The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:05619

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
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OCALA

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Weather Forecast: Probably local
showers tonight and Friday, except
generally fair extreme north portico.
OGALA, FLORIDA, THURSDAY, JULY 8. 1920.
VOL 2G, NO. 163

I

1
IV,
v

CANDIDATES BEG

THEIR CAMPAIGN
Cox Gire Material to the Newspaper
Men and Hardin? Writes'
His Own Copy V
(Asocial! Press)
Dayton, 0 July 8 Gov. Cox, after j
working several hours in his new spa-1
number of visiting, newspaper men
about his home and haunts of hi3
boyhood days at Jaeksoriburg.
It is now expected that when Mr.
Roosevelt arrived the ensuing confer conferences
ences conferences will result in more than a mere
exchange of felicitations. Chairman
Caromings and several other party
leaders are expected to participate in
the conferences. It is understood
phases of the campaign may be dis discussed,
cussed, discussed, especially plants for the offic official
ial official notification. ;
From present indications the notifi notification
cation notification will probably occur at the gov governor's
ernor's governor's home here.
HARDING PUSHES A PENCIL
Marion, O., July 8. Senator Hard Harding
ing Harding arrived at his office earlier than
usual again today in order to accom accomplish
plish accomplish as much as possible on his ac acceptance
ceptance acceptance speech. Instead of dictating
to a stenographer, the senator follow followed
ed followed the newspaper, habit of writing it
with a penciL Members of the effke
force said the senator makes clean
copy and few changes are required in
the manuscript. 1
CALL THE LEAGUE OF
NATIONS IN COUNCIL
(Associated Press)
Paris, July 8-President Wilson
has accepted the invitation of the
league of nations to call a meeting of
the assembly of the league in Novem November,
ber, November, it was announced in the house of
commons today by Under Secretary of
Foreign Affairs Harrasworth.
BEGINNING ANOTHER
OUTBREAK IN BRUNSWICK
(Associated Press)
London, July 8. Dispatches report
that preparation are under way for a
revolution in Brunswick. Extreme
radicals are said to he working on
plans for a general strike at the end
of the week.
WASTING TIME
(Associated Press)
Chicago, July 8. The Senate com committee
mittee committee investigating campaign expen expenditures
ditures expenditures will move to St. Louis tonight
to take up investigation of Attorney
General Palmer's campaign for the
presidential nomination, Chairman
Kenyon announced today.
A COMPROMISE THE
PROBABLE OUTCOME
" (Associated Press)
Spa, July 8w A compromise with
Germany on the time allowed for dis disarmament,
armament, disarmament, fixing the period at six
months, looked to be the probable out outcome
come outcome today of the conferences among
alied delegates here. The Germans
bad asked for fifteen months.
IT WILL NEVER ARRIVE
I Associated Pressl
New Yorkr July 8. The future of
the inter-church world movement will
be decided today by the general com committee
mittee committee of organization. Three plans
are suggested: Winding up the af affairs
fairs affairs of the movement immediately;
continuing 'operations for a brief
period but on a different basis, or re reorganization
organization reorganization along lines suggested
by denominations in the movement.
Dancing at Silver Springs tonight.
rm

Willi MlfiiliUllVWlU

Mew

ANOTHER MEXICAN OUTBREAK.

Eagle Pass, Texas, July 8, Re Reports
ports Reports that twelve bridges had been
burned in Mexico, south of Monclova,
gave rise here yesterday to rumors
that a new revolution had broken. out
m the southern republic Adolf o Gon Gonzales
zales Gonzales was said to head the new move movement.
ment. movement. A Mexican government pay paymaster's
master's paymaster's train had been robbed yes yesterday
terday yesterday of $50,000 Mexican gold by
bandits controlling Monclova. Troops
were reported hurrying there from
Torreon. No trains were tunning be
yond Sabinas. "'i
THEATER YET THERE
(Associated Press)-
London, July 8. Reports from Ber
lin last week saying the theater in
Fhilippopolis, Bulgaria, had been
fciown up with a heavy loss of lif
are declared untrue by a Renter dis
patch from Sofia.
POLAND NEEDS SERVICE
OF ALL HER SONS
(Associated Press)
Warsaw, July 8- Volunteers for
immediate service, against, the Rus
sian bolshevik forces have been called
for by the Polish council of defense.
The council urges men who are un5t
for active service to register in order
to release office men for duty at the
PINCHOT AT THE
BOTTOM OF POLITICS
(Associated Press)
Chicago, July 8. Amos Pinchot, a
member of the committee of forty-
eight which meets here Saturday in
national convention, left today for
Madison, Wis., to confer with Senator
LaFolette, who is mentioned as the
candidate for the third party presi presidential
dential presidential nomination.
ELI AS THINKS VILLA
WILL BE AMIABLE
'Associated Press) t
Mexico City, July 8 Elias Torres,
who conferred on behalf of the pro
visional government with Villa re regarding
garding regarding the armistice, announced to
day that Villa had modified his peace
terms and conciliation was likely.
NATHANIEL W. ELLIS
Estill, S. C., June 28. -The entire
town and county was shocked by the
sodden death of Nathaniel W. Ellis,
which occurred at 12 o'clock today.
He was in his 63rd year and had lived
a life of interest in all that was for
the welfare of the community in which
he lived. He was the first mayor cf
Estill, serving several successive
terms, and only gave up the position
because of private interests. He was
one in whom everyone in trouble
would always find a faithful friend,
and it always seemed his greatest
pleasure to assist those unfortunates
others had forsaken. He was a mem member
ber member of the Baptist church and a
Mason. He was buried at Lawton Lawton-viile
viile Lawton-viile cemetery Tuesday morning with
Masonic honors. He is survived by a
wife and 17 children, Hampton (S.
C.) Guardian, June 30.
Mr. Ellis formerly owned a saw
mill at Summerfield, selling the same
to H. M. Goethe & Co. While operat
ing there he made many friends in
Marion and Sumter counties who will
learn of his death with much regret.
OCALA LODGE NO. 283. B. P. O. E.
Ocala. Lodge No. 286, Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, meets
the second and four Tuesday eve evenings
nings evenings of each month. Visiting breth brethren
ren brethren always welcome. Lodge rooms
upstairs over Troxler's and the Book
Shop, 113 Main street.
C Y. Miller, E. XL
"E. J. Crook, Secretary. v
Get the habit of reading the ads.

Mi

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LYNCH HIM FOR LYING

Johnson Deserves Punishment for His
Slander on the People f
Georgia
(Associated Press)
Chicago, July 8. Henry Lincoln
Johnson, the negro republican nation national
al national committeeman from Georgia, today
told the Senate committee investigat investigating
ing investigating campaign expenditures that ne negroes
groes negroes who voted the republican ticket
in Georgia have disappeared. The
committee was questioning Johnson
about lynching. ;
"They dont lynch men for belong belonging
ing belonging to the republican party, do they?"
Senator Kenyon asked. v; V
Oh, yes. they do." Johnson re plied.
COUNTY BOARDS AT WORK
The county commissioners and the
county school board are busily at
work, trying to equalize assessments
and make up their budgets.
The commissioners must increase
the miUage to provide for the bond
issue, but hope to reduce some other
expenses. Two members of the school
board rsform us that they expect to
levy the full ten mills for school par par-poses.
poses. par-poses.
The people of Marion county voted
for the roads and the commissioners
are carrying out their wishes. The
people of Marion county voted heav heavily
ily heavily against the ten-mill tax, and the
school board is using power placed in
it3 hands by outsiders.
LOUISIANA LOWER
HOUSE IS STUBBORN
(Associated Press)
3aton Rouge, July 8. The lower
house of the Louisiana legislature9 re refused
fused refused to suspend the rules in order to
take another vote on the suffrage
amendment, The legislature is expect expected
ed expected to adjourn late today.
ITS SUPPORT. WILL BE
DETRIMENTAL TO "EITHER
v (Associated Press) "-V
Westerrille, O July 8 The execu
tive committee of the Anti-Saloon
League will meet in Columbus, Jqjy
22nd, to determine its attitude in the
coming campaign.; The league is Sot
ready to issue ar statement regaraai
its attitude toward Cox and Hardin?,
the two presidential candidates.
LARGA'S FORCE ISN'T XARGE
(Associated Press)
Mexico City, July 8. Gen. Larga
has started an uprising in San Luis
Potosi state, the war office announced
today. He has only 100 men and the
movement is not consider dimportant.
JOHNDEE IS EIGHTY-ONE
(Associated Press)
Tarrytown, N. Y., July 8. John D.
Rockefelelr celebrated his 81st birth birthday
day birthday today.
Messrs. Lester Lucas and Joe Need-:
ham returned Wednesday evening
from their trip with the Florida
Shriners to the great meeting on 4 the
facinc coast, ine innners are evi evidently
dently evidently a large and influential organi organization.
zation. organization. The party from Jacksonville
went to Portland by the northern
route and returned via the southern.
They traveled over 11,500 miles and
passed through twenty-three states,
in none of which was their money any
good. They saw, Niagara Falls, Chi
cago, the twin cities, the most pic
turesque part of the Pacific coast, and
coming back all the wonderful country
from Los Angeles to their, own Flor
ida. They were in San Francisco the
day before the convention met and a
number of the members, including
the Ocala boys, by virtue of their
Shrinership, were allowed to inspect
the auditorium from the inside. They
had a grand trip and were glad to get
back home.
Dancing at Silver Springs tonight.

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toai(0K$ Mart ware Store li MiwM.

ENGK1EER TALKED

II CITY JIIOIHG
Seme Community Problems Consider Consider--
- Consider-- ed in His Address Before the
Rotary Club
In speaking before the Rotarians
on Tuesday, City Engineer Young
said in part:
The average city evolves from a
village to a town, to a small city and
then to such limits as its citizenship
is satisfied with. It results is an un unconnected
connected unconnected street system with grades
impracticable for sewers, and in many
ease3 damages abutting property by
its being above or below abutting
property and sewers not low enough
to provide sufficient fall from the
cellar to the sewer in the street, there thereby
by thereby necessitating enlarged or cross
sewers.
"Relief from above is formed by
establishing grades at all corners of
street intersections, and by an ordi ordinance
nance ordinance refusing the recording of plats
and deeds until plats are approved by
the municipal authorities after being
checked by the city engineer.
"The purposes of a city street are
twofold First; To afford, light, air
and access to abutting property. Sec Second:
ond: Second: To provide accommodation for
such traffic as may pass thru the
street, but the origin and destination
of which may be elsewhere, the route
being that of least resistance in case
of business' traffic and that which is
most agreeable in case of pleasure
traffic The first depends on height of
buildings and the proportion of the
lots that may be covered. The greater
the amount given to streets, the more
erpensive is the remaining land. Very
narrow streets mean lack of light and
air, unsanitary conditions and traffic
congestion Unnecessarily wide
streets mean a serious burden upon
the abutting land, the price of which
must include the value of that taken
for streets, greater expense to the
lot, owner for street improvement,
and additional expense to the city for
maintenance and cleaning
."Important as are the large parks
and theparkwaysof f-cty, thoie
wmeh mean most to the greatest num number
ber number are the smaller neighborhood
parks, one of which should be within
easy walking distance of every part
of the city.
"Whether the parks be large or
small, it will be advantageous to ac acquire
quire acquire them at as early a date as pos possible
sible possible and before the subdivision into
lots. By purchasing them as acreage
property the park may be so laid out
as to leave a few highly desirable
building sites whose value is enhanc enhanced
ed enhanced by the park, and the receipts from
the sale of these sites will go a long
way toward paying for the park.
"The fixing of street grades is one
cf the most important functions" of
municipal engineering, since the grade
system of the streets is the founda foundation
tion foundation of all municipal engineering
matters The grades should be es established
tablished established before the sewer system is
planned, and if established before the
property is improved the problem is
simple since they may be. laid chiefly
with reference to obtaining desirable
gradients for the street within proper
limits of cost. But when buildings
have been erected, sidewalks con constructed,
structed, constructed, trees planted, it is frequent frequently
ly frequently extremely difficult. The determi determination
nation determination of the proper grade of a street
depends generally upon the following:
Drainage, cost of earthwork, accom
modation of traffic, effect on abutting
property, general appearanec of the
street. . :
"The streets are the natural drain
age channels of the city. Lots must
drain into them and the house must
drain into the sewers placed in the
streets With no storm sewers the
grade is doubly important as the gut
ters must carry away the water.
. "Cost o f earthwork and accommo
"1

11F I

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ill Tate' Pie

dation of traffic are simple problems
in Florida as the grades are usually
ery light.
"The private interests of the prop property
erty property holder must be considered. All
municipal improvements are for the
betterment of the -individual citizen,
and, since he, as a tax payer, pays f jr
the improvements, his protection is cf

prime importance, provided that
itation and the care of future develop
ment is not interfered with.
"The longitudinal view of the street
should be pleasing on residence
streets, a parking place for trees,
shiubbery and grass between the
curb and sidewalk adds to the value
of the property and increases the dis distance
tance distance of the home from the tarSc
"If it can be avoided, the street
should not be so much lower than the
property as to compel the owner to
build a retaining wall, nor should it
be so much higher as to compel-him
to 11 his lot.
"With the streets laid out and the
grades established, sewer and water
systems adequately provided for. the
city is then in position to take up
other matters of great importance tw
the welfare and growth of the com community.
munity. community. I refer to parks, play playgrounds,
grounds, playgrounds, street lighting and white
ways. A city should capitalize on
her handsome residence section, by
making it readily accessible to tour tourists
ists tourists and others by routing thru pleas pleas-uie
uie pleas-uie traffic thru that section of her
city-
"The value of the aesthetic to the
city can be readily impressed upon
the citizenship by clean-up and paint
ing campaigns; by offering prizes for
the best kept lawns and the finest
display in the front yards of flower
beds.
"The economics of a city are often
very much helped by the purchasing
of all city supplies by some one per
son who is familiar with the sources
of supply and who is paid to see that
the best quotations are obtained from
the various manufacturers and supply
houses. I
"Imconclusion I would say that the
way to boost our city is to never be
satisfied with past performances. We
should lay out a comprehensive plan
for its advancement. Nothing should
be considered too large or too small
for its citizens to undertake if it will
make Ocala a better place for its
present residents, a more attractive
place of- strangers," and, "by availing
ourselves of and letting others know
about its great natural advantages,
we cannot fail to attract outside cap
ital and so have Ocala known by the
time the next ten years have passed,
as the best and livest interior city in
Florida."
NO NUMBER IN THE NAME
County Commissioners Will Give
Ocala Legion Post a Home
in the Armory
The Marion County Post of the Am American
erican American Legion is to have club room3
of its own. The, board of county
commissioners has granted permis permission
sion permission to the post to use the armory,
and, at the regular meeting of the
post last night, there was authorized
the appointment of a committee to
take charge of the club rooms and fit
them up for the use of the organiza organization.
tion. organization. It is believed that the securing
of club rooms and the introduction of
attractive features in connection with
them will greatly stimulate interest
in the legion in Marion county. The
membership in the post is steadily
increasing and now numbers over one
hundred and eighty.
At last night's meeting, the name
or the post was changed by omitting
the number. Up until this time the
organization has been known as Mar
ion County Post No. 1, and, as the
post is also post No. 27 in the state
department, the two numbers have
been confusing, and at the request cf
national headquarters the change was
made.
The post last night authorized the
appointment of a committee on enter entertainment
tainment entertainment for the purpose of raising
9
Iwei
ire i

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fends for the mainteriance cf the or organization.
ganization. organization. The adjutant was in instructed
structed instructed to put in a requisition for
rifies and blank ammunition for use
in ceremonies. It is understood that
the offer of the government to dis dis-tribute
tribute dis-tribute rifles to the legion pests has
been temporarily withdrawn, but an
effort will be made to obtain a num number
ber number as soon as the offer is reopened.
Post Commander Izlar this morn morning
ing morning appointed the following commit committees:
tees: committees: Entertainment: El wood Raymond,
chairman, Miss Mary Marshall R- L.
VanOsten, Charles Simpson.
Permanent Quarters: Carl Ray,
chairman, T. M. Kilgore, T. D. Lan Lancaster
caster Lancaster Jr, James Duffy.
ITS TIME TO ACT

Shortage of Houses in the City to be
Discussed by the Board of Trade
This. Evening
The Marion County Board of Trade
meets in regular session tonight at
eight o'clock. The members of the
board will be asked to discuss tha
city's housing shortage. The next
tcunst season is but a few months
away and the city is now faced with
tnc situation of beinsr unable to take
care of normal housing demands. Un
less something: is done, it is sroinsr to
be necessary to turn away many vis visitors
itors visitors and possible residents.
The biff difficulty in the wav cf in
creasing the housing facilities cf tha
city lies in rents. The existing rental
scale does not insure a reasonable re return
turn return on investments in bui!dir-s con
structed at present costs, and, cn the
other hand, there is a limit to what
the average family can nav in rents.
It is hoped that the discussion toni?ht
will lead to some solution of the dif
ficulties in the way of taking care of
the increasing population of Ocala.
TRANPORTATION HOLDS
UP THE GRAIN CROP
(Associated Press)
Hutchinson, Kans July ?; Kansas
wheat growers have been warned by
conferees at a meeting of railroad
men, farmers and bankers that they
may have to hold CO per cent of the
new crop of gTain in stacks or binds
on their farms, because of lack of
transportation to the mills. There is
a vast amount of grain from last
year's crop still waiting to be moved.
Since the conference, in response
to the appeal directed to the Inter Interstate
state Interstate Commerce Commission, the com commission
mission commission has wired Secretary J. C.
Mohler, of the state board of agri agriculture,
culture, agriculture, that 14,500 cars will be sent
to the mid-west states. It has been
estimated that it would take 19,000
cars to move the wheat from lait
year's crop still remaining in country
elevators and on Kansas farms. The
state's immediate need is 35,000 cars
to adequately handle the situation,
Secretary Mohler said. He ha3 re received
ceived received word that Kansas is to get 11, 11,-000
000 11,-000 cars.
When the present wheat harvest is
over, Kansas bankers will have ap ap-pioximately
pioximately ap-pioximately 100,000,000 "tied up" in
1919 and 1920 crops. Of this amount
bankers have advanced 65,000,000 up
to the present time, on crops that
have not been harvested. These were
figures given by J. R. Anspaugh, sec secretary
retary secretary of the Kansas State Bankers
Association at the conference. "The
security is good but the money 13 hard
to get. It will strain every resource
to get through safely,'1 said Mr. Ans Anspaugh.
paugh. Anspaugh. Even the possibility of getting the
grain threshed was anything but
hopeful, because of coal shortage in
the wheat country.
USED CARS FOR SALE
Buick. Touring, 1919.
Buick Touring, 1918.
Buick Touring, 1917.
Overland Sedan, 1920.
Hudson, 7-passenger model.
PHILIP G. MURPHY,
Jefferson St. at A. C. L. R. R. St
M
liliSca
3d

lis

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OCALA EVENING STAR, THURSDAY, JULY 8, 1920

4

OCALA EVEiiHIB STAR

I'ulillNbed Every Day Ecpt Son day by
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY,
OCALA, FLORIDA.

R. It. Carroll, Prealdeat
P. V. Leaveagood,' Seeretary-Treaasrer
J. H. nenjamtn, Editor

Entered at Ocala, Fla., poatofflce as
Hcond-clasa matter.

TELEPHONES
nuhlnenn Oflee ............ .Flve-Oae
Editorial Department ..... ,Tw-StT
Xoelety Hrpartttr Five-One
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entitled for the use for republication of
all Dews dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise cred'ted in this paper and
also the local news published herein.
Ail rights of republication of. special
dispatches herein are also reserved.

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Legal advertisements at legal rates.

the desire to build comfortable anil
pretty homes, would be a moral and
material help to them. We are afraid,
however, that if any ill-di3posed per person
son person tried to break it up this Miami
arrangement won't stand in law. We
seem to remember that the higher
courts of at least two states have de declared
clared declared such ordinances unconstitu unconstitutional.
tional. unconstitutional. However, if the better element
of both races get together and carry
it out with reference to the law, it
will work, just the same, or better.
THE NOMINEE

Another result of the two national
conventions shows the futility of the
straw vote.

If America had fewer skilled auto auto-iscs
iscs auto-iscs and more industrious wheelbar wheelbar-rcwists,
rcwists, wheelbar-rcwists, it would be better oft.;
Japan has taken full possession of
th island of Sakhalin. Sakhalin is a
continuation of the Japanese chain of
islands and logically belongs to that
nation,

The dream of centuries of the Jews
to repossess Palestine has had a rude
awakening. That country is already
crowded with people, most of them
hostile to the Jews. About all the
AlHed nations can do, for the Jews is
to secure for them a square deal, and
the question is; will they do that.
If the proceedings of the' national
convention suit democrats as well in
other communities as they have in
Ocala, the party will be solid. A month
ago, there was considerable perturba perturbation
tion perturbation here about what the convention
might do. There was not so much
worry about the candidates as there
wa3 about the platform. Now, every everybody
body everybody seems well satisfied and we
should judge there is more unity
among Marion county democrats than
there has been for years
The Ocrla police have done-' good
w ork in restraining the autoes on
South Main street, and one can now now-drive
drive now-drive a car t,!crg there without much;
danger. Our guardians of the peaetj
might; now. relieve the congestion on
some other streets. For instance, we
see no reason why a seven-passengci
car some sixteen feet long should
drop its cnehor in front of the Ocal
House with its stern stieking fourteen
to sixteen feet out into the public
square. Sometimes you can find the
square in front of the Ocala House
almost as badly congested as Main
street used to ba.

Says the Miami Herald of Gov. Cox:
"James M. Cox, the democratic
nominee for the presidency, fills all
the necessary specifications for a
party candidate, so far as his life his history
tory history is concerned.
"He and his history are, typically
American. He was born in Ohio, in
the town of Jacksonburg, on March
31, 1870, and is, therefore, in the
prime of life and full vigor of man manhood.
hood. manhood. He received his education in
the public and high schools of his na native
tive native county and state.
"From a student he became a
teacher, and taught in the' public
schools of his state for a time, as so
many men of note in this country have
done. He then began work in a print printing
ing printing office, following illustrious ex

amples in that respect. He became a
newspaper reporter and, very natural naturally,
ly, naturally, a newspaper owner.
"At one time he was connected with
the Cincinnati Enquirer in an editor editorial
ial editorial capacity, and then became the
owner of the Dayton Daily News.
Lf ter on he purchased the Springfield
Press-Republic and then formed the
News League, of Ohio. Although very
much taken up with political duties,
he is still a newspaper man and of the
first class. f
"Mr. Cox was elected to the Sixty-

nrsi ana ssixty-secona congresses,

serving- in the House from 1909 to
1913. In the latter year he became
governor of Ohio, serving two years.
He was elected to the governorship

again, beginning his second! term in

1917, and was again re-elected last

fall.' :: :

-"With hia typical American educa

tion as a basis, his connection with
journalism and his work in Congress

and his experience in the governor's
chair of one of the greatest states of
the Union, Governor Cox has well
fitted himself to occupy with credit

the great office to which the demo

cratic.party has nominated2 him and to

which it will now bend its eneries to

elect him."

A dispatch from Miami says: "By
unanimous vote of -the council last
night .the city will buy a strip of land
one mile long arid 500 feet wide,' to.

be held vacant as a color line betweerfe

the white and negro sections."
We dai oay this will be a good; a a-rangement,
rangement, a-rangement, provided each race will
try to do right on both sides- of the
line, and the nogroes be given a
chance to buy good residence proper property,
ty, property, instead of being shoyed off on any
old sort of ground. We think that an
entirely negro residence section,
where the colored people could carry
out to the full extent of their ability

The first hospital constructed and

operated exclusively by negroes south
of Augusta is being constructed in
Palatka. Its establishment will stand
a monument to the unselfish efforts
of a few of the leading colored citi citizens
zens citizens who have been, working for two

years on the project- It is a credit to

Paiatka and : the colored citizens.
Palatka News.
There is a hospital for colored peo
pie in Ocala. It has been in opera
tion for about four years. It has col

red management and nurses. The
colored doctors take their patients and

white doctors take their colored pa
tints there. A nurwber of white Teo

pie help it along, and it has been a

very helpful and. successful institu

tion.- ;' :. -;

PLEASED "WITH THE REPORT

MICKiE SAYS:
' ": -"

v

A

IliliiQlSlI

? Editor SSar: i I was exceedingly

pleased VfiAh the splendid write-up o

th industrial School for Boys at

Mariaufta. ill; yesterday's Star.

It would! hardly be possible to give

one; an. adequate idea of the wonderf u

vark being done there by Dr. F. E.

llacClane and -his helpers. The work

is 9 perrecuy symtematizea as is

l possible-1 think for any institution o

this kind1..

Everything-' possible is being done
to train these? boys to be real good and

useful men. A great many of the

boys there are- cigarette fiends, and

this is one of the greatest troubles

to keep them from this harmful and

destructive habit.

Dr. McClaae is ever alert and his

good wife is not "asleep on the job"
either,: for I saw her searching the
pockets of several boys while I was

there to see if there could be found

any evidence of this little instrumen

of deathi anywhere about them.

In crder to make this moral teach
ing more effective, Dr. McClane wil

not tolerate; cigarette smoking by

a.txp of his foremen or assistant super-

UKfindents. i

- To give you an idea of the wonder

kfut faith and confidence mutually

established between;' these boys and

ineir supermtenaent, i was tola tn

a few days before I was there 125 of
these boys were permitted to go on a
hike five or six miles away to the
river for a swim without any official
attendant and every one returned in
perfect order. I
Yesterday I received the following
telegram:
- Marianna, Florida.
M. M. Little, Probation Officer for
Marion County: ;
. Three hundred and sixty delinquent
boys with no officers sent on hike and
holiday picnic on rivci and in wood3
five miles away from school. No run runaways,
aways, runaways, no accident, no misdemeanors.
Frank E. McClane,
Supt. Fla. Ind. School for Boys.!
IThis is wonderful when we think
of how most of these boys have grown
up without proper training at home.
The only way to get a real good
idea of the work being done by this
school is to make a visit there and
observe with your own eyes the var various
ious various method of manual and religious

A A M A A J

1CT

ii

Hundreds of thrifty women took advantage of the great bargains offered
the first day of our Great Anniversary Sale.
It is not too late for you to share in this biggest opportunity
of the year. Sale will confinne until

IMIoiniclai.

The Fashion Center

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training being done by Dr. McClane
and his staff of helpers.

M. M. Little.

Dancing at Silver Springs tonight.

BELLEVIEW

Belleview, July 7. Mrs. Myers re

turned home Wednesday from Ala Alabama,
bama, Alabama, where she has been visiting
friends. While there she had the mis misfortune
fortune misfortune of breaking her arm.

Miss Mary Myers came Wednesday

from Columbia, S.C., to spend her

summer vacation with her parents.

Mrs. Guy A Smith and little son

left Thursday morning for New York
city, where they will visit for a few
days before going to New Haven,

Conn., to spend the summer with her

parents, Mr. and Mrs. Rothschild.

Rev. La whorn's children have been

suffering with the whooping cough
for some time, but are slowly im improving.
proving. improving.

Mrs. I. I. Strong has been on the

sick list for the past week.

Mrs. Harry A. Jones, who spent

last week in Wildwood with fiends,
left Saturday for Jacksonville, where
she will visit her sister, Miss Ruby
McClendon. w. 1: .' f

Bennie Shedd came home Saturday

from Hicaria, where he has been em employed
ployed employed in an orange grove.

The barbecue, and basket ; picnic

Monday- was a great success and a
large crowd attended.1 The baseball
game between Oak and Belleview in
the afternoon was won by our boys.
The score was 1 to 6.

Mrs. O. S, Shade left Saturday for

Jacksonville. ;

Rev. Tredwell preached at the M. E.

church Saturday night and Sunday
morning.

Lonnie Pierce, who has been work

ing in the crate mill at Wildwood for
some time, had two' fingers and a
thumb cut off Friday. v

Mr. Kenneth E. Merrill spent Sun

day and Monday with his mother, Mr?.
G. E. Merrill.

The contest between the Baptist
boys and girls at the B. Y. P. U. end ended
ed ended Sunday night. The girls' won.
Both sides had very interesting pro programs.
grams. programs. The boy's leader was Jesse

Freer and Eleanor Abshire the leader
for the girls. The church was beau

tifully trimmed Sunday night with

flaes. buntinsr and red, white and

blue flowers.

Rev. Reeb. preached at the Baptist

church Sunday morning and will con

tinue with a revival every night this
w eek. Every one is cordially invited

to attend.5

Miss Gertrude L. Carter of Lady
Lake is the guest of Miss Marjorie

Merrill this week.

Mr. Converse of Jacksonville was
in town a few days this' week visiting

friends.

Mr.and Mrs. W. N. Fielding have

moved to Anthony, where Mr. Field

ing is .employed as section foreman

They have lived in Belleview for
about nine years and have been great
church workers and helpers at the
Baptist church ever since they came
and will be greatly missed by both old

amrvftnTiff fnltn hprp. Mrs. HiPlflinfJ'

has been the teacher of the Philathea

and Baraca Sunday school classes and

leader of the B. Y. P. TJ. Her Sunday

school class and many friends wish

her much happiness in her new pome.

The Belleview Utility Co. furnished

the town with its first home made ice
Tuesday, which every one is very

proud of.

The dance at the league hall was

well attended Monday night.

v Sec Me
For All Classes Oi
Stone, Brick, Wood,
and Concrete
Building

j.

D. McCasMi

Contractor
Phone 446. 728 Weaona

St.

Dancing at Silver Springs tonight.

What have you to sell or trade?

Look it ud and advertise it in the

Star.

Dancing at Silver Springs tonight.

iHs. Service is not an empty
tw word. I am prepared to

JC ve J0UT eTes e serv
i.-SK y 'ce you have been need
"Ji-.vf ing so long.
; DR. K. J. WEIHE,
2?. Optometrist and Optician ;

Eyesight Specialist ;

f....lllrl I v. iw-nwwTBaWw
pi nm.. Jl

Was a
Misery

Mrs. F. M. Jones, cl
.Palmer, Okla., writes :
" From the time I en entered
tered entered into womanhood '..
. . 1 looked with dread ;
from one month to the
nexL I suffered with my
back and bearing-down
pain, until life to me was
a misery. I would think
I could not endure the
pain any longer, and I
gradually got worse. V
Nothing seemed to help
me until, one day,
I decided to
TAKE

if

1

11

The Woman's Tonic

JVlrs. Jones goes on to
say, "and was not only
greatly relieved, but can
truthfully say that I have
not a pain. .
"It has now been two
years since I tookCardui,
and I am still in. good
health. . I would ad advise
vise advise any woman or girl
to use Cardui who is a
sufferer from any female
trouble." f
If you suff erpain caused
from womanly trouble, or or-if
if or-if you feel the need of a
good strengthening tonic
to build up your run-down
system, take the advice
of Mrs. Jones. Try Car Cardui.
dui. Cardui. It helped her. We
believe it will help you.

All Druggists
J. 68

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Florida Citrus Exchange
Markets Citrus Fruits oil
Food and HealOi Values

4

The Florida Citrus Exchange sells
grapefruit and oranges on their food
and health values.
Growers who market co-operatively,
advertise and demonstrate the food
and health values of Sealdsweet fruits.
Consumers are taught to pay what
they are worth and dealers educated to
distribute them at fair profits.
Speculative marketing agencies do
little or nothing to educate the buying
public as to the value of Florida fruits.
Therefore, they can appeal to the trade
only on a price brsis. The competition
of every car of fruit they sell reduces
the prices received by all 'the growers
of the state.
Growers who would like to sell their
fruit for what it is worth should apply
for membership in the Florida Citrus
Exchange. Write the business irian irian-:
: irian-: ager at Turppa, or call on
Marion County Citrus Sub-Exchange
First National Bank Building
Leesburg, Florida.
Eleven years of unqualified success. Proven
stability. Increasing advantages to members.

V

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f -t sfr WMWMMMW-fci

Eh

L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTER AND
. BUILDER

Careful estimates made on all con-'
tract work. Gives 'more and better I

contractor in tiie cicy.

i

W. K. Lane, 'SI. D" Piirsltlan -and

Surgeon, specialist Eye, Ear. Nose sr.fl
Throat, Olike over 3 and 1Z teat stsre,
Ocala. Fla. ti

heart of City terd for oockfsr
n Will USntTM. PRCPR

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STUPE!

AUTOMOBILES

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OCALA. M

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f-H'l -T- --r-. r. .-t-. .-T-. sr tr-. fZm- Kiim- Z-Z'-T' O r-X- O -"X- "T- -Z 1"--.2v-C'. L'-Jm."--: riS



OCALA -EYENING TAB, THURSDAY, JULY 8, 1920

mi

,3

' Hiiiin minim ii1"1"

not? .onrio awcvrxrs

TRADE HERE

We are determined to do our share towards reducing
the high cost of living by giving Special Low Prices on

From Wow until July 20ili inctosive.
Every item in our entire stock has been?reduced in
price the same proportion as those we mention below.
ELThese prices are only a few selected at random; com compare
pare compare them with those you are now paying for the
same goods; then make up your list and let us help
you reduce the "high cost of living.

Dancing at Silver Springs tonight.
Mrs. George Ford leaves this after

noon for her home in Jacksonville,
after 'some time spent in the city, a

fguestat"the home of her parents, Mr.

and Mrs. B. A. Weathers.

......

. ..40c
. .75c
...40c
. .50c
. .50c
...40c
. .50c
. .55c
...25c

Sweet and Sour Pickles, 6 oz.
bottle .. 15c
Stringless Beans No. 2 &ns.....l5c
Early Jane Peas No. 2 cans . ;. ..15c
Heintz Pork and Beans No. 1 cans 15c
Heintz Cooked Spaghetti Italian
.style, No 1 cans . .15c
Van Camp's" Soups, two cans for 25c
Bee Brand Flavoring Extracts,
assorted flavors, 5Vz drams, net. 15c
No. 3 cans Pie Apples. .25c
No. 3 cans Pie Peaches. . ..... ,25c

Grapejuice, pints
Grapejuice, quarts,

Loganberry Juice, pints.....
Luzianne Coffee, 1 lb. .....
Morning Joy Coffee, 1 lb. .
Golden Rase Coffee, 1 lb ...
Our Special Coffee, 1,1b. .
Private Estate Coffee, 1 lb.
Green Coffee in bulk, per lb.

Maxwell House Coffee per lb. . .55c
Maxwell House Coffee 3 lb. can. .$1.60
White House Coffee per lb. I..... 55c
White House Coffee 3 lb. can, . .$1.6U
Pure Lard ; per lb. . ... ........ 25c
Compound Lard, per lb. ........ .25c
Pilsbury Flour, 12 lbs . ... . $1.00
Pilsbury Flour, 24 lbs. . .... . .$2.0u
Gold Medal Flour, 12 lbs. .. .. .$1.00
Gold Medal Flour, 24 lbs. .v. .$2.00
Cottolene, 2 lbs. . . ...... .65c
Cottolene 4 lbs. .$1.25
Quaker Oats two pkgs for. ... . .25c
Mother's Oats two pkgs for. .... ,25c
Armour's Oats two pkgs for. ..25c
Skinner Macaroni and. Spaghetti,1
three packages for. .......... ,25c
Eagle Macaroni and Spaghetti,
three packages for.. ...-..... 23c

Star Naptha, LighUiouse, Gold
Dust, ; Octagon and Sunshine
Washing Powder 6 pkgs for. ... .25c
LAUNDRY SOAPS : Clean Easy,
Crystal White, Rub-No-More, :j
Sunny Monday and Clairette,
at, per bar. .................. t. 7c
Lipton's Tea, quarter lb. pkg...:.20c
Tetley's Tea,' quarter lb. plfg. 20c
White Bacon,, per lb. ...... ... .'.24c
First Class Smoked Bacon per lb. .20c
American Cheese per lb. ...... . .35c
American Sardines 3 cans for. .; .25c
Small size Salmon, per can, 15c
Tall can Salmon, per can. ...... ,25c
Corned Beef; large. ...... ... . .35c
Roast Beef, large. ....... i 35e

Libby's Dill Pktle FlbC'can
Sliced Pie Apples No. 1 can. . .25c
Sliced Pie Apples No. 2 can... . L40e
Sliced Pie Apples No. 3 can...... 60c
Sliced Peaches,1 Gold Bar brand,
15 oz. cans. ................. ,30c
Sliced Peaches, Gold Bar brand.
No. 2 cans. . 45c
Grated Pineapples, No. 1 cans.... 20c
Grated Pineapple No. 3 cans. . .40c
1 ...
Plain Olives in small bottles 15c
Plain Olives, medium bottle ...... 20c
Plain Olives, large bottle. .. . :30c
Stuffed Olives, small 'bottle. . . -20c
Stuffed Olives, medium bottle. .. .30c
Asparagus Tips, j White Rose
brand, No. 2 cansi....... ;'..'. 30c
Romford's Baking Powdeiy large s I
size, per can t -.25c
Calumet Baking Powder, large
1 izp pir c&ii p 2oc
Royal 'Baking Powderlarge size,,
per can .... .... .50c
Royal 'Bakihgr' Powder, small size,
per can ... .25c
Hirsch's Apple Buter, 10; oz. jar.. 25c
Lippincott's Apple Batter, 1456 1
oz. jar, per jar. ..... .;ii,??cL
Ilrintz Apple Butter 2 lb. jar. ...75c
Curtis Bros. Jams, assorted fruit,
f 15 oz, jars. .... ...... ...... . 35e

I Wilson's Jelly,, assorted, fruits,

71

Vi oz.

glass

15c

Van Camp's Peanut' Butter, sniall
size, per glass. ..... . .... ... .15e
Van Camp's Peanut Butter, med- 3

ium size, per glass, . . . . . .25c

Van Camp's Peanut Butter, large
size, per glasSj. . .. . . . .40c

"Covo Oil for cooking and saladsv :

nint ... .35c

Covo" Oil, "quart ...... . .65e

All 75c. Brooms at. . . '. . . . .65c
All $1 Brooms at . . ........... .S0c

All $125 Brooms at ..... . .$1.10

All $1.40 Brooms at. $1.25

Heintz Pure Cider Vinegar, pint

bottle, for ...V. .. ......... .25c
Heintz Pure cider Vinegar,'1 qt. ." ;40c
Heintz Cider Vinegar, Yz gal..... 75c
Good Grade Viriegar.pint bottle.. 15c

Good Grade Vinegar, qt. bottle. . .20c
Crisco, 1 lb. can . . . . . . 35c

Crisco, 1 V lb. can v .......... . 50c
Crisco, 3 lb. can .... . . . .... $1.00
Onions, per lb. .6c

OU QCCUHRENCES

If 'you have

phone 'five-one.

any society items,

Dancing at Silver Springs tonight.
Rem and Mrs. W. H. Hines have re

turned from a pleasant tour down the
east coast.

Cream puffs at Carter's Bakery to

day. 8-lt

Misses Annie Davis and Cora Grif-

fia have returned home from a pleas

ant week's visit in Orlando, guests of
Miss' Griffin's1 relatives.

Mr and Mrs. Charles Lloyd of Jack

sonville will return to their home Fri Friday
day Friday after a week's visit in the city,

guests of Mrs. Lloyd's sister, Mrs.
Harvey Clark, and family.

Mr. James Watkins of Greenville,

S. C, who accompanied his nephew,
Mr.JK.. W. Estes to the city Tuesday
to'be 'pTesentat his marriage to Miss

Eugenia Fuller, has returned home.

iilr. and' Mrs. Paul Theus have gone

to Baltimore for a several weeks' va

cation. En t route they stopped m
Jacksonville to leave their son, Paul

Jr. I with Mrs. Theus. mother, Mr3.
Stein, during their absence.

Dancing at Silver Springs tonight.
Mrs. R. L. J Martin of Lake Weir,

went to' Jacksonville today to visit her
daughter, Mrs. H. B. Potter for two
weeks. Then 'she and her" daughter1
and her "grandson, Martin Potter, will
gbfto Asheville, N. C, to spend the

balance of the summer.

A BEAUTIFUL LAWN FETE

Mr. and "Mrs. J.' H. Mason of Tampa

were 'again 'complimented last eve

ning," their '"hostess being Mrs. Emily
Green, who pleasantly entertained for

them at a theater party. After wit

nessing1 the pictures, Mrs. Green was

accompanied to her home by her

gcests. and they spent an hour with

a damty refreshment course.

Mrs. Paul Simmons and daughter.

Mary, Elizabeth, and Mrs. Simmons'
mother, Mrs. Carson Lee of Washing

ton,- D. C., will leave Saturday af ter ter-npcnfor
npcnfor ter-npcnfor Savannah, Ga., for a several
weeks' visit. They are going espec especially
ially especially to.be present at the marriage of
their cousin Miss Virginia Mae
Thompson j to Mr. Frank s Arden a
church wedding on Wednesday, July

14th," at "which Mrs. Simmons will be

matron of honor

Dancing at Silver Springs tonight.
l v . ..o. (
Don't fail to visit the Guarantee
Clothing r& Shoe Company. Every Everything
thing Everything we sell is guaranteed. We're

fighting for QUALITY not prices, tf

REMEMBER that Our Guarantee stands back of every
purchase you make. Your purchases will be
promptly delivered any where in the city limits. Our
line of STAPLE and FANCY GROCERIES is com complete,,
plete,, complete,, and we solicit your patronage.

It ve arc not now serving yon,
GIVE US A TRIAL.

r4t

1

y

lilt II
Proof

I

Negotiable Storage Receipts Issued un Cotton, Automobiles, Etc

LONG DISTANCE U0VM6

p r

MOVE, PACK, SHIP
LIVE STOCK,
PIANOS, BAGGAGE,
MACHINERY,
FURNITURE, ETC.,

1 Sheriflf Galloway's deputies raked

in for 'shining, the other day, Dur

ham Grice, colored, of near Anthony,

and Judge Smith gave Grice six
months. George Stuart, colored, will
also help out on the roads awhile.
Marshal Thomas caught him with the
goods on and the judge senteneced

him to three months and to pay $200.

He is likely to work the $200 out.

Dancing at Silver Springs tonight.
Levi Alexander Jr who has been

engaged .as a teacher in the Florida
Agricultural College at Tallahassee,

has 'come iiorne for his vacation, most
of which he will put in helping his
father in building operations.

FELLOWSHIP
Felldwship, July 7. -Mr. B. B. Beck-

eaves tomorrow to attend the B. Y.

U;; assembly at DeLand for the

next week. He and Rev. E. Lee Smith
will represent the Fellowship B. Y.

P. U.

The" carnival given by the lad

members of the B. Y. P. U. last Fri

day night proved a success, both fi

nancially and socially. Everybody had

a good time and were glad they came

out to help make it a success. ,

Mr. and Mrs." B. F, Stewart and

famityof Hull, accompanied by Mr.

Earl Phillips passed through Fellow-
..." VVi 5. t 1 "it-

snip ims wees en route 10 Asnevuie,
N.C, to spend several weeks. They

will make,,the trip via auto, so they

can see the country.

Mr. Claud McCully, who is attend

mer the normal m Gainesville, came

home last Friday afternoon so he

could attend the carnival and spend

the fourth with his parents.

The patrons of Fellowship school

have met twice for the purpose of
selecting teachers, but failed each

time. It was decided to leave it up to

the trustees to secure the teachers.

Doubtless they will : soon decide on a

torps of teachers and all will be well.

'Messrs. T. M.JPhillips, J. H. Clark

and A. S. Pickett have had a carbon

light plant installed at their premises.

which is quite an improvement over

the old coal oil lamps.

Dancing at Silver Springs tonight.

Many Bargains arc found in "Acls." SRcad tlicm

The spacious and lovely grounds
surrounding the home of Mrs. Frances
Howse on Oklawaha avenue was the
scene of a colorfull gathering yester yesterday
day yesterday afternoon, when her daughter,
Mrs. M. H. Stovall entertained at an
elaborate and exceedingly interesting
lawn fete in honor of her son-in-law
and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. J. H.
Mason of Tampa.
The guests, some 200 or more, be began
gan began to arrive at 5:30 o'clock and after
being greeted by those assisting Mrs.
Stovall, strolled around and made
themselves at home. The spacious
grounds of the Howse home were fur further
ther further enhanced by many baskets filled
with beautiful flowers on stands plac placed
ed placed throughout the grounds, and hang hanging
ing hanging from the limbs of the trees.
Meeting the guests upon their ar arrival
rival arrival at the front gate were five young
Lord Chesterfields, Masters Arthur
Anderson of Oldsmar, Bonner Clark.
Martin Roess of Jacksonville, Clifford
Ayer and Robert Camp. They were
then greeted by Mrs. E. L. Carney,
whc invited them to the punch table,
which was cozily arranged under a
magnolia tree and gracefully" presided
over by Misses Mary and Agnes Bur Bur-ford,
ford, Bur-ford, Kate Carlton of Arcadia, Mrs.
C, V. Miller of Tampa and Mrs. A. J.
Beck of Fort Lauderdale. After being
refreshed with punch, the guests dis dispersed
persed dispersed into groups about the lawn,
which was made most comfortable
with benches and chairs, and the hos hostess,
tess, hostess, Mrs. Stovall, in her charming
and clever manner seemed at all times

everywhere, seeing that everybody
was having a pleasant time.
Later in the afternoon Mrs. Stovall
called the attention o' fher guests to
Miss Dorothy Lancaster, who stood in
a corner on the west side of the ver veranda
anda veranda with er violin, and rendered a
most difficult piece, which was highly
appreciated and strongly encored by
all Another enjoyable musical num number
ber number was that of Miss Lillie Bailey,

who also plays the violin with much

skill. She was accompanied on the

piano by Mrs. Hooper.

Evoking much praise-and favorable

comment were the "strolling min

strels,' who delighted their audience

w ith half a dozen numbers. This band
of -players was composed of Misses

Rhoda Thomas, Ruth Simmons and
Ullaine Barnett, who were all cleverly
dressed in Hawaiian costume and

each one carried a Hawaiian guitar.

Those assisting Mrs. Stovall in en

tertaining her guests were her sister
and brother, Mrs. J. C. B. Koonce, Mr.

O. B. Howse and Mrs. H." M. Hampton,

Mrs. Harry Walters, Mrs. T. S. Tran-

tham, Mrs. E. G. Peek, Mrs. Clifford
Ayer and Misses Marian Dewey and
Alice Bullock. For the first time since
her accident, four years ago, Mrs.
Frances Howse was able to greet her
friends and as she sat on the front
veranda was constantly kept busy re receiving
ceiving receiving her many friends.
'Ice cream and cake were served
late in the afternoon by a bunch of
the daintiest little fairies imagin imaginable.
able. imaginable. They were Susan Stovall of
Tampa, who also shared in the honors
of this parly, and Cora Mae and Ethel
Fair Pillans, Josephine Clark, 5 Alice
Miile rof Tampa, Lucille Home, Helen

Watt, Lucretia Hocker, Mary Eleanor
Anderson of Oldsmar, and Mary

Rachel Roess of Jacksonville.

This lawn fete was. among the most

enjoyable social affairs Ocala has

ever had and to the hoonrees, Mr. and

Mrs. Mason, is was a notable event,
as it celebrated both their birthdays,

coming within a few days of each

other. '

This was the first opportunity af

forded Mrs. Mason's many friends of

making the acquaintance of her hus
band and the affair was more enjoy
able for this reason.

Two Pounds for................. .55
V Ten Pounds for $2.60
With a Dollar" Purchase of Other Groceries
Twenty Pounds for .......... $5.10
With a Two Dollar Purchase
of Other Groceries. ....

TUT cjl
iiiid iil)o

ATTENTION, K. OF P.

Ocala Lodge No. 19 will have work

in the amplified form on next Monday

night, July 12th. All members of the

team are requested to be present. Also

all esquires who want to take the

work. We invite visiting members
from the district lodges to bring

their candidates and come to see the

work. J. W. Aiken, C. C.

Ninety day and old fashion velve

beans, chufas, cow peas and sorghum

teed. Ocala Seed Store, phone 435. tf

SEEDS

Ninety day and old fashion velvet

beans, chufas, Pyles and Gist seel

corn. Ocala Seed Store, phone 435. tl

Dancing at Silver Springs tonight.

Attend the

Band Concert :

AT

WMI 11 H IMG I R

Orange Ave. and Eighth St.

Phone 377

J. Q. SPENCER

W. II. PEDRICK

V ml t Trt ",1 1 j'xst

AG ENCY

We Make a Specialty of Parts for the Buick and N
the Prices are Consistent with the Cost of Same.

GOODYEAR AND U. S. TIRES AND TUBES
Exclusive Agents for "VESTA" BATTERYI8 Mo, Guarantee
An Up -to-Date Battery Service Station
We Maintain an Up-to-Date, Garage with
Expert Workmen, at all times, Assuring
Prompt and Efficient Service. .

GASOLINE, OILS "AND GREASE.

CICALA GAS EMGINE WO'EKS
PHONE 271
Ocala - Florida

JAMES ENGESSER, Proprietor

121 W. Broadway phone 238 Ocala, Florida

F ord Repairs a Specialty
; We Use Genuine Ford Parts in OurFord Cars
Arco and Biamoaa Tires and Tubes

Gasoline, Gils and Grease

Silver Springs

Sunday Afternoon :

UKAN
KEEP
KOOL

Stcple and Fancy

Miosis ic

-FlofMci andl--

Mill

Advertise and get B.esulti

I
If.
h
i!
n



OCALA EVENING STAR, THURSDAY, JULY 8. 1920

Hi II

LATEST LOCALS

Temperature this morning. 72; this
afternoon, 88.
Registration Officer Earco of Cotton
Plant was a visitor in town Wednes Wednesday.
day. Wednesday. ...
Mr. Philip G. Murphy has sold to
Dr. F. C. Zoll of Mcintosh a new Es Essex
sex Essex touring car.

E. Ervin. for a week. They will be

iomed here shortly by Mr. Carlton,

who will accompany them to their

home in Memphis, Tenn.

Mr: Percv Smith has eone to Jack

sonville, where he has accepted a po

sition and will in the future make his

heme. His many friends resrret to lose

him, but he has their best wishes for

a successful business career.

Mrs. Li C. Bell, Master Leslie and
Miss Mamie of Hernando and the lat lat-ter's
ter's lat-ter's house guests. Misses Leah Chai Chai-ker
ker Chai-ker and Mildred Mcintosh of Brooks Brooks-villc
villc Brooks-villc and Live Oak, were visitors to
the city Wednesday.
Mrs. J. F. Cdrlton and Miss Eliza Elizabeth
beth Elizabeth have returned from St. Peters Petersburg,
burg, Petersburg, where they were the guests of
Mrs. Carltcn's sister-in-law, Mrs. M.

Dancing at Silver Springs tonight

It may interest friends of Miss
Eeatrice Bonev of Jacksonville, for

merly of Ocala, to know that she is
leaving for Porto Rico. After visit-

inr friends in Detroit for the pas

four months. Miss Boney will. leave to

visit Niagara Falls and Buffalo for a

few days. She will then go to ew
York and sail for Porto Rico, to visit
her brother-in-law andsister, Mr. and

Mrs. Clem Purvis, formerly of Oca la

Miss Alice Berryhill has returned

to her home in Levy county.

Mr. E. R. Canady and daughter,

Lyndell of Leesburg were visitors in
the city yesterday.

Messrs R. L. Clvburn and Nathan

Mayo were representatives of Sum Sum-merfield
merfield Sum-merfield in town yesterday.

Diekison Chapter. U. D. C., will

meet at the home of Mrs. P. W.

Whitesides at 4 o'clock Friday after afternoon.
noon. afternoon. A full atendance is desired.

MEW

v X m
...... rr

5
5

liairlkt mi (Erey

MOW OFEM

If.',
:

Choice Florida and Vestern
Meals and Fancy Groceries
Come in or Phone 243

GPS

OS

o

(DM

9 N. Main St.
Opposite Banner Office

9

28

jr ; .4 Hit fri?rf?
I -

ff :." vur i1 1 a ra mtm

Mrs. H. J. Jones leaves this after

noon for a hrff visit to Valdosta,

from where she will go to Asheville
to spend the remaindef or the summer.

The friends of George Davis, one

of cur brave A. E. F. boys, who after

suffering for months with a leg brok

en in France, broke it again in a tall

from an Atlanta street car, will be

clad to know that he has so far recov-

! ered that he will be able to soon come

home again on leave.

Mr. James Ellis, who enlisted in the

navv about five months ago, is home

for a ten days furlough, which he will!

stend with his mother and sister. Mrs.

Susan Ellis and Miss Susie Lou .bllis. i

"Jimmie" is looking fine and pro-

firessine sDlendidly. He has been sta

tioned at Gulf port, Miss., since his

enlistment, but after his furlough 13

ended he will go to Newport, R. 1 to

enter a yeoman s school.

Mr. Jessie H. Goss and family of

Chicago were in town -yesterday, on

their way in their car to Tampa. Mr.

Goss is the son of Judge J. H. uoss,
a prominent Chicago lawyer, who

made his home here over thirty years
agoi and a nephew of J. D. Goss, who

was quite a power m Ocala politics ml

the 80's. Mr. Goss hunted up several

of his father's old friends during his j

brief visit and had pleasant interviews

with them.

Mr J. C. Howell is home from a

busy business trip thru South Florida.

Mr. Hansel Leavengood is home

from a visit to Washington. Phildel-

phia and other eastern cities. He had

a good trip, but is glad to be home.

Mr. J. iL Mathews of Flemington,

daughter, Miss Marie and son, C. M.j

Mathews, were in town yesterday.

Mr. James Engesser leaves tomor

row for a brief business trip to At-i

lanta.

Mr Linn Sanders, now in business

on the east coast, is visiting his Ocala

friends.

Miss Ruby Lane Mtbley, one of Su-

.

wanee county's cnarmmg young

ladies returned with her brother from

his visit to their parents' home at
Pinemount, and is his guest for the

week.

OAK VALE

Oak Vale. July 7. About sixty peo-

nlp in the community enjoyed a big

picnic and fish fry at Johnson Lake

Friday. They had as guests Mr. ana
Mrs. H. A. Larson of Raleigh and Mr.

and Mrs. Vivian Whitehurst and chil

dren of Williston.

Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Reddick are the

proud parent sof a little baby boy, j
born July 3rd.
Mr. Alton Boyer of Jacksonville,
came Saturday and spend the fourth
with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. W.

Boyer. :

Mrs. Robinson of Williston is spena-

ing the week with her daughter, Mrs.

R. H. Reddick.

; ;: -:

llk.

!nnMiiiimi in mil a. li i a n. innin nim,mr1f

TTT7

After a game in the torrid sutv what joy in
icy-cold, sparkling Ward's Orange- Crush I
Pure as it is tempting!

As a lemon drink, Ward's Lemon Lemon-Crush
Crush Lemon-Crush is equally pure and delicious
The exclusive Ward process blends
the oil of freshly-picked oranges or
lemons with best sugar and citric
- dd (the natural acid of citrus fruits).

ENTHUSIASM

Emerson said: "Nothing great was ever
achieved without enthusiasm'
Our customers are Enthusiastic people.
Enthusiastic over the fact that they,
through their efforts, are saving money ob
their grocery bills.
Enthusiasm is Contagious
And if you hang around this store very long
yon will catcb it.
A Customer's Talk
One of our customers remarked to us that
he liked this store because it is a medium
through which children can be taught econ economy.
omy. economy. It's a good thought. Let them know
the value of a Dollar
I -Serve Grocery

inCLASSl?

ADVERTISER

CASH and CARRY

Ocala

Florida

mill - i r:

Aaents and
frvipf

CHEVROLET, COLUMBIA and COLE

Cast Iron, Steel and Brass Welding V

GENERAL AUTO REPAIRS

OCALA MOTOE CO CE- sinmc?

N. Main St Phone 71
Opposite

Ocala Iron Works f

THE WHB HOTEL
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA

In the heart of the city with Hemming Park for a front yard.

Every modern convenience in each room. Dining room service la

second to none

WANTED, LOST, FOUND, F02

SALE, FOE RENT 'AND SIM

ILAR LOCAL NEEDS

RATES Six line maxirantfi. ona

time, 25c; three times, 50c.; six tiraes

i7ic.: one montn. rayaoie ra aa-

vance.

WANTED Boys at the Star oSce to

learn routes.- Must have bicycle, tf

WANTED Young lady to wait on

table. AppI yto City Cafe. U-U

WANTED Honey. Send two-ounce

sample to Jacksonville Cracker
Works, Jacksonville, Fla. 23-1 m

HADSOCKS WOOD YARD Phoua

your orders to Smoa.k'a Shop. Phone

FOR SALE A fine young Jersey

cow, just fresh. C P. Howell, Box

188, Ocala, Fla. Phone 39M. 24-Ct

WOOD! Put in your winter supply

of wood now. By the cord or in

carload lots. W. N, Horne, Ocala,

Fla. 25-12t

FOR SALE House and lot with all

latest improvements; Ford trad;

rock face cement block madia;
also second hand lumber 2xlQ's 13

ft long, 2x6's 16 ft long. Chsap

for cash. Carl Wenzel, 702 Vyo-

mina SL 5-17- co-vr

FOR SALE Five room house in

North Ocala, four lots; good well;
close in. Apply to J. W. Gates,

Ocala, Fla. 6-12t

WANTED Fifty tie choppers &i

once. Come ready to work. Apply
to Mr. J. F. Hampton, Cornell, Fla.,
or H. C. Bilbro, care Carroll Motors

Co., Ocala, Fla. 7-6t

CALL EARLY Chase piano and

household gods for sale. Inquire
for Mr. Wilbur Shively, North
Magnolia street. 7-3t

WANTED To rent, six to eight room

house at once. Apply Box 99, tlua

city. 7-3t

WANTED To exchange nice North

Lake Weir home and small grove.

- fine for week ends and Sundays, for

a good rental house and lot in
Ocala. Address, Home, care Ocala

btar. e-st

WANTED At once, white boy, age

16 or 17 years Apply at Carter's

Bakery. 8-3t

LOST A ten dollar bill at postof-

fice (Thursday. July 8.) Return to

.Mrs. M. E. Williams at Rheinauer

& Co. 8-3t

SECOND" HAND CARS

ROBERT M. MEYER,
V,
Manager.

J. E. KAVANAUGH

Prcprietor.

I J

I -v3 I 6

HU1 t I: t

4

No. 44. ".

Report of the Condition oi

THE BAtlK OF DU tl II ELLO II

At Dunnellon ,in the State of Florida,

at the close of business June ciuxn,
1920.
Resources

Loans on real estate. 80,037.b6

Loans on collateral secu-

rity other than real
estate : '.. . . ....... 15,5024

All other loans and dis-

counts I95,lbz.id
O vedraf ts ......... . 649.68
United States bonds 22,632.40

and fixtures xvZ2m
Other real estate , . 1685.41

Claims and other resources 344.48
Due from private banks
- hnVpr 181.248.99

Other cash items 9,916.19
Cash on hand ........... 15,041.43
Total $547,966.00
Liabilities

Capital stock paid in. . .$ 30,000.00

Surplus fund &o.vi
Undivided profits (less ex ex-Denses
Denses ex-Denses and taxes paid). 9,974.13

TnHividnal Hpnosits subiect

Aher.lr . . .......... 30355.94

Time certificates of deposit 5,083.47

Certified checks 149.03
f'-jsViipr's phecks outstand

ing .. 5,y87.o7
Savings deposits 188,333.22

FLOWERS WILL FADE
but the stone is an enduring and con constant
stant constant token of affection for those wh
have passed beyond. We are prepar prepared
ed prepared to furnish a monument and will
brintr to the work all the skill of ex

perience and all the care induced by

sympathy with your idea ox a nttrag
memorial.

O CALA MARBLE WORKS

Old Shoes

mobs

t Is'

v-.

in bottles or at fountain
Prepared tT Orne-Crah Co- Ctka
BOTTLING WORKS
OCALA COCA-COLA
Evforfrm Uok. "TU Story ofOrtasOrmSr

Total

.

.$547,966.00

State of Florida,
County of Marion, ss.:
I, G. W. Neville, cashier of the
above named bank, do solemnly swear

that the above statement is true to
the best of my knowledge and belief.
G. W. Neville, Cashier.
Correct Attest:
J. G. Baskin,
W. M. Griffith;
J," F. Cocowitch, Directors.
Subscribed and sowrn to before me
this- 7th day of July,. 1920.
Chas. J. G. Tullis, Notary Public.

YOU CAN SAVE
Many Dollars

fin shoe bills bv havine us re-

Kni'M cmiT nM kViops. Our charees are

moderate, and we guarantee sausinc

tion.

MAZON & CO.

Between Ten Cent Store and Gerig'a

Drug Store

Don't fail to visit the Guarantee

ninthine' & Shoe Company. Every-

i- tmaranteed. We're

fighting for QUUTY not prices, 't of the summer.

i

.
Buy Your

WESTERN MEATS
. of all kinds
FLORIDA DFEF, PORK,
POULTRY, ETC.,
from
New York Market
W. Broadway
Phone 110

The Ocala Auto & Garage Co.. suc

cessors to Gates' Garage, has on

hand the following second nand cars,

guaranteed to be in good condition:

One 1920 7-passenger Chandler.
One 1920. Ford coupe.
One 1918 Buick, 5-passenger.
Also one new Oldsmobile Six, five-

passenger and one new Oldsmobile

Economy Truck.

Cas;h or terms.

6-tf Ocala Auto & Garage Co.

ii

j
1-3
13

t!

-

t- 1!

11

11

HOTEL ALBERT
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
Modern Throughout. Rates
from $1.50 day. Chil.
Restaurant Adjoining

A. TINS MAN
Contractor
Crick and Plastering
Tiic and Garble Flooring
Specialties
215 Fifth Street. Phone 52S

MEETING OF VETERANS

Marion Camn No. 56. U. C. V.. met

July 6th, 1920, with W. E. McGahagin

commanding. Prayer by Chaplain

'oiks. The following comrades an

swered to roll call: Alfred Ayer. J.

L. Beck, Dr. M. T. W. Christian, ii.
A. Carlton, R. J. Evans, W. J. Folks,
M. P. Frink, L. D. Geiger, W. A.

Hammond, W. E. McGahagin. B. II.
Norris, John Pasteur, J. C. Trantham,
T.. M. Graham. D. R. Irvine. Minutes

ot last meeting read and approved.

Received an ofScial order from maj.
Gen. N. A. Blitch saying that the next

general reunion would be in Houston,

Texas, on the 6th, 7th and 8th of next

October, and that the Florida division
would 'meet in Orlando on the ICth,
11th and 12th of November.

Alfred Ayer, Adjutant.
Get the habit of reading the ads.

irn

nflnnfiufi nnnrnii

iiiiiLiiUiiu mamm

Mrs. S. Lehman of North Lake
Weir and Mrs. Hafner of Belleview,
will leave Saturday for their homes

in the north to spend the remainder

trains at OCALA UNION STATION.

The following Ecneauia ngurei
lished as information and not guar

anteed.
(Eastern Standard Time)
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILROAD
Leave Aniv
2:20 am JacksonviHe-NTTork 2:10 an
1:55 pm Jacksonville 13 fa
4:C5 pm Jacksonville 4:25 pra
':" Tampa-
2:15 am Manatee- 4:C3rr.i
St. Petersburg
2:15 am Tampa 2:13 sza
1 .r.fi t-t- TftTnna.MfiTss.tea l'.ZTi r 1

4:05j)m Tarapa-St. Petrabrg 4:Capn

ATLANTIC CUASi" i
Leave Anirt
2:liSpm Ja:ksonvilleNYork S: 15 era
1 :45 pm Jksonvilla-Gaingvilla 0 :Z5 pa
6:42 am Jksonville-Gnesvilla 10:13 53
3:lSam St.Petsbrg-LakeIand 2:12 tra
3:25 pm SU?etsbrg-Lakeland 1 :- j pra
7:10 am Dunnellon-Wiicox
7:23 am D-unellon-Lkeland 11:C3 pa
3:25 pm Hcmosassa l:0prj
10:13pm Leesburg : 6:42 asa
4:45 pm Gainesville 11:53 en
'Monday, Wednesday, Friday.
Tuesday. Thursday, Saturday.



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