The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:05323

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
r 1

EVENING

,0?

A Tin

A
Weather Forecasts Partly cloudy in
north, probably local showers in south
portion tonight and Tuesday.
OCALA, FLORIDA, MONDAY, JULY 2S, 1919.
VOL. 26. NO. 179
3t
STRIFE IN THE
WINDY CITY
THIRD DIVISION
SETBACK FOR
A REQUEST AND
A IWIG
BUSY WEEK
THE SOVIET
THRO THE DITCH

WASHINGTON'S

DREADNAU6HTS

ORDERED

HOME

r

r

9
t
7

Race War in Chicago Causes Two
Deaths and a Large Num Number
ber Number of Wounds

(Associated Press)
Chicago, July 28 A policeman was
shot and several other persons injur injured
ed injured during fighting between negroes
and whites which broke out m the ne negro
gro negro district early last night. Every
available policeman was rushed to the
district.
While fighting was in progress on
South State street in 'the, negro dis district
trict district which extends about five miles
along that thoroughfare, another riot
took place at the Twenty-ninth street
beach. Two negroes were reported to
have been drowned after being struck
by missiles. White men were fre frequently
quently frequently attacked on State street, the
police said.
The police soon cleared the rioters
from the streets and established
strong patrols which they believed
would compel order. A negro was shot
and four other persons, including a
white woman, were injured by clubs
and stones, according to early reports.
The immediate cause of the rioting is
not known, but bad feeling has existed
for months and resulted in recent
bomb explosions and other disorders.
The bombs are believed to have been
due to feeling against negroes for
moving into white neighborhoods.
Negroes greatly outnumbered the
writes in the two districts where the
disturbances occurred.
POLICE IN CONTROL
Chicago, July 28. -The situation in
the "black belt" of Chicago, where
race rioting late yesterday resulted in
the death of two negroes and the in injury
jury injury of perhaps fifty or more whites
and blacks, including four patrolmen,
was under control of the police early
today.
ANOTHER OUTBREAK
Chicago, July 28. The trouble be between
tween between whites and negroes was renew renewed
ed renewed in Chicago's "black belt" today,
when Moses Thomas, a negro, fired
several shots at a wagon load of white
workmen being taken to a south side
factory. When an attempt was made
by the whites to disarm Thomas,
dozens of negroes rushed to' ,his. as assistance.
sistance. assistance. The police quelled', the dis disturbance
turbance disturbance and reported nobody injured.
ERZBERGER BLAMES IT
ON THE ARMY
Berlin, July 27. Mathias Erzberg Erzberger,
er, Erzberger, vice premier and minister of fi finance
nance finance declared in the German nation
al assembly that Great Britain and
France made two overtures to Ger
many through the Vatican in August
1917, and that Germany rejected both
of them. Documents to support the
statement were mentioned by Erz
berger. These included the text of a
note from Monsignor Pachelli, papal
nuncio at Munich, enclosing what was
. said to be a telegram from the Brit British,
ish, British, envoy at the Vatican to which
France assented.
The British note, Erzberger ex explained,
plained, explained, asked for a German declara declaration
tion declaration of .Belgian independence and in inquired
quired inquired as to what guarantees Ger Germany
many Germany would need for herself. Chan Chancellor
cellor Chancellor Michaelis did not answer this
note for four weeks, then on Septem September
ber September 24 he wrote that the situation for
giving such declaration was not suf sufficiently
ficiently sufficiently clear. 'Erzberger promised
more important : revelations in a few
days.
W. K. Lane, M. D., Physician and
Surgeon, specialist Eye, Ear, Nose and
Throat. Law Library Building, Ocala,
Florida. tf
V STANDS FOR VALUE
Let us vulcanize your old, worn,
blown-out tires and add greatly to
their value and their length of serv service.
ice. service. Thrift is the national -watchword
and today thrift in auto and cycle
tires is essential. Vulcanizing is as
valuable to used tires as repairing is
to ued shoes.
MM BS0

PHONE 78
Oklawaha Are

Solon are Working Night and Day to

Obtain a Summer
Vacation
(Associated Press)
Washington, July 28. Senate con
troversy over the peace treaty with
its league of nations covenant will be
halted temporarily this week to allow
consideration of the long pending
Colombian treaty. However the peace
treaty and related subjects are ex
pected to be to the fore every day, if
not on the floor of the Senate at least
ir the cloak rooms and conferences.
While the Senate considers the two
treaties, the House will be occupied
witha rush of legislation preparatory
to the planned recess of five wreeks
beginning Saturday.
INVITED TO ATLANTA
Washington, July 28. Representa Representative
tive Representative Upshaw of Georgia called on
President Wilson today to ask that he
include Atlanta in his itinerary of his
proposed trip. The president express expressed
ed expressed a desire -to go to Georgia.
A GOOD BILL
Washington, July 28. Without a
record vote the Senate today passed
and sent to the House the administra administration
tion administration bill authorizing an increase from,
9500 to 18,000 in number of commis commissioned
sioned commissioned officers to be retained in the
army this year.
WASTE OF WORDS
Washington, July 27. Henry
Fletcher, American ambassador
P.
to
Mexico, in telegrams yesterday to the
Mexican senate and house of repre representatives
sentatives representatives requested their patriotic
cooperation toward securing more ef efficient
ficient efficient and adequate protection for the
lives of Americans in Mexico so that
unhampered enjoyment by Americans
of property rights, lawfully acquired
in Mexico which are accorded to them
in other friendly countries, might be
obtained.
Mr. Fletcher's telegrams were in
reply to messages that he received
from the Mexican senate and House
thanking him for his fair and impar impartial
tial impartial statement of conditions in Mexico
made recently before a committee of
the American House of Representa Representatives.
tives. Representatives. Meanwhile the state department re received
ceived received advices yesterday that Phillip
Thompson, 14-year-old son of an
American citizen, had been kidnapped
by bandits from his father's ranch
thirty miles from Mexico City and
was being held for ransom of 1500
pesos.
Officials here believe that the kid kidnapping
napping kidnapping is a direct result of the in inflammation
flammation inflammation of public opinion by anti anti-American
American anti-American propaganda which had
broken out anew in Mexican news newspapers
papers newspapers especially those recognized as
Carranza organs in Mexico City.
ENTIRELY INACCURATE
Washington, July 27.- President
Wilson in a letter to Representative
Ballinger, republican, of Massachus Massachusetts,
etts, Massachusetts, made, public last night, charac characterized
terized characterized as "entirely inaccurate" a re
cently published statement by John
W. Kehoe, a hospital superintendent
of the Knights of Columbus, that Mrs.
Wilson obtained personal evidence in
Paris of brutal treatment of Ameri
can Military prisoners.
The president's letter said that Mrs.
Wilson's inquiries "brought out the
fact that whereas one of the prisons
used by the American army in Paris
had been delivered over to them in a
very bad condition, the conditions had
been rapidly corrected and such harsh
treatment as had been practiced in
one or two instances had been
promptly checked.
With the correspondence Mr. Bal
linger gave out a statement to the ef effect
fect effect that he could. not reconcile the
president's favorable references to the
prisoners with the recent testimony of
General March, chief -of staff "show
ing conditions rivaling that of Sibe
rian prison tamps."
Use the Star's Unclassified Column

C

Unless Something Unforseen Hap Happens,
pens, Happens, All the Boys -Will Leave
Europe by Sept. 1st

(Associated Press)
Coblenz, Sunday, July 27. The
Third division of the American army
has been ordered home from the oc occupied
cupied occupied area of Germany. The division
will begin entraining for Brest Aug.
5th. The movement of the division to
the port of embarkation is expected
to be completed within one week.
REOPENING TRADE
Coblenz, Sunday, July 28. Army
headquarters yesterday gave permis permission
sion permission for five American commercial
travelers to proceed through the Cob Coblenz
lenz Coblenz bridgehead on business in the in interior
terior interior of Germany. An opportunity
for the reopening of trade relations
betwen the United States and Ger-
Lniany was thus afforded, allowing Am-
V c- i A tt
erican nrms 10 compete wiin Euro European
pean European houses in the German markets.
THE BOYS WOULD GIVE THEM
AWAY
Paris, July 28. All the American
troops, except a few thousand who
would remain on the Rhine, should be
able to leave France by September 1,
in the event a tentative agreement for
the sale of. American army supplies in
France to the French government is
approved.
TAX ON FOR HIRE AUTOMOBILES
Jacksonville, July 28. The war
revenue act of 1918, section 1001,
calls for a special tax on automobiles
-for hire at the following rates:
Each automobile having a seating
capacity of more than two and not
more than seven,, $10 per annum.
On each automobile having a seat seating
ing seating capacity of more than seven, $20
per annum.
This is a special tax and must be
paid in the month of July to avoid
statutory penalty. It is for the fiscal
year ending June 30, 1920.
"As I do not want to see any of
these good fellows penalized I hope
every one will pay this month and I
am trying in this way to tell them
about it," so said Collector of Internal
Revenue James M. Cathcart this
morning.
Speciartaxes must also be paid hi
the same time by people in our county
on the following occupations:
On motor boats that are now used
exclusively for trade or fishing where whereby
by whereby the owner makes his living.
The tax on motor boats under hve
net tons is $10 per year.
Boats of over five net tons are tax
able by the length over all at the fol following
lowing following rates:
Not over 50 feet, one dollar per
foot.
Over 50 feet and not over 100 feet,
two dollars per foot.
Over 100 feet, four dollars per
foot.
The records of the collector's office
show that not more than fifty per
cent of the boats in this district are
registered to date in accordance with
the law. Those who have not regis registered
tered registered their boat tax are urged to give
this special tax their immediate at attention
tention attention and not be penalized.
Brokers, $50 per annum. This in
cludes produce brokers and merchan merchandise
dise merchandise brokers.
Pawnbrokers, $100 per. annum.
Proprietors of theaters based on
seating capacity, from $25 to $200
per annum.
Proprietors of public exhibitions,
$15 per annum.
Proprietors of bowling alleys, bil billiard
liard billiard or pool rooms, $10 per alley or
table, per annum.
Manufacturers of tobacco from $6
to $24 per annum.
Manufacturers of cigars from $4 to
$24, and an additional 10c. per thou
sand on all sales exceeding 400,000.
The latter two taxes are based on
sales for the twelve months ending
June 30, 1919.
All these special taxec are for the
fiscal year ending June 30, 1920.
"I am trying to place this informa information
tion information before those who are subject to
the taxes that they may not be pen
alyzed, which will occur if not paid
during July," said James M. Cath
cart, collector of internal revenue to
day.
TEMPLE ATTRACTIONS
Today, 28th: Bessie Barriscale in
"Hearts Asleep." L-Ko. Comedy.
Tuesday, 29th: Constance Talmage
in "Veiled Adventure." Hearst News.
Wednesday: 30th: Tom Mix in "The
Coming of the Law." Mutt and Jeff.
Thursday, 31st: Charlotte Walker
in "Every Mother's Son.".
Fresh carload of Atlas cement just
arised. R. H. Todd Lumber Co. 22-2t

Rumanian Troops Met Hungarian
Bolsheviki and Treated
Them Rough

(Associated Press)
Vienna, July 28. Hungarian soviet
troops have been thrown back in dis disci
ci disci der across the Theiss river by the
Rumanians at Szolnok and other
points, according to reports received
here today.
FIXING A BOUNDARY
Paris, July 28. The supreme allied
council today considered the proposi proposition
tion proposition advanced by Foreign Minister
Titoni to reestablish a system of shar sharing
ing sharing coal and foodstuffs among-the al allied
lied allied peoples. The council also named
members of the miiltary mission to
fix the boundary between Germany
and Poland.
SUMMARY JUSTICE
Havre, July 28. Officials of the
Federated Trades Union went to the
wholesale market today and obliged
producers to sell them a quantity of
foodstuffs at prices carying from five
to seventy-five per cent under the
average market price. Then they
took the foodstuffs to one of the pub public
lic public market places where they were
sold at the cost price.
PROTEST FROM AUSTRIA
Vienna, July 28. The financial
clauses of the peace terms offered
Austria by the Allies are strongly
protested against by both newspapers
and in financial circles. Both of these
quarters .go so far as to predict bank bankruptcy
ruptcy bankruptcy for Austria within a few
weeks unless the financial terms are
modified. J
CLEMENCEAU HONORED
Paris, July 24. Premier Clemen Clemen-ceau
ceau Clemen-ceau spent Sunday touring the de devastated
vastated devastated region of the Somme and
everywhere received a most enthus enthusiastic
iastic enthusiastic reception. At Amiens the crowd
broke through the lines and swept the
premier along to the city hall, where
the mayor enumerated the needs of
the city.
REPORTS EXAGGERATED
Paris, July 28. Henry Morgen Morgen-thau,
thau, Morgen-thau, former American ambassador
to Turkey, who was appointed by
President Wilson as head of the Am American
erican American commission to investigate the
reported pogroms in Poland, told the
newspaper men today that in a short
visit. which he had made to Poland he
was convinced the reports of pogroms
were tremendously exaggerated.
WEDDED BY WIRELESS
(Associated Press)
New York, July 27. Traveling 80
miles per hour 2000 feet in the air
Lieut. George Burgess of the army
aviation corps and Miss Emily Schaf Schaf-er
er Schaf-er of Brooklyn, were married yester yesterday
day yesterday by wireless telephone. The cere
mony was conducted by Rev. Alex
ander Wouters from another airplane
piloted by Lieut. E. H. Hartsdale,
best man, while the machines circled
above 200,000 persons attending a po
lice field day at Sheepshead aBy.
WEEVILS WAGE
DESTRUCTIVE WARFARE
The destruction of grain by weevils
causes an annual loss of something
like 20 per cent, of the total crop. The
corn crop in Marion county this year
is good; the acreage is increased.
This means that the yield will be
larger than last year, which is esti
mated at something like 800,000 bush
els. The Marion county farmers can
not afford to let the weevils have 20
per cent of this crop. In many of the
other counties of the state the yield
will not be large; in some sections
rains have almost ruined the crop.
About the middle of August a com
paign against the corn weevil will be
started in this county. County Agent
Blackburn, is arranging to hold meet meetings
ings meetings in every section of the county, at
which time the farmers will be urged
to treat their corn against the weevil.
If a surplus crop is made, this will en enable
able enable them to hold their corn without
it being weevil-eaten, until the best
market price can be secured. Prof.
J. R. Watson of the experiment sta station
tion station and District Agent E. W. Jenkins
will assist Mr. Blackburn with these
meetings.
The expense of fumigating the corn
is small compared with the loss of
grain where it is not fumigated.
When corn is bringing $1.75 a bushel,
it is too precious to be eaten by
weevils.
TO ADVERTISERS Copy for dis display
play display ads. must be in this office on the
aay before they are intended for pub publication
lication publication The Star, if

Colossal War Vessels are Now Steam Steaming
ing Steaming Northward Along the
Pacific Coast

(Associated Press)
On Board the U. S. S. New Mexico,
Friday, July 26. Four dreadnaughts
of the Pacific fleet, the New Mexico,
Arkansas, New York and Colorado,
passed through the Gatun locks yes yesterday.
terday. yesterday. This is the first time the ef effort
fort effort has been made to negotiate the
locks by dreadnaughts and tonight the
vessels lay in the fresh water of
Gatun lake, 85 feet above sea level.
COURSE LAID FOR SAN DIEGO
On Board of the U. S. S. New Mex Mexico,
ico, Mexico, July 27. The Pacific fleet, which
passed successfully through the Pan Panama
ama Panama canal yesterday on its voyage to
the west coast, sailed tonight from
Panama for San Diego.
ANOTHER LETTER
FROM MR. FORT
Editor Star: In replying to my
article commenting on duties of tax
assessors and boards of county com commissioners,
missioners, commissioners, Mr. O. H. Rogers ex expresses
presses expresses amusement and surprise at
what I had to say, and disputed it as
not being'true, etc.. This brings it to
a points of veracity between us. I
said the law required the assesor to
have his roll made up by ac ertain date
and meet with the county commis
sioners to equalize said roll. The time
is the first of July of each year. Mr.
Rogers says this is not true, that the
assessor has not made up the tax roll
for the present year. How and why
did the assessor meet with the board
July 7, 1919 with the assesment roll
a3 shown in the official minutes of
that date? And further action was
deferred, etc. What action deferred?
Equalizing the values contained in the
roll, of course. Now they send tax
return blanks to the taxpayers and
command them to make sworn returns
of their personal property by the Au August
gust August meeting or they, the taxpayers,
will have no redress from any raise in
values they make. And yet Mr. Rog Rogers
ers Rogers says they are not assessing taxes.
What do you call it, anyway? Surely
you do not call it equalizing values
contained in the roll. Mr. Rogers, the
facts are, the assessor did meet with
you in July with his tax roll, as the
law requires. The law stipulates that
you shall meet from day to day till
you equalize the values of property
contained in that roll, then levy the
millage that the assessor may calcu
late the amount of taxes each person
is to pay. The facts are you gentle gentlemen
men gentlemen have waded in deep and assume
to do something you .have no legal
right to do, using as an excuse the in inequalities
equalities inequalities in tax assessments. Of
course these things do exist, but the
fact of it does not justify' you in try
ing to remedy an evil by an illegal ac
tion, which if persisted in by you can
only result in an unjust proportion of
state taxes being paid by our county.
Tax assessors have held conventions
with the view of reaching some decis
ion on an equal valuation on proper property,
ty, property, by counties. These meetings did
but little good. County commissioners
likewise have held conventions with
the same aim, but so far have been a
failure. We had a state tax commis commission
sion commission which was charged with the duty
of equalizing and fixing the values of
all property at 100 per cent valuation.
Did it succeed? You know the rest.
Tax assessors will not assess property
at its cash value because they will not
make it uniform by counties. You
gentlemen have tackled something
which is doomed to failure, so far as
equal justice is. concerned. Again I
suggest that there are only one or
two ways to remedy this evil; one by
dividing state and county taxes; sec second,
ond, second, changing our revenue laws. Mr.
Rogers, you've only been a county
commissioner six months. I think
you have much to learn. When you
shall have served your people 12 or
14 years then will be time enough to
dispute one's word who has been long
in the service. I have only kind feel feelings
ings feelings toward, you. I hope it will not be
necessary for me to continue this dis
cussion any further. N. A. Fort.
PHONE 108
or 243
for
FRESfl MEAT
and
GROCERIES
Prompt DeDvery.
MAIN STREET
MARKET

Mayor Chace Asks Autoists to Ob Observe
serve Observe the Law and Informs Them
They Will Suffer if They
. Don't
To the People of Ocala:
There has been a great deal of an annoyance
noyance annoyance and some suffering caused in
this city by the immoderate use of
cutouts. A warning from the city
government some time ago has been
heeded by some and disregarded by
many. There is not any necessity for
running with cutouts on the city
streets; in fact, our best autoists sel seldom
dom seldom use them anywhere.
It is against the law in the city of
Ocala for an auto to run with cutout
open on the streets. This notice is to
give fair warning that the law will
henceforth be enforced without fear
or favor. I hope all drivers of cars
will observe the warning and make
arrests unnecesary.
Respectfully,
' J. E. Chace, Mayor.
WEIRSDALE W. C T. U.

July 24th the union held a Christian
citizenship meeting with a good at attendance.
tendance. attendance. The topic for discussion
was "Americanization."
The first number of the program
was, "The Immediate Need for Amer-
icanization," by Deborah K. Living Livingston,
ston, Livingston, chairman Rhode Island commit committee
tee committee on the subject, which stated that
one of the great tasks confronting the
organized women of the country is
their part in making American citi citizens
zens citizens out of the millions of foreign
peoples in our midst. To accomplish
this task requires the most tactful and
helpful methods that we possess. We
must first understand them, if we
hope to have them undertsand us. The
issue is clear; we must Americanize
them or they will foreignize us. The
very life of our free government is at
stake. Civilization can only continue
a3 we keep burning bright the torch
of true liberty.
The next number was "The For
eigner Deserves Our Interest and
Prayers," by Mrs. Eva lander, super superintendent
intendent superintendent of Americanization for the
state of Michigan. If ever in the his history
tory history of our patioh we should put forth
every effort possible to interest and
Americanize the foreign born, it is
just at this time. The necessity of
the work should impress itself upon upon-us
us upon-us when we realize that every third
nan in the city of Detroit, for exam
ple, was from abroad or was born in
the United States of foreign parents.
Kindness should be shown to the for
eign born. Make them feel like they
belong to us, not treat them like
strangers. Begin with the children
because the parents can be won thru
them. We women of the W. C T. U.
can accomplish much by calling upon
the foreign mothers in the capacity
of domestic educators offering them
advice as to sanitation, personal hy
giene and home economics. v
Third number: We must encourage
adults to speak our language because
how can they be loyal to America if
they don't understand our language.
We ought to have a law to compel
every person to know how to speak
English.
An enouraging report was made by
Mrs. Jacoby, superintendent of L. T.
L. work. The reception for the chil
dren July 19th was a. success in every
way. A new yell was adopted since
the name of our union was changed
from Lake Weir to Weirsdale, which"
reads: -v
We are the Weirsdale L. T. L, from
the liquor traffic free, which was a
menace in our land, and now we are a
happy, happy band.
The next meeting will be held Aug.
7th, 3:30 p. m. The topic will be
"Work for the Soldiers and Sailors."
Mrs. L. B. Walling, superintentdent.
Mrs. J. F. Sigmon, Reporter.
CANDLER
Candler, July 28. Mr. and Mra.
Wiley and baby arrived Thursday aft
ernoon from Mississippi, and were the
guests for several days of Mr. Wiley's
uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. George
McGee, ere going to Orlando, their
destination.
Mr. Hall and bride, the former a.
brother of Mrs. Henry Sylvester, ar arrived
rived arrived last week from Rochelle, and
are occupying the cottage recently
vacated by Mr. and Mrs. Peter Fort.
Mrs. Albert McClain went to Tam Tampa
pa Tampa Saturday for a visit to her daugh daughter,
ter, daughter, Miss Mabel McClain.
Mrs. Charles Mathews, Mr. Robert
Mathews, Mrs. George Yancey and lit-'
tie daughter, Mary Elizabeth, motor motored
ed motored to Umatilla Sunday morning for
an all day visit to the family of Mr.
Will Yancey.
Miss Delia Hall of Rochelle is visit visiting
ing visiting her sister, Mrs. Henry Sylvester.
Fresh carload of Atlas cement Jest
arised. R. II. Todd Lumber Co, 22-2t

Ocala, Fla.

i
.n
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i

OCALA EVENING STAR, MONDAY, JULY 28, 1919

OCALA EVEIIIIIG STAR

Pa 11 1 bed Every Day Except Sunday by
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY
OF OCALA, FLA.
II. II. Carroll, President
P. V. Lenvengrood, Secretary-Treaaurer
J. II. Ilenjamin, Editor

Entered at Ocala, Fla., postofflce as
second-class matter.

TELEPHONES
Dnalneaa Office Five-One
Editorial Department Two-Seven
MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Associated Press is exclusively
entitled for the use for republication of
all news dispatches credited to it or
not otherwise credited in this paper
and also the local news published
herein. All rights of republication of
8 pedal dispatches herein are also reserved.

SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Domestic
One year. In advance $6.00
6Ix months, in advance. 3.00
Three months, In advance 1.50
One month, in advance 60
Foreign
One year. In advance 18.00
Six months, In advance 4.25
Three months, in advance 2.25
One month, in advance 80
ADVERTISING RATES
Dlaplayi Plate 10c. per Inch for con consecutive
secutive consecutive insertions. Alternate inser insertions
tions insertions 25 per cent additional. Composi Composition
tion Composition charged on ads. that run less than
six times 5c. per inch. Special position
20 per cent additional. Rates based on
4-inch mlnimtim. Less than four inches
will take higher rate, which will be
furnished on application.
Heading; Notices t 5c. per line for first
insertion;. 3c. per line for each subse subsequent
quent subsequent Insertion. One change a week
allowed on readers without extra com composition
position composition charges.
Legal advertisements at legal rates.
Electros must be mounted, or charge
will be made for mounting.
Climate liars are almost as numer numerous
ous numerous as fish liars. As we never look
at a thermometer, and never go fish fishing,
ing, fishing, we have so far refrained from
perjuring ourself on either subject.
The. county commissioners of
Bradford county have increased the
valuations in that county $750,000.
Palatka Times-Herald.
Pretty good for little Bradford; lets
see if Marion can't do better.

We see that a member of the Sen Senate
ate Senate wants to submit the peace treaty
to a vote of the people. But first the
constitution must be amended. The
people, however, will vote on. the sen senators
ators senators who vote on the treaty.
And now they accuse Mr. Wilson of
having shenaniganed the Shantung
provisions in to the peace treaty. We
are glad the Mdna Lisa wasn't stolen
while Mr. Wilson was in Paris. The
republican senators would have hung
it on Prexy, sure.
Our remarks in Saturday's paper
concerning cutouts have brought forth
many comments, mostly unfavorable
to the cutouts. We are informed by
several people who have been abroad
that in civilized communities the use
of the cutout is considerd a mark of
illbreeding, unless some person out in

the country uses it to scarce a cow off
the track. It seems to us that the use
of the cutout is inspired by something
of the same spirit that incites a cow cowboy
boy cowboy coming into town off the range to
turn loose his sixshooters while rac
ing his bronc thru the streets. It's
an ebullition of damphoolishness as
well as a sure sign of "poor raisin'."
It is useless as well as idiotic, for it
does not add to the efficiency of the
auto. It is in disrepute in all civilized
communities, there is an ordinance
against it in Ocala, and in the name
of the sick and nervous we call on our
authorities to enforce it.
Henry Ford, we believe, is a pure pure-minded
minded pure-minded patriot, but he has one prac practice
tice practice that we disapprove of. He has a
news bureau, which every day sends
out long reports of the trial at Mount
Clemens, and with them comments
favorable to Mr. Ford. These reports,
vhich run from a column and a half
up to two or three columns a day, are
sent to all the newspapers in the
country. Mr. Ford evidently expects
a good proportion of them to be print printed.
ed. printed. If they were they would give Mr.
Ford about 25,000 worth of free ad advertising
vertising advertising every day. Perhaps, how however,
ever, however, he is not to blame. This, like a
good many of the acts attributed to
him, may be done by some of the' men
he hires to do his thinking and writ writing
ing writing for him. Nearly every rich man is
surrounded by a bunch of grafters,
and the testimony at this trial is re revealing
vealing revealing that poor old Henry is worse

afflicted in that respect than any
other plutocrat in America.
Joe Earman in his Palm Beach
Post tells a very pretty story about
Miss Mabel Bates of Tampa, who will
graduate at the Florida College for
Women next year. Miss Bates has
been blind, since she was two and a
half years old. Notwithstanding, she
has acquired at the state school for
the blind at St. Augustine an excel excellent
lent excellent education, which is being finished
at the Tallahassee college. Joe is
going to lead the young lady from her
seat in the auditorium to the plat platform,
form, platform, where she will receive her
diploma, and says this honor, will be
his salary for two years work on the
board of control. Miss Bates is being
educated to be a teacher in the school
for the blind. The fact that she has
received such excellent instruction in
spite of her blindness is a fine recom recommendation
mendation recommendation for two of our state insti insti-tutions
tutions insti-tutions the school for the blind and
the Florida College for Women.
Saw somewhere in a paper 'the other
day that boys and girls no more walk walked
ed walked in the woods and fields under the
shade of the trees, and through the
greensome grass, acquiring flowers
and redbugs and whispering sweet
silliness to each other. We had al almost
most almost commenced to believe so, and
that it was at least a ride in a flivver
for the swain and swainness of today.
But Sunday our friend Carter took us
riding in his Fordmobile, and drove us
by various paths and groves, where
we saw sundry young couples walk walking
ing walking and talking as in the days of yore.
Believe, us, girls, the youngster who
retains the use of his feet, and rides
his mammy's ponies instead of burn-

si

TIE PROOF OF THE PUDDING
IS IN TEE EATING

FEDERAL 24-oz. Loaf 15c
FEDERAL Pullman ... 15c
FEDERAL Graham .. 15c
FEDERAL Rye 15c
FEDERAL Raisin (like cake) 17c
FEDERAL Rolls (a pan) 10c
CINNAMON Buns (extra fine) 20c
DOUGHNUTS (in the we ue milk, butter and eggs) doz 30c
Our shop is open from 2 a.m. until 8 p. m.
The public is invited to visit us at any time.
WERNER'AI. 1BAMEEY

ing his daddy's bank account, stands

the best chance of ensconcing you in a j
:n: : : 1 e 1

muiiuiiuiie a niansiua ueiure it unngs
tears to your eyes when Marie the
frenchmaid laces you up.
Some days ago it was announced
from Tallahassee that the office of
rural school inspector had been offer offered
ed offered by Gov. Catts to Senator W. T.
Cash of Taylor county. It is now said
that Gov. Catts offered the position to
Mr. Cash as an inducement for his
support and that Mr. Cash has de declined.
clined. declined. This is -wise in him. The of office
fice office of rural inspector of schools is
about as useful as Jerry on Job of
hotels and fire warden of the ever everglades,
glades, everglades, and like them an imposition on
the people. Isn't the educational de department
partment department of our state government in
a helluva fix when positions in its ser service
vice service can be traded off for political
support?
The reappearance of Raisuli in the
news brings to mind the president
who called for his dead body and
didn't get it. Times-Union.
It seems impossible for the Times Times-Union
Union Times-Union to tell anything straight about

Mr. Roosevelt. An American citizen
named Perdicaris was captured and
held for ransom by the Moorish ban bandit,
dit, bandit, Raisuli. President Roosevelt sent
a warship to Tangier and with it an
ultimatus to the sultan of Morocco
"Perdicaris alive or Raisuli dead."
And Perdicaris was produced alive
and well in a very short time.

Some of the benches on the court courthouse
house courthouse square are becoming badly
frazzled and should be removed. The
county commissioners should also
direct that said benches never leave
the square. They were paid for with
money raised by private subscription,
with the intention that they should be
used on the square and nowhere else,
and they should never be taken away
from that locality. Thousands of peo people
ple people have obtained much rest and com comfort
fort comfort from the benches.

so built can be definitely reckoned
upon as an investment by the tax taxpayer,
payer, taxpayer, who thus gets the benefit of a
direct and immediate betterment to
his property and the capital is pro procured
cured procured for this outlay upon the credit
of the state at much lower interest
rates than could be permitted to any
individual for private improvements.
These are the sentiments of one
who still loves Florida, and his views
are fortified by actual experience.
The good roads of California are
of .concrete, covered with crude oil,
with sand sifted on.
Sincerely, William Hocker.
Riverside, Calif., July 18.

The old question, "What becomes of
the pins?" may soon be supplanted by
the query, "What has become of the
whisky bottles?" Four years ago,
they lay around Ocala in dozens; now
you hardly ever see pne. Soon they
will become as extinct as the dodo.
We have saved one' and are keeping it
to .show to our grandchildren.
The effort of the county commis commissioners
sioners commissioners to have people report their
property is having effect. Many re returns
turns returns with considerable increase in
assessments are being sent in. Wo
are informed that the returns for
Saturday show an increase of five
thoousand dollars.

KELSEY MAKING GOOD
IN CALIFORNIA

PXIE HIGHWAY GARAG
JAMES S. ENGFSSER,Prop.

Stationery Engines
and Trucks

MIJIlTf All Makes Autos
Kill II and Tractors

Sfaiidard Gas, Oils and Grease

OPEN FROM 6:30 A,lM. TO 10 P. M.

Phone 1 358
121 W. Broadway

OCALA, FLA.

Editor Star: There are many in
Marion county who remember O. K.
Kelsey, formerly of Lake Weir, who
for the last twelve years has resided
near here. I am glad to inform Mr.
Kelsey's Florida friends that he is
prospering and that he enjoys the
full confidence of his neighbors and is
a highly respected citizen of this
county.
Mr. Kelsey's friends will regret to
know that through an accidental faU
from a bicycle he lost his oldest boy.
His family circle is still gladdened by
the presence of four fine children, two
sons and two daughters.
Through the chance mention of my
name in a local paper here Mr. Kelsey
found me out, and took me for many
nice drives and entertained me at his
home seven miles from this town.
He said I was the third Floridian
who had come his way. The lamented
Col. C. L. Bittinger, one of the found founders
ers founders of your paper, was the first to
visit him here, followed by our banker
friend, the active and ubiquitous Z.
C. Chambliss.
Many people here have been very
kind to me, but after my long sojourn
among entire strangers it was a great
surprise and treat to meet in this
far-away spot an old friend. Mr. Kel Kelsey
sey Kelsey was keen to get news about all
the old-timers at home and asked
about them all in detail; and was
especially anxious that I should give
them his very best greetings.
In the midst of his good fortune
and beautiful surroundings, Mr. Kel Kelsey
sey Kelsey has not lost his love for Florida,
and expressed the hope that some day
he may return to live among us and
a keen desire to help develop the in industries
dustries industries of our state by applying the
lessons learned by his experience in
California. As a first step in such
development he told me to urge, upon
our people, as the very best invest investment,
ment, investment, the construction of a 16-foot
concrete road from Jacksonville to
Fort Myers and plenty of short lines
of the same material.
This message did not come as a re result
sult result of any prompting from me, but
as a sincere friend of our state he
wanted us to get those benefits in the
increase of land values, the increase
in the volume of old industries and
the opening of new ones which he had
actually witnessed as the result of the
building of such concrete roads in
California. He went to that state be before
fore before good roads had been built in a
systematic way and has seen that
state first issue $15,000,000 road
bonds by a small majority vote over
great opposition, and the results are
so good that later $18,000,000 more
road bonds were authorized by popu popular
lar popular vote and an additional $40,000,000
debt was voted by a majority vote of
six to one to put concrete roads all
other that vast state. He savs that

' the people have found out that the
best roads are the cheapest, and when

UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS

WANTED. LOST, FOUND. FOR
SALE, FOR RENT AND SIM SIMILAR
ILAR SIMILAR LOCAL NEEDS

RATES Six line maximum, one
time, 25c; three times, 50c; six times
75c; one month $3. Payable in advance.

i

FOR SALE About two tons of pea peanut
nut peanut hay, about oi:e thousand pounds
of velvet beans. Apply to Sam R.
Pyles Jr., box 374, Ocala. 28-6t

FOR SALE Farm of 40 acres; house
and other buildings; good water; 1G
miles out on hard road; for $600. En Enquire
quire Enquire of owner 302 West Broadway,
Ccala, Fla. 28-6t

FOR SALE Twenty acres unim unimproved,
proved, unimproved, in section 30, 17, 22, seven
miles west of Summerfield, close to
hard road. Price $500, or will trade
for something out west. C. Rummick,
1830 Nineteenth St., Bakersfield,
Calif. 6-20-6t

FOUND Small amount of money.
Owner can have same by paying for
this ad. J. H. Smith, 310 North Main
street, Ocala. 26-lt

FOR SALE One Ford truck for
cash. Just overhauled and in good
condition. Dixie Highway Garage, tf

FOR RENT After Sept. 1st, five five-room
room five-room cottage, all moden conveniences,
second ward on South 6th street, two
blocks from school. Price $10 per
moth. M. M. Little. 23-6t

FOR SALE OR EXCHANGE Eight
large and desirable lots, well located
in North Ocala, close in. For sale or
will trade for automobile of equal
vlue. Address Box 65, Ocala', Fla. 12t

FOR RENT Three 'furnished rooms
fot light housekeeping, pleasantly
located. Modern conveniences. Apply
at No. 614 East Adams St. 18-6t

WOOD Phone 146 for all lenghths
oak or pine wood; thoroughly season seasoned.
ed. seasoned. Special price on quantity orders.
Put in your winter, supply now.
Smoak's Wood Yard. 15-tf

HUNTER'S SECOND HAND HOUSE
Furniture bought and sold. Get
prices elsewhere, then see me
there's a sale made on one side or the
other. I have expert mechanics to put
in good condition anything you have,
such as furniture, lawn mowers, sew sewing
ing sewing machines, scissors, knives, saws,
pots, pans and all kinds of enamel enamel-ware.
ware. enamel-ware. Repair all kinds of broken
castings. Call at 310, 312 and 314
South Main street. 30-tf

WANTED Al once, small office
safe. Must be in good condition

and cheap for cash, Address,
giving price, Safe, care of Ocala
Star. 11-3-

A, -i

I 5
i
x.
fa
V
c
.
L

Tire Conservation Day

At our place of business
AUGUST 2MB
brings to the motorists of this
city and vicinity first-hand in information
formation information for all who are
interested in increasing the
wearing power of their tires
and so reducing this item of
expense.
A well-known tire expert will
give personal attention to the
tire problems of all who come
to the demonstration. His
interesting exhibits show all
kinds of tire wear preventable
and unpreventable and his
mission is to reduce to the mini minimum
mum minimum the preventable kinds of
tire failure for motorists of this
community.
This demonstration is jree.
It makes no difference what
kind of tires you use you are
urged to corne-for your good.
Remember the date and re remember
member remember the places-

August 2nd. At

B. F. Condon's
Next to the Fire Station

Schedule ol
SILVER SPRINGS-OCALA BUS SERVICE
Comfortable Bus Will Until Further Notice
Run Between Ocala and Silver Springs on
Sundays and Thursdays on the following
Schedule, Leaving Ocala from Court House.

Thursday's Schedule
Lv. Ocala Lv, Silver Spfcs.
1:30 P. M 2:00 P. M.
3:30 P. M 4:00 P. M.
5:30 P. M 7. -00 P. M.
7:30 P. 31. 8:00 P. 31.
9:30 P. M.' 10:00 P. 31.

Sunday's Schedule
Lv. Ocala Lv. Silver Spga.
9:00 A. 31 2:00 P. M.
1:30 P. 31 4:00 P. 3L
k 3:30 P. 3L. 7:00 P. 3L
5:30 P. 31 8:00 P. 1L
9:30 P. 31 10:00 P. M.

HI

Arrival and Departure of passenger
trains at OCALA UNION STATION.
The following schedule figures pub published
lished published as information and not guar guaranteed.
anteed. guaranteed. (Eastern Standard Time)
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILROAD

Leave
2:20 am Jacksonville-New York
1:55 pm Jacksonville
4:05 pm Jacksonville
2:15 am Tampa-Manatee-
St. Petersburg
1:50 pm Tampa-Manatee
4:25 pm Tarn pa-St. Petersburg

Arrive
2:10 am
1:20 pm
4:25 pm
2:15 am
1:25 pm
4:05 pm

Eil. Carmmlclhiael, PFoprietop

ATLANTIC COAST LIfiE RAILROAD
Leave Arrive
2:12 pm J'cksonvllle-Nw York 2:15 am.
1:45 pm. J'ksonvllle-G'lnMYllle 2:25 pm.
1:42 am. J'lcsonvllle-G'&errille 10:12 pm.
2:15 am. St. Pefabrs-Lakeland 2:12 atx
3:35 pm St. Pefsburgr-Lakeland 1:25 pm
7:10 am. Dunnellon-Wilcox
7.40 am. Du,nellon-L'kelnd 11:03 pm
5:25 pm. Homoaassa 1:25 pm
10:13 pm. Leesbursr C :42 am.
4-45 pm. Gainesville ,11:50 am
Moniay, Wednesday. Friday.
Tuday. Thursday. Saturday.

LIFE

FIRE

. A. E. GERIG
INSURANCE
Ocala, Florida
ACCIDENT AUTOMOBILE

SAVE MONEY ON MEAT
We always handle the best fresh meat to be
had and our prices are always the lowest

Round Steak 25c
Loin Steak 30c
Stew Meat

I

Best Pork Chops ....35c
Pork Sausage .'..25c
...15c.

Groceries, Fruit, Vegetables, Etc
NEW YORK MEAT MARKET

FREE DELIVERY

WEST BROADWAY

PHONE 110

TRANSFER AND STORAGE COMPANY

Negotiable
Storage Receipts
Issued on Cotton,
Automobiles. Etc
FIREPROOF
STORAGE

Moving. Packing
Live Stock.
Pianos,
Machinery and
rnrniture,
FIRE PROOF
STORAGE

We have first class trucks with competent drivers, and our
equipment will move you complete no matter what you possess.

PHONE 296

Read the Star Want Ads. It Days



OCALA EVENING STAR, MONDAY, JULY 28, 1919

OCALA OCGilllCES
Kipling told us, is more deadly than
the male the young married woman
who keeps her husband's nose to the
grindstone to provide her with geor georgette
gette georgette waists and pattern hats that she
may win the admiration of some
young man, who might otherwise
BEAN SEED
A fresh shipment of Guth's and
Nunnally's Candies just in at Gerig's
Drug Store. tf
SPANISH MOSS WANTED
FALL IRISH POTATO SEED
We have bean seed for fall plant planting;
ing; planting; Wadwell Kidney Wax at $10 per
bushel; green beans at $9 per bushel.
14-tf Ocala Seed Store.
Just a few left. Plant them early;
Z per 100 lbs., f. o. b. Elkton, Fla.
Prompt shipments. J. E. Gauzens,
Elkton, Fla. 25-21
There is a sharp demand in the mar market
ket market for Spanish moss. The secretary
of the Board of Trade has had an in inquiry
quiry inquiry for large quantities, to be ship shipped
ped shipped to northern markets in car lots.
Large quantities of moss are used in
ihe hrst years
of man must
make provision
for the last.
Such a result is
impossible i f
If you have any society items for
the Star, please phone five-two-three.
Mr. L. J. Wight of Tallahassee
spent the week-end in Ocala visiting
friends.
r
When packing your Dlankets and
winter clothing, think of Cedar Com Compound,
pound, Compound, which will keep moths away;
25 cents the package at Gerig's Drug
Store. tf
Mclvcr 2r MaeHay
UNDERTAKERS and EUBAIHECS
PHONES 47. 1M. ZZ3
OCALA FLORIDA
I the married woman's attentions hadn't
i upholstery Among the .users is the
spoiled mm to ueam.
A package of Cedar Compound in
your piano will probably save a repair
bill. Ge rig's Drug Store. tf
Pullman company. There are large
your vision is defective.
DR. K. J. WEI HE,
Eyesight Specialist,
Ocala, Fla.
quantities of moss in Marion county
and there should be a good opening
for some reliable person to handle
this product.
Use the Star's Unclassified Columa

Mrs. fynilio Suarez of Tampa is the
guest of her sister, Mrs. Dehon, arriv arriving
ing arriving yesterday by motor.
Get ready, your fall garden. We
hava new seed in. Bitting & Co. tf
Mr. Cranford Stanley came from
Jacksonville yesterday to spend Sun Sunday
day Sunday with his mother, Mrs. S. A.
Standley.
Mr. and Mrs. II. C. Cameron and lit little
tle little son Henry, left early this morning
to spend a week at Worthington
Springs.

Keep out t the moths with Cedar
Compound, 25 cents the package at
Gerig's Drug Store. tf
Misses Frances and Evelyn McMul McMul-len
len McMul-len of Largo v's;re the guests yester yesterday
day yesterday of Mrs. E. II. Martin, en route to
York to visit relatives.

Mrs. A. T. Thomas and Mrs. C. E.
Cimmons with their famiiles returned
to Ocala Saturday from a week
spent at Daytona Beach.

If you want the best bread made
just ask for a 15-cent loaf of BUT BUTTERNUT
TERNUT BUTTERNUT bread at Carter's Bakerv.

Misses Louise and Loureen Spencer
are in Eustis in attendance at a house
party which is being given by Mrs.
W. A. Goin, formerly of Ocala.
..
Mr. and Mrs.. J. Glove Taylor of
Gainesville, whose wedding was a
brilliant society event in Jacksonville
last month, were visitors to Ocala yesterday.

Miss Hannay Ellis, who is a student

in Telfair Hospital, Savannah, arriv

ed in Ocala to spend a four weeks

avaction with her mother, Mrs. S. A.

Ellis on Oklawaha avenue.

Mrs. Mary A. Sheppard of Daytona

is in the city on a visit to her daugh daughter,
ter, daughter, Mrs. Laura Luckie. Mrs. Shep Sheppard
pard Sheppard formerly Jived in Ocala and her

friends are glad to see her.

Get ready your fall garden. We

have new seed in. Bitting & Co. tf

W. W. Hayes, a Dunnellon boy, who
served in France and Germany with

Company E, First Piooneers, was in

town Saturday, shaking hands with

his comrades and other friends.

The gallant and good-looking boy,
Floyd Olds, seems iufet suited with

the army. Arriving home a few days

ago from service in France, he has
re-enlisted. He will serve in the

motor transport branch.

Ladies, use Nailoid Cuticle pack

ages, and keep your nails in good
shape. Sold only at Gerig's Drug Store

at 25 cents the package.- tf

Lieuts. Cundiff and Bobzein of Carl-

strom field flew over Ocala yesterday,

making a landing at the golf links.
They made the trip from Daytona in

fifty-five minutes, and complained of
the heat at that place, but it is hoped
the only heat they will encounter in
Ocala was found in the warm welcome

of their friends here.

1

V- i t IB
jfeJaJy :

The lamous BUTTERNUT bread

is now beiner turned out in two size

loaves, 10 and 15 cents each. To be

had only at Carter's Bakery. tf

A. B. Fort, one of .Marion's boys
from across the river, a son of Mr. R.
, C. Fort, and a soldier in Company E,

, 318th Field Artillery, was in the city
Saturday. He has just returned from
overseas service and is receiving the
welcome due to a brave young soldier.
He was for eleven months in France
and was in the thick of the Argonne

drive.

Having decided to discontinue our

line of men's and boy's dress shoes,
and. only keep service shoes in these

lines hereafter in order to specialize

more on ladies' and children's shoes,

we will close out all low shoes in these

lines at real bargains. "Come and

see." Little's Shoe Parlor. 19-6t

Judging by the crowd at the Tem

ple Saturday night, to see Mary

Boland in "A Woman's Experience,"
there are not many gossips in Ocala.

The story was a good one, but we
can't see that it was more given to

scandal than the average picture of

its class. The attraction tonight will

be Bessie Bassiscale in "Hearts

Asleep," and an L-Ko. comedy. Miss

Barriscale appeared on the Temple
screen a few weeks ago and made an

excellent impression.

' "The meanest specimen of a human
skunk is the idler who hangs around
and tries to' seduce the young married
woman whose husband has to work so

hard ,to support her in style that he
cannot give her the social attention
she desires."
. The society reporter seeing the
foregoing on the editorial page of a
recent issue was moved to pen the
following:
"His equal is only found in 'the
I female of the species,' who as Mr.

'3. n n im M (0) if a im g eC if nn

s

El

(TTjPEN an ice-cold bottle of this delightful drink today!
Fill your glass to the brim with sparkling, thirst-

tempting ramfle-Craslfo. The glowing goodness of it
will banish thirst and refresh you.

You can enjoy the deliciousness of
Orange-Crush with complete assur assurance
ance assurance of its purity because it is made
from fresh ripe oranges, and such other
wholesome ingredients as pure granu granulated
lated granulated sugar, carbonated water and citric
acid, which is a natural acid found in
oranges, lemons and grapefruit.
No matter how hot the day at home,
or away morning, noon or night, you
will enjoy Orange-Crush. Drink it
anywhere and as often as you likd.

Orange-Crush, served ice-cold, is
guaranteed to bring you thirst quench quenching
ing quenching joy always.
We bottle Orange-Crush in strict
conformity with the most rigid sanitary
requirements and personally guarantee
it to be the perfect family drink.
Orange-Crush is obtainable by the
bottle or the case wherever soft drinks
are sold. Buy an ice-cold bottle of
Orange-Crush today. Then order a
case for the family.



OCALA EVENING STAR, MONDAY, JULY 23. 1919

1. T3

UE OUR ICE
AMP USE IT SENSIBLY

PURE ICE, the kind we make and sell, is the "best thing that
comes into your homes these days. Nothing you can buy gives you
so much for so little money.
So don't make the mistake of trying to skimp on your ice bilL
Avoid extravagance ort the one hand, and don't be "penny wise and
pound foolish" on the other.
Take enough of our ice to keep your refrigerator in good con condition
dition condition and have some tospare for other uses. Then you will be pro protected
tected protected all around, and will never experience the annoyance of being
without ice at the very time you need it most and cannot get it
immediately.
Be intelligently liberal in the use of OUR ICE and you will
escape most of the discomforts and dangers incidental to this time
ofythe year.
CPcaila Ice &l PacMiup Co.

vSf'ZZr "zs '-Of -z.'

s ;

Tomorrow Night

D a n c i n

at
Silver Springs
every
t
Thursday Afternoon
Tuesday, Thursday and
Saturday Nights.

Private Instruction
By Appointment.

Dancing under Direction
C. W. Thompson.

First Class
CHINESE L
Young King, Proprietor
ALL DELICATE LINEN, ETC.
RECEIVE SPECIAL ATTENTION.
Ft. King Ave. Ocala, Fla.

t-ATEST LOCALS

Mr. Clifford Anderson of Lakeland

3 in the city on a visit to his family.

Miss Winnie Hunt will leave tomor

row for a two weeks visit to New

ork.

Miss Eugenia Fuller is enjoying a

well-deserved vacation at Caesar's

Head, S. C.

DEATH OF A LITTLE BOY

Miss Susie Haycraft has returned
rom a week-end visit to her home at

Fellowship.

Messrs. E. F. Scott and O. H. Math

ews, two sturdy yeomen of Fleming-

ton, were in town today.

Mrs. W. W. Condon returned to

Ocala yesterday after a delightful so-

jcpm of two weeks in Montreat, N. C.

Mr. Thelbert Troxler went to Fort

McCoy today to accept a position in

he commissary of the Wilson Naval

Stores Co.

Mr. and Mrs. B. P. Wallace of
North Orange street have lost their
son, aged 11. The boy was out play playing
ing playing yesterday afternoon and fell in
the city lime pit, which is near their
house. He struck in a yellowjackets'
nest and was terribly stung. He died
about 12 o'clock last night.
The child was a bright little boy,
and is greatly mourned by his parents,
sisters and brothers, as well as the

'friends he made during his short life.

His remains were laid to rest this
afternoon in the Kendrick cemetery.
Mr. L. Hurst of Goldman's undertak undertaking
ing undertaking parlor had charge of the arrangements.

r

W. T. Loos, who did good service in
he lOGth Engineers, is home from his

arduous and honorable service in
France.

Mrs. G. R. McKean and Mrs. C. V.
Miller and little daughter, Alice, who
have been the guests of Judge and
Mrs. W. S. Bullock, will return to their
home in Tampa tomorow. They will
make the trip by motor, Mr. McKean
coming from Tampa today to accom accompany
pany accompany them.

ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE

OF TRAINS AT OCALA

Wc Do Not Experiment
At your expense on your car,nor is it puiely guess
work.
Wc Can Find Your Trouble
and fix it. This is economy on your purse; therefore
if vou have
A Maxwell Car
That needs repair, bring it to the Maxwell Repair
Shop, where you can get real Maxwell Service. We
can convince you that our service is the best and
cheapest in the long run.
Maxwell Repair Shop
Next Door to the Maxwell Service or Parts Room
Corner Osceola and Ft. King. Ocala, Fla.

Time Schedules

-'- m"mm?m?mmmmmmmm- mmmmmmmm- ; .,: j

Mr. R. R. Carroll, who has been

quite ill for some days, is much bet-

er, owing to the skill of his physician

and care of the hospital nurses.

That gallant soldier, Ledger Weath-

ersbee, arrived 'home Saturday night,

and is being warmly welcomed by his

friends.

Mrs. Perry Anthony and smart lit

tle son, Eugene, expect to leave this
week for Starke to join Mr. Anthony,
who has an excellent position in that
city.

Fresh carload of Atlas cement just

arised. R. H. Todd Lumber Co. 22-2t

Miss Emma Perry, who has been

visiting; friends in Charlotte, N. C,
the past week, is now in Blowing

Rock, where she is the gue'st of a

former schoolmate.

Mrs. T. J. Nixon, after several days
spent in Ocala .with her mother, Mrs.
Blalock, and sister, Mrs. G. L. Taylor,
returned to her home in Tampa this

afternoon.

Mr. J. D. Mixon and daughter Miss
Alice, of Micanopy, who iave been
the guests of Mr. Mixon's son, Mr. J.
S. Mixon of this city, have returned
home.

Mr. Max Israelson is home from
New York, where he has been visiting
Mrs. Israelson and Mr. and Mrs. Mar Marcus
cus Marcus Frank. Max is a popular young
man and his friends are glad to see
him home.

AUTOIST TAKE NOTICE

66

I used your Lubricant Carbon Remover in a
motor that had run eighteen thousand miles and
the first treatment removed the carbon. The next
evening I used some more and now the man who

owns the car says it runs better than it ever did. (

I, know it did the work; I have had ten years ex experience
perience experience testing motors and this is the best Carbon
Remover I have ever seen.
F. Bomhoeft
Motor Tester with Cadillac Motor Co.,
Detroit, Michigan.

a can today. Sold on a money back
$1,00 per 'can post paid, address al

Order
guarantee,
orders to

W. L. BAKER,

!"

.
.--

w .O. .. .. .C .r. .r. .0 .-r:-. .r.

Miss Davis and her scholars out at
the industrial school had a great'treat
recently. Messrs. E. C. Bennett,
Frank Logan and P. V. Leavengood

went fishing a few days ago, and hav having
ing having caueht most of the fish on this

side of the gulf presented the school

with all except what their own fam

ilies could use. It was a fine lot of
fish, and greatly enjoyed at the school.

Philip Beebe, who as a member of

the 23rd Infantry, served his country

well in France, stopped here yester

i a t ? i a. Tr A

aay on nis way xo nis nome air run,

Op-den to visit his sister. Miss Ver-

CJ
na Beebe, a student in the industrial

school. Philip was one of the first

American boys to go over, and the
little badere- on his blouse tells that

he took part in four drives.

7. 1

Donald Knoblock of Martin, who
served in France with Battery E, 60th

Field .Artilery, was in to see us to

day. Donald was severely wounded

during the fighting last autumn, and

his right arm is yet stiff from the ef

feet of the bullet that tore thru his

shoulder muscles. He had been in the
hospital in Atlanta for several weeks,
and onlv a few days ago reached

home, where he is receiving the wel

come due a bov who has shed his

blood for his country.

Mr. A. Deshong of Jacksonville,

representative of the Malsby Machin Machinery
ery Machinery company, is the guest of Miss

Agnes Thompson and is stopping at

the Harrington. Mr. Deshong had the

misfortune to break his arm while

coming to Ocala, due to the wheels of
his car getting locked and running

into a tree, but it is good news to

know that he is doing nicely.

Seaboard Air Line

R. R. Time (Northbound) Local Time

Ar. Lv. Ar. Lv.
l:35p l:55p No. 4 12:35pl2:55p
4:05p 4:05p No. 16 3:05p 3:05p
2:15a 2:20a No. 2 1:15a 1:20a
(Southbound)
Ar. Lv. Ar. Lv.
l:30p l:50p No. 3 12:30pl2:50p
4:25p 4:25p No. 15 3:25p 3:25p

2:10a 2:15a No. 1 1:10a 1:15a

Limited.
Atlantic Coast Line
(Main Line Northbound)
Ar. Lv. Ar. Lv.

6:42a 6:42a No. 10 5:42a 5:42a
l:25p l:45p No. 40 12:25p 12:45p

2:12a 2:12a No. 33 1:12a 1:12a

(Main Line Southbound)

Ar. Lv. Ar.

3:16a 3:16a No. 37 2:16a
3:35p 3:35p No. 39 2:35p

10:13pl0:13p No. 9 9:13p

(Branches, Southbound)
Ar. Lv. Ar.
7:10a- 7:10a No. tl51 6:10a
7440a 7:40a No. 135 6:40a

11:50a No. 141 10:50a

3:25p No. 49
t(Sunny Jim): For Wilcox.

day, Wednesday and Friday.

I (bunny Jim): or Lakeland,

day, Thursday and Saturday.

tJDaily except Sunday from

cox.

For Homosassa.
(Branches, Northbound)
Ar. Lv. Ar.
l:53p No. 48 12:53p
6:45p No. 1150 5:45p

10:48p No. t32 9:48p

4:4op ,No. 1-1140

ttDaily except Sunday for Wilcox.

rom Homosassa.

t( Sunny Jim): From Wilcox. Mon

day, Wednesday .and Friday.

t( Sunny Jim): From Lakeland,

Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.,

Oklawaha Valley

(Southbound)
Ar. Lv. Ar.
l:00p No. 71 12:00p
(Northbound)
3:30p No. 72
UNCLASSIFIED ADS.

Lv.

2:16a I
2:35p
9:13p

Lv.

6:10a
6:40a
2:25p

Mon-

Tuei-

WU-

Lv.

3:45p

Lv.

2:30p

LOST Lady's black umbrella Satur Saturday
day Saturday afternoon. Reward to finder. Call

phone 309. 28-lt

Kendrick
Florida.

THE WIMBSOM MOTEL
Jacksonville, Florida.

In the heart of the city with Hemming Park for a front yard.
Every modern convenience in ear room. Dining room service is
second to none.

9

Thank Heaven.
Kissing' may have come down from

the dark ages, but the blondes are
not opposed to it, Toledo Blade.

4

RATES From $1.50 per y pe- person to ?6.

ROBERT M. MEYER.
' Manager.

J. KAVANAUGH,
Propriefor.

Use the Star's Unclassified Column

In our supply depart department
ment department we carry a large
line of accessories for
automobiles. A c o m m-plete
plete m-plete line of Tools, Tubes,
Spark Plug3, Etc.
Service Station for Moon
Chalmers, Maxwell and
Oakland Antomobiles.
Open 6 a. m. to 12 p. m.

J!

BOMS

A

E

(The A. A. A. Garage)
Corner Fort King and
Magnolia St.

WANTED Two dozen young laying

hens, either Leghorns or Rhode Islana

Reds, also one vouncr milch cow. Box

237, Ocala, Fla. 28-3t

L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTER
AND BUILDER
Careful Estimates made on all Con Contract
tract Contract work. -Gives More and Better
Work for the Money than any other
contractor in the city.

GRACE'S MA1IGE REMEDY
For skin and scalp diseases, dandruff
and falling hair, at all druggists. 9 26t

FUNERAL DIRECTORS and E 171 B ALTERS
AUTOMOBILE SERVICE
No charg? for delivery of casket anywhere day or night.
WILBUR SMITH, SAM R. PYLES JIU
Licensed Embalmenf
Office Phone 10 Night Phones 225 or 423

TIRES REBUILT

We have just installed the latest machinery
for rebuilding auto tires and can fix up your
old ones so that they will be as good as new
for all practical purposes. We give them
the Non-Skid or Rib tread. Our process for
re-treading is the same as that used in the
factories and if the fabric is uninjured you
will get just double service out of your tires.'
Local Distributors for
HOOD AND FISK TIRES

DAVIES
N. Magnolia St.

"The Tire Man"

Ocala, Fla. ;

r

Q

WHY; WEAR.
UNCOMFORTABLE SHOES
When for a very small cost you can have them repaired and
made as good as new for all practical purposes? Nothing is
more unsightly than an old, run-down shoe or one that has
been improperly repaired. When your shoes are repaired here
the work is done by exj-erts with the most improved machin machinery
ery machinery to be hid. In fact, when we do your work your shoes
will have the appearance of new ones, and will give you just
double the service of those lepaired by "shops' where incom incompetent
petent incompetent workmen are employed. In connection with our repair
department we have a thorough system of delivery. We send
for your shoes and deliver them under a strict guarantee
that you will be satisfied. There is no guess work with us.
Every pair of shoes sent us i3 repaired in a scientific manner
no slipshod methods are used here. We are in position to
save you many dollars on your shoe bills. Just call PHONE
143 and let us send for your work.
OCALA ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP



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