .much regret of this accident.
Mrs. Cahoon was a sister of Mr.
George Stevens of this city, who has
the sympathy of the entire town and
county in the loss of his sister.
FUNERAL OF MRS. GAMBLE
The remains of Mrs. Mary A.
Gamble were laid to rest in Green Greenwood
wood Greenwood cemetery yesterday afternoon.
There were many friends present to
pay their last respects and devotion
to this beloved Christian woman. Rer.
C. W. White of the Methodist church
officiated and the following named
gentlemen were pallbearers: Messrs.
George Taylor, J. S. Mixson, J. L.
Edwards, H. B. Baxter, E. F. Colby
and M. M. Little.
The following were among the Sat Saturday
urday Saturday visitors to the city: Mrs. J. G.
Baldorf, Candler; Mrs. J: G. S. Gas Gas-kins,
kins, Gas-kins, Miss Nora Colson and Miss Fay
Gillis, Gaiter; Miss Grace Kidd and
Miss Gwendolyn Merrill, Belleview;
Mrs. Ella Caulte and daughter, Eve Evelyn,
lyn, Evelyn, Fellowship; Mrs. George Kings Kings-ley
ley Kings-ley and Miss Othella Cassels, Bay
lake; Mrs. Lloyd Tucker, Martel;
Mrs. E. O. Powell, Conner; Miss
Gladys Wallace, Kendrick; Mrs. Theo
Russell, Lake Weir; Miss Dorothy
McQuaig, Fort McCoy; Mrs.' J. G.
Proctor, Summerfield; Miss Clara
Ricketson, Bushnell; Mrs. J. G. Blitch
and Mrs. F. E. Fant, Blitchton; Mrs.
Wm. E. Miller, Eastlake; Miss An Annette
nette Annette Pfeil, Lowell; Mrs. J. H. Mor Mor-lison,
lison, Mor-lison, Mrs. W. C. White, Oklawaha;
Miss Nellie Scrable, Shady; Mr. and
Mrs. F. H. Lowell and Mr. and Mrs.
H. V. Lee, Eastlake.
Those two competent young men,
Chas. R. Tydings Jr. and Wayne Ten
Eyck, who studied at Macon together,
have received from the eGorgia Board
of Pharmacy their certificates as
apothercaries. Robert and Wayne
have worked hard for the prized doc documents,
uments, documents, and their friends hope for
tbem uninterrupted success.
NOTICE
Of Teacher's Examination
The state teacher's examination
committee will hold an examination
in Ocala commencing November 9th,
1920. All teachers now teaching
without Florida certificates will be
r quired to take this examination.
All others desiring to take the ex examination
amination examination are asked to be on hand.
Examination will commence Tuesday,
Nov. 9th, at 9 o'clock.
10-ll-4tmon W. D. Cam, Sunt.
GRINER FARM SCHOOL X
HOUSE FOR SALE
Bids will be received on November
4th, 1920, for purchase of the old
Griner Farm school house, five miles
out on the Ocala and Anthony road.
Land does not sell with building. Th
board reserves the right to reject any
or all bids.
By order of the Board of Public
Instruction, W. D. Cam,
10-1 1-4 tmon Secretary.
WOODMEN OF THE WORLD
Fort King Camp No. 14 meets at
K. of P. hall at 7:30 p. m. every sec second
ond second and fourth Friday. Visiting sov sovereigns
ereigns sovereigns are always welcome.
J. C. Bray, C. C
Chas. K. Sage, Clerk.
MARION-DUNN MASONIC LODGE
Marion-Dunn Lodge No. 19, F. & A.
M.. meets on the first and third
Thursday evenings of each month at
7:20 o'clock until further notice.
Jake Brown, Secretary.
A. L. Lucas, W. IL

Constantine Can't Contest Them

Without Giving Up Claim to
his Kingship
(Associated Press)
Athens, Nov. 8. The question of
the legal rights of Madame Manos,
the morganatic wife of the late King
Alexander, is creating interest. She
claims Alexander's property because
tf approaching motherhood. The at attorney
torney attorney for former King Constantine
contends he will contest, but jurists
point out if Constantine takes action
it might constitute an admission that
he is no longer king.
BRINGING HOME BODY OF
. A MARION COUNTY BOY
Mr. P. T. Randall of Connor has re
ceived notice that the body of his son,
V irgil, of the A. E. F who died over
seas, has arrived at New York, and
will soon be sent home. Mr. Randall
has requested MacKay & Company to
receive the remains. The American
Legion Post will try to-arrange a fit-'
ting ceremony. This will be the first
of our boys' bodies to be sent home,
and our people should give the occas occasion
ion occasion due honor.
COX IS A FINE CHARACTER
Advises All Americans to Give Loyal
Support to the Incoming
Administration
(Special to the IJev York Times)
Columbus, O., Nov. 5. Governor
James M. Cox made public today the
first statement he has authorized since
the election of Senator Harding to
the presidency. In it he expressed the
hope that the democratic party would
CO-operate with the new administra administration
tion administration in working for the welfare of the
country and not resort to "political
sabotage."
That a new party would result from
the' election to replace the democratic
party, Gov. Cox held to be absurd.
His statement read:
"For the first time in ten years the
republican party is in complete con control
trol control of the legislative and executive
branches of the national government
therefore policy as to statute and ad
ministration, is with it. Its task is no
longer that of the critic, but the con
structor.
"It is my hope and firm belief that
the democracy of the nation will not
attempt political sabotage. The coun country
try country has seen quite "enough of that. We
are in the midst of emergency and
the nation's every resource should co
ordinate in behalf of the things that
are helpfuL
"So long as government exists, the
principles of Thomas Jefferson will be
the center about which human hopes
will gather. Talk of a new party is
absurd. One might as well discuss
the destruction of human emotions.
As essential as it has been to the wel welfare
fare welfare of the country in the past, the
creed of- democracy is more needed
now' than ever because recent events
have made it distinctly the American
party.
"In spirit I am as proud as when
the fight started. I would not retrace
a step nor yield a single jot in prin
ciple. It was a privilege to make the
contest for the right in the face of
overwhelming odds.
"There is a distinct difference be
tween defeat and surrender. The flag
of democracy still flies as the symbol
of things more enduring than the
passions and resentments that come
with the aftermath of war,."
SCHOOL WEEK WILL BE
OBSERVED DECEMBER 5-11
Washington, Nov. 7. School week
will be observed over the country
Dec. 5th to 11th. Commissioner of
Education Claxton has requested the
governors and chief school officers of
the states to take such action as may
be necessary to cause the people to
use this week in such way as it will
most effectively disseminate informa information
tion information in regard to the conditions and
needs of the schools.
Chambers of commerce, boards of
trade, women's clubs, Rotary clubs,
labor unions, farmers organizations
and patriotic and civic societies are
requested to devote one meeting to a
discussion of the need3 of education
in their states. The ministers also
are asked to devote one of their
church services on Sunday, Dec. 5th,
for emphasizing the importance of
education.
Friday afternoon and evening of
school week has been designated as
the date on which community meet meetings
ings meetings in the interests of education
should be held in all school houses,
both in the city and country, for the
purpose of discussing the needs of
the schools, the means of meeting
these needs and remedying conditions.
Successful business men are good
users of printer's ink.



OCALA EVENING STAR, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1920

Ocala Evening Star

PabllMbed Kvery Day Except Sunday by
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY,
OCALA, FLORIDA.
II. It. Carroll, Prenideii
P. V. LaveiKMdf Secrctary-Treamirer
J. II. Benjamin, Editor
Entered at Ocala,Fl3.., poetofflce aa
second-class matter.
TELEPIIOAES
IlaIaea Of flee 1 .Five-One
Editorial Department ......Two-Seven
Soviet? Reporter ..........Five-One
MEMBEH ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press Is exclusively
entitled for the use for republication of
all news dispatches credited to it, or
not otherwise cred'tea ra this paper ana
also the local newjs published, herein.
All rights of .republication of special
4is patches herein are also reserved.
DOMESTIC Sfc'MSCIUPTIOXiRATES
One year, in advance ...... 6.00
Six months, in advance 3.00
Three months, in advance .... .. 1.60
One month, in advance .60
ADVERTISING RATES
Dlaplayt Plate 15 cents per inch for
consecutive insertions. Alternate inser insertions
tions insertions 25 per cent additional. Composi Composition
tion Composition charees on ads. that run less than
ix times cents per inch. Bpeclal
Dosition 20 per cent additional. Kates
based on 4-inch minimum. Less.tnan
tour tnches will take higher rate,
which will be furnished upon applica application.
tion. application.
IleaAlBsr Xtlce 5 cents per line for
first insertion; 3 cents per line ror eacn
subsequent insertion. One change a
week allowed on Teaders without extra
composition charges.
Legal advertisements It legal rates.
THE UNIFORM
Editor Star: You have an editorial
iii your issue of Saturday in reference
to the wearing of the army uniform
by ex-soldiers. I think that you make
a mistake in the advice that you give
to the men who were in service. You
are wrong, I think, in saying that
regulations govern men in the army,
not citizens, if you mean by thisthat
the government shall, not say whether
its citizens shall wear the uniform
prescribed for its soldiers. : ....
The dignity of the uniform must be
preserved. It seems to me that it de
tracts something from the uniform,
cr rather from the regard in which it
is held, to have it .worn as a pair' of
overalls, for example. It is proper, for
instance, that the government should
proniDit ine use oi unuorms similar
to the army uniforms by bell toys.
But apart from opinion, permit me
to quote the following, from the laws
enacted by the Congress of the United
States: - ,'
"It is unlawful for anyone not. a
member of the army, navy or marine
corps to wear the uniform, any 'dis 'distinctive
tinctive 'distinctive part of the uniform any part
cf which is similar to a distinctive
part of the regulation uniform.
, "Exceptions to this general provis provision
ion provision are: ;
"Mpmliprs of societies comnosed
entirely of honorably discharged offi officers
cers officers and men may wear the uniform
on occasions of ceremony, but must
have some distinctive mark on it and
much not wear any insignia of rank.
"Honorably discharged officers may
wear, on occasions of ceremony, the
uniform of the highest grade they
held. 1 A
"Honorablv discharged men are
lowed to wear the uniform from
place of discharge to their homes,
during a period of three months; but
on reaching home within this period
must immediately divest themselves of
the uniform.
"Persons representing a military
character in a theatrical or moving
picture performance may wear the
uniform during that performance,
providing it does not tend to bring
discredit on the service.
"Instructors and members of cadet
corps may wear the uniform pre prescribed
scribed prescribed for their corps.
"Members of the Boy Scouts, Naval
Militia and similar organizations may
wear the uniform of their organiza organizations.
tions. organizations. '
"Members of the National Guard
may wear the uniform prescribed for
the guard."
It is evident that these regulations
apply to civilians.
Undoubtedly it may be a hardship
on some to have a number of uni uniforms
forms uniforms out of which they can get no
service. But here is the law,' and the
law should be obeyed. Moreover, the
government has the power to enforce
these laws. Respectfully,
Louis H. Chazal.
The government has the power to
do many things that' it should do and
doesn't do. One of these things is
that it doesn't demand f or the wear wearers
ers wearers of its uniform the respect due
them not only as soldiers and sailors
but as men. There are a. number of
hotels," theaters and other public
places in the United States where a
profiteer, a slacker, a gambler, a
wanton or any thing with money and
in civilian clothes can enter, alongside
of the most respected men, and wom women,
en, women, but.if a clean, well set up and wTell
behaved man in the -uniform of a pri private
vate private soldier or common sailor seeks
admittance he is refused. The gov government
ernment government can and should make. these
places open their doors to its defend defenders,
ers, defenders, but does it ? Not so as you could
notice it.
We yield to no one in our respect
: r j i
. me umiorm anu nonor lor the
men who wear it. We think the gov government
ernment government is right in saying .. that a
man who has not served in its army
or navy shall not wear its uniform.
We think that every ex-service man
should take care of his uniform and
wear it only on ceremonial occasions
if he can. But we don't believe in

making a fetish out of the uniform or

anything else. A fetish is a bad j
thing and very much out of place in j
a republic. The fetish of the uniform i
and the clanking saber has brought!
untold misery to this world. j
The American soldiers and sailors!
who came home from the world war, j
and Jfvere honorably discharged, were
oa something of a different basis
from the regular army and navy.
They had first been told that they
must return "their I uniforms; later,
they were told they might keep them.
The section of the law that Mr.; Cha Chazal
zal Chazal quotes, fbut on returning home
within this period must immediately
divest themselyes of the uniform,"
would have it enforced set some two or
three hundred thousand men out in
the streets in their bvdees, as about
that number had no clothes but their
uniforms, and no money to buy any
others. A great many men were fined
jnd re-fined and a large proportion of
the fines were unjust until there was
coming to .ithem when discharged only
a fraction of their pay. Each had a
small bonus not enough to buy a man
a suit of clothes and pay his board
for a fortnight in the average city.
What was the reason their, money
wouldn't go any further? Because
they .were met by an army of slackers
and profiteers, to whom the govern government
ment government had presented several billions
of the people's money during the war.
These creatures, wearing civilian
suits costing from a hundred dollars
up, silk shirts and toothpick shoes,
driving their own cars and rolling in
luxury, caused many a soldier to feel
like the war had not been, fought to
make democracy safe, but to give
every extortioner, and coward in Am America
erica America a chance to get rich.
It, lias been not three but twelve
months since the last member of the
A. E.. F reached home. During that
time a considerable number have used
their uniforms as tho' they were their
own property. They understood they
were. Except the overcoats, most of
the uniforms used have been worn
until they .would hardly pass muster
at any ceremonial occasion. No serv service
ice service man has been arrested or rebuked
for the ; practice. Suddenly it is
brought, up. If it was going to be en enforced,
forced, enforced, why didn't the enforcement
begjn with the, first troops that were
discharged?
The ex-service man is a citizen. He
is not amenable to military law. Even
the United States government can't
punish him without a trial, nor can it
override the verdict of a jury. It will
find; precious few juries 4 to convict
ex-soldiers for making necessary use
of their uniforms.
An ex-army officer tells us that if
an ex-sdidier has his overcoat, or other
parts of his uniform dyed, and army
buttons replaced with civilian buttons
that he is safe is using it. It's our
opinion that it would be an act of
foolish tyranny to try to keep him
from using it. ?
There is a great deal of very neces necessary
sary necessary work for the government to do.
It had better attend to it and refrain
from picayunish proceedings against
any' of the men who helped it win the
war.'
A WARNING
It has been correctly said that many
a true word is spoken in jest, and it
may be added that many a good man
has been brought to prison or even
execution by, a foolish joke.
In several Florida cities lately have
appeared bands of men, clad and
mounted in imitation of the old-time
Kuklux, riding around at night, not
doing any damage, but in a solemn,
mysterious manner, suggestive of ter-
rible things: Nevertheless, we have
no idea that they were anything more
than parties of men and boys out on
a larky indulging in a grim spirit of
fun, and with no intent to hurt any anybody.
body. anybody. A dispatch says one of these
parties was riding in Orange county
the night before election.
The next day there was a riot in
Orange two white men and several
negroes were killed. ;- Of course, the
matter was seized upon with joy by
the Southhaters, and similarly of
course' the mysterious, white robed
riders played up as positive proof of
oppression t6 the negro and rebellion
to the government. i
There was a reason for the Kuklux
Klan fifty years ago. The Teason no
longer exists. The organization that
is now trying to obtain a standing
under that name is following a course
of incendiary foolishness. Let all our
sensible and patriotic citizens i dis
Ctfurage it. If there is real necessity
for our men to arm and ride, there
wfll.be no. time for them to wrap up
n sheets and pillow cases.
Get the habit of reading the ads.

Raising the Family "Times and Women have changed since Pa

I ,miL- r3 R So ov-0
I r- rr i .L list V
st;on!,.ahioo con y.

YOUR RED CROSS

n
...
The American Red Cross, by its
Congressional charter, is officially
designated:
To furnish volunteer aid to tho
sick and wounded of armies in
time of. war, in accordance with
the conventions of Geneva.
To act in matters of voluntary
relief and as a medium of com communication
munication communication between the American
people and their Army and Navy.
; To continue'and carry on a sys system
tem system of national and international
relief in time of peace and to ap apply
ply apply the same in mitigating the suf sufferings
ferings sufferings caused by pestilence, famine,
fire, floods and other great calam calamities.
ities. calamities. To devise and carry on measures,
for preventing these causes of
suffering.
FOURTH RED CROSS ROLL CALL
November 11-25, 1920.
MEMBERSHIP FEES:
Annual 1X0
Contributing 5.00
Life 60.00
.Sustaining 10.00
Patron .'. 100.00
Send dues to your nearest local
chapter.
FIRST AID TRAINING
TO MEN AND WOMEN
American Red Cross Is Teaching
Hundreds of Thousands Life Life-Saving
Saving Life-Saving Methods.
! The purpose of Instruction in First
Aid to the injured offered by the Amer American
ican American Red Cross is to train men and
women to administer First Aid' treat treatment
ment treatment promptly and Intelligently when
emergencies demand it. First Aid
treatment is not intended to take the
place of a physician's service. A sur surgeon
geon surgeon should always be sumnioneed as
a precautionary measure,, where there
Is an Injury of any consequence, but
when one cannot be secured a few min minutes'
utes' minutes' delay may mean a fatality. In
such a case a person trained in First
Aid Is invaluable not only to the in individual,
dividual, individual, but through him to tl;e com com-'munity
'munity com-'munity In which he lives.
There Is perhaps no way f ascer
taining the number of deaths or seri serious
ous serious disablements which resalt from
lack of proper safeguards or prompt
emergency treatment. It is safe to as assert
sert assert they, number thousands daily.
. There can be-no doubt that the appli
cation of First ; Aid methods to each
case would Immeasurably lighten the
country's toll of suffering and death.
The dissemination of First Aid train training
ing training and information has already pro produced
duced produced a f arreaching and beneficial In Influence
fluence Influence In the. prevention of accidents
on railroads, In mines and In great in industrial
dustrial industrial concerns. -..
The benefit of a widespread knowl knowledge
edge knowledge of First Aid In the ovent of a
great disaster, such as a train wreck,
an explosion, an earthquike, etc., is
obvious. Laymen who have had First
Aid training can render efficient as assistance.
sistance. assistance. Many lives may depend upon
such emergency care.
Red Cross First Aid work includes
(1) the formation and conduct, through
Red Cross chapters, cf classes for In Instruction
struction Instruction In accident prevention and
First Aid to the Injured among men
and women in all communities and in
every industry ; (2) the introduction of
courses of instruction in high schools
and colleges.
The Red Cross Is prepared to supply
First' Aid books and equipment at rea reasonable
sonable reasonable prices..
Every person in this country able to
do so. should. In his own interest, re receive
ceive receive Red Cross First Aid instruction.
Information about the course and In Instruction
struction Instruction classes may be had at the
nearest chapter headquarters.
. Canine Characteristic.
Once in a while you meet a man
who is like a dog. He would rather
stand still and shiver than to get out
and hustle and keep warm. Cincin Cincinnati
nati Cincinnati Enquirer.
Close Observer.
"A man's, character Is sometimes
read In bis wife's face," truly remarks
the Florence "Bulletin."

I f dappv have I iHow oo xo- j r OP Va T-.fi' f rLJf .rm v I pome grahdhpsi

1 I I i lr I I I i 1 MPS 1 rfcvMCl I I -J IJm i I AH. tnVt. I 1 1 J

" J vni) Her I KREOiTH .1 I " '. f I I .V ..i 1 i.KTUiSr &6V V-

'mn wcouw rrmE .(w:y ax

- l v j ii . zvj r iti l v i- v n I I w ..... nw j r 1

Millions for a
New Stomach
One of the greatest American mHIioa
aires said to h's physician, "A million
dollars, Doctor, spot cash and no grum grumbling,
bling, grumbling, for a new stomach," and then
the sick man groaned and turned away.
All his wealth could not make hire
happy or contented, for happiness large largely
ly largely depends upon digestion. Without
health where does happiness come in!
After all the stomach plays a great
part in everyday life.. Without a
healthy stomach and good digestion our
blood is thin, watery and poor, our
heart action is weak, our liver does not
do its duty, and man is miserable andj
unhappy. Prevent disease by putting
the house in order and strengtLening
tie system against the germs of disease.
Br. Pierce, of the Invalids' Hotel and
Surgical Institute, at Buffalo, N. Y.,
years ago understood diseases and their
prevention, and he discovered certain
roots and herbs which were nature's
remedies, and succeeded in putting them
up in a form that could be easily pro procured
cured procured at the drug store (liquid or
ablets). This he called Dr. Pierce's
Golden Medical Discovery. This Dis Discovery
covery Discovery gives no false stimulation bo bo-i&ae
i&ae bo-i&ae it contains no alcohol or any nar narcotic.
cotic. narcotic. It helps digestion and the as as-eindlation
eindlation as-eindlation of such eie jaents in the food
ts axe required for the blood. It glve3
to the blood the food elements the tis tisanes
anes tisanes require. For over fifty jeju it
& esjoygd the confidence of the
taaikan public, 'Try it nowl

NAVY HAS THE SHIPS AND
IS GETTING THE MEN
During the last week there were
2425 enlistments. The average enlist
ments per week for the last four
weeks is 2249. The average gain in
personnel of the navy, is 1S87 per
week, j
The navy is still short about 26,000
men, and that means that there are
several good vacancies to be ftlled. and
the men coming in now will get them.
Iiop on, boys, while there i3 still
plenty of room. For information see
the navy recruiting agent in the post post-office
office post-office building.
OCALA LODGE NO. 286. B. P. O. H
Ocala Lodge No. 286, Benavolert
and Protective Order of Eiim, meets
the second and four Tuesday eve
nings of each month. Visitinj; breth brethren
ren brethren always welcome. Lodj;o rooms,
upstairs over Troxler's and tho Book
Shop, 113 Main street.
C. Y. Miller, E. R
E. J. Crook, Secretary.
Gerig's Drug Store has instituted
"individual service" at its soda foun fountain.
tain. fountain. .29-tf
For groceries and meat phone 103.
Main Street Market. l 5-Zt

GARAGE OPEN

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 11th
r
Oil, Gas and all accessories on hand
HUPSON : ESSEX STOHDEBAM

-.
v.

Vhirohv Motor

r. r. st: sr-. -X'- -x-- -X- -X-- D- O
was Young!

1 1 1

KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS

Ocala, Lodge Nol 19. Conventions
held every ilonday evening at 7:30
o'clock at the Castle Hall, over the G.
C. Greene Co. drugstore. A cordial
welcome to visiting brothers.
J. W. Akin, C. C.
Chas. K- Sage. K. of R. & S.
ORDER OF EASTERN STAR
Ocala Chapter No. 29. O. E. SL,
meets at the Masonic hall the second
and fourth Thursday evenings of each
month at 8 o'clock.
Mrs. Lillian Simmons, W. M.
Mrs. Susan Cook, Secretary.
ODD FELLOWS
Tulula Lodge No. 22, I. O. O. F.,
meets every Tuesday evening at the
Odd Fellows hall at the corner of
ort King Ave. and Osceola St. A
warm welcome always' extended to
-isiting brothers.
J. D. McCaskill. N. G.
H. R. Luffman, Secretary.
I
Apples! Apples!
Just Arrived
Fresh Car of Apples
Will sell at a
reasonable price
A. C. L FREIGHT DEPOT
Square deal
to everybody
Properly fitted" glasses
t tivp 9wav that snuint-
'S tC" R8 drawn unnatural
'f.C vV expressiun seen in ucict-
ve eyes.
DR. K.J. WEIHE,
Optometrist and Optician
Eyesight Specialist
WM. A. TINSMAN
i CONTRACTOR
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
Estimates Furnished Free j
Phone No. 52G, 215 W. 5th St., Ocala
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTER AND
BUILDER
CareJul estimates made on all co-
tract s ork. Gives more and better
work fir the money than any other
contractor in the city.

AND NIGHT

AUTOMOBILES
O -X- j 'Z'Jr&J

PYLES & PERKINS
Funeral Directors & Einbalraers
PARLORS OPPOSITE POSTOFFICE
Two Hearses. Grey Hearse for White
People Only.
Phones 555 and 225. Open All Night.
OCALA. FLORIDA

jC. Cecil Bryant j
Accoanlinrj and Auditing
PHONE 332 :
Sec Me
For all Classes of
Stone, Brick, Wood
and Concrete
Building
J. D. IcCasMl
'Contractor
Phone 446. 728 Wenana St. I
LIFE
FIRE
A. E. GERIG
INSURANCE
Ocala, Florida
ACCIDENT AUTOMOBILE
WOi SCHEDULES
Arrival and departure of passenger
tra:ns at OCALA UNION STATION.
The following schedule figures pub published
lished published as information and not guar guaranteed.
anteed. guaranteed. (Eastern Standard Time)
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILROAD
Leave Arrive
2:20 am Jacksonville-NTTork 2;10am
1:55 pm Jacksonville 1:30 pra
4:05 pm Jacksonville 4:05 pm
Tampa-
2:15 am Manatee- 4:05 pra
St. Petersburg
2:1b am Tampa 2:15 am
1:50 pm Tampa-Manatee 1:35 pm
4:05 pm Tampa-St. Petrsbrg 4:05 pm
ATLANTIC COAST LINE R. R.
Leave Arrive
2:12 pm Jacksonville-N'York 2:48 am
1:45 pm Jksonville-Gainsville 3:35 pm
6:42 am Jksonville-Gnesville 10:13 pm
2:42 am St.Petsbrg-Lakeland 2:12 am
3:35 pm St.Petsbrg-Lakeland 1:25 pm
7:10 am Dunnellon-Wilcox
7:25 am Dunellon-Lkeland 11:03 pm
3:25 pm Homosassa 1:30 pm
10:13pm Leesburg 6:42 am
4:45 pm Gainesville 11:50 am
"Monday, Wednesday, Friday.
Tuesday. Thursday, Saturday.
9
.4
Coa? 0CALA
fSbiM. V Jiy'urIv2 5V2 v3-; "x Si
Fisher

DAY

H7I

5



L
.ii ?
k"?
1

OCALA EVENING STAB, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1920

A

f J
1
iv:

F

PJoveinber 13

'OCALA' HIGH SCHOOL

vs.

BE LAND HIGH SCHOOL
Admission, 25c and 50c.

Game Called 4:15

HUNTER PARK

A

51

I

:!

2X.

X
I

The Wilmington, N. C., Star, Sept. 21st, says: "The cleanest and
cleverest show seen in many a day was Sparks three-ring circus, which
exhibited here yesterday, the audience taxing the capacity of the huge
tent." "Clean and clever" sums up the show and the crowds were orderly.

f j: MAMMOTH INSTITUTION S f&Pftz
:-$mr MERIT AND ORIGINALITY- ife
A COMPREHENSIVE ENSEMBLE 'jS&J
tem?THE WORLD'S BEST PERFORMERS
I&lC w ..AMD THE FINEST TRAINED ANIMALS- fa
V -;; fir ? MULTITUDE' Of STRANGE AND Mf
:,fv rris&f&tff CURIOUS FEATURES FROM ALL fe
i lf ?;.f i.;i?i:ifc-?V ENDS THE EARTH-
''';ViVfl EXHIBITION THAT
COMING TO :

mnn

J

(cja package

dm

store toe war

package

unns-

the war

4

nd

m

The Flavor Lasts
So Does the Price!

- 3

Meet mo "at the American Cafe.
Union Station, Ocala, for a regular
dinner family style. Best dinner in
the state for 75c. Eat and drink all
you want. Time for dinner 11 a. m. to
2:30 p.m. 17-tf

- The Toad to success is advertising.

BELLEVIEW

(The following was mailed last
Wednesday morning, but did not reach

the Star until Saturday afternoon)

Belleview, Nov. 3. Mrs. M. A.
Tremere returned last Thursday from
a two months' visit to her old home in

Georgia.

The very biggest affair financially

and one that will stand with any so socially
cially socially ever given in Belleview, was
the Hallowe'en party at the town hall

last Saturday night, given by the B,

Y. P. U. At the appointed time, 7:30,

tne doors of the big town hall were

swung open and there were many al

ready waiting for admittance. At ten
o'clock the crowd was at its height,
and there were to be seen people from
Wild wood, Leesburg, Jacksonville, all

around the lake, Candler, a goodly at

tendance from Ocala and many other

places. There were easily 150 per

sons in attendance.
At the door the guests were tagged
with an attractive little hand painted

cat for five cents. They were then

met by the floor committee who saw
that they were escorted around the
hall and made acquainted with the
different characters. Every one
breathed the Hallowe'en spirit, and it

was a pleasure to see how our out of
town friends joined in the fun.

The town hall never looked more

beautiful and each committee was
right on the job to see that their booth
was the drawing card of the evening.

At 10 o'clock a grand march was

called for. This was a very attractive

feature as most all participants were

costumed.

Alter tne marcn a program was

rendered. This was a prize event as

every number went off smoothly, and

ter for Belleview. She is a great fav favorite,
orite, favorite, especially with the young peo people,
ple, people, who wish for her a pleasant visit,
but hope she will soon return.
Miss Gertrude Turner and Miss
Sarah Bosworth returned Wednesday
from a pleasant summer in New Eng England.
land. England. Mr. and Mrs. Louis Weihe and
daughter, Alice have returned from
their summer vacation spent in Ohio
and Pennsylvania.
Miss Mary Powers came in last

Monday from Chicago and expects to?

remain, aunng me winter.
Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Eay have return

ed to Belleview after a visit with

friends at Newberry.

Mr. "William Lucius of Coleman was

a business visitor to Nelson's garage

last Friday.

The Epworth League has extended
invitations to all its friends to attend

a pound party to be given Friday

night, Nov. 5th, on the lawn between
the church and town hall. This prom

ises to be the biggest social affair of

the week and a goodly attendance is

expected.

President Frank E. Martin of the
Belleview Utilities Co., after spend

ing a six weeks vacation at his big
farm in Illinois, expects to leave this
week for Florida, driving his big Reo

car. Mr. Martin in his usual patriotic
manner wrote for a Marion County
Fair sign for display on the car mak making
ing making the trip. How many home cars

are carrying one. Get busy, the fair
is close at hand.

j
ApalscMcola

Fresh Every Day

sltars

CLINICS IN OCALA

At the invitation of the Marion

County Medical Society, Dr. T. Z.
Cason of Jacksonville, and a member

much time had been spent in training tne state board of healt will hold

and making costumes.

At 11:30 the crowd still lingered

and many were the words of praise

and congratulation bestowed upon the

B. Y. P. U. for giving the people such
a' funfeast. One youne man (Mr.

clinics in Ocala Friday, Nov. 12th,
1020. -

A clinic for white people; will be

held in the rooms of the Woman's
Club in the afternoon from 1 to 5
o'clock. Ane for the colored people

Arthur Baker) who came down from r h?ld j.n the etroPolitan Bank
Ocala and spent the week end at the fcu?dm& jn the morning from 9 to 12

Lake View, especially to attend the otOCK- ,

party, was so impressed by the good erso,ns.wno nave oeen exposea xo
time and lovely manner in which eve- tuberculosis or who have not made a

v-tVnno. tu ro?o nn Via OTncM!; recovery irom innuenza are

his views as follows:

Woh put the bell in Belleview,

Is a question asked by the people;

To the B. Y. P. U. the credit is due

And 'twill ring in the little, church

steeple.

How it all came about I'll endeavor to

tell;

urged to attend.

Dr. Cason did special tuberculosis

work for two years in the army. He

is connected witn tne tuoercuiosis

dispensary in Jacksonville.

AMERICAN LEGION

MASQUERADE BALL

COOK'S
MARKET and GROCERY
Phone 243
The Store of Quality

NEEOHAM MOTOE CO.
- General Repairing,!
Storage, Gasoline, Oils and Grease.
We use genuine Ford Parts. Cars washed, $1.00
AGENTS FOR
SCRIPPS-BOOTH SIX
Phone 252 Cor. Oklawaha and Orange
Used Cars for Sale

j y

;FpR0E0FSTAf

Negotiable Storage Receipts Issued on Cotton, Automobiles, Etc.

Thprp rpmnin? insf tlirno r?gxra Tmtfl

Their little old church looked for- the night of the masquerade ball to be
lOm Irrivpn hv tVi Amarinart T .ncrin-n in thoir

And some one suggested they should dance hall at the army. A masquerade

have a bell

,To call the folks out Sunday morn.

Well, they talked the thing over, 'twas

on every tongue.

a decision was made which was

well

To have some big doings for both old

and young.

ball that promises to be one of the

biggest events this season. Enjoy

ment is the legion's pass word, and

even the smallest detail has not been
overlooked in preparing for this oc occasion.
casion. occasion. Music that has plenty of pep
in it. Refreshments to be served by

the ladies' auxiliary and gold prizes"

And the proceeds would purchase a being awarded is part of the program

bell.

Twas open for business at 7 o'colck,

The admission was only five cents:

Of course, I went down, only living a I

block,

And enjoyed myself something im-

v mense;

There was good pie and candy, ice

' cream and cake,
And plenty of amusement for 11;

Everything was fine without a mis-

' take,

And black cats were all 'round the

wall.

Masquerade suits were numerous, red,

white and green
Grab bag in the center of the floor,

And they had a fortune teller ,t

Just as you went in the door. 1

Tickets are now on sale at the Court

Pharmacy. If you haven't, bought
one yet, buy it at once.

.. nj
Chinese Jubilation.
A sea lion, a fusillade of crackers,

a banquet, and the raising of the Chl Chl-nise
nise Chl-nise flag, Indicated to the Victorian
town of Echucha that a branch of
the Chinese Masonic society had been
formed. Chinese from all parts of

Victoria attended the cfeemony, and

the mayor and councilors of Echucha

were guests. The Chinese master of
ceremonies was Interviewed by re

turned soldiers who objected' to the

flying of the Chinese flag alone. Aus

tralian and British flags were at once
hoisted to the top of the flagpole.
Indianapolis News. I

was

very

The Hall of Mystery

queer place,
To enter you paid two-bits;

So dark you couldn't look a girl in the

face-.
I was scared clear out of my wits.

WOODMEN OF THE WORLD

Fort King Camp No. 14 meeU at

K. of P. hall at 7:30 p. m. every sec

ond and fourth Friday. Visiting sov

ereigns are always welcome.

J. U Bray, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage, Clerk.

Wllll GUM K pi

They had a cat without a tail,

Twas a dime a tail-they had 'em for """"X

sale,

0xv 0 x I Seaboard Air Line

After covering vour eves thev .-mve 1 Arrive from Jacksonville.. 2:09 a. m

leava tor ramna. :au m.

Arrive from Jacksonville . 1 :30 p. m.

Leave for Tamna 1:50 p. m

Arrive from Jacksonville . 4:04 p. m.
Leave for Tampa 4:05 p.m.

Arrive from Tampa z :14 a.m.
Leave for Jacksonville.... 2:15a.m.

MOVE, PACK, SHIP
LIVE STOCK,
PIANOS, BAGGAGE,
MACHINERY,
FURNITURE, ETC

.LONG DISTANCE MOVING

IPSnoite

ItJM

;THE WINPSOE ..HOTEL
JACKSONVTLLE,rEORIDA :?J
In the heart of the city with Hemming Park for a front yard.
Every modern convenience in each room. Dining room nervice i
second to none

ROBERT M. MEYER,
Manager,

J. E. KAVANAUGH
Proprietor.

you a spin
Then started you off, full of fear.

Some pinned the tail on the poor cat's

; chin,
And some upon his ear.

ine music and speaking sure was a

treat
To say nothing of the drills.

After that I started to drink and eat

And I sure did get my fill.

Arrive from Tampa 1:35 p.m.

Leave for Jacksonville.... 1:00p.m.

Arrive from Tampa....... 4:04p.m.

Leave for Jacksonville. ... 4:uo p. m.

Atlantic Coast Line

Things were fine, there was aothing jeV. 3:34p.

rough.

They say all is well that ends well

Leave for St. Petersburg.. 3:35p.m.
Arrive from Jacksonville.. 10 :12p.m.

The council didn't pass the ordi ordinance,
nance, ordinance, but we put in the individual
service. Gerig's Drug Store. 29-tf

Dont fail to visit the Guarantee
Jlothing & Shoe Company. Every Everything
thing Everything we sell is guaranteed. We're
Sghting for QUALITY not prices, tf

And I sure do hope they made enough! Leave for Leesburg 10:13 p. m.

To buy that little bell. Arrive from St. Petersburg zai a.m.

Leave for Jacksonville.... z:ia.m.

Each committee deserves much I Arrive from St. Petersburg 1:25 p.m.

credit. They all worked together I Leave for Jacksonville.... 1:45 p.m.

with a wilL but it isfco Mrs. I. 1. 1 Arrive from Leesburg.... 6:41 a. nt.

FtrmiP. that, nil tho nmmHt irtnv I Arrive f rom Jacksonvule. a. m,

ifici, I Leave for Jacksonville.... 6:42a.m.

untiring efforts that made the affair f"--""' jwEE.

I cue wuuueuui fcuctess mat it was, lAwWo -frnm fZoinoiro-iilo

A report from the finance commit-1 daiiv excent Sunday.... 11 :50a.m.

tee has not yet been rendered ut it is Leave for Gainesville, daily

expected that the proceeds will be! except Sunday 4:45p m.

close to one thousand dollars. I Leave for Lakeland Tues-

Mr. O. M. Gale has a brand new

Ford.

Miss Marjorie Merrill, the Star's

Belleview regular correspondent, left

last Monday afternoon for Jackson

ville to visit her brother, Mr. Kenneth

Merrill. Miss Merrill has been very

faithful to the Star readers, as she I Double recleanea seed oats and rye.

always contributes a weekly new3 lew Ocala Seed Store. 6-tf

day, Thursday, Saturday 7:25 a.m.

Ar. from Lakeland, Tues

day, Thursday, Saturday 11:03 p.m.

Leave for Wilcox. Monday,

Wednesday and Friday.. 7:10a.m.

Arrive from Wilcox, Mon

day. Wednesday. Friday. 6:45 p.m.

Goodrich
Silvertown Cords

"BestjintheLongRun"

air. Bruce Mcneri. on a

one ol these Famous
Tires, made
29,981 Miles

BLALSCK

Viilcanizing
Phone 78 Oklawaha & Main

Ml 'A.

1

1 Mm"

FLOWEES FADE
but the stone endures for ages.
A well executed monument is
the only last memorial to the
memory of those gone before.
Our designs are varied both in
ideas and prices. You can select
a stone here that will do justice
- to the memory of the departed
for a very moderate sum.
0 CALMIARB1E WORKS

Read the Star Want Ads. It pays

t-

v -.



OCALA EVENING STAB, MONDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1920

QCALA OCCUiEIICES

Temperature this morning, 55; this
afternoon, 82.

If you have any
phone to five-one.

. society items,

Mrs. S. J. McQuaig of Anthony was
in the city for the day.
Mr. and Mrs. F. L. Durand of Yala Yala-ha
ha Yala-ha were visiting friends in town to today.
day. today.
Double recleaned seed oats and rye.
Ocala Seed Store. 6-tf

Mr. Dick Stroud left Sunday .aft .afternoon
ernoon .afternoon for his annual vacation, which
he will spend with relatives in Miami.
Mr. Bernard Fonce spent Satur

day and Sunday in the citya guest at

the home of his mother, Mrs. J. C. BA

Foonce.

Use "Goodnight" and then go to
sleep; 25 cents at Gerig's Drug Store.

Mr. James Foster of Birmingham,

Ala., but now holding a position in

Tampa, was in town yetserday, visit

ing friends.

Miss Sarah Agnew has arrived
from her home in Jacksonville to
snend several weeks at the home of

her sister, Mrs. J. Carstens.

Flower bulbs at
Store.

the Ocala Seed
6-tf

Mr. II. M. Hampton motored to In Inverness
verness Inverness this morning to transact pro professional
fessional professional business in the circuit court,
vhich is in session there this week.

Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Harriss and
Mrs. Annie Van Deman returned yes yesterday
terday yesterday afternoon from a week's motor
trip to many points of interest on the
west coast.

Dont fail to visit the Guarantee
Clothing & Shoe Company. Every Everything
thing Everything we sell is guaranteed. We're
ighting for QUALITY not prices, tf
Dr. and Mrs. L. H. Van Engelken
have returned from a pleasant week's

motor trip to Tampa, St. Petersburg,
Passa-Grille, Clearwater and" Tarpon

Springs.

For groceries and meat phone 108.

Main Street Market. 5-3t

Judge E. E. Cox of Camilla, Ga

spent Sunday in the city a guest at
the home of his brother, Mr. O. E. Cox

and family, en route home alter u

business trip to points south.

No fear of germs when you drink

at Gerig's Drug Store. 29-tf

Mr. W. A. Stroud has returned
from a business trip to Jacksonville

and Tampa, where he made arrange

ments for his Thanksgiving and

Christmas stock of candy and fruit.

Advertising not only builds up your

business but also builds up the town.

Mr. John Mathews of Candler was

in town today, busy making arrange

ments for the fair. Mr. Mathews,

who will have charge of the one of
the departments, is optimistic for

a splendid fair this year.

Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Burnett, who
have been spending the summer in

topringfield, Mass.. are expected to

arrive in Ocala some time this week

and will spend the winter in the city,

guests at the Arms House.

For groceries and meat phone 108

Main Street Market. 5-3t

Mr. and Mrs. John Pasteur, daugh

ter and grandson. Miss Tillie Pasteur

and Master Jim- Lytle, have returned
home from a pleasant week-end visit

at the home of the former's daughter,

Mrs. E. J. Lytle of Stanton.

Try some of "Ole Mammy" Pra

lines, the most delicious nut candy
ever made. The Court Pharmacy. 6t

Mrs. Annie Van Deman has been
chosen by the Sons of the Confederate

Veterans as one of the chaperones for

the annual meeting of the veterans

and sons that will take place this

week, Nov. 10-12th. at Orlando.

Mr. Frank E. Dix, who spent sev

eral weeks in Ocala in the late sum

mer, representing the Continenta

Guaranty Corporation of New York
city, automobile financiers, is here for
a few days, a guest at the Harrington

Hall.

nil ?.-.: c

Ww& ,tm J fell

fv
0EiranFKAinH AeiinHMEGinrf 1
t X

The Phonograph used by Miss
Gladys Rice in her Tone Test
last Friday afternoon, Nov. 5th,
Was not a Special Phono Phonograph.
graph. Phonograph. It was loaned by Dr.
L G. Peek, of Ocala. We sold
Or. Peek this Instrument one
year ago. Ask Dr. Peek.

1VX

now in our store. She has signed one of these Certificates of Authenticity to be presente

with each instrument. It guarantees that such instrument is an exact duplicate of the New
Edison which triumphed at Miss Rice's tone-test given last Friday at the Temple Theatre, and that it
is capable of sutaining the same test.

We have justnine of these Official Laboratory Models, as follows:

Serial Number 1333802 (Chippendale
Cabinet)

Serial Number 16976
Mary Cabinet)

(William and

Serial Number
Cabinet)

114960 (Chippendale

Serial Number 16840
Mary Cabinet)

(William and
Snial Number 14648
Mary Cabinet)

Serial Number
Cabinet)
Serial Number
Cabinet)
Serial Number
Cabinet)
Serial Number
Cabinet)
(William and

122798 (Chippendale

133814

(Chippendale

139774 (Chippendale

133695 (Chippendale

EDI

4

u

ThelPhonograph With A Soul

Come in and inspect these nine instruments
which have been Certified byMiss Rice.

V

elley-Milier

usic

Company

Harrington Hall Corner.

Only one drink served in each cup
at Gerig's Drug Store. 29-tf

Mrs. Charles D. Miller, Orlando,
Mrs. J. R. Keller; Leroy, Mr. and Mrs.
Frank Durand, Yalaha, Mr. L. A. Wil Wilcox,
cox, Wilcox, Dunnellon and Miss Bessie Teu Teuton
ton Teuton of Eureka, were in town for the
day, shopping and attending to busi business
ness business matters.

A beautiful little girl arrived a the
Marion county hospital Sunday morn morning
ing morning to make her home with Mr. and
Mrs. George Pasteur. Besides her
happy parents, she is being given an
affectionate welcome by her two
brothers and sister.

For groceries and meat phone 108.
Main Street Market. 5-3t

Mr. Fred W. Barse, a popular trav traveling
eling traveling salesman, spent the week-end in
Ocala. Mr. Barse has many friends
in the city, having resided here fox a
number of years, who will learn with
pleasure that he will visit the city
regularly again in making his rounds
through the state.
Dont fail to visit the Guarantee
Clothing & Shoe Company. Every Everything
thing Everything we sell is guaranteed. We're
ighting for QUALITY not prices, tf
We regret to announce a painful
accident to Mr. H. Goodnow. While
trying to crank a big truck near
Summerfield, he had his arm broken
in two places. Notwithstanding his in-

jury, ne is going around with his
right flipper in a sling, as cheerful as
usual. .

One of the best opportunities for

a reasonable investment in the state
of Florida. Due to the fact that I am
goingNback in the phosphate business,

I am offering my three rock crushing

plants for sale at really a sacrifice
My. books are open for inspection.
For the amount invested, this busi business
ness business is one of the best paying propo propositions
sitions propositions in the state of Florida. If in

terested, see A. T. Thomas, office 1-2

Holder building, Ocala, Fla. 11-6-tf

Mrs. Charles Tydings and sister,
Miss Annie Davis, accompanied by
Mrs. McLendon, who is a visitor in
the city at the home of her daughter,

Mrs. Robert. Tydings, returned Satur

day night from an automobile trip to
Orlando, where they went to meet the
former's brother, Mr. N. E. Davis of

Chicago, who returned with them and
was their guest until today, when he

left for home.' Mr. Davis is chairman

of the hospital and home board of the

Methodist

Chicago.

Episcopal Centenary of

W. K. Lane, BL U- Physician and
Surgeon, specialist Eye, far. Nose and
Throat. OSce over 5 and 10 cent store,
Ocala, Fla.- tf.

Mrs. Napolean Hickman has arriv arrived
ed arrived in the city from a summer spent in
New York and Pennsylvania and will
spend the winter at the home of her
daughter, Mrs. L. R. Chazal and fam family.
ily. family. Mrs. Hickman has been a regular
winter visitor for years and her many
friends are always glad to welcome her
return.

Mr. and Mrs. J. Carstens' home on
Fort King avenue is nearing comple completion
tion completion and some time within the next
week they will move into same. The
improvements that have been made
on this residence have greatljr added
ts its looks" and comfort and the
property is now one of the most at attractive
tractive attractive on Fort King avenue. The
cottage on Oklawaha that Mr. and
Mrs. Carstens have been living in for

the past two years will be occupied at

an early date by Mr. and Mrs. R. L.
Anderson Jr.

TWO SPECIAL

SHOE FOR LADIES

Dr. Edison's Cushioned Sole for tender

feet, former price Q1 1 CC
$13, reduced to . ?L JJ
Utz & Dunn's "Easeall" with arch arch-protecting
protecting arch-protecting feature. Former price
$14,00, reduced $12 65
These are new goods just received,
but were purchased about six months
ago. Factory prices have been reduc reduced
ed reduced since these goods were placed upon
cur shelves, and we feel that our cus customers
tomers customers are entitled to this benefit.
FOOT COMFORT BY THE
'"SCHOLL METHOD"
LITTLE'S SHOE PARLOR

Mrs. H. M. Hampton will motor to
Orlando tomorrow to spend the re remainder
mainder remainder of the week. She will be ac accompanied
companied accompanied by Mrs. E. L. Carney and
Mrs. Annie Van Deman and while- in
that city they will be guests of the
San Juan hotel. These ladies are go going
ing going especially for the annual meeting
of the U. C. V. and S. C. V., which is
being held in Orlando this week.

UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS
WANTED, LOST. FOUND. FOB
SALE. FOR RENT AND SIM-
ILAR LOCAL NEEDS
RATES Six- line, maximum, one
time, 25c; three times, 50c.; six times
75c; one month. $3 Payable in ad-vance.

FOR SALE Fifty acre farm two
miles from Ocala. Apply to owners,
Collier Brothers. 30-tf

FOR SALE One sorrel mare, eight
years old; weight 950 pounds. Well
broke and good saddler. See R. H.
Connell, Anthony, Fla. 1-I2t6

FOR SALE First class auto paint painting
ing painting and top trimming: business do doing
ing doing from $1700 to $2030 per month.
Will stand strictest investigation.
Good reason for selling. Box 5,
Gainesville, Fla. 28-9t

FOR SALE Abruzzi rye seed, $3.50
per bushel. Anthony Farms, An Anthony,
thony, Anthony, Fla. 4-t

CABBAGE PLANTS Protected from
frost by overhead irrigation. Char Charleston
leston Charleston Wakefield, Early Summer,
Lupton's best Long Island seed,
$1.75 per thousand; special price in
large quantities. Parcel post or orders
ders orders 25 cents per thousand extra.
' J. R. Davis Farms, Bartow, Fla. tf

FOR RENT Two unfurnished rooms
for light housekeeping. Phone No.
116. 53t

WANTED Immediately a idy sten stenographer.
ographer. stenographer. Permanent position. Ap Apply
ply Apply at Ocala Iron Works. 6-3t

SACRIFICE
FOR QUICK SALE One 1919
Dodge Touring Car. See Mr.
Sheppard at Lewis-Chitty Com Company.
pany. Company. 8st

FOR RENT Three unfurnished
rooms Apply at No. 15 Daugberty
street. 8-3-eod
WANTED A cook and dining room
maid. Apply at Marion County
Hospital. g3t

WANTED Male bookkeeper,
to B. Goldman.

Apply
8-Ct

FOR SALF Three quarter of an acre
of cane for seed or syrup. L. Fred Fred-eriUe,
eriUe, Fred-eriUe, Lake Weir avenue, Ocala. t

CITY TAX NOTICE

City taxes and licenses due.
A discount of 2 per cent allowed on
city taxes if paid in November. The
tax rate slightly reduced.
W. W. Clyatt,
City Tax Collector.



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