The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:05452

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
EVENING

A
S
OCALA, FLORIDA, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2a. 191!).
VOL. 26, SO. 307
RETURN OF THE
RAILROADS
ANNOUNCE THEY
A REBUFF FOR CAUGHT UP WITH
MANY PROBLEMS
TO .MEET
PEACE ens
IN GAY PAREE
.
D'ANNUNZIO
ONE CRIMINAL

K

WILL ORGANIZE

i

9

V
6

From the Government to their Own Owners,
ers, Owners, xdr. WiLson Says, Will Take
Place March First

(Associated Pres
Washingtonr Dec. 25. Control and
operation of the nation's railroads, as assumed
sumed assumed by the government as a war
measure, will revent to the owners of
the railroad properties next March
1st, unless Congress by legislation
fixe3 an earlier date. President Wil Wilson
son Wilson through a proclamation last night
fixing March 1st as the date of the
return put at rest speculation as to
the time of handing back the roads.
EXPRESS ALSO
By another proclamation
issued (
last night the president ordered the
dissolution March 1st of the American
Railway Express company, which was
fpimed under government directionby
consolidation of the Adams, 'Ameri-j
can, Wells-Fargo and Southern com companies.
panies. companies. LYONS-MOORE
A wedding of interest to a host of
Ocala people was that of Miss Mar Marguerite
guerite Marguerite Moore and Mr. Fred C. Lyons
of Tampa, which took place last eve evening
ning evening at 9 o'clock at the First Baptist
church in Tampa, Rev. C. W. Duke
performing the ceremony. The wed wedding
ding wedding though a quiet and simple affair,
was: an extremely pretty one. The

young bride was never more radiantly jwe republicana 0r 'democrats or Cath Cath-happy
happy Cath-happy and pretty than she was lasto;ica or A R Ag c Methodists or

evening.
Mrs. Lyons is an Ocala girl and has'
lived in this city all of her life, with)
uieuon oiaicw BpCa m
Tampa and four years at San An-1
x 1 -1 .ii xT TT 1

torno, wnere-ane aircnueu i xoiyi Congress and make it see things our
Name Academy. She is one of Ocala sT v Wo Af a.r won, f

xavorue arm cievur yuuug iauief
; nas won me jove anu auuniauuu ui
all by her sweet and vivacious man
ners.
Mrs. Lyons' many friends
that her marriage takes her away,
but wish her the greatest happiness
in her new home in Tampa, where the
groom has made ready for her a cozy
furnished bungalow.'
Mr. Lyons was born in New York
city, but has been a regular winter
-visitor to Florida for many years,
and for the last four years has been
with theExchange National Bank of
Tampa, where he has made a fine re-
cord for his business integrity and
ability.
The happy couple will immediately
gov to housekeeping and the congrat congratulations
ulations congratulations and best wishes of their
Ocala friends go with them into their
new home.
i
FELLOWSHIP
Fellowship. Dec. 22. Winter
has
certainly come to greet oh
Santa
Claus.
The farmers are about through
grinding cane and the quality of syrup
i3 extra good on account of the long
season this fall. Every farmer who
makes syrup this winter should make
at least 100 pounds of sugar for home
consumption, and then they would be
indeepndent of the sugar trust.
Quite a lot of hogs are being but butchered
chered butchered in this vicinity and the high
price of meat will not cut any figure
with the farmers.
The acreage of the farms will be cut
at least 20 per cent, in 1920 on ac account
count account of the shortage of labor. I
would advise all farmers to plant a
small acreage and prepare the ground
thoroughly, fertilize and cultivate well
and fast.
Misses Fae Beck, Mamie Hudgens
and Beecher Best were callers Friday
evening.
Mr. and Mrs. Ferdinand Fant and
daughter, Miss Leone, also Mr. Roland
Blitch and.sister, Miss Oda and Miss
Annie Stepnens of Jacksonville were
callers last Thursday afternoon.
Mr. and Mrs. Golden of Kentucky
are the guests of MrT and Mrs. J. R.I
Shearer.
Mr. and Mr. H. L. Shearer 'will
have their mothers from Kentucky as
their guests during the holidays. This
"is the first visit of these ladies to
Florida and we hope they will be fav favorably
orably favorably impressed with the land of
flowers.
Misses Sara and Caledonia Fergu Ferguson
son Ferguson of New Smyrna, are expected
home today.
Mr. Claud McCully, who is teaching
at Palm View in Manatee county, will
snend the holidays with his parents.
Mr. Garv Beck, who is teaching at
New Smyrna and his sister, Miss
Mabel, who is teaching in Ocala, came
home Saturdav to snend the holidays

with their parents. ; doesn't interest us to be bowed to by
Miss Fae Beck will have as her. Mrs. Gotrox, not be invited to the
guest during the holidays Mrs. W. L. ; Dvchess of Dingbat's tea. When we
Howell and children of Plant City, 'get through our day's work, we want
also Mrs. J. M. Smith and son of Wa- to go home and tend the garden, eat
cahoota. 'with our family, play with the chil-
This scribe made five exhibits at the dren, read a book and go to bed.
fair and was fortunate enough to win; We are not of any elect,
a prize on each exhibit. We are not misunderstood. On the

V hat we Suppose May Properly be
Termed the Hen Wing of the
Democratic Party

New York, Dec. 25. The organiza organization
tion organization of the national woman's demo demo-ctatic
ctatic demo-ctatic party begins here tomorrow,
with more than one hundred promi prominent
nent prominent New York women in attendance,
it v.as announced today. The call for
the meeting was issued by Mrs.
George Childs, president of the Wom Women'.;
en'.; Women'.; Democratic Club, and Miss Mar Margaret
garet Margaret Vale, niece of President Wil Wilson.
son. Wilson. According to the organizers of
the new woman's party, it will co cooperate
operate cooperate with the national democratic
on-aniztinn nl is tn h& r crnrfforl
"in no way a split in the democratic
rjnks."
WE ARE THE SHEEP
(By Dr. Frank Crane)
It's about time the great, silent un un-vocal,
vocal, un-vocal, majority had its innings.
I refer to what Mr. Meltzer calls the
"intermediary class" neither capital capitalist
ist capitalist nor proletariat. They call us
bourgeois.
That means just plain, every-day
United States folks.
We are not socialists, because we
have no cocksure scheme for running
the government nor for bringing in
the millenium in a minute.
We are not of Wall street, nor are
Sinn Feiners or bolsheviks
. .
or any-
We don,t want graft We dont want
ap ything we don't earn. We don't
t to hold a pistol at the hed of
rags and g0 home unless everybody
agrees With us. We are no menacing
i minority.
I XT xl 1 1 1 -- 1
i t; are uiu Mietp everyuouy snears.
Wu go along, paying our taxes, get getting
ting getting all the money we honestly can,
hiring people to labor for us when we
can get anybody that will work, in investing
vesting investing in stocks and bonds we don't
knew much about, paying parsons to
tell us how to be decent, reading the
L. f nrinA inti,,, nir
Kind ot newspapers and magazines
Lnd eati the b'read that we find for
lj and t in to ob the laws our
I, -c ix.- .ftT1Af.
lsn t it about time we iormed a
party, or a union, or something?
The railroad men have their union,
and the bricklayers, and the molders,
and the waiters, and the plumbers,
and the actors. And the bankers have
their trusts. And then there are the
embattled office seekers and grafters
that organize into political parties.
What about us? Us is spelt U. S.
What about me, and John and Cous Cousin
in Cousin Ed, and Aunt Mary ?
I mean that vast multitude that
walk when the street-car men strike,
freeze when the janitors strike, pay
$50 for a 30 suit when the tailors
strike, eat flapjacks when the bakers
strike, cook our own bacon and eggs
when the cooks strike, and enjoy a lit little
tle little peace of mind and a chance to
talk when the theater orchestra
strikes.
We thought we didn't belong tS
any class, but we discover that we do.
We are bourgeois.
It is we that the rampant bolshevik
hates. It is upon us that the Green Greenwich
wich Greenwich Village revolutionist looks with
scorn.
The capitalist and the aristocrat
snub us.
The laborer regards us as his ene enemy,
my, enemy, also gouges us.
We give the literary high-brow a
large pain.
When there is a strike, both sides
strike us, not each other. The grocer
cheats us.
All who yearn to revolute and up-
turn find us i nthe road and curse us.
Also the reactionary, seeing we are
cold toward the time-honored bunk of
his glorious traditions, pauses to swat
us.
Poets look upon us as hopeless, and
bricklayers are of the same opinion.
The trouble is, viewed from one
side, that we use a toothbrush, wear
a clean collar, live with our legal wife,
work for a living, save up a little
money, keep most of the ten corn-
mandments, and generally try to mind
! our own business. Which is just plain,
disgustingly common.
'' The trouble is, viewed from the
other side, we don't care a hang about
, s&ssiety and our best people, we don't
' want to keep up with the Joneses, it

Begins to Look Like the Hero Stuff
Will Yield to a Safe and
Sane Policy

i Associated Press)
Rome, Dec. 22. Premier Nitti will
make new declarations before the
St rate concerning Fiume, before he
leaves for Paris, according to th6
Giornale D'ltalia. General Badoglio
has returned suddenly to Rome for sx.
conference with the premier and king.
The Messaggero announces that Ad
miral Millo has informed D'Annunzio
he would not tolerate the landing of
D'Annunziantroops at Zara. adding
the only way to save Italy was to ac accept
cept accept the government's proposal.
LEE KNOCKED OUT
BY DEPONTHIEU
t A.soclaie1 Press. i
Paris, Dec. 23. Deponthieu, feath featherweight
erweight featherweight champion of Europe, knock knocked
ed knocked cut Taney Lee, British champion,
in the seventeenth round her tonight.
LAUGH AND THE WORLD
LAUGHS WITH YOU
(Ella Wheeler Wilcox)
Laugh and the world laughs with you;
Weep, and you weep alone;
For the sad old earth must borrow its
mirth,
But has troubles enough of its own.
Sing, and the hills will answer;
Sigh, it is lost on the air.
The echoes bound to a joyful sound,
But shrink from voicing care.
m
Rejoice, and men will seek you;
Grieve, and they turn and go.
They want full measure of all your
pleasure,
But they do not need your woe.
Be glad, and your friends are many;
Be sad, and you lose them all.
There are none to decline your nec nec-tared
tared nec-tared wine,
But alone you must drink life's gall.
Feast, and your halls are crowded;
Fast, and the world goes by,
Succeed and give, and it helps you live,
But no man can help you die.
There is room in the halls of pleasure
For a large and lordly train,
But one by one we must all file on
Through the narrow aisles of pain.
SHERIFF TO ENFORCE
ANTO LICENSE LAW
BEGINNING JAN. 1ST
Booklets containing the automobile
laws of the state of. Florida, with
marked sections referring especially
to licenses, are being distributed from
the sheriff's office to automobile deal dealers,
ers, dealers, who are requested to call the at
tention of their patrons to them.
All auto owners are warned that on
and after January 1, 1920, all cars
must bear a license tag issued by
State Comptroller Amos, and that
failure to comply strictly with this
law entals a penalty that may be a
fine of from $25 to $100, or a prison
sentence of from one to six months.
The sheriff of this county will rigid
ly enforce the law, so this is fair
warning to auto owners not to be
caught unnrepared.
contrary, our neighbors have us sized
up about right, and we are getting
about all we earn.
We don't believe the country is go going
ing going to the dogs. We think the presi president
dent president isj doing his durndest according
to his lights. We believe most men
are honest and want to do the square
thing, and most things will get well
if you don't pick 'em.
We are full of the most bourgeois
opinions. We believe prohibition's a
good thing and that well all be glad
of it in ten years from now. We don't
sec why a woman shouldn't vote if
she wants to. We think the men who
arc running the big business of the
country, and who came to their posi positions
tions positions by natural selection, are doing it
better than a lot of walking delegates
qf the plumbers' union would do it.
Aiso that a man is not necessarily a
criminal because he's rich, nor a no nobody
body nobody because he's poor.
We are in the bourgeois class, along
with Abraham Lincoln, Henry Ford,
J. J. Hill, Ed Howe, Melville Stone,
James Whitcomb Riley, Walt Mason,
John Wanamaker, William Shakspere,
also the typewriter and telephone girl,
the clerk in the shoe store, and the
milkman, the doctor, lawyer, preacher
and the ex-saloonkeeper.
JWe don't belong to the Vere de
Veres, and a good many of our ances
tors, likely as not, were glad to book
passage in the steerage. Neither do
we, on the other hand, belong to the
professional proletariat; Upton Sin
ciair, the United States Senate. Debs
and Berser jret on our nerves with
their unending yaps and aches.
-We are hopeless. We even go to
church. Hearst's Magazine.
All customers of Federal Bread are
satisfied customers. Ask them. tf

Worse Than Death Sentence Given

One German for Yiolation of
Rules of Warfare
(Associated Press)
Amiens, Dec. 25. A courtmartial
has passed sentencejpon the German
officer Robert Roekling, administrator
of the mines at Karlsruhe, to ten
years confinement, fifteen years exile
and a fine of ten million francs, upon
conviction of the charge of organized
pillage of the factories in eastern
France. Roekling testified at the trial
that he collected machinery and other
material from factories and blew it up
in November, 1918. A brother officer,
Reiman Ludwig, was given a similar
sertence by default.
PRESENT THEIR GREETINGS
TO THE POPE
(Associated Pn-sa)
Rome, Dec. 25. All cardinals pres present
ent present in Rome, patriarchs, archbishops
and ecclesiastical lay courts gathered
at the Vatican today to present their
Christmas greetings to the pope. Car Cardinal
dinal Cardinal Vannuttelli, dean of the sacred
college, delivered an address voicing
the sentiments of his colleagues and
seif. The pope replied, returning the
greetings and recalling the urgent
necessity for aiding the poor and
children of war victims.
GOT INSPIRATION AT PIANO
Immortal Melodies Evolved by Masters
x While Their Fingers "Wandered
Idly Over the Keym." j
A story 19 told of Mendelssohn to
the effect that the charming arpeggio
figure In the Spring song of his "Song
Without Words," came to hlra on a
day when he played with his children
at the piano, and allowed them to
catch his hands, as they wandered
over the keys; and it Is a fact that
many of our most beautiful musical
productions owe their origin to axtem axtem-porizlng
porizlng axtem-porizlng on the piano.
This Is not to be wondered at for
many of our greatest musicians have
poured out their heart? deepest feel feelings
ings feelings as their fingers hare flitted. In a
desultory fashion, over the keys, pro producing
ducing producing corresponding cotes and chords
to their ever-changing moods; finding
at the keyboard a vent for their In Inmost
most Inmost thoughts and desires, often meet meeting
ing meeting with that triumphant response that
time can never diminish.
We can see in the works of Chopin
and Schumann a proof that in the
piano Is the origin of many of their
most beautiful productions, while in
the great symphonies of the old mas masters
ters masters their shape, form, and color have
been gained at the piano whero their
fingers "wandered idly over the noisy
keys."
This Is not so hard to understand
when we consider that the method of
composing a melody Is, In essence, but
the picking out and assimilating some
melodic tune to which the harmony Is
afterward added. From this primitive
Instinct Is ultimately produced the Im Immortal
mortal Immortal tone pictures of the great mu musicians.
sicians. musicians. FISH LIAR WORKS OVERTIME
Here Is One Concerning a Salt Her Herring
ring Herring That Is Challenge to the
Imaginative.
That Is the worst of those fish sto stories.
ries. stories. Somebody always comes along
with a better one.
Recently the Evening News told the
V. A. D.'s story of the frozen fish that
came to life in the cooking pot. Then
a correspondent a naval officer. It
should be said easily j-ts that to
shame.
"An Interesting experiment was
tried some little time ago." he writes
to us, 'with an ordinary herring.
"The fish was put Into a large bowl
of salt water and every day a small
quantity, of water was removed and
an equal quantity of fre?h was sub substituted,
stituted, substituted, until eventually the flh lived
and thrived in purely fresh vatr.
"The owner was so pleased wfth the
success of his experiment that ne then
tried removing a very small quantity
of water dally until the bowl was
empty, and found that the herring did
excellently, entirely without water,
and as he was so lively In the empty
bowl he had to put him In a cape.
"Here he lived happily, hopping
from perch to perch just like a bird,
until one day some sudden noise star
tied him and re fell Into his water
trough and was drowned!"
TO AUTO OWNERS
I am again at my old place of bus business
iness business on the Anthony road, where I
shall be pleased to attend to your car
repair work by appointment. Call
phone 393. 29-tf M. A. Bouvier.

Japanese Premier Warns His People

that Their Responsibilities
are Heavy
Associated Press)
Tokio, Tuesday. Dec. 23. On the
jvc of formal opening of the diet,
Premier Kara i.-sued a statement as as-s.
s. as-s. tinjr that "many problems exist,
some of them not easy of solution:"
"rtension of the franchise, internal
food problems and foreign diplomacy,
especially with reference to China,
.-lure us in the face," he said, "de "demanding
manding "demanding study before a solution can
1j reached. The government is op op-tfrri.stic,
tfrri.stic, op-tfrri.stic, however, and expects to en encounter
counter encounter no serious obstacles."
A SON'S LETTER TO HIS FATHER
(Exchange)
"Dear Dad: I am writing this to
you, though you have been dead thirty
years.
"From your seat in the plane be beyond
yond beyond I hope you can see these lines. I
feel I must say some things to you,
thiiigs I didn't know when I was a
boy in your house, and things I was
too stupid to say.
"It's only now, after passing thru
th
e long, hard school of years, only
xi vr mir font rrantr I
rxw, when my own hair is gray, that
I understand how you felt.
"I must have been a bitter trial to
you. I believed my own petty wis wisdom,
dom, wisdom, and I know now how ridiculous
it wras, compared to that calm, ripe,
wholesome wisdom of yours.
"Most of all, I want to confess my
-xrst sin against you. It was the
feeling I had that you 'did not under understand.
stand. understand. "When I look back over" it now, I
know that you did understand. You
understood me better than I did my myself.
self. myself. Your wisdom flowed around
mine like the ocean around an island.
"And how patient you were with
me! How full of long-suffering, and
kindness!
"And how pathetic, it now comes
heme to me, 'were your effdrts to get
close to ne, to win my confidence, to
be my pal!
"I wish you were here now, across
the table from me, just for an hour,
so that I could tell how there's no wall
any more; I understand you now, dad,
and, God! how J love you, and wish I
could go back and be your boy again.
"I know now how I could make you
happy every day. I know how you
felt.
"It took a good many years for this
prodigal son and all sons are in a
measure prodigal to come to .himself,
but I've come; I see it all now.
"I know what a rich and priceless
thing,, and one least understood, is
that mighty love and tenderness and
craving to help which a father feels
toward his boy. For I have a boy of
my own.
"And it is he that makes we want
to go back to you, and get down on
my knees to you
"Up these somewhere in the silence,
hear me, dad, and believe me."
NOTICE of ANIMALS IMPOUNDED
To Whom It May Concern:
This is to certify that I have- this
day placed in the city pound the fol following
lowing following described animal which has
been found running at large within
the corporate limits of the city of
Ocala, contrary to the ordinances of
said city:
One red cow marked crop and split
ech ear.
The owners thereof or their agents,
and all whom it may concern, are
hereby notified that if the animal is
not claimed and all expenses of taking
and impounding thereof are not paid
within three days from date hereof.
to-wit: On the 28th day of December,
1010, I will sell the same to the high highest
est highest and best bidder, said sale to take
place between the hours of 11 a. m.
and 3 p. m. on said day at the city
1-ound in Ocala, Florida.
S. C. M. Thomas,
Marshal City of Ocala.
C. A. Holloway, Impounder. It
MIRIAM REBEKAH LODGE NO. 15
Miriam Rebekah Lodge No. 15
meets the first and third Monday eve
j ning in each month in the Odd Fel
Mrs. W. T. Whitley, N. G.
Eloise Bouvier, Secretary.
WOODMEN OF THE WORLD
Fort King Camp No. 14 meets at
K. of P. hall at 7:30 p. m. every sec
ond and fourth Friday. Visiting sov
ereigns are always welcome.
W. W. Stripling, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage, Clerk.
.A few of those games left. Better
I r w-t
.come in ana eei yours, ueng's urug
; Store
12-tf

Feople Trying to Make Up for 'the
Long Years of PeriL Pri Privation
vation Privation and Pain

(Associated Press)
Paris, Dec. 25 Paris celebrated the
first peace Christmas today with great
enthusiasm, crowds thronging the
churches and theaters. The principal
streets were filled all night with cele cele-brators,
brators, cele-brators, and popular restaurants were
carried by storm.
RAINS FLOOD FRENCH RIVERS
Continued rains have caused floods
ir a number of rivers, resulting in
considerable property loss. Several
streets are inundated at Nancy.
REMEDYING THE COAL CRISIS
The newspapers announce that the
government has decided on new meas measures
ures measures to remedy the coal crisis. One
plan is for turning the clocks ahead
an hour for the purpose of conserving
the fuel need for lightning. 'Another
project will greatly restrict lighting
in the larger cities, particularly Paris.
REYNOLDS-PERRY
Mr. G, O. Reynolds of Summerfield
d M w s.p of 0xford
w
were
married this morning at the residence
of the latter's sister, Mrs. T. C. Con-'
nell, at Summerfield. Only the rela relatives
tives relatives of the two families and a few
close friends were present to witness
the ceremony, but it was one of the
prettiest and happiest weddings that
eTer occurred in Summerfield. Mrs.
Reynolds is one of Oxford's best be-'
loved young matrons and her depar-
ture to another town is much regret regretted,
ted, regretted, but she left with the best wishes
of her many friends. Mr. Reynolds
is section foreman for the S. A. L. at
Summerfield and is highly thought of
and esteemed by all of his acquaint acquaintances.
ances. acquaintances. Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds will
make their home at Summerfield.,
Mrs. A. Proctor Sr., mother of the
bride, added greatly to the happy
spirit of the day by holding a family
heme of her daughter, Mrs. T. C. Con-
jnejj
WHY, WE CELEBRATE
(Joe Earman in Palm Beach Post)
.When the wise men saw the star
they rejoiced with exceeding great
jcy.
And when they came into the stable
they saw the young Child with Mary,
his mother, and they fell down and
worshipped him.
A baby was born in a stable in a
country town in far off Palestine.
There was no room for mother or
child in any house and the infant was
laid in a manger. This child grew into
a goodly youth whom his neighbors
regarded with favor. As a young man
he labored with his father at a car carpenter's
penter's carpenter's bench. When thirty years
old, he left the shop and for three
years went about preaching the gospel
and healing the sick. A few people
followed him and the new doctrine he
taught was heard with astonishment.
He said the people should love one
another.
The established church and the
political leaders at that time regarded
the young preacher as fanaticaland a
hexetic and a dangerous citizen. They
arrested, tried and put him to death.
Because this baby was born, lived,
grew, taught, cared for suffering hu humanity
manity humanity and died, we have Christinas
day.
He founded no denominational
church or sect.
He gave utterance to no formal
creed. s
He established no political party.
He left no marble monument or
great wealth.
He had no army, navy or throne.
He had no home.
He was born in a stable and buried
io a borrowed tomb.
He lived and died a pauper, yet the
whole world bows before hi3 name and
every land celebrates his birthday
with joy and gladness.
Love is the secret of the Galilean
peasant's power. He suffered, and died
for love of humanity. He taught and
lived love, and love makes Christmas,
not gifts, feasts, celebrations and din-.
ners.
If there be love, it is a merry
Christmas, whether in hut or mansion.
It is the love feast of the world.
To, every reader of the Post may it
bf so in very truth.
TEMPLE ATTRACTIONS
FOR DECEMBER
Thursday, 25: Marguerite Clark n
"Girls."
Friday, 26: Louis Benniibn in
"Speedy Meade."
Saturday, 27: All Star Cast in The
1 House of Intrigua."



OCA LA EVENING STAR THURSDAY, DECEMBER 25, 1919

QCALA EVEI1HIG STAH

I DATE MAKES NO DIFFERENCE

t'Mlke4 Erery Day Except Sunday by i
STAfc PUBLISHING COMPANY j
OF OCALA, FLA.

R. It. Carroll, President
V. Leaven good, Seeretary-Treaaarer

Entered at Ocala, Sla... post office as
second-class matter.
TELEPHONES
llwufaeaa Of flee Five-Oae
Editorial Department Two-Serea

3Q3&BEH ASSOCIATED PllESS
The Associated Press la exclusively
entitled for the use for republication of
All news dispatches credited to it or
not. otherwise credited in this paper
wad' also the local news published
herein. All rights of republication of
special dispatches herein are also reserved.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
- Domeatle
On year, in advance $1.00
dlx, months, In advance 3.00
Chree months, in advance 1.50
me -month, in advance 10
FereMra
One year, in advance ft.OO
Htx months, In .advance 4.25
Three months, in advance 2.25
One month. In advance to

Both our socks were well filled this
morning:. We were too lazy to pull
them off last night.
Little Tom Marshall is the best
looking democratic nominee we have
heard of yet. He has been partially
obscured for seven years, but he is a
mighty good man for all that.
,
In W. D. Cam for county school
superintendent and Bruce" Meffert for
county commissioner for District 1,
Gov. Catts has made two very good
appointments. They will be generally
acceptable to the county and district.
Congressman Frank Clark sends
the Star Christmas good wishes. We
reciprocate, and beg to inform the
congressman that he will stay in Con Congress
gress Congress another two years if we have
anything to say about it.
To' the many friends who have kept
out postoffice box crowded for the last
two days with Christmas messages
of good will, we can only repeat the
sentiment of Tiny Tim: "God bless
us1 all, every one." We have had so
many of the welcome missives, that
we. can't begin to answer them. But
wc are sincerely grateful for all.
The Star wishes Deputy Clerk T. D.
Lancaster Jr. a merry Christmas and
begs leave to inform him that it in intends
tends intends to support him for the office of
clerk of the circuit court in next
year's primaries. We have had an
eye on "T. D." since he was a kid in
kneepants and know he can fill the of office
fice office well.
BY OUR FLORIDA BARD

In the past score of years, wise men,
not of the east, have done considerable
iconoclasting in regard to Christmas,
but without any perceptible result, so
far as the great mass of the people
are concerned. Some of these wise
guys have insisted that Christ could
not have been born on the 25th of De December,
cember, December, because at that time the shep shepherds
herds shepherds could not have been keeping
their flocks in the fields. Others have
called attention to the Yule festival,
immediately following the turning of
the sun .and the beginning of the
lengthening of the days, which fes festival
tival festival was held in many heathen coun countries
tries countries for centuries before the Chris

tian 'era. Perhaps these highbrows, are
right, but what difference does it
make? The main thing about Christ Christmas
mas Christmas is to get together and have a good

time and .make other people happy.

Date makes no difference.

WHAT THE BORDER

THINKS OF MEXICO

(Times-Union)

Lawsey, goodness, what confusion,
everything is upside down,
Everyone, grandma to baby's, been a
buyin things in town.
Comin's in the house so sly with them
t packages so big,
AnVso little an mysterious it makes
you dance a jig.
Oh, we're tangled up in Christmas
an' the holly on the wall
Even seems to smile a greetin' to the
fambly one an' all
AnV'the mistletoe is hangin' from the
big ole chandelier
An' the girls get under it an' simply
grin from ear to ear.
Yes1; we're tangled up in Christmas an'
we can't tell where to turn
We are in each other's way but oh
? how bright the big logs burn
Gettin' ready for the Christmas day
v, there's sure lots to be done
An' we're tangled up in Christmas
" but I'll say its lots o' fun.
The Little Tin Horn and the Dram
Oh inevitably once every year it must
come
The noise of the little tin horn and
" the drum,
But -where is the mamma and where
. is the dad
Who fail to respond to, their sound
and be glad,
Respond with a laugh and a hug and
a kiss
That the dear little tots have such
--$oys and bliss.
Ob, let them be glad with these play-
f things to chum
The little tin horn and the dear little
drum,
As they march round the rooms and
play soldier so glad
To the music of best toys that they
" ever have had.
Grandpa looks longingly on as they
-play
And his thoughts go a scooting way
... back to the day
When he was a youngster on some
Christmas morn
And played with a drum or a little
tin horn.
And grandma looks on with a smile
on her face
But on her cheeks just a tear you can
trace
And ,the children play on and no one
l-' is forlorn
To the sound of the drum and the little
tin horn. Phil Armstrong.

Prudential
Life Insurance
J The kind that insures,
J Against want in old age,
J Against raises in premium
2 The Prudential Idnd
5. See Ditto at once
; F. W. Ditto.
Ocala, Florida.

ADJUTANT GENERAL WILL
BE HERE ON THE EIGHTH

Adjutant General Sidney J. Catts
Jr. informs the Star that he will be
in Ocala Jan. 8, for the purpose of or organizing
ganizing organizing a national guard unit. We
hope all our ex-service men will take
note of the date and as many of them
as possible be on hand to meet and
Help the adjutant general. He Is one
of them.

A CHEERFUL INVITATION

Mr. J. S. Blitch, superintendent of
the state prison farm, writes the Star
that its reproduction of Mrs. Blitch's
appeal for help to buy a piano for the
inmates of the farm is having some
effect. He also invites us to visit th
farm after the holidays and help eat
some of the backbone, spareribs and
sausage that the farm is producing.
If Sim Blitch stays on the job and
if we can boss the next state adminis administration,
tration, administration, he will as soon as we are too
old to work, which time isn't far off,
we are going to steal a Ford or some something,
thing, something, so we will be sent to snug har harbor
bor harbor at Sim's big state farm."1 We think
we could sew on a shuck mattress and

report at the meal table right along

with his other decrepits.
ANOTHER GOOD APPOINTMENT

Mr. B. E. Raysor of Lowell, who

was in town today, showed us the doc document
ument document with the great seal of Florida,

certifying his appointment as state
superintendent of convict inspection.

We are glad he has been -given this
office. A naturally humane man, he
wir take good care that the convicts

are not ill treated.

MY CHRISTMAS TREE

On
Christ

mas morn morning
ing morning when I
wake and
sleep-dust from
my eyes shake, I
see a sight m that
makes me start and
causes thumpings in my
heart; a Christmas tree
oh, pretty sight with can candles,
dles, candles, bells and balls alight.
, With horns and dolls and sugar
plums and skates and trains and
beating drums. And, oh, it is a won wonder
der wonder tree, with heaps of things for
me to see. Rare gifts hang upon;
the side, which tinseled fairies
cannot hide. A soldier doll,
a doll house, too, and
strings of gold come to
my view, and as
I look I seem
, to hear sweet Christ Christmas
mas Christmas music, soft and celar.
A merry Christmas, it seems to say,.
A merry, happy, holy day!
MARY'S GIFT

(Mrs. Sarah Banks Weaver)
O'er a rude and lowly manger ?
Shone a wondrous, wondrous light.

And the wise men, thrilled with rapture?
.As they hastened through the nigfrti

And beheld the infant Savior
On his pallet bed of straw
With his young and tender mother,
(This is what the wise men saw) ..
Then they knelt in adoration

And they brought their gifts of goWL;

But little cared he for these treasures
Wondrous gifts of wealth untold;.
For the little hands were groping
Until they found his mother's breast
Then he lay serenely happy;
Mother's love a place to rest.
So into each simple home life
'Comes this blessing from above,.
Gift of God himselfthe Father,,
Mary's gift a mother's love.
Blessed is he with love of children
And parents' love oh, untold worth
And as songs ring out for Christmas
Glory to God and peace to earth.
Miami Metropolis.
Mrs. Weaver was an Ocala girl, the
sister of Mrs. A. A. Winer and Mr.
S. M. Lummus.

Says the New York Times: Taking
notes on the Texas side of the border,

a correspondent of the Times, who
has interviewed men of many call callings,
ings, callings, learns that war with Mexico is
not desired by' any community nor by
any person whose opinion is worth
recording; that, in fact, there is prac practical
tical practical unanimity for a peaceful settle settlement
ment settlement of differences with Mexico and
fair play for her people, for a policy
of letting them work out their prob problem
lem problem of self-government in their own
way. If the people of border states
can live as neighbors to the Mexicans
without demanding intervention as
the only method of exacting repara reparation
tion reparation for outrages upon American cit

izens, there is no reason why the peo

ple of the other forty-five states

should 'get excited about the short

comings and contumacy of the Car-

ranza government, advocate war, and

declare for occupation as necessary if

the Mexicans are ever to know how to

govern themselves and let Americans

in Mexico alone.

It would appear that most of our

jingoes do not live on the border, and

really know nothing about the rela relations
tions relations of its people with the Mexicans
on the other side of the Rio Grande
and the international line. As a mat

ter of fact, there is little of that dis

like and aversion for the Mexicans

down there which elsewhere in the

United States is supposed to be the

common feeling. Mayor Charles Da

vis of El Paso says that, speaking

with the authority of an observer who
has lived thirty-eight years in that

border town. There are no better

people than the Mexican merchants
and professional men, while the Mex

ican peon is no trouble at all, and is

not bloodthirsty if he is left alone."

As to the -Mexican laborer, Mayor

Davis says that he is a good work

man and that Texas could not get
along without him; he is to be seen

everywhere, on the ranches, farms, in

stores, at work on the roads., and

"there is no better labor to be found
anywhere." It will surprise a good
many people infected with Mexicopho Mexicopho-bia
bia Mexicopho-bia to learn that Mexicans serve in

considerable number in the United

States army. No less than 32 per

cent of the soldiers of the battalion of

the Nineteenth Infantry that guards
the American end of the international
bridge at El Paso are men with Mex

ican names, many of them "born in
Old Mexico but all American citizens.
Some are veterans of the great war.

Yet the implacable interventionists

have insisted that the Mexicans hate
the United States and all-its works,
and are malignant and treacherous.
It has also been declared that a dem democratic
ocratic democratic and responsible government
will always be impossible in Mexico.
But on this point President Bassett
of the" El Paso Chamber of Commerce
rays:
"We believe in the integrity of the

Mexican people. We believe in the

future of the Republic of-Mexico. We
believe that Mexico has the essentials
of. a great, rich and prosperous re republic."
public." republic." fc However, all this good opinion, all

these encomiums, do not mean that

Texans believe in the policy of hands

off and drift. Americans have been
despoiled of their property, Americans
have been -outrageously treated and

murdered, because the -Mexican gov

ernments since the day of Porfirio

Diaz have been 1 weak, -vacillating,
even impotent, occasionally truculent.
"Something will have to -be done to
settle -the Mexican 'situation," says

Judge Walter D. Howe of the dis

trict court of El Paso. But he is not

for. invasion, 'war and interminable

police duty as means to the end. A
firm stand by the 1 Washington gov government
ernment government and no backward step will

bring adjustment and full satisfaction,
he. believes. Another El Paso an pro

poses the seizure of Tampico and

liquidation at the seat of customs. It

would suffice, he says. And there i

this welcome testimony that the Mex Mexican
ican Mexican people; are. tired .ofs disorder: and
ready to accept a government under

which 'they can live, advance, and

prosper. The. border sentiment, the

border judgment, point to the true

solution. What may be called firm

reasonableness should be the, policy of

the government at Washington. While
supporting American rights, it should

be fair to the. .Mexicans. and consider

ata of their real interests. But this

attitude requires good faith and fair

performance on the part, of the Mex

icans.

INNOCENT CHILDHOOD

J. EL Spencer W. R Pedriclc
THE OCALA GAS EMGINE WOMKS
Local Agents for the Old Reliable

MJEGK AtLTOMMELE
Announces that they are now Handling Storage Batteries and
maintain a fully equiped service station for recharging batteries.
Complete line of GOODYEAR and UNITED STATES Tires and
Tubes. All kinds of Automobile Accessories, and a full line of
parts for the BUICK.

GASOLINE

OILS

GREASE

Acetylene Welding Our Specially

OCALA GAS EMGIME WORKS
SPENCER & PEDRICK, Proprietors.
" When Better Automobiles Are Built buick Will Build Them

Ocklawaha Avenue and OsceoIaiSt.

Ocala, Florida

Iclyer MacKay
UNDERTAKERS and EIIBAHIEES
PHONES 47. 194. ZtZ
OCALA. FLORIDA

OCALA FRATERNAL ORDERS

MARION-DUNN MASONIC LODGE

Marion-Dunn Lodge No. 19, F. & A.

M., meets on the first and third
Thursday evenings of each month at

7:30 o'clock until further notice.

H. O. Cole, W. M.
Jake Brown, Secretary.

ORDER OF EASTERN STAR

Ocala Chanter No. 29, O. E. S.,

meets at the Masonic hall the second

and fourth Thursday evenings of each

month at 8 o'clock.

Mrs. Isabel Wesson, W. M.
Mrs. Susan Cook, Secretary.

ODD FELLOWS

Tulula Lodge No. 22, I. O. O. F.,

meets every Tuesday evening in the

Odd Fellows' hall on the third floor of
the old Star office building at seven
o'clock Florida time. This will be 3
o'clock Eastern or Ocala time. A

warm welcome always extended 'to
visiting brothers.

,H. R. Luffman, N. G.
Jake Brown, Secretary.

SAVE MONEY ON MEAT
We always handle the best fresh meat to Tje
had and our prices are always the Iowes
Round Steak 25c IBest Pork Chops "0c
Loin Steak 30c Pork Sausage 15c
Stew Meat 15c
Groceries, Fruit, Vegetables, Etc
NEW YORK MEAT MARKET

FREE DELIVERY

WEST BROADWAY

PHONE 110

t

R. A. M. CHAPTER No. 13

Regular convocations of the Ocala
Chapter No. 13, R. A- on the first
Friday in every month at 8 p. m.
C. E. Connor, H. P.
Jake Brown, Secretary.

KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS

Ocala, Lodge No. 19. Conventions
held every Monday evening at 7:30
o'clock at the Castle Hall, over the G.
C. Greene Co. drugstore. A cordial
welcome to visiting brothers.
W. W. Stripling, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage. K. of R. & S.

OCALA LODGE NO. 286. B. P. O. E.

Ocala. Lodge No. 286, Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, meets
the second and four Tuesday eve evenings
nings evenings of each month. Visiting breth brethren
ren brethren always welcome. Lodge rooms
upstairs over Troxler's and the Book
Shop, 113 Main street.
J. H. Spencer, E. R.
E. J. Crook, Secretary.

I,..'

mm m m. t

Hi Km m 1 1 1 1 mil ml 1

WE

MEPAffi AMD) MEBUILIdI

AMAT

AUTOGENOUS WELDING & ELECTRIC CO. I!

IT. L. WIKLE, 3Ianager.

Cor. Oklawaha Ave. & Orange SL

H

MIRIAM REBEKAH LODGE NO. 15

Miriam Rebekah Lodge No. 15
meets the first and third Monday eve evening
ning evening in each month in the Odd Fel Fellows
lows Fellows hall at 7:30 o'clock.
Mrs. W. T. Whitley, N. G.
Eloise Bouvier, Secretary.

WOODMEN OF THE WORLD

L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTER
AND BUILDER

Careful Estimates made on all Coeh

tract work. Gives More and Better

Work, for the Money than any; other

contractor m the city, v

(St. Augustine Record)

Yesterday the aviator who takes

people up for ten dollars a throw

made more flights than common. Eve

ry time we'd hear him we'd run out in
the street to look at him. So would a

little girl less than three years old

who ives in our neighborhood.' Final

ly it became monotonous that run running
ning running out to watch the airplane fly by.
Then the little child in her innocence
expressed, far better than -we could
have, exactly what was in our heart.
We had rushed to the street and for
the fortieth time watched the plane
sail over us to the golf links.
"Say," she said turning her angel
eyes up toward our sophisticated but

youthful face, "I'm dettin' tired of
wunnin out here lookin' at that damn
thing, ain't you?w
When we came to, we told her that
we'd say we were.
If it's a Kodak that is wanted, re remember
member remember that Gerig's Drug Store is
the only store in Ocala where you can
get one. All Kodaks are cameras, but
all cameras are NOT KODAKS. 12-tf

Fort King Camp No. 14 meets at
K. of P. hall at 7:30 p. m. every sec second
ond second and fourth Friday. Visiting sov sovereigns
ereigns sovereigns are always welcome.
W. W. Stripling, C.'C.
Chas. K. Sage, Gerk.

TO AUTO OWNERS

I am again at my old place of bus business
iness business on the Anthony road, where I
shall be pleased to attend to your car
repair work by appointment. Call
phone 393. 29-tf M. A. Bouvier.

PHONE 5

I. O. BOX 239

LUCAS BROTHERS
Corner Oklawaha Ave. and Orange Street
LUCAS9 A

Commercial Signs
Bill Boards
Posters
Auto Lettering
Electric Signs

Ad. Cuts
Price Tickets
Drawings
Plans-Designs
Stencils

DISTINCTIVE ADVERTISING

STEAM CLEANING

PRESSING
AND
DYEING

IMEM FIH
AND OYSTERS
Received on
Tuesdays and Fridays
At 2 P. 5L
J- BAWKMS
PEaone 519

OCALA STEAM LAUNDRY
-:- PHONE 101 -:-

PYLES & PERKINS CO
(Successors to E. C Jordan & Co.)
Funeral Directors and Embalmers
Calls Answered Promptly, Day or Night
Motor Equipment
117 East Oklawaha Avenne
PHONE 555 RESIDENCE PHONE 225



OCALA EVENING STAR, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 23, 1919

RUDD
SI

i

A ?M

M KB
...

Service aindl QnaaMtty
are the important features of our business. Satisfaction is assured
to buyers. Let us serve you. A select line of recleaned
Fulghum, Ninety-Day and Rust Proof Oats.
Rape Seed
Now is the time to put in your orders for spring planting of
CANTALOUPES BEANS FIELD CORN
WATERMELONS CUCUMBERS EARLY CORN
OCALA EEP STORE

Ocala

0B3 TJEI?J3OI0Al?Ji3
Let us quote you prices
on a Monument or Head Headstone
stone Headstone to mark the last rest resting
ing resting place of your loved
ones.
MARBLE OR GRANITE.
OCALA MARBLE WORKS
E. W. LEAVENGOOD, Mgr.
N. Magnolia St.
OCALA. FLORIDA.

GOTO
O L ID) M A M 9

IB

FOR
Coffins and Caskets,
Furniture, Etc.
Day Phone 253 Night Phones 511 and 395
L HURST, MANAGER

Magnolia Street,
Opposite Court House.
YOUR CREDIT IS GOOD.

AUTO AND TRUCK REPAIRING

We are thoroughly equipped to handle repair work on all makes
of cars. Nothing but experienced workmen and all work fully guar guaranteed.
anteed. guaranteed. Inner Tubes vulcanized. Full line of the famous Two-in-One
Inner Tubes, either 30x3 or S0x3; price $3.25.
STANDARD OILS, GAS AND GREASE
Our place (the old Ford Garage) is open from 6 a. m. until 10 p.
m. every day in the -year, where you are invited to call and let us
serve you.
DIXIE HIGHWAY GARAGE
: JAMES ENGESSER, Proprietor
121 W. Broadway phone 2ss Ocala, Florida

If Everything Was As
Cheap As Our Ice
The cost of living would be as low as it was in the good old days.
No use worrying, however, because it isn't that way. Be glad that
ice is helping to keep down the cost of living, besides giving you
better food and a greater variety of it than your grandfather's fam family
ily family ever had.

GAS HEATERS

Furnish your home with a
RUDD
and always have hot water at
small cost. We have the in all
sizes and styles. Let us show you.
THE GAS CO.
Harrington Hall Block, Fort King Acenue

Florida
Ocala Fla.
"WHY PAY MORE"
SPECIAL
PRICES
ON OVER OVERHAULING
HAULING OVERHAULING FORD
ENGINES

WISE AND OTHERWISE

(Contributed)
To our readers and friends we wish
you a Merry Christmas and Happy;
New Year. "May you live long ana)
prosper." When you time comes to
hit the golden chute, we hope St.
Peter will provide you with an asbes asbestos
tos asbestos union suit.
Some of us are born clever, some
bet c me clever, and ther are others
who just imagine they are clever,
"Even as you and I."
Even a live wire woman cannot keep
a dead secret.
Some folks run into debt in a tour-
ins: car and run out of it in a hearse.
Talk about a woman not being able
to throw! She can throw a hint or a
fit when occasions require, and don't
you forget it.
Not every man who goes on a re
stricted diet these days does so on his
doctor's orders. More often it is his
banker's orders.
Somehow we nre forced to believe
that the world is crowing better
especially since the ministers of the
state are condemning the 2-34 per cent
church oyster soup.
m
We read that there is at least one
place on earth where a common citi
zen's life is safe. That's Bermuda,
where an automobile isn't even allow allowed
ed allowed to make one honk.
loverywhere in Florida they are
voting bonds -for good roads. Marion
county is putting it off, but will either
have to come to it soon or lose much
in the long run.
We have discovered that a decayed
.ooth is far more dangerous to the
health than a fly in the soup.
A girl standing under the mistletoe
may be kissed by any man who finds
her there. But haven't you noticed
how they are not standing there if the
right fellow isn't near?
Tc find nine peas in a pod is a fore forerunner
runner forerunner of good luck. But when you
find more than one oyster in a stew
you know the chef is a philanthropic
creature who cares nothing for the
Loss' profits.
m
Be courteous to strangers. It is a
mark of good breeding. Courtesy to
heme folks too often is a sign that
there is company in the house.
The price of shoes has gone so high1
that there is some advantage in be'ingj
one-legged. A friend of ours says
that he loves old shoes because he
knows that new ones will put an awful
crimp in his pocketbook.
It is easy to distinguish the good
citizens from the "otherwise" in
Ocala, by simply looking into their
yards.
' i
Every woman who has a shape like
a whaleback freighter knows that if
she could afford to pay $15 for a
made to order corset she would have
as good a figure as anybody.
Now that we are to have war-time
food control, the housewives will be
put to the necessity of buying their
excess sugar supply to keep it from
being confiscated.
Did you ever notice how germs get
on a man's mind and worry him to
acath?
How different to observe how a man
gets mad all over if he can't get a
seat in the front row at a theater.
And gets mad all over if the usher
leads him to a front pew when he
goes to church.
Don't tell a girl she is the first you
ever kissed. Its time enough after
marriage for her to find out what a
liar you are.
"Begin the new year right," says
a writer. "Be original and create an
atmosphere of your own." Well, we
should say so. Any old skunk has
scents enough to do that.
The world moved and that rapidly.
Just now are the young men beginning
to realize the truth of Plato's pro prophecy.
phecy. prophecy. "When a beautiful soul har harmonizes
monizes harmonizes with a beautiful form and
the two hearts seem cast in one mould,
it is one of the fairest sights to him
who has the eye to contemplate the
vision." The present day girlies have
eye 3 just as attractive as in days of
good old Grecian lore, and we know
they are sweeter.
Many a couple go before the "judge"
and get a life sentence for speeding
along the highway of love.
Everything comes to those who
wait, provided they wait long enough.
Now the chiropractors are having
their day; since evening gowns are cut
so low in the back, their work is more
convenient.
In court the other day, a woman,
right before everybody, said her hus husband
band husband called her a snob. This shows
that men ought to be mighty careful
in addressing their wives.
Bishop Mann gives these beautiful
lir.es which are worth considering: "It
is the time of trouble, when some to
whom we may have looked for conso
ciation and encouragement, regard us

with coldness, and others perhaps
treat us with hostility that the
warmth of the friendly heart and the
support of the friendly hand acquire
increased value and demand addition additional
al additional gratitude."

The term "college bred" ha been
characterized as a "four-years loaf
by a father who had to pay bill upon
r
bill for a sporty youth curing a col
lege course.
One reason Ocala is so pleasant in
the winter time, is that we have no
frigid manners or icy stares for visit
ing friends.
Sleep is said to be a great beauti beauti-fier.
fier. beauti-fier. Still many a pretty girl is wide wideawake.
awake. wideawake. One hears a great deal about the
men who are made Knights of the
Garter. We wonder how they would
go about it to decorate a lady mem member.
ber. member. The schools of our city, or any other
American city, have no duty more im imperative
perative imperative than to teach Americanism.
The rule of three is not so important
as the Golden Rule.
.
We know a man in this city who
can knit, cook, play auction and trim
a hat and he is not married. Here,
girls, quit crowding. A man who can
do all those things doesn't need a wfie.
It is said that a hawk flies 150 miles
an hour, a duck 90 miles and a pigeon
40 miles. All that information is very
good, but money flies faster than all
combined.
Mary Roberts Rinehart says, "as a
spooning proposition the airplane is a
failure." So is the automobile. There
was never a spooning proposition like
a rustic seat in a bower riotous with
honeysuckle and roses, with the moon
light filtering through upon star-lit
night in the springtime, and a mock mocking
ing mocking bird singing his heart away in a
neighboring tree. The moderns can
have all their gas-smelling cars and
go to heck with them as far as we are
concerned, but give us love-making in
a cozy nook built for two as per above
description.
Ocala is getting her share of tour tourist
ist tourist travel by automobile. Many are
bound for the west coast and some
are en route to the down-east section,
preferring the inland roads, for the
sake of a stop here a few days to view
Silver Springs, and admire the un unexcelled
excelled unexcelled farming country.
How many parents know how to
select wisely Christmas toys for their
children. An old toymaker once said:
"Children sometimes get the toys they
want, but many times those their par
ents want them to want."
It is our opinion that more homes
would be like heaven if wives were
doves with olive branches in their
mouths and hickory switches in their
hands, instead of emulating the par
rot with unlimited conversational at
tainments over their neighbors' af
fairs, which is none of their business;
and exacting obedience from their
children.
A person must make the most of
his opportunities if he expects them
- 1- Al A. t-
io matte me most ox mm.
It is the women of Florida who are
so very much interested in the sale of
the Red Cross Christmas seals, which
mean so much for the health condi conditions
tions conditions in the state.
What would you think if you saw:
Judge Williams playing marbles?
Judge Smith scoring at lawn ten tennis?
nis? tennis? Rev. Kirkby playing leapfrog?
John Galloway on a windy day
walking the streets wearing blinders?
Prof. Brinson full of alarm and ex excitement
citement excitement running to a supposed fire?
If you listened to a stenographer
for a half hour and she neglected to
say "you know" at least thirty-nine
times?
If every property owner in Ocala
would clean up their alleys and yards
which surround or adjoin their attrac attractive
tive attractive homes?
If you should take a lady out to din dinner
ner dinner and she should fail to pull out her
powder puff and dab her little squee squee-zy,
zy, squee-zy, weezy, nozey nose?
If Dr. Peek, who is long, lean, slin
and slender, should be standing on th
sidewalk and suddenly turn round?
If you should notice Mr. George
MacKay wearing his kilties in to thv
Christmas dinner to be given at t;
Harrington?
If you should talk for fifteen min minutes
utes minutes with Dr. Henry and he should fail
to consume during the conversation
period at least two cigarettes?
If Dr. Watt actually brought home
from his hunt one solitary wild tur turkey
key turkey that he really shot not that he
had bought?
If you should detect Dr. Parrish
riding with his lady love in his new
Buick, and he failed to sport a smile
and a blush at the same time?
If T. W. Troxler should close his
store and go out for an afternoon's
walk?
If you should see any one or more
of these things happen you'd know
you were loco.
From the way the times are headed,
in the dim, distant future the only by by-produce
produce by-produce not of value will be the en envelope
velope envelope which wraps up your wages.
In a recent report of a very fash fashionable
ionable fashionable wedding, the society editor

wrote "The bride was gownedV in an
j attractive blue ribbon girdle." Her
'friends are wondering when she will
I return to lake up her work again.

UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS
WAMTD. LOST, FOUND. FOB
SALE. FOR RENT AND SIM SIMILAR
ILAR SIMILAR LOCAL NEEDS
RATES Six line maximum, one
time, 25c.; three times, 50c; six times
'oc; one month $2. Payable in ad-
t ance.
FOR RENT Furnished
house; eight rooms two
sleeping porches See
L M. MURRAY, Holder
Block, Ocala. 24-31
FOR SALE 14-H. P. Stover oil en engine.
gine. engine. For price and terms see L A.
Gabel. 24-3t
APARTMENT FOR RENT Over U-Sc-rve
Grocery. Four large, well ven ventilated
tilated ventilated rooms, closets, kitchen, bath
and other conveniences. Suitable for
housekeeping or doctor's or lawyer's
offices. Rent moderate. Apply to the
Ocala Banner. 24-3t
WANTED Fresh young milk cow.
Give price and description and where
can be seen. Apply F. J. B., care Star
offce. 22-3t
LOST Pocket book at oostoffice. Re-
ward to finder by applying to Star
ofhee. 22-3t
FOR SALE Two new phonographs.
Will sell at half the cost for cash.
Robert Lawrence, 417 Magnolia St. 3t
1 OR SALE Piano just worked over.
Good value for the price. Call and see
I: at my residence, or call phone 185 185-V.
V. 185-V. J. E. Frampton, 1109 East Fifth
I.t.. Ocala. Fla. 22-6t
WANTED Two to five million feet
longleaf yellow pine timber. Address
with full particulars, stating whether
rt.und or boxed; if under lease. In
elude map showing location of rail-
icad, hard road, acreage, estimate,
),rice and terms. P. O. Box 857, Tam
pa, Fla. 19r4t
FOR SALE Must sell before Jan. 1
and I am asking for biC3 on my prop property
erty property situated on lot 12, block 16, Alar-
ion Heights, Ocala, Fla. This prop
erty is unincumbered and can give
guaranteed title. Lot 50x150 feet; six-
100ms, bath and sleeping porch; front
and back porches; good well. This
house at present prices would cost
$3500 to build. It's yours .at your
price. Go look it over and mail me
your offer at once. Not for sale after
Jan. 1st. Write P. D. Odell, Andrews,
S. C. 17-tf
FOR SALE Nice milk cow with
heifer calf. See C. A. Holloway, 715
Lime street, Ocala, Fla. 5-tf
WANTED At ence, 10,000 bushels
of peanuts, any variety. We also want
your furs, hides, cotton, etc Ocala
Exchange & Hide Co., Carmichael
building, Ocala, Ha. 19-tf
WANTED InCant clothing of any
description. No matter how small the
cift, it will be appreciated. Leave
our offering at Mrs. Blackburn's res residence
idence residence on Oklawaha avenue. Mrs. C.
L. Bittinger, president King's Daugh Daughters.
ters. Daughters. 9-tf
I OR SALE Residence with 5 rooms
i nc! bath, large porches; corner of
Franklin and Clark streets; also
i:uge barn. Will sell for cash or on
teims. Call phone 493. 12-2-lm
l OR SALE at 702 Wyomina street,
six-room house, also bath and summer
kitchen; all modern improvements.
Also rock face cement block machine.
Carl Wenzel. 2-l-30t
WOOD For oak wood, cut to order,
call Teapot Grocery, or see J. H. J.
Counts. 19-tf
FOR SALE 26 head mule colts two
and three years old. Can be seen at
my farm cn Blitchton road. 17 miles
out from Ocala. A. L. McKay. Mor-rL-.ton,
Fla. 19-6t
FURNITURE, ETC. I buy and seU
second hand furniture. Experts put it
in good condition before re-selling,
ttcrair sewing machines, lawn mow
.rs. cnamelware, etc. J. W. Hunter,
'10, 312, 314 South Main St. 23-tf
a OO D Phone 146 for all lenghths
ak o- pine wood; thoroughly season season-'
' season-' ,ecial price on quantity orders.
I lu t in your winter supply now.
Srr.oak's Wood Yard. 15-tf
TOR SALE (Wood Cut to Order.)
Reduce the high co3t of keeping com comfortable
fortable comfortable this winter by buying your
wood cut ready to burn direct from
the producer, thereby saving the
profits of the city wood yard. Orders
tilled anywhere in the city. Phone
3i M. C. P. Howell, Ocala. 4-m
If you want Candy, and want really
..cood candy, come and see our lines.
Xunnally's, "The Candy of the South,'
Guth's, "Made in Baltimore," and Lig
;;ett's, "Made in Boston." Boxes large
cnl small. Gerig's Drug tSore. 12-tf
Tir i ii i I a M r I
Exchange and Hide Co. 6-lm
Rye, rape and oats. Get our prices
before buying. The Ocala Seed
Store. 17-tfw
Remember the Ocala xchange &
Hide Co. wants your furs. 6-lm

1Hf fl know just the- gift

they need
Sec j$ Ask about my Christmas
.wCA certificate.
DR. K. J. WEI HE,
Optometrist and Optician.
Eyesight Specialist
Sec Me 5
For All Classes Oi
; Stone, Brick, Wood, :
and Concrete ;
Building I
J. D. IcCaskill ?
Contractor
Phone 446. 72S Weaona St-
DKcAD
MB
T
i NEED-SAM'S I
AUTO SERVICE
Speedy and Comfortable 2
Cars at All Hours I
Call
Phone
74
KS12MJ
DR. G. A. EDMIST0N
Veterinary, Physician and Surgeon
Phone 38 M
Ocala - Florida
Arrival and Departure of passenger
trains at OCALA UNION STATION.
The following schedule figures pub published
lished published as information and not guar--intend
(Eastern' Standard Time)
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILROAD
Leave Arrive
2:15 am Jacksonville-N'York 2:10 am
1:55 pm Jacksonville 1:30 pm
4:05 pm Jacksonville 4:25 pm
Tampa-
2:15 am Tampa 2:15 am
2:15 am Manatee- 3:35 pm
St. Petersburg
1:50 pm Tampa-Manatee 1:35 pm
4:25 pm Tampa-St. P'tersbrg 4:05 pm
ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD
Leave Arrire
2:12 pm Jacksonville-N'York 3:15 am
1:45 pm JTcsonville-Ga'nsville 3:35 pm
6:42am JTcsonville-G'nesvile 10:13pm
3:18 am StPet'sbrg-Lakeland 2:12 am
3:35 pm StPet'sbrg-Lakeland 1:25 pm
7:10 am Dunnellon-Wilcox
7:40 am Du'nellon-L'kelnd 11:03 pm
3:25 pm Homosassa 1:30 pm
10:13 pm Leesburg 6:42 am
4:45 pm Gainesville 11:50 am
Monday, Wednesday, Friday.
Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday;
TERRIDLYSWOLLEN
ioHtihg Describee! As Torture
Reliered by Black-Draught.
Rossville, Ga. Mrs. Kate Lee Able, o!
this place, writes: "My husband is aa
engineer, and once while lifting, he in injured
jured injured himself with a piece of heavy ma machinery,
chinery, machinery, across the abdomen He was
so sore he could not bear to press cn
himself at all, on chest or abdomen. H e
weighed 165 lbs., and fell off until he
weighed 110 lbs., in two weeks.
He became constipated and it looked
like he would die. We had three different
doctors, yet with all their medicine, his
bowels failed to act. He would turn up
a ten-cent bottle of caster oil, and drink 1
it two or three days in succession, lit
did this yet without result We became
desperate, he suffered so. He was swol swollen
len swollen terribly. He told me his suffering
could only be described as torture.
I sent and bought Thedford's Black Black-Draught
Draught Black-Draught I made him take a big dose,
and when it began to act he fainted, he
was in such misery, but he got relief and
bega? o mend at once. He got welt
and we both feel he owes his life to
Thedford's Black-Draught."
Thedford's Black-Draught win help yoa
to keep fit, ready for the day's work.
Try It! NC-131

Jh

RAILROAD SCHEDULES

4-



OCALA EVENING STAR, THURSDAY, DECEMBER 25. 1919

' f I 1 V i-

l i in i'n (u: ituJU!i i c

l it IS TO SMILE mowmu. wiuawi .ruen.""' ;s up i ;i

LATEST LOCALS

Mr. W; T. Dupree, postmaster at
Citra, was in town yesterday evening.
Dark and white fruit cake for your
Christinas dinner at Carter's Bakery.
Mr. and Mrs. Lester Marsh are here
from Tampa for Christmas with their
relatives and friends.

Select Stationery in Holiday boxes
at Geriff's Drug Store. 12-tf
Mr. John Long of the Gainesville
ilght and power plant is spending
Christmas with his Ocala friends.

Waterman's Ideal Fountain Pens on
sale every day at Gerig's Drug Store.
Jimmie Whitesides is here from
Jacksonville, spending Christmas with
his folks and his numerous friends.

If you want Ivory Pyralm goods,
come in and inspect the large display
we have. You can get a small piece or
a complete Toilet Set. Lots of odd
pieces. Gerig's Drug Store. 12-tf
. ;
Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Wartmann of
Citra are spending Christmas with
their son, Mr. Allison Wartmann, and
family.
The most complete line of Thermos
Bottles we have ever displayed. Come
i nand see them. Gerig's Drug tSore.
We are glad to report Mr. T. I. Arn Arnold
old Arnold steadily improving. Mrs. Arnold
, says that with good wishes, presents
and flowers, he is having a good sized
Christmas of his own in his room at
the hospital.
W. ft. Lane, M. D "Physician and
Surgeon, specialist Eye, Ear, Nose and
Throat. Law Library Building, Ocala,
Florida. tf

Rev. Richard D. Dodge of Jackson Jacksonville,
ville, Jacksonville, will occupy the pulpit of the
Presbyterian church Sunday morning,
December 28th. His many friends will
be glad of the opportunity to hear
this talented young man.
Mr. Bruce Meffert was a much sur surprised
prised surprised man to learn he had been ap appointed
pointed appointed county commissioner. He had
not been a candidate nor even thought
of it. A case of the honor seeking the
man. It is the Star's opinion that
Bruc will make a good commissioner.
Mr. J. J. Harris of Morriston left
Ocala in his car at 2 o'clock yester yesterday
day yesterday afternoon, went to Sanf ord and
returned to Ocala by 10 p. m., stopped
for a little refreshment and some gae
and went on home. He says he had
good roads all along hi sroute except
in Marion county.
The best winter hog and cow pas pasture
ture pasture is rye, rape and oats. At Ocala
Seed Store. 13-tf

IT IS TO SMILE

A Classy Yegg.
Officer How will I know this "gen "gentleman
tleman "gentleman burglar?
Captain If he shoots yon with a
pearl-handled revolver ifs him, me
lad.

Squaring Himself.
1 claim that
man Blump is a
born diplomat."
"How's that?"
"His wife ob objected
jected objected to his spill spilling
ing spilling cigar ashes on
her rug, so he
bought her a car carpet
pet carpet sweeper."

Had Him There.
I am an agnostic,' said the thin
man.
"And an agnostic Is what?" In Inquired
quired Inquired a listener.
"An agnostic is well, a fellow whe
Is not sure of anything.
"Well, then, how does it happen
that you're sure you are an agnostic?'
Loud Raiment.
"Did you sell that man the green
and blue checked suit you were show showing
ing showing him?" asked the proprietor of the
"Nifty Togs Shop."
"No, sir," replied Percy, the peerless
salesman.
"Why not?"
"He said he couldn't etand excite excite-ment."
ment." excite-ment." In Very Close Contact

"Have you ever
come in contact
with the moneyed
classes?"
"Oh, yes ; I was
knocked down
once by a million millionaire's
aire's millionaire's auto."

Perish the Thought.
Mrs. Tungsmith Did I hear yon re
fer to me, your wife, as nothing but a
talking machine?
Her Husband! I never said it
;Why, if yon were a mere talking ma machine
chine machine you'd talk only when I wished
you to.
Why Not?
The Caller Is Mrs. Van Stile with
In?
The Doorman I will see, madam
Will you kindly step withup?

EPISCOPAL CHURCH

j.tp":- r r-

OCALA LODGE NO. 286, B. P. O. E.

Ocala Jx)dge No. 286, Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, meets
the second and four Tuesday eve evenings
nings evenings of each month. Visiting breth brethren
ren brethren always welcome. Lodge rooms
upstairs over Troxler's and the Book
Shop, 113 Main; street;
J.,H. Spencer, E. R.
E. J. Crook, Secretary.

(MM

In subdivision and sale of
farms and plantations, also
city property, disolution of
partnership and adminstra adminstra-tf
tf adminstra-tf on sale.

MJCMM CdDlPMY

We are the people that sell
farms and lots of farms and
lots, my! my! If you want to
sell your farm list it with us
and kiss it good-by.

ome Office Ansiey Hotel

Eugene Bention,
Contracting Agent.

Jno. P. Oglesby,
General Manager.

ii

2 FT 5!

P. O. BOX 606

STAR JOB

DEPARTMENT

'PHONE 51

CHANGE IN CONSTITUTION TO
ADMiT CON GREG AT ION-ALISTS

CHURCH IS REORGANIZED

Nation-Wide Campaign Expected To
Make Possible Several Impressive
Deve?opmcntc Within
Communion

Southern leader cf the Episcopal
Church, buck heme after the epoch-

making General Convention of the
Church at Detroit, huve plunged into
the task of shaping into reality the
impressive polici fur which founda foundation
tion foundation was laid there, and which include:
1. The move toward a union of
churches, to which the Episcopal
Church committed itself by steps for
an amendment to its Constitution that
will permit in tnre yeans the Epis Episcopal
copal Episcopal ordination ol Congregational
clergymen, as weii as similar agree agreement
ment agreement with other denominations.
2. The complete reorganization of
the Church, turouii citation of an
executive council io supplant all exist existing
ing existing official boctiGs ol inc General Con Convention.
vention. Convention. 3. The establishment of the Na National
tional National Churcn JLe-o4e ior Social and
Industrial Demuciui,), to fiat for so social
cial social and economic principles on a
Christian basis.

All tnese mings the broadening oi
the Ciiuicii s facopB and functions are
expecteu to be maae possible ui rouge
the success cf its Nation-Wide Cam Campaign
paign Campaign of spiritual awakening and
greater practical service. This cam campaign,
paign, campaign, ueaigned to m.eiiu the Church'j
influence along social, educational and
spiritual lines at nouie and abroad,

nas ueen uesonocu o leaders of the
Churcn as 'ine t,ivu;cst missionar
adventure in the liiuiy of the com communion,
munion, communion, an auvtuij.fc mat should help
mightily to enaoie uie Churcn to re recover
cover recover us Apostolic torch of leadership
freed from tne cumroi of the stanu
pat influences tL.t have for so long
muffled its proclamation of Christian
.fundamentals."
"The genius of the Nation-Wide
Campaign is not the mooey-raising
end of it," said Dr. ltobert W. Pat Pat-ton,
ton, Pat-ton, national campaign director, who is
touring the South. "It is a very mod modest
est modest financial goal, that of probably
less than $5u,u0o,000 for the richest
Church of 'Protestantism in America.
The big thing is the campaign's
avowed determination to reach every
individual community of the Church
to discover just what Lis religion
means to him, and wnat he is willing
to sacrifice for it. It intends to trans transform
form transform every 'paper communicant' into
a real Churchman aflame with the
old zeal for the spread of Christian
fundamentals.
"We must organize the world along
mselfish lines, or the selfish interests
of civilization will organize it along
selfish lines."
Episcopal leaders are pointing to
"the proposed concordat with the Con Congregational
gregational Congregational Church the old Church

of the Puritans as a historic event
Jn religious annals, as it brings into
close unity of effort two great forces

in the national life that were as far

apart religiously and socially as the
'poles throughout colonial history and

down to and including the War Be Between
tween Between the States the Puritan of New
England and the "Anglican Cavalier"

of the South.

Words and Music,
Tfcs value of words is going up. at
rc3t in Rouen. There the courts
nave decided that the artistic values
of the words and music of a poem ar?
equal. At present In the United
States and Canada the writer of the
words of a song gets only a pittance
of the royalties or a small sum out outright
right outright at the start. In England many
of the most popular ballads have

brought thtlr writers no more than
two or three guineas, while the com composer
poser composer goes on cashing his royalty
checks for years. What measure pub publishers
lishers publishers apply to the two arts thus
combined to make words so much Uss
valuable than music is rather hard to
understand. Verse writers might well
send a little gold medal to the just just-minded
minded just-minded citizens of Rouen who have
ruled it a false one.

CAROLINA-CHURCH
ENTERS INSURANCE

FIELD FOR FLOCK
EPISCOPAL RECTOR DEVI8E8

PLAN TO CARE FOR PARISH PARISHIONERS
IONERS PARISHIONERS AND DEPEND DEPENDENTS
ENTS DEPENDENTS IN TIME OF
TROUBLE.

Christmas
Good Wishes

Can be most eloquently expressed
by a box of Norris Candies.

Unusual Methods Used. j

With the end of the war have come
many revelations of the unusual meth methods
ods methods used by the Germans to spread

their harmful propaganda in the coun-
tries arrayed against the central pow- j
ers, and of the clever work which'
often frustrated their well-laid piansJ
In one case, mentioned in Popular Me-1

chanics Magazine, what appeared tc
be an old and worn copy of the works
of Homer proved to be a volume o!
attacks on British rule in India. Only
the first few pages of the hook were
printed with the words of the ancient
poet. The remainder, though in Greek
type like the beginning, was filled with
the diatribe. The volume was ad addressed
dressed addressed to an educated Hindu capable
of translating the. Greek into an In Indian
dian Indian dialect.

i
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QGoodyGoodyiJ

EXOmSTTG
GANDIES

- lit,

Utt-Jm J

THE COURT PHARMACY

Al 3

Costly Parking Space.
Tired of being taken into court by
traffic policemen, because at the time
he goes to business his car has to be

parked In the street, as day storage is

at a premium and access to a pub public
lic public garage at those hours is difficult.

Philip Rosenbach, art connoisseur of

Philadelphia, has just paid $16,000 for
a stable property which he will con convert
vert convert Into a private garage for himself.
It is near his place of business.

Babies More Plentiful Than Houses.
"It is easier to find a baby than a
house in Sydney now," reports the
Bulletin of that Australian city, con continuing
tinuing continuing thusly: "Writer knows a
young bride who went to live with her
mother pending the dscovery of a
suitable residence. She has two In Infants
fants Infants now and is still living with her
mother." '

ANNOUNCEMENT,!
We are now prepared to give demonstrations
in the popular

CRIPPS.HOOTH 1

to show its many new and striking features.
NEEDHAM BROTHERS

Opposite Harrington Hall Hotel.

Phone 193

Stop! Have you tried Federal Bread,

the "best bread in the world." 20-tf

Ficr. citron, walnut, marble cherry

and raisin cakes at Carter's Bakery- 3t

SIGNS OF ALL KINDS

The Star is an advertising medium thru which you can reach Ocala people

ML

dDnniP EmiflnE

nirncs

of

at-

Smite

" LETTERHEADS, BILLHEADS, CARDS,
CIRCDLAKS, FOLDERS, FINE BOOKLETS, ETC.
WE NEVER DISAPOINT A CUSTOMER ON A
PROMISE. YOU GET THE JOB WHEN ITS DUE.

Death benefits, sick benefits and

old age pensions are part of the prac
tical Christianity practiced .by St

John's Episcopal Mission of Charles

ton, S. C among its parishioners, with

one day's wage a month from each
employed man and woman as pre premium.
mium. premium. St.. John's is perhaps the first

"insurance church" in history.

In the four months the plan has been

in oneration. the congregation has in

creased until a movement has been

started to raise a SaO.OCO fund and
build a church large enough for the
needs.
The inventor of the "insurance
church" plan is Rev. A. E. Cornish, a
veteran Episcopal Rector of Charles
;ton. Mr. Cornish held the pulpit ot
St John's from 18S3 to 1S96, and re returned
turned returned last July when the Episcopal
Nation-Wide Campaign for ascertain ascertaining
ing ascertaining and financing the needs of the
whole Church made it neces3ary for
some one to direct the survey of the
Cornish found his former parish parishioners
ioners parishioners strangely apathetic. Deciding

to win back their interest. Le planned
to give them an opportunity to do
something definite for the mainte- J

nance and constructive work cf the

church. The insurance plan was con conceived.
ceived. conceived. All giembers ol the mission
passing the age of 7" are to be pen pensioned
sioned pensioned at $2 a week. Persons who fall
ill are given $5 a week sick benefit
for four consecutive weeks. One hun hundred
dred hundred dollars Is paid the relative ol
each member in good standing at hit
death.

0)

2

iO

CccDinmpsiimy

I 1- It TT 1
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Go UFDC FDA Preparation Tool
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sobekcm newspaper
mods:identifier type OCLC 11319113
ALEPHBIBNUM 2052267
LCCN sn 84027621
sn 84027621
mods:language
mods:languageTerm text English
code iso639-2b eng
mods:location
mods:physicalLocation University of Florida
UF
mods:note dates or sequential designation Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
funding Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855
mods:originInfo
mods:publisher Porter & Harding
mods:place
mods:placeTerm marccountry flu
mods:dateIssued December 25, 1919
marc point start 1895
end 1943
mods:frequency Daily (except Sunday)
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mods:recordInfo
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mods:recordCreationDate 841027
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mods:detail Enum1
mods:caption 1919
mods:number 1919
Enum2
December
12
Enum3
25
25
lccn 84027622
oclc 11319138
mods:titleInfo
mods:title Ocala weekly star
mods:subject SUBJ651_1 lcsh
mods:geographic Ocala (Fla.)
Newspapers
SUBJ651_2
Marion County (Fla.)
Newspapers
mods:hierarchicalGeographic
mods:country United States
mods:state Florida
mods:county Marion
mods:city Ocala
mods:nonSort The
Ocala evening star
uniform
Ocala Evening Star
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Evening star
Star
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sobekcm:VID 05452
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sobekcm:Publisher
sobekcm:Name Porter & Harding
sobekcm:PlaceTerm Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
sobekcm:Source
sobekcm:statement UF University of Florida
sobekcm:SortDate 693595
sobekcm:serial
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2 12 December
3 25 25
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