The Ocala evening star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:05623

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
Weather Forecast: Showers prob probably
ably probably tonight and Wednesday.

OCALA, FLORIDA, TUESDAY, JULY' 13, 1920;
VOL 2G, NO- 16'

B OF GOV.
JAM ES fl CO
How the Timid Boy Grew Into
Fearless Journalist' and One of
America's Leading Statesmen
While reading the following, you
would think it was written by a good
democrat for a red-hot democratic
paper. But it was written by Boy Boy-den
den Boy-den R. Sparks, who may or may not
be a democrat, for the New York
Tribune, the most staunch republican
paper in the United States.
When Jimmie Cox was a small boy
running barefoot- on his father's
farm in Jacksonburg, Ohio, other
youngsters less imaginative used to
point scornful index fingers in the
direction of his tow head and shout,
"fraidy cat" Little Jimmie was
afraid of the dark.
It seems trivial now, but it was
tragic for that country. lad. The
taunts hurt his pride far more than
any stone bruise hurt his feet., Final Finally,
ly, Finally, because of this ridicule, he steel steeled
ed steeled himself to overcome his fear of
the dark, and in succeeding apparent apparently
ly apparently developed an immunity against all
fears.'' -y ; ;:7;-'
Overcame His Fears
Nowadays, when Jimmie Cox is
master of a fortune that is estimated
to exceed $5,000,000, owns and edit3
two newspapers, has been elected
governor of Ohio three times and is
the democratic nominee for the
presidency, the men who work for
him and his other friends like to at attribute
tribute attribute hia success to his fearlessness.
Dayton, Ohio, where the cash reg registers
isters registers are made and the Wright
brothers first envisioned the aero aeroplane,
plane, aeroplane, was a boss-ridden town when
Jimmy Cox came to town; and. bought
the moribund "News" with its boiler boilerplate
plate boilerplate columns and feeble circulation.
That was in 1898. Immediately he
started in to provide the people of
Dayton with a paper with a vigorous
news policy. .
"Doc" Lowes was the political boss
of Dayton and "Doc" "proved to be a
splendid grindstone for young Cox,
then, twenty-eight years of age, to
sharpen his circulation on. The mu municipal
nicipal municipal government reeked with graft.
' The News" exposed this situation
beneath headlines that showed a total
disregard for the nrice of nrintini?
ink. I ; .
Frequently when Publisher Cox,
who was also Manainc Editor Cox
and Telegraph Editor Cox and Re Reporter
porter Reporter Cox and Advertising Solicitor
Cox, appeared at his office therev
would be a delegation waiting for
him, heavy-handed friends of "Doc"
Lowes. If Jimmie couldn't whip them
hi bluffed them.
The Last Rough Stuff
About the last of these experiences
occurred when he had just acquired a
private office, half frosted glass and
half matchboard partition. Jimmie
was very proud of that office, and on
the first day it was ready to be used
he arrived at the News to find a
thick-shouldered, scowling rough neck
waiting "to see" Mr. Cox. It was a
henchman of "Doc" Lowes.
Jimmie led the way into his pri private
vate private office. Some of the old em employes
ployes employes of the News say that as the
visitor followed him into the sanctum
they saw him spit on his hands.
The door closed on them; the em
ployees waited nervously. Then, tho'
no words had been spoken, the News
staff heard the scuffle of, feet and a
chair overturned. There was a crash
of glass ar d a splintering of wood.
The rough neck was catapulted thru
a wall of the private office and lighted
on the back of his neck four steps
from the bottom of the narrow flight
that led up from the street He didn't
return, but the private office was pri private
vate private no longer. It was just wreck wreckage.
age. wreckage. Father a Republican
Cox hadn't learned how to run a
newspaper in a day or a week. His
ability had a background. "" Neither
had he acquired the tough muscles
with which he bounced the friend of
"Doc" Lowes without hard work.
To begin, James Middleton Cox
was born March 31, 1870, on a small
farm. near Jacksonburg, Butler coun county,
ty, county, Ohio. His father was Gilbert Cox,
a farmer who voted or Lincoln and
his republican successors, and his
mother was Elizabeth Andrews Cox.
Jimmie was the youngest of seven
children, and, while he was still a
tipy chap, the country gossips were
given plenty to talk about in a suit
for divorce filed at the county seat by j
"Gib" Cox, Little Jimmie's mother
Went away from the farm. His oldest
sister, now Mrs. John Q. Baker, wife
of the postmaster of Middletown,
Ohio, went with hem. She is Jimmie's
favorite today.
The other children were William,
who now conducts a small candy, to tobacco
bacco tobacco and soft drink shop in Dayton;
Mary Catherine, now Mrs. William
F.&spcofF, wife of a Dayton painter of
buggies and automobiles; John Cox,
who works in the Dayton gas office;
Charles Cox, who works for a Detroit
automobile concern, and one other
brother, who is employed on the
News.
1 Jimmie was little more than a baby
when the family was broken up. When
he wa3 six years old "Gib" Cox mar married1
ried1 married1 again, a widow, Mrs. Caroline
Ilartin, whose school teacher. husband
Y.sd died, leaving her with three chil children.
dren. children. The tvo broods of youngsters

grew up together, and little Jimmie
grew fond of his father's wife;
She said of him a day or two ago;

m C ainA i
in my heart for Jimmie and-hevhas
been just as good as he could be to his
father and me. Seems strange that
he is going to be president. When
he was quite a young boy fee was a
republican, but he switched over in a
hurry. He'd argue with any one
about politics and hold up his efiA,
too, when he was quite small. Had
to scold him for it sometimes, because
it seemed like he was sassin' his
elders.
' Always a' Student
"He was always a-studying, wheth whether
er whether you wanted him to or not. lie just
wouldn't idle. Mr. Cox "is so frail
now we can't go around much, but
Jimmie comes over to see us when whenever
ever whenever he can. After he had gone thru
the little school tit Jacksonville he
went over to Amanda, ;' where his
brother-in-law, John Q. Baker, was in
charge of the schools,
"When -he was eighteen they all
moved to Middletown, where Mr. Ba Baker
ker Baker had something to do with 'The
Signal and Jimmie, after teaching
school for a while, went to work
there."
It was a country school at Amanda
that Jimmie attended and he was
graduated when he was sixteen and
then was offered a position as a dis district
trict district school teacher. He accepted with
a certain amount of trepidation, due
in part to the necessity of disciplin disciplining
ing disciplining the strong farm lads who were
among his pupils and also because he
was distressingly sure that some of
the big girls and boys in his class
would know more than he did.
"I had to study every lesson over
and over at home before I dared give
it to the class," he once confessed.
"Often it was as new to ; me and as
unintelligible as it was to the pupils."
During one of his school vacations
he had worked as printer's "devil" on
"The Middletown I Signal," a weekly
paper. Middletown is not far from
Amanda. Mostly he had cleaned ink
rollers and type, but occasionally he
had been t allowed to prepare an
"item," and the virus got into his
blood .He; wanted to be a real re re-porter,
porter, re-porter, V ".Vvi.:.':'-.:;
.Then his brother-in-law V acquired
"The Signal," and Jimmie left the
school and went to work as city editor,-
reporter, make-up man and cir circulation
culation circulation manager of the paper. Re Recently
cently Recently he displayed a yellowed copy
of one of these old "Signals" and with
twinkling eyes pointed out a column
he had "Written about the people of
Middletown. This is a sample:
ti- "Mrs. Street, the charming -wife of
our up-to-date grocer, Mr. John
Street, accompanied by her beautiful
and winsome daughter, Miss Helen
Street, spent today in i-Cincinnati.
Mrs.; Street made the trip to the
Queen City on the 7:18 train and will
return on the 6:02. Mrs. Street wore
a gray tarveilng suit, while Miss
Helen looked stunning in a dark blue
gown." . :
.-''I What a Wreck Did
Jimmie was growing ; restless on
"The Signal" when one night a train
was wrecked just outside of Middle-
towr. Jimmie telegraphed the "story
to "The Cincinnati Enquirer." Sev Several
eral Several persons had been killed in the
wreck, but this simply proved anew
the old adage that 'tis an ill wind that
blows nobody good. Jimmie received
an offer from the Enquirer to come
to Cincinnati and work probably be because
cause because it was believed that he would
come cheaply. He did too, and a few
mouths later he was the railroad edi editor,
tor, editor, which meant that he made the
rounds of the railroad offices every
day and gleaned some copy and more
experience. They counted him a good
reporter in Cincinnati before he had
been there very long- r
Incidentally, it was not so long be
fore that the rival paper, "The Cin
cinnati- Commercial Gazette," had
numbered among its cubs a husky
ycuth just out of ; college who an answered
swered answered to the name, of Bill Taft. And
about the same time up in Marion,
Ohio, one Warren Gamaliel Harding,
a gawky youth, was struggling to
make a living out of "The, Marion
Star."
Jimmie was fired from the En Enquirer
quirer Enquirer because of a story he wrote.
It was one of the luckiest things thai
ever happened to him. He went back
to Middletown with less than $5 in
his pocket' and sought out Paul Sorg,
who had grown rich through his to tobacco
bacco tobacco fields and wanted to represent
his district in Congress,
Jimmie's father, "Gib" Cox, now
eighty-six years old and a resident of
Camden, Ohio, a town of 1800 people
about twenty miles from Dayton, told
a few days ago how Sorg decided that
Jimmie would tuit him as secretary,
Old "Gib" fs getting mighty feeble
and there are days when he doesn't
manage to totter down to Billy Wil
son's grocery store and talk politics
with the loungers there, but stays
heme and sits in the faded parlor and
talks to visitors about Jimmie. He is
deaf and his memory is partially
clouded sky. He says:
"I don't recollect much,"
The old man is white haired and
has a stubby white mustache and
chin beard. His days are drawing to
an end, and he spends much of his
time napping. t
"There were soma peculiar circum
stances connected with Jimmie's go
Ing to work for Paul Sorg." he said.
"While he was teaching he had a day
and night class. There was a German
boj in the night school. He was poor
and worked in a factory by day. Then
there was a holiday.- I cant remem remember
ber remember whether it was Christmas or the
fourth of July, and some of the young

fellows got to cutting up. They had
ja big time. John Oglesby, a banker,
j fired off a pistol and shot this young

w w .w
So did about four others.
"Then the German boy's case, was
taken up and it was fixed for him to
sue for the worth of his eye. The
other side got every witness to leave
town but Jimmie. They wanted him
to take some money and leave the
county, but Jimmie said;
"No, sir, I'm going to stick to that
poor Dutchman and he did. He made
a. good wimess, recollecting every everything'
thing' everything' that had happened, and the
German Boy won his suit.
Why He Was Hired
"Paul Sorg heard Jimmie testify
and he said when Jimmie came back
from Cincinnati:
" 'He made a hell of a -good wit
ness- and he'll make a hell of a good
secretary and he hired him.
"After that after thatOh, I can't
recollect nothing any more. A word
or two and I forget"
Whatever it was old "Gib" couldn't
remember, Jimmie Cox did go to work
for Representative Sorg as his sec
retary. He stayed with him until
about 1898, when he resigned, with
the friendship of Sorg and the idea
of going back ; into the newspaper
business as a publisher.
The Dayton News" was for sale.
It was owned by a banker named
Siicms, who couldn't see any advan advantage
tage advantage in owning a plant that cost him
money and brought him no pleasure.
Sorg assisted young Cox to finance
the deal, which didn't require a great
dear of money. W
Jimmie was married then to Mary
Harding and they had a couple of
children. With a family dependent
on him he worked furiously. ."Doc"
Lowes and his ring of politicians were
the targets of the shafts in the News,
but the objective of, Cox was circula circulation,
tion, circulation, and The News began to get it.
(Continued on Second Page)
CITRA
Citra, July 12. Mrs. J, B. Borland
and daughter. Miss W. L. DuPree and
children-have gone to Daytona Beach
to spend the summer. v
Mr. E. L. Wartmann is expected
heme from Atlanta tonight. He has
been visiting his wife and daughter.
Mrs. ; Driver and daughter, Mar-
jorie, returned last week from Day
tona Beach, where they have been
for the past two weeks,; Miss Dorothy
wsil retur nthis week, haying gone to
Hastings with Miss Mane Gladney,
who had been her house guest at the
beach. -
Mr. Miller of Demorest, Ga., is a
visitor to Citra
Mrs. Orr was the guets of her
mother, Mrs. Redditt, last Friday.
Mr. Lee Douglas is visiting his
parents, Mr. and Mrs. A J. Douglas.
The Methodist Sunday school will
have a picnic at Orange Springs this
Thursday. ; V
Mrs. Wyckoff and daughter, Miss
Kathryn are spending the summer in
Georgia. ? ; ....
Mrs. Burleson has as her guests her
son, Bruce and daughter-in-law, Mrs.
Ben Burleson of Tampa.
Mr. George Getsee of Jacksonville,
has been visiting his parents.
Mr. Williams of Lake Butler visit visited
ed visited Citra yesterday.
SAWED THEIR WAY
OUT OF THE CELLS
Associated Press;
Asheville, July 13. Seven, prison
ers escaped from the Buncombe coun
ly jaii eariy tnis morning, sawing
their way out of the cells and drop
ping from the third story with the
aid of blankets tied together. Jerry
Dalton, convicted of double murder
and sentenced to die, was one of the
prisoners who escaped.
OCALA LODGE NO. 285. B. P. O. E.
Ocala Lodge No. 286, Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, meets
the second and four Tuesday eve evenings
nings evenings of each month. Visiting breth brethren
ren brethren always welcome. Lodge rooms
upstairs over Troxlers and the Book
Shop, 113 Main street.
, s C. Y. Miller, E. R.
E. J, Crook, Secretary.
What have you to sell or trade ?
Lcok it up and advertise it in th
Star. .';

rank's

llf All

aCLOSES

MdDnii(ijlsiy9 Jiffllly 1

Many Big Bargains are still to
be had in Ladies' Ready to
Wear, Dry Goods and Millinery

F.

: RAN

The Fashion Center

m

SECOEID 10 F

0

OUR EX-SOLIi
Underwood Appeals to Then, to Aid
in Combat Against Partisan- ;
ship and Avarice -;
(Associated Press ) -1
Birmingham, Senator Unperwood,
addressing the veterans of tpe,1 Rain Rainbow
bow Rainbow Division at their reunion here
today, declared the government had
become the football of the partisans
and the desire of the plunderers. He
pleaded with the veterans to; become
lenders in the fight against he dan dangers
gers dangers which he said threaten; the "life.
of the republic.
GREAT SPORT FOR THE BOYS
A "sports carnival was, the feature
of today's session of the iiiambow
Division, with business
the -morning. .V
sessions in
MR. WYCKOFF'S MISTAKE
Editor Star: I Tead in last weeks
Star the article written vbyj Allan
Rodgers for some soldiers' graves.
Also an article written some time ago
by him on the same subject.-;:'
And I suppose this is a fair, sample
of the way some men blame the gov government
ernment government for every, conceivable thing
from now back to "thee-quarters of a
century-" This man should be better
posted on what he is writing: abont
before he blames the governlnent to
i .. -.
What are the facts in the f case ?
There is a fine monument ejected by
the government to the memory of
the soldiers killed at the Dtide mas
sacre. The monument is infthe gov-
erjiment cemetery at 'St, Augustine,
There are a good many names orit;he
monument. I do not know itast how
many, but I presume that Jthey :arw
all on that were killed at that time.
And there is no reason to think that
there are any of the soldiers bodies
left out there in the woods at .Fort
King. The government does not do
business that way. Look at the graves
of the soldiers killed near i Lookout
mountain in Tennessee, those : that
fought on the southern side; as well
as those on the northern side. Very
much better than our private ceme cemeteries
teries cemeteries around here and cared for by
the near relatives and friends of
those who have passed away from
this "lif e. r ; Jno. S. Wyckoff.
Citra, July 12th, 1920.
Mr. Wyckoff is mistaken. It is
more than forty miles, from Fort King
to the scene of Dade's massacre. The
soldiers killed at Fort King are buried
there yet. And Allan Rodgers is not
given to blaming his government. He
is a loyal citizen and his eldest son is
buried in France, the very first of
our Marion county boys to die there.
CROP IMPROVEMENT
NOTED IN MIDDLE WEST
' f Associated Press)
Chicago, July 13 Marked improve improvement
ment improvement in the principal food crops of
the middle west has been reported in
the last few weeks, in contrast to un unfavorable
favorable unfavorable prospects earlier in the
season which gave rise to some alarm.
"There is no danger that, the country
will starve this year," is the com comment
ment comment that J. R. Howard, president cf
the American Farm Bureau : Federa
tion, made on reviewing the situa
tion.
President Howard reported that
the com prospect was now very fair
and that wheat was really better.
Corn production promised to be a lit little
tle little under normal, but it was well cul cultivated
tivated cultivated and clean and would turn out
with good weather in July and Au August.'
gust.' August.' '
While the wheat : crop would not
be normal, the crop condition was
very fair. As against a lighter acre
age there was a heavy carry over. Mr.
Howard estimate dthat 30, per cent
of last year's wheat remained on
Kansas farms today. In Kansas and
Oklahoma a better wheat crop than
last year is expected.
666 has more imitations than any
other Chill and Fever Tonic on the
market, but no one wants imitations
in medicine. They are dangerous, to
9

airy Sale

AMEHICAE) SHIPS
IVElilD

At Tientsin and Their .Crews Will
Take Part in "Persuading" Chi Chi-.
. Chi-. nese to be Orderly
(Associated Pr83) ;
Pekin, July 13.4-Efforts "are con continuing
tinuing continuing to persuadejjthe rebels to
obey the go veranient mandate not to
march on Pekin. Martial law has
been proclaimed at Tientsin;, .where
Admiral Crteaves of the American
Pacific squadron, is reported to have
arrived. " ;
METHODS OF ;RAT-PROOFING
:. (Associated Press)
:t Washington j uly : 13.Methods of
destroying1, and proofing against rats
are out!m5d;in literature prepared by
the:U4)ied States Public Health Serv Service;
ice; Service; for use bystate and municipal
health officers over, the country in the
campaign which they have been asked
by Surgeon General Gumming to in
augurate in, order to protect the na nation
tion nation Mgainst bubonic plague. The ac
tivity of "the" health service results
fi'om the appearance cf the pi
m Mexican and American, gulf ports
a
and at points in the Mediterranean,
"Rat -destruction," says the healtH
service bulletin' "can be accomplished
by individuSl-effort to? a limited de
gree btu tor-be successful; in, a large
city there must be rat-proofing of
buildings. No spasmodic or individ
ual efforts will .result in the desired
ends.-V : ; '
"Rats can be destroyed by trapping,
by poisoning and by using natural
enemies' such as certain breeds of
cats and dogs.: To 'insure the success
of these measures it is necessary to
curtail the rat food supply by prop- j
erly disposing of garbage and table j
refuse and by preventing rats jrain-s
ing. access to such foddsas -ia con-
tained in pantriesgroceries, markets.
stables-.ana the like. -'
"Success in trapping is proportion proportional
al proportional to the attention and industry the
trapper devotes to his traps and pro protection
tection protection of other food supplies. Two
kinds of traps are generally used
the wire cage trap and the snap trap
or dead-fall. The trap 'should be
placed wherever rats have been ac accustomed
customed accustomed to come for feeding pur purposes
poses purposes and should Hbe more jot less con concealed,
cealed, concealed, the snap trap by scattering
dust, cornmeal or flour on or about
them and the cage by pieces of sack sacking,
ing, sacking, stj aw or rubbish, leaving on'.y
the opening, free.
"Highly savored articles, such as
chese and toasted bacon, will more
quickly attract rats than will food
without odor; but the idea that a rat
can be enticed into a trap by the em employment
ployment employment of bait more appetizing to
him than the surrounding food sup supply
ply supply is fallacious. To the rat, food
supply is a question of availability
and preference is a secondary consid consideration.
eration. consideration.
"The destruction of rats by poison
has always been more or less in
favor. A preparation of arsenious
acid or phosphorous, ten per cent and
suitable base, as cheese, meat or glu glucose,
cose, glucose, are the most popular poisons.
Poisons undoubtedly have a certain
efficiency in ridding a place of rats,
but whether by causing their migra migration
tion migration or their actual destruction is
somewhat difficult to determine.
Rat-proofing excludes rats from
the food supply and deprives them of
harborage. Without this procedure
it is almost impossible to reduce the
rodent population.
"In rat-proofing any building, the
ollowing parts have to be consider
ed: ground area, walls, ceilings, gar
ret, roof, bed spaces in general, ven
tiiators, abandoned sewers, doors,
windows, outside piping, water and
sewerage pipes, down spouts, wiring
and air or light shafts. By the omis
sion of some small detail an other
wise rat-proof structure may become
badly rat-infested
"The rat-proofing of floors of build
ings is secured either by elevation of
the structure with the under-pinnin
opening free or by marginal walls of
concrete, stone or brick laid in ce
ment mortar sunk two feet in
ground, fitting flush with the floor
above. The wall must fit tightly to
the flooring
"Food depots ara of the greatest
importance in rat-proofing because
they furnish both sustenance and
shelter for rats. In this class of
buildings are stables, meat markets,
retail and wholesale groceries, bak-
eries, warehouses, docks and wharves.
These places are .best rat-proofed as
to the ground areas by the construc
tion of concrete floors and founda foundation
tion foundation walls. Untenanted a3 they are
at night time, rats might well enter
doors or windows carelessly left open
or be introduced concealed in the mer merchandise
chandise merchandise and knawing through plank
flooring obtain well protected hiding
and breeding places.
"Double walls with dead space be between
tween between should be avoided or if used
should be rat-proofed at top and bot bottom
tom bottom with heavy wooden timbers, four
by four joist or by a concrete fill. At Attics,
tics, Attics, should be well opened and kept
free of dunnage or other refuse for
rats.
"Double ceiling should be avoided
especially so in basements. Boxed in
structures, such as uprights and
roughly finished dwellings, plumbing,
kitchen sinks and the like should be
removed. Miscellaneous openings as

voirt insisT

Intention of Germans to Talk Until
All Their Opponents are Dead
' May be Carried Out
Associated Press)
; Spa, July 13. Allied leaders have
decided not to insist on the Germany
replying to the ultimatum regarding
eoal deliveries at 3 p. m. today. The
Germans will be permitted to refer
their reply until tomorrow.
BOLSHEVIKI HAVE MINSK
London, July 18. Minsk have been
captured by the bolsheviki, according
to a Moscow official statement Soviet
troops occupied the city July 11th.'.
REDS IN NO HURRY
j-Spa, J uly 13. The Russian soviet
gbyernment has not replied yet to th
request of the Allies that an armis armistice
tice armistice be arranged with Poland.
.-
ARRIVED AT AGREEMENT
Committee of- Forty-Eight and La La-v
v La-v bor-Party Think Taking Every Every-.
. Every-. thins in Sight Will Make
- i- Them Content
(Associated Press)
Chicago, July 13. An agreement
for the amalgamation of the labor
party and the committee of forty -eight
was TeachedJ:oday, the confer conference
ence conference committee reported to the labor
convention. ,The committee of forty forty-eight
eight forty-eight conferees yielded to the labor
party on the question of nationaliza nationalization
tion nationalization of banks and credit facilities and
democratic control of essential indus industries.
tries. industries. -
An exchange says:
When the workmen own the work
.- ; hops; ': -And,
the railroad! men the rails;
Ami the grocery clerks the groceries;
; And the mail clerks own the mails, I
When the preachers own the pulpits;
And the pressmen own the shops;
And the drillers own the oil wells;
And the jails are owned by cops
When the conductors own the street-
' cars;
And each driver owns Ms bus;
Will you tell us common teoplt
Whatmell becomes of us?
REVOLUTION 1 N BOLIVIA
(Associated Press)'
Lima, Peru, July 13. A revolution
has broken out in Bolivia, according
to dispatches from Lapaz. The gov
ernment has been overthrown and
Bautista Savedra, the former minister
of instruction has assumed power,
supported by an army.
RUSSELL RECEIVED
(Associated Press)
Rome, July 13. Bishop Russell, of
Charleston, S. C, was received hy
the pope today. t
FRANK TRUMBLE
. (Associated Press)
New York, July 13.-Frank Trum-
ble of the Chesapeake & Ohio rail rail-xoad,
xoad, rail-xoad, died last night at Santa Bar Barbara,
bara, Barbara, Calif., of heart trouble.
ENGLISH LABOR MAY
HAVE OPENED ITS EYES
( Associated Press)
London, July 13. A proposal to
employ direct action if necessary to
force the government to withdraw
troops from Ireland and; cease manu manufacturing
facturing manufacturing munitions for Ireland and
Russia, was defeated in the special
trades union congress called to con consider
sider consider labor's attitude toward the
Irish question.
COX AND ROOSEVELT
AND WILSON TO CONFER
(Associated Press)
Washington, July 13. Cox and
Roosevelt the democratic nominees,
will confer with President Wilson at
the White House Sunday morning at
10:30 o'clock.
RADICALS RECEIVE
REINFORCEMENTS
(Associated Press)
Chicago, July 12. Amalgamation
cf the principal groups attempting to
from a new party was affected today.
A large non-partisan group and a del
egation of single taxers entered the
labor convention, announcing their
intention and the committee of forty-
eight voted for them to join.
Rub-My-Tism is a great pain killer,
lit relieves pain and soreness caused by
rheumatism, neuralgia, sprains, etc
Men's white buck and canvas ox oxfords,
fords, oxfords, also large line tennis and sport
shoes for men, boys, children and
women. II. A. Waterman,' the haber haberdasher.
dasher. haberdasher. 13-ot
Dance
Bank.
tonight over
Commercial
13-lt
Advertising trailda business.
light shafts, ventilators and windows
should be screened 'preferably by 12 12-gauge
gauge 12-gauge wire screen with mesh not ex exceeding
ceeding exceeding one-half inch. ,The grounds
about the 'building are to be devoid tit
rat harborage and premises are to
pt clean and free of rubbish,"

lilltllitilo.bLi:
. IPflliPfiH?

WSiil.Sllifi i3

To Save Italians During a Celebration
at Spa la to was Resented by
Jugo-Slav Troops
(Associated Press)
Rome, July 13. An American ad admiral,
miral, admiral, controlling the coast outside
the armistice zone, was responsible
for ending an encounter between
Jugo-Slavs and Italians in Spalato
recently, it is semi-ofScially announc announced.
ed. announced. When the Italian officers were
attacked and wounded daring the
Jugo-Slav nationalists' demonstration
an American boat went to the rescua
of the officers. The boat was fired
upon by Serbians and a naval lieuten lieutenant
ant lieutenant and three sailors were woundoJ
and a mechanic killed
OFFICER REPORTED KILLED
Triest, July 13. Arr-American of officer
ficer officer is reported to have been killed at
Spalato.
NAVY HASNT HEARD OF IT
Washington, July 13 No report
tht; killing of an officer at Spalato
has been received by the navy.
RACE TO SAVE
RACE BERRY'S. NECK
(Associated Press)
Montgomery, Ala., July 13. Race
Berry, a negro, wasrushed away
from the local pail for safekeeping
today owing to the ill feeling over th
killing of a white boy and wounding
another. Berry was captured early
this morning after an attempt to
escape.
HARDING BUCKLES
.TO HIS TASK
Associated Press)
Marion, July 13. Senator Harding
today began work in earnest to finish
his speech accepting the republican
presidential nomination. He experts
to deny himself to visitors throush-o-at
the rest of the week.
UNGALLANT JAPS
(Associated Press)
TokioJuly 13.. Universal suffrage
was defeated in the lower house of
parliament when the resolution in introduced
troduced introduced by 'the opposition was re re-jeited;"r"
jeited;"r" re-jeited;"r" f "" ';.
PRICES HAVE NOT DECREASED
(Associated Press)
Washington, July 13. Tho level of
prices paid farmers for their princi principal
pal principal crops decreased 1.7 per cent dur during
ing during June, but they are still 20 per
cent higher than a year ago.
ORANGEMEN ARE
READY TO FIG h i
' (Associated Press)
Belfast, July 13. The celebratic
of Orangemen's day had as its gr
feature the customary parade and
addition, a notable speech by Sir
ward Marson, Ulster unionist le. r,
whose pronouncement on the present
situation in Ireland wa3 looked for forward
ward forward to eagerly.
. Sir Edward, as usual in such mat matters,
ters, matters, came up fully to expectations.
He minced no words and the enthus enthusiasm
iasm enthusiasm reached a climax when he de declared
clared declared in effect that the government
had failed to govern Ireland, and that
if it could not protect -Ulster the vol volunteers
unteers volunteers would reorganize and Ulster
would take matters into its own
hands.
Every hamlet, village and town in
Ulster had some kind of a celebration
and reports over a wide area last
night were that all passed quietly.
ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE
OF TRAINS IN OCALA
Seaboard Air Lis
Arrive 'from Jacksonville.. 2:03 a. m.
Leave for Tampa......... 2:10a.m.
Arrive from Jacksonville.. 1:30p.m.
Leave for Tampa..' 1:C0 p. m
Arrive from Jacksonville.. 4:21 p.m.
Leave for Tampa......... 4:25p.m.
Arrive from Tampa....... 2:14a.m.
Leave for Jacksonvilla ... 2:15a.m.
Arrive from Tampa....... 1:D5 p.m.
Leave for Jacksonville.... 1:55 p.m.
Arrive from Tampa....... 4:01p.m.
Leave for Jacksonviiit.... 4:05 p.m.
Atlantis ast Lin
Arrive from Jacksonville.. S:14a. m.
Leave for St. Petersburg. 3:15 a.m.
Arrive from Jacksonville. 3:34 p. m.
Leave for St. Petersburg.. 3:iop. m.
.Arrive from Jacksonvilla. 10 :12 p. m.
Leave for Leesburg ..10:13p.m.
Arrive from St. Petersburg 2:11 a. n.
Leave for Jacksonville.
2:12 a.m.
Arrive from St. Petersburg 1:25 p.m.
Leave for Jacksonville. . 1:45 p. m. m.-Arrive
Arrive m.-Arrive from Leesburg..-. 6:41a. ra.
Leave for Jacksonville. . G:42a. m.
Arrive from Homosassa... 1.25p.m.
Leave for Homosassa 2:25 p. m.
Arrive from Gainesville,
daily except Sunday . .11 :50 a. ra.
Leave for Gainesville, dally
except Sunday 4:45 p. ra.
Leave for Lakeland Tues Tuesday,
day, Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday 7:25 a.m.
Ar. from Lakeland, Tcea Tcea-Leave
Leave Tcea-Leave for Lakeland, Tuss-
day, Thursday, Saturday 11:03 p. ta.
Leave for "Wilcox, Uorday,
Wednesday and Friday.. 7:10a.m.
Arrive from Wilcox, Uen-
day. Wednesday, Friday.! 6:45 p-. r.;.
. Washable tie3 25c, Z'jc, three for
$1;-- 50c., 75c and fl. -'Large lb??
sick neckwear to select from. II, A.
.Waterman, the haberdasher. lZ-Zf,



BGALA MUG SUB

I'uMMiei' V.wrr iy i:ept Sunday by
STAU I'UIUJSHING COMPANY,
OCA LA, FLORIDA.

II- It. rrol, Prexlilen
I,-aventooJ, Seeretary-Treaanrer
J. It. -jaiflM,'ti:aiCor

Entered at Ocala,
f icon .i-elass matter.

Fla..- postoffice as

n.al.. Offire .FlTe-One

IMilorlAl Druarlmrut . . .Two-SWB

jnwlely lleprter ......

r.,Ilve-Oi

SI 12.11 HKIl .' ASSOCIATED PRESS

The AK.soeiated Tress Is exclusively
pntitlfcd for the use for reoublioation, of

all nwa disDatchfa credited to it or

not otherwise cred'ted in this paper and
fir the lof-ni hp.ws T)ubli.hfed herein.

All rights of republication of special

patches herein are also reservea.

DOMESTIC SUBSCRIPTION RATES

One year. In advance ........... .$6.00

Six months. In advance .....
Three months. In advance ...
On month., In advance ......

CAREER OF COX

'(Continued from First Page)

. 3.00
. 1.50
. 60

ADVERTISING RATES -DUplayt
Plate 15 cents per Inch for
consecutive Insertions. Alternate Inser Insertions
tions Insertions 25 per cent additional. Composi Composition
tion Composition charges on ads. that run less than
six timet & cents per Inch. Special
position 20 per cent additional. Rates
based on 4-inch minimum. Less than:
four Inches will take higher rate,
which will be furnished upon applica application.
tion. application. :.M
Keadine Notlceat 5 cents per line for
firKt insertion; 3 cents per line for each
subsequent insertion. One 'change a
week allowed on readers without extra
composition charges, ? -
Jgal advertisements at legal rates.

YV1U U1W wuriq evej auaiiuuu lite
fool system of taxing improvements
of fining a man for making two
blades of grass grow where one
rew ? ;'. .::

This, the littlest paper, sends
greetings and congratulations to our
next president, James Middleton Cox.
Summerfield Chronicle.
Littlest but one of the liveliest.

The county commissioners are fav favorable
orable favorable toward helping out the city of
Ocala with its white way around the

public square, which will add greatly

to the beauty of the town.

We clip the following chunk of
good sense from an exchange: "Let

ua all recognize that we have a new
load to get rid of and the only way to
red rid of it is "for everyone to take

off his coat and work ten hours a day
for the next two years, Instead of

working five or six hours a day."

Cox beat' Lowes definitely and

thoroughly over a contract sought by

Lewes to supply the city of Dayton

with arc lights at ?1UU each. Cox
learned that the city could purchase

them for $08.50. Through the News

he told Dayton all about it.- He said

things about "Doc" Lowes which

caused that gentleman to sue for

libel. But a short time later the city
purchased its arc lights, paying
f(3.f0. "Doc" Lowes offerd-to settle

the libel suit for $1,, Cox declined
and the suit was forgotten, but not
Cox.; :. v "-' V
A Philadelphia syndicate was try trying
ing trying to get its trolley lines into Day Dayton,
ton, Dayton, with grade crossings. Cox
launched into a fight on them. This
grew excessively hot, and the law lawyers
yers lawyers for the syndicate dug up some
ancient Ohio libel laws and filed suit.

Under this forgotten statute the pub publisher
lisher publisher sued had to post a bond equal

to twice the amount sued for. The
syndicate was suing for half a mill

ion dollars. There was also a provis provision
ion provision under this old statute, that the
publication, sued should be closed by
the sheriff. Accordingly, the sheriff
appeared and put a padlock on the

front door of the News. Jimmie

promptly removed it.

Won the Suit

The rival paper issued an extra

announcing that the News had been
closed up by the authorities. Fifteen

minutes after this news had beeii

spread broadcast there appeared an

extra edition of the News telling how

the syndicate had attempted to tam tamper
per tamper with the freedom of the press

After that Jimmie had no trouble

raising the $1,000,000 bond. He won

out in the libel suit and not long aft

erward exposed .the fact that the syn

dicate was taking control of small

banks in Ohio and using their capita

to promote its schemes. The trolley

lines and grade crossing were kept

cut of Dayton. i

The News and Cox were always in

a battle to improve civic conditions
and in the end they always came out

on top. The newspaper was wel

established in Dayton when in 1905

Cox acquired a 'Springfield, Ohio

newspaper.
In 1908 there was a split in the re

publican party in the district and two

republicans ran for the place as rep

resentative formerly ; filled by the

democrat, Sorg. Cox obtained the

democratic nomination and. thank

to the republican fight, was voted

into office. He got Dayton a nev,

postoffice and he secured better appro

priations for the soldiers-' home, and

The Ocala Rotarians are making
pieparations to give a 4 good time to

aif who will be present at' the inter-jthen he got a second term.

city meeting of the Rotarians Thurs

day afternoon, July li, at Silver

Springs." Rotarians with their fam

ilies from Gainesville, Palatka and
Orlando are expected to begin to ar arrive
rive arrive at the springs about 3 o'clock,
and a number of our Rotarians will
be there to meet them. All Ocala
Rotarians should try to be al the

pTzngs; not only to help entertain
the guests but to have a good time
themselves. The band has been en-

jaeu, ttnu win rentier, music xrun
.i t ti -

me pavilion during tne aiiernoon. j
basket supper will be spread between
5 and C p. rn. There will; be bathing
and boating and dancing for all .who
rejoice in those sports ,and all who
are present can be assured of a good
time.'- ' :'..':" ; i.

The position taken by Gov. Clem Clement
ent Clement of Vermont, in regard to calling
the legislature in : special session to
cnoor?the suffrage amendment is

1y the correct, one.- The con-

of his state forbids -him or
lure frorn doing any such
conduct of the leading
J, of President Wilson and
p residential" candidates in this
...Uer is highly represensible. There
is no principle in it, only, political ex expediency.
pediency. expediency. How can we' expect women
to be good citizens when they try to
have the constitutions of states vio violated
lated violated in order that they ; may obtain
the vote. President Wilson has no
right to ask the legislature of any
state to do anything for a political
purpose: Candidates Cox and Hard Harding
ing Harding are each, asking the move4 to be
made in order to obtain votes for
themselves and their parties. It is
not proper nor patriotic for either of
them to do so; neither is it good pol politics,
itics, politics, for the -women, have sense
trough to know that all this sudden
agitation in their : behalf is from in interested
terested interested motives. It's .the Star's
opinion that if the women obtain the
vote before November, most of them
will vote the republican ticket, even
if the action of a democratic -state
gives them the ballot. Whichever
party they vote against will receive
the just punishment of a vote-buyer.

MICK1E SAYS:

, GQOO FEAJUERS OP -tUVAVXlCSi

-UHfc GOOD FCVJUcS O.VLBOT

lnl..i.l.i.ih J A. i m. rn n n ..jy-, ifliMMlIIIWlniillinMIMiMlill-ttMiii-ii I unrT iTM ' II ij1""'

WHENEVER you have a need in our line and
want it quick
We will give you Absolutely Accurate and Immediate
. Service, and deliver to you perhaps before you
could reach our store.
We give special attention to phone orders because we
know tHe need is urgent, and we send you just
what you want.

tin

WliEUKlU til

KHIVA BECOMES A REPUBLIC

Famous Khanate of Central Asia Has
Definitely Rejected the Chains
of Despotism.

So Khiva, the khanate In Central

Asia through which Col. Fred Burnaby
I once, rode on horseback to the capital.

has declared itself an independent re republic!
public! republic! That prodigious English sol soldier
dier soldier and traveler who won military
glory fighting outside the endangered
square at Abu Klea, In the Sudan,
would smile hugely, no doubt, were he
able to read the news. For the. semi semi-barbaric
barbaric semi-barbaric city of Khiva as he found it
on that famous ride in the seventies,
or rather as the Russians found it Just
two or three years before, to be exact,
was filled with slaves captured from
the Persians by Turkoman raiders. Its
whitewashed houses, scattered amid
the elms and poplars, produced a wel welcome
come welcome effect, however, after, the count countless
less countless miles of arid steppes which had
to be negotiated before it could be
reached. Its citizens were those
weirdly named ."cousins" of the
Turks, the Uzbegs, Kirghiz, Sarts, Ta Ta-jaks
jaks Ta-jaks and the Kara-Kalpaks, or Black
Bonnets of the Turkl tribe whom the
caliph would fain gather into the fam family
ily family fold. The khanate Is but the relic

of the once great kingdom of Choras Choras-mia,
mia, Choras-mia, over which King Darius ruled by

means of his satraps. ChrisUan

Science Monitor.

ecaasssa
. c
..!
. ; - y . - TI '
I rv 'WW's V

CLOSES

9

lxie Migiwai iiarase

JAMES ENGESSER, Proprietor

I 121 W. Broadway phone 258 Ocala, Florida

Ford Repairs a Specialty
We Use Genuine Ford Parts in Our Ford Cars
Arco and Diamond Tires and Tubes

In 1912, when the republican party

split, Jimmie Cox was given the dem

ocratic nomination for governor and
was elected. Soon after he assumed

office came the floods of 1913. bring

ing disaster to many sections of Ohio,

and worst of all to Dayton, his home

The nevr governor" took charge, cu

ail red tape and had relief work under

way iri marvelously quick time, i
In 1914 Cox was defeated for gov

ernor by Frank Willis, he who re

cently nominated Warren G. Hard

ing, that other Ohior editor, to be the

republican pai-ty's standard bearer in

the presidential contest. In 1916 Cox
beat Willis by a narrow margin. In
1918, running on his record as a war

governor, he aain defeated Willis

but by a narrow margin.

m iyii, wnne ne was a represen

tatiye and a year; before he became

governor, Cox- was : Sued for divorce

The papei s'char eed crueltv. Friends

and foes alike seem pretty well agreed
that there was nothing discreditable

to the governor m this affair. He

had three children. There is Helen

now Mrs. Daniel J. Mahoney. whose

husband is vice president of the News

Publishing company, the holding com
pany of the two Cox newspapers
then there is "Little Jim," who is sev

enteei, and John Cox, thirteen, who

lives with his mother, who has mar married
ried married again.
: All during the years in Dayton a

tenderly cared for member of the

Cox household was the governor's

mother, that Mrs. Cox who was di

vorced by "Gib" Cox when Jimniie

Was a baby. She died about six vears

ago. It was to" her grave in Wood Wood-lawn
lawn Wood-lawn cemetery, Dayton, that Gover Governor
nor Governor Cox vent a few ; mornings ago

when the first news of his nomination

was clicked out of. a telegraph wire
in the News office.
In 1917 Governor Cox married Miss
Margaretta Parker Blair, of Chicago,
daughter of the- wealthy Thomas P.
Blair. They have one child, the tiny
Anna Baker Cox, whose picture
adorns the parlor of old "Gib" Cox.
The governor and Mrs. Cox live at
Trail's End, a magnificent home he
has built on a 70-acre plot about four
miles fronruthe heart of Dayton. Not
veiy long ago he purchased that old
farm at Jacksonburg where he lived
as a. boy. He acquired some of the
adjoining land, so that the place now
encompasses 250 acres. These he has
fashioned into a model' farm with
new-fangled agricultural machinery
and blooded stock that makes old
Gib tremble with eagerness whenever
he talks about it. .
When in Columbus the governor
and his wife live at a hotel.

Cox has a build like a football

back.'except for a waistline that would
not be tolerated by the most lenient
of coaches and which he struggles to

reduce by fairly regular golf and

horseback riding. The governor con

siders himself a pretty good golfer.

He is of medium height," 'broad of

shoulder and he walks with an ag-

gressive swing, ins neaa is ouiiet-

shaped, and his chin is strong and

backed up by an assistant chin. His

mouth is firm and turns down a trine
at the corners.

When Al Shartle, a Dayton boot bootblack,
black, bootblack, makes his daily visit to Gov Governor
ernor Governor Cox's office in the News build building
ing building he drops his brushbox to the
floor, flops down on his knees and
then, as he begins to polish, asks:

"Well how's 'Fighting Jimmie' to

day?'-and the governor repiels:
"Fine, Al. How're you?"

All in all, there i3 hardly likely to
be a person in the world who would

Gasoline, Oils and Grease

Hi

IMtM 99999 ff9ttVf 999 9 9 i g WW WWW

PLAN SCHOOL ON SHIPBOARD

Socialistic Council of Bradford, Eng

land, Is Considering the Adoption
of Remarkable Scheme.

When it became necessary to erect

a .new secondary school In Bradford,

the rich wool textile center of Eng England,
land, England, the usual estimates were asked
for, and reported, in the total sum of
$500,000. -
Socialists, who' have a considerable
majority on the Bradford education
committee, at once decided to break
free from tradition, and adopted the
Idea of buying a suitable seagoing ship
for that amount, one big enough for a
couple of hundred children. These,
children will be sent to sea for a six six-months
months six-months or 12-months period, if a sub subsequent
sequent subsequent suggestion Is adopted.
It Is stiH to be settled whether the
ship schoolhouse will remain moored
In Bradford canal docks, only going to
sea as a freighter during vacation pe periods,
riods, periods, or whether it would not be In
the Interests of a general education to
let the scholars see glimpses of for foreign
eign foreign ports, learning their languages
among natives, the ship at the same
time being loaded with cargoes that
would pay full maintenance expenses,
probably even of the boarding of the
children.

Many .Big Bargains are still to
be had. in Ladies' Ready to
Wear, Dry Goods .-lid Millinery

1 1

A

UN!'

The Fashion Center

W 9 1

M

Base

TMUMSIMY, My 15

(Oeala fa

iieswiie

unter Park 4:00 O'clock

- 4

Auto Worked Chang. v
lie used to be a pretty easy-going
fellow before he bought his machine.
Some days his name would decorate
the spare board at the car barn and
some days It wouldn't, for he and work
were not firm friends.
But now how different. lie contract

ed the automobile fever. The machine
was the result Now, buying an auto
is easy. But keeping it running and

taking your girl out is another thing.
That; requires coin of the realm.

He has developed into a terrible
shark. Ills face is now a familiar fig figure
ure figure on the North Easton line and tr

there are any spare trips laying

around loose he Is right up to the win

dow leaning on both elbows.

We should have made an exception

as to Sunday. Ah, that Is the day he
shines. The little machine rolls mer

rily along.
"It's worth It at that, to be a million

aire one day a week," he remarked as

he unlimbered his portly form after

11 hours' labor the other night on a

North Easton hack. Brockton Enter

prise.

-- lr

Why Both er to Bake Rolls?
Federal Rolls Are Delicious
Cost but a Penny Each
Tasty, tempting rolls as light and crispy
crusted as you can bake at home.
Step into a Federal Bakery and take home
some Federal Rolls today. Ten rolls to the
pan ten cents.
Made ta fee-and are good to the last crumb,

SYSTEM OF
0AKEFIIE5
OFTilEIGHTU

Federal Bakories in Ocala at

OCALA HOUSE BLOCK; M

'

2LM.m,

Want ads aire business getter:s.

A visit to our market will cor.vince
you that it is up-to-date and thor thoroughly,
oughly, thoroughly, sanitary. Cook's Market.
Phone 243. 12-Ct

Don't fail to visit the Guarantee
Clothing & Shoe Company. Every Everything,
thing, Everything, we sell is guaranteed. We're
fighting for QUALITY not prices, tf

Something to seii? Advertise it.

Iff
IB Jig: N
J-fc" ,a2

4J

orzw

SpeeM

Let a nsKed hotiM of .qpgrldmg-

; , 7

circfea ctk; nd tfrrt thSrsty feling, leap
. jug a lonj trail cf rznilsa szsd cantenrrnern.

s s

Refreshing lilM
7ith. no bad after effect f r k
y - : ':
S 'j i r--t 1 i f i
.A L J Iwui Lj L J Lj i t- J llii-. V
; ... m ,-
L P ,1 .. I... X.lll i ii i ii j jf
-S Ti r. rr J1. T,

call him "'fraidy cat."

itttm i "hi" r i m' i T'rn



cm on
v 9 a
AIR SERVICE GOES TO
AID OF SALVATION LASSIES
TRAITS
If you have any society items.
f"
-1
phone five-one.
L., "73 Li
X "Ot' 1 f I i I II I r I 1
f
Prompt service and Al quality are
at your command at Cook's market. 6t
Mr. F. E. Wetherbee leaves Thurs
.Fire
day for a visit of some time with rel
y
atives in Boston..
Proof
if si

r

We are determined to do our share towards reducing
the high cost of living by giving Special Low Prices on
From Wow until July 20th, inclusive.
Every item in our entire stock has been reduced in
price the same proportion as those we mention below.
These prices are only a few selected at random; com compare
pare compare them with those you are now paying for the
same goods; then make up your list and let us help
you reduce the "high cost of living."

Sweet and Sour Pickles, 6 oz. ...
bottle .. .... .......15c
Stringless Beans, No. 2 cans... ..15c
Early June Peas No. 2 cans. ... .,15c
Ileintz Pork and Beans No. 1 cans 15c
lieintz Cooked Spaghetti, Italian-
fctyle, No. 1 cans .15c
Van Camp's Soups, two cans for 25c
Bee Brand Flavoring Extracts,
assorted flavors, 5' dramsnet.l5c
No. 3 cans Pie Apples. ......... .25c
No. 3 cans Pie Peaches 25c
Grapejuice, pints .". 40c"
Grapcjuice, quarts' . . . .... . .75c
Loganberry Juice, pints .......... 40c
Luzianne Coffee, 1 lb. . . '. . .50c
Morning Joy Coffee, 1 lb...... ...50c
Golden Rose Coffee, 1 lb......... 40c
Our Special Coffee, 1 lb. ...50c
Private Estate Coffee, 1 lb. ......55c
Green Coffee in bulk, per lb. . . .25c
Maxvell House Coffee per lb.. ..55c
Maxwell House Coffee 3 lb. can. .$1X0
White nouse Coffee per lb... V. 55c
White House Coffee 31b. can. . .$1.6U
Pure Lard per lb.. ........25c
Compound Lard, per lb. ........ .25c
Pilsbury Flour, 12 lbs. ...... . .$1.00
Pilsbury Flour, 24 lbs.. ....... .$2.0u
Gold Medal Flour, 12 lbs. .$1.00
Gold Medal Flour, 24 lbs. ... ...$2.00
Cottolene, 2 lbs. ............... .65c
Cottolene 4 lbs. ............. ..$1.25
Quaker Oats two pkgs for. . ... .25c
Mother's Oats two pkgs for...... 25c
Armour's Oats two pkgs for.. "... 25c
Sktnner Macaroni and Spaghetti,
three packages for. .25c
Eagle Macaroni and Spaghetti,
three packages for..... .....1.25c
Star Naptha, Lighthouse, Gold
Dust, Octagon and Sunshine
Washing Powder 6 pkgs for... .25c
LAUNDRY SOAPS: Clean Easy,
Crystal White, Rub-No-More,
Sunny Monday and Clairette,
at, per bar. .
. . tc
..20c
,.20c
..24c
Lipton's Tea, quarter lb. pkg.
Tetley's Tea, quarter lb. pkg.
White Bacon, per lb
First Class Smoked Bacon per
American Cheese per lb. ....
American Sardines 3 cans for
Small size Salmon, per can...
Tall can Salmon, per can....
Corned Beef, large..........
Roast Beef, large ...........
lb
30c
..35c
..25c
. .15c
..25c
..35c
..35e

REMEMBER that Oar Guarantee stands back of every
purchase you make. Your purchases will be
promptly delivered anywhere in the city limits. Our
line of STAPLE and FANCY GROCERIES is com complete,
plete, complete, and we solicit your patronage.

It we arc not now serving you,
GIVE US A TRIAL.

mi
122 S. MAIN ST.
J.H. SPENCER
A II I
t-.-..Yrrr.T.'r'rrv

mt ,ar" 11 "'

4TV M I V

We Make a Specialty of Parts for the Buick and
the Prices are Consistent with the Cost of Same.

GOODYEAR AND U.

Exclusive Agents for "VESTA" BATTERY, 18 Elo. Guarantee
An Up-to-Date Battery Service Station
We Maintain an Up-to-Date Garage with
Expert Workmen, at all times, Assuring
Prompt and Efficient Service. .

GASOLINE, OILS AND GREASE.

CCALA GAS EMGlBJEWOKEiS
PHON13 271 N;

Roaid .tiie ;-S tar i Warit

Libby's Dill Pickles, 3 lb. can.... 25c
Sliced Pineapples, No. 1 can . . 25c
Sliced Pineapples, No. 2 can. . .. 40c
Sliced Pineapples, No. 3 can. . .60c
Sliced Peaches, Gold Bar brand,
15 oz. cans. . . . ...... .. . 30c
Sliced Peaches, Gold Bar brand.
No. 2 cans ..... V . . . . . 45c
Grated Pineapples, No. 1 cans. .. .20c
Grated Pineapple No. 3 cans. .... .40c
Plain Olives in small bottles. . . .15c
Plain Olives, medium bottle. .. ...20c
Plain Olives, large bottle. . .... ..30c
Stuffed Olires, small bottle. r. ...20c
Stuffed Olives, medium bottle.... 30c
Asparagus, White Rose brand,
No. 2 cans . ... . .. ... 30c
Rumford's Baking Powder, large
size, per can 25c
Calumet Baking Powder, large
size, per can . .25c
Royal Baking Powder large size,
per can ... . . ........ ... .50c
Royal Baking Powder, small size, size,-'
' size,-' per can . . . . .. ..... . . . 25c
Iiirsch'g Apple Buter. 10 oz. jar.. 25c
Lippincott's Apple Butter, 14 Yi
oz. jar, per jar. . . .... .. . ..30c
Ileintz Apple Butter 2 lb. jar.... 75c
Curtis Bros'. Jams, assorted fruit,
; 15 oz, jars......,....;, 35c
Wilson's Jelly,., assorted, fruits,
7J4 oz. glass ...... ...... .15c
Van Camp's Peanut Butter, small
size, per glass... ............. 15c
Van Camp's Peanut Butter, med medium
ium medium size, per glass. .. ...... .25c
Van Camp's Peanut Butter, large
size, per glass.... 40c
"Covo" Oil for cooking and salads,
pint .. .. ...................35c
"Covo'! Oil, quart . ............ 65c
All 75c Brooms at. . .... .. ..... 65c
All $1 Brooms at. . . ... .. ..... .90c
All $1.25 Brooms at. . . . . . .$1.10
All $1.40 Brooma at. . ..... $1.25
Hcintz Purs Cider Vinegar, pint v
bottle, for . .... . . . .....25.:
Ileintz Pure cider Vinegar,.qt. . ,40c
Ileintz Cider Vinegar, V2 gal..... 75c
Good Grade Vinegar, pint bottle. .15c
Good Grade Vinegar, qt. bottle. . .20c
Crisco, 1 lb. can., 35c
Crisco, V2 lb. can. ........... . .50c
CriscO, 3 lb. can. ............. i$1.00
Crisco, 6 lb. can. .:. . $3.00
Onions," per lb. ... .6c

Obposile Harrington Hall Hotel
W. R- PEDRICH
AGENCY
SATIRES AND TUBES

Don't fail to visit the Guarantee

Clothing & Shoe Company. Every
thing we sell is guaranteed. We're
ftghting for QUALITY not prices, tf
Mr. C. E. Johnston -of Daytona, is
a visitor in the city at the home of
his. aunt, Mrs. Francis Ho wse.
W. K. Lane, M. D Physician and
Surgeon, specialist Eye, Ear. Nose and
Throat. Office over 5 and 10 cent store.
Ocala.Fl. tf.
Mrs. D. S. Woodrow left this aft
ernoon for Charleston, S. C.- to join
her daughter. Miss Blair Woodrow,
or a visit at the home of Miss Ruth
tlarvey. : ; -..
666 has proven it will cure malaria,
chills and fever, bilious fever, colds
and lagrippe. It kills the rerms that
cause the fever. Fine tonic tn
Mrs. E. J. Boyer and son, Mr. Burt
Boyer of Lakeland, are visitors, in the
city for a, couple of days, guests of
Mrs- L. J. Knight, en route to point
north for several months.
Our every aim is to please our cus
tomers by giving the best quality ob
tainablcj Cook's Market. 12-6t
Mrs. N. R. Dehon left Sunday aft
ernoon for Albany, Ga., having been
summoned there, by a, telegram an-.
nouncing ; the illness of ; her father,
udge Walters. Mrs. Dehon's many
riends trust that she found her
ather much improved and that he
will at an early date he entirely well
again.
We are proud of the confidence doc
tors, druggists and the public have in
666 Chill and Fever Tonic tu
Miss Dorothy Schreiber leaves the
fitter part of the week for Wiscon
sin for a visit of several weeks to
Rev. and Mrs. Campbell Gray and
family. En route to Wisconsin, Misa
Schreiber will make several stops to
visit friends and before returning
home in the fall will visit her brother
and sister-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Don Don-old
old Don-old Schreiber at Youngs town, Ohio.
Pon't fail to visit the Guarantee
Clothing & Shoe Company. Every Everything
thing Everything we sell is guaranteed. We're
fighting for QUALITY not Drices. tf
Mrs. Frances Howse received a
cablegram yesterday from her neph nephew,
ew, nephew, Mr. D. C. Hull of Cuba, announc announcing
ing announcing that he would arrive at Port
Tampa this afternoon and will come
to Ocala for a visit at the home of
Mrs. Howse. Mr. Hull is originally a
Marion county boy and as he was very
popular with a large circle of friends
8nd since it has been fifteen years
hat he has been away, he will be
given most cordial welcome on this
visit.
AUCTION PARTY
Miss Agnes Burford entertained
very informally1 but most pleasantly
yetserday afternoon about a dozen of
her friends at a game of auction to
make the acquaintance of her guest,
Miss Marion Howard Tharin of Mad-
son.
About five o'clock -the players com
menced what proved a very enjoyable
game which lasted for an hour and a
half, and then the young hostess, as assisted
sisted assisted by her sister. Miss Mary Bur Bur-ford,
ford, Bur-ford, served a refreshing and detec detectable
table detectable salad course with sandwiches,
mints and drinks.
Miss Elizabeth Davis was presented
with a dainty gift for making highest
score and to the honoree was given a
ovely "remembrance.
Miss Tharin is a most attractive
and charming young lady and during
her short visit in Ocala; is making
many friends who regret very much
the shortness of her stay.
The following were those who en
joyed Miss Burford's ; hospitality:
Miss Marion Howard Tharin of Mad
ison, and Misses Elizabeth and Meme
Davis, Ava Lee and Marguerite Ed
wards, Eloise Henry, Caroline Har
riss, Sue Moore, Elizabeth Hocker,
Marion Dewey and Mary Burford.
Men's white flannel, stripe serge,
white duck and rep pants to be worn
with sport coat. We have them, tu
A. Waterman, the haberdasher. 13-5t
Nut Butter Is Wholesome.
Cocoa butter, as nut butter Is called
in England, was not accepted with en
thusiasm by the British public when
natural butter became scarce during
the war, so the food committee of the
Royal society made some elaborate
tests of its effects on human beings.
The New York Medical Journal sum
marizes the results, which show that
slightly less of the fat of cocoa butter
than of that of real butter is utilized
by the body ; it causes no digestive
troubles; -when consumed In large
quantities It has a slightly laxative ef
feet, and in general It is a safe and
wholesome food.
Bugs That Birds Eat.
According to a paper on behalf of
bird protection published by the State
Horticultural society of, Kansas the
bird population of that state Is 258,
000,000, which every year eat enough
Insects to fill 4SO trains of 50 box cars
each-r-24,000 cars of a minimum
weight of 24,000 pounds to the car.
These Insect trains would be long
enough to reach from Oklahoma to Ne Nebraska.
braska. Nebraska. Reduced to pounds, Blair fig
ures that the birds of Kansas every
year eat 576,000,000 pounds of Insects.
It is hard to conceive the dollars and
cents value of the insect-eating birds

to the Kansas farmer.

VV iff -4k t$&"
" ?? i ;:T ? I

Salvation Army lassie all over the
United States are busy Just now get getting
ting getting ready for the nation-wide Home
Servfce appeal for $10,000,000 the Army
is to make from May 10 to 20. Here
are some of the popular blne-bo.nneted
girls loading an airplane with printed
matter so urgently needed that the
usual method of shipment would have
been too slow.

w

li

CLOSES

Many Big Bargains are still to
be had in Ladies' Ready to
Wear, Dry Goods and Millinery

TI? TU)

AN K

li L

The Fashion Center

Attend the
Band Concert!
AT
Silver Springs
Sunday Afternoon
UKAN v
KEEP
KOOL
(DldSffOCsl
YOU CAN SAVE
Many Dollars
On your shoe bills by haying ns re rebuild
build rebuild your old shoes. Our charges are
moderate, and we guarantee satisfac satisfaction.
tion. satisfaction.
.MAZ0M&G0.
Between Ten Cent Store and Gerig's
Drug Store

Get the habit of calling phone 243
vrhen you want high class fresh meats
and groceries promptly delivered.
Cook's Market. 12-Ct
Advertise in the Star.

The supplies which were la tSww
York City had to b in Albany' the
same afternoon. Th United States
Air Service stepped into the breach
and got them there from, the flying field
on Long Island In a little over two
hours. The obliging, aviator' is Ser Sergeant
geant Sergeant J. Cole. Th three lassies are all
"war veterans."

9
KEPT HER AWAKE
Tte Terrible Pains in Back &ad
Sides. Cardui Gave Relief.
Marksville, La. Mrs. Alice Johnson,
of this place, writes: "For one year 1
suffered with an awful misery in my back
and sides. My left side was hurting me
all the tima. The misery was something
awful.
I could not do anything, not even sleep
at night. It kept me awake most of the
night ... I took different medicines, but
nothing did me any good or relieved me
until I took Cardui .
I was not able to do any of my work
for one year and I got worse all the time.
was confined to my bed off and on. I got
so bad with my back that when I stooped
down I was not able to straighten up
again ... 1 decided I would try Cardui
. . By time 1 had taken the entire bottle
I vas feeling pretty good and could
straighten up and my pains were nearly
all gone.
I shall always praise Cardui. I con continued
tinued continued taking it until I was strong and
well." If you suffer from pains due to
female complaints, Cardui may be just
what you need. Thousands of women
who once suffered in this way now praise
Cardui for their present good health.
Give U atrial. NC-133
:VM. A. -TINS MAN
Contractor
Brick and Plastering
Tile and Marble Flooring
Specialties
215 Fifth Street. Phone 526
For All Classes Of
Stone, Briclc, Wood,
and Concrete
Building
j. D. McCaslull
Contractor
Phone 446. 723 Weacna St.
-

Negptiable Storage Receipts

3IO VE, PACK, SHIP
LIVE STOCK,
PIANOS, BAGGAGE,
MACHINERY,
FURNITURE, ETC

lttMMMittttlMtMt IMtMltK..

&-J&J&&&v&j&- "X- 'X-- O
ft

MEW

Iirtet! mi

MOM
5
tiioice rionoa

Meats and Fancy Gfc series

'V
Come in or
:

91. Miiiii St.
Opposite Banner Office

Z. .-. CrvOt w, ."w. .O. tT w'
III
TH IT T.-TTTl 'TXTTT
I i II I t J I v I 1
ill

We now have on hand a number of real up-to-date
Bed Room, Dining Room and Parlor Sets,
and considering the quality the prices are ex extremely
tremely extremely reaaonable.

r0
;
:i:
-
as.
X
o
T 1
ill

r X. Ill- til -jiCI"

of every description will prove attractive to you duii:
-'good old summer's time." We have them from

as

515 amfl Up.

TGHEU
8
' Opposite Ocala
North Magnolia St.
vi

I I

UdV U MUUllfliJ.

Emerson said: "Nothing great was ever
achieved without enthusiasm.
Our customers are Enthusiastic people.
Enthusiastic over the fact that they,
through their efforts, are saving money on
their grocery bills.

MS
Enthusiasm

And- if you hang arcana tills store very long
yon will catcb it.
A Customer's Talk
One of our customers remarked to us that
fie liked this store because it is a medium
through which children can be taught econ economy.
omy. economy. Its a good thought. Let them know
the value of a Dollar.

U-Sem

CASH "and. CARRY

Ocala

advertise and. set

0

STAK" LIP

Issued, on Cotton, Automobiles, Etc
a
a
s
e
LONG DISTANCE
I I 'J : ?A
jX. O O O .-x-. -r-- .-r-.
PEM
aid v;
Plioite 243
Mr-
v;.?
o
f i -4r
v..
- d? rX--!!!'- -CD- -"H ir. .
nTTTT TTTT 77 H
II til
4'
.I,
r
V
!
A
4
"1
V
National Bank
CCALA,-FLA.
4
it
A
- )
mm:
is Co
maawus
m
- s
on

(Era

f I I I.

1 i

J l i
1



fj -.fs-.fj v. lr& & v2 -3f 's zJ- & -3-- 3

At

I

v Wi mmmmmmm

AUTOMOBILES
So MMIPpliy 9 2ALA

i IP! mill mill)

12

LATEST LOCALS
Temperature this morning', 70; this
afternoon, 93.

Dance
Br.nk.

tonight over

Commercial

13-lt

Mr. II. Gatrell of Fairfield was a
welt known visitor in the city this
morning.
4
"Nucoa" nut margarine 40 cents a
. xorind at Cook's MarketPhone 243.

Whit Palmer
iernoon from
ville.

returned home
a short trip to

Bank.

tonight over

Commercial

13-lt

Tomorrow morning the Harrington

Hall lunch room will close for im improvements
provements improvements for a few days, and dur

ing that period the main dining room

will serve meals at lunch room prices.

CCG auickly relieves Constipation,

Iwliousne.ss, Low of Appetite and
Headaches, due to' Torpid Liver, la

.Miss Marion Howard Tharin of

Madison, after a few days visit with

Miss Agnes Burford, is now the guestj

of Misses Ava Lee and Marguerite
Edwards for a short stay. before she;

returns to her home.

CONDITIONS NOW.-: AND IN 1865

According to General Sherman'

Uemolrs, History 8eem to Be
Merely Repeating tUelf.
A single page In the story of the
Civil war, the Memoirs ot General
Sherman,, carries observations by two

'Ohio men prominent In that war. Gen

eral Sherman himself and Secretary
of War Stanton, that have a strange strangely
ly strangely familiar sound now amid the dis distressing
tressing distressing conditions that have followed
the World war here.
General Sherman has. arrived with
his story at the opening of the year
1805, and he is dealing with the clos closing
ing closing events of the Civil war. He Is
at Savannah and the secretary of war
U there, partly on an official visit and
partly for recreation. The policy of
enlisting slaves is ; under discussion
nd the order giving the freed slaves
, He right to occupy seized lands Is
agreed a. yy : :;...y-y yy:y
"He professed to have come- from
Washington for rest and recreation,
writes General Sherman, "and he
sooke unreservedly of the bickerings

-and Jealousies at fne national capital,
of the interminable quarrels of the
state governors about their quotas
and more particularly of the very ex existence
istence existence of the government Itself.
"He said that the price of every everything
thing everything had so risen in comparison with
the depreciated money that there was
danger of national bankruptcy, and he

appealed to me, as a soldier and pa patriot,
triot, patriot, to hurry up matters so as to
bring the war to a close.
T was quite Impatient to get off,
myself, for city life had become dull
and tame, and we were all anxious to
get Into the pine woods again, free
from the importunities of Southern
women asking for protection, and of
civilians from the North who were
coming to Savannah for cotton and
all sorts of profit"
High prfces, weariness of the war
conditions, eagerness on all sides for
the return of peace, swarms f people
at Washington official and private
citisens, with axes to grind, and spec speculators
ulators speculators from the North pushing right
down to the hostile lines in promoting
their profiteering enterprises. But we
came through itColumbus Dispatch.

F HOUSEWIVES' BELIEFS -!

! It Is unlucky to toast bread on s
tnlfe.

. To throw bread away means want
some day.
; Give bread m charity and It will
bring prosperity.
Throwing bread away Is to Ignore
pxe virtue of charity.
i '-.
' Eat bread that another has bitten
and you will quarrel.
IYou will get a letter If you acct
dentally drop bread in a cup of tea.
If you wish to be wealthy, cut a loaf
jof bread evenly, says Dame Supersti Superstition.
tion. Superstition.
' If a glass of any kind falls and
does not break great success awaits
you.

; Or, if you let a piece of bread fall
out of your hand, some one is coming
"to beg.
To get your sheets on the bed wrong
!side out Is a sign, of a change of resi residence.
dence. residence. ;
The one who eats the crusts of
jbread is the one wbowill get all the
kisses. 7
y '
'- Never drink out of a glass that has

F spoon In it or you are doomed to
e an old maid.
Never give away' the first slice of
bread you cut off a loaf or you will

UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS
WANTED, LOST, FOUND. F02
SALE, FOR RENT AND SIM SIMILAR
ILAR SIMILAR LOCAL NEEDS

Remember we are still closing out
children's wash suits and pants, also
boy's Palm Beach and Kool Kloth
suits, with extra pants in the Kool
Kloth. H. A. Waterman, the haber haberdasher.
dasher. haberdasher. 13-5t

Dance
Bank.

tonight, over

Commercial I

13-lt

-.r

th oi m v r

11 GIL ii Jill

if Aiilweir

UilIV

CLOSES

RATES Six line, maximum- one

time, 25c; three times, 50c; six times
75c; one month, $3. Payable in ad advance.
vance. advance.

WANTED Boys at the Star office to

learn routes. Must have bicycle, tf

WANTED Honey. Send two-ounce
sample to Jacksonville Cracker
Works, Jacksonville. Fla. 28-lm

FOR SALE House and lot with all
litest improvements; Ford truck;
rock face cement block, machine;
also second hand lumber 2xI0's 18
ft long, 2x6s 16 ft long. Cheap
for cash. Carl Wenzel, 702 Wyo Wyo-mina
mina Wyo-mina St 5-17- eow

FOR SALE Five room house in
North Ocala, four lots; good well;
close in. Apply to J. W. .Gates,
Ocala, Fla. 6-12t

WANTED Fifty tie choppers at
once. Come ready to work. Apply
to Mr. J. F. Hampton, Cornell, Fla.,

or H. C. Bilbro, care Carroll Motors
Co., Ocala, Fla. 7-6t

give your luck away.

If a young matron bakes bread and
runs over the sides It is a sign she

III have a houseful of children.

Mrs. W. D. Shephard and child will

arrive in Ocala Thursday from

Gainesville to join Mr. Shephard to

make this city their, home and they

have rented Mrand Mrs. C. L: Gams-.

by'a pretty home on Wenona" street,
where they will immediately begin
housekeeping. Ocala welcomes this
family. Mr. and Mrs. .Gamsby will i
for the present make their home with
Mr. and Mrs. Charley Marshall on

Fort King avenue.
Uub-My-TLsm is a powerful antiaep.
tic; it kills the poison caused from n-

-fccUd -ruts, cures old sores, tetter, etc

Many Big Bargains are still to
be had in Ladies Ready to
Wear, Dry Goods and Millinery

M9

THE
FASHION
CENTER

i Speak unkindly or profanely with
.bread In your hand and you will be
sore troubled before It is digested.
! When two persons are folding a
'.sheet let them wish, and If ( the last
'fold comes out even they will get their
wish.
i .
If you find a .whole grain of wheat
in a loaf of. bread, and put It over the
door, the name of the first who enters
will be that of your sweetheart.
Because the Lord ate bread at the
last supper therifare many interpreta

tions of Its observance as a sacred
food. The act of eating bread with
the head, uncovered was considered
most disrespectful to God.
' Seal Herds Increasing.
The protective measure adopted by
the government for the benefit of the
seals In our waters has been entirely
successful, as indicated by the great
number of animals seen to be migrat migrating
ing migrating to the Arctic sea. The migration
was three weeks earlier than usual,
and an unusually large amount of
animals were awted on their way to
the north.' :

BOARDERS WANTED The Holly

House, 113 East Second street, has

accommodations for boarders and
roomers. Mrs. E. L. Lapier, Man Manager.
ager. Manager. 12-6t

FOR SALE One set of Harvard

Classics, never been unpacked. The
original price was $79, will sell for
$60 cash. See Harley March, Main
Street Market, or phone 108. 12-6t

FOR SALE Gas range. Call at Star

:cfSce and ask for R. N. Dosh.

MARION-DUNN MASONIC LODGE

Marion-Dunn Lodge No. 19, F. & A.
Mv meets on the first and third

Thursday evenings of each month at
7:30 o'clock until further notice.

Jake Brown, Secretary.
A. L. Lucas, W. M.
Dance tonight over Commercial

Bank. 13-lt

FLOORING FOR SALE Car load of

Martel No. 1 common flooring at
$65 per 1000; will regrade about 20
per cent. B and B. Can be had at
lot between Jake Brown's ware warehouse'
house' warehouse' arid packing house. First
come first served. This is $15 below
yard ; prices. John Thomson, phone
457. ; ; 10-t

FOR SALE 1919 model Maxwell
; touriivg car, in good condition; has
been run only 7200 miles.V Will sell
cheap. L. E. Futch. : 13-6t

DAYTONA BEACH Furnished
; rooms for light. housekeeping with

kitchen and dining room privileges,
$5 up weekly. The Raymond, Sea Seabreeze,
breeze, Seabreeze, Fla. 13-8t

WANDERED OR STOLEN Satur Saturday
day Saturday night from Fairfield, black
mare mule, six feet high, weight
about 850 pounds. Split in left ear.
Snuff colored mouth.-VRe'w'ard to
finder. A. G. McKay, Mofriston,
' Fla. v 13-6t

HADSOCK'S WOOD YARD Phone
your orders to Smoak's Shop. Phone
?146. 2-m

Dance
Bank.

tonight over

s Commercial

13-lt

Cured by Gold Injections.

The very latest post-war discovery.

is the curing of certain ailments by

means of injections of diluted gold.;

This very expensive method of restor

ing lost health was discovered by,
French doctor, who has co"
cured a wealthy Parls!sT"r
similar to sheU--v '
is very t: 'C

ivaehes
iaiie in one or
,.uses gold Injections
.,vcr a hundred pounds each.
icquently, only very rich persons
can at present undergo this gold
treatment, which has been successful
In rescuing several cases of complete
nervous breakdown. It should be re remembered,
membered, remembered, however, that the gold it itself
self itself Is of no great value as a tonic.
The idea In making the Injections is
to liven up the patient and prevent
him or her from brooding too serious seriously.
ly. seriously. This done, doctors believe that
half the battle is won. Strange to
say, the injections are not made
through the usual type of syringe, but
generally through a conical-shaped
tube of pure platinum costing over
twelve hundred dollars.

Hi

tons

pais the yiiiho

t

- Money. : '. 1 -After
having studied the careers of
many of our richest men, and after
having obtained from many of them
an outpouring of their inmost
thoughts, my conclusion about money
is this, says a writer in Forbes Maga Magazine:
zine: Magazine:
"Honey Is a very desirable thing,
even a lot of it Its possession en enables
ables enables one to do a great many things
which are Impossible If one lacks it.
There Is no "such potent material in instrument
strument instrument for enabling one to do wor worth
th worth v fields in larce numbers and on a

large scale. Money, indeed. Is so de desirable,
sirable, desirable, so useful, so rich in possibili possibilities
ties possibilities for worthy accomplishment, that
one should exercise every honorable
effort to acquire every dollar of it that
one can earn, but there is not enough
money in the world to compensate one
for turning even one sharp corner, for
never have I known an instance of ill--gotten
money to have yielded true hap happiness
piness happiness to possessor and his offspring.'
Bird Protection Important.
Preserving birds as game is only
one part of the duty of the. govern government.
ment. government. They are even more valuable
as enemies of noxious weeds and In Insects.
sects. Insects. They are the farmer's best
friends, though he is too often oblivi oblivious
ous oblivious of the fact, says the Philadelphia
Inquirer. Those who care nothing for
their beauty of plumage and song must
recognize the clrumstance.: Yet the
birds have been too long the. prey of
their human hunters. Some species
have been wellnlgh exterminated In
consequence. To protect them In the
United States and Canada will ac ac-compllsh
compllsh ac-compllsh much, though; to make the
protection of many of the migrants

plete Mexico ana central American
i 'fc;:U Jc!n ii ti

hen:. P'W mMmW

1 tfl i

ffy ul crVI F-Universs!

proves i

at YOUR

pense.

com

K6 other tabes in the world are road tested
on so big a scale as Firestones. The Yellow
Cab Company of Chicago uses Firestone
Tubes exclusively on its 800 taxi cabs. The
service of these tubes is checked constantly
improvements and developments are
arrived at.
By close watching of a large number of
tubes in service not confined to isolated
instances, the conclusions are accurate and
definite.

Firestone puts the best in materials into
tubes by establishing purchasing experts at
Singapore, center of the world's rubber
market. Firestone puts the best in work workmanship
manship workmanship into tubes by organizing the crack
manufacturing organization of the industry

on a profit-sharing basis.

And then subjects the finished product to
this big-scale road test in order to get you
more for your tube money and more miles
out of your tires. And yet Firestone Tubes
cost no more than the ordinary kind.

v'V:y ?' r T

PEOPLE OF OUR TOWN

The Qty Yap breezes out to Visit
his Country Cousin in the Summertime
and has the Time of his Life. Our
Small Town Stuff tickles him, while
his funny City Ways are Duck Soup
for us, for he's as Green in Our Town
as We are in His. City Life can't be
So Difficult if he Gets By.

USED CARS FOIl SALI

Buick Touring, 1919.
E'-akk Touring-, 1918.
Buick Touring, 1917.
Overland Sedan, 1920.
Hudson, 7-pasenger model.
' PHILIP G. MUIIPHY,
Jefferson St. at A. C. L. R. R.St

Get the habit of reading the ads.

rm

'AV

k i r.

f J
X
w

1

j art cf City Seni for Boclctet
In) VT.KiLIW.SniTH.PSOP'Ji

SECOND HAND CARS

The Ocala Auto & Garage Co., suc successors
cessors successors to Gates' Garage, has on
hand the following second hand cars,
guaranteed to be in good condition:
One 1920 7-passenger Chandler.
One 1920 Ford coupe.
One 1918 Buick, 5-passenger.
""Also-one new Oldsmobile Six, five five-passenger
passenger five-passenger and one new Oldsmobile
Economy Truck.
Cash or terms.

6-tf

Ocala Auto & Garage Co.

HOi SC

Arrival and departure of passenger
trains at OCALA UNION STATION.
- The following schedule figures pub published
lished published as information and not guar guaranteed.
anteed. guaranteed. (Eastern Standard Time)

SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILROAD

Arrive

2:10 am
1:30 pra
4:25 pra
4:05 pm
2:15&m

1:S5 pm

Leave
2:20 am Jackscnville-NTork
1 :E5 pm Jacksonville
4:05 pra Jacksonville
V Tampa Tampa-2:15
2:15 Tampa-2:15 am Manatee Manatee-Si.
Si. Manatee-Si. Petersburg
2:15 am Tampa
1:50 pm Tampa-Manatee

4:05 pm Tampa-St Petrsbrg 4:05 pm
ATLANTIC COAST LINE R. JL
Leave Arrive
2:1 pra JacksonvilleNYork 3:15 am
1 :45 pm Jksonville-Gainsville 3 :35 pm
6:42 am Jksonville-Gnesville 10:13pm
3:18 am St.Petsbrg-Lakeland 2:13 am
3:35 pm St.Petsbrg-Lakeland 1:25 pm
7:10 am Dunnelion-VfTilcox
7:23 am Dunellon-Lkeland 11:03 pm
3:25 pm Homosassa 1:30 pm
10:13pm Leesburg 6:42 am
4:45 pm Gainesville 11:50 am
"Monday, Wednesday, Friday.
Tuesday. Thursday, Saturday.

T". J. V--- T

1 1

The Kind to
which Barney
trusted his
life

II Barney Trusts Then
YOU CAN

DAVIES, The Tire Man
Vulcanizing
Phones 438-76.

Mr"
yf

13
I

Buy Your
WESTERN MEATS
, of all kinds
FLORIDA BFEF, FORK,
POULTRY, ETC.,

from
Kew Yorli Market
"W. Brondway
Phore 110

n
' 5

3
i

f

3

p-;--t berviee 13 not an empty

"A ve y,jr eyes the serv serv-"!
"! serv-"! ikf. ice you have been need--J.V4&
ing.no long. :
DR. K. J. VEIIIE,
Optometrist and Optician
Eyesight Specialist

L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTER AND;
BUILDlR
Careful estimates made on all con contract
tract contract work. Gives more and better
woik for the money than any othar
contractor in the city.

Aficnts and
Service

UlbVUULfcT. COLUMBIA and COLrJ

Cast Iron, Stec! and Brass WeldSno v

GENERAL AD7 0 IJEPAiES

.OCALA MOTOR CO c-E- Sis

Opposite I
Ocala Iron Works j

THE WHMBSOE HOTEL
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
In the heart of the city with Hemming Park for a front yard.
Every modern convenience in each room. Dining room service ia
second to none

ROBERT f.f. MEYER
Miamtrer.

J. E. KA VANAUGXI
Proprietor.

P. O. EOX COG

STAR JOB

DEPARTMENT

PHONE 51

I

LETTERHEADS, BILLHEADS, CARDS,
CIRCULARS, FOLDERS, FINE BOOKLETS, ETC.

WE NEVER DISAPOINT A CUSTOMER ON A
PROMISE. YOU GET THE JOB WHEN ITS DUE.

'Hi-



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