The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:05606

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
EVENING

STAIR

Weather Forecast: Fair tonight;
Wednesday local showers.
OCALA, FLORIDA, TUESDAY, JUNE 22. 1920.
VOL 26, NO. 1 19
ACCOMMODATING
TO THE UNIONS
INTEND TD TELL
UNABLE TO REACH
THEM ABOUT IT
AGREEMENT

J I - ......

FIGHTING BRISK FRONT LINES HAVE CATACLYSM AGAIN
ON THREE FRONTS REACHED ERISCO! RACKS CALIFORNIA

All

33

V
-r

Great Inconvenience and Suffering
They Cause the People Doesn't
Worry the Government

(Associated Press)
Washington, June 22. The switch switchmen's
men's switchmen's strike which began in Philadel Philadelphia
phia Philadelphia and Baltimore several days ago
and spread over other railroad cen centers,
ters, centers, is being watched by the gov government,
ernment, government, but as far as could be learn learned
ed learned today no steps have been taken to
combat the situatio nor prevent the
situation from spreading. Officials
are relying upon recognition of the
union heads to bring about a return
of the strikers.
PALESTINE HAS NO STAMPS
(Associated Press)
London, "June 22. Palestine is now
the only nation which has no postage
stamp of its own. But representatives
of the Zionist government here have
iirformed London philatelists that this
anomaly promises soon be to be reci reci-fied,
fied, reci-fied, for with the establishment of
Palestine as the national home of the
Jewish nation, it is believed little time
will be lost in emulating the examples
of other small nations called into be being
ing being by mandates of the peace confer conference
ence conference by the issuance of distinctive
stamps. Pending the preparation of
definite designs, stamps sold by Brit British
ish British army postoffice in adjacent former
enemy territory are being utilized by
overprinting with the word "Pales "Palestine."
tine." "Palestine." INFLUENCE OF LITERATURE
Essay by Miss Helen Veal, Graduat Graduating
ing Graduating Class 1920 Ocala
High School
To me, everyone is born a poet but
few have the gift of expression. There
are many feelings and attitudes which
we have but we do not possess the
talent to voice them in words as
some of our more fortunate fellow fellow--
- fellow-- men have,- God has given us all feel feelings
ings feelings and emotions but to only a few
has he given the power of interpreting
them.
The first great importance of lit literature
erature literature is to provide an outlet for
our souls, and an expression for our
emotions. Joy and grief are the two
extremes of our mental attitudes.
If we are not sad we must be glad.
When everything is gloomy, and some something
thing something has just happened to make us
sad, or- some unhappy event of our
past life has come back to us, nothing
can do more to dispel the grief and
console us than to confide m a friend.
On the other hand, when everything
is bright and cheery, we feel so hap happy.
py. happy. Perhaps we have heard some
good news. Doesn't it make us bubble
over with joy all the more when we
tell others about it? In either case,
to read a fitting passage in literature
is an expression of our attitude. Thus
expression relieves grief, while it
magnifies joy. That law is uncon unconsciously
sciously unconsciously obeyed by all writers. One
poem is a song of joy, while another
i3 a tale of woe, the relating of which
unburdens the soul of the poet. Thus
wc who are unable to express our
feelings effectively find them ex expressed
pressed expressed for us in literature.
When a writer has attained that
stage in which he can produce litera literature
ture literature that voices the sentiments and
puts into words the emotions that fill
the hearts of men, he is beloved by
all. Lincoln accomplished this in his
Gettysburg address.
We find in all literature something
that is common with us, if we ap approach
proach approach it from the heart side, looking
for the vital things that strike near nearest
est nearest our own life. Literature also pro provides
vides provides a means by which we might di divert
vert divert our minds from the melancholic
and center it on the optimistic. Thus,
the boy who is tired of school, who
wants to run away from its gloomy
walls into bright sunshiny fields, finds
sympathy in Robinson Crusoe.
It seems as if existence itself de depends
pends depends on literature, for while litera
ture reflects the history of nations it
plays a very important part in mould moulding
ing moulding the character of the -nations. As
the, individual is influenced by litera literature
ture literature so is the nation. Literature and
history are so closely related and
bound together that no distinct line
car: be drawn between their influence.
All men have ideals. Literature
holds before us a vision of the ideal.
Humanity is forever striving for
something higher for perfection. It
is literature, poetry that keeps the
spark of our ideals burning. We may
never catch up with our ideal and it
is best that we should not because
our progress would be halted. Thus
progress, the seeking for better
things, is stimulated by literature.
The ideal is tle guide of nations and
of individuals, and the poet is the
standard bearer.
There are two great things about
which literature is centered nature,
or the visible world, and personality,
or the invisble world within us. Both
are mysteries and they would be far

Not Much Longer Before Harding and

Coolidge Will be Informed of
Their Nomination
(Associated Press)
Washington, June 22. With the
dates fixed for officially notifying the
candidates of hhe,r nomination, the
lepuoucans toaay were awaiting an
announcement of the personnel of the
A A A
executive committee, wnicn will nave
general charge of the campaign. Sen-
ator Hardine- will be notified Julv
20 and Gov. Coolidge five days later.
MEMORIAL TO BE ERECTED
TO THE PILGRIM FATHERS
(Associated Piess)
Plymouth, Eng., June 22. Founda
tion stones of a new memorial to be
called "The Mayflower Hall." which
the Salvation Army proposes to build
on a site near the starting place of
tae Pilgrim fathers here are to be
laid on September 6th. The ceremony
wii itake place m connection with the
.a m m
tercentenary celebration 01 the sail-
ing 01 tne rngrims. ine stonea,
which are to be brought from Ply-
mouth. Mass.. will he laid hv Amhas-
1
I sador Davis, .Lady Astor, who is the
j mtmber 01 parliament tor the divis-
ion, ana uenerai tfooth. The cost 01
the scheme is $25,000.
WOODMEN, ATTENTION
The quarterly meeting of the Mar-
ion Woodmen's Association to be held
at Oxford, Fla., has postponed until
July 12th, 1920. All members should
be present on that date.
T. D. Lancaster Jr.,
Pres. Marion Woodmen Association.
'
- j
more mysterious if it were not for
tne poets, iney nave tne power to
iuu ueyonu ami to xoreteu a wnoie
when at times only a part can be
realized. Darwin wrote "The Orierin
of the Species," which upset the world
with its theories of evolution, but be-1
fere that Tennyson in "In Memoriam"!
said: "They say I

The solid earth on which we tread a most powerful personage, represent represent-In
In represent-In tracts of fluent heat began, ed the oppressed and revealed their

And grew to seeming random forms,
Tne seeming play of cyclic storms
Till at last arose the man." I
Thus the poet's dream preceded the I
scientist's theory.
We are told that Americans are the I
most "idealistic people who have thus j
tar inherited the globe, by Ex-Presi-
dent Eliot of Harvard, and we only
have to read Longfellow's "Excelsior,''
Holmes' "Chambered Nautilus" or
Lanier's "Song of the Chattahoochee"
to agree with him. These poems are
unsurpassed in their message of per-
fection and encouragement in the
search for a higher plane, I
Perhaps the most vital and impor-
tant thing that we should understand
thoroughly is human, nature. It is al-
ways with us and holds the power al-
most to make or break the world. We
all understand human nature to a
certain degree at least, but it is so
complex that it is impossible to be un-
derstood by only the daily exper-
lences. One should make it his aim to
gain a fair knowledge of it, for with-1
out that knowledge life mav not be
enjoyed to the fullest extent. As there
is no school created purposely to teach
human nature, knowledge may be I
gained by observation and through
literature. All literature reveals
something concerning the men who
created it as well as something of the
people who? like or dislike it. The
epic, the drama, the novel and the
short story are full of character
building. They reveal to us the in-
nermost structure of character.
To all business men. in fact all men I
of influence, a knowledge of human I
nature is essential. For knowledge
there is strength where ignorance is
weakness.
The writers have graciously step- I
ced forward and eiven us almost eve- I
ryy type of individuality to study.
Shakspere alone has given us forty-
six well known characters, to say
nothing of the creations of other
writers. Shakspere is the master of
human nature, because his characters
exceed those of other writers in num-
ber as well as in clearness, accuracy
and trueness to life.
Homer, the Greek poet, helped to
mould the character and institutions
of Greece by his great figure Ulysses,
The character of King Arthur, to
whom writers of all ages have con-
tributed, has wrought a most marvel-
ous influence over all the world. There
is perhaps no other character that
has caused more discussion ind
thought than Shakspere's Hamlet.
Robinson Crusoe represents primitive
man in his upward struggles, not
having the garden prepared for him.
He has come into the lives of many
children and if he has helped them in
no other way except to give them an
insight of human nature, he has aided I
them greatly. Think of Dickens' 1

of Peace Thinks Olive Trees
are Dead from Yezo
to Donegal
I (Associated Press)
Warsaw, June 22. The Poles have
PMlse,dthe e.nemy in.atta(s V1 fhe
considerable losses 0 th; bolsheviki,
according to an official statement.
ALBANIANS WORSTED
I
Rome, June 22. Serious fighting
between Albanian insurgents and
Italian troops near Drasciovitza is re
ported in an Avlona dispatch. The
Albanians were forced to retire.
LITTLE WAR IN LONDONDERRY
Londonderry, June 22. Firing was
resumed in several parts of the city
today after a comparatively quiet
night. Several were killed in the
rioting of yesterday and scores were
wounded.
DRUGGISTS JOIN IN
THURSDAY HALF HOLIDAY
Ocala June 22 1920
We the undersigned druggists of
Ocala agree to close our places of
business everv Thursdav afternoon
I vm uut ciA j wivv. rv uux 1 1 ill Lit;
summer season
The Court Pharmacy,
Bv H W Walters
j. j. Gerie
Anti-Monopoly Drugstore,
By J. G. Parrish.
G. C. Greene & Company.
This
agreement goes into effect
Thursday, June 24.
The Star congratulates the drug
gists on their willingness to add to
the general happiness of the town
They make a real sacrifice in closing
as there is no time in a summer aft
ernoon that someone does not want to
patronize their fountains, and some
of these are people who if they are
not waited on at once can't return
work in portraying childhood! Look
at the poor, subdued classes of France
Who has done more to create their
type than Victor Hugo? Jean Valjean,
oppression. Cooper and Harris have
described to us the nature of the In
dian and the negro. These are just
a few characters who represent real
types.
What is more interesting and vivid
than one of Scott's historical novels ?
oome 01 our literature is based 011
historical subjects, while other works
reflect the time in which they were
written. The ideal held before us by
literature points to the future, but
when literature gives us an insight
into the people who represented the
living it revives the past. Historians
give us mere, bare facts, but the poet
not only gives us facts but vitalizes
them in addition. Besides Shakspere
and Scott, there is Addison, who has
given us vivid pictures of England in
the 18th century: Lonerfellow who
has polished our memories with de
scriptions of America before and after
the days of the colonists, and if it
were not for "Les Miserables, there
would be many people who never
would have understood the real sig
nificance of the French revolution.
Therefore one of literature's most im
pcrtant missions is to bring the past
back to us.
Scores of us believe that poetry or
literature have little to do with the
common every day things of ordinary
life, but we are mistaken. It is not
something created to help us fill up
time, but something created to help
us master the problems and overcome
the difficulties of life. Although
poetry sings to us of the beautiful it
also exalts the commonplace. Who
but Burns would think of writing a
noem about a mouse : But when we
have read it we have a different feel
ing toward the mouse and if not ex
actly that of brotherhood, like Burns,
we feel less inclined to be cruel to it.
Almost any subject can be refined and
poetic if treated properly. Poets see
farther than ordinary men. They can
point out features in common things
that make them more interesting and
raise them above the common level.
By interpretation, new meaning and
new beauty can be brought out of
things insignificant before.
Literature helps us remarkably in
getting acquainted with our own lan-
guage. If we read widely we meet
various forms of literature, and be-
sides, our vocabulary is greatly in-
creased. By merely studying the
forms in a text book we are not so
much impressed as we are if we read
the types and thoroughly acquaint
ourselves with them. There are only
eleven forms of literature, and every
thought that has been written thru
the ages may be found in one of these
forms. Therefore when we read these
different forms we are not only amus-
ing but educating ourselves
In summing up literature's virtues
we find that they are many. It helps

Dove

Golden Gate Town Already Invaded
by the Democratic Advance
Guard

(Associated Prss)
San Francisco, June 22. While the
hotel lobbies today began to resemble
the national convention, only a few
democratic chieftains had arrived.
Direct developments of the day were
confined to the preparation of the
municipal auditorium for the conven convention.
tion. convention. Out of the current comment came
an increasing rumble of the wet or
dry maneuvers. No definite state statements
ments statements were made by the leaders al already
ready already here, but it was clearly indi indicated
cated indicated they expected a fight on the
floor of the convention over efforts
to make the platform advocate modi
fication of the prohibition enforce enforcement
ment enforcement law through a beer plank.
EMMA GOLDMAN HAS ENOUGH
Of
Soviet Russia and at Last
ognizes the Virtue of
America
Rec
(Chicago Tribune)
Paris, June 17. On the bureau of
Emma Goldman's room in the Hotel
Astoria at Petrograd, draped over the
corner of a picture of her niece, is the
American flag. Emma Goldman, de deported
ported deported from America as an anarchist,
makes no apologies for this flag.
The communist leaders living at
the hotel joke with her a little about
it, but Emma says:
"That's the flag of my niece's coun country.
try. country. I'm going back there some day,
for I love America as I love no other
land."
She is sick of bolshevik Russia.
When I called on her in Petrograd she
asked:
"What do you think of it? You
have been here six weeks. How do
you feel about it?"
"It is rotten," I replied. "It's so
rotten I'm sick with it."
"You're right, it is rotten," she said.
"But it is what we should have ex ex-petced.
petced. ex-petced. We always knew the Marxian
theory was impossible, a breeder of
tyranny. We blinded ourselves to its
faults in America because we believed
ic might accomplish something. 4
"I've been here four months now
and I've seen what it has accomplish accomplished.
ed. accomplished. There is no health in it. The
state of socialism or state of capi capitalism
talism capitalism call it what you will has
done for Russia what it will do for
every country. It has taken away
even the little freedom the man has
under individual capitalism and has
made him entirely subject to the
whims of bureaucracy which excuses
its tyranny on the ground it all is
done for the welfare of the workers.
"Where did you find the greater de degree
gree degree of freedom, Miss Goldman?" I
asked, "in the United States or in
communist Russia?"
"Any form of government is bad
enough," she replied, "but between
this and individual capitalism, the
choice lies with the latter. At least,
the individual has a chance to ex ex-press
press ex-press his individuality."
Of all the deportees who entered
Russia with Miss Goldman, only one
or two have assimilated the doctrines
of communism. Miss Goldman, Berk Berk-man
man Berk-man and Novikov, the leaders of the
group, refused to work with the gov
ernment in any way except purely
humanitarian labor.
"We are studying conditions in Rus
sia," said Miss Goldman, at another
time. "We want to make b trip thru
the country districts and talk with
the peasants. Then we will be ready
to speak. We probably will go to
jail when we start criticising, but
that doesn't matter. We've been in
jail before. We canont be true to our
principles and not speak."
Miss Goldman and Novikov refused
places in the reviewing stand at the
May Day procession, nor will they ac accept
cept accept places at any government meet meeting.
ing. meeting. I spent much of my week in Petro Petrograd
grad Petrograd with them. When I was ready to
leave, she said to me:
"Be careful what you write, if you
want to return to Russia. If you don't,
then hit out from the shoulder and
hit hard. You may be called an agent
by the capitalistic class, by the peo people
ple people in America who don't understand.
If you are, tell them we have been
her four months and now we know.
We have investigated factories, homes
and institutions as no newspaper man
can be permitted to investigate them,
and we've found them bad. I know,
from my conversation with you, you
have gotten at the heart of the mat-
. m m m
ter. It's ud to you to tell the Ameri
can people, and tell them straight."
us express ourselves, keeps the vision
of the ideal before us, gives us infor information
mation information concerning human nature.
brings the past back to us, shows us
that common themes are exalted by
iterature and helps to educate us. In
fact, it really makes life worth while.

Earthquake Does Much Damage to
the Country Around
Los Angeles

(Associated Press)
Los Angeles, June 22. A survey of
the damage resulting from the earth earthquake
quake earthquake last night indicated that Ingle Ingle-wood,
wood, Ingle-wood, ten miles southwest of here.
suffered more severely than was first
reported. Twenty-one business build
ings were practically destroyed, the
town was deprived of lights and gas
and scores of dwellings were serious seriously
ly seriously damaged.
Many plate glass windows in Los
Angeles were shattered and several
buildings were otherwise injured.
Several persons were struck by bricks
shaken from chimneys. San Pedro,
Long Beach, Santa Monica and Ven Venice
ice Venice reported minor damage.
CHINA CAME IN
BY THE SIDE DOOR
"Peking, June 22. China's ratifica
tion of the Austrian peace treaty has
been promulgated. It is held that this
entitles China to participation in the
League of Nations.
PLUGGED UP THE HOLE
(Associated Press)
Berlin, June 22. "The hole in the
west," the popular name for channels
through the occupied territory thru
which articles of luxury poured into
Germany evading the import duties,
is now closed. The inter-allied Rhine Rhine-land
land Rhine-land commission has agreed to en enforce
force enforce the new German ordinances im imposing
posing imposing fines and imprisonment for in infractions
fractions infractions of the regulations on im imports.
ports. imports. MUSIC WHILE THEY WORK
To stimulate quicker work in a
laundry at Bath, England, the pro proprietor
prietor proprietor has installed a phonograph
which grinds out popular songs and
dances while the girls scrub and iron.
A marked difference in the amount of
work done is said to be noticeable.
SOUTHERN JAPANESE
ARE VERY SICK
Tokio, June 22. One hundred cases
of cholera have been discovered in
southern Japan.
FRENCH MET TURKS
WITH BIG GUN FIRE
(Associated Press)
Paris, June 22. The Temps today
says that Turkish forces attacked
Mersina, on the Mediterranean, and
French warships in the harbor bom
barded the Turks.

WILL HE MAKE THE TOP?

Frequently, on board ship, sever ai poles are rigged and inter-divisional
arguments settled by seeing which has the be3t climber. This is especially
true on Decoration Day and other hoi idays, when sometimes the sailors are
at sea and haven't a chance to see their teams clean up in baseball or
rowing, then all hands gather around and many an unheard of new cham champion
pion champion appears to take his place later among the foremost ranks of the
fleet's athletes.

On Most Questions, Supreme Council
has Adjourned to 3Ieet in
Brussels July 2nd

(Associated Press)
Boulogne,. June 22 The supreme
council of the allied powers adjourned
today to meet in Brussels July 2nd,
leaving most of the questions on the
program undecided. The German rep reparations
arations reparations problem was referred to ex experts
perts experts who will meet in Paris in an en endeavor
deavor endeavor to conciliate the conflicting
viewpoints of the allies regarding
division of the sums Germany must
pay. The experts have not yet reach reached
ed reached a decision as to the total amount
of the reparations and the method of
payment.
NEW NOMINATIONS
(Associated Press)
Washington, June 22. Fred Neil Neil-sen
sen Neil-sen was nominated today as solicitor
for the state department, and Roland
Mahany of New Y'ork was nominated
as a solicitor for the department.
INTEND TO NOMINATE
McADOO ANYHOW
And McAdoo Positively Refuses to be
Nominated
(Associated Press)
Kansas City, June 22. Burris A.
Jenkins, clergyman and newspaper
publisher, issued the positive state statement
ment statement today that W. G. McAdoo would
be placed in nomination before the
democratic convention with or with without
out without the consent of Mr. McAdoo.
Jenkins had been seletced to make
a speech before Mr. McAdoo declined
to allow'his name to be placed before
the convention. "Whether I nominate
McAdoo or whether some one else
does, this much is certain, his name
will be placed in nomination," Jen Jenkins
kins Jenkins said.
MAC IS OBDURATE
New York, June 22. Mr. McAdoo
today telegraphed Jenkins requesting
that his name not be suggested for
the nomination. The message was
sent when he learned Jenkins an
nounced McAdoo's name would be of offered
fered offered with or. without his consent.
ANOTHER SHOCK
AT LOS ANGELES
lAssoclaled Press)
Los Angeles, June 22. Another
slight earth shock was felt in th
Inglewood district at 5 o'clock this
morning. There was no additional
damage.
K
'

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U.7 j-.l V7 :

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'"1



OCALA EVENING STAR, TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 1920

OCALA EVEIIIIIG STAB
1'ubllMheJ l-:vry Day Kirept Sunday by
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY..
OCALA, FLORIDA.

It. It. C arroll, I'remldent
P. V. I.ritri-oKuwd, S--retar -Treasurer
J. K. ISeujamln, i:dltur
Entered at Ocala, Fla., po.stoffioe as
second -clas.s matter.
Rutin- Oftl-e Five-One
LIdJtorlal DepurtiiK-nt Two-Seven
Society Reporter Five-One
ii:miikh associated press
The Associated Pre.ss la exclusively
entitled for the u.-;e for republication of
all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise cred'ted in this paper and
also the local news published herein.
Ail rights of republication of special
dispatches herein are also reserved.
DOMESTIC SUHSCRIPTION" RATES
One year, in advance $6.00
Six months, in advance 3.00
Three months, in advance 1.50
One month, in advance 60
advertising; rates
Displays Plate 15 cents per Inch for
consecutive insertions. Alternate inser insertions
tions insertions 25 per cent additional. Composi Composition
tion Composition charges on ads. that run less than
six times 5 cents per Inch. Special
position 20 per cent additional. Rates
based on 4-inch minimum. Less than
four inches will take higher rate,
which will be furnished upon applica application.
tion. application. Headline Notice: 5 cents per line for
first Insertion: 3 cents per line for each
subsequent Insertion. One change a
week allowed on readers without extra
composition charges.
Legal advertisements at legal rates.
Cox beat Harding for governor of
Ohio, and he is the only man who can
beat him in that state for president.
The ex-service men are having a
high old time in Tampa, which city
sent many of its boys to the front.
We are glad to see that our two
biggest morning papers, the Times Times-Union
Union Times-Union and the Tampa Tribune, have
set their faces against that pernicious
house joint resolution 279, by which
it is proposed to lay another $20,000, $20,000,-C00
C00 $20,000,-C00 on the schoulders of the taxpay taxpayers,
ers, taxpayers, and probably add to the burden
every time the legislature meets.
Van Swearingen "has come out in a
statement regarding his defeat, in
which he shows no ill feeling and de declares
clares declares his loyalty to the party. Mr.
Swearingen is a good man in most
ways, and if he will teetotally swear
olf the pernicious brand of politics he
has been using, he will hold all his old
friends and make plenty of new ones
as he goes along. We would like to
see his cheerful and loyal example
imitated by the great katzenjammer,
who seems to have been struck
speechless.
The Star is informed that the
church-going people of Ocala will
unite in the undertaking to bring the
teachers and scholars of the indus industrial
trial industrial school in to church every Sun Sunday
day Sunday morning, each of them to the
church of her preference. The Bap Baptists
tists Baptists we are informed have made ar arrangements
rangements arrangements to bring in their contin contingent
gent contingent next Sunday, and the other
churches will quickly follow. A very
fine thing to do. It will help the girfs
greatly, and be a source of pleasure
to those who help them. If those who
are engaged in the work want any
noticed printed, they have only to
bring them to the Star.
Elsewhere will be found the appli application
cation application for a pardon of W. S. Tucker,
the white man who with other shop shoplifters
lifters shoplifters was tried and convicted in
Marion circuit court a few weeks ago.
The Star hereby warns the state par pardoning
doning pardoning board that it will make a
great mistake .and discourage the
cause of justice in this county if it
gives Tucker a pardon. There are
many men among the state convicts
far more deserving of a pardon than
he. In fact, he deserves a pardon not
at all. Plenty able to work, he chose
to make a living by stealing. He and
his accomplices not only stole from
our merchants, but exposed to censure
and possible discharge the honest and
hardworking clerks who waited on
them. They had a fair trial, were
MICKIE SAYS

; It

convicted, and were given as much
mercy as they deserved in their sen sentences.
tences. sentences. For the last few' years Flor Florida
ida Florida has been the pasture ground of
such people, and the arrest and
prompt conviction of this gang is a
discouragement to them a lesson
that will be lost if they are pardoned.
Wc don't suppose the state board will
pardon Tucker, but we put it on fair
warning that it will commit a crime
against every honest man p.nd woman
in the state if it does.

LIGHTS SPIRIT REMAINS LIGHT
Editor Star: Please tell the people
in the county as follows:
I am pleased, big pleased, with the
vote Fletcher and Hardee received.
There were 27 offices to be filled. I
helped elect 23 of them; that's good.
My being elected to stay at home
and tend to my own affairs, that's
sure good for Light. His defeat is all
to his personal gain. He's not sore,
no complaint coming. Glad he was in
the race, happy in the result thereof
and. ready to co-operate with his
neighbors in any move that goes to
make a better community, county,
state and nation.
I am going to prove to the 322 that
voted for me that I am worthy of
their votes. Thanks.
Good luck and no disappointments
to the 1471 voters who voted for the
other three candidates, and may Mr.
Hunter prove to be the best represen representative
tative representative Marion county ever had.
L. S. Light.
Reddick, Fla., June 21.
We are glad to print this letter,
which shows the spirit of a philoso
pher and a good sport.
Light went into the campaign be because
cause because he thought he was wanted, not
because he hankered after the office.
He waged a clean campaign. He be betrayed
trayed betrayed no confidences and didn't abuse
anybody. He showed no ill-feeling
nor prejudice. He was open and
aboveboard in saying what he believ believed.
ed. believed. If he had been elected he would
have done his best. Defeated, he
shows no grouch. A full-sized little
man is L. S. Light and the Star is
glad he is one of its friends.
It appears probable that the real
reason why Catts didn't win has been
discovered. Of course there are many
others, chief among them being the
fact that he didn't get votes enough
by more than 35,000. R. W. Storrs,
editor of the DeFunik Breeze,
brought the news to the meeting of
the editorial association at Pensacola
last week. Storrs hails from the
county, Walton, where Catts votes,
and was at home when the governor
came to vote. "He votes in precinct
No. 20, and when he went down to the
polls to vote he was given ballot No.
13. If there is anything in the idea
that 13 is an unlucky, number, then
Catts seems to have got the full ben benefit
efit benefit of it." Tampa Times.
Seems to have been a No. 13 ballot
in almost every precinct, and Catts
notices printed, they have only to
precincts where he received no vote.
There is an old saying that you
can't touch pitch and remain undefil undefil-ed.
ed. undefil-ed. The wise man who first uttered
it intended it to apply to other things
than pitch. You can't act like a
bcrbarian without making yourself
barbarous; you can't indulge in cruel cruelty
ty cruelty without bringing the inborn cruelty
in your nature to the surface. The
crowd of Georgia men who, Monday,
took a negro rapist, and chained him
to a tree and poured gasoline over
him. intending to burn him to death,
and shot him to pieces when he broke
loose, did their state and community,
and worst of all themselves and, their
children ,a great wrong. No matter
what a man does, nobody is justified
in killing him with torture. If, the
crowd had the right man,, they would
have been excusable in taking him
out in the woods and 'swinging him to
a tree. But they, took a' step back
toward his own wickedness when they
tried to torture him to death.
ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE
OF TRAINS IN OCALA
Seaboard Air line
from Jacksonville . 2 :09 a. to.
for Tampa 2:10 a.m.
from Jacksonville.. l:S0p.m.
for Tampa, 1:50 p.
from Jacksonville . 4:24 p. m
for Tampa 4:25p.m.
from Tampa 2:14 a. m.
for, Jacksonville .... 2:15 a. m.
from Tampa 1:35 p. m.
for Jacksonville.... 1:55p.m.
from Tampa 4:04 p.m.
for Jacksonville.... 4:05p.m.
Arrive
Leave
Arrive
Leave
Arrive
Leave
Arrive
Leave
Arrive
Leave
Arrive
Leave
Atlantic Coast Line
Arrive from Jacksonville. 3:14
Leave for St- Petersburg.. 3:15
Arrive from Jacksonville. 3:34
Leave for St. Petersburg. 3:35
Arrive from Jacksonville.. 10:12
Leave for Leesburg 10:13
Arrive from St. Petersburg ,2:11
Leave for Jacksonville, ... 2:12
Arrive from St. Petersburg. 1:25
Leave for Jacksonville. .. w 145
Arrive from Leesburg.... 6:41
Leave for Jacksonville..... 6:42
Arrive from Homosassa... 1.25
Leave for Homosassa .... 3:25
Arrive from Gainesville,
daily except Sunday.... 11:50
Leave for Gainesville, daily
except Sunday. 4:45
Leave for JLakeland Tues Tuesday,
day, Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday T:25
Ar. from Lakeland, Tues Tues-Leave
Leave Tues-Leave for Lakeland, Tues Tuesday,
day, Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday 11:03
Leave for Wilcox, Monday,
Wednesday and Friday.. 7:10
Arrive from Wilcox. Mon
a. m.
p. m.
p. m.
p. m.
p. m.
a.m.
a.m.
p. m.
p. m
a. m.
a. m.
p. m.
p. m.
a. m.
p. m.
a. m-
p.m.
a. m.
day. Wednesday. Friday. 6:45
Don't forget the dance over
Commercial Bank Tuesday night
p.mj
the!

BUFFET SUPPER

Lieut, and Mrs. E. B. Bobzien of
Arcadia, who are spending a few
days of their honeymoon in Ocala,
the guests of Miss Elizabeth Davis,
were the honorees at a delightful but but-fet
fet but-fet supper last evening at G:30, given
them by their hostess, who was maid
of honer at their wedding, which took
place last week in Virginia.
Five tables, covered with handsome
embroidered centerpieces, In the mid middle
dle middle of which were placed bud vases
containing a bright flower, were ar arranged
ranged arranged around the spacious Davis er er-anda
anda er-anda and the made a most attractive
and inviting appearance. Shortly aftt-r
the arrival of the guests they gather gathered
ed gathered around the tables and an elegant
f.upper was served and extremely en enjoyed.
joyed. enjoyed. The latter part of the evening was
happily spent in various informal
ways, some dancing, other indulging
in music, etc., and at a late hour the
guests reluctantly bade each other,
the honorees and hostess good-night.
The folowing were those present,
who included the personal friends that
Lieut, and Mrs. Bobzien made dur during
ing during their visits in the last last sum summer:
mer: summer: Misses Elizabeth and Menie Da Davis,
vis, Davis, Onie Chazal, Avalee and Mar
guerite Edwards, Caroline Harris,
Sue Moore and Alice Bullock, Messrs.
Bruce Meffert, Albert Harriss, J. R.
Bullock, Robert MacKay, Ed Martin,
Norton Davis, Frank Harris Jr. and
Dr. Nichols.
MONTHLY MEETING
METHODIST CIRCLE
The monthly literary meeting cf
the Methodist missionary circle met
yesterday with Mrs. C. G. Bamett and
besides being a very enjoyable gather gathering
ing gathering there were subjects discussed that
were both interesting and profitable.
The musical selections rendered were
thoroughly appreciated, and those en entertaining
tertaining entertaining in this manner were Miss
Ruth Simmons, who delighted all
preseht with several selections on the
Hawaiian guitar, and Miss Luvy Lee
Schoeflin of Tampa, who sang several
songs. Miss Schoeflin was accom accompanied
panied accompanied by Miss Ullaine Bamett at the
piano and Miss Simmons on the man mandolin.
dolin. mandolin. At the conclusion of a pleas pleasant
ant pleasant afternoon, Mrs. Barnett assisted
by her daughter, Miss Ullaine serv2d
those present to pineapple ice and
cake.
OCALA LODGE NO. 286. B. P. O. E.
Ocala Lodge No. 286, Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, meets
the second and four Tuesday eve evenings
nings evenings of each month. Visiting breth brethren
ren brethren always welcome. Lodge rooms
upstairs over Troxler's and the Book
Shop, 113 Main street.
C. Y. Miller, E. R.
E. J. Crook, Secretary.
THE 10SQUIT0
IS DEADLY
Disease Carrying Insects Everywhere
a Danger
Mosquitoes have always been with
us but their true character has only
been recognized a short time. They
are carriers of malaria germs and
other deadly diseases. Dr. Carroll, a
government investigator in Cuba says
"Natural yellow fever is transmitted
by the mosquito and always and only
by the mosquito."
The mosquito bite is often as dead deadly
ly deadly as a rattlesnake's.
By every method known to mankind
both the national and local health
services are trying to exterminate the
mosquito. But this will never be.
We must protect ourselves against
this pest, by proper screening and the
use of TOR&1ENT. TORMENT is a
gaseous vapor in which no mosquito
or fly can live. It is death to insects.
Torment is sold by druggists, gen general
eral general stores and dealers everywhere.
Manufactured by G. B. Williams
Co., Quitman, Ga., exclusively. Ad 3
HOTEL ALBERT
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
Modern Throughout. Rates
from S1.50 day. Childe
i linn mi inmii
)niiHWHiw.iim
1 li.... ;,!
m
Buy Your
WESTERN MEATS
of all kinds
FLORIDA BFEF, PORK,
POULTRY, ETC.,
from
New York Market
W. Broadway
Phone 110
M
m
3

3J

i w w t7 CT .Ov .O. .Ov TN

HUDSON
.
PflnflflniQ)
(': :'"-..'tVi': :'Z'-:'Z i. Z': r'TvTVX
SEEDS!
Ninety day and old fashion velvet j
beans, chufas, Pylea and Gist seed
corn. Ocala Seed Store, phone 435. tf
Old Shoes
YOU CAN SAVE
Many Dollars
On your shoe bills by having us re rebuild
build rebuild your old shoes. Our charges are
moderate, and we guarantee satisfac satisfaction.
tion. satisfaction. MAZON & CO.
Between Ten Cent Store and Gerig's
Drug Store
The Kind to
which Barney
trusted his
lite
If Barney Trusts Them
YOU CAN
DAY ItS, The Tire Man
Vulcanizing
Phones 438-76.
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTER AND
BUILDER
Careful estimates made on all con contract
tract contract work. Gives more and better
work for the money than any other
contractor in the city.
WM. A. TINSMAN
Contractor
Brick and Plastering
Tile and Marble Flooring
Specialties
213 Fifth Street. Phone 526
KEPT HER AWAKE
The Terrible Pains in Back and
Sides. Cardui Gave Relief.
Marksville, La. Mrs. Alice Johnson,
cf this place, writes: "For one year I
suffered with an awful misery in my back
znd sides. My left side was hurting me
all the time. The misery was something
awful.
I could not do anything, not even sleep
a! night. It kept me awake most of the
night ... I took different medicines, but
nothing did me any good or relieved me
until I took Cardui .
I was not able to do any of my work
for one year and I got worse all the time,
was confined to my bed off and on. I got
so bad with my back that when 1 stooped
down I was not able to straighten up
again ... I decided I would try Cardui
. . By time I had taken the entire bottle
I was feeling pretty good and could
straighten up and my pains were nearly
all gone.
I shall always praise Cardui. I con continued
tinued continued taking it until I was strong and
well." If you suffer from pains due to
female complaints, Cardui may be just
wliat you need. Thousands of women
who once suffered in this way now praise
Cardui for their present good health.
Give it a trial. NC-I33

- O. t. .-TT-. .. .-r. .O. .r. .- .-r.

ESSEX STUIDEBAKER
AUTOMOBILES S

(Go- 1M

-: Z'-jZ':: Z:'Z':'Z'..-Z'SX'- -Z-SZ' Z'- 'Z'- "X":
u.c Service is not an empty;
:.vord. I am prepared to
Hwr.,- .give your eyes the serv-
-:r. 'ce vou bave been petn!-
vvc-xV ing so long.
DR. K. J. WEI HE,
Optometrist and Optician
Eyesight Specialist
COW PEAS AND BEGGAR WEED
Whippoorwill, C.25; Whippoorwill
mixed, $0; Iron and Clay mixed, SCJfi;
New Era, $6.25; Cream Crowder,
$t'.5u; Beggarweed, 75c. pound. Send
orders at once to Deans Seed So.,
Orlando, Fla. 14-lut

THE WINDSOR HOTEL
JACKSONVILLE," FLORIDA
In the heart of the city with Hemming Park for a front yard.
Every modern convenience in each room. Dining room service is
second to none

ROBERT M. MEYER,
Manager.

IF U R N II T ra EE
We now have on hand a number of real up-to-date
Bed Room, Dining Room and Parlor Sets,
and considering the quality the prices are ex extremely
tremely extremely reaaonable.

m 9

OUR

REFRIGERATORS

of every description will prove attractive to you during the
R good old summer's time." We have them from AZ

15 and Up.

THEU
Opposite Ocala
North lLlannolia St.

WHENEVER you have a need in our line and
want it quick
PHONE US
We will give you Absolutely Accurate and Immediate
Service, and deliver to you perhaps before you
could reach our store.
We give special attention to phone orders because we
know the heed is urgent, and we send you just
what you want.

.-T-. S? ."T .!. ST: ST: .-T-. .-T: ST. y-v -v

'. .-tT-. .--- .OA
; See Me
For AH Classes Of
Stone, Brick, Wood,
and Concrete
Building
j. D. McCasMll
Contractor
Phone 41G. 72ft Wenona St.
J. E. KAVANAUGH
Proprietor.
Mm
LINE OF
O u:
National Hank let
OCALA. FLA. K5



OCALA EVENING STAR. TUESDAY, JUNE 22, 1920

HUNTER'S AUTO EXCHANGE

LIGHT PLEASURE CAR OR
HEAVY TRUCK
it matters not--t.be maic touch
of our paint brush and lo! it is
at once transformed into a new
car or truck. At least, to all
appearances it is new. Our auto
painting and finishing not only
improve its look", but adds to
its life.

iOPS Nev.-, r ove red, patched and coated with a patent wax paste
that makes old top? absolutely waterproof.
MINTING Autos painted, striped and finished in the best of
material.
UPHOLSTERING We are prepared to give you satisfactory ser service
vice service in upholstering backs, seats or cushions.
TIRES, TUBES, GAS and OILS
LET US REPAIR, PAINT AND UPHOLSTER YOUR CAR, SO
YOU C,N ENJOY IT YOURSELF OR SELL TO ADVANTAGE.

AUTOS BOUGHT, SOLD and REPAIRED

J. W. H

UNTEM

finals SOUTH MAGNOLIA STREET fE7,BT,58
CdlCl OLD METROPOLITAN THEATER 10003

.Fire
Proof

E

WS-iQTE ST

Negotiable Storage Receipts Issued on Cotton, Automobiles, Etc.

SHIP

MOVE, PACK, S
II LIVE STOCK,

PIANOS, BAGGAGE.
MACHINERY,
FURNITURE, ETC.

LONG DISTANCE MOVING

296

P. O. BOX 60C

STAR JOB

DEPARTMENT

PHONE 51

L

LETTERHEADS, BILLHEADS, CARDS,
CIRCULARS, FOLDERS, FINE BOOKLETS, ETC.

WE NEVER DISAPOINT A CUSTOMER ON A
PROMISE. YOU GET THE JOB WHEN ITS DUE.

Base

THURSDAY, June 24

Ocala

TTTTO ti

v.ininpspFflis

Hunter Park 4:00 O'clock

Agents and
Service

CHEVROLET, COLUMBIA and COLE

Cast Iron, Sleel and Brass Welding

GENERAL AUTO REPAIRS

OCALA MOTOR CO c-L Simmons

X. Main St. Phone 71
Opposite
Ocala Iron Works

DCALA

If you have any society items,
phr-ne five-one.
Miss Kate L. Scott left last night
for Roanoke, Va., to spend the summer.

Mr. Whitfield Palmer leaves tomor tomorrow
row tomorrow for a srvent! Uuys business trip
to Tampa.
RuIj-My-Ti-iu is a great pain killer,
lit relieves pain and soreness caused by
rheumatism, neuralgia, sprains, etc.
We are piouu of the confidence doc doctors,
tors, doctors, druggists and the public have in
r,CI- Chiil and I"eer Tonic. !u

Mr. Emmett Robinson lias returned
to Jacksonville after a brief visit to
the city.

Rub-My-Tism is a powerful antisep antiseptic;
tic; antiseptic; it kills the poison caused from in infected
fected infected cuts, cures old sores, tetter, etc

Mrs. Tom Pasteur has leturned to

her home in Palatka after a brief but

phasant stay in the city with rela

tives.

Mrs. L. W Ponder and her pretty

little niece, Lucy Johnson of Palatka,

have returned home from a short visit
to Sarasota.

This line o' type is placed here to remind you that advertising pays.

Mr. Marshall Cam left this after afternoon
noon afternoon for Oklahoma to spend the re remainder
mainder remainder of the summer on an adver adver-turing
turing adver-turing trip.

Mr. Claude Haycraft is a visitor to
the city, having come especially to
attend the wedding of his sister, Miss
Ethel Haycraft.
Mrs. W. J. Frink and little daugh daughter,
ter, daughter, Bettie of Sumica, arrived today
to spend several weeks with Mrs.
Frink's father, Mr. D. E. Mclver.

Mr. L. J. Sigmon of South Lake
Weir passed through Ocala Sunday
afternoon en route to Tampa, to at attend
tend attend the American Legion reunion.

666 quickly relieves Constipation,
Biliousness, Loss of Appetite and
Headaches, due to Torpid Liver, la
Misses Eloise Henry and Agnes
Burford are at Daytona Beach at attending
tending attending a house party given by a
number of young folks from Orlando.
Mrs. C. W. Long and baby daugh daughter,
ter, daughter, Ruth of Trenton are visitors in
the city, guests at the honTe of Mrs.
Long's parents, Mr. and Mrs. M. M.
Little.

W. K. Lane, M. D., Physician and
Surgeon, specialist Eye, Ear. Nose and
Throat. Office over 5 and 10 cent store,
Ocala. Fla. tf

Mr. and Mrs. P. G. Murphy accom accompanied
panied accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Dumas
and Mr. and Mrs. D. S. Woddrow
motored to Tampa Sunday to attend
the reunion of the American Legion.
Don't fail to visit the Guarantee
Clothing & Shoe Company. Every Everything
thing Everything we sell i guaranteed. We're
fighting for QUALITY not prices- '-f

Mrs. James F. Carlton and daugh daughter,
ter, daughter, Elizabeth of .Memphis, Tenn., are
visitors in the city for a week at the
home of Mrs. Carlton's father and
mother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. R. A.
Carlton.

Mr. H. E. Hawes of Elberton, Ga.,
is a visitor in town for several days.
He came to attend the wedding of his
nephew, Mr. L. C. Hawes to Miss
Ethel Haycraft, which took place this
afternoon.

The Eastern Star circle will have a
meeting tomorrow afternoon at 3:30
o'clock at the Masonic home and all
members are urged to be present, as
there are matters of importance to be
discussed.

666 has more imitations than any
other Chill and Fever Tonic on the
market, but no one wants imitations
in medicine. They are dangerous. iu
Mrs. Alfred J. Beck of Fort Lauder Lauderdale
dale Lauderdale returned to Ocala yesterday
from Tampa, wher she motored sev several
eral several days ago with Mr. E. K. Nelson
and daughter, and she is again a
guest at the home of her brother-m
law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. S. T. Sis Sis-trunk
trunk Sis-trunk for several weeks.

Lieut, and Mrs. F. B. Bobzein will
leave tomorrow afternoon for their
home in Arcadia, after several days
spent in the city, guests of Misses
Elizabeth and Meme Davis. Visits
from this couple, who are both very
popular here, are always greatly en enjoyed
joyed enjoyed by scores of friends.
Mrs. Charles V. Miller and daugh daughter,
ter, daughter, Alice of Tampa, will arrive in the
city Thursday afternon from Gaines Gainesville,
ville, Gainesville, where they have spent the past
ten days the guests of Mrs. J. M. Dell.
They will spend several weeks here
at the home of Mrs. Miller's parents,
Judge and Mrs. W S. Bullock.

. . r -- r --' 'rt "a i T "'

4

t.f-r -IJ--2 v v.

--r

4 .frc'

D re nought
Ost FrieslaCnd
Cruiser Frsjikfuii
Destroyer of V Clss

..... u,.,,,.,,., ,...i.i,m1JW,u,.m., .Mli,,.luMn,y:;?;q'"?;yj

As a sincere acknowledgement of

the paramount value of the American
navy's part in the world war and its

signal performance in "guarding the
road to France," the allied peace coun

cil allotted to our sea forces, eleven
German fighting craft ranging from
dieadnaught to submarines. With the

American flag at the peak and ac

cording to customs of war, flying high
above the conquered German naval
ensign, these surrendered ships will

scon enter New York harbor. Amer American
ican American crews have already been dis dispatched
patched dispatched abroad to bring home these
great trophies.
These are the first real prizes of
war that have been won by the navy
in our times. In the Spanish-American
war the Spanish armored cruiser
"Marie Teresa" surrendered at the
battle of Santiago but was lost at sea
and other than a few small gunboats
captured at Manila bay and in Cuban
waters, the navy had no real big
prizes from the war with Spain.
The treaty of peace ended once for
all the German navy. Only the

TROPHIES OF THE WAR
treachery of the German admiral
robbed the allied navies of the best
of the surrenedered ships, for so well
had the Germans done their work
that the new battle cruiser "Hinden "Hinden-lurg"
lurg" "Hinden-lurg" could not be salvaged. Among
the ships beached and saved was the
new scout-cruiser "Frankfurt" which
has since been alloted to the Ameri American
can American navy and is now under our flag.
Damaged by the grounding at the
Oikneys, the turbine machinery of
this ship is not in working order and
the transport "Hancock" will tow the
German vessel across the Atlantic.
But the big prize of our spoils of war
will be the dreadnaught "Ost Fries Fries-land,"
land," Fries-land," a handsome comparatively
modern battleship of 22,000 tons, arm armed
ed armed with twelve, 12-inch guns and a
powerful secondary battery. Both the
"Frankfurt" and the "Ost Friesland"
bore the brunt of battle and were in
at the melee at Jutland. The big ship
was struck by a British torpedo but
due to the clever way the Germans
have employed sub-dividing their
hulls, the vessel managed to limp into

port. The "Frankfurt" also came
through the action practically scot scot-free,
free, scot-free, being hit only four times with
a few casualties.
Three German destroyers are also
going to be ours. Of these the G-102
had an interesting career. Built orig originally
inally originally by Schichan for Argentine, as
the St. Louis, the Germans, at the out outbreak
break outbreak of the war, appropriated her
and her four sisters. This extremely
fast craft took part in the North Sea
actions and was scuttled at Scapa
Flow. The other two destroyers were
also salvaged at the Orkneys and are,
as far as machinery is concerned, in
a disabled condition and will be towed
by the American mine-swsepers. Rail,
Red Wing and Falcon. Six German
U-boats have already been delivered
to us and are in the navy yards under
examination and study by our ex experts.
perts. experts. These vessels will undoubted undoubtedly
ly undoubtedly be placed in first class condition
and comparative tests will be made to
determine the relative value of the
ships built by Germany and those

I constructed by our own experts.

Messrs. C. L. Fox and Bryan Butler
to Akron, O. They went in their car
via Atlanta to Washington, and from
Washington west to Akron. Mr. Ditto
returned by rail from Akron to Ocala.
He says he saw some of the prettiest
country in the world, particularly in
Maryland, but likes old Marion best.
Just received. White Buck and Can Canvas
vas Canvas Oxfords, also High Top Canvas
Shoes. These go with your palm
beach, white flannel pants and sport
coat. Just remember when there is
anything new Waterman has it. 3t
Mr. Leland Akin, who has been
with his sister, Mrs. J. C. Lanier for
some time and an employee of the
Ocala Auto & Garage Co.. has return
ed to Cleveland, O., where he will re resume
sume resume his former position with the
New York Central railway. Mr. Akin
has many friends in Ocala who regret
to have him make his home elsewhere,
but their best wishes follow him.

Don't fail to visit the Guarantee
Clothing & Shoe Company. Every Everything
thing Everything wre sell is guaranteed. We're
fighting for QUALITY not prices, tf

Mr. F. W. Ditto reached home Sun Sunday
day Sunday afternoon from his trip with

Just received. White Buck and Can Canvas
vas Canvas Oxfords, also High Top Canvas
Shoes. These go with your palm
beach, white flannel pants and sport
coat. Just remember when there is
anything new Waterman has it. 3t
The members of the house party,
given by a few of the young men of
the town complimenting their young
lady friends, enjoyed a dance last eve evening
ning evening at the Lawe Weir club house,
and there were a number of young
people who went to the lake for the
occasion. The young people compos composing
ing composing the house party, who have had
one of the merriest times of their
lives, will return home today.
666 has proven it will cure malaria,
chills and fever, bilious fever, colds
and lagrippe. It kills the germs that
cause the fever. Fine tonic. tu

SPECIAL

for Four Days this week
TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY
and FRIDAY

USED CARS FOR SALE
One-ton worm drive Ford truck,
only used about thirty days.
One Reo Speed Wagon (truck).
One model N Hupmobile.
All these cars are in first class
shape and prices are very low.
l(,-6t T. M. KILGORE,
120 S. Magnolia St. Phone 117.
Don't fail to visit the Guarantee
Clothing & Shoe Company. Every Everything
thing Everything we sell is guaranteed. We're
fighting for QUALITY not prices, tf

No. 10 Snowdrift
per bucket -No.
4 Snowdrift
per bucket -1
pound Seeded Raisins
per package
3 pounds Crisco
per package
6 pounds Crisco
per package
1 1-2 pounds Crisco

per package
10c package Golden Age
Macaroni
10c package Golden Age
Spaghetti -Home
Cured Smoked Bacon
per pound
Wilson's Certified Grated
Pineapple, No. 2 can -Curtis
Bros, pure Bap Maple
Syrup per bottle

Delivered any where in town
B. W HITTING TON
Phone 377

$2.45
$1.25
-20c
$1.00
$1.95
50c
. 7c
7c

35c
30c
65c

APPLICATION FOR PARDON

WT. S. Tucker
Notice-is hereby given that I the
undersigned who was convicted of
being accessory to the crime of grand
larceny, in the spring term of the
circuit court of Marion county, Flor- i
ida, and sentenced to serve one year ;

i in the state penitentiary, will make

application for pardon before tha :
next meeting of the .pardon board, j
which will meet in Tallahassee, Flor- i
ida, July 6th and 7th, 1920. j

6-22-10t W S. Tucker.
Don't forget the dance over the
Commercial Bank Tuesday night. 2t

ATTENTION, SPANISH
WAR VETERANS

All Spanish-American war veterans
resident in Marion county are urged
tc meet at the Board of Trade room,
Friday, June 25, at 8 o'clock, for the
purpose of organizing a camp of
United Spanish-American War Vet Veterans.
erans. Veterans. 21-5t Committee.

SEEDS!
Ninety day and old fashion velvet
beans, chufas. cow peas and sorghum
seed. Ocala Seed Store, phone 435. tf

1



OCALA EVENING STAR, TUESDAY, JUN'E 22, 1920

LATEST -LOCALS
Temperature this morning, 70; this
afternoon, 85.

Mrs. W. E. Smith left this after afternoon
noon afternoon for a brief visit to Jacksonville.
Mr. Handbury of Martel was a
well known visitor in town yesterday.
Mr. O. W. Long leaves this after afternoon
noon afternoon for Newberry, S. C, for a visit
of several months.
Miss Christine Sparkman, Crystal
River, Mrs. R. E. McEwen and Miss
C. Davis of Eastlake, were shoppers
in the city yesterday.
Mrs. Claude Nelson and two chil children
dren children of Jacksonville, are visitors in
the city, guests of Mrs. Nelson's
mother, Mrs". Pooser.
Mr. and Mrs. Tom Lutz and son are
now occupying their cozy little bun bungalow
galow bungalow recently purchased from Mrs,
Arthur Williams, on South Third
street.
Mr. Donald N. Loop, a prominent
young man of Jacksonville, cashier in
the city treasurer's office, is a visitor
in the city, the guest of Mr. W. E.
Montgomery.
Miss Ethel Crosby and Mr. F. D.
Tompkins of Citra, and Mrs. George
Douglas of Olustee, but visiting rela relatives
tives relatives at Electra, were among the out
of town visitors in the city this morn morning.
ing. morning. Mrs. L. C. Bell and daughters, Mar Margaret
garet Margaret and Mamie, accompanied by
Mr. D. M. Barco and Miss Helen Veal
motored to Arcadia several days ago
to be the guests of Mr. W. M. Barco
and family for ten days.
Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Robbins and
Miss Minnie Robbins of Miami, passed
through the city Monday en route to
their home after a pleasant visit with
relatives at Cotton Plant. They came
up especially to attend the gradua graduation
tion graduation of Miss Helen Veal from the

M

A

A Maxwell is a simple car.
Its engine, axles, clutch,
transmission and gears are
the utmost in simplicity,
which is the goal of scien scientific
tific scientific engineering.
Spe cial steels have made
this possible. They are steels
niacin to Mux well's own for formulae,
mulae, formulae, ilia result of thou thousands
sands thousands of te?ts and years of
analysis.
These steels give a Maxwell
the remarkable combination
of extra strength and light lightness
ness lightness in weight.
In this way complicated
construction has been
avoide:!. Simple design has
naturally followed and to
this simplicity rare strength

hi

fl a mm n. c

Vi ii llw urn, m if 1 1 j 1 1 j

Ocaal high school. While here Mr.
and Mrs. Robbins were tendered many
social courtesies by their friends.
Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Cooksey are re rejoicing
joicing rejoicing over a new daughter, who
came this morning.
Mr. N. L. Williams leaves today for
a vacation at Whitesville, N. C. It
has been a long time since Williams
had a vacation.

Miss Josephine Brockington, who
has been the guest of Mr. and Mrs. S.
J. Jones for several days, has return returned
ed returned to her home in Jacksonville.
Jesse Billingsley, on his way from
Miami to Tampa, to attend the Amer American
ican American Legion reunion, stopped in the
city yesterday to see his friends.
Mr. W. R. Britt, with the Fruit Fruitgrowers
growers Fruitgrowers Express, who has been en engaged
gaged engaged here for several months, has
gone to Atlanta, to fill a position with
the same company in that city.
We rise to vindicate Dr. J. E. Chace.
Yesterday's Star contained an item to
the effect that he had returned from
Miami, and down under the item, en entirely
tirely entirely detached from it. but inside the
dashrule, was the single work "un "untrue."
true." "untrue." How in blazes it came there
we know not but we will go on the
doctor's bail that it was "untrue."
NEW COUNT FOR NEW YORK
New York, June 22. Dissatisfied
with the government's census figures,
which showed that New York,, had
gained less than 900,000 during the
last ten years, city authorities today
started 700 enumerators on a test
recount in the Manhattan region.
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS'
Ocala, Lodge No. 19. Convention!
held every Monday evening at 7:30
o'clock at the Castle Hall, over the G.
C. Greene Co. drugstore. A cordial
welcome to visiting brothers.
W. M. Parker, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage. K. of R. & S.

fli i,

The Simplicity of a

is Due to Special Steels

has been added by the use
of these special steels.
Strains, twists, thrusts,
shocks and blows are i i-tected
tected i-tected against in many i r
cars by reinforcements, extra
weight in metals used, and
a design that obviously is
anything but simple.
In a Maxwell this simplic simplicity
ity simplicity has made the car easier
to build, and it therefore is
better built, easier to drive,
and easier to care for.
That this should win
friends for Maxwell is al almost
most almost too obvious to ciill at attention
tention attention to.
Nearly 400,000 persons
now drive a Maxwell,which is
a very definite endorsement.

TT TT ?

mm ol lie

Ocala, Florida

CROM-HANNAH

The following announcement, which
has been received in Ocala, will be of
much interest to the friends of the
groom, Captain Wm. H. Crom, who
with his parents resided in Ocala for
several years during his early boy boyhood
hood boyhood days, and made many friends:
"The Reverend Henry Dodge Ap Ap-penzeller,
penzeller, Ap-penzeller, Seoul, Korea, announces the
marriage of his sister, Ida Hannah, to
Captain William Hampton Crom,
Thirty-first Infantry, United States
Army, Monday, the twelfth of April,
nineteen hundred and twenty, Manila,
Philippine Islands."
Mr. H. K. Fryer came up from
Tampa Saturday, to visit his daugh
ter, Mrs. W. C. Charles. Mrs. Charles
accompanied him to Tampa Sunday,
and returned to Ocala Monday.
Advertise in the Star.
Arrival and departure of passenger
trains at OCALA UNION STATION.
The following schedule figures pub published
lished published as information and not guar guaranteed.
anteed. guaranteed. (Eastern Standard Time)
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILROAD
2:20 am Jacksonville-NYork 2:10 am
1:55 pm Jacksonville 1:30 pm
4:05 pm Jacksonville 4:35 pm
Tampa-
2:15 am Manatee- 4:05 pm
St. Petersburg
2:15 am Tampa 2:15 am
1:50 pm Tampa-Manatee 1:35 pm
4:05 pm Tampa-St Petrsbrg 4:05 pm
ATLANTIC COAST LINE R. R.
Leave Arrive
2:12 pm JacksonvilleNYork 3:15 am
1:45 pm Jksonville-Gainsville 3:35 pm
6:42 am Jksonville-Gnesville 10:13 pm
3:18 am St.Petsbrg-Lakeland 2:12 am
3:35 pm St.Petsbrg-Lakeland 1:25 pm
7:10 am Dunnellon-Wilcox
7:25 am Dunellon-Lkeland 11:03 pm
3:25 pm Homosassa 1:30 pm
10:13pm Leesburg 6:42 am
4:45 pm Gainesville 11:50 am
'Monday, Wednesday, Friday.
Tuesday. Thursday, Saturday.

I

L

UNCLASSIFIED

ADVERTISEMENTS
WANTED, LOST. FOUND, FOR
SALE, FOR RENT AND SIM SIMILAR
ILAR SIMILAR LOCAL NEEDS
RATES Six line, maximum, one
time, 25c; three times, 50c.; six times
75c; one month, $3. Payable in ad advance.
vance. advance. WANTED For permanent position,
competent lady stenographer, who
can assist with books when neces necessary.
sary. necessary. E. C. Jordan &Co. 21-2t
FOR RENT Furnished apartment,
private bath. Just off Fort King
avenue. No children. Call phone
211. 16-15t
G. N. CAUDLE General boilermak boilermak-er,
er, boilermak-er, sheet iron work and welding.
Day or night phones, 5 and 260. 6t
WANTED Work to do. Good cham chambermaid
bermaid chambermaid for hotel or private house.
From Sumter, S. C. Call 307 South
Main St., Ocala, Fla. Elizabeth
Linton. 22-lt
FOUND Ring. Same can be had by
calling at this office and paying for
this ad. 22-3t
WRITE The Truth Seeker Co., New
York, for sample copy of the Truth
Seeker, a free thought and agnostic
publication. 23-2t
FOR SALE House and lot with all
latest improvements; Ford truck;
rock face cement block machine;
also second hand lumber 2xl0's 18
ft. long, 2x6's 16 ft long. Cheap
for cash. Carl Wenzel, 702 Wyo Wyo-mina
mina Wyo-mina St. 5-17- eow
FOR SALE Bucks gas range. Used
but not abused. A bargain. Call
phone 304, or at 702 S. 4th St. 6t
WANTED A competent furniture
repair man, to take charge of all
repair work and second hand de department.
partment. department. Apply to E. C. Jordan
& Co. 21-3t
HADSOCK'S WOOD YARD Phone
your orders to Smoak's Shop. Phone
?146. 2-m
FURNITURE, ETC. I buy and sell
Second-hand furniture. Experts put
it in good condition before re-selling.
Repair sewing machines, lawn
mowers, enamelware, etc. J. i7.
Hunter, 310, 312, 314 S. Main St tf
FOR SALE Five passenger 19W
model Maxwell car, cheap for cash.
In perfect running order. Apply
to owner. T. D. Howell, 209 Orange
avenue, Ocala. Fla. 16-6t
FOUND Large tan suitcase, the
property of some lady. Owner ap apply
ply apply to Walter Kendrick, 109 East
Third St., or at Star office. 21-3t
FOR SALE: 20-acre farm for sale
cheap; all under fence; five-room
house and barn in Ocala. Price
$700. Apply W. Tagg, 307 Main
street. 2-6t
FOR RENT Week end light house housekeeping
keeping housekeeping accommodations at Lake
Weir can be. had after June 25. Ad Address
dress Address Mrs. Frank Lytle, Stanton,
Fla. 19-6t
FOR SALE Made to order large
heavy white enamel bed, spring and
mattress. A bargain. Call phone
211. 16-6t
FOR SALE One-horse second hand
wagon good order; one 2-horsepow-er
second hand International pump pumping
ing pumping engine, worked over; good run running
ning running order. D. N. Mathews, phone
368. 18-6t
STRAYED To my residence, one
old, black mare mule, on the 12th
of June. Same can be had by pay paying
ing paying for this ad. and feed. Six miles
south of Ocala, on Orange avenue.
W. M. Gist. 18-6t
PROBLEMS FACING
A STRICKEN WORLD
By FRANK COMER FORD.
"The program of the communist
party (bolsheviks) Is 'the program not
only of the liberation of the. proletar-
.V.'
::
V
-.
Z-
v.

ID) EL

i
j iar o; or;f -oi;r?try. ir H the program
f r!.. ii! .:;itii.il the pi l-tariut "f
all i-ountrips; it is the program of
international revolution. The ovef ovef-jtl.iow
jtl.iow ovef-jtl.iow of" iniperiali-T governments by

iui-i.it of armed revolt is the ro;.d to
: the international dictatorship of the
; working class." In these words. Bu-
charih. accredited and recognized bol bol-j
j bol-j shevik propagandist, set forth the ob ob-j
j ob-j ject of the communists at Moscow in
j 1918.
Lenine, in the same year. In Petro Petro-!
! Petro-! grad. declared "that the chief task
wnicn we set ou selves at the very
beginning of the war was to turn the
Imperialistic war into a civil war."
His aim was to force upon Russia
Communism, and to summon the dis discontented
contented discontented of the world to rise In rev revolution
olution revolution against their governments. All
existing governments were vile, lenine
said, and they must be overthrown.
Political action, parliamentary meth methods,
ods, methods, peaceful voting, were worse than
useless. They were Inventions of the
devil. Capitalism. Force must be
used ; the workers must arm them themselves
selves themselves and fight; the world could not
come to the light of freedom and
! Justice except through blood. Le
nine was 'for the great "red baptism.'
It alone could cleanse the world and
make It a decent place In which to
live. He wrote the aim and object
of bolshevism Into the soviet consti constitution
tution constitution when he defined the funda fundamental
mental fundamental problem as being the "victory
of socialism in all land." He bla blazoned
zoned blazoned the war cry on the coat of arms
of the bolshevik government In these
words: "Workers of the World,
Unite."
The bolshevik government has been
insistent and persistent in Its prop propaganda,
aganda, propaganda, collecting and pointing out the
causes for discontent in other lands.
It has been a propaganda of hate. It
has scattered, broadcast, poison seeds
In the soil of unrest. It has played
to class feeling. It has appealed to
the lowest and worst in men. It has.
written and spoken of the "Great War"
as the enterprise of capital. It has
charged up the terrible shedding of
blood to capitalistic Imperialism. It
has listed the ill-effects of the war and
charged them not to the war, but to
Capitalism. It has pointed to the
poverty and the disorganization of the
world, directly caused by the war,
and attributed all of these unhappy
results of. a four year struggle with
autocracy, not to the war but to the
system of so-called "Bourgeois Govern Government."
ment." Government." It has multiplied, magnified
and Intensified unrest. It hopes to
bring about a great world foment
which will destroy all government
except the government of the proleta proletariat,
riat, proletariat, the soviet plan. Its propaganda
has caused many of the people of the
world to think that they are still fight fighting
ing fighting the regimes of the czars, and that
reactionary governments everywhere
are conspiring to bring about their
downfall and re-establish the reign
and rule of despots in Russia. It does
not make conspicuous the fact that the
czar Is dead and that his regime has
passed forever.
Lenine Without Toleration.
TJenlne decries anyone and every
one who does not accept his gospel of
world revolution. He is particularly
bitter towards socialists who are op opposed
posed opposed to his program. Writing of
"the military program of the proletar proletariat
iat proletariat revolution" he concludes his ar article
ticle article in the November "Class Struggle"
for 1919: "Whoever. In v'ew of this
last war. Is not willing to carry out
this demand, let him be good enough
to refrain from uttering large words
about the international revolutionary
democracy, about the social revolution
and about the war against wars."
Of those who have dared to de denounce
nounce denounce militarism and demand disarm disarmament
ament disarmament Lenine has written:
"What will the proletariat women do
to prevent this? Merely denounce all
wars and militarism? Merely demand
disarmament? Never shall the women
of an oppressed and revolutionary
class resign themselves to so despic despicable
able despicable a role. On the contrary, they
will say to their sons: 'You will soon
be grown up. You will have a gun.
Take It and learn how to use It not
In order to fight your brothers. a is
the practice In this war of plunder,
but in order to fight the bourgeois of
your "own" country; In order to put
an end to misery and wars, not !y
means of "kind wishes." but by over overthrowing
throwing overthrowing and disarming the bour bourgeoisie.'
geoisie.' bourgeoisie.'
The third "International" was called
together to organize the movement

ICATESSM PEPARTIERTI

WE ARE PLEASED to announce that
we will open a Delicatessen Department
in our store in the very near future.
MACHINES have all been bought for
Mayonnaise Salads, Meat Loafs, Rel Relishes,
ishes, Relishes, etc. We will also grind our own
Peanut Butter.

aiMinr ih pence or tne worin.
ne: n? Mn ow from March 2 to March
6. 1919; it adopted a "manifesto"
which was signed by Lenine and
Trotzky. the leading spirits of th? con congress
gress congress of the communist international
This "Manifesto" has been sent all
over the world. It makes no bone
about the plan of the bolsheviks to
incite the world to disorder. On the
contrary, It boasts that this la Its
mission. Under the caption "The Way
to Victory" the manifesto declares:
"The revolutionary era compels the
proletariat to make use of the means
of battle which will concentrate Its
entire energies, namely, mass action,
with Its logical resultant, direct con conflict
flict conflict with the governmental machinery
in open combat. All other methods,
such as revolutionary use of bour bourgeois
geois bourgeois parliamentarism, will be of only
secondary significance."
The "manifesto" further proclaims
the the "First International" foresaw
the future development and pointed
the way; the "Second International
gathered together and organized the
proletariat; the "Third International
is the International of open mass ac action
tion action of the revolution, the International
of Deeds. The work of the "Third
International" Is mapped out in the
"Manifesto" In these words:
"The task of the International com com-mulst
mulst com-mulst party Is now to overthrow this
order (present governments) and to
erect In Its place the structure of the
socialist worlds order. We urge tne
working men and women of all coun countries
tries countries to unite under the communist
banner, the emblem under which the
first great victories have already been
won.
"Proletarians of all lands! In the
war against imperialistic barbarity,
against monarchy, against the privi privileged
leged privileged classes, against the bourgeois
state and bourgeois property, against
all forms and varieties of social and
national oppression UNITE
All Urged to Unite.
"Under the standard of the Work Work-Ingmen's
Ingmen's Work-Ingmen's Councils, under the banner
of the Third International, In the
revolutionary struggle for power and
the dictatorship of the proletariat,
proletarians of all countries, UNITE
I have quoted these excerpts from
an edition of the "Manifesto" printed
In Chicago. The copy In my possession
contains the name and address of the
printing company. There is an Intro Introduction
duction Introduction to this document. It Is un unsigned.
signed. unsigned. A few extracts from this In Introduction
troduction Introduction are important. Comment Commenting
ing Commenting on the. "Manifesto, the introduc introduction
tion introduction says: "It will soon become the
basis of international working class
action, and will become the lightning
that will rend the clouds and fog
that now envelop the workers of the
world.
"Comment on this manifesto would
be useless, superfluous. Its magnifi magnificent
cent magnificent language speaks the message a
suffering world Is eagerly waiting to
hear.
"It will assist the socialist move movement
ment movement everywhere into the path of un uncompromising,
compromising, uncompromising, revolutionary action
that alone can usher In the triumph
of International Socialism.
If the publication of this manifesto
and the Introductory comment to It
Is not treason, then Benedict Arnold
was a patriot. It is a conspiracy
against the peace, health ad happi happiness,
ness, happiness, as well as the lives and property,
the liberty and security, of every man,
woman and child In the United States.
It Is a call to lawlessness, organized
crime. It might be well for the peo people
ple people to give less time and thought to
partisan political wrangling and set
themselves to silencing sedition. It
should be an easy matter to discover
the author of this un-American, In Inhuman
human Inhuman and criminal foreword to the
"Manifesto." The publishers and
distributors should be brought to the
bar and made answer. Let us kill
this menace by destroying the seed.
If we do. we will save ourselves much
trouble later. By such a course we
will allay unrest.
Lenine has repeatedly said and
written that the bolshevik government
cannot last In Russia alongside of the
present governments of the world. In
other words, bolshevism cannot lire
in a world of democracy. The greater
truth Is that democracy cannot live
In the same world with bolshevism.
Bolshevism In theory Is based on the
Ideal of socialism, communism; in
methods of the bolshevism of Lenine Is
jtross violence, supreme autocracy.
(Copyrlf ht. lilt. Wetrn Nwsppr Uftlos)



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