The Ocala evening star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:05598

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
EVENING

A im

X

Weather Forecast: Generally fair
tonight and Sunday.
OGALA, FLORIDA, SATURDAY, JUNE 12. 1920.
VOL 2C, NO. iff
A
A. F. OF L IS
OF
ISA
ON ITS EAR
THE COAL TRUST
GROWING CITY
F

OUTRAGES

A

PREMIER

PROVED

BOMB

PR

ft

Bosses Trying to Break Deadlock With
Harding.

The national republican convention l
did not stick to its announced inten- j
tion of staying on the job last niijht
until somebody was nominated. A few
more ballots would -have given Wood
a majority, but this did not suit the
bosses, who brought about an ad adjournment
journment adjournment after the fourth. The re result
sult result of the first ballot was as follows:
Wood, 287. Lowden, 211.
Johnson, 133. Hoover, 5. Hard Harding.
ing. Harding. 65. Sproul, 84. Coolidge. 34.
Butler, 69. DuPont, 6. Borah, 2.
Poindexter, 20. Sutherland, 17. Prit Prit-chard,
chard, Prit-chard, 21. Warren, 1. LaFolette, 24.
The fourth ballot resulted as fol follows:
lows: follows: Wood, 314. Lowden, 281).
Johnson, 140. Hoover, 5. Harding,
61. Sproul, 79. Coolidge. 25.
Butler, 20. Knox, 2. Poindexter, 15.
Sutherland, 3. Borah, 1. DuPont, 2.
LaFollette, 22. Watson, 4.
This was the first time since 1888
that more than three ballots have
foun dthe party without a choice and
the seventh time since the nomination
of Lincoln that more than one ballot
has been required.
BUTLER WILL STICK
Chicago, June 12. Nicholas Mur Murray
ray Murray Butler sent word to the New York
delegation just before the caucus this
morning that he would stick in the
race for the nomination and would not
release his delegates.
HOPES HUNG ON HARDING
Chicago, June 12. Harding emerg emerged
ed emerged today from the all-night confer conferences
ences conferences of the republican chieftains as
the man with whom they hope fo
break the imminent deadlock on the
presidential nomination. On him the
leaders plan to concentrate their
strength should the convention fail to
berak through the blockade establish established
ed established yesterday by four ballots.
The tentative plan of the new
Harding boom is contingent upon the
failure of early votes today to result
in a nomination. The managers of
the big three have in no way relaxed
their energy or lost confidence in ulti ultimate
mate ultimate success. The backers of Hard Harding
ing Harding as a compromise candidate con contended
tended contended no nomination would be reach reached
ed reached as the situation now stands.
Conferences between leaders of all
factions looking to a nomination to today
day today began at the various hotels im immediately
mediately immediately after adjournment yester yesterday
day yesterday and were still in progress at
daylight this morning. Few impor important
tant important changes are expected today on
the first ballot, which will be the fifth
of the convention.
HARDING THE CHIEF DARK
HORSE
Coliseum, June 12. Launching into
a fight of the ballot the convention
was prepared to further test its
strength between Lowden, Wood and
Johnson and then if necessary to turn
into the string of dark horses. An all all-night
night all-night conference of the leaders put
Harding at the head of the dark
horse group. The conferences seemed
to hope to find some way to turn the
Wood and Lowden strength to Hard Harding.
ing. Harding. The leaders of Wood, wrho had
passed a sleepless night, were late in
reaching the hall, but the delegates
with interest raised to a fever heat,
reported early.
Just before the balloting the New
York delegation caucused, trying to
decide where to throw its strength.
Lowden and Wood both claimed ac accessions
cessions accessions from New York. Chairman
New, of Indiana, predicted the switch
would come on the second ballot.
Early speculation centered around
New York and Pennsylvania. Ten
o'clock passed without a call to order
as the leaders had not arrived. The
visitors galleries were thingly occu occupied,
pied, occupied, the prospects of another blister blistering
ing blistering day probably having melted the
interest of many.
SEVENTH BALLOT
Coliseum, June 12. The republican
national convention went into the
seventh inning today with the score
tied and finished the seventh ballot
without making a nomination.
Coliseum, June 12. The seventh
ballot did not bring a nomination, and
resulted as follows: Wood. 312. Low Lowden,
den, Lowden, 311. Johnson, 99. Harding,
105. Sproul, 76. Coolidge, 28. Hoover,
4. Butler, 2. Knox, 1. Kellogg. 1.
, Poindexter, 15. DuPont, 3; LaFol LaFollette,
lette, LaFollette, 24. Ward, 1. Lenroot, 1.
Wood and Lowden both stood 311
. on the sixth ballot, Lowden having
gained 100 votes since the first bal bal--
- bal-- lot yesterday.
Harding made steady but small

gains through the fifth and sixth bal ballots,
lots, ballots, having 89 votes on the sixth bal bal-loc.
loc. bal-loc. which brought the first break in
the solid delegations. Michigan broke
and gave some of the delegation's
Johnson votes to Wood, and Ohio gave
some Harding votes to Wood. On the
seventh ballot Florida voted seven for
Woo dand one for Lowden. On the
seventh ballot North Carolina gave
Lowden 15, Wood 3, Harding 3 and
Johnson 1. South Carolina gave Low Lowden
den Lowden 7; Virginia gave Wood 3 and
Lowden 12.
WE WILL STAY WITH YOU
The Star will continue to put bul bulletins
letins bulletins in its window tonight as long
as the telegraph office is open, and if
the result is not attained by that time
wiJl probably be able to give it to you
tomorrow morning.
FLAG DAY
Monday, June 14, will be Flag Day.
UNTIL PRODUCTION
CATCHES UP
Regardless of temporary better betterments
ments betterments in the price situation, such as
the recent price cutting wave which
swept the country, the high cost of
living will not permanently cease to
be until production much more nearly
overtakes consumption than it does
now.
Speakers at a recent meeting of the
Economic Club in New York city said
that only a new orgy of spending and
no permanent betterment to the price
situation have resulted from the re re-cent
cent re-cent cut price sr.les throughout the
country. Were price cuts the result
of increase in pioduction, these lead leaders
ers leaders say. such cuts would reflect
changed conditions which would mean
that prices had taken a step toward
a permanent return to lower levels.
Instead of this, it was urged, the re recent
cent recent price cuts were caused solely by
the exigencies in which merchants
found themselves because of a cessa cessation
tion cessation of buying by the public and
questions involved in the financing of
their business.
SEEDS!
Ninety day and old fashion velvet
beans, chufas, cow peas and sorghum
seed. Ocala Seed Store, phone 435. tf
That time Is swiftly approaching, If
the signs and portents of the present
are to be credited, when every dollar
not actively In circulation will be re required
quired required to tell the story of Its life day
by day. This, of course, will discour discourage
age discourage the Idle and vicious dollar.
The editor of the German paper
which declares that the trial of the
former kaiser was abandoned because
of fear of offending the pro-Germans
In the United States must himself be
afflicted with pro-German propensi propensities.
ties. propensities. Next In order will be a federal
bonus for the tired consumer who pa
tiently stayed home, bought the Lib
erty bonds, financed the war and
i served as the goat to bear the profl-
teers burdens.
Great Britain is said to have a tre tremendous
mendous tremendous over-production of men's
clothing, and American manufacturers
foresee In trepidation the end of their
fabulous profits. Meanwhile, the con
sumer will strive to grin and bear it.
The entire force of a destroyer late
ly put In commission consists of four
men three officers and one enlisted
man. The former will have to take
turns in ordering the crew about
The captain of an Incoming vessel
i reports navinx seen u seaserpeni wim
A. S .. .. M. li.L
the head of a snake and a -body that
resembled a tiger's. The ocean is
still wet.
It is said enough energy Is exhaust
ed In a wrestling match to plow 20
acres of corn, and the corn Is more Im
portant.
Eeautiful Georgia Peaches 65 cents
a basket, 25 cents a dozen, 12 cents
a pound, at W. A. Stroud's. Phone
218. U-2t

Fierce Against Republicans at Chi Chicago
cago Chicago and will Attack Dem Democrats
ocrats Democrats at Frisco

(Associated Press)
Montreal, June 12. The American
Feeration of Labor in convention
here today adopted a report condemn condemning
ing condemning the republican convention for
"turning its back on labor" in adopt adopting
ing adopting the party platform. During the
reeding of the report various sections
of the republican platform were crit criticized
icized criticized by labor leaders, who were ap applauded,
plauded, applauded, which the planks ciuticized
in the report were hissed.
Samuel Gompers said the demands
of labor will be submitted to the dem democratic
ocratic democratic convention at San Francisco,
and demoralize the democratic party's
platform when analyzed the same as
that of the republicans.
BIG DRIVE TO COLLECT TAXES
Washington, June 12. Millions of
dollars in delinquent taxes are ex ex-petced
petced ex-petced to be collected by the United
States internal revenue bureau as a
result of a general drive which will
soon be felt in every part of the
country.
Special attention will be directed to
the collection of the excise taxes on
sales by manufacturers, the so-called
luxury tax, the jewelry tax, the tax
on toilet articles and proprietary ar articles,
ticles, articles, the soft drink tax, the pleasure
resort and movie admission tax. Re Reports
ports Reports that many dealers and others
responsible for the return and col collection
lection collection of miscellaneous taxes are
failing in their duty have reached
headquarters in Washington from
many sections.
Preliminary to the nation-wide in investigation
vestigation investigation to insure a proper ac accounting,
counting, accounting, the commissioner of intern internal
al internal revenue has summoned to Wash Washington
ington Washington for a special course of instruc instruction
tion instruction a corps of revenue officers ex experienced
perienced experienced in the handling of tax sales.
These men wrill head "flying squad
rons," which will visit every large
city in the United States. Their di directions
rections directions are to conduct a thorough
an deffective campaign, using such
methods as will brin gto justice all
wilful evaders and to cause no em
barrassment to persons who honestly
are endeavoring to comply with the
law.
Through the failure of retailers to
collect in full the tax on toilet arti articles
cles articles alone and medicinal prepara preparations
tions preparations it is estimated that the govern government
ment government is losing millions of dollars eve
ry year. This is but one of the items
where "Uncle Sam" is going to get
better returns. The drive will be to
both educate and enforce and it is be believed
lieved believed that such tax dodgers as get by
the law with the government's sleuths
on their trail will have to get up
early in the morning. The law is the
law, and it is going to be enforced,
whether it is liked or not is the way
the officials here express it.
CHARLES A. MAYWORN
Mr. Charles A. Mayworn of Fruit-
land. Park, who was brought here for
treatment several days ago, died l ist
night at 11 o'clock. He is survived
by his wife only. His remains will
be forwarded this afternoon to Ann
Arbor, Mich., where interment will
take place and which was Mr. May May-worn's
worn's May-worn's old home. Pyles : Perkins
have charge of the funeral arrange arrangements.
ments. arrangements. A gentleman just married, remark remarked
ed remarked to a friend that he had that day
spent $15,000 for jewels for his dear
wife.
"I see you are no hypocrite," replied
the friend, "for she is your dear wife."
25 GEORGETTE DRESSES
IN THE CLOSING OUT SALE
Brand new stock, latest and most
up to date styles, dainty colors, plain
and combination, beaded in the latest
way. While they last only $19.98. B.
Goldman. 9-4t
Results accomplished before the
war, in the adaptation of wireless com communication
munication communication to the operation of an
American railway, lend conviction to
the report that before long it will be
possible, and customary, for engineers
In moving locomotives to talk with
each other over a distance of at least
200 miles. Trains, in short, will be in
constant conversational touch with one
another and with stations and termi terminals.
nals. terminals. Such development would facili facilitate
tate facilitate the running of railways in more
ways than could offhand be enumerat enumerated.
ed. enumerated. Less important, but probably in inevitable,
evitable, inevitable, will be the possibility of the
man of business converging by wire wireless
less wireless with the satellites in his office
while the car in which he is traveling
dashes away from them at the rate of
00 miles an hour.

On the Miners of West Virginia, Say
their Representatives, Demand
an Investigation

(Associated Press)
Montreal, June 12. The United
Mine Workers of America today ask asked
ed asked the American Federation of Labor
to demand a senatorial investigation
intc conditions in West Virginia,
where it charges "unspeakable out outrages
rages outrages have been inflicted upon mine
workers by armed detectives and gun gunmen
men gunmen employed by the coal interests
and have brought about a condition
of national shame."
CARD OF THANKS
To the Voters of Marion County: I
wish to express my sincere apprecia appreciation
tion appreciation for the splendid vote given me
in the race for county judge. I will
do my best to justify your faith in
me bv my administration in the office.
L. E. Futch.
S1BBALD IN SONG
Sibabld Wilson has taken a posi position
tion position as reporter on the Atlanta Con Constitution,
stitution, Constitution, where, strange to say, we
did our first reporting thirty-five
years ago. It was a rare old crowd
there then Henry Grady, Howell,
Hemphill, Bruffy, Joe Chandler Har Harris
ris Harris and others, all of whom were clever
and kindhearted and ready to make
things easy for a beginner. One of
Sibbald's first duties was to attend a
banquet, and we understand that he
applied for the job of banquet editor
the next day. Said no man from any
other state than Florida could eat
him under the table. Sibbald has
broken forth into song, and the fact
that these verses of his were- printed
in the Constitution is proof of their
merit as that paper is yet one of the
most highly gifted in literary taste in
the South. Sibbald's stanzas are as
follows:
The Boob
A plain country boob they called him,
A hick from the sticks was all
And he spent his time in ploughing
And sometimes playing ball.
And he liked the game, I'll tell you,
For I saw him play a few.
But that was down in the country
league
That only the hayseeds knew.
He wasn't much on the grandstand
stuff,
And he fumbled the pill a bit;
And I've seen him go to the plate ten
times
But never a single hit.
But he had the punch to plug at the
game
And he didn't know how to Eton
And he told us all in the midst of
jeers
That he'd finally reach the top.
Well, the years went by and the boob
was lost
On the flow of the whirling stream
And no one knew what become of him
In the game that he made his
dream.
Bui there is a thing that time will tell
When you learn to follow the trick;
And you'll find yourself with the rest
of them
If you've got the nerve to stick.
And the boob we knew as a farmer
boy,
Who we only thought could plow
He took the lgad and followed up
And lives with the leaders now,
For he hit the heights of the major
leagues
With an average at the sky.
Which goes to show that you never
know
What the years bring, passing by.
PEAS, PEAS, PEAS
Whippoorwill $6.25 bu.; Whippoor Whippoor-will
will Whippoor-will mixed $6; Iron and Clay mixed
$6.25 -bu.; Red Ripper $6.25; Cream
Crowder $6.50. Send orders at once
to James L. Dean, Orlando, Fla. These
prices for 2 bushel sacks and up upward.
ward. upward. 27-12t
BIG CLOSING OUT SALE
AT B. GOLDMAN'S
Ladies, here is your chance to pur purchase
chase purchase one of the loveliest and most
attractive dresses you could wish to
wear, Georgette in the newest styles.
Splendid assortment of colors. Come
early and make your selection. Priced
az $19.98. B. Goldman. "Why Pay
More?" 9-4t
BIDS FOR THE CONSTRUCTION
OF SCHOOL BUILDING WANTED
Notice is hereby given that the
Board of Public Instruction, Marion
county, Florida, will receive bids for
the construction of a school building
at Reddick, on
June 25th, up to 10 O'clock a. ir..,
according to plans and specifications
to be secured from A. C. Price, Ocala,
Fla., or may be seen hi the office of
the superintendent of public instruc instruction.
tion. instruction. All bidders must deposit 2
per cent, of their bids as a guarantee
of good faith. The board reserves the
right to reject any and all bids.
C-12-3t-sat W. D. Cam, Secretary.
Advertising is almost a rare thing.

Census of 1920 Gives It an Increase

Over 1910 of 56.3 Per
Cent
(Associated Press)
Washington, June 12. The census
bureau today announced the popula population
tion population of Sanford, Fla., as 5588, which is
an increase of 2018, or 5G.5 per cent.
DAVIS-GRIFFIN
Many children in Ocala, whose tasks
in the school room were lightened by
the tact and care of Miss Lulu Grif Griffin,
fin, Griffin, and many older folk who learned
to value the friendship of that charm charming
ing charming and highly intelligent young lady,
will be interested in the following,
and wish a long and happy life to that
pretty and accomplished girl and the
young man to whom she has given her
heart and hand:
Mrs. Ellen Alford Griffin
announces the marriage of her daugh daughter
ter daughter Lulu
to
Mr. Joseph Francis Davis
on Tuesday, June the eighth
nineteen hundred and twenty
Sneeds. Florida.
ZEWADSKI-DAYTON
Mr. Olaf Zewadski of Miami, left
yesterday for New York on the hap happiest
piest happiest mission of his life, and which
will be of interest to his scores of
friends in Ocala, his boyhood home.
On June 23rd, Miss Irene Dayton of
New York city, a bright and charming
young woman, will become his bride.
While the engagement of this cou couple
ple couple has never been formally announc announced,
ed, announced, it has been known to a few of Mr.
Zewadski's closest friends. The wed wedding
ding wedding will be a quiet home affair, after
which they will sail for Florida. They
expect to visit in Ocala, Mr. Zewad Zewadski's
ski's Zewadski's former home, where he has many
fritnds and admirers, before proceed proceeding
ing proceeding to Miami, where he has made
ready for his bride one of the most
attractive and comfortable bungalows
in the Magic City.
Mr. Zewadski is the youngest son
of Mr. W. K. Zewadski of this city,
one of our most prominent lawyers.
"Olaf" offered his services to his
country immediately upon the decla declaration
ration declaration of war and was in France
many months in the aviation corps,
being in the thickest of some of the
most severe fighting and received
several mentions for bravery. Since
reaching manhood's estate, Mr. Ze Zewadski
wadski Zewadski has made his home in places
elsewhere than Ocala, but this city
will always claim him, as he was al always
ways always most popular and considered one
of our brightset and most promising
ycung men.
The romance of Mr. Zewadski and
Miss Dayton commenced in France,
while he was in service and she at
work for the Y. M. C. A. over seas.
HARDING CASTS A LINE
TO THE WINDWARD
Columbus, O., June 12. Senator
Warren G. Harding's declaration of
candidacy for the republican sena senatorial
torial senatorial nomination was filed at the
secretary of state's office here two
minutes before midnight, the hour
when the period for filing for the Au
gust primary expires. The necessary
papers were brought to Columbus
from Chicago by George B. Harris of
Cleveland.
iHc Service is not an empty
i85e word. I am prepared to
f3 give your eyes the serv serv-P
P serv-P see ce vou nave been need need-".w
".w need-".w ing so long.
DR. K. J. WEIHE,
Optometrist and Optician
Eyesight Specialist
MOTEL
JACKSONVILLE-FiA
Europei.'vPl&v Complete Hodem- 9cr?ei?d
outride toons -Sreasvlteated 1.-up- &fe iv
cowioCowerut to vayminj-ta
heart of Gty Serd for Booklet
j?p W1HD1I W.Sf11TH. PROP R
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTER AND
BUILDER
Careful estimates made on all con contract
tract contract work. Gives more and better
work for the money than any other
contractor in the city.
FOR SALE
One Mare, One Cow and Calf,
Two Heifers.
Rose V. Falana, Admx.
Ocala, Florida

n v, i ," i

XK MBLE

III Ml

w

Attack on High Official by Insurgent
Egyptians was Unsuccessful

(Associated Press)
Cairo, June 12. An unsuccessful
attempt was made today to assassi assassinate
nate assassinate the Egyptian premier with a
bomb. The premier was uninjured,
but three bystanders were wounded.
LA FRATERNAL ORDERS
MARION-DUNN MASONIC LODGE
Marion-Dunn Lodge No. 19, F. & A.
M., meets on the first and third
Thursday evenings of each month at
7:30 o'clock until further notice.
Jake Brown, Secretary.
A. L. Lucas, W. M.
ORDER OF EASTERN STAR
Ocala Chapter No. 29. O. E. S..
meets at the Masonic hall the second
and fourth Thursday evenings of each
month at 8 o'clock.
Mrs. Lillian Simmons, W. M.
Mrs. Susan Cook, Secretary.
OCALA LODGE NO. 286. B. P. O. E.
Ocala Lodge No. 286. Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, meets
the second and four Tuesday eve
nings of each month. Visiting breth
ren always welcome. Lodee rooms
upstairs over Troxler's and the Book
Shop, 113 Main street.
C. Y. Miller, E. R.
E. J. Crook, Secretary.
R. A. MASONS
Regular convocations of the Ocala
Chapter No. 13 R. A. M., on the fourth
Friday in every month at 8 p. m.
H. S. Wesson, H. P.
Jake Brown, Secretary.
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
Ocala, Lodge No. 19. Conventions
held every Monday evening at 7:30
o'clock at the Castle Hall, over the G.
C. Greene Co. drugstore. A cordial
welcome to visiting brothers.
W. M. Parker, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage. K. of R. & S.
ODD FELLOWS
Tulula Lodge No. 22, I. O. O. F.,
meets every Tuesday evening in the
Odd Fellows' hall on the third floor of
the old Star office building at 7:30 p.
n. A warm welcome alwaye extended
o visiting brothers.
C. W. Moremen, N. G.
W. L. Colbert, Secretary.
WOODMEN OF THE WORLD
Fort King Camp No. 14 meets at
K. of P. hall at 7:30 p. m. every sec second
ond second and fourth Friday. Visiting sov sovereigns
ereigns sovereigns are always welcome.
J. C. Bray, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage, Clerk.
Read the ads. on this page.
Arrival and departure of passenger
trains at OCALA UNION STATION.
The following schedule figures pub published
lished published as information and not guar guaranteed.
anteed. guaranteed. (Eastern Standard Time)
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILROAD
Leave Arrive
2:20 am Jacksonville-N'York 2:10 am
1:55 pm Jacksonville 1:30 pm
4:05 pm Jacksonville 4:35 urn
Tampa-
2:15 am Manatee- 4:05 pm
St. Petersburg
2:15 am Tampa 2:15 un
1:50 pm Tampa-Manatee 1:35 pm
4:05 pm Tampa-St. Petrsbrg 4:05 pm
ATLANTIC COAST LINE R. R.
Leave Arrive
2:12 pm JacksonvilleNYork 3:15 am
1:45 pm Jksonville-Gainsville 3:35 pm
6:42 am Jksonville-Gnesville 10:13 pm
3:18 am St.Petsbrg-Lakeland 2:12 am
3:35 pm St.Petsbrg-Lakeland 1:25 pm
7:10 am Dunnellon-Wilcox
7:25 am Dunellon-Lkeland 11:03 pm
3:25 pm Homosassa 1:30 pm
10:13pm Leesburg 6:42 am
4:45 nm Gainesville 11:50 am
Monday, Wednesday, Friday.
"Tuesday. Thursday, Saturday.
COW PEAS; COW PEAS
! Iron and Clay Feas mixed $6.U5;
j Whippoorwill $6.25; Whippoorwill
mixed $6; Ked Kipper $6.25; Cream
Crowder $6.25 bu. These prices for
2.Vz bu. sacks. Send orders at once to
James L. Dean, Orlando, Fla. 27-12
HOUSES MOVED
Will move houses of any descrip description,
tion, description, short or long distance. Give
description of the house to be moved,
and write to Geo. W. Elbertson,
3-6t Box 79, Route 1, Morriston, Fla.

OCA

RAILROAD SCHEDULES

r



7

OCALA WEEKLY STAB, SATURDAY, JUNE 12, 1920

OCALA EVEH1HG STUB
I'tiMiobnl i:vry In Kxoeiit Sunday by
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY.,
OCALA, FLORIDA.

It. It. Cm r roll, I'reMiileat
P. V. l.ru vmtfooil, -Tetr -Treanurer
J. IS. Hii jumlii, Kilitor

allowed, the illicit manufacture and
sale of really harmful liquor will be
much discouraged. Prohibitionists
should consider the general result
of clamping the lid down too tight is
to cause it to blow off.

Knt -!-.! lit Ocala, Flu.
h-cOMJ- frill.-' s. rn:itt-r.

pOHtoffice as

ti:m:ihoks
It u l u orti-e Five-One
llriltorlul ll-iartm-Mt Two-Seven
Soelety lt-iort-r Five-One

ii-:inii:it sMiti AT: i j imikss
Tli ft As.-;of:;.'it.-l I'rftHS is exclusively
ei.litJft'l for thf for republication of
all nftws ilispat chft credited to it or
not otht-rwi.-ft red:tf-J in this paper and
also th- local news published herein.
All rI'htK of republication of special
Ji.-'pat ctieH herein are also reserved.

I j o mi: st it ; s u 1 1 s t : it i it 1 o x
One year, in advance
.Six roontliH, in advance ....
Three inonthx, in advance ..
One month, in advance

KATES
$6.00
3.00
. .. 1.50
60

XM Vi:itTISIti KATES
DlMplav: Tlate 15 cents per inch for
consecutive insertions. Alternate inser insertions
tions insertions per cent additional. Composi Composition
tion Composition charges on ads. that run less than
six 'tlincH 5 cents per inch. Special
position 20 per cent additional. Rates
Cased on 4-inch minimum. Less than
four inches will take higher rate,
which will be furnished upon applica application.
tion. application.
Iteadiue Xollee: 5 cents per line for
first insertion; 3 cents per line for each
.subsequent insertion. One change a
week allowed on readers without extra
composition charges.
Lie gal advertisements at legal rates.

Herb Felkel of the St. Augustine
Record says in his Bromides: "Once
a week men who belong to Rotaiy
clubs throughout the so-called civiliz civilized
ed civilized world become boys again for one
hour. That makes them live longer,
love one another more and renders
them of greater value to their busi businesses,
nesses, businesses, to their communities, to their
families if they have any. The local
luncheon yesterday was particularly
enjoyable. We sang and poked fun
at each other, talked business and ate
a lot of stuff to eat. A particularly
good time was had by Yours Sincere Sincerely
ly Sincerely in as much as we were presented
with a pink and blue rattle tied with
baby ribbon. There were just two cr
three uncomfortbale seconds when
some thoughtless person among those
present hollered "Bromides!" and an another
other another heartless roughneck supple supplemented
mented supplemented that with, "Speech!" If there
is one thing that we do better than an another,
other, another, as Spencer says, it is not mak making
ing making a speech. We can't talk and
swallow our heart at the same time."

behind the fighting army in France
and in the camps.
Much sacrifice was made during the
war. Material pleasures were given
up. distractions, luxuries and mani manifold
fold manifold interest narrowed themselves

down and became merged into one j
great spiritual, mental and physical ;
democracy. The result of this was
the turning of the people to art as a
substitute for material pleasure, thru j
necessity at first and then, as they i

TJ An TA rr.rvrsv

UL'ii; IU iL.Jt.ii i

, o ttr t t it

ays watcga Laoy, v;s :0
! Cardui Has l)c For Me.
; A To Help Otters."

Whs

t
6
r
t t-t
t t-t
c

OTTER'S ADT0 EXCHANGE

voru ( H is judged

familiar with it, through J

On first choice votes. Editor Bloom
of the Lakeland Star was elected sen senator
ator senator from Polk county. The second
choice votes may change this, but not
likely.
Representative-elect C. W. Hunter
called on the county commissioners
t'other day and succeeded in obtaining
$1500 for the Marion county fair this
fall. Mr. Hunter has sounded the
first note of the tune, "Work, for the
fair is coming."
A federal official, in good position
to know what he is talking about,
says that Sheriff Galloway has done
more hard work with greater effect
in suppressing, or rather depressing,
the moonshine traffic than any other
sheriff in Florida.

INFLUENCE OF MUSIC

Winning Essay 1920 Ocala High School

We are sorry that old man Thorn Thorn-dyke
dyke Thorn-dyke of the Palm Beach Post was not
elected in the contest for representa representative
tive representative in his county. If he had been a
member of the next legislature he
would have written of that body an

epic that would have been placed
among the archives of the state.
Says the Sumter County Times:
"As stated in one of our issues sev several
eral several weeks ago, we went on record as
being unalterably opposed to bonding
the state for good roads. Although we
are boosters for good roads we do not
believe in giving the legislature the
power to amend the constitution. We
want to see each county go it alone,
bond the counties separately and build
its own roads."

It is noticeable that Sheats, who is
well, known in Marion county received
far 'less votes than Hollins, who is a
comparative stranger. Our school
board had better notice this. It means
that the people of Marion are tired
of the methods of the state public
school authorities, who have piled an
almost unbearable burden on them and
are giving in return less efficient edu education
cation education than was obtainable twenty twenty-five,
five, twenty-five, years ago.

Under the ruling of the supreme
court, the people of the United States
may have beer and light wine if Con Congress
gress Congress decides those beverages to he
non-intoxicating. We think it would
be wise for Congress to make such a
decision. We have never seen any
reason why working men should not
have their beer, which is refreshing
and sustaining to hardworking men,
and there is very little harm in light
wine. Another thing to be consider considered
ed considered is that if beer and light wine are

MICKIE SAYS

U3Gvc evaooavK C hams oz vwnv

ASUS VKOfcfc W

I

J

MISS SARAH DEHON
Music has been conceived as one
of the most influential factors in life.
It is an emotional medium fitted to
express the mystic and complex emo emotions
tions emotions of the inner being. It forces us
to forget ourselves and transports us
to the mood of the composer. We do
not know why we are in that mood
but the composer understood; he put
his own feelings and emotions into
his melody. Under his spell we fancy
we experience what we do not really

feel; that we understand what we do
not comprehend; that we can do that

which is far beyond our power. Our
souls blend with his and together

with him, we are transported from

one frame of mmd to another, it a
military march is played we feel the

call of war, if dance music is played,
we enter into the spirit of the dance,
if a hymn is played we feel with the
musician the desire to praise. The
musician, if he knows how to use his
skill, may hypnotize his audience and

make it do his bidding.

It took a world war to bring music
into its own in America, to make it

recognized by the people and neces

sary for the people at home as well

as for the boys in camp. Music play

ed a very important part in the
emergency military education which

this country was called upon to assim

ilate in a very brief period of time.

Military bands and orchestras have

always been organized and used to

certain extent but not until the world

war were they know to be so com

pletely necessary.

Soon after General Pershing arrived
in France an official order was issued

that increased the army bands to fifty

members and raised the leader in

charge to the rank and pay of a firs'
lieutenant. General Pershing was im

Dressed with the importance of the

French and English bands and decid

ed that the American bands could be
improved and enlarged and that more

recognition should be given to their
military standing. This was done
not only in France, but in the camps

in America also. Music began to be
used more and more in all parts of

the army and navy. The bands were
not only increased but singing among
the men encouraged. Time was given
each day to music. It began to play
an important part in overcoming the
dull routine of the daily drill and in
speeding up and keeping up the In Interest
terest Interest of the daily drill and in speed speeding
ing speeding and keeping up the interest of the
boys. Community sings were held in
all camps, and among the people as
well, as an incentive to patriotism.
Many musicians gave some or all
of their time to the soldiers. They
sang in the training camps and in

the hospitals. It was in the hospi hospitals
tals hospitals that singing was most needed.
The wrell soldiers could sing for
themselves, but the poor sick and
wounded needed some one to sing for
them and revive their spirits. Eliza Elizabeth
beth Elizabeth Gutman tells us in an article in
The Music Bulletin of her experience
in hospital singing. It seems that
each ward called for a different kind
of song; for example, the shell shock
patients liked simple songs written
for children, and the surgical wards

enjoyed their folk songs and old negro
melodies. The last wish of many of

the dying was for music and when
they heard it they died with smiles
on their faces. It was often, too, the
privilege of the singer to cheer up a
ward after a death.
When our boys were finally put in
the trenches and the test came to go
"over the top," they went over with
a song on their lips. They were
known as the "singing Americans."
This singing did much towards the
defeat of the Germans; they were
awed by a song at such a time. They
could not fight men who faced death
with a song on their lips. Yet it was
this song that kept our boys together
and kept up their morale.
It was not only the boys in camp
who felt the influence of music. Pat Patriotic
riotic Patriotic music did more to arouse the
people than any other one thing. No
one could possibly hear the songs that
were written during the war and not
feel his own responsibility. The com community
munity community sings brought the people to together
gether together into a civilian army at home

became

choice. And now since the war is
over books will be read, pictures look looked
ed looked at and music listened to with

greater interest, attention and concen-
tratiort than ever before. More will

be gotten from them and more will
be demanded of them. As the people
become educated to art they will ap appreciate
preciate appreciate the best, will call for it and
will accept it only. No patience will

be shown the faddists who hitherto

owed their success to the easy credu-

ity of the people who go to their art
n much the same way as they would

go to a lashionable restaurant, lhe

istener plays as important a part in

he music of his country as the

musician or the composer. He is the
one who demands what he wants and

is his duty to demand the best and

nothing but the best.

Music is very essential to all na

tions at all times. Almost all great

meetings are opened and closed with

music. We rarely stop to think why.

but it is because it makes the people

come together in tne same thought.

But if music is to be anything more
than a spectacular accomplishment

we must perceive that its greatest

influence is out of the temples of art

and into the homes of our people. The

real strength of our country lies in

he protection of the home. Any

thing which adds to the beauty, in

terest, happiness, comfort and health

of the home should be guarded as
carefully as the government itself.

M isic properly used may become one

(Continued on Fourth Page)

V.'atona.W. Va Mrs.
of this town, says: v;-

1 1

U .1

toj. D :n"t cover a

i would a iuo;.t!i or i.-.o. ar.,f ; .-.
i terrible headache. b'.ck.-c!;o, i,--.ri:

down pains, and -vor.id j::st
had no appetiie. i'h:i ... it w o.:.c )
. . two weeics, and was so v.er.i ?rr ?rr-ar.d
ar.d ?rr-ar.d my health was awful.
My rrcther bought rr.e a Lrul-:
Cardui, and I be;2n to improve r:

taking the first bottle, so kept it up ti'.! J
took three ... I gained, and wrs .vr.,:
and strong, and I owe it ail to Csrc:i.
I am married now and have 3 children
. . Have never had to have a doctor for
female trouble, and just resort to Cardui
if I need a tonic. I am glad to testify to
what it has done for me, so as to help
others."

If you are nervous or weak, have hend-
aches, backaches, or any of the other
ailments so common to women, why not i
give Cardui a trial? Recommended by J
many physicians. In use over 40 years, j
Begin taking Cardui today. It may I
be the very medicine, you need. J

Nc;-rjo

i

( I

villi a top unworthy

i to to;.- are mil lc

- v. h -h demand hi'n hi'n-e';uin:ent;
e';uin:ent; hi'n-e';uin:ent; tops th.it

UJ;

66

PERFECTION

30x3 $12.50

30x3 14.50

32x3

32x4

oo

34x4

17.00
24.00
. . 25.15
26.25

32x4 32.00

Asbestos Protected Tires and
Inner Tubes

Grey

$2.05
2.60
2.90
3.40
3.55
3.70
4.30
4.50
4.65

35x4 36.75 4.75

The above Tires and Tubes are
Guaranteed "FIRSTS" NON-SKID
driving tread and are adjusted upon a
6000-mile basis.. Orders of four or
more Tires are shipped express pre prepaid
paid prepaid and are subject to inspection.
Robt. F. Hewett & Co.
P. 0. Box 796
Jacksonville. Florida

i

:vn.

See Me
For All Classes Oi
Stone, Brick, Wood,
and Concrete
Building

J. D. McCaskill

!

up Muk r the hardest er-

i.k'!' all kinds of con-li-Our
line iwludes all ihe

staple colors. See this top e e-fore
fore e-fore placing your order.

TOPS New, covered, patched and coated with a patent wax paste
that makes old tops absolutely waterproof.
WINTING Autos painted, striped and finished in the best of
material.
UPHOLSTERING We are prepared to give you satisfactory ser service
vice service in upholstering backs, seats or cushions.
TIRES, TUBES, GAS and OIlS

LET US REPAIR, PAINT AND UPHOLSTER YOUR CAR, SO
YOU ON ENJOY IT YOURSELF OR SELL TO ADVANTAGE-

AUTOS BOUGHT, SOLD and REPAIRED
J. W. HUNTER

Ocala

SOUTH MAGNOLIA
OLD METROPOLITAN

STREET
THEATER

Florida

33x4
34x4

33.00
34.50

I Contractor t
. r

99 Phone 446. 728 YVenona St.

ip:ini!Bii vT
it t? p w

Bed I mjSW--A 2W m

$2.40 i jfe&W'i iCir i v

- 25 i i" tB I

4.25 1 :t7p.i 1
3.35 I 'Wgffil 1 1

O.DU I E3

Agents and
Service

You Need These in
Your Summer Garden

ALT ERN ANTHER A, border
plant.
ASTERS, assorted colors.
COLEUS, large assortment of
colors.
GAILLARDIAS, yellows and
browns assorted.
PETUNIAS, single and double.
SALVIA, tall and dwarf, best
flowering varieties.
SWEET ALYSSUM, pretty for
borders.
TORENIAS, summer ipans'es, blue
VERBENAS, large flowers; as assorted
sorted assorted colors.
ZINNIAS, New Giant.
All the above from 2U-lnch
pots, strong, well grown plants,
$1 per dozen; $7.50 per hundred.
ASPARAGUS SPRENGERI, 25c.
each; $3 dozen.
ALLAMANDA, 25c. each.
ACALYPHA, Jaest all around fol foliage
iage foliage plant for Fla., $1.50 doz.
CROTONS, brilliantly colored fol foliage
iage foliage plants for bedding, 35c,
50c. and $1 each.
HYDRANGEAS, 50c, 75c. $1 ea.
HIBISCUS, single and double,
red, pink, orange, 25c. 35c. and
50c each.
NIGHT BLOOMING JASMINE.
25c. each.
PLUMBAGO, blue and white, 25c.
and 50c. each.
POINSETTIAS, 25c. 50c. 75c. ea.
Remember, these plants are ac acclimated,
climated, acclimated, grown in Florida soil,
and the best that skill and exper experience
ience experience can produce. F. O. B. Ex Express.
press. Express. No shipments by parcel
post.
Mills The Florist, Inc.
Jacksonville, Florida

CHEVROLET, COLUMBIA and COLE

Cast Iron, Steel and Brass Welding

GENERAL AUTO REPAIRS

OCALA MOTOR CO C-L Simmons

HOTEL ALBERT
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
Modern Throughout. Rates
from $1.50 day. Childe
Restaurant Adjoining

X. Main St. Phone 71
Opposite
Ocala Iron Works

1

Read the Star Want Ads. It pays

..j.. .!. .-- -- '..j

HUDSON

PMIms

si

ESSEX

AUTOMOBILES

UBEBAKEM

V-
)
-k

OCALA.

Jrm- m..m JM, .... .. .. ..

. .-.. -. -. ST: SI-: SZ: SL SZ: .'"': V;----C'. SZI: w : .'"Z: .J: ? VTv SZ

uildind

(Did Shoes

Vf-J

V.

ft

" X

mis up i

business affairs. W e stand ready at all times to
help our customers. You are invited to keep your ac-

$ count at our Bank so that we may have an opportun opportun-;S
;S opportun-;S ty to render you this service.

Resources More Than One Million.
1 THE OCALA NATIONAL BANK
Si
..... ..... .. .. . .. . . .-r;-. t. .-C-. -C---"J: 'w" -llm- ""w -"1 '"J'-'w '"i""- J''-!r'JrM.'')i?m.

YOU CAN SAVE
Many Dollars
On your shoe bills by having us re rebuild
build rebuild your old shoes. Our charges are
moderate, and we guarantee satisfac satisfaction.
tion. satisfaction. MAZ0N & CO.
Between Ten Cent Store and Gerig's
Drug Store

WHAT IS COURTESY
As Applied to Our Bank Service ?
COURTESY, next to character and honesty, is one
of the first demands this institution makes upon
its officers and employees
To be courteous, to be kind, showing care and
consideration in the handling of small accounts, as
well as the largest deposits. This is one of the chief
aims of this bank.
Munroe & Chambliss National Bank



OCA LA EVENING STAR. SATURDAY, JUNE 12. 1920

QCALA OCCURRENCES

Thursday for the vet and expect to

be away for three months.

j she pleasantly spent with her daugh-
ters, Mrs. A. S. Clark in Jacksonville

anJ Mrs. W. I. Evans at Fort Lau-

COMMEN CEMENT EXERCISES
FLORIDA INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL

If you have any society items,
phone five-one.

Don't fail to visit the Guarantee derdale

Clothing & Shoe Company. Every Everything
thing Everything we sell i- guaranteed. We're
fighting for QUALITY not prices- -?

Iioy's wash suits and wa3h pants,

juKt a few sizes left. H. A. Water-j
man. 11 J
., i

Dr. M. C. Izlar has returned home
fiom a short business trip to Jacksonville.

Just received, younj' men's coats
und pants, belted, in green and blue,
'.',U II A. Waterman. 11

Mrs. J. II. Livingston is in Orange Orangeburg,
burg, Orangeburg, S. C, visiting her daughter,
Mrs. J. H. Hydrick.
White flannel and stripe pants to
be worn with the sport coat. We have
both. H. A. Waterman. 11

j Beautiful Georgia Peaches Co cents
! a basket, 25 cents a dozen, 12V cents
! a pound, at W. A. Stroud's. Phone
1 218. ll-2t

Miss Callie Gissendaner left yes-;

terday afternoon for Montgomery,
A14., where she will be the guest of
l Natives for the next month.

Union suits and two-piece suits,
$1.50 suit. II. A. Waterman. 11

Mjs. C. W. Effin-er of West Palm
lU-iu h. who has beer, the guest of her
mother, Mrs. R. G. Blake for two
week.;, leaves this afternoon for hr
home.

Mr. Clarence Camp arrived in the
city yesterday afternoon from his
ti ip to Boston, where he accompanied
Mrs. Camp, who went to join their
daughters for their western trip.
Mrs. Camp and the Misses Camp left

Only one-third actual factory cost.
Government farm wagons; fine for
farm, crosstie and general use; a big
advance in freight rates is coming so
don't delay; warehouse near you; also
harness and saddles. Write today.
Government Surplus Goods Co., Jack Jacksonville,
sonville, Jacksonville, Fla. 8-8t

Mr. E. T. Helvenston has announ?-
eo "The Bargains Galore" sale, which
will be held beginning Monday. June
14th, and continuing the remainder of
the week. This promises to be an in interesting
teresting interesting event in these days of the
high cost of living and ?Ir. Helvenston
hopes to enable the people to save
substantial sums by taking advan advantage
tage advantage of this opportunity ic buy sea seasonable
sonable seasonable dry goods, ladies' wearing
apparel, gent's and boy's furnishings,
j etc., at reduced prices. You should
: make it a point to call at this store
! early in the week and see for yourself

! what wonderful bargains are on dis

play.
SEEDS!

Mrs. S. A. Standley has returned
home after a month's absence, which

Ninety day and old fashion velvet
beans, chufas, Pyles and Gist seed
corn. Ocala Seed Store, phone 435. tf

Big Special at
FRANK'S

" The Fashion Center

Saturday, Monday and Tuesday
June 12th, 14th and 15th.

D

Attractive
Figured
Veil

AC

Girlish

Organdies

Tailored

Linenes

Values to $16.50
Three Days Only

at

A

K

" The Fashion Center
Ocala - Florida

While we are writing up commence commencements
ments commencements for universities, colleges and
high schools, we mustn't forget our
Girls' Industrial School, which when

it comes to thorough work isn t ex excelled
celled excelled by any.
The school had its third commence commencement
ment commencement Friday night, the graduates be being
ing being Misses Grace Gore and Mahel
Phillippe. A number of friends were
invited to witness the exercises. We
might first name M. M. Little, who
takes the deepest interest in the
school, having taught its Sunday
school for over two years. Mr. and
Mrs. DeCamp and their adopted
daughter, Miss Tatie May Lee, Mis
Miekle, the school's music teacher and
her mother, Misses Onie Chazal and
Sidney Perrv. Dr. and Mrs. Harry

Walters, Rev. Mr. Offutt. Mr. Frank
Gates and finally three Rotarians,
Messrs. Harry Borland, Jack Neigh Neighbour
bour Neighbour and Jim Benjamin.
The exercises took place in the par parlor
lor parlor and school room, which open into
each other. The graduates, two very
pretty girls, looked specially charm charming
ing charming in their simple but tastefully de designed
signed designed white dresses. The program

wa as follows:
Chorus by the school, "Victory."
Invocation bv Rev. Neighbour.
"Welcome," essay by Miss Grace
Gore.
Piano solo, "Rondoletto," by Edith
Franklin.
Composition, "John Singer Ser Sergeant,"
geant," Sergeant," by Miss Mabel Phillippe.
Vocal solo, "Because," "by Martha
Ferry.
Pianolog, "Heartsease," by Miss
Grace Gore, accompanied by Miss
Miekle.
Presentation of certificates by Mr.
M. M. Little.
Piano solo. "Allegresse," by Miss
E. Miekle.
Pantomime and tableau, "Abide
with Me," by Misses Phillippe and
Gore.
The music was beautiful, the teach teacher,
er, teacher, Miss Miekle being not only a most
competent instructor with an inborn
love for music, but taking a deep per personal
sonal personal interest in her scholars, who
readily respond to her efforts. Her
"Alleerresse." the piano solo by Miss

Edith Franklin and the vocal solo by
Miss Martha Ferry, were all warmly
encored.
Mr. Little presented the graduation
cetrificates with a few sincere and
eloquent words of commendation and
good wishes.
The pantomime and tableau by the
graduates was gracefully carried out,
the lights being turned 6ff and the
scene lit up by whitefire, which gave
a particularly good effect.

After the exercises were over,
teachers and pupils captured their
guests and carried them out on the

veranda, where they were all soon

busy solving the mysteries of a big
bowl filled with delicious fruit punch,

after which all had a social half hour

before the meeting broke up.
The school is making most encour

aging progress. The girls have a

ie'-ular nublic school course up to the

eighth grade, which contains, most of
I the useful education received by 90

per cent .of young Americans, and
beside have a music class and prac practical
tical practical instruction in domestic science.
The school has been given some
scholarships and more are in prospect.
Miss Grace Gore, one of the grad graduates,
uates, graduates, is to remain with the school,
taking the place of assistant to the
matron, formerly filled by Mrs. Joe
Price, nee Miss Pauline Stearns a

1 sponsible position and one taking a
competent person to fill. Miss Mabel
Phillippe will return to her parents
in Charleston. In addition to her
regular studies she has taken instruc instruction
tion instruction in drawing and copying which
only needs more practice to make her
highly proficient.
It is probable that half a dozen
bright girls will graduate next year
that is. if the state and the people
of "Ocala continue their interest in
this most useful institution.
SPLASH PARTY

1 IF U M N H TO & E2 8

We now have on hand a number of real up-to-date
Bed Room, Dining Room and Parlor Sets,
and considering the quality the prices are ex extremely
tremely extremely reaaonable.

-3 O

OUR LINE OF

REFRIGERATORS

Y
of every description will prove attractive to you during the

f,""" "iu ouiuiiiv.1 J 11 till.. 11U VV. UlCIU iiuiu
$15 and Up.
Opposite Ocala National Bank
North Magnolia St. OCALA, FLA.

Misses Elizabeth. Eleanor, and
Katherine Long and Mr. William
Long of Mt. Airy, N. C, visitors at

the home of their aunt, Mrs. U. D.
Blackburn, were delightfully compli complimented
mented complimented yesterday afternoon with a

splash party at Silver Springs, given
them by their hostess. There were

quite a number of the younger society
set of the city included in the invita invitation
tion invitation list. They left town in automo automobiles
biles automobiles about 5 o'clock and upon arriv

ing at the springs a dip was first en

joyed, after which a most bountiiui
and delicious picnic supper was serv

ed bv Mrs. Blackburn, which was

greatly enjoyed. Dancing was then

indulged in until quite a late hour,
when all returned to the city, voting

thi soccasion a most charming af

fair. f

The Misses Long and Mr. Long will

quests of Mr. and Mrs. Blackburn

and family for several months, which

will be good news to their many
friends, as they are charming young

people.

MR. HUNTER THANKS

HIS FRIENDS

To the Voters of Marion County:
I desire to thank the voters of Mar
ion countv for the confidence express

ed in me by their vote on June 8th. I

will endeavor to merit this expres

sion of confidence by doing my ut utmost
most utmost to advance the interests of
Marion county in the next session of
the legislature. Sincerely yours,
Charles W. Hunter.

J.H. SPENCER

W. R. PEDRICK

A G E N. C Y

We Make a Specialty of Parts for the Buick and
the Prices are Consistent with the Cost of Same.

GOODYEAR AND U. S. TIRES AND TUBES
Exclusive Agents for "VESTA" BATTERY, 18 Mo. Guarantee
An Up-to-Date Battery Service Station
We Maintain an Up-to-Date Garage with
Expert Workmen, at all times, Assuring
Prompt and Efficient Service. . .

GASOLINE, OILS AND GREASE.

OCALA GAS ENGINE WORKS
PHONE 271
Ocala Florida

"ft Jf

X8AOC MARK RCCISTCRC0

BATTERY solution and passage
of current always succeed in
wearing out ordinary insulation
long before the plates reach the
end of their usefulness, but it is
different with Threaded Rubber.
That's the insulation which frees
the car owner from reinsulation
worries during the life of the battery.

tela Storage IBsitttary Co

20 North Main Street
Ocala, Florida



OCALA EVENING STAR, SATURDAY. JUNE 12, 1920

LATEST LOCALS
Temperature this morning", CJ; this
afternoon, 81).

Miss Mavis Fa ire loth left this aft afternoon
ernoon afternoon for a short visit to Jacksonville.

Mrs. V. T. Richie and son, W. T. Jr.
are in Plant City visiting relatives
for a month.

Beautiful Georgia Peaches Co cents
a basket, 2 cents a dozen, 12 .rents
a pound, at W. A. Stroud's. Phone
21. ll-2t

Gadson's Bazaar Store alo drew a
large number of shoppers by its an announcement
nouncement announcement of reductions on shoes.
From the viewpoint of an onlooker, it
certainly appears that these reduction
sales are beneficial both to the pur purchaser
chaser purchaser and the stores, for there has
been a steady flow of people in and
out of these stores all day.

Men's shoes, closing out $.'.50, S4,
$.50, $o, $6 and $6.50. Just a few sizes
left. H. A. Waterman. 11

Mrs. A. L. Izlar of Clermont is a
visitor in the city, the guest of Mrs.
W W. Clyatt.
Mrs. W. J. Tillman has returned

home from a pleasant visit to Gaines- j

vine, where she was the guest ot rel relatives
atives relatives for several days.

Messrs. Lester Lucas and Joe Need Need-ham
ham Need-ham have been selected by Morocco
Temple of Jacksonville as members of
its patrol to go to Portland. Ore., to
attend the annual meeting of the Im Imperial
perial Imperial Council of the Mystic Shrine.
Luke will be one of the leaders in the
patrol and Joe will be in the band.
They will leave Monday or Tuesday.

Dick Erwin of Fellowship came in
this morning and in his usual cheer cheerful
ful cheerful way informed us that his precinct
Tuesday cast a solid vote for Fletcher.

Mr. and Mrs. G. I. Singleton and
daughter of Inverness, were visitors
in the city yesterday at the home of
Mrs. Singleton's sister, Mrs. R. T.
Weaver.

Mrs. Sarah Tourtellot of Burbank
is a visitor in the city today to see
her son, who is a patient at the hospital.

Misses Florence and Dorothy
Brooks and Mrs. F. G. Demming of
Lake Weir were shoppers in town
this morning.

Miss Cevie Roberts, who is a stud student
ent student at the Woman's College at Talla Tallahassee,
hassee, Tallahassee, has arrived home for her va vacation.
cation. vacation. On her way from Tallahas Tallahassee,
see, Tallahassee, she stopped for a few days to
visit with friends, Mr. and Mrs. Jen Jenkins
kins Jenkins in Jacksonville.

Don't fail to visit the Guarantee
Clothing & Shoe Company. Every Everything
thing Everything we sell is guaranteed. We're
fighting for QUALITY not prices, tf
The city was crowded today with
bargain purchasers. The sale at
Geiig's Drug Store is continuing in
popularity, and at Frank's there are
most stylish dresses selling at re remarkably
markably remarkably reduced prices. Walkley &
Barnett, practically a new haberdash haberdashery,
ery, haberdashery, but a most up-to-date one, are
offering splendid prices on what is
styled a mid-summer clearance sale.

Beautiful Georgia Peaches C5 cents
a basket, 25 cents a dozen, 12 & cents
a pound, at W. A. Stroud's. Phone
218. ll-2t

W. K. Lane, M. D., Physician and
Surgeon, specialist Eye, Ear. Nose and
Throat. Office over 5 and 10 cent store,
Ocala, Fla. tf.

CLOSING OUT SALE

Handsome Georgette waists, the
latest styles, beaded in showy de designs
signs designs in the newest bead work, only
$3.98. "Why Pay More?" 9-4t

Help your town grow. Trade here.

INFLUENCE OF MUSIC

Continued from Page Two)
of the most powerful agents in hold holding
ing holding the home togehter in a bond of
common interest. All parents should,
teach their children early in life to
love and appreciate good music.
Many seem to regard the music of
the city as something superior and
finer than the music of the small town
or farm. This is a very decided mis mistake.
take. mistake. Of coures the great masters
center around the cities, but the
trashy rag-time music does also. The
music of the country is as a whole
more pure than that of the cities.
There is a harmful side of music, as
well as a good side and this we want
to overcome. The proper kind of pop popular
ular popular music is all right but there is a
great deal that is detrimental and
this should be guarded against.
No other country needs music so
much as America. It is a land of all
nationalities in one nation. One of

the great problems in America has
been the Americanizing of her immigrant.-.
Music can help in this more
than any other thing. Every immi immigrant
grant immigrant loves his own folk songs. Recog Recognition
nition Recognition of the musical heritage of these
people who come to us, by singing
their national songs with them and
by having recognized their national
heritage, our own patriotic songs, folk
songs and music, voicing our best
musical and national qualities. When
there is an opportunity to sing Ta Ta-mliar
mliar Ta-mliar songs under favorable condi conditions,
tions, conditions, most people enjoy it. The large
numbers who attend community sings
testify their desire to sing. It is very
evident that music is a powerful
agent in harmonizing and in uniting
numbers of the community and in
promoting projects for public good.
Music has an influence in work as
well as other things. A very notice noticeable
able noticeable example is the American negroes.
They don't seem to mind work as
much and work faster if they are al allowed
lowed allowed to sing. The same rule is ap

plicable to people of all races. This
is being realized by many of the
manufacturers and victrolas and

pianos are being placed in the rest

rooms of the factories for the use of

the employees during lunch hour. A
little music sends them back to their

work with better spirits and lighter

hearts. Charles M. Schwab says: "If

every one thought of good music it
would make a happy industrial world.
Music can be made an antidote for
unrest. No normal person can be
guilty of wrong with the sound of
music in his ears and a song upon his
lips."
"O music! miraculous art, that
makes the poet's skill a jest, reveal revealing
ing revealing to the soul inexpressible feelings
by the aid of inexplicable sounds! A
blast of thy trumpet, and millions
rush forward to die; a peal of thy
organ, and uncounted nations sink
dow nto pray. Mighty is thy three threefold
fold threefold power! First, thou canst call up
all elemental sounds, and scenes, and
subjects with the definiteness of real reality.
ity. reality. Strike the lyre! Lo! the voice of
the winds, the flash of the lightning,
the swell of the wave, the solitude of
the valley! Then thou canst speak to
the secrets of a man's heart as if by
inspiration. Strike the lyre! Lo! our
eariy love, our treasured hate, our
withered joy, our flattering hope, and,
lastly by thy mysterious melodies thou
canst recall man from all thought of
this world and of himself, bringing
back to his soul's memory dark but
delightful recollections of the glor glorious
ious glorious heritage which he has lost, but
which he may win aagin. Strike the
lyre! Lo! Paradise, with its palaces
of inconceivable splendor and its

gates of unimaginable glory!"

I
AT THE CHURCHES TOMORROW j

Baptist j
Rev. W. P. Hines, D. D., Pastor j

y:4o a. m. bunday school. Classes
or all ages. W. T. Gary, superin superintendent.
tendent. superintendent. The pastor will preach at 11 a. m.
and 8 p. m.
Morning subject, "Lost Opportuni Opportunities.
ties. Opportunities. Evening, "A Heavenly Vision."

Christian
S. S. Offut, Pastor
9:45 a. m. Sunday school, J. E.
Hyndman, superintendent.
10:45 a. m. Preaching. Subject,
"The Ark a Type of the Church."
8 p. m. Preaching. Subject. "If
Christ would return with his divinity
concealed, what church would ordain
him and permit him to preach his own
gospel?"
Grace Episcopal
John J. Neighbour, Rector
Second Sunday After Trinity
7:30 a. m. Holy communion.
9:45 a. m. Sunday school.
11 a. m. Morning prayer and or or-mon.
mon. or-mon. No evening service tomorrow.
Christian Science Society
Room 5, Merchant's Block
10 a. m. Sunday school.

11 a. m. Sunday service
8 p. m. Wednesday.
Jasper: "Dat's a mighty fine iar
you were in de other day."
Rastus: "Does you like it?"
Jasper: "Yes I'se likes de horn."
Rastus: "Every time I blow de horn
people sure do move. I'se noticed you
have no horn on your car."
Jasper: "'Don't need no horn."
Rastus: 'You don't need no horn!"
Jasper: "Nope right on de front
of my car it says 'Dodge Brothers.'

jvV VjVjVvv- i j-"m' "m -2- "X'- X-i 'X'- iZm-&i&&J&-J&J&jZ.

(!

U AT :

1 TT (T9 C IT HP Tl

3 r a fc... "'"w lis ii mm

EPUCTIOM

E

'tf

4

UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS

WANTED, LOST, FOUND, FOR

SALE, FOR RENT AND SIM SIMILAR
ILAR SIMILAR LOCAL NEEDS

RATES Six line minimum, one
time, 25c; three times, 50c; six times
75c; one month, $3. Payable in ad-

WANTED To LEND $1000 for a
client. No brokerage. D. Niel Fcr Fcr-.
. Fcr-. guson. 8-9t

WANTED To buy, baby crib or
k:'ddy coop, oil stove and wood
stove. Must be in good condition
and cheap for cash. Address, "C"
care Star. 8-3t

FOR RENT Furnished apartment,
private bath, to rent for summer
months. No children. Very reason reasonable.
able. reasonable. Call Phone 332. 29-tf

WRITE The Truth Seeker Co., New
York, for sample copy of the Truth
Seeker, a free thought and agnostic
publication. 23-2t

HADSOCK'S WOOD YARD Phone
your orders to Smoak's Shop. Phone
?146. 2-m

m 9

C5
s
Is.
)
.

.

BEGINNING

Safii

May, June 19, Enu"g Jane 31

We are going to offer for sale our entire stock at a
reduction of 20 per cent on all goods. What we
need is ready money for our Fall Goods. Below will
be found a few of the many values we are offering:
Ladies' white Garbadine Skirts, $7.50 value, $4.98.
Ladies' plain Skirts, $4.50 value, $1.98.
A nice assortment of Silk Taffetas and Georgettes
one piece dresses which we are closing out very
cheap.
Children's Hats at 98c, $1.49 and $1.98.
Boys' Straw Hats at 49c and 98c
Men's Palm Beach Pats, $1.98.
Men's Palm Beach Suits, $5.98.
Children's Middies, assorted, 49c
Ladies' white Voile Waists, 98c.
Ladies' Silk Stockings, assorted colors, 49c a pair.
Ginhams, Ginhams 24c per yard.

.
w
?
Jv
.
.
"
'if-
.V
...

LC

Sin

Hh Pry Goods Compaiy

West Corner Commercial Bank Block

S5
)
'
:t:
-
f
4c'
.i-.
.&.
'J
rift
w
I
.
t
.
v
'if
...
.
It'
..
'
...
i:

FURNITURE, ETCI buy and sell
Second-hand furniture. Experts put

it in good condition before re-selling.
Repair sewing machines, lawn
mowers, enamelware, etc. J. W.
Hunter, 310, 312. 314 S. Main St. tf

TAYLOR THE HAT MAN Beats

the high cost of living. Get your old
hat made like new. Panamas, Leg Leghorns
horns Leghorns and all straws cleaned and
bleached. Telephone me at the
Florida House. l-12t

FOR SALE Lots No. 7 and 8 in block
No. 1 being the nort half of the
northeast quarter, section 14, town township
ship township 14 south, range 23 east, Talla Tallahassee
hassee Tallahassee meridian, Florida; 20 acres
more or less. Doninick Colona, 704
Richards St., Joliet, 111. 5-6t

FOR SALE Piano; also one pianola
player and a bunch of rolls; a bar bargain
gain bargain price. See J. E. Frampton,
1109 E. 5th St., Ocala, Fla. Phone
185 Y. 9-6t

WANTED TO BUY Gentle Florida
pony suitable for child to ride. Give
description and price. Address Box
163, Ocala. 9-3t

SEWING MACHINES Run like new
when repaired by an experienced re repair
pair repair man. Work guaranteed on all
make sof machine. Hemstitching
and dressmaking by Mrs. Gray di direct
rect direct from Paris. Perfect fit guar guaranteed.
anteed. guaranteed. W. Gray, 106 N. Orange St.,
Gates House. 9-3t

TEE WIND

SOR HOTEL

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
In the heart of the city with Hemming Park for a front yard.
Eery modern convenience in each room. Dining room service is
second to none

ROBERT M. MEYER,
Manager.

J. E. K A VANAUGH
Proprietor.

WHENEVER you have a need in our line and
want it quick
PHONE US
We will give you Absolutely Accurate and Immediate
Service, and deliver to you perhaps before you
could reach our store.
We give special attention to phone orders because we
know the need is urgent, and we send you just
what you want.

s

WANTED Iron moulders, 8 hours
day, standard wages, open shop.
Wire or write quick. Southern Iron
Works, Jacksonville, Fla.

STEPHENS SALIENT SIX

The Middle Boys
633 W. Forsyth St.
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA

Agents wanted in Ocala. Your op opportunity
portunity opportunity for handling the Best
Medium Priced Car on the Market
at a Liberal Discount.

99

DRIVE AWAY FROM JACKSONVILLE

Cars on the Floor

huy Your
WESTERN MEATS
of all kinds

FLORIDA BFEF, PORK, B
POULTRY, ETC., I

from

E
s-

New York Market I

W. Broadway
Phone 110

WANTED To purchase furniture for
an office. Geo. F. Young, city engi engineer,
neer, engineer, care Star office. ll-3t
WANTED One first class automobile
mechanic. Apply Box 265, city. 11 -3t

FOUND On streets, knitted baby
sweater. Same can be had by calling calling-at
at calling-at this office and paying for ad. 3t

FOR EXCHANGE New house of
five rooms and bath, never occupied,
in Miami, Fla., for small farm on
a hard road near Ocala. WZ. Da Davis,
vis, Davis, Gen. Del., Ocala. 11-Ct

LOST Since Wednesday afternoon,
little white fice dog (male); has
black ears, nose and tiny specks

e!g..:;."!i!i! mTnt:: 'tin ;
over body. Very short legs. Answers
to name of "Trifle." Reward for his j
recovery. G. W. Stephens, No. 412 ;
S. Pond St., Ocala. ll-3t
FOR SALE 1019 model Ford tour-;
iiig car in Al condition. Apjjly to ;
C A! Holloway, 715 Lime street,
Ocala. Fla. 11-Ct

FOR SALE Pedigreed New Zealand
Red Rabbits and black fur bearing
rabbits. Mrs. F. M. McCarl, care
J. A. Manly, R. F. D. A 7, Ocala. Ct
COW AND MULES FOR SALE
Good milk cow and pair mules. The
Blowers Lime & Phos Co. 12-3t
APARTMENTS FOR RENT Yonge
apartments, Yonge block. Ft. King

ave., now open for inspection. Phone
r,04. or ask for Mr. Yonge up upstairs.
stairs. upstairs. 12-Gt
Don't fail to visit the Guarantee
Clothing & Shoe Company. Every

thing we sell is guaranteed. We're
righting for QUALITY not prices, tf

The Kind lo
which Barney
trusted his
life

It Barney Trusts Them
YOU CAN

DAVTES, The Tire Man
Vulcanizing
Phones 438-76.

Danese Feed and Grocery Co.
636 West Forsyth St.
Jacksonville, Fla.
Wholesale Feed, Grain and Groc Groceries.
eries. Groceries. Larro Cow Feed, the feed that's
guaranteed to give more milk. Shorts,
Bran, Beet Pulp, C. S. Meal, Corn,
Oats, etc.; Rice, Grits, Meal, Flour,
Molasses, Syrup etc. We are growing
and making new friends every day.
There's a reason. Price list on request.
CLOSING OUT SALE

$3.08 buys the best bargain in a
Georgette waist that you could wish
at B. Goldman V. "Why Pay More." 4t

t



Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8 standalone no
fcla fda yes
!-- Ocala evening star ( Newspaper ) --
METS:mets OBJID UF00075908_05598
xmlns:METS http:www.loc.govMETS
xmlns:xlink http:www.w3.org1999xlink
xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance
xmlns:daitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss
xmlns:mods http:www.loc.govmodsv3
xmlns:sobekcm http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcm
xmlns:gml http:www.opengis.netgml
xmlns:lom http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcm_lom
xsi:schemaLocation
http:www.loc.govstandardsmetsmets.xsd
http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss.xsd
http:www.loc.govmodsv3mods-3-4.xsd
http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcmsobekcm.xsd
METS:metsHdr CREATEDATE 2014-07-31T23:16:38Z ID LASTMODDATE 2009-04-29T15:57:01Z RECORDSTATUS COMPLETE
METS:agent ROLE CREATOR TYPE ORGANIZATION
METS:name UF,University of Florida
OTHERTYPE SOFTWARE OTHER
Go UFDC FDA Preparation Tool
INDIVIDUAL
UFAD\renner
METS:dmdSec DMD1
METS:mdWrap MDTYPE MODS MIMETYPE textxml LABEL Metadata
METS:xmlData
mods:mods
mods:accessCondition This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
mods:genre authority marcgt newspaper
sobekcm newspaper
mods:identifier type OCLC 11319113
ALEPHBIBNUM 2052267
LCCN sn 84027621
sn 84027621
mods:language
mods:languageTerm text English
code iso639-2b eng
mods:location
mods:physicalLocation University of Florida
UF
mods:note dates or sequential designation Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
funding Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855
mods:originInfo
mods:publisher Porter & Harding
mods:place
mods:placeTerm marccountry flu
mods:dateIssued June 12, 1920
marc point start 1895
end 1943
mods:frequency Daily (except Sunday)
marcfrequency daily
normalized irregular
mods:recordInfo
mods:recordIdentifier source UF00075908_05598
mods:recordCreationDate 841027
mods:recordOrigin Imported from (OCLC)11319113
mods:recordContentSource University of Florida
marcorg NPU
FUG
OCLCQ
mods:languageOfCataloging
English
eng
mods:relatedItem original
mods:physicalDescription
mods:extent v. : ; 61 cm.
series
mods:part
mods:detail Enum1
mods:caption 1920
mods:number 1920
Enum2
June
6
Enum3
12
12
lccn 84027622
oclc 11319138
mods:titleInfo
mods:title Ocala weekly star
mods:subject SUBJ651_1 lcsh
mods:geographic Ocala (Fla.)
Newspapers
SUBJ651_2
Marion County (Fla.)
Newspapers
mods:hierarchicalGeographic
mods:country United States
mods:state Florida
mods:county Marion
mods:city Ocala
mods:nonSort The
Ocala evening star
uniform
Ocala Evening Star
alternative displayLabel Other title
Evening star
Star
mods:typeOfResource text
DMD2
OTHERMDTYPE SOBEKCM SobekCM Custom
sobekcm:procParam
sobekcm:Aggregation FDNL1
FDNLN
NDNP
sobekcm:MainThumbnail 0006thm.jpg
sobekcm:Wordmark UFPKY
NEH
CHRAM
sobekcm:bibDesc
sobekcm:BibID UF00075908
sobekcm:VID 05598
sobekcm:EncodingLevel #
sobekcm:Publisher
sobekcm:Name Porter & Harding
sobekcm:PlaceTerm Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
sobekcm:Source
sobekcm:statement UF University of Florida
sobekcm:SortDate 693595
sobekcm:serial
sobekcm:SerialHierarchy level 1 order 1920 1920
2 6 June
3 12 12
DMD3
GML Geographic Markup Language
gml:FeatureCollection
gml:featureMember
gml:Point label Place of Publication
gml:Coordinates 29.187778,-82.130556
METS:amdSec
METS:digiprovMD DIGIPROV1
DAITSS Archiving Information
daitss:daitss
daitss:AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT PROJECT UFDC
METS:techMD TECH1
File Technical Details
sobekcm:FileInfo
METS:fileSec
METS:fileGrp USE reference
METS:file GROUPID G1 JP21 imagejp2 CHECKSUM 7c33e9f7191e7fba970cfde54b4e989d CHECKSUMTYPE MD5 SIZE 9392693
METS:FLocat LOCTYPE OTHERLOCTYPE SYSTEM xlink:href 0585.jp2
G2 JP22 8b25c0d39294e1a7aafed143994f97ee 9353956
0586.jp2
G3 JP23 a3fc8577ecdaa4171b4bcb4f911d6cbf 9411861
0587.jp2
G4 JP24 ccb4dac3d0eefab75796141d51b04649 9372626
0588.jp2
archive
TIF1 imagetiff 1894259b561a9bd7cdf51bacac79bba9 75112135
0585.tif
TIF2 af61ef596142c444c887e09f158467e2 74812483
0586.tif
TIF3 c55142fa2d944e9899db1effafa581b4 75255486
0587.tif
TIF4 c6af5233df6f8c5f888694e88cf9f9a6 74961985
0588.tif
ALTO1 unknownx-alto b3f35aa803fa9496749e7e15d59ec4c3 770260
0585.alto
ALTO2 6f08f607fb9f79b4229415ee585e1633 610140
0586.alto
ALTO3 2a515496814407b41b84cedce64a084b 320129
0587.alto
ALTO4 a5f895dda9841d24bc4f8f2d120391f0 502891
0588.alto
TXT1 textplain bc988764abf67e91316d47affec32758 25467
0585.txt
TXT2 620fc9d370b9802743856eb11d8afd74 18429
0586.txt
TXT3 0f051e03ca3900c86fa247548362b725 10148
0587.txt
TXT4 579796828b5dcf1efae0db458a805088 15700
0588.txt
METS1 unknownx-mets 73134139e7159cbd8cf4fb71230cf41c 9854
UF00075908_05598.mets
METS:structMap STRUCT1 physical
METS:div DMDID ADMID The ORDER 0 main
PDIV1 Main
PAGE1 Page
METS:fptr FILEID
PAGE2
PAGE3
PAGE4 4
STRUCT2 other
ODIV1
FILES1