The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:05510

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Weather Forecast: Generally fair to tonight
night tonight and Wednesday with slowly ris rising
ing rising temperature; light frost prob probably
ably probably tonight north and central portion.

PRESIDENT 18
PREPARING
To Organize the Tribunal Provided for
in Railroad Bill to Deal With
Wages and Conditions
(Associated Treas)
Washington, March 2. President
Wilson is preparing to set up the tri

bunal provided for in the railroadTlars was done to the fruit and vege-

bill to consider the wage demands of
t two million railroad men. He is writ writing
ing writing union and railroad heads asking
them to nominate representatives for
the wage board.
LEGISLATION FOR EX-SERVICE
MEN
Washington, March 2 Commander
D'Olier, and other American Legion
officers, today recommended to the
House ways and means committee
soldier relief legislation in the form
of land settlements, aid to encoiyaage
home purchases, vocational training
and adjustment of compensation
based on the length of service for
those not desiring to avail themselves
of the other three features.
NO MORE FREE SEED
On the recommendation of the sec secretary
retary secretary of agriculture, the Senate ag ag-,
, ag-, riculture committee has eliminated
the appropriation for congressmen to
distribute free seed to their consti constituents.
tuents. constituents. VICE SQUAD WAS VILE
The Senate naval committee today
. ordered a full investigation immed immed-iatefy
iatefy immed-iatefy of the indecent practices of the
naval intelligence vice squad at the
naval training station at Newport.
WILL GIVE IT A TRIAL
Washington, Match 2 The railroad
unions are understood to have voted
to give the new railroad a trial in the
settlement of wage demands, remov removing
ing removing for a time danger of a strike.
PAID THE PENALTY
James Henry Jackson, a negro, was
hanged today for murdering Miss Lil Lilian
ian Lilian Hood, a war worker of Browns Brownsville,
ville, Brownsville, Tenn., who surprised him rob-
bing a boarding house a year ago.
END OF DENIKINE'S
ARMY NOT FAR OFF
(Associated Press)
London, March 2. Denikine's army
is trapped in the Kuban peninsula,
southeast of the Azov sea, is claimed
by a soviet official statement, which
says the First Kuban corps was an annihilated.
nihilated. annihilated. WILL NOT ASK FOR
A THIRD TERM
To the People of Marion County:
Altho' I have .received assurances
of strong support, making my re reelection
election reelection practically certain, I have de decided
cided decided that I will not again ask the
people for the office of county judge.
I have been twice elected to this
office and will have served eight
years when my present term ends. I
am grateful to the people for the
honor they have bestowed on me;
also, for the appreciation so frequent frequently
ly frequently shown that proves to me that' I
have filled the office to the satisfac satisfaction
tion satisfaction of the great majority. With
thanks to all my friends and good
wishes to the man who they may
select to succeed me, I am,
Sincerely, Wm. E. Smith.
MEETING OF VETERANS
Marion Camp No. 56, U. C. V., met
March 2nd, 1920, with W. E. McGah McGah-agin,
agin, McGah-agin, commanding.
The following comrades answered
tc roll call: Alfred Ayer, F. E. Har Harris,
ris, Harris, W. E. McGahagin, B. N. Norris,
C. C. Priest, G. R. Smith, M. P. Frink,
John Pasteur, I. P. Stevens, J. C.
Trantham.
Minutes of last meeting read and
adopted.
After paying camp dues for 1920
the camp adjourned.
Alfred Ayer, Adjutant.
Come in and get a few hyacinth
bulbs. Court Pharmacy. Phone 284. 6t
Don't fail to see Ned, the largest
elephant in captivity, 11 feet 4 inches
tall and weighs 8300. M. T. Clark &
Sons' Show, Ocala, March 4. 2-
OOP 2
OAK and PINE
Cut to Any Length
PROMPT DELIVERY
GILESW00D YARD
PHONE 112

W

FLORIDA STUNG
BY TIE FRO

SI

Damage Done to Fruit and Vegetables
in Southern Part of State Over
Five Million Dollars
(Ar.soeiatod Press)
Miami, March 2. Damage esti estimated
mated estimated at more than five million dol-
table fields in South Florida by the
extremely low temperature of la3t
night. The vegetable fields north of
Miami were virtually" wiped out and
damage south of the city is reported
Thermometers regis
tered 34 HelgresTfctTfe"irft!ii.i -. cri cri-perature
perature cri-perature ,on record here.
PALMER SEEKS THE
NOMINATION FOR PRESIDENT
Attorney General Announced His
Candidacy in a Telegram to
Georgia Democrats
Associated Proses
Atlanta, Ga., March 2. Attorney
General Palmer last night formally
announced his candidacy for the dem democratic
ocratic democratic nomination for president in a
telegram to Hiram L. Gardner, secre secretary
tary secretary of the Georgia state democratic
committee.
Referring to the petition filed in hi
behalf for the Georgia primaries., Mr.
Palmer declared that "if the dem democrats
ocrats democrats of Georgia see fit to select me
as their choice, I shall receive the
honor with deep appreciation,!' hold holding
ing holding it to be highly important that an
opportunity be given in the primary
"to directly pass upon the record
made by the present administration."
OKLAHOMA MEN INDIGNANT
(Associated Pres)
Wewoka, Okla., March 2. Sheriff
Brown with his prisoner, Capt. Davis,
i a negro, eluded a lynching party after
Davis had been sentenced to forty-five
years imprisonment for an attack on
a white teacher. The mob took an another
other another negro from the Chandler jail
last night and his fate this afternoon
was undetermined.
PROHIBITION PLEASES
TWENTY-ONE STATES
(Associated Press)
Washington, March 2. Twenty-one
states joined with the federal govern government
ment government yesterday in asking the supreme
court to dismiss the original suit
brought by Rhode Island to test the
validity of the prohibition amendment
to the constitution.
Subscribing to a brief, which was
filed by Charles E. Hughes with the
j court's permission and which asked
dismissal of the Rhode Island case, on
the ground that no justifiable ques questions
tions questions were involved, were the states
of Delaware, North Carolina, Ken Kentucky,
tucky, Kentucky, Louisiana; Indiana, Alabama,
Arkansas, Michigan, Florida, Oregon,
Kansas, West Virginia, Nevada, Ne Nebraska,
braska, Nebraska, Montana, North Dakota, South
Dakota, Wyoming, Utah and Arizona.
BASKET BALL GA3IE
THIS AFTERNOON
, Members of the Ocala high school
basket ball team left for Gainesville
on the A. C. L. this afternoon at 1:45
to play the high school team of that
city. The following is Ocala's line lineup
up lineup for the game: Loureen Spencer,
Lucile Gissendaner, Myrtie Blaiock,
Katherine Henr$, Kathleen Leitner
and Mabel Lytle, with Cornelia Do Do-zier,
zier, Do-zier, Jesse Dehon and Mildred Bullock
as substitutes. Miss Louise Spencer,
the team's coach, accompanied them
and Mr. Sumner represents the fac fac-culty.
culty. fac-culty. Mr. C. L. Brownell will act
as referee and Mr. Eugene Jones as
umpire. After the game the Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville girls will entertain their visitors
at a dance. There will be several cars
full of Ocala people present at the
game to boost the Ocala girls.
CONCERT SUNDAY
AT TEMPLE THEATER
At the Temple theater Sunday aft
ernoon at 3:30 o'clock there will be
a concert consisting of some selec selections
tions selections by Ocala's best talent. It will
be given for the benefit of a nurses'
home at the Marion County Hospital,
and it is hoped that Ocala people will
show their appreciation with a crowd crowded
ed crowded house.
The entertainment will be an ex exceedingly
ceedingly exceedingly interesting one and will
please all, as there will be many dif different
ferent different selections, such as operatic
numbers, nature and folk songs and a
tableaux at the conclusion of the pro program.
gram. program. Nothing makes prettier decorations
for parlor, boudoir or dining room
than daffodils. We have a large supply
of bulbs now on hand. The Court;

Pharmacy. Phone 284. 26-6t

MEXICANS ALSO
WERE MURDERED

Their State Department Under the
Impression that Two Wrongs
Make One Right
(Associated Presd)
Mexico City, March 2. Another re request
quest request that Mexican, consuls in the
United States vise passports of Am Americans
ericans Americans testifying before the senate
committee investigating Mexican con conditions
ditions conditions was presented by the Ameri-
can embassy here
Data relative to the recent alleged
murder of Mexicans in southern
states of the United States is being
gathered at. the Mexican embassy in
Washington for protest.
STRIKE CUT SHORT
French Railroad Men .and Authorities
Speedily Come" to an
Agreement
(Associated Freas)
Paris, March 2 The railway strike
settlement provides for the right of
the men to organize, arbitration of
points not yet settled and immediate
study of future railroad rules. Nor Normal
mal Normal conditions are expected tomor tomorrow.
row. tomorrow. PLAN FOR DISTRIBUTION
Paris, March 2. Joint buying and
distribution according to the necessi necessities,
ties, necessities, and the supervision of selling
price? are provided in a tentative plan
reached at yesterday's session of the
supreme council, says the Petit Paris Paris-ien.
ien. Paris-ien. The plan will be submitted to
Premier Millerand before becoming
effective.
REPORT OF MUTINY
AMONG POLES AT KOVNO
(Associated Press)
Warsaw, March. 2. Although offic official
ial official quarters report the mutiny among
Polish troops at Kovno suppressed,
newspaper messages declare the trou trouble
ble trouble is continuing and the uprising in
many cases has taken on bolshevik
characteristics.
A SCHOOL FOR IMMIGRANTS
(Associated Tress)
New York, March 2. The Astor li-
j brary on Lafayette street, one of the
show places of the city a quarter of a
century ago, is to be converted into a j
schoo lfor immigrants. The Hebrew
Sheltering and Immigrants Aid So Society
ciety Society recently purchased the property
for $325,000 and is to spend another
$100,000 in alterations. The building
recently has been used as a store storehouse
house storehouse for disposal of surplus army
foods.
Plans for establishing a thorough
system of education for immigrants
and for rendering aid to them immed immediately
iately immediately upon their arrival are now be being
ing being made by the society. The upper
floors will be used as dormitories for
temporarily housing incoming immi immigrants
grants immigrants and the lower floors for cjass
rooms. The plans, which meet with
the approval of the immigration au authorities
thorities authorities at Ellis Island, contemplate
a school for citizenship, where im
migrants may be taught the funda fundamentals
mentals fundamentals of American history and gov government
ernment government and receive information as
to h"ow they can apply for citizenship.
"There is a pleasing sentiment
about making an immigrant school of
the Astor building," John L. Bern Bernstein,
stein, Bernstein, president of the society, declar declar-e
e declar-e dtoday. "John Jacob Astor, the
founder of the library, was himself
an immigrant and in his gift of the
librar yto the public he stated that he
particularly wanted it to perpetuate
his gratitude for what his adopted
country had done for him. He ex expressed
pressed expressed the hope that the Astor li library
brary library would render aid to all new newcomers
comers newcomers to the country. It seems like
a prophecy that his building should
now become a school exclusively for
immigrants."
ATTACKS LAGMPPE AtlU
' COLDS THREE WAYS
Dr. Williams' 101 Tonic Gets Right to
Work to Clean and Strengthen
the Body
Iron, Quinine and Magnesia are the
main chemicals in 101 Tonic. Each
one attacks Colds, LaGrippe and Ma
laria in its awn way. Iron strengthens
the blood, Quinine kills the disease
germs in it, Magnesia clears the body
of all its accumulated poisons.
Not many colds will stand this at attack.
tack. attack. They soon give in and you feel
quite your old self again.
Dr. Williams' 101 Tonic is also a
mighty fine general tonic and a lax laxative.
ative. laxative. Ahvavs keep it on hand.
25c. and 50c. bottles for sale
at

your drug store. Adv. No. 2

OCALA, FLORIDA, Tll-SDAY, MA 111-1 1 2,

PUTTING IT UP
TO THE PEOPLE
Senators of Both Parties Trying to!
Force the Peace Treaty Into
the National Election
Washington, March 2. An early
and unfavorable vote on .ratification
of the treaty was forecast yesterday
when leaders, replying to demands of
the treaty's irreconcilable republican
opponents, reaffirmed their decision
not to accept any change in the sub substance
stance substance or language of the republican
reservation to article 10. Both sides
concede that enough democratic sena senators
tors senators to defeat ratification are deter determined
mined determined to stand with Mr. Wilson and
vote against the treaty unless the re republican
publican republican reservations to article 10 are
modified. All elements in the Senate
treaty fight seemed ready to co-operate
to end the discussion and allow
the matter to go before the national
conventions and thence to the, people
in the fall elections.
Under the agreement between re republicans
publicans republicans and irreconcilables, the
latter will not carry -out the program
of prolonged debate. They will sup support
port support the republican revision program,
as they did at the last session, but
will vote, as they did then, against
ratification. Yesterday's decision grew
out of a conference between Repub Republican
lican Republican Leader Senator Lodge of Mas Massachusetts,
sachusetts, Massachusetts, and Senator Borah, repub
lican, Idaho, a spokesman for the ir irreconcilables.
reconcilables. irreconcilables. Previously Senator
Borah and Senator Hitchcock, of Ne Nebraska,
braska, Nebraska, the democratic leader, con conferred,
ferred, conferred, and the result, laid before
Senator Lodge, convinced him that no
agreement was possible either with or
without .modification of article ten's
reservations. If modified, it was
pointed out, the irreconcilables might
feel disposed to oppose a ratification
vote; if not modified a combination of
irreconcilables and administration
senators would down ratification.
The unyielding stand they have
taken on article 10 by the democrats
is said to have been backed by the de determination
termination determination of President Wilson not
to accept the reservation.
WHO WAS HE?
Honolulu, March 2 The premier of
China has resigned, according to a
special Tokio cable to Nippu Jiji, a
Japanese newspaper here.
MAJOR GENERAL DUVALL
San Diego, Calif., March 2. Major
General William R. -Duvall, aged 73,
retired, died here today.
SIZED UP BY THE
RETIRING SECRETARY
Official Washington "is a combina combination
tion combination of political caucus drawing room
and civil service bureaus" containing
"statesmen who are politicians and
politicians who are not statesmen," is
poorly organized for its task, which
"fewer men of larger capacity could
do better."
Such is an epitome of the view of
Franklin K. Lane, retiring secretary
of the interior, expressed in a char-J
acteristic report to the president on
the opinion of leaving public life Sat Saturday
urday Saturday after more than twenty years
service in the cabinet.
"Washington," said the retiring
secretary, "is rich in brain and char character,
acter, character, it is honest beyond any com commercial
mercial commercial standard. It wishes to be eve everything
rything everything that will provoke the public
good but it is poorly organized for its
task.
"Everyone seems to be afraid of
everyone. Trust, confidence, enthusi enthusiasm
asm enthusiasm are the virtues most lacking in
government organization.
"For the sake of the civil service
there should be quicker promotion or
discharge, for the higher administra administrative
tive administrative officers there should be salaries
twice as high as those now given and
they should be made to feel that they
are the ones responsible for the work
of the department. The head being
merely an advisor and constructor of
policies."
HARRINGTON HALL ARRIVALS
M. W. McMullin, Milwaukee; J. C
GrossDond. Penvan. N. Y.: C. S.
Smith, Chattanooga; C. G. Brown,
Tampa; J. M. Gregory and wife, Par Parsons,
sons, Parsons, Kans.; L. Salary, Tampa; Mrs.
S. N. Miller. St. Louis; F. H. Knabb,
Montgomery; T. C. Brown, Tampa; J.
M. Andrews, Jacksonville; H. L. Gut Gut-chinson,
chinson, Gut-chinson, Gainesville; T. C. Durham
and wife, J. S Blair, Indiana, Pa.; T.
B Fargason, New Orleans; Louise
Baker, Washington; Mrs., H. H.
Brooks, Philadelphia; Dr. S. Coolidge
and wife, Middlebrook, Mass.; O. J.
Glansier, Jacksonville; H. L. Brown Brown-lee,
lee, Brown-lee, Jacksonville; LaVergne Blue, Live
Oak; B. H. Drew, Louisville; Nick
Sandomis, G. L. Crawford, Ira L.
Taylor, Jacksonville; Ray Simpson,
Jack Gram, Chicago.

1920.

WENT DOW
WITH THE SHIP
Ley land Liner Bohemian's Crew Stay
ed with Her Till the
Very Last
(.siu(.iaied Press)
Halifax, March 2. It is believed
that seven lives were lost when the
crew of the Leyland liner Bohemian
abandoned the ship as she sank off the
Sambro ledges today. The cotton
cargo was thrown overboard in n ef effort
fort effort to save the ship. The loss of life
is believed to have occurred in the at attempt
tempt attempt to transfer part of the crew to
! a tug by life lines. Three boats got
away safely but the remainder of the
crew of 120 men were unable to take
to the boats. The passengers were
removed yesterday after the liner hit
the rocks during a blizzard.
"OUR RATES WERE
ALSO RAISED
As a large number of the Star's
readers are members of the Woodmen
of the World, the following from the
Mayo Free Press will interest and
amuse them:
Whose Who on Our Salary List
Col. B. Wood Jewell is our sovereign
adviser, but he is on the pay roll a
some kind of a clerk at $4000 per. H
was getting $3000 per for this clerk'
job, but as Bill had $12,500 extr
tacked on his salary he gave the col
onel a thousand dollar raise. Our
rates were also raised at the same
time.
John Tecumseh Yates is our sov sov-erign
erign sov-erign clerk. John is a suave, well
manicured gentleman, with a delicate
mustache and a large good natured
looking expansive front. He could put
on a monocle and pass off for an Eng English
lish English duke with all ease. John had his
salary raised from $10,000 to $15,000
per year. Our rates were also raised
at the same time.
United States Senator Morris hep hep-pard
pard hep-pard is our sovereign banker. That
old gag about a man not being able to
serve two masters doeen't apply to
Morris. He is one of the few men
who can do two things at one time.
His salary as banker was raised from
$3600 to $G000. Our rates' were also
raised at the same time.
"Gentleman Jim" Fitzgerald is our
chairman of the board of auditors.
Jim is Irish as you can tell by his
name. Jim ,is a great talker and he
likes to make speeches. He is a past
master in the art for he can speak
for two hours at a stretch and never
say anything at all. That is a great
gift for a man to have. Jim's salary
Iwas raised from $5000 to $7500. Our
rates were also raised at the same
time.
De E. Bradshaw is our general at attorney.
torney. attorney. De looks a great deal like
Lord Northcliff, the great British
newspaper man, but he comes from
Little Rock, Arkansas. De is as
smooth as a quart of Mobiline oil. He
had has salary raised from $8400 to
$10,600. Our rates were raised at the
same time.
S. A. Ferrell is our sovereign es
cort. He comes from Johnstown, Pa.,
where they had the big flood one time.
He is a tall, dignified looking gentle gentleman
man gentleman and looks like a professor of
some deep subject. He used to get so
much per day for attending the two
meetings per year of the executive
council. But he was raised to a
straight salary of $1200 per year and
expenses. Our rates were also raised
at the same time.'
C. D. Mills is our sovereign watch watchman.
man. watchman. He couldn't pass off for a duke
or for Lord Northcliff like John and
De could, but he wouldn't have much
trouble being taken for secretary of
the local plumbers' union. He used
to get so much per day for attending
the two meetings per year of the ex executive
ecutive executive council. But he was raised to
a straight salary of $1200 per year
and expenses. Our rates were also
raised at the same time.
S. L. Caine is our sovereign sentry.
He is a dapper, well groomed gentle gentleman.
man. gentleman. Goes spruced up like a racing
horse all the time. He used to get
paid the same as Brothers Ferrelf and
Mills, but his pay was raised to $1200
per year and expenses. Our rates
were also raised at the same time.
Our board of sovereign auditors is
made up of the following well trained
gentlemen. They are right up to the
minute and haven't missed a pay
check from the Woodman treasury in
years. Here they are:
Elisha B. Lewis. This is not the
Elisha spoken of in the Bible. This
Elisha has a dome that it as clean of
hair as a window pane. He also has
a job as state manager for North
Carolina. Elisha is a great hand to
laugh. He could find something fun
ny in a man getting his leg broke. He
used to attend two meetings per year
of the auditors at so much per day.
! His salary was raised to straight

(SEVEN

VOL 26, NO. 53

PRODUCTION 1ST
BE PUSHED
Allied Countries Should Exert Their
Utmost Skill and Energy To Toward
ward Toward that End
(Associated Press?
Paris, March 2. Allied countries
will be called' upon to develop to tha
utmost their productive forces and
advised that' laws improving the con condition
dition condition of workers must be applied to
that end in the manifesto prepared by
the economic section of the supren
council, says the Echo de Paris.
EDWARDS WILL BUCK
ALL AMERICA
(Associated Press)
Trenton, N. J., March 2. Governor
Edwards today signed the bill legaliz-
three decision yesterday the supreme
court arefused to dissolve the United
States Steel Corporation and its
numerous subsidiaries comprising the
so-called "steel trust."
The government's long, fought suit
for dissolution of the iron and steel
trade combination for alleged viola viola-tiori
tiori viola-tiori of the Sheriman anti-trust law
was dismissed, with absolution for the
corporation from all existing charge.
NOTICE .TO UNREGISTERED MEN
If you have never registered in Mar Marion
ion Marion county and want to vote in the
June primary, come to the courthouse
in Ocala,. or the district registration
officer in your district, during March
and register.
D. M. Barco, Supervisor.
$1800 and expenses. Our rates were
also raised at the same time.
T. E. Patterson is. another. He
looks like an eye doctor or a chiro chiropractor.
practor. chiropractor. In addition to his auditing
job he also drew down a fat pay en envelope
velope envelope as some kind of a clerk at
Omaha. His pay was raised to $1800
and expenses for two meetings pef
year. Our rates were also raised at
the same time.
E. D. Campbell is one also. lie is
built up like Jess Willard, and it
would take a punch from somebody
ike Willard to knock him loose from
he Woodmen pay roll. His salary
was raised to $1800 for two meetings
per year; also expenses. Our ra,te
were raised at the same time.
- William Ruess is there- He looks
ike Johnny Barrymore, the actor.
Only he is no actor for he couldnt
recite "Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star"
without swallowing his tongue half a
dozen times. He is a good fellow,
though. His pay was raised to $1800
for two meetings per year. Our rates
were raised at the same time.
Rainey Wells is on the rolL He can
take the biggest chew of cut plug and
still keep from choking to death of
any man in the country. That is a
great accomplishment. His salary
was raised to $1800 for two meetings
per year. Our rates were also raised
at the same time.
Rev. W. M. Crawford is listed He
has a voice like a covey pf fog horns.
His main duties at sovereign camp
meetings is to lead off on "How Dry
I Am" or "There's a Hole in the Bot Bottom
tom Bottom of the Sea." He has a fine bald
head that is so smooth that every fly
that has lit on it in the last ten years
slipped up and broke his neck. His
salary was raised to $1800 for two
meetings per year. Our rates were
also raised at the same time.
Have we forgotten anybody else on
the list? Oh, yes, there is Sovereign
Commander William A. Fraser. We
came near forgetting him. He is
known as "the great fraternalist."
When he told them at the sovereign
camp that the order was millions in insolvent
solvent insolvent and the rates would have to
be raised, he was such a good Wood Woodman,
man, Woodman, and was so sorry for the order
he wouldn't let them raise his pay but
fifty per cent. He was only getting
$1041.66 per month, hardly enough to
keep him alive, and he had wasted
away until he only weighed 250
pounds, and he was about out of
clothes, having only about half dozen
$85 suits. They took pity on him and
raised his salary from $12,500 to $25, $25,-000.
000. $25,-000. Our rates were also raised at
the same time.



i r

OCALA EVENING STAR. TUESDAY, MARCH 2. 1920

OCALA EVEHI1IG STAR

Published Every Day Except Sunday by
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY,
OF OCALA, FLA.
R. It. Carroll, Preldent
P. V. Leavensood, Secretary-Treasurer
J. II. Ilenjaniiii, Editor
Entered at Ocala, Fla., postoffice as
second class matter.
TELEPHONES
Online OfHce Five-One
Editorial Department Two-Seven
Soelety Reporter Five-One
31 121 II Kit ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Pres3 i3 exclusively
entitled for the use for republication of
all news dispatches credited to It or
not otherwise credited In this paper and
also the local news published herein.
All rights of republication of special
dispatches herein are also reserved.
DOMESTIC SUBSCRIPTION RATES
One year, In advance $6.00
Blx months, in advance 3.00
Three months. In advance 1.50
One 'month. In advance 60
ADVERTISING-RATES
DIaplay Plate 15 cents per inch for
consecutive insertions. Alternate inser insertions
tions insertions 25 per cent additional. Composi Composition
tion Composition charges on ads. that run less than
six times 5 cents per inch. Special
position 20 per cent additional. Hates
based on 4-inch minimum. Less than
four Inches will take higher rate,
which will be furnished ion applica application.
tion. application. Reading; Notice 5 cents per line for
first Insertion; 3 cents per line for each
subsequent insertion. O-t hange a
week allowed on readers without extra
composition charges.
Legal advertisements at legal rates.
In one of his utterances while in
Jacksonville, Mr. Gompers wailed
about the assault on union labor,
which he seems to fear is threatened
with extinction. Mr. Gompers should
worry. We don't suppose any sensi sensible
ble sensible and well informed American
wants to see union labor put out of
business, and we don't think it possi possible
ble possible to put it out of business. Union
labor is a -very important element in
the economic strength of America.
Labor unions should liye, thrive and
do their part. As long as they are of
and with the general mass of the
people, the people will be with them.
It is only when they try to attain their
ends by making war on the public
that the people are against them.
Another great inconsistency of
Samuel Gompers and the American
Federation of Labor is their sympa sympathy
thy sympathy with the "conscientious objec objectors,"
tors," objectors," now held by the government.
If the federation was to sympathize
with the Germans who stood up like
men and fought the Americans from
the Marne to the Meuse, it would be
more excusable than for sympathiz sympathiz-"
" sympathiz-" ing with the dirty cowards who offer offered
ed offered their consciences as an excuse to
keep their carcasses out of danger. If
this sentiment be strong in the "Am "American'.'
erican'.' "American'.' Federation of Labor, it is
time it dehorned itself of the first
proper adjective of its name.
There is one thing the Star would
like to impress on the people of this
city and county .In the last few
years we have had a good deal of pub public
lic public work done nearly all done by con contractors
tractors contractors from other cities, who have
underbid our home folks by a few
thousand dollars. Nearly all their
work has been shoddy, and even after
spending large sums in repairs the
work is not or will not be as good as
if it had been done right in the first
place. In the future, let us try and
give our home contractors the work,
and if they don't do it right we will
have some remedy.
A large majority of the citizens oi
Marion county will regret the decis decision
ion decision of County Judge Smith to retire
from office. The judge is one of the
men who has attained public office by
merit and hard work. The knowledge
necessary for him to fill his position,
the popularity that put him in and
the success with which he has filled it
have all proceeded from his own in-
Mclver & MacKaj
UNDERTAKERS and EMBALM LKS
PHONES 47. 10 4. SZl
OCALA, FLORIDA
Call Five -One -Nine
The Old Reliable
Quick Delivery
Steak 35c.
Loin Steak 40-45c.
Pork Chops 35c.
Roast 30c.
Big Roast 25c.
Stew ....15c.
Fish, Oysters and Seasoning
Green Groceries
J. D, Dawkins
111 WEST BROADWAY

dustry and good sense. He has held
the scales of justice with impartiality,
knowing neither friend nor enemy in
the discharge of his duties. There is
no doubt that he could be elected for
another term if he would again try for
the nomination, and his friends both
expected and desired him to run, but
he has ether plans. The office of
county judge needs a man of good
judgment and the highest integrity,
and the people of Marion must see to
it that -William E. Smith has a
worthy successor.
ASKS CATTS TO EXPLAIN

The Gainesville Sun pertinently in inquires:
quires: inquires: "Wrhile the governor is on the stump
telling the people about, what he
calls, the shortcomings of Senator
Fletcher, there are some things ho
ought to explain about himself. The
report of the state treasurer has just
been issued. The people may easily
get this report by writing for it. It
shows the receipts and expenditures
for 1919. The general balance sheet
shows collections by the treasurer to
be six millions, three hundred and
thirty-four thousand, twenty-five dol dollars
lars dollars and fifteen cents, and the outgo
for the same time, to be six millions,
three hundred and sixty-nine thou thousand,
sand, thousand, seven hundred and fifty-three
dollars and ninety-nine cents. This
would make, if we calculate correctly,
an outgo of twenty-five thousand,
seven hundred and twenty-eight dol dollars
lars dollars and eighty-four cents more than
income.
llExplain that, governor.
( "ThenrtOd, we notice that the saTar-
tics in uic cACLUiive uepanmeia mt;
thousand dollars.
"Explain that, governor."
Previous to the last bond election,
a number of voters, either returned
soldiers or other young men who had
ccme of age in the previous year or

and some of them may have taken it
for granted that this was all neces-
Jsary for them to do. All such should
take notice that th's registration en entitled
titled entitled them to vote only at that partic particular
ular particular election, and if they desire to

vote in xne Dona election oi .pru z.o
! or the primary in June they must
register again, this time with the
j supervisor of registration, who is the
j only officer who can permanently en
roll them as citizens. The county
supervisor is now. in his office in the
courthouse and will be there every
day this month, and his deputies will
have books open in the respective pre precincts.
cincts. precincts. Don't forget that, if you are
of age. have never registered, and
want the privileges of a citizen, your
name must be on the county regis-
seli can put it there.
General John A. Rosborough, one of
the most prominent Confederate vet veterans
erans veterans in the state of Florida and who
has for the past several terms been
commandant of the Stonewall Jack Jackson
son Jackson camp of the United Confederate
Veterans of this city, died at 7:30
o'clock Sunday evening at his home at
Windsor, after an illness of several
months. General Rosborough, who was
78 years of age, had been a resident
of this county for many years. He was
a native of South Carolina but moved
o Florida while still a young man.
His record in the ranks of the Con Confederate
federate Confederate armies is one of which the
entire Confederacy may well be proud.
For a number of years he was com commander
mander commander of the Florida Division of
United Confederate Veterans and was
sent to the state senate from this dis district.
trict. district. Gainesville Sun.
Gen. Rosborough had many friends
among Marion county veterans, arid
they will greatly regret to hear of his
death.
The Fort Lauderdale Herald says:
"From all parts of the state come re reports
ports reports of good progress made by Cary
A. Hardee in his race for governor,
vhich is gratifying to the people who
want to see Florida elect a good,
clean business man for its chief ex executive.
ecutive. executive. Cary Hardee will make
Florida a high class governor. He
is clean. Even those who are oppos opposing
ing opposing his election do not deny that he is
honest and that his work is good. He
is a business man. He has proven
that, in the business world. He is a
good speaker and a likable man. He
has the polish of the gentleman vith vith-out
out vith-out the smoothness of the politician.
Every man who believes in clean,
business-like government should vote
for him."
TO MANY HOLIDAYS
We have too many legal holidays.
Every one of them is a bad break in
business. It is well enough to ob--serve
Christmas and the fourth of
July, but on the other days that the
postoffices are shut nearly everybody
has to work as usual and it is a great
inconvenience to the general public
not to be able to get its mail or buy
stamps. Ocala Star.
The Star is right and wrong. There
are too many holidays observed by a
few business houses and legal officer
but as a matter of fact one day each
week beside Sunday, should be ob observed
served observed as a holiday by one and all,
when we should all get out of our
regular channels of duty, get away
from our usual occupations and
mingle with nature. The working day
should be increased to 10 hours per
day for four days a week, with eight
hours on Saturday giving the pres present
ent present number of working houts, and one
day a week taken off entirely. De De-Land
Land De-Land News.

JOHN C." LUNING

(Joe Earman in Palm Beach Post)
John Christian Luning, state treas treasurer
urer treasurer of Florida, was an honored and
distinguished visitor in this city yes yesterday.
terday. yesterday. John Luning was Lorn in Albany,
Georgia, in 183, or fifty-six years
ago.
He was left an orphan at an early
age.
In 1S2J or when nineteen years
old, he moved to Florida and has re resided
sided resided continuously in this state since
that time.
He located at Leesburg, which was
in Sumter county at that time, where
he was engaged in the newspaper
business.
He has had every position of honor i
that citizens of Leesburg and Lake
county, which is his home town and
county, could bestow upon him.
He has been postmaster, treasurer
and mayor of Leesburg.
He was a member of the board of
county commissioners of Lake county
for five consecutive terms.
Realizing his ability, the board of
trustees of the Internal Improvement
Fund and the board of commissioners
of the everglades drainage district
elected him as secretary for these
two boards.
This position put him in "close
communion," so to speak, with var various
ious various governors of Florida.
When B. E. McLin died, Governor
Gilchrist appointed John Luning com commissioner
missioner commissioner of agriculture.
When Alonzo C. Croom, state
comptroller, died, Governor Gilchrist
appointed W. V. Knott, who was state
treasurer, comptroller.
Governor Gilchrist then looked
around for a competent man to be
treasurer of Florida.
He decided upon John Luning, who
has been the "Handy-Andy" in the
state hours for many years, as state
treasurer of Florida.
This appointment was made in 1912
and in the primary of that year, also
191G, John Luning has succeeded him himself.
self. himself. He is a candidate in the June dem democratic
ocratic democratic primary for the same job.
. I will tell the world, and do so right
now, that we are going to support
and also vote for him.
He is an honest" man.
He is as cantankerous at times as
it is possible for any human to be.
Notwithstanding, he is safe, for he
does at all times and under all con conditions
ditions conditions what hs thinks is right.
He has been known to "buck" the
other six memoers of the board of
state institutions.
He has been known to rear and
snort to a fare-thee-well.
Notwithstanding, he ha3 always
been known to have the high regard
and respect of other cabinet officers
and all other citizens of Florida at
all times.
The state treasurer's job pays a
salary of thirty-six hundred dollars a
years, and be it known that the small
business -with which I am connected
will pay John Luning this salary, and
it is open for him at any time that
he will take it, to come into our office
with his conservative methods to keep
us on the straight path and build up
our business.
I don't think anybody can doubt
from the above statement, but that
we are for John Luning.
I 4ike to fuss and squabble with
John Luning.
We have put over two or three rows
really worth while.
We also like to vote for him.
MOSS BLUFF
Moss Bluff, Feb. 19. Miss Martha
Fort returned home Friday after sev several
eral several clays spent in Ocala with her
aunt, Mrs. E. C. Jordan.
Moss Bluff was. well represented at
the box supper at Electra school
house Saturday night. Those who at attended
tended attended from here were Mrs. John Mar Martin
tin Martin and children, Mr. and Mrs. Lester
Wheeler and son,. Mr. Merton Wheel Wheeler.
er. Wheeler. Mr. Dan Fort,-Miss Martha Fort,
Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Griggs, the lat lat-ter's
ter's lat-ter's daughter, Miss Mamie Cochran,
Messrs. Charles and Raymond Davis
and Miss Elsie Davis. All reported
a nice time.
Mr. and Mrs. John P. Galloway and
children of Ocala were visitors here
Sunday.
Misses Mabel Squires and Martha
Fort and Mr. Sidney Fort motored to
Lake Weir Sunday afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. Earl Green and chil children
dren children of Santos spent Saturday and
Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. R. E.
Griggs.
Mr. Otis Squires and daughter.
Miss Mabel, Mr. Lawrence Marsh anc
daughter, Miss Annie Marsh, were
callers in Ocala Thursday.
Mr. and Mrs. Hayes of Pennsyl
vania and Mrs. W. C. White called or. J
Mi. and Mrs. Albert Fort Friday aft afternoon.
ernoon. afternoon. Mr. Tim Hunter and Mrs. Dora
Charlton leturned Saturday aftei
several weeks spent in Grahamvilk
and Ocala. j
Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Griggs and I
children and their guests, Mr. and
Mis. Earl Green and children of San-'
tea. were pleasant callers in Umatilla j
Sunday.
Mr. Sidney Fort was a business
visitor in Ocala Saturday. ;
There are quite a number of tour-j
ists in our town this winter. Among,
them are Mr. and Mrs. Lester Wheel- j
er and .-on, Mr. Merton Wheeler ofj
Nev. Hampshire; Mr. and Mrs. Hayes:
of Pennsylvania; Mr. and Mrs. Otis I
Squires and four children, Mr. George?
Miller, Mr. Dillon of Ohio; Messrs.j

' i iiA
; -it
FEMEMAL BMEAD j
;l il

Made by expert bakers under most sanitary conditions
It costs no more than inferior brands
At al! first class Groceries

P
H
111

j THE BEST m 1MB WOULD 99 j

Tim and Dan Hunter and sister. Mrs.
Flora Charlton and Mr. Irvine Rob Roberts
erts Roberts of Michigan, and several others.
FLORIDA SOFT PHOSPHATE-AND
LI ME-COMPANY
Ocala, Florida.
The annual meeting of the stock stockholders
holders stockholders of the Florida Soft Phosphate
and Lime Company will be held at the
office of the corporation in Ocala. Flor Florida,
ida, Florida, on the twelfth day of March,
1920, at 12 o'clock, noon, for the foU
lowing purposes:
1. To elect a board of directors.
2. To transact such other business
as may properly come before the
stockholders. James H. Bowditch,
2-24-tues-3t Secretary.
If you want a real good glass of
coca-cola go to Gong's Drug Store, tf
F-fr .tt
I

A Maxwell is 98 metal, and the very best metal that
metallurgists can specify. Pound for pound it equals
the metal in any car built.
The Maxwell is made of light-weight but strong
metals.
They had to be light because the mission of the
Maxwell is economical transportation.
They had to be strong because the Maxwell is built
to carry just as heavy a passenger load over the same
roads and at the same speed, as any car, despite its
price or size.
Any engineer will tell you that in getting that rare
combination of strength with lightness high prices
must be paid for the metals.
Their use, however, repays the makers of the
Maxwell in many ways because each car each day is

I
!i
.11
f!

winning inenas.

Today these friendships, expressed in terms of cars,
are well on the road to 400,000.
You cannot go back of these numbers any more
than you can go back of the fact that the sun rises
in the morning.
They tell the story; 'and it's largely a story of what
the Maxwell is made of fine metals.

!
Carroll
Ocala' -

COMIMGS

The
MSK JUBI

Mt. ZIob A. M. E. .Church
(Under Auspices Fessenden Academy)
TUE., MARCH 2nd, 8 P. M.
Admission 50c Reserved Seats 75c

98 Metal
Motors Co

Incorporated

Florida
C ;
71 t-'

Only

SINGERS

at
Mort tniUt ptrgalUu
Mr miUt m Urn

i

D



OCALA EVENING STAR, TUESDAY, MARCH 2, 1920
V

f

ft

V

Sec Me
For All Classes Of
Stone, Brick, Wood,

and Concrete
Building

J.

D. McCasMli

Contractor
I Phone 446. 728 Wenon St.

iHf The Optometrist ex-
s&ptHi amines the eye by the
tfV most scientific method,
sec J "sing NO DRUGS what what-.
. what-. "T.wx ever. Assuring you no
discomfort or danger to your eyes.
DR. K. J. WEI HE,
Optometrist and Optician.
Eyeijrht Specialist

OCALA OCCURRENCES

If you have
phone five-one.

any society items.

I be a very creditable exhibition. Mrs.
I G. W. Martin as chairman of art in
; the Woman's Club deserves much
i credit in securing for Ocala such a

talented teacher.

Mr. John T. Moore of Tampa and
Ocala was a visitor in the city the
first of the week.

Mr. Abner Pooser is able to return
to his position at Goldman's store aft after
er after a week's illness.

VICTOR records for March at THE
BOOK SHOP. l-3t

Mrs. J. R. Dewey is reported some somewhat
what somewhat better today, which will be good
news to her many friends.

THE VICTORY WAY AND
TUSCAWILLA PARK

MUSICAL PROGRAM

T

DREAD

Ocala
Electric Shoe Shop
We repair your shoes by the
Goodyear Welt System, and
save you money on your 6hoe
bills, besides you always wear
shoes that look like new.

We Call for and Relurn
Shoes to Any Part of Town
110 W. BnoadwayT Phone 143

Mrs. F. W. Brooks and son, Mr. Ed Edwards
wards Edwards Brooks, were visitors in town
yesterday from Lake Weir.

Another tea for the benefit of the
memorial avenue will be given Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday afternoon at 3:30 at the Wom Woman's
an's Woman's Club building. l-2t

Dr. C. E. Kiplinger will return to
his home in Miami tomorrow after
several days spent in the city attend attending
ing attending to business. He is making the
trip by automobile.
DIAMONDS. The largest assort assortment
ment assortment of unmounted and mounted dia diamonds
monds diamonds that has been in Ocala since
1914, including stones from 38-100ths
to 1 and 15-100ths carat, mountings
of yellow gold, white gold and plat platinum,
inum, platinum, just received by Weihe Com Company,
pany, Company, The Ocala Jewelers. 2-tf
The painting class of the Woman's
Club is meetjng today as usual for an
all-day lesson. The class consists of
about ten members, who meet at the
club house on Tuesdays. The mem members
bers members of the class bring lunches which
at need are temptingly served. Mrs.
Boughman is proving a delightful in instructor
structor instructor and the class is enthusiastic
in her praise. At the end of the
course there will be an exhibit of the
pictures completed and it promises to

The following program will be giv given
en given at the tea for the benefit of the
memorial avenue at the Woman's
Club Wednesday afternoon at 3:30.
This program is arranged and pre presented
sented presented by Miss Lancaster:
''Souvenir" for violin .(Dedla)
Frances Royce.
"Barcarolle" for violin (Weber)
touise Gallant.
"Valse de Papiliion" (Ludoric)
Amy Cauthern Long.
"Fairies Carnival" (Rheinhold)
Edgar Roberts.
"Flattery" (Bachmann) Herschel
and Edgar Roberts.
"Valse" (Wachs) Sara Scott.
"Mazurka" (Wachs) Martha Riv

ers.
"Gitana" (Heins) Martha Rivers

and Sara Scott.

Vocal solo, selected Miss Pearl
Fausett.

The Fannie R. Gary Missionary So Society
ciety Society held its first meeting for the
week at the home of Mrs. E. Van
Hood yesterday afternoon. There was
a splendid attendance and while the
first chapters of the Mission Study
Book were entertainingly read and
commented upon by Mrs. Hood, the
ladies busied themselves sewing. At
the conclusion of the afternoon Miss
Marguerite Porter served tea, sand sandwiches
wiches sandwiches and Creole candy. The meet meeting
ing meeting today is with Mrs. J. W. Akin at
625 Tuscawilla street. Thursday aft afternoon
ernoon afternoon the meeting will be held at the
home of Mrs. Peoples on Oklawaha
avenue and Friday afternoon at the
residence of Mrs. W. T. Gary.

AVE YOUR MOTOR WASHED

FREE!

Buy your motor oil at our filling station, corner
Washington and North Main streets, and we wash
out your motor free. This means quite a saving

5 Gal. Texas Motor Oil, Medium... S3.50
5 Gal. Texas Motor Oil, Heavy
5 Gal. Texas Motor Oil Extra Heavy -S4.50

Compare these prices with what you are now
paying, to say nothing of the free cleaning service
we give you.

Tl

MS

iFFER IS FOR TEN DAYS
ONLY

AUTO

-i

-J!

Ml.

Mack Taylor

CO.

c

Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Kingsbury of
Bridgeport, Conn., are visitors in the
city, guests at the Ocala House. They
made the trip down by automobile and
expecetd to enjoy several weeks of
hunting, so were much disappointed
to learn on their arrival that the
hunting season closed on the first. Mr.
and Mrs. Kingsbury are the parents
of Mrs. William Anderson, her wed wedding
ding wedding to Mr. Anderson, formerly of
this city, being a large event taking
place last year in Bridgeport.
Mr. J. B. Cappleman and son, Mr.
D. E. Cappleman, are planning to
take, the latter part of the week, a
very interesting trip to points on the
east coast, returning home by way of
the west coast. They expect to be

gone a week or ten days.

Show grounds north of iron works

on Main street. M. T. Clark & Sons

Show, March 4th. 2-

Any one seeking a pleasant place
to bask in the sunshine on these cool
days will be agreeably surprised by
a visit to Tuscawilla Park. Do you j
know what and where Tuscawilla i
Park is? If not, it i high time you;
are finding out for you will be a back ;
number very shortly if you have not j

strolled down the avenue and mean meandered
dered meandered up the winding pathway among

the palms and flowering trees of j

Ocala's latest acquisition.
To reach Tuscawilla Park from the
courthouse you walk east on Okia-

waha avenue two blocks, then nortn

two blocks, each again one bloc anu
there you are. On the corner you will
see the attractive bungalow of the
Woman's Club. By the way, the Wom Woman's
an's Woman's Club is responsible for the hand handsome
some handsome new avenue leading to the park
as well as for the park itself. "Vic "Victory
tory "Victory Way" they have named the ave avenue
nue avenue and it has been planted as a "way
of remembrance" in honor of the
splendid men and women whose stars,
triangles and crosses adorn the Wom Woman's
an's Woman's Club service flag.
In the park, beyond the entrance to
Victory Way, the ground rises in a
gentle slope forming a natural ampi ampi-theater
theater ampi-theater surrounded by the broad
curve of the avenue.
On the crest of the hill comfortable
seats have been placed, in the shade
in you wish, or in positions where one
may enjoy the warm sunshine on a
winter day. Swings will soon be
placed here, too, and the park com committee
mittee committee has not forgotten our four four-footed
footed four-footed friends, for drinking fountains
for them have been provided. These
have been placed here in memory of
the service of the dumb beasts in the
war, for we do not forget that to
them, too, is due a share in the glory
of victory.
The planting of trees along the
memorial avenue ha"been completed
oaks along the side and magnolia
thru the center. The drives are one

way drives down on the eastern ;ide,

around the curve and back by the

western. From the curve in the park

several drives lead off in different di directions.
rections. directions. These are being planted in

palms and wild flowering trees and
shrubs. From the crown of the hill

he eye sweeps back toward the en

trance over Victory Way and the ef-

ect is so pleasing that one can not

help but admit the magnificent possi

bilities of Tuscawilla Park.

The drinking fountains and many

of the palms and other plants have

been the gifts of various persons and

for these gifts the committee feels

very grateful. With continued en

couragement and assistance the park

iz an assured success and to the peo people
ple people of Ocala and her yearly visitors it
will be a "thing of beauty and a joy
forever."

HUNTER'S AUTO EXCHANGE

lew

If Everything Was As
Cheap As Our Ice
The cost of living would be afr-low as it was in the good old days."
No use worrying, however, because it isn't that way. Be glad that
Ice is helping to keep down the cost of living, besides giving' you
better food and a greater variety of it than your grandfather's fam family
ily family ever had.

icala Ice PacMmo COo

c
3

T

V r J

Fire

Proof

B5SH

6

I'M.1 J u. u

ssss

mm

T

Negotiable Storage Receipts Issued

MOVE, PACK, SHIP
LIVE STOCK,
PIANOS, BAGGAGE,
MACHINERY,
FURNITURE, ETC.

on Cotton, Automobiles, Etc.
LONG DISTANCE MOVIXG
Phone 296

Mrs. A. D. Proctor of Pedro, Mrs.
K. E. Gore and baby of Lacota, Mrs.
Ophelia Proctor tf Pedro, Mrs. R. L.
Perdu of Belleview, Dr. Betty Ross
Dyer of Jacksonville, were among the
Monday visitors on our streets.
PEDRO
Pedro, Feb. 24. Mr. J. H. Linder-

man returned Thursday from the

rSouth Florida Fair in Tampa. He re

ported a fine time and said the fair

was splendid.

Mr. Kimball Perry and Mr. Charlie

Cauthen visited Summerfield Sunday

morning.

Mr. and Mrs. Ed Caruthers and

Mrs. Smith of Oxford came up to at
tend preaching Sunday and took din
ner at the home of Mr. R. J. Perry.

Mr. P. B. Perry and Earnest Pruitt

went to Wildwood on business matters

yesterday.

Mr. M. M. Proctor is confined to his

bed with fever. We wish for him
speedy recovery.

Miss Mattie Leitner, who has
taught a very successful music class

here this winter, has dismissed her

class and will leave for her home in

Ai:thony Wednesday. Miss Leitner

will be greatly missed, especially in

the Sunday school, where she was the
oiganist and teacher for the young

people.

Messrs. Thurston Driggers and El

bert Perry and Misses Goldie Kaskil

and Fannie Smith of Oxford, were in

Pedro Sunday afternoon.

Messrs. Kimball, Dantwertz and P

B. Perrv made a business trip to

Ocala Tuesday.

On account of sickness and other

hindrances the young people have de

cided not to have their play.

The Woman's Club will hold another!
social at the church Saturday evening,
Feb. 27th. Let everybody attend who
can and help with this good work.

Mr. Sidney Proctor went to Cole Coleman
man Coleman Thursday. He went especially
to bring Misses Hattie and Estelle
Proctor home.
Messrs. J. W. Linderman and Willie
Lewis went to Coleman last night to
see Mr. Will Lucius, who is very ill
vith the flu.
Messrs. Jarvis Perry and Homer
Lanier spent Friday and Saturday
hunting in the scrub. They reported
a fine time.
Mr. J. P. Matlock visited Lakeland
and vicinity last week.
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis were Ocala
shoppers Saturday.
Mr. W. H. Proctor was a visitor in

Belleview yesterday.

The farmers are nearly all through

nlantins truck, but on account of

sickness some are very much behind

with their work.

A VERY "TOPPY" TOP
for your auto can be had from
us, and the best part of it is
it will be made precisely to
your order, to fit all of your
own particular notions of
what an automobile top
should be. It will give you
added pleasure on this ac account
count account alone.

TOPS New, covered, patched and coated with a patent wax paste
that makes old tops absolutely waterproof.

PAINTING Autos
material.

painted, striped and finished in the best of

UPHOLSTERING We are prepared to give you satisfactory ser service
vice service in upholstering backs, seats or cushions.
TIRES, TUBES, GAS and OILS
LET US REPAIR, PAINT AND UPHOLSTER YOUR CAR, SO
YOU CAN ENJOY IT YOURSELF OR SELL TO ADVANTAGE.
AUTOS BOUGHT, SOLD and (REPAIRED

J..W. MOOTER

Ocala

SOUTH MAGNOLIA

OLD METROPOLITAN THEATER

rul Florida

'notice
The annual meeting of the members

of the Marion County Hospital Asso

ciation will be held at the hospital,
Tuesday morning, March 9th, 1920, at

nine o'clock.

The object of the meeting is to

elect officers for the ensuing year, to

receive the annual reports and to
transact such other business as may

be brought up.

T. T. Munroe, President.

Attest: E. H. Martin, Sec'y. 9-eod

You can get the famous Butternut

Bread in 10 and 15-cent loaves at Car

ter's Bakery. l-3t

THE WINPSOM HOTEL
JACKSONVILLE, FLORIDA
In the heart of the city with Hemming Park for a front yard.
Every modern convenience in each room. Dining room service is
second to nont

ROBERT M. MEYER,
Manager.

J. E. KAVANAUGH
Proprietor.

STEAM CLEANING
PRESSING

AND

DYEING

OCALA STEAM LAUNDRY
-:- PHONE 101 -:-

KEPT HER AWAKE
The Terrible Pains in Back and
Sides. Cardui Gave Relief.

Only a few days to wait. The Clark
Sons Shows will appear in Ocala,

Marksville, La. Mrs. Alice Johnson,
of this place, writes: "For one year I
suffered witn an awful misery in my back
and sides. My left side was hurting me
all the time. The misery was something
awful.
I could not do anything, not even sleep
at night. It kept me awake most of Ike
night ... I took different medicines, b:;t
nothing did me any good or relieved me
until I took Cardui .

I was not able to do any cf my work
for one year and 1 get worse all the time,
was confined to my bed off and on. got
so bad with my back that when I stooped
down 1 was not able to straighten up
again ... 1 decided I would try Cardui
... By time I had taken the entire bottle

I was feeling pretty good and could
straighten up and my pains were nearly
all gone.
I sha'.l always praise Cardui. I con continued
tinued continued taking it until I was strong and
well." If you suffer from pains due to
female complaints, Cardui may be just
wiiat you need. Thousands of womea
vho ence suffered in this way now praise
Cardui for their present eood health.

Give it a trial. NC-133 j

PYLES & PERKINS CO.
(Successors to E. C. Jordan & Co.) Z
Funeral Directors and Embalmers :
Calls Answered Promp tly, Day "or Night J
Motor Equipment

117 East Oklawaha Ayenne

PHONE 555

RESIDENCE PHONE 225

P. O. BOX 606

STAR JOB

DEPARTMENT

PHONE 51

LETTERHEADS, BILLHEADS, CARDS,
CIRCULARS, FOLDERS, FINE BOOKLETS, ETC.

WE NEVER DISAPOINT A CUSTOMER ON A
PROMISE. YOU GET THE JOB WHEN ITS DUE.

.
.
-...

- m

..... ..C12.-wV.-'-

n TTTfTHOvn rTTNTmTTTT TTItCi w

us

5

PHILIP G. MURPHY
GARY BLOCK - OCALA, FLORIDA

Thursday, March 4th. 2-



OCALA EVENING STAR, TUESDAY, MARCH 2, 192d

HOBUMS FACING

STRICKEN WORLD
Shall Chaos or Reconstruction
in Europe Follow the Great
' World War?
CHANGE OF SOME SORT SURE
Returning Soldier Feels He Hat at
Least Earned a Better Chance
v Than He Has Hitherto Been
Granted.
Article I!!.
By FRANK COMERFORD.
Europe wears an anxious look. One
thought Is arousing her from the
stupor of her misery. She opens her
eyes In wide amazement when she no notices
tices notices and notes the striking change
that has come over her children. It Is
puzzling her, although she well knows
what they have gone through, how pa patiently
tiently patiently and uncomplainingly they suf suffered.
fered. suffered. It Isn't strange to her that they
have changed, when the remembers
the peace of the years before the war,
the quiet, sane lives they lived, and the
four years In which they lived in wet,
foul sewers called trenches, slept in
tombs on the edge of a strip of hell
called No Man's Land, breathed the
emell of burning flesh, saw their pals
"go west buried their dead, grinned
at pain, laughed at death. Nerves of
iteel could not stand what they have
gone through without being changed
by It.
They have put on mufti again. It
Is strange to them. The quiet streets
are dull. The demobilized soldier feels
the letdown. The tenseness over de depression,
pression, depression, sets In. During the war he
didn't have time to think of anything
except the job ahead of him. Every
minute, every move was life or death
to him. Now he realizes for the first
time what he has gone through, won wonders
ders wonders why he Is alive. Two thoughts
possess his mind; one the memory of
every minute of the days and nights
of the war the other, of what is
ahead of him, what Is he going to tf
with his life He is at a strange cross crossroads.
roads. crossroads. The word "job" doesn't mean
much to, him. It Isn't that he is lazy.
He has to pinch himself to realize that
It Is over and that he Is back from the
war.
Earned Right to Better Place.
Between the whizz of machine bul bul-,
, bul-, lets and the, shriek of shrapnel he
spent his time thinking, and his
thoughts were not all about the war. j
He never got used to the war. but he
1 .a a M a rr i
icniucu iu iuici 11. lit? uus uruugui
more than souvenirs and memories
- from his experience. He has brought
home thoughts, ideas and ambitions
from the trenches. Many a night, look looking
ing looking over No Man's Land, listening to
the "banshee" of the war, he thought
and resolved that if he ever "came
back he wanted, and would have, a
better chance In this queer thing called
Life. He feels that he has paid for
a place, -and he has paid. He has
earned the right to a decent place in
the world, for which he fought. He
helped save the world and he J 'is to
that world to save him from a mean meaningless
ingless meaningless machine existence. If It doesn't
he has made up his mind to use force.
He is willing to work, wants to work,
but he insists on being part of his
work, rather than his work being all of
him. Ha sees, feels and measures
things from an intensely human angle.
He feels his humnnness. The war
emphasized the value and meaning of
the human being. It was life or death.
He is alive. He wants a human inter interest
est interest in his work.
Hundreds of demobilized soldiers In
different parts of Europe. In different
words, in different languages, have
said to me: "If the world isn't going
to give us a better chance than It gave
us before the war, then the world
wasn't worth fighting for. When we
fought, they told us It was to make the
world safe for democracy and to make
life worth while. We thought this
meant us and ours. We have learned
that life Isn't only a question of a job
and enough to eat, we ( want to be
treated like human beings. A man
wants to feel that his work means
' more to him than just wages. He
spends most of his time at work, the
rest of It Is spent with his family and
in sleeping so he will be able to work
the next day. Why shouldn't he have
an interest In the business, and why
shouldn't the business have an interest
In him? We don't want to run the
business, all we ask is a say In It. a
friendly say in it. Some people think
that to be fed is to be free it isn't.
Being free means being treated like a
human being."
I have found many good honest men
and women who have lost Interest in
. work. They say, "We don't get a fair
share of what we make. We flshf
among ourselves for johs because we
have to or starve, and they pay us as
little as they can." I am not reasoning
a fact which indicates the tnte of
"mind of millions of men and 'women In
Europe who did their bit for civiliza civilization
tion civilization during the past four years.
Fflr Hearing Must Be Granted.
Calling these people bolshevists
doesn't sllence them nor solve the
problem? SucrT tactics Irritate and
deepen the unrest. Their grievance
must be given a fair, patient heating.
Their attitude of mind must be reck reckoned
oned reckoned with if we hope to get h&cfc to
normal living. I have herd some ay
that these people must be given to un

derstand that they must worft car
starve. No law or government in the
world is powerful enough to compel
people to work. This Is particularly
true of the people today. To think of
using force is foolish, suicidal.
We have had enough of force during
the last four years and the farther we
get away from the idea of beating one
another into submission the better eff
we ail shall be. The present unrest is
positively dangerous. It Isn't like any
unrest we have ever had before. It is
the restlessness of human beings who
have been face to face with death. We
need a lot of calmness and common
sense. By kindly conference we must
try to understand each other, and by
just compromise help each other. Of
one thing I am sure, and that is. If an
-effort is made to use blind, brute force
on the working people of the world,
the present unrest will be set In mo motion,
tion, motion, a whirlwind will break upon the
world.
The plain, open road back to happi happiness
ness happiness is co-operation. If we stop for a
moment and realize what we have been
through, and the changes that have
come upon us while we were going
through it. we will find getting to together
gether together easy. Unrest blocks the road.

It fetters the will to work. We must
face the truth, and the sooner we do,
the better The world is broke. The
war has bankrupted Europe. One
thing, and one thing only, will bring us
back to sane, normal living. It is work.
Sympathy and understanding will do
more to secure peace, stimulate work,
than defiance, challenge and threats.
A normal world is one in which men
live and work together in peacewhere
all men have a chance to be happy.
This means an interest in work, a joy
in working living to work, rather
than working to live. Men must have
food, clean wholesome food, and
enough of it to do their work without
exhaustion. Men must have clothes.
Not only the quantity and quality nec necessary
essary necessary to protect their bodies from the
weather, but clothes that satisfy the
normal Instinct for appearing clean
and neat. Decent clothes sustain self self-respect.
respect. self-respect. Men without them are less
normal .and moral.
All Need a Playtime.
There must be a time between the
end of the day and the beginning of
sleep in which men can know and en enjoy
joy enjoy their families. The man who is so
nsed up by his day's work that he falls
asleep at his supper table isn't play playing
ing playing fair with his wife and children,
and his employer isn't playing fair
with him. All men are boys, even aft after
er after they have gray hair. This quality
is probably the finest and best
in them. They need a playtime, a recre recreation
ation recreation time. They lose something and
the world loses' more when they do
not get It. It is not enough that bodies
are fed, minds must not be starved.
Light Is the right of every human be being
ing being with eyes. Education Is light. The
human race must have light. None of
us were intended to live in darkness.
Children are entitled to a school time,
a jump-the-rope time, a top time, a
play time. A child who enters manhood
or womanhood without ever having
known a childhood goes through life
with something missing, something
lost. The creed of the changed world
Is that while the world doesn't owe
anyone a living. It is obligated to give
every human being a chance to make a
decent living. The new commandment
Is that this chance must be given.
I foundthese thoughts planted in
the unrest In Europe. They are strong strongly,
ly, strongly, deeply rooted in the consciousness
of the people. They are growing. Men
and women are gardening, cultivating,
protecting these ideas. Any effort to
uproot or destroy these flowering
thoughts will be resented and fought
by the gardeners. They are not weed
thoughts they are the blooms of hope
and they belong to the poor. They will
fight and die before they will see these
hope growths trampled under foot.
This Is the only garden they have. The
blood of the dead fertilized it. The
living care for it.
(Copyright. 1920. Western Newspaper Union",
STANDARD KAOLIN CO.
The annual meeting of the stock stockholders,
holders, stockholders, of the Standard Kaolin Com Company
pany Company will be held at its office in Lees Lees-burg,
burg, Lees-burg, Florida, at 4 p. m. on the 10th
day of March. 1920.
H. A. Budd, Secretary.
2-24-2t-tues
ASM v"v3..:?:
fatiVinramr T v
TAKE care of yonrself. yonr
Health, Comfort and good
complexion. La Vida im improves
proves improves skin, scalp and hair, rests
tired nerves; relieves iuascle sore soreness,
ness, soreness, insomnia, headaches; rheu rheumatism,
matism, rheumatism, tones up the whole body.
LaVida means Life
A sturdy, compact vibrator, yet
light and easy to use. Fits any
light socket. No parts to oil, it
can never wear out.
Comes complete, neatly boxed,
with three applicators fr face,
scalp and body. Remember, La
Vida is more than a face massage
vibrator: it is for heavy body
treatment as well.
Every home needs La Vida. Use
it every day for your Health.
Beauty, Comfort.
H. W.TUCKER
1
i
i
H
OCALA, FLA.

LATEST LOCALS

Temperature, this morning, 25; this
afternoon, 55.
Hears the Fisk Jubilee Singer
March 2nd get their VICTOR records
at THE BOOK SHOP. l-3t
Use Klenzo Liquid Antiseptic, either
as a spray or gargle. It's pleasant and
rffective. Sold only at Gerig's Drug
Store. 2-13-tf
Mr. H. V. Cooksey, a prosperous
merchant of Crystal River, is in the
city for a few days.
All cust.j iiors cf FeCeral Bread arc
satisfied customer? Ask thc:m. tf
Klenzo Greme keeps the teeth white
and the gums in a healthy condition.
25 cents the tube st Gerig's Drug
Store. :MS-tf
Rev. Theodore Hauck and Mr. M.
Reiff oi Lowell were well known vis visitors
itors visitors in town today.
We have just received another
shipment of narcissus bulbs. They are
mepared for indoor growing. The
Court Pharmacy. Phone 284. 26-6t
Stop! Have 7ou tried Federal Bread
lie "best bread in the world." 20-tf
After several days illness, Mr. L.
H.Chazal, the energetic secretary of
the board of trade, is able to be at his
post again.
Thirty new reprints of the best fic fiction
tion fiction 85 cents at THE BOOK SHOP. 3t
When you use Butternut Bread you
know you are using the very best.
Made in Ocala only by Carter's Bak Bakery.
ery. Bakery. - l-3t
Our clever young recruiters for the
army and navy, Kassel, Davidson and
Weaver, unfurl Old Glory from the
flagpole at the bandstand every morn morn-ing.
ing. morn-ing. They are a fine bunch of boys,
typical of the youngsters who do such
good work in the service.
If you want a Kodak ,or Kodak
films, remember Gerig's Drug Store
is the only place in Ocala where you
car. buy them. "If it isn't an East Eastman,
man, Eastman, it isn't a kodak." 2-18-tf
Hears the Fisk Jubilee Singer
March 2nd get their VICTOR records
at THE BOOK SHOP. l-3t
, Dr. Peek visited the high school
this morning and found three of the
class rooms too cold for study, the
temperature being 55 degrees or less.
The others were bearable. Water was
in some of the radiators, nobody hav having
ing having thought to turn it off, and this had
a great deal to do with defective heat heating.
ing. heating. The fires in the furnaces had
been well kept up, the steam gauge
registering eight pounds most of the
time. Dr. Peek advised sending the
children home if the temperature in a
class room fell below 60. The pri primary
mary primary school seems to have done very
well today, the temperature averag averaging
ing averaging 70 except in one room, where it
was under 60. It would have saved a
lot of trouble and misery among the
children to have let school out these
two days.
Let. us send you up some of those
tulip bulbs that are now ready. They
will bloom in a short time. The Court
Pharmacy. Phone 284. 26-6t
W. K. Lane, M. D., Physician and
Sureeon, specialist Eye, Ear, ose and
Threat. Office over 5 and 10 cent store,
Ocala, Fla. tf
MRS. SARA JANE MANLY
Vocal culture m Merchants block.
Studio hours 10 to 12 a. m. 16-12t
ARR1VAL AND DEPARTURE
OF TRAINS IN OCALA
Seaboard Air Line
Arrive from Jacksonville.. 2:09a.m.
Leave for Tampa . . 2:10 a.m..
Arrive from Jacksonville.. 1:30 p. m.
Leave for Tampa . . 1:50 p.m.:
Arrive from Jacksonville.. 4:24 p. m.
Leave for Tampa
Arrive from Tampa u
Leave for Jacksonville...
Arrive from Tampa
Leave for Jacksonville...
Arrive from Tampa
Leave for Jacksonville...
4:25 p.m.,
.
7:ii?a m-
1:3a p. m.:
1:55 p.m. I
4:04 p. m. 1
4:05 p.m. I
Atlantic oast Line j
Arrive from Jacksonville.. 3:14a.m.
Leave or St. Petersburg.. 3:15a.m.
Arrive from Jack-nville. 3:34 p.m.
Leave for St. Petersburg. 3:35 p.m.
Arrive from Jacksonville. .10:12 p. m.
Leave for Leesburg 10:13 p.m.
Arrive from Jt. Petersburg 2:11a.m.
LLeave for Jacksonville.... 2:12a.m.
Arrive from St. Petersourg l:2op. m.
Leave for Jacksonville.... 1:45p.m.
Arrive from Leesburg. . 6:41 a. m.
Leave for Jacksonville.... 6:42a.m.
Arrive from Homosassa... 1.25p.m.
Leave for Homosassa 3:25 p.m.
Arrive from Gainesville, 1
daily except Sunday 11:50 a.m.
Leave for Gainesville, daily
except Sunday 4:45 p.m.
Leave for Lakeland, Tues Tuesday,
day, Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday 7:25 a. m.
Ar. from Lakeland, Tues Tuesday,
day, Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday 11:03 p. m.
Leave for Wilcox, Monday,
Wednesday and Friday. 7:10 a. m.
Arrive from WTilcox, Monday-
Wednesday, Friday. 6:45 p.m.
R. A. M. CHAPTER So. 13
Regular convocations of the Ocala
Chapter No. 13 R. A. M., on the fourth
Friday in everv month at 8 p. m.
' H. S. Wesson, IL P. j
Jake Brown, Secretary.

UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS
WANTED, LOST, FOUND, FOR
SALE, FOR RENT AND SIM SIM-ILAR
ILAR SIM-ILAR LOCAL NEEDS

UAiLb six line maximum, one
time, 25c. ;three times, 50c; six times!
75c; one month $3. Payable in ad-1
varce.
FOR SALE OR TRADE Four
smooth mouth mules in good condi
tion. Will exchange for car. F. F.
Elack, Oak, Fla. 28-6t
FOR SALE OR RENTForty acre!
tract of land, 35 acres under fence, J
four miles north of Ocala on Dixie ;
Highway. Four-room cottage, barn, j
good cement well, poultry yard, etc
Terms reasonable Se.e or write T. T.
Munroe, Ocala, Fla. 3-l-6t
FOR SALE Good lime rock for roads
or lime kiln. See E. A. Robertson,
Orange avenue. Route A, Box C9,
Ocala, Fla. 3-l-6t
i
FOR SALE My residence on Fort
King avenue, furnished or unfurnish unfurnished.
ed. unfurnished. Apply to Mrs. K. M. Brinkley,
Ocala. l-12t
WANTED Two men, at once. Must
be able to drive a car and stay oh the
job. Apply to Chief, Ocala Fire De
partment. l-3t
FOR SALE Light Oldsmobile eight,
with wire wheels. Guaranteed in A 1
shape. A bargain for cash. Ocala
Auto and Garage Co. 3-l-6t
WOOD CUTTING On account of the
scarcity of wood, we will in future cut
wood only on Saturdays for the pres
ent. D. N. Mathews, 609 East Sec-1
ond street. l-6t
P'OR SALE One Airedale dog. Ap Apply
ply Apply to Lois Livingston.' Phone 288. 13t
FARM HELP WANTED On truck
and stock farm adjoining town of
Ocoee, Orange county; wages $2.50 a
day. Steady work. Marshall's Farms,
Ocoee, Fla. 1-17-sat-wed tf
EGGS FOR HATCHING Thorough-
bied S. C. Brown Leghorn eggs, $1.50
for 15; from pize winning stock. O.
G. Jones, Anthony, Fla, 27-4t6
WANTED Young man or boy, pre preferably
ferably preferably 17 to 20 years old, to assist in
store. Apply to T. W. Troxler. 26-6t
TO EXCHANGE Forty acres land,
twelve cleared and fenced. Will ex exchange
change exchange for a good car in- running
order. Address, "P," care the Star
office. 24-12t
FOR SALE-r-Florida Runner pea peanuts,
nuts, peanuts, well matured, for seed; 12
cents per pound in any quantity. An Anthony
thony Anthony Farms, Anthony, Fla. 24 -tf
FURNITURE, ETC. i buy and se'l
second hand furniture. Experts put it
m good condition before' re-selling.
Repair sewinj machines, lawn mow mowers,
ers, mowers, enamelware, etc. J. W. Hunter,
:110, 312, 314 South Main St. 23-tf
FOR SALE (Wood Cut to Order )
Reduce the high cost of keeping com com-f
f com-f citable this winter by buying your
wood cut read to burn direct from the
producer, thereby saving the profits
of the 2ty wood yard. Orders fillti
anywhers in the city. Phone 39 M. C.
P. Howell, Ocala. 20-m
HADSOCK'S WOOD YARD Phone
Vour orders to Smoak's shop. Phone
KG. 2-m
I LOST Bunch of keys between post
office and my shop. Finder return to
; p. a. Davies. 20-tf
I CR SALE Rent or exchange, five-
jiocm house; firts class condition. Lot
! 50 x 105, North Ocala. Cash or time.
I Address Box 424, Ocala, or Star of-
fice. 4-tf
i
poR gALE New Chevrolet or Ford.
. T,w t of
-
& Guynn s store, Ocala. 27-ot
Cherry Bark Cough Syrup will
SlOP mat CUUIlf UClJg B 11 Uj
Store. 2-18-tf
.
- '

Fir a in Mil in Mf oif

Franklin performance is showing more motorists every day that shock absorbers, radiator thermo thermometers
meters thermometers and anti-freeze mixtures are crutches which thny can thiow svay when they buy a Franklin Car.
The Franklin needs none of these accessories because it is light, flexible and direct air cooled..
Franklin owner's records show that with the pound of heavy, rigid weight eliminated, blowouts are
almost unknown and punctures average only one in every 4141 miles.
Naturally, a car constructed on such a principle costs less to run and to keep in running condition.
Just how much less is a revelation to those unfamiliar with Franklin ewnet's records:
20 miles to the gallon of gasoline.
12,5000 miles to the set of tires.
50 per cent slower yearly depreciation.

J. B. HAMIBY

Box 489

AUTO

Complete Line:

Tires,
Tubes,
Spark Plugs,

SIio;Ic Absorbers.

Ft. King Ave.

BICYCLE REPAIRING A SPECIALTY

If you don't know it now
your first trial order will be ample proof to you.
We sell the best groceries
in the best way give you the best service because
we want your trade
Don't laii fo give us tba! trial order
Twill be to your advantage.

. 1 nAnnfisn OPIOIII CO'i

18 ROOM HOUSE
FdR SALE
To Close Out Estate
Located on y Qiiarier-aere
lot one block Iron PosioHiee,
cheap at S30C0. Price will
be reduced $10 per day until I
sold.
PRICE TODAY $2340
li interested see me at once
F&ANK W, MTTC
Real Eslaie fciala, Fla.
Economy
in Every Cake
I Ask your grocer
for Butternut
substitute. Its
Bread, and take no
made in 10 and lo-cent loaves, ana
i i
mauc wvuiu vaaaj
I ery.
-
'
l-3t

,,,', Va. y;7f..

SUPPLIES

Spot Lights,
Bumpers,
Snubbers,
iP3
Ocala, Florida
Arrival and Departure of passenger
1 trains p.t OCAI UNION STATION.
Tiiw fllcvi-n,; .schedule Sfrurea pub--!L?htd
as information and not guais
rsteed.
(Eastern MndanJ Time)
j I tZtevt&i, ilti LINE RAILROAD
Leave
2:1b am Jackson vilte-N 'York
Arrive
2:10 am
Jacl.Lonville 1:30 pm
4:C5 pm
Jacksonville 4:25 pm
Tampa-
- Trmpa 2:15 am
rvlanntee- 3:35 pm
am
am
St. Petersburg
l:CJpm Tr.mpa-Manatee 1:35 pm
4:20 pm Tauifi-St. P'tersbrg 4:05 pm
ATLAM it COAST LINE RAILROAD
Leave Arrive
2:12 pm JacKsonville-N'York 3:15am
l:4om J'kionville-Ga'nsville 3:35 pm
B-4Jam J'k: onvi'ile-G'nesvile 10:13 pm
3:l6am St.Pet'suig-Lakeland 2:12 am
3:25 pm St.Pet'sbrg-Lakeland l-:25pm
7:10 am Dunnellon-Wilcox
:?5 am Dun,el!o'-L'kelnd 11:03 pm
pin Hoxno-assa 1:30 pm
10. lo f-m Letfburg ,6:42a
i:4jpm Gainesville 1 1:50 am
"Monday, "Wednesday, Friday.
TupHav Thursda v. Saturday.
A licih shipment of Liggett's candy,
"The Chocolates with "the Wonderful
Centers," just in at Gerig's Drug
Store. 2-18-tf
March ih in show day in Ocala. 2-
L. A LEX AN
PRACTICAL. CARPENTER
AKD BUILDER
Careful Estimates mafle on all Con
tract work. Gives More and Better
Work for the Money than any other
"3ntracor in the city.

hi nun muni urfiiii m i

II tinlLllUnU UUiiLUULLU T,

DERF

Corner
Lemon and First Streets
PALATKA, FLA.

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