The Ocala evening star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:05556

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
if

rAi A

EVENING

'1 MHfnl

Weather Forecast: Generally fair
OGALA, FLORIDA, SATURDAY, APRIL 21. 1920.
VOL. 26, NO. 97
tonight and Sunday; cooler in north northeast
east northeast portion tonight.
U. S. CRUISERS
OFF TO MEXICO
ALLIES REACH
OVERALL PAROE
N
MOTORISTS MEET
HERE TUESDAY
AN AGREEMENT
fj GOTHA
PERILOUS POSITION

i x

SANDERS

DEDICATION. OF
HOAIAL AVENUE

w

No Move Will be Made by American
Government Unless Develop Developments
ments Developments Necessitate It

Washington, April 24. While Am American
erican American cruiseYs are en route to the
rebel menaced ports of Mexico today,
there was lacking any indication of
any altered course by the United
States government, officers watching
the situation with apparent equani equanimity.
mity. equanimity. It is unofficially declared that
any move by the United States is im improbable
probable improbable unless necessary by the men menace
ace menace of American lives.
HINES HAS RESIGNED
Washington, April 24. Walker D.
Hines, director general of railroads,
has resigned, effective May loth, and
President Wilson has accepted his
resignation.
SHEA WARNS AGAINST DELAY
Washington, April 24. A warning
against further, delay in settling the
wage demands of-two million railroad
workers was given by -Timothy Shea,
vice president of the locomotive fire firemen
men firemen when told the railroad labor
board today the men were fed up on
promises and are dog tired of delays,
lays.
CAILLAUX SET FREE
( Ashj late! Press;
Paris, April 24. Joseph Caillaux,
former French premier, convicted, of
correspondence with the enemy, has
been' set free.
RYAN SELLS HIS STOCK
(Associated Press)
New York, April 24. An agree agreement
ment agreement has been reached between Allan
Rryan, chairman of the Stutts Motor
Co. and the shorts protective commit committee
tee committee by which Ryan will accept $550
per share.
The protective committee said that
G500 shares of Stutz stock is involved,
representing a profit to Ryan of ap approximately
proximately approximately $1,G50,000.
JOHNSON LEADING IN MONTANA
( Associated Press)
Butte," April 24 Senator Johnson
has a wide margin over his opponents
for the republican nomination in Mon Montana's
tana's Montana's primary on unofficial returns.
In the absence of a democratic candi candidate,
date, candidate, votes were written in for Mc Mc-Adoo,
Adoo, Mc-Adoo, Debs, Hoover, Bryan, Wilson
and others.
THE DEATH LIST CLIMBS
(Associated" Press)
Birmingham, April 24. The loss of
life in Tuesday's tornadoes in Missis Mississippi,
sippi, Mississippi, Alabama and Tennesee stood to today
day today at 229, with 700 injured and a
property loss of several million dol dollars.
lars. dollars. The Red Cross is aiding the
homeless and injured.
ii i i i j i i r
PUSSYFOOT JOHNSON
GIVEN WARM WELCOME
' (Associated Press)
Westerville, O., April 24. William
(Pussyfoot) Johnson was given a roy royal
al royal welcome at Anti-Saloon League
headquarters on his return from Eng
land, where he literally gave an eye
to make England dry.
NEW YORKERS
WANT THEIR BEEF
" (Associated Press)
Albany, April 24. The Senate has
passed the bill to legalize 2 -beer
and the bill was sent to the assembly
for concurrence. The bill to legalize
4 beer and 12 wine failed of pas passage,
sage, passage, x
MEXICANS FIGHTING FOR
TAMPICO OIL FIELDS
(Associated Press)
Washington, April 24. The Mexi Mexican
can Mexican revolutionary forces are battling
with Mexican regular troops for pos possession
session possession of the Tampico oil fields, ac according
cording according to an unofficial dispatch.
Don't fail to visit the Guarantee
Clothing & Shoe Company. Every Everything
thing Everything we sell is guaranteed. We're
fighting for QUALITY not prices. If
Remember I receive strawberries
every day. Leave your orders with me.
My prices are always right. W. A.
Stroud, west side of square. 22-tf
K8
.-
iI.iltiMTTi
PHONE 71
C. E SIMMONS.

Premiers Lloyd George and Millerand
Have Settled Differences Over
the Treaty Situation

(Associated I're.s.s)
San Remo, April 24. Complete
agjeemnt with respect to the atti attitude
tude attitude the Allies Khali adopt toward
Germany in connection with carrying
out the peace treaty has been reached
by Premiers Lloyd George and Miller Millerand,
and, Millerand, it js stated.
COUNCIL DIDN'T MEET TODAY
San Remo, April 24. Members of
the supreme allied council held no of official
ficial official session this morning, wishing to
discuss the German question and
reach an adjustment of the different
points of view before taking it up of officially.
ficially. officially. ARMENIA WILL BE INDEPEN INDEPENDENT
DENT INDEPENDENT STATE
Armenia is to be created an inde independent
pendent independent state. This decision was
reached by the supreme council of the
allies yesterday because neither the
United States nor any other power
was willing to accept a mandate over
the country.,
STREETS TO BE PAVED
Report of Special Committee of
City Council on Plan of
Street Paving
the
It is decided to adopt the recom recommendations
mendations recommendations of the Board of Trade
committee with reference to heavy
type of paving on the streets carrying
the heaviest traffic, viz:
North Magnolia street from city
limits to S. A. L. railway.
North Main street from Washing-
tor, street to union station.
Dixie Highway from Fort King
avenue to city limits on south.
In addition.it is proposed to pave
the portions of streets as designated
below with a lighter type of paving
so far as the funds available to the
city will permit.
Practically every section of the
streets so proposed to be paved are
already provided with lime rock pav paving,
ing, paving, which will make a suitable base
for the type of paving to be used, and
which has been adopted by the state
highway commission as a desirable
base for road building.
The sections of streets to be paved
are as follows:
Heavv tvne (one and one-half to
two inches wearing surface):
North Magnolia street from city
limits to north end of brick paving
on North Magnolia street.
North Main street from Washing
ton street to union station.
Herbert street from Fort King ave avenue
nue avenue to South Fifth street; South Fifth
street from Herbert street to Lake
Weir avenue: Lake Weir avenue to
city limits.
Lisrhter .tvoe (three-auarters inch
to one inch wearing surface):
West Broadway or Exposition street
frc mcitv limits to west end of brick
paving on West Broadway.
Academy street from West Broad Broadway
way Broadway to Howard Academy at northeast
coi ner of block 7, West End addition
Pine street from West Broadway to
Third street.
Third street from Pine street to
Herbert street.
South Magnolia street from Fort
King avenue to Eighth street.
Eighth street from Lime street to
Lake Weir avenue.
Oranjre street from Eighth street
to the hospital.
Lime street from Third street to
Tenth street.
Dunnellon road from Lime street to
old city limits.
Washington street from Magnolia
street to Watula street.
Oklawaha avenue from Osceola
street to Silver Springs road.
Watula street from Oklawaha ave
nue to Adams street.
Adams street from Watula street
to Tuscawilla street.
Tuscawilla street from Adams street
to Oklawaha avenue,
Tuscawilla street from Oklawaha
avenue to Eighth street.
Anthony road from Oklawaha ave- i
nue to Hill street.
Fifth street from Tuscawilla street
to Herbert street.
All of the paving proposed is to be
done under the supervision of a com competent
petent competent engineer to be employed by the
city, and according to grades to be
established by such engineer.
The cost of paving is to be paid,
Mill

Residents of Manhattan Island Stage
Spectacular Display to Bring
Down Cost of Clothes

(Associated Press)
New York, April 24 Father Knick Knickerbocker
erbocker Knickerbocker girded his loins in denims
and patches today to take his first
serious punch at the high cost of good
dressing. An economy parade of all
classes of citizens marched from Co Columbus
lumbus Columbus Circle to Twenty-third street
over Eighth avenue and back again,
via Broadway.
NO OVERALLS HERE
Chicago, April 24. Civilian em employes
ployes employes of the Great Lakes Training
station are forbidden to wear overalls
unless too poor to purchase other ap apparel
parel apparel in an order posted today.
FATHER AND SON
SERMONS TOMORROW
Fathers and sons, let us get to
gether. Concentration and co-opera-
ion are two of the biggest words m
the present day English, or rather
American, language. The Y. M. C. A.
nas secured me nearly co-operauon
i.i t jr
of the pastors in the city and Sunday
night, April Zotn. tney win preacn
sermons calculated to greatly assist
fathers and sons to get together on a
common religious footing.
Father, did you ever take your son
to church and then talk over the ser
mon with him? Did you ever stop to
think that Christianity will ultimate
ly fail if it is not something that we
can live by and talk about?
If you as a parent don't think
enough of your son to make a special
effort to go to church with him, to the
one service in the year set aside espec
ially for his consideration, then he
won't think much of your estimate of
religion.
The services will begin at each
church at 7:45. Let every father and
on m tne city go to me service oi ms
choice
Rev. W. P. 'Hines will preach on
"Some Fathers and Sons in the Bible."
Rev. C. W. White will use as a text,
"Is the Young Man Safe?" There
will be special music by a male quar
tet and the men's chorus.
Mr. Offutt's subject is "The Father
a tnum ior ins son," tne scripture
reference being Proverbs 4:1.
Son, if you haven't a father, bor-
ro wone. Father, if you have a son,
bring him. Let's all be there to show
our interest in our boysl
Members of churches that have no
evening services are cordially invited
to worship with those that do.
Frank Tv .Wilson,
Secretary of Y. M.- C. A.
one-third bv the citv and one-third by
the property owners on each side of
the streets to be naved. Under the
citv charter the council has the right
to' make the assessments aeramst the
nrorjertv owners navable in install-
ments extending over a period of ten"
vears
,The city is now spending upwards
of S12.000 a year in street mainte-
nance, with no permanent results.
The interest and sinking fund on the
proposed bond issue will amount to
$6,250 a year, which is just about half
of the amount now being expended in
street maintenance. With the per
manent pavement put down as propos
ed, half of the amount now used for
street maintenance would suffice to
keep the other streets in good condi condition.
tion. condition. The net result would be that the
principal streets of the city would
receive adequate attention, at no
greater cost than is now being in
curred.
It is to be hoped that Ocala will
keep pace with other communities in
the matter of street improvement, as
this is a measure of the progressive-
J ness and energy of a community. It
is therefore considered by the com committee
mittee committee to be of great importance that
the public be fully informed of the
advantages to be derived from the
proposed improvement, to the end that
Ocala may do her part and the bond
issue be successfully carried.
A. T. Thomas, Chairman.
B. Goldman,
C. E. Simmons,
Special Committee of City Council.
Special sale beginning Monday. A
sixty-cent jar Coco Butter Cold
Cream and a fifty-cent box Charmona
race Powder, both for 63 cents at
Gerig's Drug Store. 6-tf

ALA MOTOR CO

f.
0

For Fourteen Hours Mobile Electric Electrician
ian Electrician Defied Death Over the
Streets of the City

(Associated Press)
Mobile, April 24. After spending
the night on the electric wires at the
intersection of two of the principal
streets in the business section,
Charles Sanders, a lineman, descended
tafely this morning into the arms of
the waiting policemen who had pled
for fourteen hours with him to for forsake
sake forsake his perilous position. The offic officers
ers officers said Sanders was crazed with nar narcotics.
cotics. narcotics. Sanders told them he feared
he would be lynched at the hands of
the crowds gathered watching his
antics.
GALA WEEK IN OCALA
Beginning May 3, the Thirty-Third
Meeting of the Horticultural
Society Will be Held
The week beginning May 3rd will
be a, gala week in Ocala. The 33rd
annual convention of the Florida
State Horticultural Society will be
held May 4-7 inclusive, and the com
munity Chautauqua will be held May
6-10 inclusive. The community Chau
tauqua is one of the largest organi
zations of its kind, and this is the
first time it has been in Florida. The
city is expected to present a holiday
appearance for the week. Ocala has
a first rate reputation for entertain
ment and it is anticipated that it will
be up to scratch a,t this time.
The annual convention of the hor
ticultural society is of state-wide Im
portance and the gathering this year
in Ocala is of particular interest be
cause of the fact that the society was
organized in this city In 1888. This
year's session will also have before
it for discussion and solution several
very important problems affecting the
citrus industry of Florida, notably
the problem of marketing the grape-
fril;, nf tu- QtfA nriH tha disnnasil nf
ctrus drops and culls.
The Community Chautauqua opens
its summer season in Ocala. On the
program is some of the best talent of
the Chautauqua platform, includin
Weltman's Famous Cosmopolitan Or
chestra, the Percival Vivian Players,
who will present the big Broadway
dramatic success "Fine Feathers," the
Boston Light Opera Revue, the All-
press All-Star Co., The Theresa Shee-
han Concert Co. and several lecturers
of wide reputation.
It is expected that Ocala will be
decorated for the gala week, and
many who attend the horticultural
convention are expected to remain
for the Chautauqua. The fact that
Ocala is reached by good roads from
most points in central and south Flor
ida will probably bring many per
sons to the city m their automobiles
tnus adding an outing on the open
road to tne attractions ot the week.
The attendance at the hprticultura
convention and the Chautauqua wil
give many persons, too, an opportu
nity of seeing Silver Springs, which
are tne largest .in the United States
A he wondertul pools and caverns are
lo be seen through the glass bottomed
boats, and the bathing is fine.
A1K iHAlLi SlKVllJK JNKVV
YORK TO SAN FRANCISCO
(Associated Press)
Washington, April 24. President
Wilson has signed the postoffice ap
propriation bill, carrying a provision
for an air mail service between New
York and San Francisco.
ARMENIAN- REPUBLIC
RECOGNIZED BY AMERICA
(Associated Prs)
Washington, April 24. Armenia
has formally been recognized as an in
dependent republic by the United
States. Similar action was decided
upon by the allied conference at San
Remo.
PICNIC AT LAKE KERR
Lake Kerr, April 20.
We wish to announce that there will
be a picnic and fish fry at Salt
Springs, in honor of the closing of the
Lake Kerr school, next Friday, April
30th. Everybody invited to come and
bring full baskets, and candidates
especially invited. R. L. Brinson.
Knock the II
Wear overalls.
out of the H. C. L.
On sale at Fishel's
for men and boys.
I3-2t
33

Large Crowd Witnessed Pleasing and
Impressive Exercises Friday
Afternoon
There was a large crowd present at
Tuscawilla Park yesterday afternoon
to hear and witness the exercises ded dedicating
icating dedicating memorial avenue, or Victory
Way, to the memory of the service of
the men and women whose stars,

crosses and triangles adorn the Wom Woman's
an's Woman's Club service flag.
At the different street crossings on
Oklawaha avenue large "Welcome"
banners with the national colors
were strung across the street, which
made a most inviting appearance, and
the grounds too were festive in their
decorations of flags, bunting, etc. The
platform where officers of the club
and those taking part on the program
sat was elaborately draped in red,
white and blue.
The exercises were in charge of
Mrs. Walter Hood, chairman of the
memorial avenue committee, and she
certainly prepared a program that
was most interesting throughout.
Norland's orchestra, Mrs. S. J.
Manly directing, opened the program
with an excellent number.
Mrs. Walter Hood then presented
the speakers.
Rev. J. J. Neighbor, rector of Grace
Episcopal church, offered prayer.
Mrs. W. T. Gary, president of the
Woman's Club, and the first speaker,
gave a short description of Tusca
willa, the wife of Micanopy, for whom
the park is named. Mrs. Gary's re remarks
marks remarks were made in a pleasant
manner and most interesting. The
following poem, written by Panchita
Kendrick of Anthony by request for
the dedication exercises, was read by
Mrs. Gary:
To Our Heroes i
Time on its never tiring wing
May bid fond memories depart,
But this "Memorial Day" will cling
And live forever in tne heart.
And when in ages yet to come
This driveway has become historic;
The stranger will salute and say:
"What grand old oaks! They look
heroic."
And when in ages yet to come
The trees will stand eo brave and
true '
They'll tell to every passing throng
The deathless love .we gave to you.
Mrs. Hood complimented the presi president
dent president of the club on her untiring ef efforts
forts efforts for the last year in making such
a success of this dedication, which,
however, was suggested by Mrs. Will William
iam William Hocker.
Mrs. Manly then rendered a solo,
with Norland's orchestra accompany accompanying
ing accompanying her, and as usual her number was
a rare treat.
Mr. F. E. Harris, editor of the Ban
ner, gave a very interesting histori
cal sketch, starting with the revolu
tionary war and closing with .the
world war.
After Mr. Harris' address, the band
rendered several numbers.
Mr. L. W. Duval, in the absence of
Mayor Anderson, spoke in behalf of
the city, thanking the Woman's Club
and assuring the members the appre
ciation the city felt for the park con
c eived and created by them.
The lowering of the flag by Annie
McKay and Harrington Hall, which
then took place, was a very pretty
and touching scene. t
Mr. W. T. Gary's speech, entitled
Gary is an earnest, eloquent speaker
and his address received the close at
tention of all present.
Rev. White closed the speaking
with a prayer. The band rendered
music and a patriotic drill ensued,
with Miss Blair Woodrow taking the
part of Columbia.
Mr. H. W. Tucker added much senti sentiment
ment sentiment to the occasion by blowing on
his cornet reveille and taps.
During the afternoon Mr. Ralph
Johnson, the aviator, flew over the
park and dropped several floral offer offerings.
ings. offerings. The Woman's Club has commenced
a beautiful movement in the dedica dedication
tion dedication of a memorial avenue and park,
and the members are anxious that the
whole of Marion county join them in
planting trees in the park in memory
of every son of Marion who served his
country during the war.
Specials on Wednesday and Satur Saturday.
day. Saturday. Cut prices on crockery, glass and
enamelware at Gadson's Bazaar Store.
York and at Princetown University,
students wear Overalls. Have you
ever seen any? On exhibition at
FISHEL'S. 23-2t
::
;t;?mt;?i;;;;;a

Florida State Automobile Association
Holds Anual Convention in
Ocala Next Week
Everything is in ieadiness for the
third annual convention of the Flor Florida
ida Florida State Automobile Association,
which will be held in Ocala Tuesday
and Wednesday of next week, April
27-28. P. K. Van Valkenburg, secre secretary
tary secretary of the state association, and R.
S. Rogers, secretary of the Ocala
Motor Club, both report that they ex expect
pect expect a large attendance at the conven convention.
tion. convention. The convention promises to be :
one of the most important yet held. A
campaign will be launched with a
view to putting over the constitution-"
al amendment permitting the states to
bond for good roads ;and a $10,000
sign posting program is planned.
There will be, also, important matters
in connection with the insurance de department
partment department of the association.
The Ocala Motor Club promises all
those who attend the convention a
good time. On the afternoon of the
first day there will be an automobile

trip through the farming sections of
Marion county and a trip to Silvex
Springs where they will be served an
al fresco supper and where there will
be music, dancing, bathing and boat boating.
ing. boating.
R. S. Rogers, secretary of the Ocala
Motor Club, is urging the importanct
of every delegate and visitor register,
ing at the headquarters of the club at
soon as they arrive in Ocala. Upon
registering each delegate and visito?
will be given an envelope containing
hotel reservations, program, anl
tickets for the entertainment feature.
TWENTY MEN TAKEN
OFF GROUNDED YACHT
(Associated Press)
Beaufort, N. C, April 24. Twenty
men irom tne yacnt ,iiay, wnicn
grounded in Ocracoke inlet during the
night, were taken off by life savers.
Three men refused to leave the ves
sel, which they believed to be safe.
WELRSDALE
Weirsdale, April 23. Prof: AJ P.
Mayberry leaves today for his home
in White Haven, Penn. He will be
very much missed here. His beautiful
cornet playing at the church has been
an inspiration to all who came, and
we cannot snow our apprepriation
enough for his leadership in our music
here. The young people and older
older ones gathered last night at the
home of Rev. and Mrs. Straub, which
is also Mr. Mayberry's home, for a
farewell surprise party in his honor.
A delightful evening was spent and
all join in wishing him a successful
summer and speedy return.
Mr. Lawrence C Little of Winfield,
Miss., who is southern field secretary
for the Christian Endeavor Union,
will sepa kat our school picnic Satur Saturday
day Saturday afternoon at Stanton, and also at
the church at Weirsdale at 7:45 p. m.
on Saturday,-April 24.
The Weirsdale school closes this
Friday afternoon and will hold its
annual picnic on Saturday, April 24,
at Stanton, in the shady lane where a
great, many former feasts have been
spread.
We are all hoping the good voters
of Marion will vote for bonds today.
The up-o-date folks will, of course,
and this is the reason why, if the
women were voting, there would be no
doubt as to the passing of this issue.
We are glad to report that Walter
Albertson, who has spent the past
month battling with typhoid-malaria
fever, is able to be out again.
Mrs. L. K. Bishop, Mother Kelsey
and Mrs. Flora May Reed have all
been on the sick list but are all im improving.
proving. improving. Mr. W. H. Dougla3 visited us Sat Saturday
urday Saturday night and Sunday but left Mon Monday
day Monday for Shady.
Rev. Boyer has been giving us some
excellent sermons since he has been
flllin gour pulpit. If you do not be be-liev
liev be-liev it, come out and hear him next
Sunday morning at 11 o'clock. It will
do you good.
Sixteen persons represented our
church, C. -E. Society and missionary
society at the meeting of the Pres Presbytery
bytery Presbytery at Center Hill last Wednesday.
We were cordially entertained and
have received much inspiration from
t"he meeting. The Presbyterial So Society,
ciety, Society, which was organized in this
Presbytery last fall at Winter Haven,
was well attended by representatives
of nearly every missionary society in
the state.
OPPOSITE
OCALA IRON WORKS; g



OCALA EVENING STAR, SATURDAY, APRIL 24, 1920

OCA LA EVENING STA R

PablUbed Every Day Except Sunday by
HTAR PUBLISHING COMPANY,
OF OCALA. FLA.
It. It. Carroll, Preafdeat
P. y. U-avrnKood, Seeretary-Treaaorer
J. II. Ilenjainla, Editor
Bntered at Ocala, Fla., postofflce as
second-class matter.
TKLKPHOXKS
luwlnp Of flee Five-One
Editorial Department Two-Seven
Society Reporter Fire-One
DOMESTIC SUBSCRIPTION RATES
One year, In advance $1.00
fciix months, in advance 3.00
Three months, in advance 1.50
One month, in advance SO
MEMIIER ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press Is exclusively
entitled for the use lor republication of
all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper and
also the local news published herein.
All rights of republication of special
dispatches herein are also reserved.
ADVERTISING RATES
Display Plate 15 cents per inch for
consecutive Insertion. Alternate Inser Insertions
tions Insertions 25 per cent additional. Composi Composition
tion Composition charges on ads. that run less than
six times 5 cents per Inch. Special
position 20 per cent additional. Rates
based on 4-inch minimum. Less than
four Inches will take higher rate,
which will be furnished jpon applica application.
tion. application. Heading Notices 5 cents per line for
first insertion; 3 cents per line for each
subsequent insertion. 0 change a
week allowed on readers without extra
composition charges.
Legal advertisements at legal rates.
A French correspondent asserts
that Germany can put 3,400,000 sol soldiers
diers soldiers into the field at once, and has
officers to command 4,000,000 men.
German ocean passenger vessels
r.ow number only 11, with gross ton tonnage
nage tonnage of about 194,000, against 59,
with gross tonnage of 778,000 in' 1914.
The famous astronomer, Camille
Flammarion, believes that the strange
signals picked up by wireless sta stations
tions stations recently came from the planet
Mars.
John D. Rockefeller Jr. says "There
is too little of service in the world to today;
day; today; the people do too much thinking
about how much pay they are going
io get."
SIn resorts around Lake Geneva,
Switzerland, alone, 14 Russian and
Hungarian princesses ancT baronesses,
driven out of their countries by bol bol-shevist
shevist bol-shevist regimes, recently committed
suicide.
During the 19 months the United
States was at war, 50,151 American
soldiers lost their lives, but in that
perior in this eountry over 126,000
civilians were killed in our industries
and on our streets.
, Paris newspapers recently made
horrified comment on the extravagant
prices paid for the first strawberries
of the year, over 12 cents apiece, and
for the first ripe, cherries, over $16
for five small cherries.
Seward Prosser, New York banker,
lately back from Europe, says: "One
of the most distressing features of my
trip was finding a complete change
of feeling towards this country,
While a year ago we were rated far
above our deserts, we are now rated
below them. I believe this bitterness
will disappear in time."
Charles M. Schwab told the Prince Princeton
ton Princeton students that the fundamental re requirements
quirements requirements for a successful life were
integrity, loyalty, a liberal education,
the making of friends, the taking of
misfortunes lightly, concentration,
and the giving of the best that is in
one to one's work.
Governor Allen of Kansas, criticiz
ing government expenditures during
and after the war, said $150,000,000
were spent on port terminals at Char Charleston,
leston, Charleston, S. C, Norfolk, Va., and other
places from which not a ship sailed
FOLKS WE ALL KNOW
The Regular Fellow likes everybody
and everybody likes .him, J He never
burnt down an Orphan Asylum nor
foreclosed a Mortgage on a Widow's
only Cow. He can Pound any of the
Fellows on the Back and the Dogs all
come at his Whistle. We should All
be Regular Fellows.

during the war; nitrate plants which
cost $120,000,000 did not produce a
pound of nitrate for use during the
war, and $100,000,000 was spent for
tanks not one of which reached France
until after the armistice.

Senator Frelinghuysen of New Jer Jersey
sey Jersey says this country is up against
the stiff est financial problem which
has ever confronted it. He sees dan danger
ger danger of bankruptcy in the wild revel revelry
ry revelry of money spending and workslack workslack-ing.
ing. workslack-ing. Estimated government expendi expenditures
tures expenditures for the year ending June 30,
1921, are over nine million dollars and
estimated revenue only a little over
six million dollars.
Seeking to secure revision of the
ersailles treaty, the Germans, it is
said, will print 10,000,000 copies of a
propagandist publication, "The Great Greatest
est Greatest Crime of Humanity," for free dis distribution
tribution distribution throughout the world.
It is estimated that 95 per cent, of
the population of Poland has been or
is now suffering with typhus. The
mortality ranges from 15 per cent, to
GO per cent. The sperad of the dis disease
ease disease is caused by vermin.
3
TOLERANCE
(Meredith Nicholson in the Cosmo Cosmopolitan
politan Cosmopolitan Magazine)
Last summer I found shelter from
a storm on the veranda of an Ohio
farmhouse and discussed with the
owner the changing times.
"You see that big elm out yonder,"
he said; "that tree has bent under
thousands of tsorms, but there it
stands. I guess this country's like
that tree. It's a mighty good thing
God made America so shell give a
little."
The secret of the permanence of the
American system of government lies
in its flexibility; it will "give a little."
But the deep-rooted trunk stands like
a pillar against the shocks of time.
"Democracy," said Theodore Par Parker,
ker, Parker, "doesn't mean, I'm as good as you
are, but you're as good as I am." In
other words, a government of the peo people
ple people must be based upon equality and
tolerance.
The year will be marked by politi political
cal political conflict. In' the fury of contro controversy
versy controversy it will be said that if one or
another leader. is victor, America will
perish. But a nation created and pre preserved
served preserved by the wisdom and devotion of
countless far-seeing, liberty-loving
men and women isnot so easily to be
destroyed.
When my; neighbor and I discuss
politics, we often disagree, but never
in bitterness. When occasion calls for
a display of the starry flag from my
window, I find that he, too, has flung
Old Glory to the breeze. Often I
have cast my ballot on the losing side,
but the success of the men and meas measures
ures measures I have voted against has never
wrought the havoc I feared.
We do well to think of America in
terms of neighborliness. What con concerns
cerns concerns the man next door is my affair
also. I would not consciously do him
an injury;I will yield a point to help
him.
We are secure only when the heart
of the nation throbs responsive to the
rhythmic beat of the hearts of the
million. Prejudice, distrust and hat hatred
red hatred have no rightful place in a dem democracy.
ocracy. democracy. The times call for a display
of that amity, generosity and toler tolerance
ance tolerance which alone can bind us all to together
gether together as neighbors and friends.
Dwelling together in unity, peace,
and concord, we need fear no evil.
Un vexed and unhindered by envy, hat hatred,
red, hatred, or malice within our gates, we
may follow our aspirations up the
ladder of the stars and win as allies
the unconquerable hosts of heaven.
CARD OF THANKS
To the many young people who at attended
tended attended the subscription dance last
night at the club house, we wish to
extend our thanks for making the af affair
fair affair a distinctly social and financial
success.
Health and Hospitality Committee of
the Woman's Club.
ITINERARY OF THE CANDIDATES
April 24 (Connor's dock) Oklawaha,
all day.
April 30. Fort McCoy, 2:30 p. m.
May 6th, Romeo (Pine Island picnic
grounds), all day.
Other places, to be announced later.
PICNIC AT LAKE KERR
Lake Kerr, April 20.
We wish to announce that there will
be a picnic and fish fry at Salt
Springs, in honor of the closing of the
Lake Kerr school, next Friday, April
30th. Everybody invited to come and
bring full baskets,' and candidates
especially invited. R. L. Brinson.
BARGAIN IN BUICK 4 ROADSTER
Buick "4" roadster in good shape.
Good tires. AUTO SALES CO.,
Mack Taylor.
Phone 348, Ocala, Fla. 12-tf
SEEDS!
Ninety day and old fashion velvet
beans, chufas. cow neaa and snnrfcnm
seed. Ocala Seed Store, phone 435. tf
TAYLOR THE HAT MAN
At Florida House. Your old hat
like new. Save money. Call me on
teiepnone. 20-6 1
Saturday and Monday are cut nrice
cash sale days at liadaon's Bazaar
Store. 9.i
aw w

PROBLEMS FACING
STRICKEN WORLD
Shan Chaos or Reconstruction
in Europe Follow the Great
World War?

That Its Industrial Life Has Not Ktpt
Pace With It Agricultural Has
Been Fatal to Country's
Prosperity.
Article XVI II.
By FRANK COMERFORD.
Less than 10 per cent of the people
of Russia "permanently" live In cities
or towns. I write the word "perma "permanently"
nently" "permanently" to call attention to the .fact
that a number of peasants and vil villagers
lagers villagers come to the cities and towns
to work for a part of the year in the
Industries. They retain their peasant
status and their domiciles in the vil villages.
lages. villages. In 1910 there were only forty
cities in the Russian empire with a
population of from 50,000 to 100,000;
only four cities with a population of
over 100,000.
Poverfy forced upon the Russian
people the co-operative spirit In a
great, long strain people can stand up
together better than alone. It is the
tdea of consolation in companionship.
It Is a principle of mass psychology
that a group of men will dare to do a
thing, to stand a suffering or a dan danger
ger danger that no individual in the crowd
would undertake alone. The Russians
have suffered from the dawn of his history,
tory, history, and one of the oldest institutions
of Russian life Is the Artel. The Artel
very much resembled the co-operative
society of western Europe, with this
difference, that the co-operative soci society
ety society In Europe and America is the out outgrowth
growth outgrowth of an economic trend. In Rus Russia
sia Russia it was the unpremeditated result
of necessity. It is the difference be between
tween between one who is hungry because he
Is dieting and one who is starving be because
cause because he Is without food.
The workers of Russia have suffered
the same slavery the peasants have en endured.
dured. endured. The maximum wage has been
a starvation pay. So when the work working
ing working men from a province come to a
city to work in the textile industries
or as carpenters, masons, etc., they at
once unite in groups of from ten to
fifty persons, rent a house, keep a
common table, elect an elder of the
Artel, to whom each one pays his
share of the expense. All over Rus Russia
sia Russia one finds the Artel in the cities.
In the lumber camps, even in the
prisons. Whn a building Is to be put
up an Artel I organized. When a rail railroad
road railroad Is being built an Artel is formed.
In some Insta-oces the Artel resembles
a labor union, In that the arrangement
of the terms of employment Is made
by a delegate -r committee appointed
by the Artel.
Live In Squalor and Misery.
Village life s primitive. The vil villagers
lagers villagers live out of the world. The vil villages
lages villages are very small, particularly in
the extreme north. The houses are
generally cheap wooden shanties. Ow Owing
ing Owing to the great flanger of fire, the vil villages
lages villages generally cver a large area of
ground. The houses are scattered and
straggling. The conveniences found
even in the American tenements are
unknown. There Is no chance for
cleanliness. They live and sleep in
crowded, smoky, unfinished houses.
Furniture they haven't what we call
furniture, even what the poorest farm
tenant in America would call furnish furnishings.
ings. furnishings. A board for a table, a shake shakedown
down shakedown for a bed.
Russia's Industrial life has always
been out of balance with her agricul agricultural
tural agricultural life. Notwithstanding her riches
of raw material and her great possi possibilities
bilities possibilities for a successful Industrial life,
Russia has continued to be a nation
with 81 per cent farmers, 7 or 8 per
cent permanently engaged in industry,
and 3 or 4 per cent of peasants who
devoted part of the time to work in
the industries. It has been said re repeatedly
peatedly repeatedly that the imperial Russian
government from the time of Peter the
Great has been unceasing In its efforts
for the creation and development of
home manufactures. All of the evi evidence
dence evidence I have examined refutes this
statement. There never has been any
security to the worker in Russia. The
only protection he has had has been
his Interest in the family allotment.
He could go back there and be hun hungry;
gry; hungry; in the city starvation was the
danger.
The czars put every obstacle In the
way of education and of course this
prevented the growth of Industry.
In 1902 the principal industries In
Russia, representing all of the facto factories
ries factories throughout the empire, of which
the annual production was valued at
more than $1,000. were textiles, food
products, animal products, wood, pa paper,
per, paper, chemical products, ceramics, min mining,
ing, mining, metal goods, miscellaneous.- and
all of these employed only 2,259,773
workers.
Led Up to Bolshevik Probl em.
This dwarfed, stunted, paralyzed
side of Russia Its industrial side
has a direct bearing upon conditions In
Russia today and is an important part
of the problem of the bolshevik gov government.
ernment. government. A nation to be economically normal
must have balanced agricultural, man manufacturing
ufacturing manufacturing and commercial sides. If
these three departments of activity
are not proportionately developed the
nation is economically a cripple. Rus Russia
sia Russia has been and is In this sense an
(Continued on Fourth Pag;)

Munroe &

INDIANS' PART
It WAR TOLD
Ah
Commissioner Recites Deeds of
10,000 Redskins Who
Fought Kaiserism.
MANY FLAYED HERO ROLES
Probably Nothing More Helpful Has
Come to Ancient Race Than Ben Benefit
efit Benefit Received From Military
Service, Says Sells.
Washington. There are 333,702 Indi Indians
ans Indians in the United States, exclusive of
Alaska, according to Cato Sells, com commissioner
missioner commissioner of Indian affairs, who has
Just made public his annual report to
the secretary of the Interior. Okla Oklahoma
homa Oklahoma has by far the largest number of
them. 119,101. while Delaware, with
five, has the least.
The following table snows, the Indi Indian
an Indian population as It is distributed by
states :
Alabama 809
Arizona 43,343
Arkansas 440!
California
Montana ........ 12.132
Nebraska ....... 2,441
Nevada I.14C
N. Hampshire.. 84
New Jersey .... ltt
New Mexico.... 20.S81
New York M6C
N. Carolina.... 8.235
Colorado
Connecticut ....
Delaware
DUt. Columbia.
Florida
Georgia
821
152
8
CS
178! North Dakota. 8.891
SSIOhlo 121
Idaho 4.066
Illinois 188
Oklahoma 119.101
Oreron C.60",
Indiana V
Rhode Island .. 284
Iowa .,
3& So. Carolina..
831
22.821
21C
702
8,041
2t
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana ....
Maine
Maryland ....
Massachusetts
Michlfa-n
1.441
. 234
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
780i
. 892
Utah
Vermont
C88
Virginia 3?
Washington .... 10.9ft
West Virginia. 3C
Wisconsin ...... ,10.211
Wyoming 1,711
7.812
Minnesota 17.4471
Mississippi 1.2S3
Missouri SIS
Indian's Part In the War.
Probably nothing is of greater inter interest
est interest in the report than the chronicle
of the part the Indians played in the
war, and the benefit military service
has proved to them. So noteworthy
has this been that the heading given
to this section of the report Is "War
as a Civillsec." "Probably, nothing
more helpful' has come to this ancient
race," it reads, "than the enrollment
of 10.000 of Its sons simply as Ameri American
can American soldiers to challenge the barbarous
rule of central Europe. The immedi immediate
ate immediate benefit comes from the equal op opportunity
portunity opportunity they had with their white
comrades for gaining knowledge, for
maturing judgment, for developing
courage through contact with events
and conditions.
Numerous Indians won medals and
recognition for distinguished service
abroad. Their citations' rank them
with the .bravest of s the brave. The
most striking la that of Private Joseph
Oklahombl. a full-blood Choctaw, com company
pany company D, One Hundred asd Forty-first
Infantry, Bismarck, Oklahoma. His ci citation
tation citation reads as follows : ,
Tinder a violent barrage. Private
Oklahoxnbl dashed t the attack of an
enemy position, covering about 210
yards throogh barbed-wire entangle entanglements.
ments. entanglements. He rushed on machine gun
nests, capturing 171 prisoners. He
stormed a strongly held position con containing
taining containing more than 50 machine guns. and
a number of trench mortars. Turned
the captured gone on the enemy and
held the post tioa .four days In spite of
a constant barrage of large projectiles
and of gas shells. Crossed No Man's
land many tbaes to get Information
concerning the enemy, and to assist his
wounded comrades.
BANKS WILL CLOSE MONDAY
Monday, April 26th, being a legal
holiday, the undersigned banks will be
closed on that date.
Commercial Bank.
Ocala National Bank.
Munroe & Chambliss Nat. Bank.
BARGAINS IN USED CARS
One 1917 Ford Touring.
One 1918 Ford Touring.
One 1919 Ford Roadster.
AUTO SALES CO.,
Mack Taylor.
Phone 348. tf Ocala, Fla.
Attention, mothers. Those boys'
Palm Beach pants have arrived.
22-3t RHEINAUER'S.

Bring in your Second Liberty
Coupon Bonds at once so that
we can have them exchanged
for New Full Coup.on Bonds

Ghambliss National Bank

J. D. SPENCER

We Make a Specialty of Parts for the Buick and
the Prices are Consistent with the Cost of Same.

GOODYEAR AND U.

Exclusive Agents for "VESTA" BATTERY, 18 Mo. Guarantee
An Up-to-Date Battery Service Station
We Maintain an Up-to-Date Garage with
Expert Workmen, at all times, Assuring

Prompt and Efficient Service. . .

GASOLINE, OILS AND GREASE.

OCALA GAS ENGINE WORMS

PHONE 271

Ocala

HUNTER'S AUTO EXCHANGE

ADDS PROTECTION
AND STYLE
To your car if we make that
new auto, top for you. The be3t
of materials and the most skill
ful workmanship result in pro pro-ducing
ducing pro-ducing a car top that is the
equal of any made anywhere, at
a higher price. Let us build for
you a one-man top, according
to your own ideas exclusive
design of quality.

TOPS New, covered, patched and coated with a patent wax paste
that makes old tops absolutely waterproof.
PAINTING Autos painted, striped and finished in the best of
material.
UPHOLSTERING We are prepared to give you satisfactory ser service
vice service in upholstering backs, seats or cushions.
TIRES, TUBES, GAS and OILS
LET US REPAIR, PAINT AND UPHOLSTER YOUE CAR, SO
.YOU CJN ENJOY IT YOURSELF OR SELL TO ADVANTAGE.
- AUTOS BOUGHT, SOLD and REPAIRED
J. W. MOOTER

fhOS&lS S0UTH MAGNOLIA STREET fpinPlfi
Hjdld OLD METROPOLITAN THEATER lUi. Ill

STAR JOB
' PHONE 51
J

LETTERHEADS. BILLHEADS, CARDS,
CIRCULARS, FOLDERS. FINE BOOKLETS, ETC.

WE NEVER DISAPOINT A CUSTOMER ON A
PROMISE. YOU GET THE JOB WHEN ITS DUE.

Advertise and get Results

W. R. PEDRICK

AGENCY
S. TIRES AND TUBES
Florida
P. O. BOX 606

DEPARTMENT

3

0



OCALA EVENING STAR, SATURDAY, APRIL 24, 1920

r

Good vision is essential

iS MBh a xl a
. of the individual. Ir yoar
-5o see. JS ViS1 as gooa as 11
J.w should be?
DR. K. J. WEI HE,
Optometrist and Optician.
Eyesight Specialist
See Me
For All Classes Of
Stone, Brick, Wood,
and Concrete
: Building
j J. D. McCasiulI
Contractor
I Phone 446. 728 Wenona St.
A BARGAIN
18 ROOM HOUSE
FOR SALE
To Close Out Estate
Located on quarter-acre
lot one block from Post Post-office,
office, Post-office, cheap at $3000. Price
will be reduced $10 per day
until sold.
PRICE TODAY $2390
If interested see me at once
FRANK W. DITTO
Real Estate Ocala, Fla.
-
RAILROAD SCHEDULES
Arrival and Departure of passenger
trains at OCALA UNION STATION.
The following schedule figures pub published
lished published as information and not guar guaranteed.
anteed. guaranteed. (Eastern Standard Time)
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILROAD
Leave Arrive
2:15 am Jackson ville-N'York 2:10 am
1:66 pm Jacksonville 1:30 pm
4:05 pm Jacksonville 4:25 pm
Tampa-
2:1b am Tampa 2:16 am
2:15 am Manatee- 3:35 pm
St. Petersburg
1:50 pm Tampa-Manatee 1:35 pm
4:25 pm Tampa-St. P'tersbrg 4:05 pm
ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD
Leave Arrive
2:12 pm Jacksonville-N'York 3:1ft am
1 :45 pm J'ksonville-Ga'nsville 3 :35 pm
C :42 am J'ksonville-G'nesvile 10:13 pm
3:18 am St.Pet'sbrg-Lakeland 2:12 am
3:35 pm St.Pet'sbrg-Lakeland 1:25 pm
7:10 am Dunnellon-Wilcox
:25 am Dun'ellon-Lkelnd 11:03 pn
3:25 pm Homosassa 1:30 pr
10:13 pm Leesburg 6:42 ai
4:45 pm Gainesville 1 1:50 an
'Monday, Wednesday, Friday.
' Tuesday, Thursday. Saturday.
JftkrOWILLE-FIA
i oufrids rocns-SreanvIkated up- Cafe h
coNioCofwetieit toverymiiv$-liv
heart of City Ssid for Booklet..
sa VflNDLE W.SHITH, PROP'R
1H E Bank,
. bring about

business.
We invite you to do your banking with us, and let
us work together in developing our city, county and state.

( SM'

J L JJL JUL JJl f JL-Lv miL

OCALA OCCURRENCES

If you have any society items,
phone five-one.
Mrs. R. L. Bridges has gone to
Thomasville, Ga., to visit her daugh daughter
ter daughter for several weeks.
Remember I receive strawberries
every day. Leave your orders with me.
My prices are always right. W. A.
Stroud, west side of square. 22-tf
Do you wear PANTS or suits while
others are wearing Overalls? To be
had at FISHEL'S. 23-2t
Mrs. N. E. Carter returned yester yesterday
day yesterday afternoon from a few days visit
to friends at Okahumpkee.
Attention, mothers. Those boys'
Palm Beach pants have arrived.
22-3t RHEINAUER'S.
Sixty-three cents buys the bear
Cold Cream and one of the best Fac
Powders on the market. Special sale
price at Gerig's Drug Store. 6-tf
Miss Fae Beck of Fellowship is the
guest of Misses Ruth Ervin and Car Carrie
rie Carrie Barco for several days.
Men's and boy's linen collars, reg regular
ular regular price, 25c, onr price, 15c; soft
collars, 15c to 35c, at Gadson's Ba Bazaar
zaar Bazaar Store. 23-3t
Ever wear EVERWEAR Hosiery?
All that the name implies. Fishel's. 2t
Miss Edna Sipple is spending this
week with her parents at Winter
Haven.
Remember I receive strawberries
every day. Leave your orders with me.
My prices are always right. W. A.
Stroud, west side of square. 22-tf
Don't fail to. visit the Guarantee
Clothing & Shoe Company. Every Everything
thing Everything we sell is guaranteed. We're
fighting for QUALITY not prices'
Messrs. Kelley Jones and Standley
Mitchell have returned to their home
in Tampa after several days pleasant pleasantly
ly pleasantly spent in the city.
You must se the pretty Children's
Dresses at Fishel's. 23-2t
Colgate's Cashmere Boquet soap,
10c; Palm Olive soap, 9c, at Gad Gad-son's
son's Gad-son's Bazaar Store. 23-3t
Rev. John' Conoley will hold serv services
ices services at the Catholic church tomorrow.
Mass at 11 a. m. and evening services
at 7:30 o'clock.
Don't fail to visit the Guarantee
Clothing & Shoe Company. Every Everything
thing Everything we sell is guaranteed. We're
fighting for QUALITY not prices, tf
Circle No. 1 of the Methodist mis missionary
sionary missionary society will meet with Mrs.
L. H. Pillans Monday afternoon at
3:30 o'clock. Mrs. Spencer will lead
the devotional exercises.
I say, we have CHILDREN'S
DRESSES. FISHEL'S. 23-2t
Dr. E. G. Peek leaves tonight for
New Orleans to attend a meeting of
the American Medical Association. He
will be- joined there by Mrs. Peek,
who is now in Cincinnati after a visit
in Wheeling, W. Va. where she was
called on account of the illness of her
sister. Dr. and Mrs. Peek will return
home the last of next week.
Mr. W. McD. Parker, who has
had charge of the gents' furnishing
department of the H. B. Masters store
for the past eight years, has severed
and its depositors,
gratifying results in

Resources more than $1,000,000.00

The Ocala National

ACD)inni

pflete Mm

his connection with that firm to take
a position with the Guarantee Cloth Clothing
ing Clothing & Shoe Company. Mr. Parker is
an expert in his line and the Guaran Guarantee
tee Guarantee store is very fortunate in securing
his services.

AT THE CHURCHES TOMORROW
Christian
S. S. Offut, Pastor
9:45 a. m. Sunday school, J. E.
Hyndman, superintendent.
10:45 a. m. Preaching. Subject,
"Scenes and Sayings at the Cross."
7:45 p. m. Preaching. Subject,
"The Father as Chum to His Boy."
Grace Episcopal
John J. Neighbour, Rector
7:30 a. m. Holy communion.
9:45 a. m. Sunday school.
11 a. m. An interesting service
with no music and very little preach preaching.
ing. preaching. The organ is being repaired and
tuned.
No evening service.
Christian Science Society
Room 5, Merchant's Block
10 a. m. Sunday school.
11 a. m. Sunday service
8 p. m. Wednesday.
LIBRARY NOTICE
Mrs. Ford Rogers and Miss Louise
Gamsby will leave Sunday afternoon
for Orlando to attend the American
Library Association convention of
Florida, -which will be held Monday,
Tuesday and Wednesday, consequent consequently
ly consequently the library will be closed until
Wednesday afternoon.
AKR1VAL AND DEPARTURE
OF TRAINS IN OCALA
Seaboard Air Line
Arrive from Jacksonville.. 2:09 arm.
Leave for Tampa 2:10 a.m.
Arrive from Jacksonville.. 1:30p.m.
Leave for Tampa 1:50 p. m
Arrive from Jacksonville.. 4:24 p. m
Leave for Tampa 4:25 p.m.
Arrive from Tampa 2:14 a.m.
Leave for Jacksonville.... 2:15a.m.
Arrive from Tampa 1:35 p.m.
Leave for Jacksonville. . 1:55 p. m.
Arrive from Tampa 4:04 p.m.
Leave for Jacksonville.... 4:05p.m.
Atlantic oast Line
Arrive from Jacksonville. 3
:14
:15
:34
:35
:12
:13
:11
:12
:25
:45
m.
m.
m.
m.
m.
m.
m.
m.
m.
m.
m.
m.
m.
m.
Leave for St. Petersburg. 3
Arrive from Jacksonville.. 3
Leave for St. Petersburg.. 3
Arrive from Jacksonville.. 10
Leave for Leesburg 10
Arrive from ot. Petersburg 2
Leave for Jacksonville.... 2
Arrive from St. Petersburg 1
Leave for Jacksonville. ... 1
Arrive from Leesburg .... 6
Leave for Jacksonville. ... 6
:41
:42
Arrive from Homosassa... 1
.25
Leave for Homosassa 3
Arrive from Gainesville,
daily except Sunday .... 11
Leave for Gainesville, daily
except Sunday 4
Leave for Lakeland, Tues Tuesday,
day, Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday 7
Ar. from Lakeland, Tues Tuesday,
day, Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday 11
:25
:50 a.m.
:45
:25
:03
P.
a.
P P-a.
a. P-a. P-
m.
m.
m.
m,
m.
.Leave for Wilcox, Monday,
Wednesday and Friday. 7
Arrive from Wilcox, Mon Monday.
day. Monday. Wednesday, Friday. 6
RECEIVER'S SALE
:10
:45
Notice is hereby given that on Fri Friday,
day, Friday, April 30th, 1920, at the hour of
ten o'clock a. m. the undersigned re receiver
ceiver receiver of Geo. Giles & Co. will sell at
public auction at the gin building of
said Geo. Giles & Co., Ocala, Florida,
certain office equipment, furniture,
tools, implements, wagon platfrom
scaie, pianorm scales, cotton, sacKS,
seed, trucks, etc., etc., the property of
Geo. Giles & Co. Receiver reserves
right to reject any and all bids. All
sales subject to approval and confir confirmation
mation confirmation of court. Elmer DeCamp,
Receiver Geo Giles & Co.
dly 21-24-26-28&wkylt
t
Girl wanted at Kindt's music store.
co-operating can
the favor of more
Bank
0

JMIILJIRIPI

I

UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS
BRICK LAYERS WANTED Palat Palat-ka
ka Palat-ka new school building. Fuquay &.
Green, Luilders, Davtona Beach, Flor Florida.
ida. Florida. 23-12t
WANTED Will some one answer a
lonely widow? Apply "N," care Star
office. 24-2t
WANTED To rent a small furnished
cottage or rooms for housekeeping.
Apply to Mrs. Mary Chambers, 19
Herbert St., or phone 242. 22-6t
WANTED Every member of every
department, cradle roll, home depart department
ment department and active membership, present
at the Methodist Sunday school Sun Sunday
day Sunday morning at 9:45. Bring a visitor.
WANTED To buy for cash second secondhand
hand secondhand show case. A. H. Hargraves, 807
South Lime street. 22-3t
WRITE The Truth Seeker Co.. New
York, for sample copy of the Truth
Seeker, a free thought and agnostic
publication. 23-2m f
FOR RENT Three rooms for light
housekeeping. Private bath and gas.
Apply at 409 E. Oklawaha avenue or
phone 559. 22-3t
FOR SALE Two mules, one dray,
one surry. Apply to Jake Brown,
Ocala, Fla. 22-6t
CLEANING AND PRESSING You
can get the best service in town by
having us clean and press your
clothes. Ladies' work a specialty. The
Arcade Pressing Club, phone 448. 22m
LOST Orange colored cat Wednes Wednesday
day Wednesday night. Reward to finder. Notify
213 South Pine St., on Star office, tf
FOR RENT Cottages on Lake Weir,
completely furnished. Rates reason reasonable.
able. reasonable. Apply to J. H. Jacoby, Wcirs Wcirs-dale,
dale, Wcirs-dale, Fla. 4-22-6t
FOR SALE Pair of mules 4 years
old; one 2-horse wagon; 5-ton plat platform
form platform wagon scales, double beam.
Blowers Lime & Phos Co. 22-6t
LOST On Silver Springs road, blacr"
bag containing blue wool Jersey bath
ing suit, cap and sox. Return to Mai
garet McNeil at Star office. Re
ward. 21-Gt
FOR SALE Horse and buggy. Call
en C. II. Stuart, 115 Magnolia street,
printing office. 21-Gt
FOR RENT Desirable offices or
storage space on second floor of the
Merchant's block. R. R. Carroll,
agent.
21-Ct
WANTED One National cash reg register
ister register with five or six separate draw drawers.
ers. drawers. Mayo-Lyles Store, Summerfield,
Fla. 20-5t
FOR SALE Boilers, engine, five
locomotives, one hundred tons scrap
iron, etc. Send representative to
Ehren, Fla. Landeck Lumber Com Company.
pany. Company. 20-Ct
TOR SALE One mare 6Y2 years old,
coit eight months old. Apply to New
York Meat Market, 18 W. Broadway,
Ocala. 4-8-15t
HADSOCK'S WOOD YARD Phone
your orders to Smoak's shop. Phone
140. 2-m
FURNITURE, ETC. i buy and se'l
second hand furniture. Experts put it
in good condition before re-selling.
Rer air sewing machines, lawn mow mowers,
ers, mowers, enamel ware, etc. J. W. Hunter,
310, 312, 314 South Main St. 23-tf
WANTED Rags. Must be well
laundered; 5 cents a pound. Star
office. 7-tf
AUTO SERVICE Automobiles re re-paired,
paired, re-paired, re-painted and re-covered.
Also a complete line of gas, oils and
grease. Firestore tires. Meadows Re Re-paii
paii Re-paii Shop, 735 N. Magnolia St. 7-lm
REAL SALESMAN-With car prefer prefer-red,
red, prefer-red, in your locality. $50 to $200 week weekly,
ly, weekly, selling that wonderful "CORAJA"
Patch not an "all-rubber" or khaki
back it's different PATENTED
nothing else like it on the market. NO
COMPETITION. You can make a
clean up BEST in the WORLD, for
automobile inner tabes territory
FREE. (You can start with a $6 or order).
der). order). "CORAJA" RUBBER MFG.
CO., Dallas, Texas. P. S.: Have sev sev-eran
eran sev-eran Openings for state managers
with $500 to $1000 capital. Should
easily make $500 to $2000 per month.
Be quick, or the other fellow will get
it. 3-4tsat

nine Anntonim(DIbfiIl

3IEETING OF THE PARENT PARENT-TEACHER
TEACHER PARENT-TEACHER ASSOCIATION

The meeting Thursday afternoon of
the Parent-Teacher Association was
the regular program meeting and was
enjoyable in every particular.
A piano duet by Misses Mildred
I Bullock and Edith Edwards was the
first number on the program, this be being
ing being followed by three vocal numbers
by 'Miss Martha Ferry one, of the
girls at the industrial school. This
girl, though having had very little
musical training, displays unusual
talent and possesses a voice of wide
scope. She played her own accom accompaniment.
paniment. accompaniment. An interesting discussion followed,
led by Mrs. Lester Warner, on the
subject of how to advise students en entering
tering entering high school in the choice of
studies. Many interesting points
were brought out in this discussion,
by Mrs. L. N. Green, Miss MacDon MacDon-ald.
ald. MacDon-ald. Prof. Hensley and Mr. Wilson of
the Y. M. C. A A suggestion meet meeting
ing meeting with favor being that upon grad graduating
uating graduating from the eighth grade, the
students, the teacher and the parent
decide together what studies the pupil
should pursue unon entering- hieh
school. In addition to the accredited
elective subjects now offered m the
course at the high school, Prof. Hens Hens-ley
ley Hens-ley announced that through the ef efforts
forts efforts of Miss Porter; high school
music was now available, this being
the fourth school in the state to adopt
this subject.
A piano solo by Miss Margaret
Gerig delighted the audience and Miss
Meffert announced that on Thursday
afternoon, April 29th, at 5:30 o'clock,
the primary school' children would
have an exhibition of their directed
play on the school grounds, and if the
weather that day proved inclement,
the exhibition would take place the
day following.
This interesting meeting closed
with a social half hour in which the
president of the association, Mrs. Os Osborne,
borne, Osborne, assisted by Miss Porter, served
fruit punch.
Knock the H out of the H. C. L.
Wear overalls. On sale at Fishel's
for men and boys. 23-2 1
Attention, mothers. Those
bo-
Palm Beach pants have arrived.
22-3t RHEINAUER'S
tx6
:;-

ABUSE and neglect will give
fl any battery the "K. 0."in
short order, but it takes care and
attention to keep it O. K. Charge
must be kept up as near as pos possible
sible possible to 1.280 mark water must
be put in to make up for loss by
evaporation connections must
be kept tight and dean. If you
want to4 keep your battery in the
O. K. class all the time be sure
' to drive in every two weeks for
inspection and test.
Ocala Storage Battery Co

-, ss
Mcalc
20 N. Main SL
UIAOC MAK

HH'W (Qtasfflllaio FflffMai

I AntoStrop j

To show our confidence in the AUTO
STROP SAFETY RAZOR we allow
you to use it thirty days on trial, free.
You are the sole judge as to whether
it gives satisfaction or not.
Price $5.00
Each razor is enclosed in a substan substantial
tial substantial case, embossed nickle, leather, or
embossed polished gunmetaL Can be
adjusted to any beard. Let us show
you this little marveL
THE COURT PHARMACY
Ocala, Fla.
I I
Call Five One-Wine
The Old Reliable
Quick Delivery
Steak ... ....35c
Loin Steak '. 40-45c
Pork Chops ....35c
Roast ..30c.
Big Roast 4. .25c
Stew 15c
Fish, Oysters and Seasoning
Green Groceries
J. D. BawMhs
111 WEST BROADWAY
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTER
AND BUILDER
Careful Estimates made on all Con Con-tract
tract Con-tract work. Gives More and Better
Work for the Money than any other
rontractor in the city.
jcoc:c
A A,. m,
w w -r -m
Taylor
Ocala, Fla
STORAGE
BATTERY
dim
RfGlftTCQSO
5-3 0

few

CBS



OCALA EVENING STAR, SATURDAY, APRIL 24, 1920

L. LEGRAND HOPKINS

Judge L. LeGrand Hopkins of Belle Belle-view,
view, Belle-view, was found dead this morning
near his barn, where he had gone to
feed his horses. Heart failure is said
to have been the cause of his death.
Judge Hopkins, one of Belleview's
most prominent citizens, highly re respected
spected respected and honored by everybody, has
for a number of years resided in
Marion county. He was originally
from Danbury, Conn., but for the last
decade has been making his home at
the quiet, pleasant little town of
Belleview. Not only Belleview, but
the entire county sustains a great
loss in the death of Judge Hopkins,
and the many friends of this family
extend their deepest sympathy to his
wife, son and daughter.
The funeral arrangements have not
H'iHiniimimri
Buy Your
WESTERN MEAST
of all kinds
FLORIDA BFEF, PORK,
POULTRY, ETC.,
from
s
New York Market
W. Broadway
Phone 110
la

1LT

1914 GvercU Touring, $150
1919 Chevrolet, t 500
1915 Ford Touring, 250
1919 Cleveland Roadster, 850
1918 Maxwell light Truclc, 350

Phono
CAST IRON COLUMNS
VENTILATOR REGISTERS
ANCHORS AND BOLTS
I BEAMS
TRUSS RODS
BALCONIES
ANGLES
CHANNELS

L. SMITH

Office 39 Barnett
JACKSONVILLE,
FIRE ESCAPES P. O. BOX 1332
JOIST HANGERS
PIPE RAILINGS
Very prompt quotations
rwa
.me
Proof

Negotiable Storage Receipts Issued on Cotton, Automobiles. Etc

MOVE, PACK, SHIP
LIVE STOCK,
PIANOS, BAGGAGE,
MACHINERY,
FURNITURE, ETC.
THE

JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
In the heart of the city with Hemming Park for a front yard.
Every modern convenience in each room. Dining room service ia
second to none

ROBERT M. MEYER,
Manager.

been decided upon, the family await awaiting
ing awaiting the arrival of the son and daugh daughter
ter daughter from Connecticut.

CONSTIPATION
Asd Sot? Stcs&cb Caused This
lady Blncii Soff erzaf Bkck Bkck-Dr&ngnt
Dr&ngnt Bkck-Dr&ngnt RelieretL
Meadorsrllla. Ky. Mrs. Pearl Pat Patrick,
rick, Patrick, of this place, writes: "I was
very constipated. I had soar stomach
and was so uncomfortable. I went to
the doctor. He tare me some pills.
They weakened me and seemed to
tear up my digestion. They would
gripe me and afterwards it seemed
I was more constipated than before.
I keard of Black-Draught and de
cided to try it I found it just what I
needed. It was an easy laxative, and
not bad to swallow. My digestion soon
Improved. I got well of the sour stom
ach, my bowels soon seemed normal,
no more griping, and I would take a
dose now and then, and was in good
shape.
I cannot say too mucb for Black Black-Draught
Draught Black-Draught for It Is the finest laxatire
one can use.
Thedford's Black-Draught has for
many years been found of great ralue
in the treatment of stomach, Urer and
bowel troubles. Easy to take, gentle
and reliable in its action, leaving no
bad after-effects, it has won the praise
of thousands of people who hare used
It HOlS
Use the Star's Unclassified Column.
Use the Star's Unclassined Column.
71
STAIR RAILINGS
CIRCULAR STAIRS
HOISTING ENGINES
COAL CHUTES
SIDEWALK LIGHTS
WIRE GUARDS & GRILLS
WINDOW GUARDS
SAFETY TREADS
MARQUIS
ROLLING DOORS
CASTINGS, ALL KINDS
0
Very prompt shipments
Bldg.
FLA
LONG DISTANCE MOVING
IPlioiic
HOTEL
J. E. KAVANAUGH
Proprietor.

iGV fSF?

TGB3SFE03

mm

236

LATEST LOCALS

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Leavengood of
Tampa arrived in the city yesterday
to spend a few days with the former's
relatives here.
Six hundred ladies can get the
BIGGEST BARGAIN at Gerig's Spec Special
ial Special Sale. Come in and see for your yourself.
self. yourself. Gerig's Drug Store. 6-tf
Mr. Philip G. Murphy and father,
Mr. Jerome R. Murphy, have returned
home from a combined business and
pleasure trip to Orlando.
W. K. Lane, M. D Physician and
Surgeon, specialist Eye, Ear, Nose anti
Throat. Office over 5 and 10 cent store,
Ocala, Fla. tf
Mr. Robert Murrell of Los Angeles,
will arrive in the city in a few days
to make a visit with friends. "Bob"
spent his boyhood days in Ocala and
has many friends here who will be
pleased to learn of his visit.
They are all wearing them now.
Read about the OVERALL CLUBS.
Don't start anything without seeing
FISHEL'S. 23-2t
The editor of the Star was taken
sick today and realizing that he would
require careful nursing, the Star force
sent him out to the hospital, where it
is hoped skilled nursing and good at
A Ml T 1 1 I
lenuon win speeauy restore mm 10 ;
liannl Visilth and ncofninocc i
,
Give your feet a chance to help you'
alonig in the world. If they trouble
you in any way have them examined t
HT -hT T UfU J,.4- 4-1 I
pedist.
15-tf
Mr. Albert Harris, Miss Caroline
Harriss and Mr. Edward Martin
motored to Gainesville this morning
to attend the Shriner's festivities,
Miss Elsie Bonds of Jackson vi 11 p. will
rT w (
a i m m 1 1 m i t
join mis party in uainesvilie ior tne
dance tonight, returned tomorrow
with Miss Harriss to be her sruest for
several days.
The "Ease-All" arch protecting
shoes and the Dr. Edison Cushion
Shoes are to be had at only one store
in Ocala. For ladies only. Little's
Shoe Parlor. 15-tf
The cemetery association desires to J
thank the public for the liberal pat
ronage at the rummage sale which re resulted
sulted resulted very successfully. This asso association
ciation association is endeavoring to beautify the
cemetery and when plans are complet-
j it. i a. in i. i.
tu me improvement win oe appreciat-i
ed by all. The ladies cleared $90 at
Tk i i
the rummage sale.
Thin glasses per set, 48c; decorated
plates per set, $1.20; docorated cups
and saucers per set, $1.98. Enamel Enamel-ware
ware Enamel-ware at cut prices at Gadson's Bazaar
Store. 23-3t
In yesterday's Star is was stated
that Mr. Clarence Camp won the
championship in the tournament for
the Florida State Golf Association,
but it should have read that Mr.
Camp eliminated Mr. Al. Ulmer, the
former state champion. This victory
did not give the state championship to
Mr. Camp, as to secure same he has
to be put down three times. News
received in Ocala today is that the
state championship lies between two
boys, 16 and 17 years old, who are
Willis Owens and Gordon Gibbons.
SEEDS
Ninety day and old fashion velvet
beans, chufas, Pyles and Gist seed
corn. Ocala Seed Store, phone 435. tf
Everything in men's and boy's sum summer
mer summer underwear at 58c. per garment
or $1 the suit, at Gadson's Bazaar
Store. 23-3t
HAVE SIMILAR FiNGER MARKS
Important Discovery Made by Cali California
fornia California Professor as to Peculiarities
of Family Groups.
Prof. J. A. Larson, instructor of
physiology In the University of Cali California,
fornia, California, announced a new discovery in
connection with finger prints which is
likely to have a remarkable inlliit ncc
on many Important cases that con
oern the law courts of California.
Briefly, Professor Larson's discovery
Indicates that a similarity of linger
prints among members of a family i.
sufficiently marked to enable scientists
to trace family groups and determine
positively whether a given individual
Is really a member of the family to
which he claims relationship.
The Importance of the discovery in
probate cases such as the Slin-sby casf
is obvious.
Should Dr. Larson's new discovery
be accepted by law and science, the
SHngsby decision may be reversed. a
well as many other analogous cases.
Dr. Larson's Investigations beu'an in
1913 at the Boston university.
"Since that time I have examined
prints of members of approximately
100 families," he said, -'and I am satis satisfied
fied satisfied in my own mind that such a
means of Identification Is possible. I
am preparing detailed reports of my
work now In order that science may
be benefited by my discovery. Before
I complete this, however, I expect to
Investigate the prints of fifteen oi
twenty additional families so as to re remove
move remove all doubt as to the accuracy of
my discovery." San Francisco Chron Chronicle.
icle. Chronicle. I say, we have CHILDREN'S
DRESSES. FISHEL'S. 23-2t

PROBLEMS FACING
A STRICKEN WORLD

(Concluded from Second Page)
economic cripple. Her body is great
and powerful ; the physical constitu constitution
tion constitution is strong. One arm, agriculture,
is overdeveloped, and its overdevelop-!
ment has been at the sacrifice of the
other arm. Russia, economically, in
one physical respect, reminds me of
AVilhelra Hohenzollern, late of Prus Prussia,
sia, Prussia, now living In Holland. I refer to
his withered, undeveloped baby arm.
Russia's undeveloped Industrial arm la
just such a crippled, useless arm. Ref Reference
erence Reference to the ex-emperor, who Is now
,x Wu iu
my mind the words of a great German!
economist. List:
A nation cannot promote and fur-
ther its civilization. Its prosperity and!
.
Its social progress equally as well by
exchanging agricultural products for
- j i- i-i. ui
manufactured goods as by establishing
n manufacturing power of Its own. A
merely agricultural n&tion can never
develop to any extent a home or a
foreism commerce, with Inland means
rf tronennrt and fnrolim ng -u irn Hon. I
. . 7
Increase Its population In due propor-
tion to their wellbeing, or make no-
. , .Mt in.Qiifl.
table progress In Its moral, lntellec-
tual, social and political development; I
11.111 oi, tmnnrfont nnliM.
ii ..... v.Hu, r
cal power or be placed in a position to
,nfiT,ott v. nit.tnn and nmirrMa
Ji nss aiivv uvtrvi uaiiuus nuu iu iu.u.
a 1 ,1 -1 -3 .... i.m
1 1 M i A A .. I Aiiltil I
eoiomes 01 ii uwu. Ainae u.uiiu-
rnl stntp la Infinitely less nowerful I
0(W-.nMni monnfo.tnrln(f
than an agricultural-manufacturing
state. The former is always econom-
Jeally and politically dependent on
those foreign nations which take from I
l a n on 1 In Ai-ohantr frtr mflnil.
ffactured goods. It cannot determine
i how much It will produce, it must wait
and see how much others will buy from
it. The agricultural-manufacturing
states on the contrary produce for
themselves large quantities of raw ma-
terials and provisions and supply I
- I
i it. JS & 1 ah. t a I
merely me uencieucy iruui juiyuuB-
tlon. The purely agricultural nauons
are thus dependent for the power of I
effecting sales on the chances or a
more or less Dountnui narvest in uie 1
agricultural-manufacturing nations.
Thev have, moreover, to compete In I
thfr ii1m with othr rnarrfv arrlcul- I
their sales witn otner purely agncui i
tural nations, whereby the power oil
J sale in itself Is uncertain; they are ex-
posed to the danger of ruin In their I
trading with agrlcultural-manufactur.
ing nations by war or new tariffs, I
whrfhv thev suffer the double dlsad-1
vantage of finding no buyers for their
surplus agricultural products and of
railing to ootainv supplies or tne man-
.,1 rAAis thav ronnlro An v.
"""-u"lv "w,i-' ""j .
ricnltural nation Is a man with one
nrm who makM use of an arm belong-
. . -1
ing to another person but cannot, of
course, be sure of having It always
.v,t a- inn.Kmonfo
lummuic. ayauiiuiai-umuw".
turing nation Is a man who has two
, m x. r .:i0i
guou arms oi uis uwu ui m tSk-w0.

Poland Cited as an Example. ne1!!3.a5Ml Justice to all i win not per per--
- per-- . I mit the use of this office lor the nro-

L,ist runner points out mat tne rei-
ative cultivation of the agricultural
and manufacturing arms of a country
possessed oi an ampie nuu leruie icr
ritorv will eive that country a dodu-
miiUU lv
as It could secure by the development
of the agricultural arm '.alone.' and
maintain this vastly increased popuia
tion in a much higher degree of com-
. c 7 7 j..
fort. Surplus agricultural produce 1
not nprpRsarllv ranltal in an afirrlcnltu-
rhi.H .niiiA
ral country. Countries which produce
such a surplus ana remain aepenaent
AnnnfAc. ara
uyuu a.umwuft "wu" -v
often obliged to puriase these mana
factored good, at an enhanced pHce.
He points to Poland as an example.
She exported the fruits of her soli to
I. j . .
obtain the goods which she could have
manufactured from It As a conse-
quence she fell like a house of cards!
when organized nations attacked her.
List considers that had Poland devei
Ana h or mnntifflctnHnp arm. besides!
Afi . j Ar,
retaining her national independence
she would have exceeded any other
tt i.,t i -wkonarff, tv
European 'country In prosperity. To
ns TJst's words : "-Go to fallen Poland
on(i oat tta Thnlej neonl now whether
and aSKltS napless people now wntruicr
It Is advisable for a nation to buy the
oThH of n forlrn conntrv so long
fabrics or a ioreign counxry o iour
a Its native manufacturers are not
cnffiHnt1v trfnrthMied to be able to
sufficiently strengtnenea w oe
compete In price and quality witn tne
fAroJimprs"
inreiiers. ,n,
Bolshevism has set out to socialize
political, agricultural and Industrial
Jtussla. and as I expect to examine the
r,i0m in Mfh nf these
departments of Russian life 1 nave set
down some historical and economical
nown some i. iuuw
truths which must be kept in mina
.j,an THminlncr the Lenlne panacea.
, j. .r.B.r TTnioni
(Copyright. 1910. Wet arm Wwippr Union
France Needs Raw Materials.
r ic,ttirhoTMa in France
Economic disturbances in nancr
during the period or reaajusimem ui
waxes to high prices were preaicxea 071
Leon Jouhaux, chief labor representa
tive on Uie rreutu -"-""
t-! f tio
international laoor conierenc mi
Washington. "The ia OI raw mai-
Hii is the only thins that prevents

k Trvi TrnrlHntrman from ffolneinot expect to he now, but need help to
the French WOntingman iroui 61U6 I flniah natlrtT nt mir thra vminc.

hnrk to his Job." said M. Jouhaux.
Wo must havf cotton and coal from
we musi nave -wuou .uu .w
the United States, ror It win De irum
three to five years before the French
inree io ue M
coal mines can be operatea. ui courae,
. im in FrinfH on ac
count of the increasea cost oi uyus.
and It Is probable that before the
workman gets this Increase there will
be more or less economic disturbance.
ITINERARY OF THE CANDIDATES
April 30. Fort McCoy, 2:30 p. m.
May Cth, Romeo (Pine Island picnic
grounds), all day,
Other places to be announced later.
Cirl wanted at Kindt's music store.1

ANNOUNCEMENTS

UNITED STATES SENATOR
Dl'XCAX U. FLETCHER
To the Democratic Electors of Flor-
m" slncTrTapprtion Tf theonfi:
oence you nave .heretofore reposed in
me, ana io announce that at the pri-
mary to be held on Tuesday. June 8,
next, I will submit to your decision
whether it is your wish that I serve the
I state another term as one of its repre-
tnc uiuicu tjwics cuaie.
I have in the past labored and will In
tne luture endeavor to give full meas
ur Of service. The record of mv work I
is open to all and speaks for itself. An 1
examination of that record will disclose
many direct and indirect accoimlish- i
ments beneficial to Florida and its
citizens. If again favored. I will be In
a position to accomplish even more
Million in me pa-si, ior lengtn or service
' I in t hp f t fc moans Iniron s&H nri.alm
and opportunity for greater achleve-
nt o sate- During
the campaign I expect to meet and
discuss with you problems affecting
i??, wffaJe the tate Snd natit?. 1
shall appreciate very much your active
support and your vote on June Mb.
Uraterully and sincerely.
DUNCAN U. FLETCHER.
FOR REPRESENTATIVE
NATHAN MAYO
To Marion County Democrats: At
tne request of .my friends I announce
myself a candidate for the lower house
f the legislature subject to the demo-
cratic primary of June 8th. 1920 (erouo
one;. I will appreciate the support of
811 aemocrais. ana promise it elected
.to serve you raithfuiiy and conscien
tiousiy. nathan MAYO.''
Summerfield, Florida.
CII4.RL.ES W HUNTFIl
Marion County Democrats: At the
instigation of a number of my friends
1 hereby make -my announcement as a
can(Jiiate for member of the leglsla-
ture from this county, in group two,
J?" th hi ldajecr8rhCi9fS
suring you that I will give my best
c"w i -M "iicreaiB i Aianon coun-
ty, if elected. I solicit your support.
UtlAltltiS v. HUNTER.
Ocala, Florida.
COUNTY. JUDGE
WILLIAM A. JEFPCOAT
Jo the Democratic Voters of Marlon
i-w -" jvfec. a noa ikJKrx u a.iiVi A Aiatru
-v a 1 T .
v" tt isiuii cuuniy, o.
w-
cation and taught country school for
Vhich timel cameti : flarfonTounty!
1 ia.. nrieen years ago. i was a ibook-
Keeper ormeml eforsdy
for district No. l. and a nracticine law
yer ot tour years experience. I fully
appreCate the dignity Cf the office for
which I am soliciting your votes and
rf "U&,l?eJ.ti!L,ft
courtesy, honor and Justice. I .believe in
tftu0d TtKltfi w aid
neVer outside it. Respectfully.
wa. A. JBFFCOAT.
L. E. FUTCH
In annnunlnc mv ftnAAfv fnr
county Judge of Marion county In the
I democratic primary election. to be held
ijune gh 1920 I respectfully solicit
the support of the democratic voters
and my many friends. I was born in
Alachua county, Fla., a democrat all
I my iife, a3 admitted to roractice law
I In 1915 and have toeen actively engaged
I In the practice of law since that time,
i except the time i served in the army.
bnouia i De elected i shall conscien
Itiously discharge the duties of said of-
fice to the ,best of ablllty wltn fair-
i motion of any private interest of my
I own or otners.
L. E. FUTCH.
CLERK 0F THE CIRCUIT COURT
I JAMES E. THOMAS
I To the Democratic Voters of Marion
County: I hereby announce myself a
I candidate for clerk of the circuit court
, June g-
1 i have 'been a member of the county
aemocratic executive committee ror
quite a number of years and have been
true and faithful to my party, though
have never before asked for an office.
1 1 now reside at Sparr within ten miles
of where 1 wa8 a llttle over orty
i years ago. i have a family of six chii-
I dren that. I very much desire to bring
up in the straight and narrow way. I
1 therefore promise1 the voters of this
rlJe'UsrseMbl.1 ""i 5m
i00k after your inteensts n a kind and
courteous way and will try to make
you feel at home when you visit the
clerk's office.
I respectfully ask your support.
JAMES E. THOif AS.
Sparr, Florida.
l t. d. Lancaster jr.
To the Democratic Voters of Marion
I County: I announce my candidacy for
the of flce of clerk of tlfe clrcult c'ourt
subject to the primaries June 8th. 1820.
1 was born in this county twenty-nine
years ago and have evr sLnce' llved
here. I have been employed in the
I clerk's office since 1915 and from actual
i thorouhlv on-vemiu-it
with the several duties and xequlre-
ments of same. Since attaining- my ma-
j0rtty i have been a -member of the
democratic xarty. true to same in name
ani in fact. If elected I promise the
patrons of the office to keep the affairs
0f same at all times in my personal
charge and an efficient, courteous ad-
ministration of. its various duties 'and
responsibilities. I respectfully solicit
your support, t. p. laxoaster JR.
I Ult
i county: I hereby announce myself as a
I canaiaate ior tne ornce or ciera or tne
I circuit court, subject to the primaries
I of Jun 8th i92o. I am a native of Fair-
I field county. S. C. came io Ocala to
I work in 1886 before I was of age. Have
,hn identlfled with Qcala and Marion
county for 34 years. Have always voted
the democratic ticket. .Married a Flor-
I a Sin in ibsb ana we nave a lanuiy ui
ava hnv oni thr eiri thnt
a credit to any community, nave euu-
. him n dnutv eirk eir-
1 CUit court under Clerks Sistrunk and
I in en i ior eiKnr years ana a-rn now
I tpmnnrarllv mnlovel in BtralehteTilnir
up the clerk's ornce in Inverness. There
- know-how To do. Ilave never been
ia candidate for an office before and did
est children. If elected I will always
I oe on tne joo. aay or ni&nx. rromuft
I vrvll Ia,vrv .n,,,..., th. vw K.t
i personal service and will make you feel
at home in the clerk's office, and will
I give the best surety company bond. I
reSpectfully ask your vote and in flu
lence. is. fc.. LTU.njnuk.
ALFRED A YER
If you will elect me clerk of court.
I will prove my gratitude fby good and
faithful work, and the county's inter interest
est interest in my hands .will be protected. A
I county office Is not a -immer of charity.
STORE FOR RENT
The store room in the Merchants'
(block now occupied by Pillans &
Smith Grocery Co. will be for rent
about May 1st. R. R. Carroll, Agt. tf

SHERIFF

S. C. M. THOMAS
To the Democratic Voters of Marlon
County: I am a candidate for the of office
fice office of sheriff of Marion county. I wa
born &rvd raispd n Alar-hira. rflunt v. and
have lived in Marlon county for the
past twenty years. During that time i
have served several years as marshal
of the town of Dunnellon. and two
years as marshal of the city of Ocala,
and my record is therefore an open one.
It is useless for me to make any fur
ther statement in regard to it. I have
bpen a. li f o-lnn dmrwrat. and with th
experience I have had in the offices
held by me. and having also been for
a eood manv vears a detutv in the
sheriffs, office, I feel that I can render
me cnaracier or service requisite io
fill such office, and I respectfully solicit
the democratic vote ior such ornce.
pled-ging myself to the full perform
ance or every duty devolving upon me.
ana a rigid ana strict enforcement oi
every law. Respectfully,
S. C. M. THOMAS.
TAX ASSESSOR
JOS. W. DAVIS
To the Democratic Voters of Marlon
County: I hereby announce myself &
candidate for tax assessor, subject to
tne democratic primary in 'June. IX
elected, I will give the office my entire
attention. Any support will be appre appreciated.
ciated. appreciated. JOS. W. DAVIS.
Summer field, Florida.
W. L. COLBERT
To the Democratic Voters of Marlon
County: I hereby announce my can candidacy
didacy candidacy for the office of tax assessor for
Marlon county, subject to the demo democratic
cratic democratic primary. If elected, I promise
to -give my entire time and attention
to the duties of the office and will to
the best of my ability give same a
clean and business-like administration.
I will appreciate any support that you
can give me during the campaign and
earnestly solicltvyour vote at the polls.
Respectfully. W. I COLBERT.
TAX COLLECTOR
V. W. STRIPLING
: To the Democratic Voters of Marion
County: Trusting that the tax collee-
tor's office has 'been conducted In such
a manner as to meet with the approval
of the tax payers of Marion county,
while in my charge. I shall be a candi-
date for the democratic nomination for
this office at the coming election to toe
held June 8th. I believe that I have
proven "the man on the job" during
my term as promised during the last
campaign. If nominated again I can.
make no better promise for the future.
Under date of May 26th, the assistant
state auditor in his report, says of the t
collector's office of Marlon county:
"The tax collector is very accurate in
all of his accounts." With the a,bove
statement I -pledge you the best that
is in nre for the best interests of all the
people of Marion county, and ask your
support at the polls.
W. W. STRIPLING.
SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS
w. D. CAIIX
To the People of Marion County: I
hereby announce as a candidate for the
office of superintendent of publks in instruction
struction instruction of Marion county. Florida. I
will greatly appreciate your support
uur,n "ie "li8" Jur vuio iu
I tj? m &llthf ho5f i?
. C,C1J,
during the campaign and your vote In
the county.
QCALA FRATERHAL ORDERS
ODD FELLOWS
Tulula Lodge No. 22. I. O. O. F.,
meets every Tuesday evening in the
Odd Fellows' hall on the third floor of
the old Star office building at 7:30 p.
n. A warm welcome always extended
o visiting brothers.
C. W, Moremen, N. G.
W. L. Colbert, Secretary.
MIRIAM KKBEKAH LODGE NO. 15
Miriam Rebekah Lodge No. 15
meets "the first and third Monday eve evening
ning evening in each 'month in the Odd Fel Fellows'
lows' Fellows' hall at 7:30 o'clock.
Miss Ruth Ervin. N. G.
Miss Ruth Hardee Secretary.
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
Ocala, Lodge No. 19. Convention
held every Monday evening at 7:30
o'clock at the Castle Hall, overthe G."
C. Greene Co. drugstore. A cordial
welcome to visiting brothers.
W. M. Parker, C. a
Chas. K. Sage, 1L of R. & S.
OCALA LODGE NO. 286. B. P. O. E.
Ocala Lodge No. 286, Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, meets
the second and four Tuesday eve evenings
nings evenings of each month. Visiting breth brethren
ren brethren always welcome. Lodge rooms
upstairs over Troxler's and the Book
Shop, 113 Main street.
C. Y. Miller, E. B.
v P. J. Crook, Secretary.
MARION-DUNN MASONIC LODGE
Marion-Dunn Looge No. 19, F. & A.
M., meets on the first and third
Thursday evenings of each month at
7:30 o'clock until further notice.
Jake Brown, Secretary.
A. Lv Lucas, W. M.
WOOD31EN OF THE WORLD
Fort King Camp No. 14 meets at
K. of P. hall at 7:30 p. m. every sec second
ond second and fourth Friday. Visiting sov sovereigns
ereigns sovereigns are always welcome.
J. C. Bray, C. a
Chas. K. Sage. Clerk.
ORDER OF EASTERN STAB

Ocala Chapter No. 29, O. E. S.
meets at the Masonic hall the secondj.
and fourth Thursday evenings of each
month at 8 o'clock.
Mrs. Lillian Simmons, W. M. v
Mrs. Susan Cook, Secretary.

R. A. M. CHAPTER No. 13
Regular convocations of the Ocala'
Chapter No. 13 R. A. M.. on the fourth
Friday in every month at 8 p. m.
H. S. Wesson, H. P.
Jake Brown, Secretary.

r

A.
K



Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8 standalone no
fcla fda yes
!-- Ocala evening star ( Newspaper ) --
METS:mets OBJID UF00075908_05556
xmlns:METS http:www.loc.govMETS
xmlns:xlink http:www.w3.org1999xlink
xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance
xmlns:daitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss
xmlns:mods http:www.loc.govmodsv3
xmlns:sobekcm http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcm
xmlns:gml http:www.opengis.netgml
xmlns:lom http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcm_lom
xsi:schemaLocation
http:www.loc.govstandardsmetsmets.xsd
http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss.xsd
http:www.loc.govmodsv3mods-3-4.xsd
http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcmsobekcm.xsd
METS:metsHdr CREATEDATE 2014-07-31T17:45:47Z ID LASTMODDATE 2009-04-29T15:57:01Z RECORDSTATUS COMPLETE
METS:agent ROLE CREATOR TYPE ORGANIZATION
METS:name UF,University of Florida
OTHERTYPE SOFTWARE OTHER
Go UFDC FDA Preparation Tool
INDIVIDUAL
UFAD\renner
METS:dmdSec DMD1
METS:mdWrap MDTYPE MODS MIMETYPE textxml LABEL Metadata
METS:xmlData
mods:mods
mods:accessCondition This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
mods:genre authority marcgt newspaper
sobekcm newspaper
mods:identifier type OCLC 11319113
ALEPHBIBNUM 2052267
LCCN sn 84027621
sn 84027621
mods:language
mods:languageTerm text English
code iso639-2b eng
mods:location
mods:physicalLocation University of Florida
UF
mods:note dates or sequential designation Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
funding Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855
mods:originInfo
mods:publisher Porter & Harding
mods:place
mods:placeTerm marccountry flu
mods:dateIssued April 24, 1920
marc point start 1895
end 1943
mods:frequency Daily (except Sunday)
marcfrequency daily
normalized irregular
mods:recordInfo
mods:recordIdentifier source UF00075908_05556
mods:recordCreationDate 841027
mods:recordOrigin Imported from (OCLC)11319113
mods:recordContentSource University of Florida
marcorg NPU
FUG
OCLCQ
mods:languageOfCataloging
English
eng
mods:relatedItem original
mods:physicalDescription
mods:extent v. : ; 61 cm.
series
mods:part
mods:detail Enum1
mods:caption 1920
mods:number 1920
Enum2
April
4
Enum3
24
24
lccn 84027622
oclc 11319138
mods:titleInfo
mods:title Ocala weekly star
mods:subject SUBJ651_1 lcsh
mods:geographic Ocala (Fla.)
Newspapers
SUBJ651_2
Marion County (Fla.)
Newspapers
mods:hierarchicalGeographic
mods:country United States
mods:state Florida
mods:county Marion
mods:city Ocala
mods:nonSort The
Ocala evening star
uniform
Ocala Evening Star
alternative displayLabel Other title
Evening star
Star
mods:typeOfResource text
DMD2
OTHERMDTYPE SOBEKCM SobekCM Custom
sobekcm:procParam
sobekcm:Aggregation FDNL1
FDNLN
NDNP
sobekcm:MainThumbnail 0006thm.jpg
sobekcm:Wordmark UFPKY
NEH
CHRAM
sobekcm:bibDesc
sobekcm:BibID UF00075908
sobekcm:VID 05556
sobekcm:EncodingLevel #
sobekcm:Publisher
sobekcm:Name Porter & Harding
sobekcm:PlaceTerm Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
sobekcm:Source
sobekcm:statement UF University of Florida
sobekcm:SortDate 693595
sobekcm:serial
sobekcm:SerialHierarchy level 1 order 1920 1920
2 4 April
3 24 24
DMD3
GML Geographic Markup Language
gml:FeatureCollection
gml:featureMember
gml:Point label Place of Publication
gml:Coordinates 29.187778,-82.130556
METS:amdSec
METS:digiprovMD DIGIPROV1
DAITSS Archiving Information
daitss:daitss
daitss:AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT PROJECT UFDC
METS:techMD TECH1
File Technical Details
sobekcm:FileInfo
METS:fileSec
METS:fileGrp USE reference
METS:file GROUPID G1 JP21 imagejp2 CHECKSUM 6dea60669ddcaaca37851b01fd215807 CHECKSUMTYPE MD5 SIZE 9332703
METS:FLocat LOCTYPE OTHERLOCTYPE SYSTEM xlink:href 0410.jp2
G2 JP22 f8182b29e4422d85b346c8e27dfc7023 9256042
0411.jp2
G3 JP23 3ec2877f2c5dcdf96fb0aec2399e55f4 9217519
0412.jp2
G4 JP24 d5efbcecb12c1b2f7a87f4a87a0ca9d3 9125284
0413.jp2
archive
TIF1 imagetiff 7bd39cb6b44cf4f78705f20f05422466 74631983
0410.tif
TIF2 13428f388725ccd0ec7614ff68050e36 74008539
0411.tif
TIF3 481251966664e7fa79340cbadf38a1e7 73731115
0412.tif
TIF4 5e332a99bef67139be398115952ba04c 72993183
0413.tif
TXT1 textplain d940321582035ed448de8f77f7b3a114 24742
0410.txt
TXT2 a099a71f9d36d309e9db42575e6a62ed 20827
0411.txt
TXT3 ee777360b03924fb71ada22860079bda 16507
0412.txt
TXT4 64808d187f1ccb73b8b30b517c43c317 26798
0413.txt
ALTO1 unknownx-alto e0ed02700b9001052c90a07414c14823 748605
0410.alto
ALTO2 f91e7039cebb6e79bb4c43f958d66528 616189
0411.alto
ALTO3 0af834f3aff9b76856afd39564a37a5e 495653
0412.alto
ALTO4 4b41567ba0bee2f67b2f6a9f650fbf15 877079
0413.alto
METS1 unknownx-mets cb20571c5a45e0968105fa7a44c98043 9854
UF00075908_05556.mets
METS:structMap STRUCT1 physical
METS:div DMDID ADMID The ORDER 0 main
PDIV1 Main
PAGE1 Page
METS:fptr FILEID
PAGE2
PAGE3
PAGE4
STRUCT2 other
ODIV1
FILES1