The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:05554

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
t

THE

Weather Forecast: Fair tonight and
Friday, except probably local thunder
showers in extreme north portion.

ADVICE TO THE
AGRICULTURISTS
Poor Winter Crops and Increasing De De-manks
manks De-manks Make It Necessary for
. Farmers to Chance their
Flans
(Associated Press)
Washington, April 22. Poor condi condition
tion condition of the winter crop and continuing
world demands have caused the de department
partment department of agriculture to advise the
farmers to revise their planting plans
and increase production with spring
crops.
MEXICAN REVOLT GROWING
State and war department reports
today continued to support unofficial
dispatches telling of a rapidly increas increasing
ing increasing area of revolt in Mexico. The
movement begun in Sonora has gained
support in four other states.
MRS. MINOR MAY BE MAJOR
Mrs. George Minor is unopposed for
president general of the Daughters of
the American Revolution.
SWIPE AT CIGARS AND STOCKS
A tax on stock exchange transac transactions
tions transactions of a one per cent levy on final
sales to consumers, a new income levy
and an increase of 15 per cent of the
tax on cigars and tobacco has been
agreed on tentatively by the republi republicans
cans republicans to raise the soldier bonus. x
. A MODEST DEMAND .V
Wage demands for an increase of
58 per cent for the switchmen have
been presented to the railroad labor
board by S. E. Heberling, president of
the. union.
DEDICATION EXERCISES
TOMORROW AFTERNOON
Tomorrow afternoon at 5 o'clock
the Woman's Club will dedicate the
memorial avenue, or Victory Way, to
the memory of the services of the men
and women whose stars; crosses and
triangles adorn the Woman's Club
service flag.
The exercises will be in charge of
Mrs. Walter Hood, chairman of the
memorial avenue committee. Mrs.
Hood has prepared a program which
insures a splendid occasion. (See pro program
gram program elsewhere).
The building-of this, avenue has
been the special work of the Wom Woman's
an's Woman's Club for the year and every ef effort
fort effort o'f the club has been bent to this
end. While the building of the ave avenue
nue avenue has been financed by the entire
club, it has been through the untiring
efforts of Mrs. Walter Hood, chair chairman,
man, chairman, and Mrs. Emily Green, treas treasurer,
urer, treasurer, of the memorial avenue commit committee
tee committee that the dedication of this avenue
has been made possible. The first
plans for Victory Way were made to toward
ward toward the close of the last club year
and it has been gratifying to all to
watch the development of these plans
throughout the year.
There are many to whom we are
under obligations for their interest
and assistance and to all we extend
our most hearty thanks. Especially
we thank Mr. Winer and Mr. Thomas
of the city council and Mr. J. W. Akin
fo rtheir interest and co-operation;
Mr. Thompson and the Messrs. Collier
for their thorough and conscientious
work in building the sidewalk and
planting the trees; Mrs. Bennett for
her financial assistance, and Dr. Wal Walter
ter Walter Hood for his faithful interest. The
editors of the Star and the Banner
have been kind in giving us space.
For the development of Tuscawilla
Park we owe our thanks to the chair chairman,
man, chairman, Mrs. Weihe, for her untiring
work throughout the year, and Mr.
Ffeiffer and Mr. Boon for lending aid
in this work, and Mr. Israelson for
contributing seats. Many others have
contributed money and assistance and
we thank the mone and all and today
the avenue and park stand as they are
entirely free from financial obliga obligations.
tions. obligations. Mrs. W. T. Gary,
President Woman's Club.
GREAT ROAD RACE
WON BY A GREEK
(Associated Press)
Boston, April 22. Peter. Trivloui Trivloui-das,
das, Trivloui-das, a native Greek, whcr won the
American Marathon road race Mon Monday,
day, Monday, will run in the Olympic games at
Antwerp.
Don't fail to visit the Guarantee
Clothing & Shoe Company. Every Everything
thing Everything we sell is guaranteed. We're
fighting for QUALITY not prices, tf
nnuuu;:iit:;i:!:::;::!:::i:i'
PHONE 71
C E SIMMONS.

AMERICA HAS

AN IRELAND
It is a Safe Bet the British Will Not
Try to Tell Us How to
Manage It
(Associated Press)
Manila, April 22. The democratic
party will join the nationalists in de demanding
manding demanding immediate independence for
the Philippine Islands, even urging
force of arms if necessary, according
to Senator Sandiko.
LOCAL LEGISLATION
The city council met in regular ses session
sion session Tuesday evening with Council Council-men
men Council-men Mclver, Goldman, Simmons,
Thomas and Winer present.
'Minutes of April 9th, 13th and 16th,
read and approved.
Request of W. F. Blesch and Geo.
G. Chambers to be restored to the
registration book was granted.
It was ordered on motion of Mr.
Thomas that water tjill of H. W. Wal Walters
ters Walters for $17.72 be reduced one-half on
account of leak.
Report of City Manager McKenzie
for the light, water, street and sani sanitary
tary sanitary departments for the month of
March read and ordered filed for in information.
formation. information. An ordinance amending section 1
of an ordinance entitled "An ordi ordinance
nance ordinance to prohibit any person or per persons,
sons, persons, company or corporation, from
owning, operating or maintaining any
show, game of chance or other amuse amusement
ment amusement on certain blocks in the city of
Ocala, and to provide .a penalty for
the violation of this ordinance," was
introduced by Councilman Goldman,
placed upon first reading and upon
motion of Councilman Thomas ordi ordinance
nance ordinance was laid on the table.
D. W. Davis Insurance Co. was au authorized
thorized authorized to renew insurance on the
library building and contents in the
amount of $4500 for a period of three
years.
Certain bills properly approved
were ordered paid.
It was ordered that the city attor attorney.
ney. attorney. and city manager get up proper
permit and ordinance governing the
wiring of houses.
It was ordered' upon motion of
Councilman Simmons that the city
take $2500 f. o. b. Ocala for the gen generator
erator generator at the light plant.
Report of committee from the Mar Marion
ion Marion County Board of Trade relative to
the construction of paved streets in
the city and the issuance of bonds to
cover same was read and. considered
and upon motion of Mr. Goldman spec special
ial special committee was appointed by the
chair, consisting "of Messrs. Thomas,
Goldman and Simmons to designate
the streets to be paved, also designat designating
ing designating the depths of pavement on the
different streets and report to the
council.
The clerk was authorized to have
necessary printing done for the bond
election.
Request of C. Rheinauer for reduc reduction
tion reduction in valuation in property was con considered
sidered considered and the following described
property, to-wit: Com 52 ft w of tie
cor lot 1 blk 55 O. S. Ocala, w 42 ft
s 119 ft w 25 ft s 9 ft e 119 f t n 9 Ct
w 52 ft n 119 ft, reduced from $20,000
to $18,000.
Personal assessment of Mrs. Emmai
Rehinauer for $100 wras ordered elim eliminated.
inated. eliminated. Personal property of Standard Oil
Cd. raised from $5000 to $6000.
Personal property of Gulf Refining
Co. raised from $3000 to $5000.
Personaproperty of the Texas Co.
raised from $2500 to $5000.
Upon motion of Mr. Goldman, duly
carried, May 18, 1920, 8 o'clock p. m.,
was set by the council as date to hear
complaints against raises in assess assessments
ments assessments of property as made by the
board of equalization.
Council thereupon adjourned.
FATE OF CAILLAUX
IN THE BALANCE
(Associated Press)
Paris, April 22 The high court
trying former Premier Caillaux. who
is charged with high treason and ne negotiating
gotiating negotiating with the Germans during
the war, is now balloting on a verdict.
COLLECTING VOTES FOR
FORD AND NEWBERRY
(Associated Press)
Detroit, April 22. Initial steps in
the collection ofi ballots cast in the
Ford-Newberry senatorial contest be began
gan began today under David S. Barry, ser-geant-at-arms
of the Senate, which
ordered a recount.

CyD Ca3 -V J" isS.-

OGAM, FLORIDA, THURSDAY, APRIL 22. 1920.

NEEDS A LIVE
NEWSPAPER!
It Would Take the Star Just Two
Days to Show 'that Mayor
Where he Got Off
(Associated Press)
Elcentro, Calif., April 22. Mayor
Ohmetede has instructed the chief of
police to suppress news of arrests and
crimes, saying its publication in no
way benefits the community.
URUGUARY WANTS
US TO LINE UP
Little South American State Wants to
Lead an Ali-American
League
(Associated Pres3)
Monteviedo, April 22. The forma formation
tion formation of an American league on a basis
of absolute equality between all Am American
erican American nations for common action
against aggression threatening in any
form from outside nations, is, proposed
by President Brum of Uruguay.
JOHN ME1KLE
This morning when the city learned
of the death of Mr. John Meikle,
which occurred at 9 o'clock this morn morning,
ing, morning, there was a wave of sadness cast
over the entire community. Mr. Meikle
was an unpretentious man, but was
one of Ocala's most highly respected,
admired and beloved citizens. He had
been in ill health for the past year or
so but was a very patient sufferer.
Those who knew him well speak 'of
him as having been a most devout
Christian, finding places to do good
for others wherever he was. He whs
originally from Scotland but Mr.
Meikle with his wife and daughter,
Miss Eleanor Meikle, have resided in
Ocala for a number of years, and the
friends they have made honor them
with magnifying praises. The city is
in deep sympathy with his survivors
and the profoundest condolence is ex extended
tended extended to them. The funeral services
will take place tomorrow morning at
10 o'clock from the residence, 717
South 5th street, and interment will
be made in Greenwood cemetery.
OCALA ART EXHIBIT
The Ocala Woman's Club building
will be opened on Friday afternoon
(tomorrow), at 3:30 o'clock, when the
public will have the opportunity of
seeing the work' of the art depart department
ment department of the club. There have been
ten students during the winter work working
ing working under the directio nof Mrs. Emma
Bauman, an artist of real ability, who
came to Ocala from her studio in Chi Chicago
cago Chicago on account of war conditions.
From the cultural viewpoint Mrs.
Bauman's class work has probably
been the be$t ever done by the women
of the club, and her charming person personality
ality personality has won for her many friends.
She is by no means an amateur, but
a genuine artist, who is sincere and
true to herself and her art. For seven
years she studied under the best mas masters
ters masters in the art centers of Europe.
Ocala is to be congratulated upon the
"rare privilege of having had her con connected
nected connected with the club this winter. There
will be a nexhibition of Mrs. Bau Bauman's
man's Bauman's pictures on Friday as well as
the work of her pupils. There will
also be a sale of pictures, Mrs. Baa Baa-man
man Baa-man and each of the art class donating
one, the proceeds of the sale to be
given by the art department towards
the memorial tablet upon which will
be inscribed the names of Ocala's
heroes in the late war. This tablet of
bronze will be placed on the columns
supporting the art at the entrance of
Victory Way, leading to Tuscawilla
Park. The idea is a very beautiful
one and we hopk all Ocala will show
their love for "our boys" and their ap appreciation
preciation appreciation of the efforts of the women
of the club to memoralize them by at attending
tending attending en masse the exercises and by
the purchase of the pictures, so gen generously
erously generously donated by the art depart department.
ment. department. Mrs. Bauman and her charming-daughter
will be present and con conduct
duct conduct the "exhibit. Many of the pic pictures
tures pictures are copies of masterpieces in
art from the galleries of the old world,
some Florida scenes and others Mrs.
Bauman's original work.
Attention, mothers. Those boys'
Palm Beach pants have arrived.
22-3t RHEINAUER'S.
Don't fail to visit the Guarantee
Clntbincr X- 5?Vtrtf rnmrn r Fvprv.
fining we sell is guaranteed. We're
fighting for QUALITY not prices, tf

CANADA IS TO

BE COMMENDED
Sentenced to Death a Woman Who
Tortured and Murdered
Her Stepdaughter
t (Associated Press)
Quebec, April 22. Mrs. Marie Gag Gag-non,
non, Gag-non, found guilty i torturing and
murdering, her sixteen-year-old step stepdaughter,
daughter, stepdaughter, was sentenced to be hanged
October 1st. Evidence disclosed the
girl was Burned with a red hot poker,
made to walk barefoot In the snow and
forced to drink poison.
MURDER AND WORSE
Will Our Indiana Friends' Have any
Sympathy for the
Girl
ass odfa t ed Pr e s s )
Indianapolis, April 22. William
Ray, a 19-year-old negro, has confess confessed
ed confessed the murder of 14-year-old Martha
Huff, a white girl, according to the
pplice. The girl's body was found in
a creek stripping of clothing.
FORM AN ALLIANCE
AGAINST FRANCE
San Remo Conference Breeds the
Foregoing Suspicion y
Paris, April 22. (Havas Agency.)
The San Remo correspondent of the
Matin says Premiers Lloyd George
and Nitti suggested that Germany be
invited to take part in the discussions
here, but finally yielded on objections
Ly Premier Millerand.
GOOD ADVICE TO
SPINNERS AND GROWERS
(Ansoclated Press)
Boston,; April 22. Closer relations
between grower and spinner would in increase
crease increase the value of cotton a billion
dollars to the grower and result in a
better product for the spinner, II. M.
Cottrell told the National Association
of Cotton Manufacturers here today.
RECOVERED THREE BODIES
FROM THE RIVER
(Associated Press)
Anderson, S. C, April 22. The
belies of Mrs. Lester Waters, Miss
Alice Meschine and Robert Manning
have been recovered from .the Savan-
nah river. The bodies of three others
were seen floating down the river.
Five bodies remain unrecovered of the
party of ten who were drowned in the
river April 4th when a ferry boat
capsized.
;
PART A IN RETAINS HIS
PERILOUS POSITION
(Associated Press)
Anderson, S. C, April 22. E. C.
Partain, who escape'd death by grab grabbing
bing grabbing a friendly pier when the bateau
in which he was riding went over
Gregg shoals dam yesterday, is still
marooned at the same spot thirty
hours after the accident, in which his
companion was killed. He is unable
to get food and water and may have
to spend another day there.
CORN MARKET QUIVERS
(Associated Press)
Chicago, April 22. Sharp breaks
again took place in the corn market
today.
O'BRIEN WENT UNDER
(Associated Pr-ss)
Boston, April 22. The coast guard
cutter Acushnet, searching for the
disabled steamer O'Brien, reported
she found the sea covered with fuel oil
and the name board of the steamer
drifting.
WEARY OF NOT WORKING
(Associated Ptess)
New York, April 22 Five thousand
railroad strikers meeting in Jersey
City decided by lot to return to work.
BOYS IN O. D. ARE
GOING TO BUTTE
(Associated Press)
San Francisco, April 22. Federal
troops have been ordered to Butte as
a result of the mine strike disturb disturbances,
ances, disturbances, as the request of the governor
of Montana, according to General Lig Liggett.
gett. Liggett. j Use the Star's Unclassified Column.

MAJORITY
FOR BONDS
More than Two Ballots to One Were
Cast for Good Roads Money
Following are the precincts so far
heard from in Thursday's election.
The remaining precincts can not
change the result:
ing under the direction of Mrs. Emma
Precinct For Against
Ocala 405 40
Reddick 54 8
Fkmington 17 37
Romeo 18 6
Summerfield .. 20 34
Lake Weir 32 ...
Grahamville 18 31
Citra 7 23
Anthony 30 32
Martin 10 ...
Stanton 91 ...
Blitchton 10 8
Belleview 69 6
Mcintosh 74 ...
Pedro 18 3
Dunnellon 4 54
Candler 33 5
Kendrick 10 13
Martel 4 27
Fairfield 37 5
Geiger 3 17
Cotton Plant 20 34
Sparr 35 5
Emathla 3 19 K
Fort McCoy 37 12
Eureka 4 7
Total 1051 406
TIME TO CALL A HALT
, Editor Star: The communication of
Mr. H. M. Hampton in last week's
Star was good and I appreciated it
very much.
I truly believe there will be no re retrenchment
trenchment retrenchment in national, state and
county affairs till the public is more
fully shown as to how their tax money
is being spent, and demands are made
for less appropriations, and if the
Star will let me I'll show up some of
the extravagance of bur present state
administration, quoting nothing but
what is published in state documents.
The nine items of expenses as men mentioned
tioned mentioned in Mr. Hampton's letter
amounted to but $127,770. What about
the balance, $6,000,000 not mentioned ?
The four state, colleges and two re reform
form reform schools in 1918 cost the taxpay taxpayers
ers taxpayers of the state $621,993.39, as much
as 10 per cent of -the total state ex expenditure.
penditure. expenditure. These six state schools cost as much
as the nine departments Mr. Hamp Hampton
ton Hampton mentioned, $127,770.
Salaries of executive depart department
ment department .. $ 22,000
Salaries of clerks, adminis administrative
trative administrative department 69,000
Expenses of collecting state
revenue 146,000
Salaries of all judges in the
state 116,000
Cost of jurors and witnesses. 151,000
Total $627,770
The total costs of all public schools
in the state in 1918 was $4,800,000.
These six state schools cost as much
as 13 per cent of all public schools.
' Marion county's proportion was
about $12,000.
It cost per pupil enrolled in the
common schools $24.63 and the six
state schools cost between $300 and
$500 per pupil.
The Gainesville school wants for
two terms $419,000; the Woman's Col College
lege College wants $619,000; the blind and
deaf school, $270,000; negro school,
$74,000. Other wants amount to $30, $30,-000,
000, $30,-000, making a total of $1,414,000 for
four state schools, and if we add the
wants of the two reform schools, it
will show a demand of amout 33 per
cent more than before.
The wants per year for blind and
deaf school is more than the cost of
all the schools in Marion county same
year. The Woman's College is nearly
three times the cost of the county
schools, the Gainesville school nearly
twice as much and the negro school
about three-fourths as much.
Is it not time to call a halt?
If you want more on state expendi expenditures
tures expenditures I have it. L. S. Light.
CAN WOMEN KEEP
EACH OTHER'S SECRETS
London, April 22. Whether the
church should provide women confes confessors
sors confessors threatens the Lambeth confer conference
ence conference of the clergy of Great Britain,
which meets in July.
All the late styles in ladies' hats
and dresses at the Elite, Shop, Ocala
House block, opposite courthouse. 6t

BIG

OIR CO

VOL. 26, NO. 95

TAKE STRAW VOTE
ON LEGISLATION
American Legion Post Balloting on
Four-fold Plan of
Benefits
Marion County Post No. 1 of the
American Legion is taking a straw
vote on the legion's plan of beneficial
legislation for the soldiers and sailors
who served in the American forces
during the world war. Post cards
have been mailed to all members of
the post with the request that they
notify the post adjutant whether they
favor or oppose the four-fold plan.
The four-fold optional plan of the le legion
gion legion embraces the following:
1st. Land settlement whereby for former
mer former service men and women receive
$1.50 for each day of service to ap apply
ply apply on the purchase of land and gov government
ernment government projects, or loans for the
equipment. 2nd. Home aid' with $2
for each day of service to apply on the
purchase of a home or farm. 3rd.
Vocational training with $1.50 for
each day of service, to be paid as long
as the recipients are obtaining edu education
cation education from the government. 4th. Cash
compensations with $1.50 for each day
of service, to be paid within a year
i after the approval of the bill.
Up to yesterday afternoon the vote
of the members of the post was as
follows on the bill as a whole: For 38,
against 1. On the first three provis provisions:
ions: provisions: For 1, against 0.
One member of the post expressed
himself opposed to option No. 4. very
doubtful as. to the practicability of
options No. 1 and No. 2 as at present
proposed, and in favor of option No. 3
provided it is efficiently carried out
and managed.
Members of the post who have not
made a return as yet, should send
their vote to the post adjutant at once.
Franklin D'Olier, national command commander
er commander ( has asked every member to work
for the legislation which the legion
has presented to Congress.
The time limit to choose one of the
projects is ten years. National
guardsmen are to be compensated for
time served in 1917, after April 6 and
before being called into the federal
service.
For the land settlement project, a
board of five, of which three will be
ex-service men, will administer a
fund. This board will acquire land to
be developed. It will lend up to $1500
to each man for improvements on his
tract. It will seell the land at cost
to the man and he will put five per
cent down and have forty years in
which to pay the balance. The amount
he has coming from the government,
at $1.50 a day of service, will apply
as first payment.
If a man dies after undertaking the
land settlement project, the full title
of the land goes to his widow or heirs
at law.
This land is not subject to state or
municipal taxes until five years have
elapsed. After the five years title
cannot be forfeited for non-payment
of taxes but they shall be paid out of
the fund and charged against the land
settler.
The board can make short-time
loans up to $1200 to settlers with
which to buy live stock and equip equipment.
ment. equipment. In case of an emergency the
board can make additional loans up to
two-thirds of the service man's total
investment.
The board also-'will administer the
home aid project whereby the former
service man gets $2 for each day of
service, to apply on the purchase of a
home or farm. The rules for purchas purchasing
ing purchasing will be made by the board and
$50,000 is appropriated, to be avail available
able available at once, with which to carry out
the provisions of this scheme.
Ex-service men can choose a course,
to be furnished by the federal board
for vocational training and while tak taking
ing taking this course will be paid $1.50 for
each day of service. The days of train training
ing training cannot exceed the number of days
spent in service between April 6, 1917,
and Nov. 11, 1919. The sum of $5, $5,-000,000
000,000 $5,-000,000 is at once appropriated by the
bill to carry out this feature.
In taking cash compensation, the
soldier gets $1.50 for each day of his
service, to be paid when funds are
available and not later than one year
after approval of the bilL If the serv service
ice service man dies before the bill becomes
effective this widow (o ra woman's
widower ( or the children or other
legal dependents get the cash compen compensation.
sation. compensation.
It is provided in the bill that any
one who knowingly makes a false or
fraudulent statement of a material
fact in connection with the four pro projects
jects projects of compensation shall be fined
$1000 or imprisoned up to five years.
OPPOSITE.
OCALA IRON WORKS



OCALA EVENING STAR, THURSDAY, APRIL 22, 1920

OCA LA EVEillllG STAR

Published Every Day Except Sunday by
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY,
OF OCALA, FLA.

FATHER AND SON

BANQUET TONIGHT

II. It. Carrol!, Ire!dent

P. V. LeaveaKood, Secretary-Treasarer

J. II. Ilenjatnln, Editor

Entered at Ocala, Fla., postoffice as

second-class matter.
TEI.EPIIOXES

BoalaeHN Ofllee Five-One

Editorial IJeparlment Two-Seven

Society Reporter ...Five-One

DOMESTIC SUBSCRIPTION" RATES

One year, in advance 6.00
Blx months, in advance 3.00
Three months, in advance 1.50
One month. in advance 60

9f ESI HER ASSOCIATED PRESS

The Associated Press is exclusively

entitled for the use for republication of

all news dispatches credited to it or

not otherwise credited in this paper and
also the local news published herein.

All rights of republication of special

dispatches herein are also reserved.
ADVERTISING RATES

Ocala Rotarians Will Have Boys as

Their Guests
Tonight at 8 o'clock, in the dining

room of the new Masonic home, the
Ocala Rotary Club will have its

"Father and Son" banquet. The ban

quet was to hav been held several
weeks ago but hltl to be postponed
until now. The dinner will bring to

gether the Rotarians and the boys.

Members who have not a son will

adopt one for the occasion, tach

Rotarian will have as his guest one
boy. There will be several good ad

dresses, both by fathers and sons, and
a number of amusing features are on

the program. The principal address
of the evening will be made by Rev.
J. J; Neighbour, pastor .of the Epis Episcopal
copal Episcopal church. Short talks will be

made by Frank Wilson, secretary of

the county Y. M. C. A., and Stirling

Hooper of the Boy Scouts organiza

tion.

The Ocala Rotary Club now hasia

membership, of thirty, so that it is

expected that there will be a banquet
of about sixty, places. The "Father

and Son" movement is a national one

and designed to bring the boys and

Display Plate 15 cents per Inch for
consecutive insertion Alternate inser

tions 25 per cent additional. 'Compost- I X jV 4 i i.;oV,;
tion charges on ads. that run less than their daddies into closer relationship.

sir times 5 cents per inch. Special

sitlon 20 cer cent additional. Kates

DO

based on 4-inch minimum. Less than

tour Inches will take higher rate,

which will be furnished jpon appllca
tloiu

Reading- Notices 5 cents per line for

SCHOOL NOTES

We take this opportunity to make
few commencement announcements.

K&SKSfTiiSS? PeS'inece.1CS The honor graduates have been select-

ea on tne oasis oi xneir excellence in
scholarship and deportment during

the four years of high school work.

The first honor goes to Winnie Gor-

dpn as valedictorian of the class. The
following are the six chosen to take
nart in a contest for which a medal

The Rotary Club of Ocala has al- w;n be awarded on, commencement

ways taken a heasty interest in the night: Mildred Manning, 92.28; Eliz Eliz-girls'
girls' Eliz-girls' industrial school, east of the aDeth Hocker, 90.56; Helen Veal,

city, and Wednesday evening a num- 89.37; Estelle McAteer, 88.41; Sarah
ber of the members went out there to Dehon, 87.10; Lucile Gissendaner,
pay a friendly call. The Rotarians in 37.05. The averages given are based

the party were President Ed Chace, on the grades in the different subjects

week allowed on readers without extra

composition charges.
Legal advertisements at legal rates.

ROTARIANS AT THE

INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL

the inimitable Albert Gerig and his

inimitabler brother, Jake, Dave Wood-

row, Hugh Sawbones Henry, Harry
Davies, George Pasteur, Will Cam,
Never Run Dehon, Ben Rheinauer and

Ben Benjamin. Mrs. Woodrow and

Mrs. Davies went along as chaperones.
Also among the visitors were State

for the. past three years and a half,

including those of the last semester.

The commencement events arrang

ed for to date are the promotion ex exercises
ercises exercises of the eighth grade on May

10th, at 10 a. m., the commencement
sermon on June 6th at 11 a. m. and

the high school graduation exercises

Treasurer Luning and State Super- the evening of June 7th. These exer-
intehdent Sheats, both of whom be- cises will all be held in the Temple
ing in town on a visit were invited theater and the patrons and friends
to accompany the party. are cordially invited to attend. One

Miss Davis and. all her girls were 0r two other events are being planned
out in front on the piazza and walks but it is necessary to defer announce-
A 1 .1- j1 J

10 meet ana greet xne visitors, jve- ment of them for the present.

ryone of the girls had several friends with the session rapidly drawing to
in the party, as they are always wel- a ci0Se we wish to remind Barents

.come visitors to the churches, stores, that any absence from school during

lmrary ana many nomes in xne city. 1 study periods as well as recitations is
After the Rotes were all present I hurtful to progress and promotion. So
OTlrl -f 'rt 4-Vin-tr cf n yi cttA in I a j xl a. -J t x

iv.uuin.u vnvj obuxiu w we trust tnat requests xor uudus to

have some music. The Rote repertoire leave before the closing hour of the

was nanaea to tne gins, ana tney day will not be made unless there is

caught on and sung it the same as

tho' they were Rotes themselves. Par

ticularly did they assimilate "The Lit Little
tle Little Prairie Flower." Jake Gerig, with

Albert accompanying him on the

, piano, sang "The Golden Sea," and
some other Rote gems were rendered.

The piano was then taken by Miss

Martha Ferry one of the students,

who has a superb voice and a skilled
touch on the instrument. Following

her lead "De S'wanee Ribber" and sev

eral other pretty songs were sung by

the school, some of the visitors join

ing.

some imperative need for it.

The following is the honor roll of

the Ocala High School for the seventh

month:.

Fourth Grade: Lillian Leak, Pau

line Godwin, Lillian Hyndeman, Cora

Lee Goolsby, Guyula Chandler, Ches

ter Fort, Malcom Davis, Edward Hel Hel-venston,
venston, Hel-venston, Elizabeth Rodgers, Dasibel
Clement.
Fifth Grade: Babette Peyser, Ani Anita
ta Anita Chazal, Frances Drake, Amy Long,
Dora Burnett, Mamie Sue Spencer,
Bonner Clark.

Sixth Grade: James Hardee, J. M.

Superintendent Sheats gave an in- Meffert, Myra Baxter, Sara Scott, In

teresting talk, comparing school af

fairs of today with those of thirty or

forty 'ysars ago. This was Mr. Sheats'
first visit to the school and he was

very much pleased with it.

Mr. Luning made a brief talk, com

plimenting the school, and thanking
in the name of the state the visitors

for their interest in it. He said that

dia Smith, H. M. Baxter, Pinckney
Clement, Herbert McCaskill, George

Jordan, Alice Barrett, Euva Burton,
Bemice Bell, Edna Roberts, Louise
Clement, Adeline Malever, Virginia
Minshall, Delzelle Pasteur, Fay Rus Russell,
sell, Russell, Marie Snowden, Christian White Whiteside,
side, Whiteside, v

Seventh Grade: Therese Condrey,

in the places where other state insti- Louie Smoak. Emilv Billintrs.

tutions were located the people were Eighth Grade: Turney Colbert,
rather indifferent, but here in Ocala a Henry Camp, Charlotte Chaazl, Mabel
hearty interest was taken 'that did priest, Marie Jones, Lena Ricketson,
honor- to the people and made the Majorie Burnett, Ben Culverhouse,
teachers and scholars feel so much at j0bn Hardee, Karl Henderly, A. T.
home and encouraged in their work Thomas, Vernon Rawls. Jessie Ray
that-conducting the school was very Culverhouse, Grace Fausett. Margaret
much more easy and agreeable than Hastings, Elizabeth Murray. Mar-

ix it nau oeen locaxea near any town garet Gerigi Ethel Runnels

wnere xne people neid aiooi irom it. 0n account of the variation in the

msiaent uace a so made a few length of session in the high school
remarks for the club, and then the LHp. v, n f tho fciofc

Rotes took the girls out on the lawn school department cannot be given un unto
to unto teach them "Shoo Fly." They had Ln 00v

previously given a practice perform

ance" in the parlor, and the girls had

no trouble in catching on.

The lawn in front of the school, lit
by both the moon and electric lights,
is a fine place for "Shoo Fly," which
was gone thru without a bobble, and
making lots of fun. After which the

Rotes did a few more stunts, one of
which was getting together in a clump
and vocalizing the startling announce announcement
ment announcement "that one of their members
wasn't quite the man he was forty forty-five
five forty-five years ago.
After this good-byes were said and
the visitors came home.
. It is a mutual pleasure to visit the
school. The forty bright-faced girls
are -always glad to see real friends
and are not stingy in showing' their
appreciation.

til next week.

P. H. Hensley, Principal.
BELLEVIEW

' W"He: Good vision is esse:
to the highest usefu!
2yp of the individual. Ir
Sce vision as good a
- .we' -should be?
DR. K. J. WEIHE.
, Optometrist and Optician.
Eyesight Specialist

- The smartest ladies' hats and
dresses may always be found here and
at moderate prices,, The Elite Shop,
Ocala v House block, opposite the
courthouse. 17-6t

Belleview, April 21. The dance at
the Civic League hall last Friday
night was well attended and there will
be another dance Friday, April 30th.
Mrs. Snow of Wildwood is visiting
her daughter, Mrs. Lula Hudley; this
week.
Several of the young folks enjoyed
a fish fry at Smith Lake Saturday.
Mr. William Pape of Tampa was in
town over Sunday.
The electric lights were turned on
Sunday night and we were all glad to
see them.
The literary society had a social at
the town hall Monday night. Games
and music were enjoyed and light re refreshments
freshments refreshments served.
Mrs. Maggie McClendon and daugh daughter,
ter, daughter, Miss Ruby are spending a few
days with Mrs. Paul in Wildwood this
week.
Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Fisher left
Tuesday for their home in Bridgeport,
Conn.
Misses Marjorie Myers and Clara
Mae Crosby called on friends in Wild Wild-wood
wood Wild-wood Tuesday.
Miss Marjorie Merrill visited in
Wildwood Tuesday.
Miss Gertrude L. Carter and Mrs.

N

AVY 1 RAVELOGUES

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YOU'LL BE WELL
PLEASED
with the monument we set up
in your family plot. There
will be dignity about the de design
sign design that will appeal to your
taste. There will be a beauty
of carving that will attract
your pleajsed attention. And
there will be a moderation in
our charges that cannot fail
to commend itself to you.
Ocala Marble Works
Ocala, Fla.

'Dixie Highway Garage
JAMES ENGESSER, Proprietor
121 W. Broadway phone 238 Ocala, Florida

REAR ADMIRAL PEARY

And Some of His Experiences in the
Arctic
On the 20th day of February Rear
Admiral Robert E. Peary died at his
home in Washington, D. C, after an
illness of two years. Two weeks before
his death he underwent an operation
for. blood transfusion, and this only
revived him temporarily.
During his illness. Rear Admiral
Peary submitted to forty blood trans transfusions,
fusions, transfusions, and it is said that this was
the only way in which the great ex ex-plorer'S'life
plorer'S'life ex-plorer'S'life could be maintained. Rear
Admiral Peary was fighting to the
last, and remained conscious until the
last breath had left the greatest and
most prominent explorer that the

world has ever known.
Rear Admiral Peary was born in
Cresson, Pa., May 6, 1856, and was
the son of Charles and Mary Peary.
The famous rear admiral had not
been'in good health since his trium

phal return from his Arctic expedi expedition
tion expedition and subsequent controversy over
the discovery of the North Pole. He
had been fighting against an anaemic
Condition, which was only prolonged
by the transfusion of blood.
His first Arctic expedition was in
1886, at which time he went far into
Greenland; again in 1891 he headed
another expedition of explorers. Dur During
ing During the following years he made re repeated
peated repeated attempts to reach the Pole, but
it was not until April 6th, 1909, that
he led a small expedition to the cen-

Ford Repairs a Specialty
We Use Genuine Ford Parts in Our Ford Cars
Arco and Diamond Tires and Tubes

Gasoline, Oils and Grease

21MM M Mf MfMMt IMMMMij

ter of the world. The final dash,
lasting over five days, took the rear
admiral's party to and a short ways
beyond the North Pole, where Old
Glory was planted for the first time
in the history of the world.
Rear Admiral Peary was not a
graduate of the Naval Academy at
Annapolis, but he was a graduate of
Bowdoin College in 1877. He entered
the navy as a civil engineer in 1881.
He invented several appliances that
were used in naval construction and
the building of the locks of the Pan Panama
ama Panama canal.
Iu 1908 Rear Admiral Peary started
on his epoch-making voyage to the
northland. The vessel in which he

sailed was the Roosevelt. He pro proceeded
ceeded proceeded to the Kan Basin, through

Robeson Channel, and established his
winter base at Cape Sheridan Sept.
5th, 1908, which base he left in Feb February,
ruary, February, 1909, for Cape Columbia. Five
detachments were made up and one by
one they were sent back, until the
final dash was made by the rear ad admiral,
miral, admiral, a member of his crew and four
Eskimos. The final dash, which took
five days, was 130 miles at the termi termination
nation termination of which the life's dream of
Peary came true.
Thirty hours were spent at and
beyond the pole after which the re return
turn return to Cane Columbia was started.
For the discovery of the North
Pole Rear Admiral Peary was given
the thanks of Congress by a special
act and made a rear admiral and
showered with decorations and honors
from every nation in the world.

THE WTOPSOM HOTEL
K x JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
In the heart of the city with Hemming Park for a front yard.
Every modern convenience in each room. Dining room service ii

second to none
ROBERT M. MEYER,
Manager.

i
I
J. E. KAVANAUGO
Proprietor.

Robert Sumner and children were
business callers in Ocala Wednesday
morning.
BLITCHTON

Blitchton, April 21. Mr. Drew God Godwin
win Godwin is attending school in Madison.
Mr. Fenton Blitch visited our coun county
ty county seat Saturday.
Miss Opal Blitch and a party of
friends from Cedar Key spent Sun Sunday
day Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. B. R. Blitch.
Mr. J. B. George and Mr. Looris
Blitch attended a picnic at Lowell
Saturday.
Mrs. Ramsey and children, Miss
Eloise Ramsey and Mr. Fred Watson
of Gainesville, were Sunday guests of
Mr. J. J. Godwin and family.
Miss Glenner Godwin accompanied
Mrs. Ramsey home and will be her
guest for several weeks.
Messrs. Landis and Loonis Blitch
have purchased a Ford from the Ford
shop in Ocala.
Mr. A. B. Folks and Mr. Porter
Young of Juliette called Sunday.
Messrs. J. B. George, O. S. Sanders

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sminsiniimiiEnaiiismniiiiunii'UTr-inuir

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Buy Your g

WESTERN MEAST
of all kinds

FLORIDA BFEF, PORK, 1
POULTRY, ETC., I
from s B
m
New York Market j
W. Broadway jl
Phone 110 1
n
iwMiiiiiiiii.li)iiiii'iii.i.ie)in'tfiiirmrn'imtwm"f"Mr'Tf
m 1 hi "'".u-rt(...ifia""' u

and Landis Blitch visited the county
seat Monday morning.
Mr. and Mrs. A. G. McKay were
shopping in Ocala Monday.
Election day was rather quiet. There
were eleven votes for bonds and eight
against bonds.
MOSS BLUFF

Moss Bluff, April 20. Mr. Arthur
Davis arrived here last week from Al Alabama,
abama, Alabama, and he will make his future
home with us. Mrs. Davis and their
two daughters will join him here
soon.
The friends and relatives of Mrs. M.
O. Morrison" will be glad to know that
she is improvjig after several weeks
of severe illness.
Mr. and Mrs. John Wiley and daugh daughter
ter daughter of Leesburg, were visiting in our
midst Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. Otis Squires and fam family
ily family spent Wednesday the guests of Mr.
and Mrs. Albert Fort. Mr. Squires
has purchased a farm here and ex expects
pects expects to build as soon as they return
from Ohio this fall.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Griggs and
children were visiting relatives at
Electra Monday last.
Mr. Sidney Fort spent the week weekend
end weekend in Leesburg.
The many friends of Mrs. S. A. Mc Mc-Kinney
Kinney Mc-Kinney were saddened to learn of the
accident which occurred to her last
Thursday while returning home. Mrs.
McKinney was driving along, not
noticing where tho horse was going,
and all at once he got out of the road
and ran over a stump, throwing her
out. We wish for her a speedy re recovery.
covery. recovery. Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Rogers and
two pretty daughters, Margaret and
Jane Elizabeth, of. Lynne, spent Mon Monday
day Monday guests of Mr. and Mrs. Albert
Fort.
Rev. Colson will fill his regular ap appointment
pointment appointment here at the Christian
church Sundav morning and evening.

! Everyone is invited to' attend.

HUNTER'S Al)T0 EXCHANGE

V

1

ADDS PROTECTION
AND STYLE
To your car if we make that
new auto top for you.- The best
of materials and the most skill skillful
ful skillful workmanship result in pro producing
ducing producing a car top that is the
equal of any made anywhere, at
a higher price. Let us build for
you a one-man top, according
to your own ideas exclusive
design of quality.

TOPS New, covered, patched and coated with a patent wax paate
that makes old tops absolutely waterproof.
PAINTINC5 Autos painted, striped and. finished in the best of
material.
UPHOLSTERING We are prepared to give you satisfactory er er-vice
vice er-vice in upholstering backs, seats or cushions.
..TIRES; TUBES, GAS and OILS
LET US REPAIR, PAINT AND UPHOLSTER YOUR CAR, SO
YOU CAN ENJOY IT YOURSELF OR SELL TO ADVANTAGE.
AUTOS BOUGHT, SOLD and REPAIRED
Jo W. HUMTER
SOUTH MAGNOLIA STREET B7Ivi?Srl!l
HJCdld OLD METROPOLITAN THEATER a IU1 Itlct

A WO

.Fire
Proof

OTHBTE STAGS LOW

Negotiable Storage Receipts Issued on Cotton, Automobiles, Etc

MOVE, PACK, SHIP
LIVE STOCK,
PIANOS, BAGGAGE.
MACHINERY,
FURNITURE, ETC.

LONG DISTANCE MOVING
Pluoiue 296

Advertise and get Results

8



t

OCALA EVENING STAR, THURSDAY, APRIL 22, 1920

ft

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)4j

J. II. SPENCER

ri

We Make a Specialty of Parts for the Buick and
the Prices are Consistent with the Cost of Same.

GOODYEAR AND U. S.

Exclusive Agents for "VESTA" BATTERY, 18 Mo. Guarantee
An Up-to-Date Battery Service Station

We Maintain an Up-to-Date Garage with
Expert Workmen, at all times, Assuring
Prompt and Efficient Service

GASOLINE, OILS

OCALA GAS ENGINE-WORKS
PHONE 271
Ocala - - Florida

PYLES & PERKINS CO.
(Successors to E. C. Jordan & Co.)
Funeral Directors and Embalmers
Calls Answered Promptly, Day or Night
Motor Equipment

m

117 East Oklawaha Avenue

PHONE 555
STAR JOB
PHONE 51

. LETTERHEADS, BILLHEADS, CARDS,
CIRCULARS, FOLDERS, FINE BOOKLETS, ETC.

WE NEVER DISAPOINT A CUSTOMER ON A
PROMISE. YOU GET THE JOB WHEN ITS DUE.

THE TAMBOURINE GIRL

u-'iiiiWtifiiiMiii-'i1ifiiiiiMTifti,ini'ti1"ri'lif rtirt'TMrffni"irrinnf -iKintm ,--'-----'",i'-"'','v1 ':,iiMVTiif'"',wTtT-1iii'tifiiti

THE Doughnut Girl of wartime has doffed her khaki and donned the
familiar blue. Today she is serving just as valiantly as ever as The
Tambourine Girl of the city slums, the angel of the tenements and the
guardian of the poor. Instead of the doughboy, the poverty-stricken, the

distressed, the sick and the unfortunate know her now and call her blessed.
Oh, boy, she's still the Girl in peace as well as in war!

A

W. R. PEDRICK

AGENC
Y
TIRES AND TUBES
AND GREASE.

RESIDENCE PHONE 225

P. O. BOX 606

DEPARTMENT

Photo by Paul Parker, N. T.
Cdpmpll

(Go

OCALA

OCCURRENCES

If you have
phone five-one.
any society items,
The many friends of Mrs. A. G.
Moree are glad to learn of her im improvement
provement improvement after several weeks' illness.
Mr. Welsh Dewey, now a popular
traveling salesman, is in the city for
a few days viisting his parents, Mr.
and Mrs. J. R. Dewey.
Girl wanted at Kindt's music store.
Mrs. D. R. Connor is in Georgia vis visiting
iting visiting relatives. Mr. Connor, who ac accompanied
companied accompanied his wife as far as Jackson Jacksonville,
ville, Jacksonville, has returned home.
Remember I receive strawberries
every day. Leave your orders with me.
My prices are always right. W. A.
Stroud, west side of square. 22-tf
0
Mr. S. S. Smith returned early this
morning from Gainesville, where he
spent several days visiting his wife
and infant daughter, Eloise, who ar-
i rived only several weeks ago to their
home happy.
Mr. Lorenzo A. Wilson, president of
the Wilson-Toomer Fertilizer Com Company,
pany, Company, will arrive in'the city this after afternoon
noon afternoon from his home in Jacksonville,
to pay visits to the phosphate fields
in this section.
Don't fail to visit the Guarantee
Clothing & Shoe Company. Every Everything
thing Everything we sell is guaranteed. We're
I fighting for QUALITY not prices, tf
The many friends of Mrs. E. G.
Peek are glad to hear that her sister,
who hasbeen quite sick, is on the road
to recovery. Mrs. Peek will remain
in Wheeling, W. Va., with her sister
until she is further improved.
Messrs. Edward Green and White-
law McCuen will go to the lake to tomorrow
morrow tomorrow to be the guests of Mr. and
Mrs. McCuen for several days. Mr.
McCuen just recently purchased from
Mr. L. R. Chazal his handsome sum
mer home at Woodmar.
Six hundred ladies can get the
BIGGEST BARGAIN at Gerig's Spec
ial Sale. Come in and see for your
self. Gerig's Drug Store. 6-tf
Mrs. Philip Murphy and Mrs. J. R.
Dumas, who motored to Jacksonville
several days ago in the former's car,
to meet Mrs. Murphy's father-in-law,
Mr. Jerome Murphy of Massachu Massachusetts,
setts, Massachusetts, have returned home. They re report
port report an excellent trip and Mr. Mur Murphy
phy Murphy is already much taken with Flor Florida,
ida, Florida, and it is hoped after his visit
here he may decide to reside perma
nently.
Attention, mothers. Those boys'
Palm Beach pants have arrived.
22-3t RHEINAUER'S.
Mr. A. H. Hargraves arrived in the
city last night from Jacksonville to
take charge of the property that h
recently purchased from Mr. J. T.
Miller on Lime street. The property
consists of a residence and store build
ing, and Mr. Hargraves will- immed
iately open a retail grocery store. Mrs.
Hargraves will arrive from Jackson Jacksonville
ville Jacksonville in a few days to join her hus
band. ..Ocala welcomes -this family as
residents to the-city.
CARD OF THANKS
We wish to thank our maliy friends
and neighbors for their kind deeds
during the sickness and death of our
dear daughter and sister, and for the
beautiful remembrances of flowers.
May God's richest blessings rest upon
each and every one of them, is our
prayer. J. L. Hinton and family.
OF INTEREST TO ALL
TRAVELERS BY RAIL
The railroad commission has given
notice that there will be a special
session in the chamber of commerce
rooms, Jacksonville, on Thursday
morning, April 29, at 10 o'clock, to
consider the application of the Pull Pullman
man Pullman Company for an inerease in
sleeping and parlor car rates in Flor Florida.
ida. Florida. All parties who are rightfully
interested will be given an opportu opportunity
nity opportunity to be heard fully.
BARGAINS IN USED CARS
One 1917 Ford Touring.
One 1918 Ford Touring.
One 1919 Ford Roadster.
AUTO SALES CO.,
Mack Taylorl
Phone 348. tf Ocala. Fla.

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MIILJIRIP

IN HONOR OF MRS. MIMS

Mrs. Buena Wilson Minis was again
the honoree at a very delightful oc occasion
casion occasion yesterday. This courtesy to
Mrs. Mims was given by Mrs. Anna
M. Holder and it was in the nature
of a sightseeing motor trip to points
south. Thev visited Orlando and sev-
eral of the surrounding tourist towns
and at Clermont, where they spent a j
few hours at Clermont's popular club
house. About noon, at one of the
prettiest and most inviting spots on
this drive, Mrs. Holder served a pic picnic
nic picnic lunch which was most tempting
and appetizing.
Ther.e has been no visitor to Ocala
this winter who has received more
social attention that Mrs. Mims and
this affair yesterday was one of the
most enjoyable of them all. Mrs. Hol Holder's
der's Holder's other guests wers Mrs. E. L.
Carney and Mrs. H. M. Hampton.
PROGRAM FOR DEDICATION
OF MEMORIAL AVENUE
Music by Norland' band.
Opening prayer by Rev. Neighbour.
Introduction by Mrs-. Gary.
Presentation by Mrs. Walter Hood.
. Song by Mrs. Sara Jane Manly.
Speech by Mr. F. E. Harris.
Music by band.
Speech by Mr." L. W. Duval.
Lowering the flag by Annie Mac Mac-Kay
Kay Mac-Kay and A. T. Thomas Jr.
Prayer by Rev. C. W White.
Music by, the band.
Drill by fifteen young ladies with
Miss Blair, Woodrow as Columbia.
These dedication exercises will take
place at 5 o'clock Friday afternoon in
Tuscawilla Park. The Woman's Club
would be very grateful to the merch merchants
ants merchants if they will close their stores for
an hour that all way attend.
Mr. Ralph Johnson, the aviator, will
fly over Tuscawilla Park during, the
dedication program.
i i i ... .....
, i
xueips
? d Sick
CI) I p it
women
Cardui, the woman's
tonic, helped Mrs. Wil William
liam William Eversole, of Haiel
Patch," Ky. Read what
she writes: "1 had a
general breaking-down
0
J of my health. I was in
A bed for weeks, unable to
get up. I had such a
weakness and dizziness,
Cm m uiiu paitta mw
very severe. A friend
told me I had tried every- ) f
thing else, why not
Cardui? ... I did, and
soon saw it was helping
me After 12 bottles,
I am strong and well."
v) i
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The Woman's Tonic
Do you feel weak, diz dizzy,
zy, dizzy, worn-out? Is your
lack of good health caused
from any of the com complaints
plaints complaints so common to
women? Then why not
give Cardui a trial? It
should surely do for yon
what it has done for so
many thousands of other
women who suffered it
should help you back to
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Ask some lady friend
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She will tell you how it
helped her. Try Cardui.
All Druggists
Use the star's Unclassified Colamn.
Use the Star's Unclassined Column.
V
TTTT

11

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11 JL

PICNIC AT ROMEO
THURSDAY, MAY 6TH

Editor Star Answering an inquiry
from Mr. D. Njel Ferguson, chairman
of the itinerary committee for the
county, we choose the above date,
Thursday, May 6th, next, for an all-J
the various offices with us to set forth
their claims, and to mix and mingle
with the people of this community.
We understand from Mr. Ferguson
that this date is satisfactory to his
committee, so we beg leave to an announce
nounce announce that we will arrange to have
our pirtiic May the 6th, on Pine Isl Island
and Island picnic grounds, just one mile west
of Romeo on the southwest edve of the
lake.
This is a picnic for the public gen generally.
erally. generally. All are cordially invited to
come, so come, bring a pleasant smile,
an attentive ear and a big appetite
and something good to eat, if nothing
but a guava or a limburger sandwich.
Mr, Thomas E. Hutchins of this com community,
munity, community, will be on the grounds with
plenty of good cold refreshments,
ice cream and "happy gas" from soda
bottles, to keep your cool.
For the benefit of our timid Ocala
friends, beg to say that we have a
hard road within one mile of Romeo,
straight west via Martel and Cotton
Plant, so that big limousines, touring
cars, Fords and jitneys may reach this
beautiful picnic grounds with all ease
and grace, without rumpling a single
feather on a lady's hat.
Again we extend a cordial invita invitation
tion invitation to the public to be present and
participate in the pleasures and ben
efits of this day.
To our candidate friends we will
give you a cordial welcome, but may
ask you some pointed questions.
To our would-be legislators, your
position on:
The no-fence law.
Compulsory- cattle dipping.
Good roads and where.
Education.
Taxation, etc.
inese men will be cnosen from a
standpoint of issues they represent.
County judges from their creden
tials, with and beauty.
Superintendents from a standpoint
of age, experience arid accomplish
ments.
Clerks from the size of their fam
ilies or natural claims to office.
Tax assessors from length and
readth.
County commissioners from a net
work of hard roads.
Sheriffs from their ability to evade
Catts.
School board, justices and consta
bles well, just the best way we can.
Everybody come, cheerful and pleas
ant, and go away happier and wiser.
We understand that the Banner has
made an error in the place where this
picnic is to be, naming Cooter Pond
near Morriston, instead of Pine Isl
and, at Romeo. We would like to
change the impression any one may
have gotten as to the place. Remem
ber, the picnic will be at Romeo in
stead of Cooter Pond.
We will endeavor to have some of
the distinguished from other parts of
the state with us on this occasion.
Thanking you for all courtesies and
for your kind presence in advance, I
beg to remain. Very cordially,
W. O. Brewer,
Chairman Romeo Picnic.
PICNIC AT LAKE KERR
Lake Kerr, April 20.
Wewish to announce that there wil
be a picnic and fish fry at Salt
Springs, in honor of the closing of the
Lake Kerr school, next Friday, Apri
30th. Everybody invited to come and
bring full baskets, and candidates
especially invited. R. L. Brinson.
ITINERARY OF THE CANDIDATES
April 24 (Connor's dock) Oklawaha
all day.
April 30. Fort McCoy, 2:30 p. m.
Slay 6th, Romeo (Pine Island picnic
grounds), all day.
Other places to be announced later.
TAYLOR THE HAT 3IAN
At Florida House. Your old hat made
like new. Save money. Call me on
telephone. 20-t
SEEDS!
Ninety day and old fashion velvet
beans, chufas, cow peas and sorghum
seed. Ocala Seed Store, phone 435. tf
j
AIRPLANE RIDE
For $30 Thursday a round trip to
Leesburg. Same for Saturday, to
Gainesville, where the Shriners will
held a big 'convention. 21-2t
Ladies' hats and dresses at the
Elite Shop, Ocala, House, opposite
courthouse. 17-6t
N

Y 2allai9 FIl(D)ipfi(fflsi

FOR SALE
40 Acres of land with within
in within three miles of court courthouse,
house, courthouse, northeast of town
$450-00
F. W. DITTO

Sec Me
For All Classes Oi
Stone, Brick, Wood,
and Concrete I
Building I
I D. McCasluli j
Contractor t
Phone 446. 72S Weaon St S
To show our confidence in the AUTO
STROP SAFETY RAZOR wc allow
you to use it thirty days on trial, free.
You are the sole judge as to whether
it gives satisfaction or not.
Price 85.00
Each razor is enclosed in a substan substantial
tial substantial case, embossed nickle, leather, or
embossed polished gunmetaL Can be
adjusted to any beard. Let us show
you this little marveL
THE COURT PHARMACY
Ocala, Fla.
1
Call Five One Nine
The Old Reliable
Quick Delivery
Steak ..35d.
Loin Steak 40-45c
Pork Chop! ...85c
Roast ...... SOc
Big Roast 25c
Stew 15c
Fish, Oysters and Seasoning
Green Groceries
J: D. BawMits
111 BROADWAY
JftkSMYilLE-fLA,
heart of City Send for Booklet
79 wsuusnrrH.PROp-R
RAILROAD SCHEDULES
Arrival and Departure of passensrer
trains at OCALA UNION STATION.
The following schedule figures pub published
lished published as information and not soar-
(Eastern Standard Time)
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILROAD
Leave Arrive
2:15 am Jacksonville-NTork 2:10 1
1:55 pm
4:C5pm
2:15 am
2:15 am
1:50 pm
Jacksonville
1:20 pa
Jacksonville
Manatee Manatee-St.
St. Manatee-St. Petersburg
Tampa-Manatee
4:25 pa
2:15 am
3:85 pa
1:55 pa
4:25 pm Tampa-St. P'tersbrz 4:05 pa
ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD
Leave Arrive
2:12 pm Jacksonville-N'York 3:15 aa
1:45 pm JTcsonville-Ga'naville 3:S5 pa
6:42 am J'ksonville-G'nesvile 10:13 pa
3:18 am St.Pet'abrg-Lakeland 2:12 aa
3:35 pm StPet'sbre-Lakeland 1:25 pa
7:10 am DunneDon-Wilcox
:25 am Dun'ellon-LTcelnd 11:03 pa
3:25 pm Homosassa 1:30 pa
10:13 pm Leesburg 6:42 aa
4:45 pm Gainesville .11:50 aa
ilonday, Wednesday, Friday.
Tuesday, Thursday. Saturday.



OCALA EVENING STAR, THURSDAY, APRIL 22, 1920

GCALA FRATERNAL ORDERS

ODD FELLOWS
I
j

Tulula Lodge No. 22, I. O. O. F., j of town. Mr. Howard was a well well-meets
meets well-meets every Tuesday evening in the : liked man, popular with a large circle
Odd Fellows' hall on the third floor of 1 of friends and by his death we have
the old Star office building at 7:30 p. lost a good man who will be greatly
n. A warm welcome always extended j missed. He is survived by his wife,

o visiting brothers.
C. W. Moremen, N. G.
W. L. Colbert, Secretary.
MIRIAM KEBEKAIi LODGE NO. 15
Miriam Rebekah Lodge No. 15
meets the first and third Monday eve evening
ning evening in each month in the Occ Fel Fellows'
lows' Fellows' hall at 7:30 o'clock.
Miss Ruth Ervin, N. G.
Miss Ruth Hardee. Secretary.
KNIGHTS OF PVTIIIAS
Ocala, Lodge No. 19. Conventions
held every Monday evening at 7:30
o'clock at the Castle Hall over the G.
C. Greene Co. drugstore. A cordial
welcome to visiting brothers.
V W. .M. Parker, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage, K. of R. & S.
OCALA LODGE NO. 286, B. P. O. E.
Ocala Lodge No. 286, Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, meets
the second and four Tuesday eve evenings
nings evenings of each month. Visiting breth brethren
ren brethren always -welcome. Lodge rooms
upstairs over Troxler's and the Book
Shop, 113 Main street.
C. Y. Miller, E. R.
E. J. Crook, Secretary.
MARION-DUNN MASONIC LODGE
Marion-Dunn Lodge No. 19, F. & A.
Mv meets on the first and third
Thursday evenings of each month at
7:30 o'clock until further notice.
Jake Brown, Secretary.
A. L. Lucas, W. M.
WOODMEN OF THE WORLD
Fort King Camp No. 14 meets at
K. of P. hall at 7:30 p. m. every sec second
ond second and fourth Friday. Visiting sov sovereigns
ereigns sovereigns are always welcome.
, J. C. Bray, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage, Clerk.
ORDER OF EASTERN STAR
Ocala Chapter No. 29, O. E. S.,
meets at the Masonic hall the second
and fourth Thursday evenings of each
month at 8 o'clock.
Mrs. Lillian Simmons, W. M.
Mrs. Susan Cook, Secretary.
l. A. M. CHAPTER No. 13
. Regular convocations of the Ocala
Chapter No. 13 R. A. M., on the fourth
Friday in every month at 8 p. m.
H. S. Wesson, H.T. H.T.Jake
Jake H.T.Jake Brown, Secretary:
ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE
OF TRAINS IN OCALA
Seaboard Air Line
Arrive from Jacksonville.. 2:09 a. m
? Leave for Tampa. 2:10 a. m.
Arrive from Jacksonville.. 1:30p.m.
Leave for Tampa 1 :50 p. m
Arrive from Jacksonville.. 4:24 p. m
Leave for Tampa......... 4:25p.m.
Arrive from Tampa. ..... 2:14 a. m.
Leave for Jacksonville. ... 2:15 a. m.
, Arrive from Tampa 1:35 p.m.
Leave for Jacksonville . . 1 :55 p. m.
Arrive from Tampa 4:04 p.m.
' Leave for Jacksonville.... 4:05p.m.
Atlantic Coast Line
Amve from Jacksonville.. 3:14a. m
Leave for St. Petersburg.. 3:15a.m.
Arrive from Jacksonville.. 3:34p.m.
Leave i for St. Petersburg.. 3:35p.m.
Arrive from Jacksonville. .10:12 p. m.
Leave for Leesburg 10:13p.m.
Arrive from ot. Petersburg 2:11a.m.
Leave for Jacksonville. . 2:12 a. m.
Arrive from St. Petersburg 1:25 p.m.
Leave for Jacksonville 1:45 p.m.
Arrive from Leesburg.... 6:41a.m.
Leave for Jacksonville. ... 6:42 a. m.
Arrive from Homosassa. . 1.25 p. m.
Leave for Homosassa 3:25 p.m.
Arrive irom Gainesville,
daily except Sunday. . 11 :50 a. m
Leave for Gainesville, daily
except Sunday 4:45 p.m.
Leave lor Lakeland, Tues
day, Thursday, Saturday 7:25 a. m.
Ar. Irom .Lakeland. Tues
day, Thursday, Saturday 11:03 p. m.
ieave lor Wilcox, Monday,
Wednesday and Friday.. 7:10a.m.
Arrive from Wilcox. Mon
day. Wednesday, Friday. 6:45 p. m.j

19S4 Everett Touring, $150
1919 Chevrolet, 500
1915 Ford Touring, 250
1919 Cleveland Roadster, 850
1918 Maxwell Light Truck, 350

Phone

JAMES HOWARD

Mr. James Howard died at 8:30
o'clock this morning at the home of
his parents, two and a half miles south
mother and father and several sisters
and brothers. His remains will be
forwarded tomorrow aftemon over the
Seaboard to Russell, Ky., where inter interment
ment interment will take place. Pyles & Per Perkins
kins Perkins have charge of the funeral ar
rangements.
FARM NOTES BY
THE COUNTY AGENT
Cultivated plants need three con-
ditiens in the soil in order for them
to thrive. The presence of moisture J
in the right amount; the presence of
oxygen of the air, and the presence of
the proper temperature. If any one j
of these is totally lacking no plant
can grow, and a deficiency of any one
will cause a poor growth. To main
tain these conditions for the growing
nlant is the Drimarv Dumose of all

cultivation. If the soil is not stirred George and Mrs. S. E. Steen of Mor Mor-nronerlv
nronerlv Mor-nronerlv and freauentlv the moisture riston were shoppers in town this

escapes, the air is shut out and the
earth fails to warm up.
Cultivation, then, is mainly to pro-
duce the conditions in the soil most
favorable to the growth of the crops
tilled and not, as is so commonly sup-
posed, for the purpose of killing
grass. Grass-killing .is more an in-

cident, or secondary matter, in cul-las

tivation than an object. Proper till
ae will Drevent the erowth of crass
and the working of a crop simply to
destroy grass should never have to be I
done. Of course, in times of con continued
tinued continued rains when the grass gets be be-vond
vond be-vond the use of harrows and cultiva
tors it mav be necessary to resort to
the use of plows in a way to do the
most damaere to the crass. But this
will not occur often with the careful
and painstaking farmer.
With the right idea as to the pur purpose
pose purpose of cultivation in mind, it will not
be difficult to decide what method of
working the corn crop is best. If the
land was stirred deeply just previous
to planting, shallow cultivation should
be the rule with every working. But,
if the soil was plowed sometime before
planting, or has become packed by
heavy rains since, the first working
should be deep and done before the 1
plants develop much of a root system,
From them on tillage should be shal-
low and irequent. To go deep will
damage the crop by breaking the
roots and by turning up the soil to
dry out rapidly. To work the crop
only occasionally will allow the mois-
ture to escape by capillary attraction,
will permit grass to grow and will
cKuse tne plant sto suner ior iacK oi
air. Those who have never investi-
gated the root system of the corn
plant can hardly realize how exten-
sive it is and how important it is to
work deep after the crop is up as
much as twelve inches hieh. As a

rule the roots at all stages of the Knoblock, .Martin; Mrs. W. P. Will Will-plant's
plant's Will-plant's growth are longer than the iamson, Lake Kerr; Mrs. S. J. Martin
stalk is tall, and near maturity the and baby, Moss Bluff; Mrs. E. H. Gore
whole soil is a complete network of and Mrs. W. H. Fore, Lacota; Mrs.
roots and rootlets. The farmer who Letchia Walker, Mantel; Mrs.. C. E.
uses the turn plow m the final culti- Lucius and Mrs. A. H. Angus, Charter
vation of his corn certainly fails to Oak; Mrs. E. S. Stephens and Mrs. E.

appreciate these facts. His corn
"fires" and he wonders what the trou
ble is and why his crop failed to yield
well after promising so much. To
avoid such disappointments care
should be used to work the crop not
to exceed three inches deet after the
first cultivation and not that deep un
V - -

less the cultivation can be repeated Before and after the exercises to to-every
every to-every eight or ten days.' Where the morrow there will be an exhibit and
practice is to get over the crop every sale of water color paintings at the
two or three weeks the shallower Woman's Club house done by the
depth of two inches is to be preferred, painting class under the auspices of
But fjor the final working, when the the chairma nof art, Mrs. G. W. Mar Mar-silks
silks Mar-silks are showing, one inch is safest, tin. The proceeds from this sale will
This, though, is hardly possible with be given for the memorial tablet
the implements ordinarily used, but it which is to be placed at the entrance
certainly will pay to go this depth as of the avenue. The tablet will bear
nearly as possible. thenames of all on the Womanls Club

Right now is the time to think
about the second plantings of vege
tables in the warden. There is no need
to let the weeds have the garjden when
the crops now growing have been
harvested. Keen un the nlantinf of
corn every two or three weeks till
' jj- C7 i
June and put in another planting of
beans, okra and peas.
Wm. A. Sessoms,
County Agent.
a
LT
71

LATEST LOCALS

Temperature this morning, 70; this
afternoon, 88.
Mr. Morris E. Robinson is in the city
in the interest of Star brand shoes.
Miss Isabel Burton of Sparr is
spending two weeks at New Smyrna
beach with friends.
Attention, mothers. Those
Palm Beach pants have arrived
boys'
22-3t RHEINAUER'S.
Mr. B. F. Morrison is reported to be
. a, i t
beter alter a weeK s illness anu ex
pects to be out in a short time.
Mr. John Long, the efficient super
intendent of the Gainesville light
and power plant, was in town today,)
interviewing his numerous friends.
Remember I receive strawberries
every day. Leave your orders with me.
My prices are always right. W. A.
Stroud, west side of square. 22-tf
Mrs. Florence George, Mrs. J. B
George and daughter, Miss Ruth
morning
Mr. W. C. Credle, candidate for tax
assessor, was in town yesterday. He
drives a rusty, battered, democratic
Ford, and if he can run as fast as a
candidate as he can make that little
Ford travel, his opponents had might
well quit
Special sale beginning Monday. A
sixty-cent jar Coco Butter Cold
Cream and a fifty-cent box Charmona
Face Powder, both for 63
'Gerig's Drug Store.
cents
6-tf
at
State Treasurer Luning and State
Superintendent Sheats have been in
the city yesterday and today. Both
these gentlemen have a great many
Iriends, who are glad to see them per
sonally as wTell as candidates. Both
have been faithful in their work for
the state
The ".Ease-All" arch protecting
shoes and the Dr. Edison Cushion
Shoes are to be had at only one store
in Ocala: For ladies only. Little's
Shoe Parlor. 15-tf
Everybody in Ocala who knew "Lit
tie Joe" McCorkle will be saddened to
hear of his passing, away at his home
in Atlanta Monday. Joe was a very
bright and reliable boy, and a life
time of success seemed assured him
He was only 21 years old. The Star
joins their other friends in sympathy
for the, bereaved relatives.
i uememoer i receive strawDerries
every day. Leave your orders with me.
j My prices are always right. W. A.
Stroud, west side of square. 22-tf
-The following were among yester-
day's visitors in town: Mrs. J. H
L. Kicker, bparr.
Give your feet a chance to help you
alonig m the world. If they trouble
you in any way have them examined
free.. M. M. Little, graduate practi-
pedist. 15-tf
service flag.
Sixty-three cents buys the bear
Cold Cream and one of the best Face
Powders on the market. Special sale
price at Gerig's Drug Store. 6-tf
The Woman's Auxiliary of the Mar Marion
ion Marion County Hospital held a very in interesting
teresting interesting and profitable meeting yes yesterday
terday yesterday afternoon at the Ocala House.
The making of some bedsheets, wipes
and bandages was accomplished but
as there is considerable necessary and
proper attention to be given the hos hospital,
pital, hospital, more members should be enroll enrolled
ed enrolled for this auxiliary stands for one of
the best causes and every citizen in
Marion county should be affiliated
with this splendid work.
W. K. Lane, M. D., Physician and
Surgeon, specialist Eye, Ear, Nose and
Throat. Office over 5 and 10 cent store,
Ocala, Fla. tf
SEEDS
i
, Ninety day and old fashion velvet
beans, chufas, Pyles and Gist seed
corn. Ocala Seed Stpre, phone 435. tf
.
STORE FOR RENT
The store room in the Merchants'
clock now occupied by Pillans &
Smith Grocery Co. will be for rent
about May 1st. R. R. Carroll, Agt. tf
Six hundred ladies can get the
BIGGEST BARGAIN at Gerig's Spec Special
ial Special Sale. Come in and see for your yourself.
self. yourself. Gerig's Drug Store. 6-tf
Star unclassified ads. turn the trick.

YESTERDAYS FLIGHTS

That clever Lieut. Johnson was
seen all over the skies yesterday for
the greater part of the afternoon, and
the following were some who took
flights: Mr. Robert Parks and Mrs. T.
C. Carter had straight flights, while
Mr. Parker Painter enjoyed the thrills
of most of Lieut. Johnson's repertoire.
This afternoon Lieut. Johnson accom accompanied
panied accompanied by Mr. D. W. Tompkins flew to
Leesburg to spend several hours. To Tomorrow
morrow Tomorrow afternoon, Lieut. Johnson will
fly over Tuscawilla Park during the
dedication exercises about 5 o'clock
and drop bouquets of flowers through throughout
out throughout the grounds.
CANDIDATES
File with clerk not less than twenty
days before primary:
1st. Oath on form furnished by
democratic executive committee.
2nd. Receipt for democratic ex-
ecutive committee assessment.
3. Pay filing fee to clerk.
Do these foregoing things at the
same time.
Statements
First statement to be handed clerk
not less than twenty-five nor more
than thirty days before primary.
Second statement to be handed clerk
not less than eight nor more than
twelve days before primary.
Third statement to be handed clerk
not more than ten days after primary.
Primary is June 8th, 1920.
SHADY
Shady, April 21. Ml. and Mr.
Will Woods and Miss Jessie Woods
visited Mr. and Mrs. James Brown at
Stanton Sunday afternoon.
Miss Pearl Hogan of Ocala is visit visiting
ing visiting her sister, Mrs. Otis Gaskin this
week.
J. M. Douglas and Mrs. J. J. Knob Knob-lock
lock Knob-lock and Miss Mary Knoblock of
Weirsdale and Eastlake made a short
call here Monday afternoon.
Mr. Dexter Phillips, who is attend attending
ing attending Georgia Tech in Atlanta, called on
relatives here Friday.
B. J. Woods, who has been in Baker
county for the past two or three
months, is at home again.
Miss Vivian Douglas is boarding in
Ocala for the remainder of the school
term.
Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Jones and Miss
Mary Frances Jones went to Orlando
Saturday and returned v Sunday after afternoon.
noon. afternoon. All relatives and friends who have
loved ones buried at Blue Sink, or
sometimes called Gibson cemetery,
are requested by Mrs. Martha Goin to
meet there the 29th of this month and
have a cemetery working. It is desir desired
ed desired that dinner be carried and suitable
tools to work with.
The young people enjoyed Sunday
evening at Miss Ida Perkins home,
singing and chatting till a late hour.
The fourth Sunday is Rev. C. W.
White s regular preaching day
Olivet church. Everybody is invited
to come, at 3 o'clock.
We don't know whether weazels are
common anywhere else or -not, but we
had never seen one till one day lait
week when one was killed here after a
vain effort to catch him alive. The
weazel put up a fight rather surpris surprising
ing surprising for so small an animal. We are
told it is difficult to build a chicken
coop or house they can't get into and
they kill several fowls before leaving,
just suck a little blood from each fowl.
Makes us feel dubious about the coh
vention of preachers being supplied
with chickens, heretofore mentioned,
if there be many weazels abroad this
spring.
English Town Has Woman
To Spy on Profiteers
London. Bennondiey is the
first community In England to
employ a profiteer hunter a
woman. She receives a salary
of $20 weekly and her work con consists
sists consists of making purchases and
inquiries and instituting pro proceedings
ceedings proceedings against dealers who
charge unreasonable prices.
Aged Voter Walks and Works.
Newark, O. Rev. George B. Bald Bald-,win,
,win, Bald-,win, eighty-thsee years of age, cele celebrated
brated celebrated his birthday aniversary the oth other
er other day by walking six miles to his
farm, husking 0 bushels of corn and
walking back to the city in time to
cast a ballot at the election booth.
A MISREPRESENTED RACE.
The Filipino people are a much mis misrepresented
represented misrepresented race. The frequent pub publication
lication publication of pictures of semi-naked Min Mindanao
danao Mindanao Moros ami Igorotes has caused
a great manyftiericans to believe
they are typical of the inhabitants of
the Philippines. Such Is far from the
case, however. Of 11,000,000 inhab inhabitants
itants inhabitants of the islands,. 10,500,000 are a
Christian, civilized people with a cul culture
ture culture and refinement that will compare
very favorably with that of other na nations.
tions. nations. The Filipino women are excep exceptionally
tionally exceptionally modest. A street flirtation In
Manila, so far as a Filipino woman is
concerned, is something that is almost
unknown, as any American that has
visited Manila will testify.
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTER
AND BUILDER
Careful Estimates maSe on all Con Contract
tract Contract work. Gives More and Better
Work for the Money than any other
rontractbr in the city.

LED TO FORTUNE

Pierre's Long Trail of
Tip Rewarded
Sliver
Determined Hunter Trailed Bear Over
Miles of Snow, and Finally Stum Stumbled
bled Stumbled On and Killed Valuable
Arctic Fox.
Of all fur-bearing animals, none la
eo highly prlxed by the trapper and
patron as the silver fox of the arctic
circle. So rare are the that hunters
do not devote themselves exclusively
to the pursuit, but the story of Pierre
Baptiste of that far country Is pe peculiarly
culiarly peculiarly thrilling, as it recounts how
one of these animals fell before his
trusty rifle while he was on the trail
of a marauding bear which had been
devastating his traps. The Hunter Hunter-TradeVTrapper
TradeVTrapper Hunter-TradeVTrapper of Columbus, O., tells
the story, as repeated by Robert E.
Hewes.
"When Pierre Baptiste swore to trail
Silver Tip down, he did so with a full
realization of what he was swearing
to do. But the fiery blood that ran In
Pierre's veins when aroused knew no
cooling till Justice was done," says
Mr. Hewes. "And so with his lips set
firmly and a light of determination
burning In his eyes, he took up the
trail of Sliver Tip the sworn Nemesis
of that outlaw of the North.
"Two hours later Pierre stopped.
The last blur of the timber line had
melted away behind him and on the
north and on all sides stretched in interminable
terminable interminable snow. Pierre was sweat
ing from his superexertlon and during
the momentary rest his clothes- froze
to boardlike stiffness. His legs were i
dog-weary and even the weight of his j
rifle seemed tons, hut still the bear's
trail led on and on Into those God- J
forsaken regions.
"After a while, Pierre began to lose
sense of time. He just plodded aog-
gedly ahead, his eyes gluea to me
bear's trail. He knew1 he was getting
far, far Into the arctic regions. That
a bear should wander so far again
he marveled.
Pierre halted, dropped to his knees
and stared at something. Hairs, ne
cqto that iha 1 crcprfl odcre of the Ice

had pulled from the bear as he clam-' aret McNeil at star 0ffice. Re Re-bered
bered Re-bered over but they were white! ward. 21-6t

white as the snow itself He, Pierre
Baptiste, was trailing a bear that
knew no boundary of snow and ice. A
ohm -wind heean to creeD over me
snow wastes,' and Pierre's snow snow-shoes
shoes snow-shoes seemed to be tugging to drag
him down. But had he not sworn to
trail down Silver Tip?
"Within an eighth of a mile, Pierre
saw something moving, a lumbering
figure plodding over the snow, a figure
brown-haired and with a silver nose
and a splash of white on the belly as
the snow-dragged. A smile of grim sat satisfaction
isfaction satisfaction cracked Pierre's frosted fea features
tures features as he slipped off his mitten and
raised his rifle to his 'shoulder.
"As Pierre pressed his cheek against
the stock of his rifle he thought he
saw something out of the corner of
SSrSS e' Usnow
n Kn rr rs eves
, "r:r
couiu reacn mens sucitucu
white barrens. The only living thing
besides himself, was that lumbering
ball of brown. Something, the barest
bit of a glimpse had drawn his atten attention,
tion, attention, but he saw no moving thing other
than the bear.
Eet ees so rer" funny, muttered
Pierre, and prepared to raise his rifle
determinedly. Hien, on a ridge, ana
the color of the Ice It moved against,
he saw something move. One moment
he stared, and his keen 'eyes distin distinguished
guished distinguished the silver fox from Its Icy
background.
"With steellike steadiness Pierre
raised his rifle and sighted. A spurt
of flame cracked the frosty air and
shattered the white silence into a mil million
lion million echoes. The next moment Pierre
was stumbling madly, across the snow
to where a growing red blotch showed
clearer than the fox. The trapper
fell to his knees by the dead animal
and examined It most reverently, run running
ning running his fingers through the silky fur
with the tenderness of a connoisseur.
Fortune of fortunes! There was not
even a blemish; the bullet had passed
into the brain, through the eye.
Explorers Will Travel Far.
n. A. Snow, Oakland (Cal.) natural naturalist,
ist, naturalist, accompanied by his son, Sidney
Snow; Donald Keyes, a writer, and
Frank S. Wilton, a camera man, are
on their way from San Francisco to
collect big game specimens and Alms
of obscure natrve tribes In Africa and
Asia.
They will Join Leslie M. Simpson and
Kenneth Qunlnan In Africa, both Oak Oakland
land Oakland men, who have been on that con continent
tinent continent since May, preparing the expe expedition
dition expedition that the rest will Join In Cape
Town.
They purpose to traverse Africa from
the Cape to the Sudan, terminating
their Journey by a boat trip down the
whole length of the Nile. Thence they
expect to enter Asia, returning to the
United States by way of Siberia. They
hope to obtain specimens of the Man Man-churian
churian Man-churian tiger. ;
Yakima Indtani Run a Bank.
At Wapato, Yakima county, Wash Washington,
ington, Washington, Is perhaps the only bank In the
United States owned and controlled by
Indians. The American Commercial
bank in the center of the Yakima In Indian
dian Indian reservation, was established
a!: out a year ago and Is on a solid j
financial basis, doing an exceptionally
good business. All of its officers and
directors, with the exception of the

UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS

WANTED. LOST. FOUND, FOR
SALE, FOR RENT AND SIM SIM-,
, SIM-, ILAR LOCAL NEEDS
RATES Six line maximum, one
time, 25c. ;three times, 50c; six times
75c.; one month $3. Payable in ad ad-varce.
varce. ad-varce. WANTED To rent a small furnished
cottage or rooms for housekeeping.
Apply to Mrs. Mary Chambers, 19
Herbert St., or phone 242. 22-6t
WANTED To buy for cash second secondhand
hand secondhand show case. A. H. Hargraves. 807
South Lime street. 22-3t
FOR RENT Three rooms for light
housekeeping. Private bath and gas.
Apply at 40i) E. Oklawaha avenue or
phone 559. 22-3t'
FOR SALE Two mules, one dray,
one surry. Apply to Jake Brown,
Ocala, Fla. j 22-6t
CLEANING AND PRESSING You
can get the best service in town by
having us clean and press your
clothes. Ladies work a specialty. The
Arcade Pressing Club, phone 448. 22m
FOR RENT Cottaces on Lake Weir.

completely furnished. Rates reason-
able. Apply to J.' H. Jacoby, Weirs- A,

dale, Fla. 4-22-6t
FOR SALE Pair of mules 4 years
form wag0n scales, double beam,
Blowers Lime & Phos Co. 22-6t
HORSE FOR SALE Bay horse six
years ol(L weigh't about 1000 pounds:
perfectly sound. S. P. Burton. Sparr.
Fla.
22-2t
LOST Blue Coat with two pair of
eiaa.ea. fountain nen and a bottle of
i medjcine. Address, C. M. Bailey, 207
j ast Qak Lakeland. Fla. 21-3t
;
LOST On Silver Springs road, black

bag containing blue wool Jersey bathW
: j r 4.'nr. f

FOR SALE Horse and buggy. Call
c H. Stuart, 115 Magnolia street,
printing office.
21-Ct

FOR RENT Desirable offices or
storage space on second floor of the,'si

Merchant's block. R. R. Carroll,
agent. t 21-Gt '". ')
WANTED One National cash reg register
ister register with five or six separate draw drawers.
ers. drawers. Mayo-Lyles Store, Summerfield,
Fla. k 20-5t
FOR SALE Boilers, engine, five
locomotives, one hundred tons scrap
iron, etc. Send representative to
Ehren, Fla. Landeck Lumber Cora-
; pany. 20-6t ;
FOR RENT-ComfortabiTIo:
, nS rooms, close in, good location. Ad-
dress "L" care of Star. 16-6t
FOR SALE One mare 6 years old,
colt eight months old. Apply to New
York Meat Market, 18 W. Broadway,-
Ocala. 4-8-15t
HADSOCK'S WOOD YARD Phon
your orders to Smoak's shop. Phone
146. 2-m
FURNITURE, ETC. 1 buy and e!l
second hand furniture. Experts put it
in good condition before re-selling.
Repair sewing machines, lawn mow-"
ers, enamel ware, etc. J. W. Hunter,
310, 312, 314 South Main St. 23-tf
WANTED Rags,
laundered; 5 cents
oifice.
Must be
a pound.
7-tf
AUTO SERVICE Automobiles
paired, re-painted and re-covered.
Also a complete line of gas, oils and
grease. Firestore tires. Meadows Re-
paii Shop, 735 N. Magnolia St. 7-lm
BARGAIN IN BUICK 4 ROADSTER
Buick "4"
Good tires.
roadster in good shape.
AUTO SALES CO.,
Mack Taylor.
Phone 348. Ocala. Fla. 12-t
A BARGAIN
18 ROOM HOUSE
W?iThlTh iT A IT TCI
To Close Out Estate
Located on quarter-acre
lot one block from Post Post-office,
office, Post-office, cheap at $3000. Price
will be reduced $10 per dayA
until sold.

well
Star O

re

PRICE TODAY $2410i:

If interested see me at once
FRANK W. DITTO
Reaf Estate Ocala, Fla.

i

t
i



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