The Ocala evening star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:05594

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
EVENING

STAR

Weather Forecast: Local showers
tonight and Wednesday, gentle to
moderate variable winds.
OGALA, FLORIDA, TUESDAY, JUNE 8. 1920.
VOL. 2G, NO. 137

At 11:34 A. M. Today the Republican
National Convention Opened.

Coliseum, Chicago, June 8 The re republican
publican republican national convention was
called to order at 11:34 a. m. Soon
after Chairman Hays appeared on the
platform and was greeted with rounds
of applause and shouts. After Hays
had rapped for order. Bishop Wood Woodcock,
cock, Woodcock, of Louisville, Ky., offered the
opening prayer. At its conclusion
three cheers were called for the great greatest
est greatest country on earth, the "United
States of America." The rolling
cheers rocked the hall. After the of official
ficial official photograph had been taken,
Secretary Miller read the convention
call. Secretary Hays then introduc introduced
ed introduced Senator Lodge as temporary
chairman and after the cheers had
died down, Senator Lodge began his
keynote speech.
UNBOSSED AND UNBRIDLED
Chicago, June 8. Unique in the
annals of the party the republican na
tional convention assembled today rni rni-bofcsed
bofcsed rni-bofcsed and unbridled and no presiden presidential
tial presidential candidate having enough votes' in
sight to assure his nomination. The
convention promises to be a record record-breaker
breaker record-breaker in all respects. It may cast
more ballots than any republican con convention
vention convention since Garfield was nominated
in 1880, when thirty-six ballots were
cast before the party standard bearer
had been named.
WILL BEGIN WITH A DEADLOCK
Overnight reports and rumors from
the camps of the different candidates
and delegation headquarters shed no
new light on the situation. The tri triangular
angular triangular deadlock between Wood,
Lowden and Johnson still appeared
certain on the first trial of voting
strength on Wednesday or Thursday,
with probably more than a score of
favorite sons, dark horses or individ individuals
uals individuals sharing more than half of the
total vote. The roll call will give,
however, the first clear intimation of
what the mass of uninstructed dele delegates
gates delegates have been thinking.
CONSIDERING A SHORT CUT
Talk of cutting the convention
preliminaries by making the tempo temporary
rary temporary organization, with Senator Lodge
as chairman, the permanent conven convention
tion convention structure, had taken no definite
steps before the first session today.
CROWD TOO GREAT FOR THE
COLISEUM
Hours before the doors opened at
the Colisieum thousands were waiting
hoping to get in. Only a fraction of
these applicants for seats were ad admitted
mitted admitted despite the capacity of the
building for more than ten thousand.
Political activities moved out of the
hotel district into the Coliseum itself
with the assemblying of the first ses session.
sion. session. Today's proceedings in the hall had
little to do with the actual nomina-
tion, merely routine but preliminary
to the sessions to follow. The keynote
speech by Senator Lodge, temporary
chairman, was really the big business
o fthe day.
While last minute arrangements
were being made no change in the
line-up was visible and the various
managers admitted they saw no evi evidence
dence evidence of which way the wind is going
to blow, looking to the first ballot to
develop to point the way to a course
of action.
The convention actually opened its
first session at 11 o'clock, Chicago
time.
NEGRO COMMITTEEMEN FOR
GEORGIA
Henry Lincoln Johnson, of Atlanta,
negro, who led the fight of the Low Lowden
den Lowden delegates before the republican
national committee, was elected com committeeman
mitteeman committeeman from Georgia by the state
delegation. The Wood delegates an announced
nounced announced they' would carry the fight
to the credentials committee of the
convention in favor of Roscoe Pickett,
the defeated committeeman candidate.
COMMITTEEMEN FROM THE
CAROLINAS
John M. Mooreh earwdas elected na national
tional national committeeman from North
Carolina, and Joseph W. Tolbert was
elected national committeeman from
South Carolina.
R. A. M. CHAPTER No. 13
Regular convocations of the Ocala
Chapter No. 13 R. A. M., on the fourth
Friday in every month at 8 p. m.
H. S. Wesson, H. P.
Jake Brown, Secretary.

ELECTION RETURNS
The Star has made what prepara preparation
tion preparation it can, which isn't much, to obtain
election returns this evening. The
ticket is a long one and will take sev several
eral several hours to count. We will receive
information from Fletcher and Hardee
headquarters as soon as the result
is known, but we can't tell what time
that will be probably not before to tomorrow.
morrow. tomorrow. 'COUNTING THE GAME'
In his speech last night, Mr. Har Hardee,
dee, Hardee, to show the voters how his op opponents
ponents opponents had been double-teaming on
him, gave the following illustration:
Sitting in a hotel one day watching
four traveling men playing set-back,
he noticed that whenever one of the
began to win, the other three played
against him, and if another should
then come dangerously near winning,
the other three- played against him.
Mr. Hardee said Dr. Hulley and Mr.
Swearingen were playing against him
but he had already caught Hulley's
jack and Swearingen's deuce, and
hoped today to outcount them for
game.
PRESIDED OVER BY FAIRIES
That big; sale at Gerig's drugstore
will be presided over by a bunch of
fairies. Go see.
Northern France Recovering.
Production has been resumed In
about one-half the factories of north northern
ern northern France, where the outbreak of the
war paralyzed Industry and where
battles raged for four years. Of this
number, however, about IS per cent
have been at work only a month. Fig Figures
ures Figures examined by the correspondent of
the Associated Press, who Is visiting
the war zone under a special dispensa dispensation
tion dispensation of the government, showed that
in this region 30,000 plants employing
800,000 workers were razed by gunfire,
looted or badly disorganized.
Austria Seeks Loan in Paris.
Herr Roisln, Austrian secretary of
state, will go to Paris to negotiate an
advance of from 150,000,000 to 200, 200,-000,000
000,000 200,-000,000 francs, to be guaranteed by a
rental of the Austrian tobacco monop monopoly.
oly. monopoly. It was announced In Vienna.
An Anglo-American group has been
negotiating with the Vienna municipal municipality
ity municipality regarding the erection of water
power stations to supply electricity to
the city at a cost of 30,000,000 francs,
the works to be completed within
three yearfe.
Poles Bar Bolshevik Advance.
Poland has her entire army mar marshaled
shaled marshaled along the Russian frontier to
form a barrier against the western
spread of bolshevism, according to an
Interview with Cardinal Krawkawski,
archbishop of Warsaw, printed In the
Corrlere d'ltalla. The cardinal says,
however, that Polish detachments are
too weak to withstand the pressure
from the east, which, he says, may last
from 20 to 25 years.
Something to sell? Advertise it
ft
PERFECTION
99
Asbestos Protected Tires and
Inner Tubes

Grey Red
30x3 $12.50 $2.05 $2.40
30x3 14.50 2.60 2.90
32x36 17.00 2.90 3.25
32x4 24.00 3.40 3.80
33x4 25.15 3.55 4.00
34x4 26.25 3.70 4.25
32x4 32.00 4.30 1.90
33x4 33.00 4.50 5.10
34x4 34.50 4.65 5.35
35x4 36.75 4.75 5.50

The above Tires and Tubes are
Guaranteed "FIRSTS" NON-SKID
driving tread and are adjusted upon a
6000-mile basis. Orders of four or
more Tires are shipped express pre prepaid
paid prepaid and are subject to inspection.
Robt. F. Heweft & Co.
P. O. Box 796
I JacKsonville, Florida

A. F. OF L,

II All
Snowing Under the Meeting at Mon Montreal
treal Montreal with Demands and
Censure
(Associated Press)
Montreal, June 8 Resolutions cov covering
ering covering political economy conditions in
the United States and demands upon
the administration forces of that
country were presented by the score
when the American Federation of La Labor
bor Labor opened its session her today.
One resolution demanded the impeach impeachment
ment impeachment of Attorney General Palmer,
and another condemned Postmaster
General Burleson.
K EARNS AND DEMPSEY
UP IN COURT
Trial of the Slacker and His Man Manager
ager Manager Begun in Frisco
(Associated Press)
San Francisco, June 8. The trial
of Jack Dempsey and his manager,
Jack Kearns, on a charge of conspir conspiracy
acy conspiracy to evade the draft law is sched scheduled
uled scheduled to begin today in United States
district court.
SEVEN SAVED
FROM STARVATION
Killed in Vienna in a Fight Over High
Cost of Food
Vienna, June 8. Seven persons
were killed and a score wounded in
the fighting between the police and
citizens yesterday during a demon demonstration
stration demonstration over the high cost of food.
GILCHRIST'S VIEWS
ON THE PEACE TREATY
Punta Gorda, June 6th.
Editor Star: The treaty of peace
with Germany embodies in part 1, the
covenant of the league of nations, in
part 13, what I call the covenant of
the league of labor, being labor's
world-wide Magna Charta. On the last
vote in the U. S. Senate, on March 19,
1920, 57 senators went on record as
favoring this treaty with the so so-called
called so-called Lodge reservations included,
seven more are necessary to ratify
it. For the Lodge reservation to ar ar-tible
tible ar-tible 10, the president calling article
10 the heart of the league, over two two-fifths1
fifths1 two-fifths1 of the senators are known to
favor it. For the Simmons reserva reservation
tion reservation to article 10, every democrat who
went on record, excepting those dem democrats
ocrats democrats who favor the Lodge reserva reservations,
tions, reservations, and excepting the two who are
opposed to the treaty in toto, and
excepting Williams, democrat, Mis Mississippi,
sissippi, Mississippi, who alone went on record as
opposing both, voted for the Sim Simmons
mons Simmons reservation. Simmons is a
democrat from North Carolina. If any
democrat can swallow the Simmons
reservation he can swallow the Lodge
reservation to article 10, for they are
identical in meaning. Now how many
sane men believe this treaty can pos possibly
sibly possibly be ratified except with practical practically
ly practically these reservations? There are 49
republican senators, all opposed to the
treaty except with reservations; 12
opposed to it in toto. There are 47
democratic senators, 24 of whom went
on record as opposing the ratification
of the treaty with the reservations,
two of them being totally opposed to
it; 25 went on record favoring the
ratification, including the Lodge res reservations.
ervations. reservations. How many sane men be believe
lieve believe this treaty can be ratified except
with these reservations? In the
Georgia primary April 20, 1920, prac practically
tically practically one-third voted for a candidate
for nomination for president who op opposed
posed opposed the treaty in toto; one-fifth for
a candidate who favored the treaty
with the Lodge reservations; o.ie o.ie-third
third o.ie-third for a candidate who was for the
treaty without reservations. Conclus Conclusion:
ion: Conclusion: Two-thirds voted against the
treaty as it came from France. I am
a democrat. I want the party to win.
I favor the endorsement of the na national
tional national administration. If I did not I
would not be a candidate for the San San-Francisco
Francisco San-Francisco convention. Now, we have
to take the treaty with the reserva reservations
tions reservations or remain technically at war
with Germany until the Senate is so
changed that 04 senators will vote for
ratification or the treaty without res reservations,
ervations, reservations, or we have to wait until a
Senate and a president are seated
who will agree to a declaration cf
peace, omitting any reference to any
league at all. You who favor the rat ratification
ification ratification of the treaty without reser
vations, take your choice. Make any
deductions you wish. You have the
facts. Very truly,
Albert W. Gilchrist.
Only one-third actual factory cost
Government farm wagons; fine for
farm, crosstie and general use; a big
advance in freight rates is coming to
don't delay; warehouse near you; aiso
harness and saddles. Write today.
Government Surplus Goods Co., Jack Jacksonville,
sonville, Jacksonville, Fla. 8-8t

WANTS

VI GOVERNMENT
MiKEpTATION
Mr. M. S. Wiggins Will Have Desk
in Board of Trade Room Dur During
ing During Melon Season
The 1920 watermelon season in
Marion and adjoining counties opens
tomorow with the arrival here of Mr.
M. S. Wiggins, representative of the
United States bureau of markets, who
has taken a desk in the office of the
Marion County Board of Trade in
Ocala. Mr. Wiggins will begin issu issuing
ing issuing market reports about noon tomor tomorrow
row tomorrow and will issue them about the
same hour each day during the melon
shipping period. The market station
he is opening here is one of six
throughout the United States.
The rains have done some damage
to the watermelon crop in this section
of the state, but it is expected that
the shipments from this section will
exceed those of last year. In Marion
county alone there are something like
2500 acres in watermelons.
The market bulletin service will be
mailed to all points in Florida from
this station during the watermelon
season. The bulletins will be sent
free to any one whose address is sent
to Mr. M. S. Wiggins, care of Mar Marion
ion Marion County Board of Trade, Ocala,
Florida.

DISTRICT CONVENTION
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
A district convention of the Knights
of Pythias will be held at Ocala Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday night, June 9th. The grand
chancellor will be present and the
amplified third rank work will be put
on. All knights requested to attend.
There will be nine candidates, and
with the highly trained team for the
third rank ceremonies, the meeting
will be a most interesting one.
Chas. K. Sage. K. of R. & S.
BASEBALL THURSDAY
The crack team of Dunnellon will
be in Ocala Thursday afternoon to
cross bats with the local baseball
team. Jake Goldman says Ocala now
has a winner and he wants everybody
to come out and see them put it over
the Phosphate City bunch. While the
Ocala line-up has not yet been an announced,
nounced, announced, Jake says it's a real hummer
and nothing short of a professional
team or a long series of accidents can
keep down the score.
FELLOWSHIP
Fellowship, June 7 We are having
a great quantity of rain, too much for
the farmers, and it looks like the
crops will be short.
Mr. Claud McCully returned home
last Tuesday afternoon after spend spending
ing spending several days wit hhis friends at
Palmetto.
Mrs. S. R. Stephens moved last
Tuesday. She will make her future
home with Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Miller
of Martel.
Mrs. Ethel Johnson and son and her
sister, Miss Berne Smith arrived last
Monday from Red Springs, N. C. and
will be the guests of their parents,
Mr .and Mrs. J. L. Smith, for some
time.
Mr. Willie Mills of Winter Garden,
is the guest of his parents, Mr. and
Mrs. G. W. Mills.
Mr. and Mrs. H. J. McCully are the
happy parents of a fine boy, who ar arrived
rived arrived last Tuesday night.
Miss Fay Beck arrived home last
Wednesday from Tampa, where she
spent several weeks very pleasantly
with friends.
Yesterday being memorial day, the
Fellowship W. O. W. met and deco
rated the graves of deceased Wood
men with flowers.
Mr. S. B. Brooks spent last week
in Ocala, serving on the jury.
Mr. Dan Mathews and father of
Fairfield were guests of Mr. and Mrs.
S. D. Atkinson yesterday afternoon.
Mr. Claud McCully and sister. Miss
Winifred were the guests of their sis sister,
ter, sister, Mrs. N. A. Noble of Morriston
Saturday night.
Mrs. R. A. Sand if er and little
daughter, Muriel of Oklawaha, are the
guests of Mr. and Mrs. H. J. McCully.
Mrs. E. M. Petty continues quite
ill. We hope she will soon be all right
again.
The picnic at Fellowship last Thurs
day was quite a success. Fully 600
were present and all seemed to have
a good time. Every nook and corner
of the county was well represented
and all the county candidates were
present and made their little speeches
in their own behalf.
Advertising is almost a sure thing.
FOR SALE
One Mare, One Cow and Calf,
Two Heifers.
Rose V. Falana, Admx.
Ocala, Florida

Matt Reif Says Farming is More Profit Profitable
able Profitable in Marion County.

Matt Reif, who has been in Marion
county since 1913, says that farming
is more profitable in Florida than in
Illinois. Mr. Reif is from Kewanee,
111. For a given amount of capital
invested the farmer can make a
greater return in Florida, says Mr.
Reif, who gives this as his opinion
after seven years of farming near
Martin in this county. The reason for
this is that the climate of Florida
gives the farmer a longer growing
period, making possible the planting
of more crops in a year, and making
it possible to follow any crop that
fails with another crop the same sea season.
son. season. Since coming to Marion county
Mr. Reif has paid for his land, put
substantial improvements on it, and
put money in the bank. He says that
he would have done even better if he
had possessed more capital.
Mr. Reif believes that successful
farming must be built upon a -basis
of livestock. He believes in putting
back into the soil as much or more
than is taken from it. This fall,
therefore, he intends building a con concrete
crete concrete barn for his cattle, not because
cattle need any housing in Florida but
for the purpose of getting manure
with which to replenish the fertility
of the soil. He will also build a con concrete
crete concrete manure vat, following a plan
that he has himself worked out. He
has a herd of grade cattle on his
farm, headed by a pure-blooded Aberdeen-Angus
bull. He believes in cover
AMERICAN AND AUSTRALIAN
INTERESTS IN THE PACIFIC i
ARE IDENTICAL
(N. Y. Tribune's European Bureau)
London "It is not America's indif indifference
ference indifference to European affairs so much
as her interest in the Pacific."
This is the gist of what has been
expressed by a distinguished admiral,
Sir Cyprian A. G. Bridge, and the
Australian treasurer, W. A. Watt.
The treasurer has just reached Lon London
don London and in repeated speeches and in
terviews has reiterated the view that
the world center of the future will be
in the Pacific, that America has iden identical
tical identical interests with the British com
monwealth he represents realizes
the common danger and is building
great fighting ships for Pacific wa
ters. I
Mr. Watt's primary concern is to
obtain a voice for Australia at the
time the Anglo-Japanese alliance is
renewed. But from opinion in official
circles the alliance will be renewed
by its own terms without discussion.
However, he voiced his apprehensions
in the following manner:
"Australia always will be for the
white. man and the white man only.
The world center of the future will
be in the Pacific and the three coun
tries vitally concerned will be Amer America,
ica, America, Japan and Australia.
"Great Britain is our mother coun
try and we shall remain loyal to hex
as such, but it is plainly to be seen
that in the possibility of a great
world-shaking conflict the interests
of America and Australia will be
identical. Australia today is prac practically
tically practically defenseless. We are of the
firm opinion that Australia can never
be taken, but in the event of war she
could be incalculably crippled."
Possibilities of the Pacific
Admiral Bridge, a recognized au
thority on international relations, has
written a letter to "The London
Times." He does not raise the jingo
fear, but bases his opinion on the
natural development of America west westward,
ward, westward, her insular possessions in the
Pacific and her, therefore, natural de
sire to cast the horoscope of Asia.
Here is what he says:
"The attitude of the United States
toward the league of nations and to toward
ward toward the settlement of Europe gener
ally is often described as one of aver aversion,
sion, aversion, or at the least of indifference.
May I suggest a reason which is rare
ly or, more correctly, never men
tioned, for believing that it is in re
ality one of easily explained, and in
no small degree justifiable, indiffer
ence?
"As far back as last September
you permitted to invite in your col
umns attention to what you yourself
designated the 'great possibilities of
the Pacific ocean. It will not be go going
ing going very far to believe that an almost
distinctive or intuitive perception of
the greatness of these possibilities,

crops and in turning them under to
get humus.
Mr. Reif, with his brother, John
Reif, and Charles Gutsclag. came to
Marion county, from Henry county,
Illinois, in the fall of 1913. They
bought 1650 acres of land near Mai Mai-tin.
tin. Mai-tin. Up until last year they farmed
on this tract together, having much
clearing to do. They have now divid divided
ed divided the tract and are farming sepa separately.
rately. separately. Mr., Matt Reif is farming the
largest acreage of the three, having
more land cleared. His success is
typical of the others who have follow followed
ed followed him in the move from Illinois to
Florida. Three barns, one of which
is concrete and just completed, and
over 100 head of pure blooded Duroc Duroc-Jersey
Jersey Duroc-Jersey hogs, indicate the character of
farming he is doing. Mr. Reif is
planting some truck, and at present
has twenty acres in melons. His main
crops are corn, velvet beans and pea peanuts,
nuts, peanuts, and has always made enough cf
these to give him a surplus, for which
he has found a ready market and
good prices. He has baled and mar marketed
keted marketed hay.
Too many have made the mistake
of attempting to farm in Florida, say3
Mr. Reif, without the knowledge of
farming and without sufficient capital,
and, for these reasons there have been
failures. There is now quite a colony
of Illinois farmers at Martin, all of
whom have done well, and if there
is anyone who doubts the possibili possibilities
ties possibilities of farming in Florida let him
visit this colony.
and of the relatively rapid approach
o fthe period in which their realiza
tion will be practicable, is tendincr to
decide the attitude toward internation
al affairs of a large and increasing
section of the American people.
"How many of the inhabitants cf
Europe understand or even know all
that is meant by the steady shifting
of the center of gravity toward the
west of the great American republic?
How many of us in western Eurooe
still conceive of the United States as
the country to the east of the Missis
sippi, or perhaps as only the country
to tne east of the Alleghanies and
Lake Michigan? Yet we have but to
glance at a map of the republic to see
proof of the imposing development of
the vast territory west of the 90th, aDd
even of the 100th, meridian of west
longitude. The whole of it is cover
ed with organized and prosperous
states, is studded with gerat cities,
is covered with innumerable lines of
railway.
"The population west of the 100th
meridian is already one of millions,
and is increasing; moreover, it in includes
cludes includes some of the most enterprising
and energetic people in the world.
The abundant natural resources are
still only in the early stages of de
velopment.
"It is not surprising that to these
people the Pacific ocean should be
what the Atlantic has been to their
felJow citizens east of the ninetieth
meridian. Many of them, oerhans
the best of them, are descendants of
the hardy 'pioneers' who went in long
migratory trains to what was called,
within living memory, the Great
West. Instinct and the well-remem
bered predictions of their fathers
combine to induce them to turn their
backs on the Atlantic ocean and the
Europe that lies beyond it.
"Japan has come forth as a 'world
power on an equality with the great
states of the west: China China of
all countries has become a republic.
Is it any wonder that the inhabitants
of the western half of the United
States should find themselves intui intuitively,
tively, intuitively, unconsciously trying to cast
the horoscope of Asia?
"South of the line also there are.
on both sides of the Pacific, impor
tant and progressive communities
with which great and profitable com
merce can be conducted. Besides the
Hawaiian Islands the United States
already has many insular stepping
stones in the Pacific between the
western coast of the republic and the
Philippines.
"Intent contemplation of the prob probabilities
abilities probabilities of the future connected with
conditions in the Pacific ocean may
well so occupy the minds of the west western
ern western people of the great American re republic
public republic that indifference to the affairs
of Europe is inevitable. Whatever
their minds may be occupied with, it
has to be taken into account by those
who aspire to direct the opinions of
the country at large."



OCALA EVENING STAR, TUESDAY, JUNE 8, 1920

OCA LA EVEIIIC STAR

Pu I1 In bed Kvcry Day Kxeept Sunday by
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY.,
OCALA, FLORIDA.

R. It. Carroll, Prenldent
P. V. UfDKtMHl, Sfretary-Treanrer
J. K. Ilenjamln, Editor

Entered at Ocala, Fla., postoffke as
second-class matter.
TKLKI'IIOXES
IluklnrHN Office Five-One
Auditorial Department Two-Seven
Society Iteporler Flve-Oae
MKMIIi;it ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively
entitled for the use for republication of
all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise cred'ted in this paper and
also the local news published herein.
All rights of republication of special
dispatches herein are also reserved.
DOMESTIC SUI1SCRIPTIO.V RATES
One year, in advance $6.00
Six months, in advance 3.00
Three months, in advance 1.50
One month, in advance 60

ADVERTISING RATES
DUpIayt Plate la cents per inch for
consecutive insertions. Alternate inser insertions
tions insertions 25 per cent additional. Composi Composition
tion Composition charges on ads. that run less than
six times 5 cents per inch. Special
osltion 20 per cent additional. Rates
ased on 4-inch minimum. Less than
four inches will take higher rate,
which will be furnished upon applica application.
tion. application. Readlnic Xollce: 5 cents per line for
first insertion: 3 cents per line for each
subsequent insertion. One change a
week allowed on readers without extra
composition charges.
Liegal advertisements at legal rates.

We do not know how
tion will result, but we
are glad we supported
Hardee. We would far
defeat with them than
Catts and Swearingen.

today's elec elec-do
do elec-do know we
Fletcher and
rather share
victory with

During the republican convention
in Chicago, the Star will take extra
seivice, and all dispatches that come
in after press time will be bulletined
in the office window. Announcemnt
of a nomination will be made as soon
as it arrives. The Star will give the
same service for the national demo democratic
cratic democratic convention.

said that he was one of four men
that he knew to be in the same pre predicament,
dicament, predicament, each losing his right to
vote because the polls wer not open
on time. He also reported that he
had met a number of men from other
precincts who had cast their ballots
and came to the city to work for their
favorite candidates during the day.
HARDEE PLEASED HIS HEARERS

General Wood says that a soldier
in the regular army can be well fed at
the cost of 49c. a day.
The population of New York city
is 5,621,268 rather less than was ex expected.
pected. expected. Boston's line-up is 747,923.
Buffalo has 505,875.
The wife of the president of the
French republic has refused a $5000
hatmade for-her by the American
Retail Millinery Association.
A New York man, having swallow swallowed
ed swallowed two tacks in the soup that he was
eating at a restaurant, has obtained
a verdict for $25,000 damages against
the restaurant proprietor.
The price of a kiss has been fixed at
$2 by a magistrate. It looks like pro profiteering.
fiteering. profiteering. Tampa Tribune.
A kiss you have to pay for is not
worth a dern, but those that are given
you are priceless.
A New York publicist believes that
Morris Hillquit, the socialist leader
who lauded Eugene V. Debs, the con convict,
vict, convict, and said a good word for soviet soviet-ism,
ism, soviet-ism, would be a better citizen if be
changed his name to Willquit, and
acted accordingly.
Some disgruntled citizen proposes
an educational test for state legisla legislators.,
tors., legislators., The very idea Anybody is qual qualified
ified qualified to make laws in this country. At
least, that's the theory we act on.
Pensacola News.
Who is qualified to decide who is
qualified to make laws?

. A traveling man came to the Star
office this morning and made what
seems to be a just complaint. On ac account
count account of the lateness in opening the
polls he was compelled to leave the
city on his rounds without casting his
ballot in the primary election. He

MICKIE SAYS

fO.tw store nwrnu jur'

Cary A. Hardee's speech last night
from the bandstand to the people of
Marion county, the closing address of
his campaign for governor, was, in
the opinion of many in the audience,
the best piece of oratory Ocala people
have listened to since the lecture of
John Temple Graves, in the lyceum
course, at the Woman's Club building
during the winter. Mr. Hardee is not
famed as an orator, but his address
was the most pleasing heard here in
the present campaign. His language
was beautiful and his sentences well
rounded and everything he said per perfectly
fectly perfectly understood by his hearers. 1
Though at times he used words that;
are not in the vocabulary of the ordi-!
nary layman, his remarks were as
plain as a b c. He had his audience's
sympathy and respect from the begin beginning
ning beginning and at the conclusion of his ad address
dress address he was given an ovation seldom
accorded a candidate for public of office,
fice, office, nearly everybody who could
press through the crowd grasping his
hand and speaking words of commen commendation.
dation. commendation. Mr. Hardee was introduced by Col.
R. F. Rogers, who knew him as a boy
in Suwanee county, with a short com complimentary
plimentary complimentary speech.
The speaker stated that he was
sorry he could not reached Ocala
earlier in the campaign, but circum circumstances
stances circumstances prevented. -He stated that he
did not consider himself a candidate of
any section of the state, but if elected
would represent the whole state; that
in 1916 when the cry came from
south and central Florida that an im important
portant important industry was about to be de destroyed,
stroyed, destroyed, it was his pleasure and priv privilege
ilege privilege to introduce in the legislature
the bill to eradicate the citrus canker
pest. That if elected governor he
would appoint those men to office only
who were capable and efficient, re regardless
gardless regardless of personal friendships, and
his appointees would not be "spokes
in a wheel" to perpetuate him in o5 o5-fice,
fice, o5-fice, as he would not be a candidate,
while governor, for any other posi position.
tion. position. In his appointments he would
"hear the voice of the people."
Stating that it was necesary in the
exigencies of practical politics to re reply
ply reply to some of the vituperative at at-taks
taks at-taks of his opponents, he took up
different accusations brought against
him by Dr. Hulley and Mr. Swearin Swearin-gen,
gen, Swearin-gen, and gave an instance happening
in Brooksville, when the former ad advertised
vertised advertised a meeting by writing on the
sidewalks with chalk the inscription:
"Hot stuff; come out tonight and hear
Hulley skin Cary Hardee." He stated
that personally both his opponents
were affable gentlemen, but in pol politics
itics politics "they don't look good to me."
He stated that his opponents accused
him of being against the labor fac faction,
tion, faction, but that he was not for any fac faction
tion faction and would represent labor when
labor was rights but would be against
labor if labor was wrong. One of the
charges brought against Mr. Hardee
is that the money interests are behind
him. Because he was president of a
small bank in his home town was no
reason why the money intersts were
behind him. Another charge is that
certain papers are supporting 'him.
But the speaker declared that "certain
papers" comprise about 95 per cent
of the state press, and why did they
support him ? Because they were tired
The only personal reference Mr.
Hardee made during his talk was to
his legislative record, stating that he
had been elected speaker of the house
his first term as representative "and
re-elected unanimously in 1917, and
that out of the entire membership
serving with him he did not believe
there were six men not his friends
and who were not working for his
election. He closed with the state statement
ment statement that he did not wish to dangle
a wooden minnow before the eyes cf
the voters, in an endeavor to get their
votes, and have them grab it to find
it filled with the hooks of incompe incompetency
tency incompetency and demagogery.
of the system of government that has
been growing at Tallahassee.
The speaker was in favcr of law en enforcement,
forcement, enforcement, an economical administra administration
tion administration and equalization of taxation in
the state modeled after the county
system. The tax rate of 12 mills as
at present he hoped to reduce by con conservative
servative conservative business ideas, but he was

net making flamboyant promises that
hp would do so.
Mr. Hardee closed his address by
touching on the school problem. uni universal
versal universal military training, conserva conservation,
tion, conservation, reforestation and good roads.
He said that he was in favor of
broadening the curriculum of the
small schools, and that while he was
youth, physical and military training
being afraid it would Prussianize onr
youth, physical and military training
shculd be embraced in the schools.
However, he said, the governor had no
more to do with universal military
training than the open door to China
or the Monroe doctrine.
It was on the program for Mr.
Hardee to go over to the Temple and
attend the high school commence commencement,
ment, commencement, but the hour was so late and he
met so many friends on the street be between
tween between the bandstand and the Har Harrington,
rington, Harrington, holding a regular reception
of at least an hour on the street cor cor-ner,that
ner,that cor-ner,that this part of the plan was
eliminated. About 10 o'clock, he went

to the 'hotel, to obtain a little rest be before
fore before leaving on the early morning
train for Live Oak.

Pennsylvania school teachers have
abolished the spelling book; and the
best authorities in the profes.iom
have long ago abolished oral spell spelling.
ing. spelling. Tampa Tribune.
Yes, and from the specimens we see
every day they are rapidly abolishing
the people who can spell.

John Wanamaker says he saved his
first five hundred dollars out of his
savings as office boy in a book store.
Many another man cannot remember
how he saved his first five hundred,
but only knows that it was in the
days before cash registers. Toronto
Mail and Empire.
It's seldom that a man who steals
money saves it.

A pillar of the law says: "There
are two great legal tribunal in this
country, the United States supreme
court and Charles Evans Hughes. The
latter's opinions usually have the
merit of being unanimous."
This meeting of the American Fed Federation
eration Federation of Labor, say the dispatches,
beingin Montreal, is the second to be
held on foreign soil. Canada can
hardly be considered foreign soil for
an American organization that is try trying
ing trying to better conditions on this con continent,
tinent, continent, but if the A. F. of L. continues
to follow its present course it may not
be long before it holds a meeting m
Russia.

ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE
OF TRAINS IN OCALA

Arrive
Leave
Arrive
Leave
Arrive
Leave
Arrive
Leave
Arrive
Leave
Arrive
Leave

For fourteen months the joint con congressional
gressional congressional commission on postal sal salaries
aries salaries has been wrestling with the
question of the admitted underpay underpayment
ment underpayment of postal employees. The com commission
mission commission is as deliberate as the Paris
peace commission or the United States
Senate. Hundreds of postal employees
are resigning and those still on duty
are not resigned. Better pay they
say would put "pep" into a lagging
mail service.

WILL FLORIDA PROVE
AN OIL STATE ?

(Manufacturers Record)
Some years ago a soil expert from
the United States department of ag agriculture
riculture agriculture was testing soil around
Southern Pines, N. C, where nearly
all of the soil looks like sand. Taking
one shovelful after another and ex examining
amining examining it carefully, he said to some
gentlemen in the party: "Whatever
this soil may or may not produce, it
will never grow cotton."
One of the men to whom he was
speaking replied:
"I raised a crop of cotton averag averaging
ing averaging one bale an acre on this soil last
year."
Experts are good expert advice is
advisable but experts sometimes
make mistakes, as in this case.
In our issue of April 22 we publish published
ed published a report from the United States
Geological Survey in which the possi possibility
bility possibility of findin goil in Florida v.as
discredited, though personally we are
inclined to question the accuracy of
that report, and bearing on this sub subject,
ject, subject, Mr. William T. Wells of Mel Melbourne,
bourne, Melbourne, Fla., referring to this item
from the Geological Survey, writes as
follows:
"On page 127 of issue of this week
you seem to favor the idea that there
is no oil in Florida.
"I know this is entirely wrong, as
I have oil here on the East Coast, and
it is coming up in the deep well on my
home place continually. I also have
'oil sand' and black iron sand (mag (magnetic
netic (magnetic oxide) and asphalt on my lands
south of here. All these go to show
that there is oil here, but of course
we do not yet know how much.
"The well in Sumter county was
net sunk deep enough to make a fair
test, as it is on the apex of the Ap Appalachian
palachian Appalachian spur which makes into
Florida, and has its highest point
about Ocala, and then slopes down
rapidly to the south.
"The well at Waycross was on the
east slope of the Appalachian range,
where geologists have always claimed
there was no oil.
"In this lower part of Florida we
are on the south slope of the spur, and
the Trenton rock is said to have been
found near Orlando at about 2000
feet, and if the money had not given
out the men drilling the well would
have probably struck the oil seam.
Our great trouble in South Florida is
that we have not had money enough
to make any real hunt for oil, as little
stockholders soon get impatient and
fall down and refuse to keep up the
work. I had reason to believe last
fall that big men who have operated
heavily in Texas, and are there yet,
would come here and put down at least
three real oil wells, going to 3000
feet or further, if necessary, but the
men referred to have been so busy
making money and big strikes in
Texas that they have not felt like
coming to an unknown field."
SEEDS!

Ninety day and old fashion velvet
beans, chufas, Pyles and Gist seed
corn. Ocala Seed Store, phone 435. tf

Wm. A. Tinsman
Contractor
Brick and Plastering
Tile and Marble Flooring
Specialties
215 Fifth St. Phone 526

Seaboard Air Line
from Jacksonville.. 2
for Tampa 2

from Jacksonville.. 1

for Tampa
from Jacksonville.,
for Tampa
from Tampa
for Jacksonville....

from Tampa 1
for Jacksonville.... 1
from Tampa 4
for Jacksonville. ... 4

Atlantic Coast Line
Arrive from Jacksonville. 3
Leave for St. Petersburg. 3
Arrive from Jacksonville. 3
Leave for St. Petersburg. 3
Arrive from Jacksonville. .10
Leave for Leesburg 10

Arrive from ot. Petersburg 2

Leave for Jacksonville....
Arrive from St. Petersburg
Leave for Jacksonville. .
Arrive from Leesburg....
Leave for Jacksonville....

Arrive from Homosassa... 1

Leave for Homosassa 3
Arrive from Gainesville,
daily except Sunday. . .11
Leave for Gainesville, daily
except Sunday 4
Leave for Lakeland, Tues Tuesday,
day, Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday 7
Ar. from Lakeland, Tues Tuesday,
day, Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday 11
Leave for Wilcox, Monday,
Wednesday and Friday. 7
Arrive from Wilcox, Mon Monday.
day. Monday. Wednesday. Friday. 6

:09
:10

:30
:50

:24
:25
:14
:15
:35
:55
:04
:05
:14
:15
:34
:35
:12
:13
:11
:12
:25
:45
:41
:42

.25

:25
:50
:45
:25
:03
:10
:45

a. m.
a. m.
p. m.

Rexall Toothache Stopper, fifteen
cents the bottle, two for 16 cents at
Ceng's One Cent Sale, June 9th, 0th
and llthl tf

m
m
m.
m.

G66 quickly relieves Constipation.
Riliou: ne&s. Lass of Appetite and
Headache, due to Torpid Liver, la

PEAS. PEAS, PEAS
Whippoorwili $6.25 bu.; Whippoor Whippoor-will
will Whippoor-will mixed $6; Iron and Clay mixed
$6.25 bu.; Red Ripper $6.25; Cream
Crowder $6.50. Send orders at once
to James L. Dean, Orlando, Fla. These
prices for 2 bushel sacks and up upward.
ward. upward. 27-12t

a. m.
p. m.
p. m.
p. m.
p. m.

a.
a.
P.
a.
P P-P.
P. P-P. a.
a.
P.
P-
a.
P P-a.
a. P-a. P.
a.

m.
m.
m.
m.
m.
m.
m.
m.
m.
m.
m.
m.
m.
m.
m.
m.
m.
m.
m.

p. m.

Don't forget the DANCE tonight
over the Commercial Bank. Jazz
music. it

Rub-My-Tism is a great pain killer,
lit relieves pain and soreness caused by
rheumatism, neuralgia, sprains, etc

L. ALEXANDER?
PRACTICAL CARPENTER AND
BUILDER
Careful estimates made on all con contract
tract contract work. Gives more and better
work for the money than any other
contractor in the city.

Veronica Sprling Waller
BOTTLES, C0c; Case of 12 Bottles, $6.50
As a SpringVTonie and Blood Purifier and to
Cool the Blood far the Summer It
Has No Equal
IT WILL REMOVE THE CAUSE OF CHRONIC CONSTIPATION,
STOMACH AND LIVER TROUBLES
West Palm Beach, March 6, 1920.
Jaundice Six years ago Hon. Joe L. Earman, now president of
State Board of Health of Florida, recommended the use of Veronica
Water for jaundice, and it cured me. Send me another case as a spring
tonic, blood purifier and liver regulator. GEO. O. BUTLER,
Clerk Circuit and County Court, Palm Beach Countv.
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:
Jacksonville, Fla., Feb. .23, 1920.
As a minister of the gospel, I have always had a feeling that men
of my calling should not allow their name to be associated with ad advertising,
vertising, advertising, but when a thing is so good, and one knows that it is from
experience, he should say so for the benefit of suffering humanity.
Having used "Veronica Water," I do not hesitate to say that, in my
opinion, it is the best natural medicinal spring water in the world for
removing the poisonous toxins that cause rheumatism, renal calculi,
stomach, liver and kidney troubles that arise from lack of proper
elimination. W. A. HOBSON,
Pastor First Baptist Church, Jacksonville, Fla.
HONEST PROPOSITION
We give results the first day and you pay after. While our rep representative
resentative representative is in town we will send any responsible party a case of the
water, which they can use ten days (about three bottles) and if not
as represented, it can be returned and there will be no charge for Ihe
watr used.
YOU CAN HAVE A CASE ON TRIAL IF YOU LEAVE YOUR
NAME AND ADDRESS WITH
Anti-Monopoly Drug Co., j. e. parrish, prop.
Phone 123 Ocala, Florida
THE VERONICA MEDICAL SPRINGS WATER COMPANY,
Write for Circular
Santa Barbara, California,

M jy
i
i

Those Good Brakes

in a

H

MAX

are aided by special steels

Brakes seem to be one of the
overlooked features of a motor
car. In a Maxwell they have
had the extreme of attention.
For instance, a road engineer,
in about 500,000 miles of ex experimental
perimental experimental driving, has con constantly
stantly constantly tested and studied them.
That is why you can check the
speed of a Maxwell in an instant
and bring it to a standstill either
by foot brake or hand brake.
Special steels in a Maxwell
are largely responsible. They
giro it extra strength in wear
and endurance, but they make
the car light in weight.

t
t
.
a:
?.
i

X

Thus when you call on it to
halt, the brakes are not required
to "wrestle" with superfluous
weight, and the momentum of
the car is easily stopped.
These are steels made to
Maxwell's own formulae. They
equal, pound for pound, the
steels in any car built. But
no ear has steels just like
them. e
In a large measure they con contribute
tribute contribute to Maxwell's growing
prestige, as expressed in figures
like these: nearly 400,000 now
in use; and 100.000 more for
the year 1920.

OCALA MOTOR CO., toe,
Ocala Florida

6

i



OCA LA EVENING STAR. TUESDAY, JUNE 8,, 1920

o
V

Sec Me

; For All Classes Oi
Stone, Brick, Wood,
; and Concrete
Buildino
jj. D. McCasMH
I Contractor
J Phone 446. 728 Wenona St.

oes

YOU CAN SAVE
Many Dollars
On your shoe bills by having us re rebuild
build rebuild your old shoes. Our charges are
moderate, and we guarantee satisfac satisfaction.
tion. satisfaction. MAZON & CO.
Between Ten Cent Store and Gerig's
Drug Store
aiHt I am attending the op-

. week in the interest of

see your eyes, so that I can
.w give yo" the benefit of
up-to-the-minute service and knowl knowledge.
edge. knowledge. DR. K. J. WEIHE,
Optometrist and Optician
Eyesight Specialist

The Kind to
which Barney
trusted his
life

If Barney Trusts Them
YOU CAN

DAVIES, The Tire Man
Vulcanizing
Phones 438-76.

Buy Your
WESTERN MEATS
of all kinds
FLORIDA BFEF, PORK,
POULTRY, ETC.,
from

New York Market

W. Broadway
Phone 110

u

Pqninmiliilteimif

a w m w w mmmmr- mmammm tmmmmw m

a. 9

'vi.7 HOTEL

W JACKSONVILLE-FiA
roppKIa-Cornpl(?te Rodem-Screened
outride roon Sream UJ l.up- Csie k
CQNvedioCow?fiat to CverytKii-h
heart of City Servd For Booklet
70 VINDUW. SMITH. PROP'R

OCAU OCCURRENCES

If you have any society items,
phone five-one.
There will be no meeting of the
hospital auxiliary this month.

Don't forget the DANCE tonight
over the Commercial Bank. Jazz
music. It

Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Gornto and love love-ly
ly love-ly daughter, Beth are spending a few
days at Live Oak.

. to Mrs. Hood's daughter, Mrs. W. A.
. Collier. From there they will go to
j DesMoines, Iowa, to visit Mrs. Hood's

other daughter, Mrs. Lew Lyons, and
in the early fall both Mrs. Hood and

j Miss Porter will go to Long Mont,

Colo., to spend a year, Miss Porter
havingaccepted a splendid position as
music instructor in one of the schools
of that city. Miss Porter before go going
ing going to Colorado will make her annual
trip to Chicago for a six weeks study
course in music. Ocala regrets, and
especially the high school, losing Miss
Porter as she has accomplished much
in the musical advancemnt of this
city, but the best of wishes from
friends go with her to her new home.

We are proud of the confidence doc doctors,
tors, doctors, druggists and the public have in
666 Chill and Fever Tonic tu

Mr. Bernard Koonce is expected in
the city today for a short visit to his
mother, Mrs. J. C. B. Koonce.
Mr. Frank Butler leaves tonight
for Richmond, Va., where he will
spend his vacation with his mother.
Messrs. C. M. Curry and J. S. Mix Mix-son
son Mix-son received the lessons of the sec second
ond second rank from the K. of P. last evening.

666 has more imitations than any
other Chill and Fever Tonic on the
market, but no one wants imitations
in medicine. They are dangerous, la
Miss Caroline Borden left last

Thursday for Galveston, Texas, where

she will be the attractive guest of her
sister, Mrs. W. J. Redman until
Christmas.

Don't fail to Visit the Guarantee
Clothing & Shoe Company. Every Everything
thing Everything we iell is guaranteed. We're
fighting for QUALITY not prices, tf
Miss Elizabeth Davis leaves this
afternoon for Farmville, Va., to act
as maid of honor at the Bobzein Bobzein-Spencer
Spencer Bobzein-Spencer wedding, a brilliant event of
this week in that town.

Mrs. R. S. Rogers has arrived in
the city from Chicago and joined her
husband at the home of Mrs. E. Van
Hood, where they have rented the
upper floor for one year.
Syrup Hppophosphites Compound,
pint bottles, one dollar per bottle, two
bottles for $1.01 at Gerig's One Cent
Sale June 9th. 10th and 11th. tf
Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Martin left this
afternoon for St. Petersburg, Clear Clearwater
water Clearwater and Safety Harbor. Mrs. Mar Martin
tin Martin will spend two or three weeks in
that vicinity.

Danese Feed & Grocery Co., 636 W.
Forsyth St., Jacksonville. Larro Cow
Feed, Shorts, Beet Pulp, C. S. Meal,
Corn, Peacock Syrup, Rice, Grite, etc.
price list on request. 9th th-sat-tues
Miss Annabelle Wesson, who re returned
turned returned Saturday from her school
term at the Florida College for Wom Women
en Women at Tallahassee, will act during her
vacation as stenographer for the
Board of Trade.

Miss Inez Collens is now making
her home with Miss Byrd Wartmann
on Sanchez street. Her sister, Miss
Pauline Collens, has returned to Fair Fairfield
field Fairfield after spending the winter in the
city attending high school.
After the commencement exercises
at the Temple last evening, the danc dancing
ing dancing set went to the Woman's Club,
where one of the loveliest dances of
the season was enjoyed, which was due
to the good music furnished by Mrs.
Pat Davis.

666 has proven it will cure malaria,
chills and fever, bilious fever, colds
and lagrippe. It kills the germs that
cause the fever. Fine tonic. tu

Mr. Frank Kuhlemeyer of Cincin Cincinnati,
nati, Cincinnati, of the firm of Leonard, Crossett
& Riley, will arrive in the city this
afternoon on his usual business mis mission.
sion. mission. Mr. Kuhlemeyer is one of the
most popular of the many commission
men that visit the city.

Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Van Horn and
Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Van Horn and
family leave this afternoon for their
trip north. The many friends that
they have made while in Ocala sin sincerely
cerely sincerely hope to se them return in the
fall to again make their home with
us.

HOTEL ALBERT g
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA j
Modern Throughout. Rates B
from 1.50 day. Childe
Restaurant Adjoining f

Mrs. R. E. Filcher of Fruitland
Park, who has been the guest of Mrs.
R. G. Blake for the past few days, re returned
turned returned home this afternoon. Mrs.
Filcher came up especially to be pres present
ent present at the high school graduation ex exercises
ercises exercises at the Temple theater last
evening.
There are many in the eity who will
learn with much cordial interest of
the marriage on March 14 in Jackson Jacksonville
ville Jacksonville of Mr. Charles Albert Davis to
a lovely and talented widow. Mr. Da Davis,
vis, Davis, a brother to Mrs. Clifford Ayer,
during his boyhood days spent most
of his time in Ocala and made a great
many warm friends who congratulate
him upon his success in winning such
a charming life companion and it is
sincerely hoped that they will at some
date in the early feature make his
old home town a visit.

Mrs. E. Van Hood and daughter,
Miss Marguerite Porter leave this af afternoon
ternoon afternoon ? for Tuscaloosa. Ala., where
they will pay a visit of several days

Don't fail to visit the Guarantee
Clothing & Shoe Company. Every Everything
thing Everything we sell is guaranteed. We're
fighting for QUALITY not prices, tf
Pead the ads. They'll save you coin.
NOTICE

Owing to the high cost of labor and
supplies that we have to use in the
manufacture of ice, beginning June
4th, 1920, we have advanced our
price as follows:
Wholesale, delivered for coupons
only," 45c. per 100 lbs.
Retail, delivered, for cash or coj coj-pons,
pons, coj-pons, 60c. per 100 lbs.
Sacker, 100 lb. sacks, 65c. per 100
lbs.
Sacker, 200 lb. sacks, $1.25 per 2C0
lb.
Platform, delivered, cash or cou coupons,
pons, coupons, 60c. per 10 Olbs.
Ocala Ice & Packing Company,
4-3t Taylor Brothers.

CONSTIPATION
And Sour Stomach Caused THi
Lady Much Suffering. Black Black-Draught
Draught Black-Draught Relieved.
Meadorsvllle, Ky. Mrs. Pearl Pat
rick, of this place, writes: "I was
very constipated. I had sour stomach
and was so uncomfortable. I went to
the doctor. He gave me tome pills.
They weakened me and seemed to
tear up my digestion. They would
gripe mo and afterwards It seemed
I was more constipated than before.
I heard of Black-Draught and de decided
cided decided to try it. I found It Just what I
needed. It was an easy laxative, and
not bad to swallow. My digestion soon
Improved. I got well of the sour stom stomach,
ach, stomach, my bowels soon seemed normal,
no more griping, and I would take a
dose now and then, and was In good
shape.
I cannot say too much for Black.
Draught for It Is the finest laxative
one can use."
Thedford's Black-Draught has 'for
many years been found of great value
in the treatment of stomach, liver and
bowel troubles. Easy to take, gentle
and reliable in Its action, leaving no
bad after-effects, it has won the praise
of thousands of people who have used
It NOW
THE MOSQUITO

IS DEADLY

Disease Carrying Insects Everywhere
a Danger
Mosquitoes have always been witk
us but their true character has only
been recognized a short time. They
are carriers of malaria germs and
other deadly diseases. Dr. Carroll, a
government investigator in Cuba says
"Natural yellow fever is transmitted
by the mosquito and always and only
by the mosquito."
The mosquito bite is often as dead deadly
ly deadly as a rattlesnake's.
By every method known to mankind
both the national and local health
services are trying to exterminate the
mosquito. But this will never be.
We must protect ourselves against
this pest, by proper screening and the
use of TORMENT. TORMENT is a
gaseous vapor in which no mosquito
or fly can live. It is death to insects.
Torment is sold by druggists, gen general
eral general stores and dealers everywhere.
Manufactured by G. B. Williams
Co., Quitman, Ga., exclusively. Ad 3

AHA

SCHEDULES

Arrival and departure of passenger
trains at OCALA UNION STATION.
The following schedule figures pub published
lished published as information and not guar guaranteed.
anteed. guaranteed. (Eastern Standard Time)
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILROAD

Leave
2:20 am
1:55 pm
4:05 pm
2:15 am

2:15 am
1:50 pm
4:05 pm

J ackson ville-N'York
Jacksonville
Jacksonville
Tampa-Manatee-St.
Petersburg
Tampa
Tampa-Manatee
Tampa-St. Petrsbrg

Arrive
2:10 am
1:30 pm
4:35 pm
4:05 pm

2:15 am
1:35 pm
4:05 pm

ATLANTIC COAST LINE R. R.
Leave Arrive
2:12 pm JacksonvilleNYork 3:15am
1:45 pm Jksonville-Gainsville 3:35 pm
6:42 am Jksonville-Gnesville 10:13 pm
3:lSam St.Petsbrg-Lakeland 2:12 am
3:35 pm St.Petsbrg-Lakeland 1:25 pm
7:10 am Dunnellon-Wilcox
7:25 am Dunellon-Lkeland 11:03 pm
3:25 pm Homosassa 1:30 pm
10:13pm Leesburg 6:42 am
4:45 pm Gainesville 11:50 am
"Monday, Wednesday, Friday.
Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday.

O. H. S. COMMENCEMENT

The commencement of the Ocala
High School was carried out smoothly
and prettily. The largest class in the
history of the school graduated, and
there could never have been any larg larger
er larger attendance, as the Temple theater
was crowded to capacity upstairs and
down.
The graduates, particularly the
girls, looked very nifty in their caps
and gowns, and made a most impos imposing
ing imposing appearance, massed on the stage,
almost an entire platoon in the army
of education.
The young soldiers in this detach detachment
ment detachment were as follows: Misses Lenore
Colby, Irene Henderly, Mary Bryce,
Irene Rou, Annie Hadsock, Kathleen
Leitner, Billie Kennedy, Catherine
Henry, Winnie Gordon, Eva Theus,
Sarah Dehon, Augusta Dodd, Mil Mildred
dred Mildred Manning, Estelle McAteer, Helen
Veal, Irene Tompkins, Elizabeth
Hocker, Ruth Stevens and Lucille
Gissendaner, Ralph Cullen, Frederick
Winer, Ernest Hensley, Robert Smith,
Ronk Buhrman, Williard Steele. Ed Edward
ward Edward Chazal, Robert Blake and James
Melton.
The program was smoothly carried

i out as follows:

Music: High School Orchestra.
Invocation: Rev. W. P. Buhrman.
Chorus: Glee Club, led by Miss Mar Marguerite
guerite Marguerite Porter.
Address of welcome by the presi president
dent president of the senior class, Fred Winer.
Piano solo: Christine Close.
Class valedictory: Winnie Gordon.
Piano duet: Elizabeth Bennett and
Ruth Chaffee.
Address to graduating class: R. L.
Turner.
Presentation of honor essay medal:
J. H. Brinson.
Presentation of diplomas: L. W.
Duval.
Chorus: Glee Club.

REWARD

Five dollars reward will be paid for
information as to the. whereabouts of
William Stevens, colored, who ran
away from home on Tuesday, June 1.
Discription Twelve years old, light
color, four feet 7 (or 8) inches tall.
When he left home was wearing blue
overalls, black hat and dull looking
white shirt. .Was barefooted. Ad Address
dress Address John Stevens (C),
2t Box 50, R. F. D., Williston. Fla.

Dont forget the DANCE Tuesday
night over the Commercial Bank, Jazz
music. 7-lt

Don't forget the DANCE Tuesday
night over the Commercial Bank. Jazz
music. 7-lt

W. K. Lane, M. D Phjsldan and
Surgeon, specialist Eye,. Ear, Nose and
Throat. Office over 5 and 10 cent store,
Ocala. Fla. tf

OCALA FRATERtlAL QRDEfiS
WOODMEN OF THE WORLD

Fort King Camp No. 14 meets at
K. of P. hall at 7:30 p. m. every sec second
ond second and fourth Friday. Visiting sov sovereigns
ereigns sovereigns are always welcome.
J. C. Bray, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage. Clerk.

KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS

Ocala, Lodge No. 19. Conventions
held every Monday, evening at 7:30
o'clock at the Castle Hall, over the G.
C. Greene Co. drugstore. A cordial
welcome to visiting brothers.
Wi M. Parker, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage. K. of R, & S.

ORDER OF EASTERN STAB

Ocala Chapter No. 29. O. E. S.,
meets at the Masonic hall ,the aecond
and fourth Thursday evenings of each
month at 8 o'clock.
Mrs. Lillian Simmons, W. M.
Mrs. Susan Cook, Secretary.

OCALA LODGE NO. 285. B. P. O. E.

Ocala Lodge No. 286, Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, meets
the second and four Tuesday eve evenings
nings evenings of each month. Visiting breth brethren
ren brethren always welcome. Lodge rooms
upstairs over Trader's and. the Book
Shop, 113 Main street.
C. Y. Miller, E. R,
E. J. Crook, Secretary.

MARION-DUNK MASONIC LODGE

Marion-Dunn Lodge 17o. 19, F. & A.
M., meets on the first and' third
Thursday evenings of each month at
7:30 o'clock until further notice.
Jake Brown, Secretary.
A. L. Lucas, W. M.

R. A. M. CHAPTER No. 13

Regular convocations of the Ocala
Chapter No. 13 R. A. 31 on the fourth
Friday in every month at 8 p. m.
H. S. Wesson, H. P.
Jake Brown, Secretary.

ODD FELLOWS
Tulula Lodg No. 22. I. O. O. F.,
meets every Tuesday evening in the
Odd Fellows' hall on the third floor of
the old Star office building at 7:30 p.
n. A warm welcome always extended
o visiting brothers.
C. W. Moremen, N. G.
W. L. Colbert, Secretary.
SEEDS
Ninety day and old fashion velvet
beans, chufas, Pyles and Gist seed
corn. Ocala Seed Store, phone 436. tf

J.H. SPENCER

W. R. PEDRICK

AGENCY

We Make a Specialty of Parts for the Buick and
the Prices are Consistent with the Cost of Same.

GOODYEAR AND U. S. TIRES AND TUBES

Exclusive Anenls lor "VESTA" BATTERY, 18 Mo. Guarantee
An Up-to-Date Battery Service Station
We Maintain an Up-to-Date Garage with
Expert Workmen, at all times, Assuring
Prompt and Efficient Service. .

GASOLINE, OILS AND GREASE.

OCALA GAS ENGINE WORKS
PHONE 271
Ocala Florida

THE WINDSOR HOTEL
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
In the heart of the city with Hemming Park for a front yard.
Every modern convenience in each room. Dining room service is
second to none

ROBERT M. MEYER,
Manager.

J. E. KAVANAUGH
Proprietor.

w

Agents and
Service

CHEVROLET, COLUMBIA and COLE

Cast Iron, Steel and Brass Welding

GENERAL AUTO REPAIRS

OCALA MOTOR CO C-E- Simmons

N. Main St. Phone 71
Opposite
Ocala Iron Works

w

TGAIKISFE
AND

WHITE LINE
Negotiable Storage Receipts Issued on Cotton, Automobiles, Etc.

LONG DISTANCE MOVING
Fhone 296

MOVE, PACK, SHIP
LIVE STOCK,
PIANOS, BAGGAGE,
MACHINERY,
FURNITURE, ETC.

Fort

Coy Garage

Ford Repairs a Specialty

Gasoline Oils Grease

Fori Mc Coy

Florida

SEEDS!
Ninety day and old 'ashion velvet
beans, chufas. cow peas and sorghum
seed. Ocala Seed Store, phone 435. tf

HOUSES MOVED

Will move houses of any descrip description,
tion, description, short or long distance. Give
description of the house to be moved,
and write to Ceo. W. Elbertson,
8-0t Box 79, Route 1, Morriston, Fla.
Rub-My-Tism is a powerful antisep antiseptic;
tic; antiseptic; it kills the poison caused from in infected
fected infected cuts, cures old sore, tetter, etc.

Don't fail to visit the Guarantee
Clothing & Shoe Company. Every Everything
thing Everything we sell in guaranteed. We're
fighting for QUALITY not prices-' t

Red Cedar Compound 25 cents tne
package, two for 2G cents, on June 9,
10 and 11th at Gerig's One Cent
Sale. tf

COW PEAS; COW PEAS
Iron and Clay Peas mixed $6.25;
WhippoorwHl $G.25; Whippoorwill
mixed $6; Red Ripper $C25; Cream
Crowder $0.25 bu. These prices for
2 bu. sacks. Send orders at once to
James L. Dean, Orlando, Fla. 27-1 2t

...

6



OCALA EVENING STAR, TUESDAY, JUNE 8. 1920

LATEST LOCALS
Temperature this morning, G7; this
afternoon, 77.
George Howell was in town today
from Steen to visit his family.
Mrs. F. Cm. B. Weihe and Mr. and
Mrs. K. J. Weihe returned today from
their visit to Jacksonville.

Mr. E. W. Davis and family of Or Orlando
lando Orlando were in the city today. Ocala
is always glad to see them.
The election prophet is abroad to today
day today in all his glory, while the "I told
you so" man is making no wild predictions.

The Belleview Civic League will
give a dance at their pretty clubhouse
Friday evening, and hope to see their
Ocala friends.

Sam Dosh, one of the Western
Union's live messenger boys, has re returned
turned returned from his vacation, which he
spent with his grandmother in Geor Georgia.
gia. Georgia. Mr. W. J. Tillman returned today
from a visit with relatives at Orange
Heights. Mrs. Tillman will return
the latter part of the week after a
short visit with Gainesville friends.

In writing the O. H. S. commence commencement,
ment, commencement, which is on the second page,
the name of the winner of the honor
essay medal was unfortunately omit
ted. The honor went to that very
bright young lady, Miss Sarah Dehon,
whose friends rejoice to see her merit
so well recognized.
WANTED To LEND $1000 for a
client. No brokerage. D. Niel Fer Fer-,
, Fer-, guson. 8-9t
The way the papers speak of "la "labor
bor "labor and the farmer getting together"
might lead one to believe that the
farmer got those calloused hands sit sitting
ting sitting around the parlor playing the
ukelele.

It is said that only 12 men living
understand the Einstein theory of
light. That doesn't keep a thousand
wise-looking fellows from stating pos positively
itively positively that there's nothing in it.

These controversies over who did
the most to win the war are not half
so Important as the problem of mak making
ing making secure what has been won by the
war.

Then N one big advantage !n deal
U.j wi;)i a bnlslievist. 'It's a hnndreo
nt-r '-"tit 'ro-thIng bet that vhntever
h you Is !ther n tr!k or n !!

PROBLEMS FACING
A STRICKEN WORLD

By FRANK COMERFORD.
The bolshevik government seized in industry;
dustry; industry; the working men took ever
the factories. It was part of the plan
of communism. The promise was that
the socialization of industry would in increase
crease increase production and free the work workers
ers workers from exploitation. The owners and
managers were driven from the plants.
Tiiese men were of the bourgeois class.
They had no place In the new scheme
of things. v They were "tainted" with
soccess. They had Intelligently and
efficiently built up their Industries.
This was enough. The bolshevik gov government
ernment government denied them dtl sen ship and
drove them from the enterprises tbj
had built
Everything was to be owned in
common ; private property of all kinds
had been abolished. Tbe men who
worked in tbe factories or mills wese
to be their own bosses. They were
part of the state, and the state owned
and operated everything. The gov-,
emment of the factory was to be by
committee, every man was the equal
of every other man ; orders were gfven
and orders taken with this thought In
mind. The result was insnbordtna insnbordtna-tion.
tion. insnbordtna-tion. Every man was boss; all sys system
tem system banished; system made slaves
Down with system I The business
brains having been driven oat, insub insubordination
ordination insubordination having come in, produc production
tion production declined until it almost ceased,
many workers gave up in disgust and
returned to their villages. The exodus
from Petrograd was marked. Prior
to 1B15 Petrograd was a city of nearly
2,000,000. In 1018 Its population had
shrunk to less than 700,000. Fac Factories
tories Factories dosed. Again the theory of
communism, when put to the tssx,
failed.
Trotsky Had Remedy.
Trotsky, in confessing the failure of
the bolshevik program to successfully
socialize industry, eharged it to the
"sabotage of the Intellectuals." By
this he meant that the bolshevCfks
drove the specialists, the technicians
and managers of industry, out of busi business;
ness; business; that the working men, not hav having
ing having the training for these places re requiring
quiring requiring special skill and knowledge
were unable efficiently and successfully
to carry on the business. Having
.pointed out the cause of the failure,
he presented a remedy. He truly said
that the intellectuals have tbe benefit
of special training, education and ex experience,
perience, experience, and that shops and factories
filled with machines, material and
working men, cannot be run without
the skilled manager, the intelligent,
experienced foreman. But Trotsky
has not lost faith in the plan of In Industrial
dustrial Industrial communism, nor has he lost
belief in the theory that it can be
made to increase production. He
says that the bourgeois brains, when
forced into the factories by the state,
do not work with the same ambition

Ba

Tluiuirsday
tenia liiidtoi

Hunter Park

4:00 O'clock

0A

WHENEVER you have a need in our line and
want it quick
PHONE US
We will give you Absolutely Accurate and Immediate
Service, and deliver to you perhaps before you
could reach our store.
We give special attention to phone orders because we
know the need is urgent, and we send you just
what you want.

to make a success of the business that
they did when it was their private
property and they had a personal-profit
interest in its success. Thus they
are guilty of withholding their best
from factory management under the
bolshevik scheme of communism.
This he calls the "sabotage of the in intellectuals."
tellectuals." intellectuals." To eliminate this diffi difficulty
culty difficulty he proposes that the bolshevik
government turn its attention to the
education of the working men, pro provide
vide provide technical schools and schools
teaching business management, and
in this manner make competent man managers
agers managers and technical experts out of
workingmen. It Is his opinion that
workingraen educated to be experts
and managers would retain their class
sympathy and their Interest in the suc success
cess success of the class struggle.
Had Forgotten Human Nature.
The bolsheviks are strong on theory.
Trotzky falls to take Into considera consideration
tion consideration some simple fundamental truths.
He falls to reckon with human na nature
ture nature as it is. He thinks of it as it
should be. Let us take an example
which Illustrates and emphasizes the
difference between bolshevik theory
and practical experience. Let us sup suppose
pose suppose that the bolshevik government es establishes
tablishes establishes schools for the purpose of
training men In business managemeet
and for technical work. Then enroll
In these schools workingmen who, at
the time, are entirely "class con conscious."
scious." conscious." They are ardent communists
when they enter the front door of the
school on the first day of their attend attendance.
ance. attendance. They attend School for several
years. The time spent In school and
the education given to the men makes
a change in them. They become con conscious
scious conscious of the power of education, of
their fitness for a better class of
work. Education gives them a sense
of superiority, and I do not mean
superiority in the arrogant or boastful
sense. The trained mind Is conscious
of training. It Is a more ambitious
mind. The men are not less human.
They want to get out of education ma material
terial material benefits. They feel the sense
of leadership. When they graduate,
these men leave the door of the school
different men In aspirations and am ambitions.
bitions. ambitions. Take them back to the fac factories
tories factories and in nine cases out of ten you
will find that you have made mana managers,
gers, managers, foremen, experts out of them,
and that they are conscious of it.
There will be some few whose great
idealism will inspire them to go back
into the shop and work for the com common
mon common good. Such men are the excep exceptions
tions exceptions to the rule. The great majority
will insist upon recognition of their
greater skill and demand compensa compensation
tion compensation for it. Their thoughts would be
"Now that I am skilled and educated,
now 'that I take on 'my shoulders a
larger and more Important responsibil responsibility,
ity, responsibility, I am entitled to increased consid consideration
eration consideration and a larger reward. Why
should I be put on the level with the
jmen who haven't the capacity I have

possibility I do?" Trotzky's plan re

ds me of the Intensely maternal

that after practicing on white

idoor knobs, discovered some eggs in
ja barn, and with great enthusiasm be belt
lt belt an to set. In the course of time her
patience and motherhood were reward reward-led.
led. reward-led. As soon as her brood was able
to walk she took them on an excur excursion
sion excursion to the river bank to give them a
worm banquet. When she reached the
Water ed&a she was startled at seeing
her young ones paddle Into the water
'and without even so much as a good good-iby,
iby, good-iby, swfan oft.
The test of the communist theory Is
jwhether or not, when put to practice,
jft increases production. The theory
itf tbe communist is that It will m m-rsfsm
rsfsm m-rsfsm production by inducing men to
'work becaase they are their own
bosses and are guaranteed an equal
share la the production. The prae prae-tSccl
tSccl prae-tSccl fact which upsets the theory Is
that human beings are moved to work
by tbcAr desire for gain. Human be
hiss have this strain in their blood.
It Is arganse; it is a part of them. I
6o not refer to greed. I mean that all
experience proves that human beings
are Individualists. The average man
thinks of himself and his intersets a
dosen times to the one time he thinks
of the general interest of society. This
is true even of the man who gives
much thought and has much concern
for tbe common good. He may be
generous to a fault, but be wants to
acquire the thing and then give it.
Competition, notwithstanding all the
theories of the idealists to the con contrary,
trary, contrary, quickens life, stimulates men
to work, makes for progress. Every Everywhere
where Everywhere about us we see in our daily
experiences evidence of this fact Life
is a gamble in the sense that every everything
thing everything ts uncertain ; life itself is uncer uncertain.
tain. uncertain. Ifo man can plan or program
his tomorrow. While I am not a
fatalist, I can see from my own life
and from the lives of others, that many
things come to pass over which we
have no control. It is the effort of
man to provide against unfavorable
contingencies, to compete with chance,
which makes him basically a competi competitor
tor competitor with every other man.
Element of Human Nature.
Take the poker game. Men who
play the "national game" win tell you
that they play for the fun of the game,
not for the money, and they are speak speaking
ing speaking the truth. Try an experiment,
play a game for matches instead of
for money, and observe the effect upon
the mftim and skill of the players.
Maybe It should not be so, but we
are not dealing with "should not be's."
The life problem must be handled
from the point of view of things as
they are.
While the theory of communism Is
beautifully Ideal, human beings are
not. Thft njiy fact Is that selfishness
ts at the bottom of nearly all personal
endeavor. It stimulates men to work.
JX fa hs wQ to work.

UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS
WANTED, LOST, FOUND, FOR
SALE, FOR RENT AND SIM SIMILAR
ILAR SIMILAR LOCAL NEEDS

RATES Six line minimum, one
time, 25c; three times, 50c; six times
75c; one month, $3. Payable in ad-

W ANTED Some one to come to the
house and sew. Phone 198. Mrs.
E. J. Bryant. 8-tf

FOUND Pair gold spectacles. Own Owner
er Owner may have them by calling at the
Star office, proving property and
paying for this ad. 8-lt

LOST Gold brooch, two snake heads
with green setting. Lost between
Court Pharmacy and Arms House
Monday evening. Mack Carter, ex express
press express office. 8-3t

FOR RENT Furnished apartment,
private bath, to rent for summer
months. No children. Very reason reasonable.
able. reasonable. Call Phone 332. 29-tf

WRITE The Truth Seeker Co., New
York, for sample copy of the Truth
Seeker, a free thought and agnostic
publication. 23-2t

HADSOCK'S WOOD YARD Phone
your orders to Smoak's Shop. Phone
?146. 2-m

FURNITURE, ETC. I buy and sell
Second-hand furniture. Experts put
it in good condition before re-selling.
Repair sewing machines, lawn
mowers, enamelware, etc. J.
Hunter, 310, 312. 314 S. Main St. tf

FOR SALE Twenty-five acres on
South Orange avenue, fifteen clear cleared.
ed. cleared. Quick sale, cash $900. Lottie
Matzler, Reno, Nevada. 29-6t

USED CARS One 1918 model Dodge
touring; one 1917 Hupmobile; one
1917 Velie. Velie Service Station,
120 S. Magnolia St., phone 117. 6t

TAYLOR THE HAT MAN Beats
the high cost of living. Get your old
bat made like new. Panamas, Leg Leghorns
horns Leghorns and all straws cleaned and
bleached. Telephone me at the
Florida House. l-12t

HUNTER'S AUTO EXCHANGE

YOUR CAR IS JUDGED
often L-y its top. Don't cover a
costly car with a top unworthy
of it. Our auto tops are made
for cars which demand high high-grade
grade high-grade equipment; tops that
stand up under the hardest ser service
vice service vnder all kinds of condi conditions.
tions. conditions. Our line includes all the
staple color?. See this top Le Le-fore
fore Le-fore placing your order.

TOPS New, covered, patched and coated with a patent wax paste
that makes old tops absolutely waterproof.
AINTING Autos painted, striped and finished in the best of
material.
UPHOLSTERING We are prepared to give you satisfactory ser service
vice service in upholstering: backs, seats or cushions.
TIRES, TUBES, GAS and OILS
LET US REPAIR, PAINT AND UPHOLSTER YOUR CAR, SO
YOU CAN ENJOY IT YOURSELF OR SELL TO ADVANTAGE.
AUTOS BOUGHT, SOLD and REPAIRED
J. W. HUNTEM
finals soura magnolia street Florida
HJ CdlCt OLD METROPOLITAN THEATER flUl lUd

FOR SALE Elegant bungalow, elec electricity,
tricity, electricity, bath and toilet, hardwood
floors, overlooking lake in beautiful
mountain town of Demorest, Ga.
Piedmont College, mountain breezes,
mineral springs, cheap living. Price
$3000. Address, Laura Blackshear,
Athens, Ga. mon-tues-wed-wky

FOR SALE Lots No. 7 and 8 in block
No. 1 being the nort half of the
northeast quarter, section 14, town township
ship township 14 south, range 23 east, Talla Tallahassee
hassee Tallahassee meridian, Florida; 20 acres
more or less. Dominick Colona, 7(4
Richards St.. Joliet, 111. 5-6t

APARTMENT WANTED I want a
furnished apartment; have no chil
dren. Address "J. O." care Star

office.

-tf

WANTED To buy, baby crib or
kiddy coop, oil stove and wood
stove. Must be in good condition
and cheap for cash. Address, "C
care Star. 8-3t

()

99

.
7v

ESSEX STUPEBAMEM
AUTOMOBILES----

IPMlp Go MnniFpttiiy9 CALA

Rtolce to up Pattri

MM

TOM

MM

We have managed to get a little Sugar at different times,
all along. But, it has been a fight at all times.
By paying the cash, and doing a little begging too, we have
succeeded in getting hold of a little over Three Thous Thousand
and Thousand Pounds at one time, at a cost of 28 1-4 cents per
pound.
Now, we want our patrons to get this sugar. And we will
let you have enough to do you some good, and too, you will
be in a position to do canning and preserving.
The sugar will be packed in 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 pound
lots. So you can have what you want up to Fifty Pounds.
The price will be
Thirtty Cents per Pound
and Cash with the order.
You will appreciate the fact that it takes quite a sum to
handle this deal and we are sure you won't mind paying the
cash.
We have paid for this sugar and it will no doubt arrive in
a few days. Make payments now for what you want up to
50 pounds and we will deliver it to you on arrival.

o EL Tea Ptt Qrweiry

imti

.



Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8 standalone no
fcla fda yes
!-- Ocala evening star ( Newspaper ) --
METS:mets OBJID UF00075908_05594
xmlns:METS http:www.loc.govMETS
xmlns:xlink http:www.w3.org1999xlink
xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance
xmlns:daitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss
xmlns:mods http:www.loc.govmodsv3
xmlns:sobekcm http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcm
xmlns:gml http:www.opengis.netgml
xmlns:lom http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcm_lom
xsi:schemaLocation
http:www.loc.govstandardsmetsmets.xsd
http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss.xsd
http:www.loc.govmodsv3mods-3-4.xsd
http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcmsobekcm.xsd
METS:metsHdr CREATEDATE 2014-07-31T17:50:09Z ID LASTMODDATE 2009-04-29T15:57:01Z RECORDSTATUS COMPLETE
METS:agent ROLE CREATOR TYPE ORGANIZATION
METS:name UF,University of Florida
OTHERTYPE SOFTWARE OTHER
Go UFDC FDA Preparation Tool
INDIVIDUAL
UFAD\renner
METS:dmdSec DMD1
METS:mdWrap MDTYPE MODS MIMETYPE textxml LABEL Metadata
METS:xmlData
mods:mods
mods:accessCondition This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
mods:genre authority marcgt newspaper
sobekcm newspaper
mods:identifier type OCLC 11319113
ALEPHBIBNUM 2052267
LCCN sn 84027621
sn 84027621
mods:language
mods:languageTerm text English
code iso639-2b eng
mods:location
mods:physicalLocation University of Florida
UF
mods:note dates or sequential designation Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
funding Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855
mods:originInfo
mods:publisher Porter & Harding
mods:place
mods:placeTerm marccountry flu
mods:dateIssued June 08, 1920
marc point start 1895
end 1943
mods:frequency Daily (except Sunday)
marcfrequency daily
normalized irregular
mods:recordInfo
mods:recordIdentifier source UF00075908_05594
mods:recordCreationDate 841027
mods:recordOrigin Imported from (OCLC)11319113
mods:recordContentSource University of Florida
marcorg NPU
FUG
OCLCQ
mods:languageOfCataloging
English
eng
mods:relatedItem original
mods:physicalDescription
mods:extent v. : ; 61 cm.
series
mods:part
mods:detail Enum1
mods:caption 1920
mods:number 1920
Enum2
June
6
Enum3
8
8
lccn 84027622
oclc 11319138
mods:titleInfo
mods:title Ocala weekly star
mods:subject SUBJ651_1 lcsh
mods:geographic Ocala (Fla.)
Newspapers
SUBJ651_2
Marion County (Fla.)
Newspapers
mods:hierarchicalGeographic
mods:country United States
mods:state Florida
mods:county Marion
mods:city Ocala
mods:nonSort The
Ocala evening star
uniform
Ocala Evening Star
alternative displayLabel Other title
Evening star
Star
mods:typeOfResource text
DMD2
OTHERMDTYPE SOBEKCM SobekCM Custom
sobekcm:procParam
sobekcm:Aggregation FDNL1
FDNLN
NDNP
sobekcm:MainThumbnail 0006thm.jpg
sobekcm:Wordmark UFPKY
NEH
CHRAM
sobekcm:bibDesc
sobekcm:BibID UF00075908
sobekcm:VID 05594
sobekcm:EncodingLevel #
sobekcm:Publisher
sobekcm:Name Porter & Harding
sobekcm:PlaceTerm Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
sobekcm:Source
sobekcm:statement UF University of Florida
sobekcm:SortDate 693595
sobekcm:serial
sobekcm:SerialHierarchy level 1 order 1920 1920
2 6 June
3 8 8
DMD3
GML Geographic Markup Language
gml:FeatureCollection
gml:featureMember
gml:Point label Place of Publication
gml:Coordinates 29.187778,-82.130556
METS:amdSec
METS:digiprovMD DIGIPROV1
DAITSS Archiving Information
daitss:daitss
daitss:AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT PROJECT UFDC
METS:techMD TECH1
File Technical Details
sobekcm:FileInfo
METS:fileSec
METS:fileGrp USE reference
METS:file GROUPID G1 JP21 imagejp2 CHECKSUM 2c020467949f4bd577cb359560fea675 CHECKSUMTYPE MD5 SIZE 9431982
METS:FLocat LOCTYPE OTHERLOCTYPE SYSTEM xlink:href 0569.jp2
G2 JP22 b1bfdbcab18ec9a251877f68c71fe6fb 9438163
0570.jp2
G3 JP23 f4b50e6b28285b35ccd5481646dbc21e 9453814
0571.jp2
G4 JP24 5ba7293ed6b95ad0f62bf850378b3541 9437388
0572.jp2
archive
TIF1 imagetiff 43182aae47bd5150b948bd81aee90e14 75416103
0569.tif
TIF2 b46f88eddaebbe1caceb2527f06211ed 75465455
0570.tif
TIF3 ed60c40919aae218d78ab49f5e31985e 75591073
0571.tif
TIF4 ee319d809a5dd0baaae62be07f21062a 75479946
0572.tif
TXT1 textplain fd1234761fa48ee9e4936d8be4954ad9 26339
0569.txt
TXT2 ef95cbb529047c7cb1da9c3e08ead953 21236
0570.txt
TXT3 c22eb78c003529c56cd2f2a1648bca0d 17603
0571.txt
TXT4 888839667a31581aa6e1f18b578e1155 17025
0572.txt
ALTO1 unknownx-alto 2061b2d34bfb38a38223bb1441640290 784840
0569.alto
ALTO2 4a2596bd991e59dea4a900b780d61b93 651099
0570.alto
ALTO3 640da18bf29fedb5da386333d58875cf 549687
0571.alto
ALTO4 d4d414a1cf2f7da72a6557534746da23 520881
0572.alto
METS1 unknownx-mets c092a13762e836d4384031fb674008d5 9852
UF00075908_05594.mets
METS:structMap STRUCT1 physical
METS:div DMDID ADMID The ORDER 0 main
PDIV1 Main
PAGE1 Page
METS:fptr FILEID
PAGE2
PAGE3
PAGE4 4
STRUCT2 other
ODIV1
FILES1