The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:05229

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Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


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Full Text
J

EVENING

STAM

Weather Forecast: Cloudy tonight
and Thursday, probably rain north northwest
west northwest portion tonight and north and
central, portions; colder Thursday.
OGALA, FLORIDA, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9, 1919.
VOL. 26, iNO. 87

ILIED ARMIES TO

li ORDER
Begins to Look Like This Will be
Germany's Only Opportunity to
Obtain Stable Government
(Associated Prss)
Paris, April 9. At its last session
the Geiman council considered even eventually
tually eventually rr. a an appeal to the allied
armies to maintain order in Germany
in the interest of the whole of Europe,
the Zurich correspondent of Le Jour Journal
nal Journal report::. v .
MORE TROUBLE IN BERLIN
Paris, 'Ap; il 9. A general strike
has been proclaimed in Berlin and the
suburb of Sfr.r.dau, advices received
here say.. Minister of Defense Noske
reported the concentration of thirty
thousand loyal troops at the Berlin
gates for in the event of trouble.
CHRISTIANS ARE OPPOSED BY
A T6UGII CROWD
Copenhager April 9 German gov government
ernment government troe.vj are marching on Es Essen,
sen, Essen, where, a collision occurred be between
tween between strikers and a Christian work workers'
ers' workers' organization, the members of
which desire to continue their em employment,
ployment, employment, a Berlin dispatch an announces.
nounces. announces. Thcj strikers have occupied
the Krupp munition plant.
COUNCILS OF CONFUSION
Basel, Ai;iil 9. Soviet councils
have been chosen at Regensburg and
Fuerth, Bavaiia.
SHORTENING SENTENCES OF
CONVICTED SOLDIERS
Washington, April 9. The special
clemency board appointed to review
all cases of soldiers remaining in con confinement
finement confinement has considered 1683 cases,
or approximately one-third' of the
cases calling for its action. The
board has recommended clemency in
1621 cases, reducing the average, sen sentence
tence sentence from seven years and foui
months to one year and nine months.
Recommenda Lions of the board havt
cut a total of 9339 years from the ag
gregafte sentences, t lve cases involv involving
ing involving life sentence were considered, one
i. 1 N 1 1 1. A.
semence uemg reuucea 10 iwo years,
another to twenty .. years, and clemen clemency
cy clemency -being denied in the other three.
MISSIONARY SOCIETY MEETING
t
The regular monthly meeting of he
Baptist Missionary Society and study
class will be held at the Baptist
church at 3 o'clock Thursday after afternoon.
noon. afternoon. J. R. Rogers.
CENTER
Center, April 8. Mrs. Grace Priest
has returned to her home at Carbur
after a" few weeks' pleasant stay with
relatives and friends.
Messrs. Newton and Clyde Priest
and Misses Lassie Priest and Estelle
Young motored to Ocala and Anthony
Thursday.
Miss Ollie Mills, the efficient teach teacher
er teacher of Branf ord, spent the week-end
with her parents and friends, return returning
ing returning to her school duties-Monday.
Miss Viola Priest was the guest of
friends in Williston Friday.
Miss Laurene Carter of Fellowship
was the pretty and attractive guest
of Misses Tillie and Eula Priest for
the week-end.
Miss Maggie Priest is home again
after fan extended visit with relatives
and friends at Williston.
Miss Alice Forbes spent Saturday
very pleasantly as the guest of Miss
Elizabeth Britt of Williston.
Mr. Wheeler Priest has returned
home after a few days stay in Madi Madison.
son. Madison. Mr. E. E. Williams of Cotton Plant
was a pleasant caller at the home of
Miss Maggie Priest Saturday eve evening.
ning. evening. Miss Alice Forbes entertained a
party of friends Saturday evening.
They all report having spent quite an
enjoyable time.
Mrs. C. L. Marston is visiting her
parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. Young for
a few days, and will then return to
her home at Dunedin.
Misses Viola "Priest and Alice
Forbes were pleasant guests of Miss
Lassie Priest Sunday.
Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Sapp of Irvine
were spend the day guests of Mrs. E.
Young Sunday.
Mr. L. D. Curry has gone to Inver
ness on account of the serious illness
of his aged father,Mr. James Curry.
His friends wish him a speedy recov recovery.
ery. recovery.
Private Rufus Forbes has returned
home, having received an honorable
discharge from the army. His friends
are glad to see him again.
Mr. and Mrs. Hollie Butler of Jq Jq-iette
iette Jq-iette were guests of Mrs. Curry Sun Sunday.
day. Sunday.
Call five-one and say send the Star.

RED CROSS STORES

IRE RAIDEI
Supplies Needed by Hungry People
of Bavaria Carried Off by the
- Predatory Spartacans
(Associated Press)
Basel, April 9. Storage sheds of
the American Red Cross were among
the food depots pillaged by the armed
crowds in Nuremburg Tuesday, ac
cording to a dispatch received here.
Goods valued at seven hundred thou thousand
sand thousand marks are said to have been
taken from the various food depots.
WEDDING NEXT WEEK
The many friends of Miss 'Mary
Harriett Livingston will be interested
to know of her approaching marriage
to Mr. John Henry Hydrick of Or Orangeburg,
angeburg, Orangeburg, S. C. The wedding will take
place Tuesday, April 15th. The cere
mony will be a quiet home wedding,
only the very near relatives and the
immediate families being present. No
formal announcement of the engage
ment has been made, although it does
not come as a verv ereat surnrise. as
km w -
nown among the friends
of the bride-eect, .but only yesterday
were definite arrangements made for
the wedding. Immediately after the
ceremony Mr. and Mrs. Hydrick will
leave on a short wedding trip tc
North Carolina, before going to Or Orangeburg,
angeburg, Orangeburg, where they will make their
future home.
Miss Livingston is the second
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Henry Liv Livingston
ingston Livingston of this city. She was born in
Ocala and it has been her home ever
since, excepting the few years that
she was away at school. All her life
she has made and endeared herself to
a large circle of. friends, both old and
young. She is known and loved among
her many friends for her pleasing
personality and bright and cheerful
disposition.
Mr. Hydrick is a well known young
attorney of Orangeburg, S. C. He has
been a visitor in Ocala several times
and during "his short stay here he
made a number of friends who will
congratulate him on winning one, of
Ocala's most attractive and talented
ycung ladies.
The many friends of Miss Living Livingston
ston Livingston will be sorry that she will make
her future home in another state, but
tneir best wishes for her future hap happiness
piness happiness will follow her to her new
home.
SWEPT BY A CYCLONE
(Associated Press
Durant, Okla., April 9. Six oer-
sons are reported to have been killed,
others seriously injured and much
damage-to property in a storm which
swept through this county yesterday
and last night. The storm Dassed five
miles from here, and didn't hit any
towns.
-FELLOWSHIP'
Fellowship, April 8. This section
is needing rain very badly. The cold
did notdo as much' damage as was
thought for at first; but it did enough.
Mr. Bryant Curry, who has been
with Uncle Sam in the navy and sta stationed
tioned stationed at Chicago, returned home last
Thursday.
All the boys of Fellowship who
were in the service of their country
have returned home, safe and sound,
except four, Seabron Ferguson, Jack
Crumpton and Alymer Seckinger,
who are in France, arid Coyl Roe, who
is stationed at Fort Sill, Okla.
Misses Irene and Hortense Hodges
of Inglis, are the guests of Miss
Louise Crumpton.
The sing at the home of Mr. and
Mrs.- -S. J. McCully Sunday evening
was well attended and the singing
extra good.
Rev. B. L. Adams of Hawthorn will
preach at Fellowship on the third
Sunday in April. All are cordially in invited
vited invited to attend.
Quite a delegation of Fellowship
W. O. W. attended the initiation in
Ocala last Tuesday night and enjoy enjoyed
ed enjoyed the degree work.
Messrs. S. D. Atkinson, Fred Prine
and Vasco Seckinger spent last Sun Sunday
day Sunday at Orange Lake.
Mrs. Stanley of Greenvile was the
guest of her parents, Mr. and Mrs.
C. P. Haycraft last week.
Mr.- and Mrs. W. B. Rawls and
family were the guests of Mrs. C. C.
Stephens last Sunday.
Dr. S. H. Bhtch was a caller this
afternoon. ..",
.
SERVICE AT SHADY
Rev. Wm. H. Wrighton will preach
at Olivet Baptist church, Shady, Sun Sunday
day Sunday afternoon at -,4 o'clock, Ocala city
time.
Rol films for any make of camera.
Anti-Monopoly Drug Store. 6t

BEGINNING WITH
FIVE BILLION

Allies Will Start the Germans on the
Task of Paying Off Their
Vast Indemnity
(Associated Press)
Paris, April 9. The preliminary
peace treaty will require Germany to
make an immediate indemnity pay payment
ment payment on account of five bilion dollars
in cash and raw materials, according
to the Echo de Paris. The treaty, it
declares, will not leave an uncertain
total which Germany must pay, as
that amount will be written into the
document.
HUMBERT'S COMMAND
Paris, April 9.t The newspaper Le
Clair says it understands that Gen General
eral General Humbert, former commander of
the French Third army, will be ap appointed
pointed appointed "commander of allied troops"
in central Europe.
ALLIES HAD TO LEAVE ODESSA
Paris, April 9. The evacuation of
the Black Sea port of Odessa by th6
allied forces has been confirmed offic
ially.
PRESENT CLAIMS OF POLAND
Paris, April 9. Premier Paderew Paderew-ski
ski Paderew-ski of Poland, was summoned before
the council of four today to present
Poland's claims Paderewski wil urge
that Danzig must be given to Poland
and that Poland must have the coal
fields of Teschen in Silesia.
- ESTIIONIANS ADVANCE
Copenhagen, April 8. The capture
of seven villages, five hundred pris
oners and a large amount of war ma material
terial material is reported in an official state
ment issued from Esthonian army
headquarters. The Esthonians con
tinue to advance, according to the
statement.
EXCHANGE OF PRISONERS
Archangel, April 9. A delegation
of American and British officers under
a flag of truce went into the Bol-
sheviki lines today to negotiate an ex
change of prisoners.
GREEKS GETTING GAY
Saloniki, April 9 Bulgarian troops
troops have been sent to Strumitza to
suppress an uprising of Irridentist
TURKISH AFFAIRS
Constantinople, Tuesday, April 8.
The Turkish commission appointed to
draw up a report dealing with the na national
tional national rights of the Ottomans before
the peace conference has concluded
its labors. The report will be sub submitted
mitted submitted to the high commissioners of
the Allies directly.
NOTICE, U. D. C.
The members of Dickion Chapter,
U. D. C, will meet Friday afternoon
at 3 o'clock at the home of Mrs. J. C.
Johnston. Full attendance is desired
as delegates will be elected to the an annual
nual annual meeting to" be held in Jackson Jacksonville
ville Jacksonville in May. Mrs. S. R. Whaley,
Corresponding Secretary.
ELECTRA
Electra, April 8. Rev. Boatright
filled his regular appointment Sun Sunday,
day, Sunday, April 6th, and delivered a fine
sermon. Everybody loves to see the
first Sunday come, for they know we
will have a good service.
We are enjoying the fine spring
weather now, but the farmers need
rain badly. The farmers are busy
planting their crop's, but the cold last
week did considerable damage.
Mr. Lippincott killed a daddy of
the alligator family Sunday morning
in Lake Bryant. The 'gator measur measured
ed measured ewelve feet and after dressing it
the hide weighed 140 pounds. Quite a
monster.
The Electra Baptist Sunday school
is going to give an entertainment
Sunday evening at 7:30 at the church,
on mission work. Everybody is invit invited
ed invited to come and bring some one.
Messrs. J. W. Johnson and Ernest
Roberts were visitors in our little
town last Wednesday evening.
We are glad to know that Mrs. Sid Sidney
ney Sidney Thompson has returned to her
home again at the turpentine still.
They are rejoicing over a fine baby
boy.
Misses Dixie Pillans and Mary
Hoyt Martin of Ocala were out to
spend the. week-end with their par parents,
ents, parents, Mr. J. C. Pillans and Mrs. John
Martin.
Mr. Glover Caldwell has returned
to his job at Winter Haven, after a
few weeks visit to his parents, Mr.
and Mrs. Brad Caldwell of Lynne.
We keep nationally advertised pro products
ducts products and sell you what you want.
Anti-Monopoly Drug Store. 6t

SOUTH WOULD GIVE
THEM SHORT SHRIFT

Agitators Who Would Try to Spread
Bolshevik Propaganda Among
the Colored People
(Associated Press)
Washington, April 9. Reports that
the Bolshevist agitation in the United
States is being financed by a number
of wealthy persons has been reported
to the department of justice, but is
not taken seriously so far. It is re reported
ported reported tftat a wealthy woman had un
dertaken to pay the expenses of agi agitators
tators agitators to work aniong the negroes in
the South to get them to organize
soviet committees. "No evidence of
this agitation has developed.
COUNTY WORK OF .
THE Y. M. C. A.
In view of the fact that the organ organized
ized organized county Y. M. C. A. is taking
such definite form in Marion county
the committee believes that the read read-eis
eis read-eis of this paper would be interested
in a few figures concerning this .kind
of Y. C. A. work in the country.
The state office in Jacksonville re reports
ports reports some interesting facts, gathered
from reports of 73 of the organized
counties, which is 'only about half of
the number in operation in the coun country.
try. country. One great feature of the county
work are the committees and it is
found in these counties that 3622
were serving on committees last year.
There were 91 employed officers in
the 73 counties, 2120 volunteer lead leaders,
ers, leaders, 6475 boy members and 2988 men
members; 3613 persons attended
county conventions, 4247 boys con conferences,
ferences, conferences, 541 boys made decisions for
the Christian life, 1462 attended sum
ner camps and 117 made decisions
for Christian life in these camps; 325
communities held athletic meets with
1065 persons participating; ,195 com communities
munities communities held play festivals with 9893
persons participating; 4652 persons
took physical training both indoors,
and out of doors, and educational
features of the county Y. M. C. A.
work consisting of educational trips
where 1800 participated, agricultural
contests where 3700 participated,
numerous lectures, practical talks,
educational clubs and discussion
groups, etc., were held.
The religious phase of the county
Y. M. C. A. is also very interesting
and the year book report indicates
that special religious county SundayS
were held in 161 communities with
over 15,000 attending; 277 communi communities
ties communities held leaders' training conferences
with 2808 participating. Bible classes
for men and boys were held with total
attendance of 81,392. Religious meet meetings
ings meetings for men and for boys were held
with total attendance of 29,242. De Decisions
cisions Decisions for the Christian life number numbered
ed numbered 1334.
It will thus be seen that in this re report
port report of only about 50 per cent of the
organized counties for last year that
a great variety of activities "were car carried
ried carried on. A study of things that are
being done throughout the country
reveals the fact that all of the work
proceeds along three directions. First
there are those activities centering
around the local self-governing
groups in each community, section of
the town or location in the country.
These groups are made up of a small
number of boys of like purposes and
aims, fathered by the adult leader
who, under the direction and help of
the county secretary promotes pro programs
grams programs along physical, educational,
religious 'and service lines. The plan
is that this group shall meet at elast
one night per week and take up some
cf these features.
The second line of activities carried
out by boys is that on the community
wide plan under the direction of the
local town association which includes
such things as social gatherings,
father and son banquets, educational
trips, community wide athletic meets
and numerous other things that
might h$ undertaken in a given com community.
munity. community. The third line of activity promoted
by the County Young Men's Chris Christian
tian Christian Association has to do with the
ccunty wide agencies and includes
such things as county older boys' con conferences,
ferences, conferences, athletic meets which bring
in representatives from all sections,
dramatic leagues,' rural church con conferences,
ferences, conferences, county camps for boys, base baseball
ball baseball leagues for boys and young men,
health campaigns and numerous other
things which might be undertaken.
So broad and varied are the activi activities
ties activities and is the field of the county Y.
M. C. A. that it is almost impossible
to describe the same in a brief article.
The committee in this county has
studied the thing sufficiently to be
thoroughly convinced that there is
more constructive work to be done
for the men and boys than will hardly
le possible for one man to engineer,
yet it feels that the work must be be-

EXTRAVAGANCE

EXPENDITURES
At the Government Nitrate Plant
Near Muscle Shoals Uncovered by
Department of Justice
( Associated Press)
Washington, April 9. -Extrav
agance in connection with expendi
tures for the crovernment nitrate
plant at Muscle Shoals, Ala., has been
uncovered by the department of jus justice
tice justice in investigating the project, it
was learned today. It has not yet
been determined whether there is any
criminal iability.
SENATOR FLETCHER
IN THE CITY
Mr. D.-U. Fletcher, our senior sen senator,
ator, senator, who arrived in town last night,
spent this morning most pleasantly
with his numerous friends here. He
had a late supper at Charlie Hun Hunter's
ter's Hunter's restaurant, registered at the
Harrington, and up to traintime vis visited
ited visited around among his friends, amon&
whom is the Star. The senator is
very optimistic abount the future of
th country, which is a good sign, as
no man is better acquainted with
public affairs. Mr. Fletcher is taking
a trip around the state, looking into
the needs of his constituents. He
spent most of yesterday in Bronson
and met the Gainesville Rotarians at
supperlast night. He went on this
afternoon to Leesburg, and will visit
a number of other points before re returning
turning returning to his home in Jacksonville.
DREW IS DEAD
Famous Movie Actor Who Gave Many
Pleasant Hours to Watchers
of the Films
(Associated Press)
New York, April 9. Sidney Drew,
an actor on the stage and for the
screen, died today at .his home here
from urnaemia due to nephritis. He
was fifty-four years old and a native
of New York.
ERRONEOUS REPORTS DENIED
. Editor Star: Permit me to correct
an error in the minds of some con concerning
cerning concerning the two evangelists who are
! holding meetings in the tent on- North
Main street. Ihey are not connected
with Mormonism nor holy rollerism,
but are giving freely of the best that
they have without money and with without
out without price, in the way that Jesus es established
tablished established for all time when he sent
the twelve and the seventy, proving
that He who said 'I am the way, the
truth and the life," is indeed "the
same yesterday, today and forever,"
and that God never has changed the
way, even tho men seek to climb up
Vsome other way." Thanking you in
advance, I am, Yours truly,
Mrs. Joseph L. Manly.
SERVICE AT BELLEVIEW
Rev. Wm. H. Wrighton will preach
at the Belleview Baptist church on
Sunday afternoon at 2:30, Ocala time.
A second shipment of the famous
SENECA cameras has just arrived.
Anti-Monopoly Drug Store. 6t
Messrs. Frank Gates and A. C.
Price have established a shop for
"half-soling" auto tires in the room
between the express office and Alle Alle-mand's
mand's Alle-mand's jewelry store. They have an
excellent appliance for renewing tires
and will probably be very successful
in disposing of them. They are clever
young men and sure to do faithful
work.
A good Ford touring car for sale
cheap at the Maxwell-Chalmers agen agency.
cy. agency. 9-Ct
Charlie Hunter was one of the
numerous Ocalan3 who saw the ball
game in Gainesville yesterday. He
numbers some of the famous ball ballplayers
players ballplayers among his personal friends.
Miss Annie N. Swain of Nashville,
Tenn., is the guest of Mr. and Mrs.
S. R. Pyles at Glenhurst.
Mr. Fred Allen of Grand Rapids,
Mich, who spent several months at
the home of Mr. J..L. Manly, expects
to return home this week.
Peptona Tonic.
tf
gun and is willing to undertake the
task by employment of one county
secretary if the people of Marion
county are sufficiently interested in
the welfare of the young men and
boys. Mr. J. H. Taylor of Ocala is
chairman of this committee and plans
are now being laid for a quiet can canvass
vass canvass to secure the funds to carry on
this great work.

CONGRATULATIONS TO
BELGIUM'S ilG

Sent by President Wilson to a Mon Monarch
arch Monarch Who Has Proven Himself
Worthy to Wear a Crown
(Associated iTess)
'Paris, April 9. President Wilson
telegraphed a congratulatory mes
sage to King Albert today on the oc occasion
casion occasion of the latter's birthday.
FRENCHMAN STARTS FOR HIS
TRANS-ATLANTIC FLIGHT
Versailles, April 8. (By the Asso Associated
ciated Associated Press.) Lieut. Jean Pierre
Fcntan started on a flight today to
Casablanca, Morocco, from which
town he will proceed to Dakar, in the
French colony of Senegal, and thence
to Cape Verde Islands to attempt t
flight across the Atlantic. He is ac accompanied
companied accompanied by Philibert Cahouet, his
mechanician.
A dispatch from London under date
cf March 18 said that according to
reports from Paris, Lieut. Fontan
left" Villacoublay for Dakar on Marcl
10 but was compelled to land south south-cast
cast south-cast of Blois because of a cracked
cylinder. He planned a .flight from
Dakar to Pernambuco, Brazil. The
Histance from the Cape Verde Islands
t Pernambuco is 1616 miles.
EVERY MAN TO HIS TRADE
In Siberian Prison Campi Etch Un Unfortunate
fortunate Unfortunate Exile Followed Hie
Vocation.
Far more popular than the church
were the library and the school, a'
regular organized high school-college,
where law, mathematics, chemistry,
ten languages and many other sub subjects
jects subjects were taught. Again, this part
of our work rose out of a very humble
beginning. The first school was held,
almost secretly. In an old washroora,
and ambitious Russian guards con confiscated
fiscated confiscated logarithm tables and French
dictionaries because they looked a
suspicious. And the teacher of ge geometry,
ometry, geometry, who made those peculiar
drawings, was arrested and taken for
a spy, who taught how to escape with
a plan of the camp. The library waa
born when the first Y. M. G. A. sec secretary
retary secretary arrived and gave six or eight
books which he found In his trunk
to members of the head committee
to read, Johan W. Prinz writes la
Asia magazine. The sport conical
tee was in charge of the 60cker field
and tennis courts and in some camps
there was even a gymnasium, A
small bank was established for the
convenience of those who wanted te
borrow a few rubles on their ofildal
announcements from banks in P
trograd that money had been received
from relatives In the central countries
(by way of Sweden) and was on the
way. Work shops were organized eo
that the tradesmen, the carpenter, the
shoemaker, the barber, might turn to
his trade and work for the benefit
of his comrades. But the pride of
the Y. M. C A. was the Americas
kitchen. This welfare kitchen was nec necessary
essary necessary because the Russians never
gave the men enough to eat. Hera
they had a chance, once in a while,
to get a hearty meal for a few ko kopeks;
peks; kopeks; here a certain number of sick
and poor could eat every day without
cost. How many favorable comments
have I heard upon those kitchens,
which really became a blessing for
the prisoners!
MAN OF IMAGINATIVE MIND
Among Many Useful Inventlone ef
8eth Boyden Was That of Pop Popular
ular Popular Patent Leather.
The first "patent" leather was the
Invention of Seth Boyden, who waa
born In Foxboro, Mass., one hundred
and thirty years ago. He was brought
up on a farm and cheated in a dis district
trict district school and In the, village black blacksmith
smith blacksmith shop, where he spent all his
leisure time "tinkering' and experi experimenting.
menting. experimenting. His first invention was a
machine for making nails and files.
Later he invented a machine for split splitting
ting splitting leather, and in 1S15 he engaged
in the leather business In Newark, N.
J. In 1$10 he Invented an appliance
for cutting brads and In the following
year he perfected his "patent leath leather.
er. leather. .The leather prepared by this
process gradually became popular, and
until 1S31 Boyden was. principally en engaged
gaged engaged In Its' manufacture. He then
turned his attention to steam engines,
and made several Improvements In lo locomotives,
comotives, locomotives, lie took part In the Cali California
fornia California gold rush of '49, but soon re returned
turned returned to New Jersey, where he engaged-In
farming and produced a vari variety
ety variety of strawberries vastly superior to
any then known in both size and qual quality.
ity. quality. He died in 1S70, and his memory
Is perpetuated by a statue at Newark.



N.

OCALA EVENING STAR, WEDNESDAY, APRIL'S, 1919

OCALA EVENING STAR
Pbltake4 Erery Day Except Sunday by
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY
OF OCALA, FLA.

R. K. Carroll, President
P. V. Lea veiiffood, Secretary Treasurer
J. II. Benjamin, Editor

Entered at Ocala, Fla., ostofflce aa
iecond-class matter.

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all news dispatches credited to It or
Utt otherwise credited in this paper
and also the local news published
herein. All rights of republication of
special dispatches herein are also reserved.

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Six months, in advance 3.00
Three months, in advance 1.50
One month, in advance..... 0
" ForeUm
One year, in advance 18.00
Six months, in advance... 4.25
7hree months, in advance........ 2.25
One month, in advance 80

ADVERTISING RATES
' DWmlayt Plate 10c. per inch for con consecutive
secutive consecutive insertions. Alternate inser insertions
tions insertions 25 per cent, additional. Composi Composition
tion Composition charged on ads. that run less than
toix times 5c. per inch. Special position
20 per cent, additional. Rates based on
4 -inch minimum. Less than four inches
will take higher rate, which will be
furnished on application.
Reading Notices t Sc. per line for first
insertion; 3c per line for each subse subsequent
quent subsequent insertion. One change a week
allowed on readers without extra com com-oosltior
oosltior com-oosltior charges.
RATES. Six line maximum, one
time 25c.; three times 50c; six times
75c; one month S3. Payable in advance.
Iegal advertisements at legal rates.
Electros must be mounted, or oharge
will be made for mounting.

' The Giants lost the third and final
game to the Red Sox at, Gainesville
yesterday. The Giants can't play ball
any more.
Clemenceau has caused the sen sentence
tence sentence of his would-be assassin; Cot Cot-tin,
tin, Cot-tin, to be commuted from death to
ten years' imprisonment.
t The Star regrets to learn of the
death of E. Lamar Sparkman, a ris rising
ing rising young lawyer of Tampa and son
cf Congressman' Sparkman.
Unless the league of nations works
a million J times faster than the peace
conference, it will never be able to
move quick-enough" to stop a war.
Gov. Catts' recommendation that
the legislature provide 'means' to fur
nish employment to jobless' soldiers
is a good one. The" state can't do too
much for these men.

Elsewhere we publish the' recdm'
mendations of Gov. Catts to' the leg legislature.
islature. legislature. Some of them' are' good; some
bad and a good many superfluous, but
he has left out several he should have
made.

. Gov. Catts wants an income tax on
all citizens who make over $3500 a
year. Seems to the Star that the
federal income tax is about all our
citizens can pay, but if such a tax is
levied it should be on those who make
$1000 a -year or over..
Attorney General Palmer- says he
will strongly oppose any attempt to
obtami executive clemency for Debs.
We 'hope he will prevail and will also
put John Reed and other such 'incen 'incendiaries;
diaries; 'incendiaries; behind the' bars. The law must
suppress such people or they will sup suppress
press suppress the law.
It isn't so much "government own ownership"
ership" ownership" as it is "Burleson control"
that' we -are fearing. Tampa Tri Tribune.'
bune.' Tribune.'
The trouble is that one man like
Blirleson sets 'the people to wonder wondering
ing wondering how -many more like him the gov government'
ernment' government' will put in control.
Dispatch f to Tampa" Times tells of
a northern man swindled out of

MICKIE SAYS

A FELLER O-ITS l SORC

STOPS1 HIS P A PET? H EJ ACTS
SUPiP&lSED OECAUSf wie

OONt ACL BUST OUT INTO

TE AOS AND HANO- CRAPE5

ON THE OOOR7

MICKY IS THE STAR'S DEVIL

$5000, all he had, by a gang which
was running a phoney broker's office
in Miami, evidently in a public place,
with people coming in and going out
all the time. It is an awful reflection
on the Miami police if such a joint
could be operated in their town.
Senator D. U. Fletcher, who is to
be the guest of Leesburg today, ar arrived
rived arrived in he city last night on the
late train from Jacksonville. Mr.
Fletcher comes here to look at the
Oklawaha, for the pending improve improvement
ment improvement of which he is 'largely respon responsible,
sible, responsible, his vigilance and energy dur during
ing during the last days of the 65th Con Congress
gress Congress keeping the necessary appro appropriation
priation appropriation in the rivers and harbors
bill. In a brief interview with a Star
reporter, Mr. Fletcher said that he
had no" doubt of the ability of himself
and the other Florida members to
keep the work going on provided ,the
people would get busy and put more
commerce on the stream. Senator
Fletcher goes to Leesburg today, to
meet the people of that enterprising
town, who at a big banquet this eve evening
ning evening will try to express some of
their appreciation for the good work
he does not only for this section and
state but all the country. He will re remain
main remain in Florida until the president
calls Congress in session, which is
bound to be by the first of June, if not
sooner. Mr. Fletcher is a working
senator. He -is not responsible for
any congressional sins of omission.
When many other senators were try trying
ing trying to make political capital by long long-winded
winded long-winded speeches, last February, he
was hard at work trying to finish up
the business of the session, and if all
the others had been as conscientious
as he public affairs would not be in
such a muddle today. Senator Flet Fletcher
cher Fletcher has steadily 'supported the ad administration,
ministration, administration, and he believes the
league of nations will win in the
Senate despite the opposition that
has been' manifested.

There may be some truth in the re report
port report that a wealthy northern woman
has offered to finance a bolshevist agi agitation
tation agitation among the negroes of the
South. There are yet" a few south south-haters
haters south-haters in the North who would be
glad to turn the -South into another
Hayti. Unless the Star is greatly
mistaken, however, very few of our
colored people would have anything
to do with anything that looked like
treason to the national government.
Catts wants an 18,000-acre experi experiment
ment experiment farm in the everglades. With
a 13,000-acre farm at Raiford and an
experiment farm at Gainesville, it
looks to the Star like overtaxed Flor Florida
ida Florida has all the state farms it can pay
for. For some 1 reason, probably best
known to himself, the governor is
more sblicitious about the everglades
than any other part of the state.
Senator Fletcher has been a steady
subscriber to the Star for over half a
dozen years, and he told a StarJ re reporter
porter reporter last night that when in Wash Washington
ington Washington he took it home to read every
evening. This is another proof of th
old saying that great .minds move in
the same channel for Senator Fletcher
and the Star agree on almost every everything.
thing. everything. Gov. Catts gives another proof of

his extraordinary tenderness forthe
everglades (or the syndicates that

own everglades lands) by his recom.

mendations for fire guards in the
glades. Thousands of 'dollars worth
of property all over the state are de

stroyed by forest fires every year.
Why guards in the everglades only?
We understand that" it works back

ward in Georgia. That prohibition in

stead of emptying the jails is filling
them with blind tigers. Tampa Tri Tribune.

We don't see anything backward

about that: Filling jails with blind
tigers is one of the things jails, are

made for.

GOV. CATTS RECOMMENDS
TO THE LEGISLATURE

Means for employment of returning
soldiers who find themselves jobless.
State budget system for legislative
appropriations.
State efficiency board of" second
board of control to handle part of th
state institutions.
University extension by use of
mails, thus taking the university's
facilities to men who have had no
chance to enjoy its benefits.
More equal tax laws and the even eventual
tual eventual sepaartion of state and county
taxes.
Franchise tax on out-of-state cor corporations
porations corporations doing business in Florida.
Inheritance tax.
Income tax on incomes above $3500
yearly.
. Repeal of statute allowing doctors
to prescribe liquor.
Increase in number of assistants in
state auditor's office.
Added members on supreme bench
or law allowing court to call circuit
judges whose dockets are light to
assist in clearing up supreme court
business when needed.
Increased pensions for Confederate
foldiers.
Privilege of bank deposits modeled
after Oklahoma law
Better marketing and shipping
laws. v
Reduction in legal rate of interest
from 8 to 6 per cent.
Erection of building near capitol to
house overcrpwded departments.
Pardon board to keep records of
long termers, so that worthy men en entitled
titled entitled to pardons may not be overlook-,
ed because of inability to hire an at attorney
torney attorney to take the matter up with the
pardoning board.
Calls attention" to need of better
roads, but takes no stand on necessity
of 'two-mill tax to meet federal aid or
on. abolition of convict lease system.
Absentee voting law for soldiers
and traveling men.
Operation of former state board of
health train to visit northern points
to interest settlers in Florida.
Creation of board to perpetuate
Florida's part in War.
Preventing sale of ginger or other
components with a kick.
Limit purchases of school books to
two years' supply.
Hog cholera serum plant at state
prison farm.
An 18,000-acre experiment farm in
the everglades from lands held by the
state.
Granting equal suffrage to women;
b'lt taking no stand as to whether by
constitutional amendment or giving
right ofprimary suffrage.
Fire guards in the everglades.
Strengthening child labor laws.
Workmen's compensation law.
Creation Of bureau of labor sta statistics.
tistics. statistics. Laws encouraging establishment of
small de-hydrating plants.

r Establishment of salt and fresh

water fish hatcheries.
Riparian rights law which owners
of riparian rights feel would be a
steal.
Acts to curb loan sharks.
Engineering experiment station at
Gainesville
Soldiers' and sailors' home.
Encouraging venereal disease cam campaigns.
paigns. campaigns. Act creating state orphans' asylum.
Better laws for chattel mortgages

on cattle.

' Law 'abolishing change of venue in J

trial of cases.

USED CAR BARGAINS

One 1917 model Overland, five five-passenger,
passenger, five-passenger, in first class condition:

new tires and top. Price, $500.

One Cadillac, 1913 model five five-passenger
passenger five-passenger car; good tires; body, top
and 'mechanical condition perfect, ex except
cept except storage battery. Price, $200.
One Ford touring car. early 1918
model. Almost as good as new. A
bargain at $450.
1918 model Buick roadster. Abso Absolutely
lutely Absolutely perfect mechanical, tire, body,
top, starter and ignition system. A
bargain.
One 1917 model Maxwell five-

passenger car; new tires, perfect
condition and looks it throughout.
Price, $550.
The. Maxwell-Chalmers Agency,
4-l-6tdly-ltw Ocala, Fla.
SEEDS! SEEDS! SEEDS!

Large supply of Pyles and Gist's
seed corn best grown "for this sec section.
tion. section. Also rice, guber and chufa seed.
Phone 435.
tf OCALA SEED STORE.

If it is an automobile or marine en engine
gine engine and you want SERVICE phone
393 or come to Bounder's Garage. We
are prepared to handle any job. The
prices are right and satisfaction
guaranteed. Marshall Bouvier, Man Manager.
ager. Manager. 7-tf

We are not using any flour substi

tutes in our bread, cakes and pies
now. In fact, they are better than

ever. Let us serve you. Carter's

Bakery. tf

ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE
OF TRAINS AT OCA1.A

According to Both Railroad and Local
Time Schedules

Seaboard Air Line
R. R. Time (Northbound) Local Time
Ar. Lv. Ar. Lv.
l:41p l:56p No. 4 12:41pl2:56p
4:07p 4:07p No. 16 3:07p 4.:07p
2:50a 2:55a No. 2 1:50a 1:55a

Ar.
3:06p
5:10p
2:45a

Lv.

3:26p
5:10p
2:50a

(Southbound)

No. 3
No. 15
No. 1

Ar.

2:06p
4:10p
1:45a

Lv.
2:26p
"4:10p
1:50a

Limited.

Atlantic Coast Line

(Main Line Northbound)
Ar. Lv. Ar. Lv.
6:42a l 6:42a No. 10 5:42a 5:42a
2:00p 2:20p No. 40 l:00p l:20p
3:12a 3:12a No. 38 :227a :212a

(Main Line Southbound)
Ar. Lv. Ar.
3:16a 3:16a No. 37 2:16a
3:35p' 3:35p No. 39 2:35p
10:13pl0:13p No. 9 9:13p

(Branches, Southbound)

Lv.
2:16a
2:35p
9:13p
Lv.
6:10a
6:40a
2:25p
Mon-
Tues-
Wil-

Ar. Lv. Ar.

7:10a 7:10a No. fl51 6:10a
7:40a 7:40a No. J35 6:40a
11:50a No. U141 10:50a
3:25p No. 49
f( Sunny Jim): For Wilcox,
day Wednesday and Friday.
J(Sunny Jim):For Lakeland,
day, Thursday and Saturday. y
fjDaily except Sunday from

cox.
For Homosassa.
(Branches, Northbound)
Ar. Lv. Ar. Lv.
l:53p No. 48 12:53p
:45p No. tl50 5:45p
10:48p No. f32 9:48p
4:45p No. fJUO 3:45p
. tJDaily except Sunday for Wilcox.
From Homosassa,
J(Sunny Jim): From Wilcox, Mon Monday,
day, Monday, Wednesday and Friday.
f(Sunny Jim): From Laeland,
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday.
Oklawaha Valley
(Southbound)
Ar. Lv. Ar. Lv.
l:00p No. 71 12:00p
(Northbound)
3:30p No. 72 2:30p
Use the unclassified ads. It pays.

iat"ir. Spsariiffl TMifc eI

W

afec's FmMm TacMe

April 9, 1919.

Mr. Jake Goldman,
Ocala, Florida,

Cf)
&

Dear Jake:
After much persuasion on your part, I decided to
buy a certain artificial casting minnow, the one you recom recommended
mended recommended so highly. I'usedthis bait or lure for nearly a day
and landed 153 fish all trout. There were 189 caught by two
of us. I was glad when the day was over, for I was tired. It
Is a full man's size job to land 150 fish in one day; to say
nothing about the ones that get away Some were small and
some weighed 84 pounds.
I thought I knew the best bait, but must take my
hat off to you this time, for your good judgment is the cause
of it all.
I might say something about the split bamboo rod
you "urged me to buy you know I have three steel rods' on
hand but you could not buy the bamboo from me by adding
a comfortable increase to price paid you.
Thought you might be interested to know how
the rod and minnow worked, having this letter as an encour encouragement
agement encouragement to one just embarking in business for himself.
You are evidently a distant relative of Sir Isaac
Walton (The greatest fisherman of his day).
With very kind regards and best wishes for succes-
Cordially yours,
J. H. Spearing
Seaboard Restaurant.

(Gd "Yorar TacMs sllJifee's 1

' 4

A D N MEAT

CLOGS THE KIDNEYS

Take a glass of Salts if your Back hurts
cr Bladder bothers you Drink
more water.

i

4

THE- WIIMPSOM HOTEL
Jacksonville, Florida.

If yoa must have rour meat every day, j

eat it, but fluBH your kidneys with salts
occasionally, says a noted authority who
tells us that meat forms uric acid which,
almost paralyzes the kidneys in their ef efforts
forts efforts to expel it from the blood. They
become sluggish and weaken, then you
suffer with a dull misery in the kidney
region, sharp pains in the back or sick
headache, dizziness, your stomach sours,
tongue is coated and when the weather
is bad you have rheumatic twinges. The
urine gets cloudy, full of sediment, the
channels often g?t sere end irritated,
obliging you to seek relief two or !'--'
time during the night.
To neutralize these irritating aci..-, to
cleanse the kidneys and flush off the
body's urinous waste get four ounces of
Jad Salts from any pharmacy here;
take a tablespoonful in a glass of
water before breakfast for a few days
and your kidneys will then act fine. This
famous salts is made from the acid of
grapes and lemon juice, combined with
lithia, and has been used for generations
to flush and stimulate sluggish kidneys,
also to neutralize the acids in urine,
so it no longer irritate, thu ending
1 ''dder weakness.
,ad Salts i3 inexpensive: cannot in injure,
jure, injure, and makes a delightful effervescent
lithia-water drink.

-

In the heart of the city with Hemrninif Park for a front yard.
Every modern convenience in each rtvoo. Dining room service is
second to none.
RATES From $1.50 per day per person to $6.
ROBERT M. MEYER, J. E. KAVANAUGH,
Manager. Proprietor.

WHITE STAR LINE
TRANSFER M. STORAGE

Peptona, the Great Tonic

tf

W. K. Lane, 31. Physician and
Surgeon, specialist Eye, Ear, Nose and
Throat. Law Library Building, Ocala,
Florida. tf

AUTO
RUCK
SERVICE
Long Distance
Mo vino

(SO

COVERED
MOVING
VANS
Teaming Packing
Hosting

PHONE 2Ji

COLLIER BROTHERS

Head the Star Want Ads. It Days

-A,

m lstf
1

f ft



OCALA EVENING STAR, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9, 1919

I

jTW TT fljl m

uaiiy-jaeaiui raiKs
URIC ACID III THE SYSTEM
BT LEE H. SMITH, M. D.
Uric acid is now generally recognized
as the cause of more diseases than was
heretofore believed. When the kidneys
are out of. order uric acid accumulates
within thi. body in super abundance.
The disordered kidneys do not filter
the poisons out of the blood, as they
ought to do, and so the poisons remain
in the blood and float around until
they find a place to lodge, in form of
urate salts. The thing to remember is
that you may have rheumatism in any
part of the body you may have pains
anywhere your back may ache and
your heai may be dizzy but the
trouble is not where the pain appears.
The trouble is in the kidneys, and
what is the first thing to do ? You must
get that excess uric acid out of your
system, which can be. done by taking
Anuric Tablets, the splendid remedy
which Dr., Pierce, of Buffalo, N. Y.,
has put on sale in the drug stores at
a low prioe. Anuric Tablets (made
double str ngth), when taken into the
system as medicine, have the peculiar
Dower of dissolving the. n rift ftftirl r!o-
' try w m w v v
posited thfre. Drop a bit of sugar or
salt into hot water, and it will dis disappear.
appear. disappear. In precisely the same way do
these Anuric Tablets dissolve uric acid.
Of course, after ridding the system of
uric acid; it-may return again unless
you eat the right foods and live tha
right kind of life, but Dr. Pierce will
advise yor. fully on proper food and
correct living if you write and- ask
him. lie makes no charge for such
advice. Take Anuric Tablets to-day,
by all means, and get that uric acid
out of your System Don't, don't,
don't, put the matter off.
LIFE
FIRE
A. K. GERIG
INSURANCE
Ocr?!n, Florida
ACCIDENT AUTOMOBILE
MelVer:MaeKay
UNDERTAKERS and EMBALMERS
PHONES 47. 104. 303
OCALA, FLORIDA
SALT FIS
DIRECT FROM OUR FISHING
BOATS TO YOU!
Delicious fresh caught Dry
Salt Fish direct to the consumer
by prepaid parcel post or express
15 lbs. for $2.0(T
Special price on barrel lots
THE ST. GEORGE
PACKING CO.
St. George on. the" Gulf
Apalachicola, Florida
i NEW FRUIT STAND
J (Next to Anti-Monopoly
' Drug Store)
FANCY FRUITS I
FRESfl VEGETABLES
AND GROCERIES
All Prices Reduced ;
PRONE 399 SAVOY CAFE
EAT AT THE
GREEK-AMERICAH CAFE )
I A la CARTE SERVICE I
; Everything 4n the Market :
Best Home Cooking ;
; Quick Service ;
: C Jelfers ? p
H.D.Baxter) ;
J Phone 272 J
11 f S. Magnolia St., Next to
J Clarkson Hardware Store.
FRESH GARDEN SEEDS
All kinds of FRESH garden seeds
in any quantity.: Ocala Seed Store,
phone 435. tf
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTER
AND BUILDER
Careful Estimates made on all Con Contract
tract Contract work. Gives More and Better

Work for the Xoney than any other! Big lot of popular records at 75 cents
contractor In the city. ?each. E; C. Jordan & Co. 6t

OCALA OCCURRENCES

If you have any society items,
please phone One-Two-One (121).
Mr. Newcomb Barco was in Tues Tuesday
day Tuesday from Cotton Plant to meet his
sisters and see his mother.
Two and four-passenger lawn
swings at E. C. Jordan & Co. 6t
Mrs. Sue Barco was brought in
from her son's home at Cotton Plant
Monday and is now in the hospital.
Mr. and Mrs. F. H. Logan have re returned
turned returned home after a delightful trip
in their car to the southern part of
the state.
Mrs. Markley and Miss Sue Barco
of Clearwater arrived in the city
Tuesday to be with their mother, who
is in the hospital here.
Mrs. Ernest Lytle and children of
Stanton arrived in Ocala yetserday
and will be the guests of the former's
mother, Mrs. John Pasteur.
Mrs. Briggs, who is making, her
heme with W. L. Scott and family and
who is spending a few days with
friends at Crystal River, is expected
to return to Ocala today.
The regular monthly meeting of
the King's Daughters will be held
Thursday afternoon at the home of
Mrs. M. A. TenEyck on Fifth street.
All members are cordially, invited to
b" present.
Marion Davis played very prettily
in "Cecilia of the Pink Roses" at the
Temple last night. It was a good play
well rendered. Gladys Brockwell, one
of the brilliant stars of the Fox film
corporation, will shine tonight in "The
Call of the Soul."
At the ladies' missionary society of
the Presbyterian church, which will
meet at the manse tomorrow after afternoon
noon afternoon at 4 o'clock. Miss Ruby Ray will
give an interesting talk on her work
done among the mountain people oi
Kentucky. All members are urged to
attend.
Peptona is sold in Ocala at Gerig's
Drug Store at one dollar per bottle, tf
Dr. and Mrs. J. Lee Kirby'-Smith
are expected to arrive today from
Jacksonville, motoring through the
country in their car. They will spend
the remainder of the week in Ocala,
as the guests of Mr. and Mrs. R. L.
Anderson at their country home,
Marowood.'
One of our young ladies has just
received -from a friend in the Ameri American
can American Expeditionary Force a packet of
postcards illustrating scenes on the
French side of the Pyrennes, where
hfc, recently enjoyed a leave of ab absence.
sence. absence. The postcards show beautiful
scenery, which the French'appreciate
by the good taste with which they ar arrange
range arrange their pretty homes and towns.
Mrs. Anna Holder is the proud pos possessor
sessor possessor of the ball used by the Red
Sox in their winning game with the
Giants at Gainesville Monday. Mrs.
Holder took a party of friends to see
the game. Her car was by far the
most handsome of the 800 parked
about the field and chanced to be near
the path leading to the university
gymnasium, which the members of
the ball teams used for their showers
and athletic work. As the victorious
Red Sox went by the captain made a
courteous bow to the ladies in the cai
and tossed the "winning ball' to Mrs.
Holder. Now the question is, was it
the beauty of beautiful little Miss
Mims, the winsomeness and enthus enthusiasm
iasm enthusiasm of Missr Porter, who is a great
baseball fan, the stately elegance of
Mrs. Holder, the judicial "judge of
the supreme court" look of Mr. Fer Ferguson
guson Ferguson or that "Packard" that won.
However the party at the end of the
perfect trip returned to Ocala bring bringing
ing bringing the trophy.
This being the regular afternoon of
the Wednesday bridge club, the two
tables of members with a table of in
vited guests met at the home of Mrs.
Harry Walters. The house was at
tractively decorated for the occasion
with roses and trailing honeysuckle
The players spent a most pleasant
afternoon in the keen competition of
the game. After several rounds had
been played, the scores were collected
and the prizes awarded to the for
tunate winners. For the visitor's
was given a lovely box of apricot sta stationery
tionery stationery and'for the club prize a dainty
pair of lingerie pins. Mrs. Walters
assisted by her mother, Mrs. T. H.
Johnson and Mrs. Logan served the
players refreshments consisting of
chicken salad, olives, saltines, toasted
pimiento sandwiches and ice ceram.
Those who were the recipients of Mrs.
Walters' hospitality were: Mrs. E. H.
Martin, Mrs. Arthur Williams, Mrs.
E. J. Crook, Mrs. Anna Holder,, Mrs.
Harry Borland, Mrs. F. H. Logan,
Mrs. E. G. Peek, Mrs. E. L. Carney,
Mrs. T. H. Johnson, Mrs. Carney
Mims of Winston-Salem, N. C, Mrs.
W. A. Wilds, Mrs. Peter Mackintosh,
Mrs. Clifford Ayer, Misses Helen
Brown, Caroline Harriss and Adele
Bittinger. i
Call and 'hear the Pathe Talking
Machine. No needles to change as it
uses the sapphire ball point needle.

OCALA WILL LOSE
REV. VM. H. WRIGHTON

At a meeting of the deacons of the
-fc 4 A 1 t 1 A V i iL a. A. a
Baptist cnurcn last nigni ine pabiur, j
Rev. Wm. H. Wrighton tendered his
resignation, having accepted a call to
Valdosta, Ga., where he will go about
the first of May. The Star regrets to
learn of Mr. Wrighton's leaving. He
has done noble work during his stay
among us.
The Star hopes the church may
be able to induce the former pastor,
Dr. Bunyan Stephens, to return to
Ocala, where he labored for a period
of five years preceding his going into
the service of his country. Dr. Steph Stephens
ens Stephens is universally respected and be beloved
loved beloved by the people of Ocala. He
organized the Boy Scouts and exerted
a fine influence among the boys and
young men of our town. At present
he is working in the Y. M. C. A. at
Carlstrom Aviation Field, Arcadia.
TEMPLE ATTRACTIONS
FOR THE WEEK
Today: Gladys Brockwell in "The
Call of the World."
Thursday: Elsie Ferguson in "The
Rose of the .World."
Friday: Geraldine Farrar in "The
Turn of the Wheel."
Saturday: "The Craving," a great
photo drama.
Monday: Bert Lytell in "The
Spender."
Tuesday: Alice Brady in "The Hol-
lov of Her Hand."
PEDRO SCHOOL REPORT
The following named pupils have
not been absent during the month
beginning March 10 and ending April
4th: Cora Proctor, Louise Perry,
Icla : Snowden, Ethel Snowden, Robert
Shaw, Leslie Smith, Gladys Shaw,
Bertha Shaw, Mildred Lovell.
Lillian Batcheller,
J. W. Mann, Teachers.
Mosquito nets, refrigerators and ice
cream freezers. E. C. Jordan & Co. 6t
OCALA FRATERNAL ORDERS
ORDER Of EASTERN STAR
Ocala Chapter No. 29, O. E. S.,
meets at Yonge's hal) the second and
fourth Thursday evenings of each
month at 8 o'clock.
Mn. Isabel Wesson, W. M.
Mrs. Susan Cook, Secretary.
WOODMEN OF THE WORLD
Fort. King Camp No. 14 meets at
K. of P. hall at 8 p. m. every sec
ond and fourth Friday. Visiting sov sovereigns
ereigns sovereigns are always welcome.
W. W. Stripling, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage, Clerk.
ODD FELLOWS
Tulula Lodge No. 22, I. O. O. F.,
meets every Tuesday evening in the
Odd Fellows' hall on the third floor of
the" Star ooffice building at 8 o'clock
pronfptly. A warm welcome always
extended to visiting brothers.
Joe Potter, N. G.
J. D. McCaskill, Secretary.
OCALA" LODGE NO. 286. B. P. O. E.
Ocala Lodge No. 286, Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, mets
the second and fourth Tuesday eve evenings
nings evenings in' each month. Visiting breth brethren
ren brethren always welcome. Club house oppo opposite
site opposite postoffice; east side.
J. H. Spencer, E. R.
E. J. Crock, Secretary.
MARION-DUNN MASONIC LODGE
Marion-Dunn Lodge No. 19, F. & A.
M:, meets on the first and third
Thursday evenings of each month at
8 o'clock until further notice.
H. O. Cole, W. M.
Jake Brown, Secretary.
MIRIAM REBEK AH LODGE NO. 15
Miriam Rebekah Lodge No. 15
meets the first and third Monday eve evenings
nings evenings in each month in the Odd Fel Fellows'
lows' Fellows' hall at 8 o'clock.
Mrs. W. T. Whitley, N. G.
Eloise Bouvier, Secretary.
R. A. 11. CHAPTER NO. 13
Regular convocations of the Ocala
Chapter No. 13, R. A. M., on the first
Friday in every month at 8 p. m.
J. A. Bouvier, H. P.
Jake Brown, Secretary.
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
Ocala Lodge No. 19. Conventions
held every Monday evening at 8
at the Castle Hall, over the G. C.
Greene Co. drugstore. A cordial wel welcome
come welcome to visiting brothers.
W. W. Stripling, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage, EL of R. & S.
Don't Talde Fishing
Without the Right j
1 Kind oi
1 TACKLE S
Get it at j
1 Jake's 1

J

The Echoes of
Silence
By VICTOR RZDCUJT2S

Coprrlbt. 1919. br WtsUra Kwfpc Union.)
lie had written a beautiful sons that ;
touched the soul of every true poet'
and then had stayed hUrhand. She
had sung it through one great tri triumphant
umphant triumphant season and then her voice
was mute he, Bertram Vernon, she,
Viola Davenant. An abyss had opened,
a shock had come and they two were
sundered.
Ten years back they had met and
loved, he a young man of ample for fortune,
tune, fortune, she a proven young queen of
song, dazzled by the adulation that
Y-oufed in upon her.' She had gone
abroad with her sister, promising him
that with the following spring 'She
would abandon all professional duties
and live and sing for him alone.
Surely never had there been so
det-p, so fervent a love as 'his -he
knew it, she realized it. Day and
nlpht during her absence Bertram
Vernon lived In a bewitching dream,
lie had planned out a home fit for a
In'n:ss. He had anticipated a tour
taking In the fairest spots of earth.
He had so shaped his. life that the
coming years would be a devotion to
srt. to music, .to the higher literary
taste, above all, to love.
One day the closest friend of Ver Vernon,
non, Vernon, a lawyer named Joyce El wood,
came to the office of the former. lie
closed the door after him. lie seated
himself opposite to Vernon.
Bertram." fie said, "I would be to
you a false friend if I stayed" my llpi
concerning a discovery that" must
cuuse you pain, distrust, heart wreck.
It i of Viola that I must speak. Be
t-mve, be strong she has deceived
rcu."
"That would not be possible,"
said Vernon, simply and with a smile
of ufter confidence.
"Then read," answered Elwood, and
he produced' a crumpled ntwspaper
and a written sheet. "Viola was at
Palermo when she last wrote you.
This is a Palermo newspaper. I hap happen
pen happen to have a client, aa Italian, who
receives the paper from abroad. He
noticed the name of Miss Davenant.
He knows you, myself, and that "we
would be Interested. I hare had a
titualatlon made of Ihe artlcls read.
A ad Bertram Vsrnon read his
death warrant, it seemed.
When Joyce Elwood called to see
his friend the next day he found him
absent, and then a week, a month,
many of them, but the missing man
did not return.
One month later Bertram had found
the spot he had been looking for. At
a wild spot in th Rockies he had dis discovered
covered discovered a partially isolated segment
of a chain of hills. Here at one time
au erratic hermit had lived. Here
now, a broken wanderer, Vernon ap appropriated
propriated appropriated the old cabin, spanned a
broad abyss with a kind of a draw drawbridge,
bridge, drawbridge, never lowered except when he
toiled to a distant town to secure the
necessaries of life. Then began an
anchorite existence. Grim silence held
the barren spot, and there day or
night as he moved about the narrow
hilltop or tossed upon his rude bed of
straw, the self-exiled being constantly
dwelt, not amid alienee, but amid the
echoes of silence. They possessed
him, they pursued him.- Ever there
was the semblance of a dying note of
sweetness, the faint accent of the
voice he had so loved. The newspaper
had recounted the marriage abroad of
Viola Davenant to a famous opera
singer. Accepting the announcement
as natural, as logical, Vernon had
abandoned all of hope or faith in womankind.-
He could not silence those echoes of
silence. They obsessed him, they gave
him no rest. Exhaustion came. One'
night he dragged himself toward his
wretched hovel, so weak and prostrat
ed that he fell to the ground beside'
the drawbridge and lay there unable
to move farther. It was a royally'
grand moonlit evening and he glanced'
wearily at the glowing stars, and felt"
that not for many hours longer would
he greet their pitying gl earnings.
Suddenly amid the halucination of
a growing fever there rang out a loud louder,
er, louder, more distinct "echo of alienee."
He smiled. This was the beginning
of the end I The song he had written
and which Viola had sung stole forth
upon the ambient air and In Viola
tones Ah sweet delusion aa he
neared the dark river! It closed. It
was repeated, and beyond the chasm
a white-robed form seemed to pans
In a ghostlike walk and listen.
What Impelled him? Strength
seemed given him to seize the ropes
ot the drawbridge and loosen them.
The rude framework spanning the
abyss crashed Into place.
"It is death!- he cried. "Oh, fair
one! Oh. false one! I come! I
come !"
A form flitted across the rude
planks, his weary head was lifted to
a throbbing, longing bosom.
"My wounded love! my poor, dear,
lost one found found V And a glory
Ineffable came into his face, and earth
faded away.
A week later, Viola beside him in a
mountain hotel, Bertram Vernon knew
that It was his sweetheart's sister
whom the foreign newspaper had
wedded to the opera singer, and his
peerless Viola had traced him to his
hfrmlt hut, calling to him with the
sung that still lived in. her heart. In Intent
tent Intent upon roaming the wide world
over, but she mast find again the man
tae loved!

Tllf AlinnnRITrF inil Anll"IIUA rim

I nt uUMIiUiu rr V

We Vulcanize CASINGS and INNER TUBES and
Guarantee Every Peace of Work.
SECOND HAND TIRES BOUGHT AND SOLD
JAMES E. ENGESSER, Proprietor
(At the Old Ford Garage)

' T4- -n -rr v 1
FRESH
MCY

Here is a stock that will do justice to a city.
Look this list over check the items you want and
phone or send us your order.

I'remier Salad Dressing 40c
Small Bottle Premier ,17c
Royal Mayonnaise 35c and 60c
Chop Suey Sauce 75c
Chop Suey 35c
Glace Angelique, lb $1.00
Glace Cherries, package ..: 30c
Glace Assorted Fruit, lb. $1.00
Glace Pineapple, lb ....$1.00
Brands' A-l Sauce 35c
Tobasco Sauce 50c
Beefsteak Sauce 30c
Mushroom Ketchup 40c
Walnut Ketchup 35c
Kitchen Bouquet 35c
Liquid Rennet 20c
Junket Tablets ;,..12c
Mint Sauce .".......... 25c
Preserved Ginger, glass 25c
Crystallized Ginger 37c
Mexene Chili Powder. .. .15c and 30c
Hot Tamales, tin 20c
Chili Con Came 15c and 30c
A rtichokes. No. 2 Vi ti na 35c
Puree of Tomatoes 10c
N. Y. Full Cream Cheese, lb..... 50c
American Swiss, 'lb. 60c
. i
Here, you will iind as
ceries as you can locate
loolc at pur store. It will
Phones

THE UNJ yiTR".SAI-CAH
The Ford Factory hasnot yet
reached normal production.. It will
take some time; after being entirely
given over to war work. We are get getting
ting getting a few cars right along, and sug suggest
gest suggest that you leave your order with us
as soon as possible and we will de-
liver as soon as possible. Runabout,
$500; Touring Car, 525; Coupe, $650;
Sedan, $775; One Ton Truck Chassis,
$550. These prices f. o. b. Detroit.
Don't forget the service we give Jin
our shops, genuine Ford Parts, Ford
skill and Ford prices.
Tucker's Garage
Phone 439
Ocala - Florida.

tow to me wmum

I '("'l t""

MALM

VULCAMZ

Plionc 78

I.UiJIIIJK wl ill;! I u

JUST IN
0ISPJ
Brick Cheese, lb 60c
Edam Cheese," each .....T $2.00
Pineapple Cheese, each ...$1.25
Philadelphia Cream Chese ,20c
Imported Roquefort, lb. $1.80
Olive Sauce, Russian Dressing. .40c
East India Chutney 70c
Walnut Meats, lb. $1.20
Pecan Meats, lb. $1.50
Valencia Shelled Almonds, lb 70c
Jordan Shelled Almonds, lb 90c
Pride of Sea Mackerel, in
live-pound tins $2.00
Round Shore Herring, lb 12c
Salt Ocean Whiting, heads off, lb. 12c
Fat, Juicy Mackerel 20c
5-lb. Kit Fancy Mackerel, 20-
ounce Fish, kit $1.85
Holland Style Herring, each... ...5c
salt Mullet, pound 20c
Marine Herring, lb. 25c
Finnan Haddie, in glass.. ..45c
Antipasto in glass an
Hors D'Ouevre, glass 60c
Carbonated Apple Juice, qt. 60c
Pure Apple Juice, qt. .......... .45c
Grapejuice, pint 40c
Grapejuice, qt. .. 65c
complete a stock ot gro groin
in groin Florida. Come in and
do yon good.
16 and-174
i
Let uj VULCANIZE your old,
used, supposedly worn out tires
and save you money. The extra
service you'll get out of our re re-built
built re-built tireswill prove the practi practical
cal practical value of our VULCANIZ-
. ING. Try it on one tire and
convince yourself.
IMG
Ocala, Fla



OCALA EVENING STAR, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 9, 1919

Lieut. Carlisle Izlar expects to
leave Friday for a short trip to Ma Macon
con Macon "and Atlanta.

Mr. H. Shroeder, theEastlake poul poultry
try poultry man, is among the business visi visitors
tors visitors in the city today.
Shaving brushes, 50 cents to four
dollars. All kinds; all guaranteed. Tho
Anti-Monopoly Drug Store 6t
The veteran Captain Tucker was
able to come down town this morning
and swap handshakes with his numer numerous
ous numerous friends.
Mrs. N. Hickman is spending a few
days with her nephew and niece, Mr.
and Mrs. C. P. Chazal before leaving
for her home in the north.
Mrs. Almeda Turnipseed of Gaines-
vine, is tne guest oi ner motner, Mrs.
Emma L&avengood at her home on
North Magnolia street, for a few
days. ..
The Auto Sales Company sold v
Dodge touring car and a commercial
car yesterday to Mr. Ollie Mordis,
the North Magnolia street market
man.
Your credit is good at E. C. Jordan
& Company's. 6t
Mr. and Mrs. Mack Carter yester yesterday
day yesterday moved into their attractive little
cottage on Sanchez street, which has
recently been occupied by Mr. and
Mrs. R. S. Rogers.
Miss Mary Burford leaves Tuesday
for Atlanta, where she will be joined
later by' her mother and sister. Miss
Ajrnes Burford, who is attending col college
lege college in Lynchburg, Va.
You can't eat enough this week to
last you all next week, nor can you
advertise enough in one week to last
a month. Both must be kept up con constantly
stantly constantly to get proper results.
Mr. John Dewey, who went to
Gainesville to see the ball game, stop stopped
ped stopped by one of the ponds in Payne's
prairie on his return and hauled out
a couple of fine fish, which he "brought
along home.
9
Among the. Ocala people who will
go to Atlanta for grand opera week
are Mrs. G. S. Scott, Mrs. J. H. Tay Taylor,
lor, Taylor, Miss Mamie Taylor, Mr. W D.
Taylor, Mrs. Charles Lloyd and Mrs.
H. M. Hampton.
Sergeant Ned Anthony has secured
his discharge from the army, but is
engaged in government work as fore foreman
man foreman of a body of workmen on a build building
ing building at Macon, so is not likely to re
turn to Ocala right away.
Mr. DeWitt Griffin spent several
days of last week in Tampa and while
there witnessed the melancholy sight
of pouring 32,000 gallons of beer into
the sewers. He saw ..... little colored
boys go swimming in the amber fluid.
Mr. and Mrs. J Carstens, who
have been keeping house in the bun bun-gaow
gaow bun-gaow tof Dr. Watt's in Linwood Park,
have rented the cottage owned by
Miss Alice Bullock on East Oklawaha
avenue, where they will move immed immediately.
iately. immediately.
Seeley, Famous in This Specialty,
Called to Ocala
F. H. Seeley of Chicago 'and Phil Phil-a
a Phil-a delphia, the noted. truss expert, will
personally be at the Ocala House and
will remain in Ocala Friday 'only,
April 11th. Mr. Seeley says: "The
Spermatic Shield will not only retain
anycase of rupture perfectly, but con.
tracts the opening in 10 days on the
average case. This instrument re received
ceived received the only award in England and
in Spain producing results without
surgery, injections, medical treatment
or prescriptions. Mr. Seeley has doc documents
uments documents from the United States Gov Government,
ernment, Government, Washington, D. C, for in inspection.
spection. inspection. All charity cases without
charge, or if any interested call, he
will be glad to show same without
charge or fit them if desired. Busi Business
ness Business demands prevent stopping at any
other place in this section.
P. S. Every statement in this no notice
tice notice has been cerified before the Fed Federal
eral Federal and State Courts. F. H. Seeely.
Adv. dly 9-10- wky 4-4
Many a self-made
rVc3ik man might have made
v"3f 1 11 1 i i i
ueiuer jod oi w naa
he cared for his vp
in youth.
Dr. K. J. Weihe,
Eyesight Specialist
Graduate Optometrist
With Weihe Co Jewelers, Ocala, Fla.
I FISHING TACKLE 1
Of AH Kinds
S3
at
Jake's-
Sc3
if
I m.Uti l'l'J.WU..ll1MMl.(.,lil.li;,,I4lIiti.tll.lM.iail,IHl.Uilil.ilUl1Mll.,lMluillri1.1ill..UjB

RUPTUnE EXPERT

HER

Mr. Julian McClymonds, so favor favorably
ably favorably known in this city, where upon
several occasions he has been the
guest of his father, the late Mr. J. H.
McClymonds, has recently returned
to his home in Lexington, Ky., from a
year's service in France, where a few
weeks ago he was commissioned as a
lieutenant colonel in the medical
corps. Dr. McClymonds spent a few
days in Chicago en route to his home
as the guest of his brother, Mr. John
McClymonds, former president of the
California citrus exchange. Mr. Mc McClymonds
Clymonds McClymonds has recently been appoint appointed
ed appointed a director and manager of the
Chicago Ice & Packing Co. with a sal salary
ary salary of $30,000 a year.
The Star hears of an exciting event
across the river. It is reported that
a negro went to the home of a citizen
over there and stopping at the gate
asked the citizen's fifteen-yearold
daughter if any of the men folks
were at home. She replied they were
not, whereupon the negro said he did
not care for the men, but was com coming
ing coming in to see the" girl. She promptly
picked up a gun and warned him to

stay out, but he started to come in,
and she fired at him. Just as the gun
went off; the negro dodged and most
cf the shot struck the gatepost, but
some went into him and he left. The
girl's neighbors are after him.
Mrs. D.-E. Mclver has just received
a letter from her brother, Lieut. Hugo
Mcintosh, who at the time it was
written was just leaving his post in
France with a detail for Germany.
Lieut. Mcintosh had only recently
seen and talked to two of his formei
comrades of Company A. Sergeant
Geo. C.. Woods and Corporal Curing Curing-ton,
ton, Curing-ton, who were' well and in good spirits.
Lieut. Mcintosh is with the regulars
and will probably be among the last
to come home.
Mr. C. C. Kirby of the Mangels Mangels-Kirby
Kirby Mangels-Kirby Co. of Jacksonville, state dis distributor
tributor distributor for Maxwell and Chalmers
cars and Republic trucks, isN in the
city today on business with the local
dealer for the Maxwell-Chalmesr line,
Mr, R. R. Carroll. Mr. Kirby is ac accompanied
companied accompanied by a special factory repre representative
sentative representative of the Republic trucks, Mr.
George W. Zwergel. The two gen gentlemen
tlemen gentlemen are making a trip over the
state n the interests of their lines.
Mrs. Ella Ditto' has received a let letter
ter letter from her son, Cecil Ditto, petty
officer on the revenue cutter Talla Tallapoosa,
poosa, Tallapoosa, saying he is married- He did
not give the name of his bride, but
said she was a pretty French girl.
The Tallapoosa is cruising off. the
North Atlantic coast and Cecil's bride
is probably one of the pretty French
Canadian girls that are numerous in
the ports of that part of America.
The friends (among them the Star)
of those two- clever young soldiers,
Eddie Lopez of Ocala and Eddie Mar Marshall
shall Marshall of Oklawaha, have just received
postcards saying the boys were well
and in good spirits, but home would
look good to them. Eddie Lopez is
with the Army of Occupation and the
other Eddie is in France.
Sergeant Travis Collier has just
completed a very pleasant visit to his
relatives in London. While there he
sent his mother some beautiful old
family heirlooms, in the form of jew
els which he had fallen heir to. and
which have been in the family for
several generations. Naturally Mrs.
Collier is delighted to have received
these beautiful and valuable jewels.
A letter from Corporal Marion
isray, First. Pioneer Infantry, station
ed near Coblenz, tells of a leave of
absence which he spent very pleas
antly at Aix-les-Bains, once a place
greatly frequented by tourists but
for the past year or more set aside
as a recuperation ground for our sol
diers in France.
The dispatch elsewhere announcing
the death of Sidney Drew, a popular
movie actor, will particularly interest
Ocala people, as many of the plays
ne has had a part m recentlv were
written by Mrs. S. G. Moyers, sister
of Mrs. kmily Green and Mrs. Mary
.bagleton of Ocala.
- 4
The many Ocala friends, of Rev. L
B. Warren will be glad to know that
he is as well and happy and useful as
ever in Atlanta, where he is doing
good work for the Baptist Home Mis
sion Board. Wonder if he doesn'1
ever hear the Florida fish calling.
A letter received bv Dr. D. M
Smith from his son. Lieut. Morris
Smith, in France at the date of the
letter, announced that he was about
to be sent on special dutv to Ger
many. Lieut. Smith hopes to return
heme some time this summer.
Dr. and Mrs. H. F. Watt and little
daughter. Helen, who are now in
Asheville, expect to arrive" in Ocala in
about two weeks and will resume
housekeeping in their own home in
Linwood Park. Their many friends
here will be very glad to see them.
Mrs. Norman Kirk and little daugh daughter,
ter, daughter, Bettie, who have been spending
the winter at the home of Mrs. B. T.
Perdue, expect to leave Tuesday.
Their exact destination is undecided.
Rev. Wm. H. Wrighton will give a
Bible reading on the humanity of
Christ at the Baptist churcrT tonight
at7:45 o'clock.
Peptona.
tf

BRITAIN BUILT
OCILY 1,245 SHIPS
It! LAST YEAR

Record for 1918 Far Below That
of 1913.
FEW LINERS ARE LAID DOWN
Tonnage for 1918 Was 1,876,411, as
Compared With 263,933 fop 1913
Wonder Work of the War Period
ts Found in Naval Engineering
Build Wonder Warship Capable of
Outrunning and Outrunning Any Anything
thing Anything Afloat.
Some remarkable figures are now
available -of war work in the British
shipbuilding yards. No records are
broken in regard to shipbuilding as
a whole. In that respect the com
prehensive statistics given only con confirm
firm confirm knowledge of the slow progress
which Xs being made In replacing the
losses of the war period.
The total output of the United
Kingdom during 1918 naval as well
as mercantile is given as 1,245 ves vessels
sels vessels of 1,876,411 tons and 4,349,260 L
h. p. The tonnage is disappointingly
low after all that had been heard of
speeding up processes, the inaugura inauguration
tion inauguration and organization of government
programs of construction, arrange arrangements
ments arrangements for supplying materials for the
yards and for cbtaining skilled arti artisans
sans artisans from the fighting services, and
all of the advantages in. the way of
expediting output which were to fol follow
low follow the introduction of standardized
and fabricated and assembled ships.
The fact is, of course, that no of official
ficial official programs can be carried out
without man-power, and the man manpower
power manpower of the shipyards of the United
Kingdom is not capable of maintaining
and Increasing the effective strength of
the British navy as it had to be main maintained
tained maintained so long as Germany was u
naval power which had to be reckoned
with and at the same time of In Increasing,
creasing, Increasing, mercantile output at the ex exceptional
ceptional exceptional rate which would have bevn
necessary to cope with the German
submarine menace in Its work in its
most virulent form. s
Far Behind 1913's Record.
The figures now published show that
the work of the United Kingdom
shipyards in 1918 was far behind that
of 1913,' which was the record year
and also the last complete pre-war
year. In those, twelve months the
total consisted of 1,474 vessels, of
2,263,933 tons and 2.661,260 L h. p.,
so that -while there was the extraordi extraordinary
nary extraordinary increase over the previous United
Kingdom's best of some 1,600,000 horse
power, there were decreases of 229
In number of vessels and of 367,522
tons In measurement of vessels
launched.
The increase in horse power is ex
plained, of course, by the relatively
higher power of the machinery In
stalled in war vessels, especially In
destroyers, as compared with merchant
vessels, and by the fact that a very
large number of destroyers were built ;
but the explanation of the lower ton
nage Is. to be found In another direc direction
tion direction altogether In the fact that It
has not been found possible' to divert
from naval work, and especially from
naval overhauling and repairing, and
from the reconstruction of those ves
sels which were salved after being tor
pedoed or mined, a sufficient number
of men and a sufficient amount of ma materials
terials materials to enable work on new mer
chant vessels to make satisfactory
progress.
For it is merchant vessels- really
tramp steamers which make up In
normal times the great bulk of the
new British tonnage each year, and
although there were built in 1918 many
"war" steamers of standard types to
the order of the shipping controller.
the aggregate of these was low in
comparison with that of merchant ves
sels in gqod years before the war.
Few Liners Launched.
Practically no large first class liners
were launched. This work was al
most wholly confined to the Belfast
and Clyde yards of Messrs. Harland
and Wolff, where five such vessels
were turned out. But of these tho
largest were only of 17,221 tons, which
Is not large when It i& compared with
the big Cunard, White Star, Hamburg-
American, and other vessels which fig
ured in shipbuilding records in pre
war years. The contribution of liner
tonnage to -the 1918 total was. Indeed,
almost, negligible, while, of coasting
vessels and other special service mer
chant steamers there were remarkably
few.
The hopes of large output, rested
solely on the standard shipbuilding
program, and the war did not last
long enough to give It the chance for
which Lord Pirrle was preparing the
chance of proving that 'British ship shipbuilding
building shipbuilding could and would rise1 to the
height of the great occasion. Whether
It would ultimately have done so is
now only a matter of academic dis
cussion. Certainly, so far as avail
able figures show. It did not seem,
.when the armistice was signed, that
it was likely to do so In the then near
future.
The wonder work of the war period
Is to be found not fn mercantile ship ship-bunding,
bunding, ship-bunding, but In naval ; and above all
things In naval engineering. Takinc
the record .of the Clyde alone," we find
! that during the war -481' vessels : of
j770,347 tons and 6,093,830 L h. p. were

constructed, as additions to the naval
strength of the country.
In this total there are included no
merchant vessels ordered by the gov government
ernment government (so that the standard ship shipbuilding
building shipbuilding program Is completely ex excluded)
cluded) excluded) and no general service trawl trawlers,
ers, trawlers, or tugs, or handy craft built to
government order.
AM Actual Fighting Ships.
All are actual fighting ships, carry carrying
ing carrying guns and designed each within
its own sphere of action for taking
part in naval operations. The list is
composed of battleships, battle-cruisers,
light cruisers, destroyers, subma submarines,
rines, submarines, an armed merchant cruiser, a
seaplane carrier, monitors, mine minesweepers,
sweepers, minesweepers, those new vessels known as
'sloops," but wldch are really little
light cruisers or low speed destroyers,
gunboats, patrol boats, hospital steam steamers,
ers, steamers, and also those Q boats and I Q
boats of which so very little could be
said while the war was on, or can be
eaid even yet for that matter.
It Is an extraordinary list, and as
tabulated, It looks more like a navy
In itself than the record of the work
of one river during the war. It Is
headed by that great Sheffield-Clydebank
firm, Messrs. John Brown & Co.,

Limited; who turned out no.fewer than t
forty-seven vessels of 155,153 tons and
1,563,500 horse power, and in whose
work there were Included the great
battleship Burham and the great bat battle
tle battle cruisers Tiger and Repulse, not to
speak of the still greater Hood, about
which even yet nothing can be said
except that she exists, and is being
completed at Clydelbank.
The Hood was the greatest of all
British mystery ships. She and the
Rodney (at another Clyde yard that
of the Fairfield company) would have
been the great surprise packets of the
war. In speed and gun-power they
were to have exceeded anything afloat,
and what they were Intended for only
our naval authorities and the builders
knew. Only the Hood, however, will
he completed.
When It became evident that the of offensive
fensive offensive power of Germany was waning,
and that the naval power of Great
Britain and her allies was overwhelm overwhelmingly
ingly overwhelmingly sufficient for all likely possi possibilities,
bilities, possibilities, the question of proceeding
with the construction of two' such
great vessels came up for serious con consideration.
sideration. consideration. If they were not to be
required for this war they would be
lost, as they could never be required
again. Even granting the possibility
of another war They would be out of
date before It came.
Decision to Complete Hood.
" But while the Kodney was In the
early stages of her construction at
Fairfield, the Hood was well advanced
at Clydebank. So it was decided to
complete the Hood as a great speci specimen
men specimen of the latest in British naval
architecture, but -to scrap all that ex existed
isted existed of the Rodney. That is how
we are likely to have, for many years,
one great mid ship, capable of out
running and outranging any other ship
of war afloat unless It should unfor unfortunately
tunately unfortunately be the case that it will be
necessary to carry naval designs still
further, build still larger, faster and
more heavily armed vessels.
Meantime the Hood Is the world's
greatest fighting" ship, and if ever the
Institution of Naval Architects are al
lowed to discuss her designs In public,
there should be revelations of extra extraordinary
ordinary extraordinary Interest.
But It is really in marine engineer engineering
ing engineering that the year 1918 and the war
period as a whole has been extraordi extraordinary.
nary. extraordinary. For the twelve months the rec record
ord record .in the production of ships ma machinery.
chinery. machinery. Is held by the Wallsend Slip Slipway
way Slipway company. Limited, of Wallsend
on-Tyne, which turned out engines of
316,290 horsepower. As an achieve achievement
ment achievement this would have been looked on
as almost impracticable before, the
war. But there were many almost
as remarkable.
Second on the list came John Brown
& Co., of Clydebank, with machinery
of 13.600 I. h. p. As a matter of fact,
this firm is first, as the Hood will be
of more horsepower than their own
Repulse, which worked out at 115,000,
so that their 1918 total must be well
over400,000 L h. p. At present, how how-ever7
ever7 how-ever7 they can only be credited with
second place. In which they are fol followed
lowed followed closely by their Clyde neigh neighbors,
bors, neighbors, the Fairfield company, with 291, 291,-000
000 291,-000 I. h. p.
After them come CammelL Laird
& Co., of Birkenhead, with 230,200
I. h. p.; John Thornycroft & Co., of
Southampton, with 211,843 L h. p.;
Messrs. narland & Wolff, of Belfast,
Glasgow and Greenock, with 209,600
I. h. p.; and a large number of firms
with totals ruling between 100,000 and
200.000 i. h. p., each of which would
have been considered notable in normal
times.
But higher records than any of these
are to be found in the work of all the
period of the war. In 1910 the Fair Fairfield
field Fairfield company turned out marine pro propelling
pelling propelling machinery of a total of 468,410
indicated horsepower; John Brown &
Co., a total of 349,400 Indicated horse horsepower;
power; horsepower; the Wallsend Slipway com
pany, a total of 346,310 indicated horse horsepower;
power; horsepower; and Cammell, Laird & Co. had
319.000 Indicated horsepower to their
credit.
It is evident from these figures that
the year 1916 was the greatest year In
the history of marine engineering. It
was a year when" high-powered de destroyers
stroyers destroyers were being turned out almost
en masse by all the firms for the pur purpose
pose purpose of hunting down the German sub submarines,
marines, submarines, and it will live for all time
in the Industrial annals of the United
Kingdom as a year of extraordinary
engineering activity, and one which
contributed more than any other to
that supremacy at sea which ultimate ultimately
ly ultimately strangled Germany and compelled
her to cry aloud for peace.

UNCLASSIFIED ADVERT1SIMTS
WANTEDr LOST. FOUND, FOR SALE. FOR RENT AND SIM SIMILAR
ILAR SIMILAR LOCAL NEEDS
RATES: Six line maximum, one time 25c.; three times 50c; six
times 75c; cne month $3. Payable in advance.

WANTED CLEAN RAGS. OLD
TABLE AND BED LINEN PRE
FERRED. HOWEVER, OLD COT-
TON UNDERWEAR, ETC WILL j
DO. WILL PAY 5 CENTS PER
POUND IF WELL LAUNDERED
!
OCALA IRON WORKS. PHONE. 4.
: 1
WOOD An honest load of wood can!
be had by phoning Smoak's Wood I
i ara, pnone i-o. n
OVERLAND BARGAIN We have
an Overland car with new tires which
we will sell, if taken at once, for $250.
Auto Sales Co., North Main street,
phone 348. tf
FOR SALE Ten acres land 3
miles north of courthouse; under
fence and half of it cleared. Cheap
for cash 'and title guaranteed. All
txes paid to date. Address Samuel
Fenters, care Star office. 7-3t6
FOUND Big white bulldog with
blown spot over right eye; ears and
tail cut. Came to James Jackson, 320
North Orange St., at 6 o'clock Sunday
morning. Owner can obtain dog by
paying advertising charge. 7
LOST An 18-karat golden opportu opportunity
nity opportunity to have light, heavy or long longdistance
distance longdistance hauling done, if you don't
sec the' Maxwell Transfer Company.
Phone 376, L. E. Yonce, Ocala, Fla. tf
WANTED You to know I repair all
makes of stoves, gas, wood or coal. I
also buy old stoves. Drop me a card
o rcall at 417 N. Magnolia St. Acme
Stove Hospital. 20-3t
FOR VS ALE We have on hand a
worm-driven Ford truck which we will
sell at a bargain. Auto Sales Co.,
North Main St., phone 248. tf
AUTO REPAIR SERVICE For
quick and reliable automobile service
come to the Florida House Garage. J.
C. Lanier and H. C. Williams. 8-lm
WANTED The present whereabouts
of Doc Dursse. Communicate with
Mrs. Ollie Dursse, 211 N. Sixth St.,
St. Joe, Mo. 4-t

THI RTY YEARS' EXPERIENCE IN THE BUSINESS.
J. W. HUNTEM
GUN AND LOCKSMITH
GUNsi REVOLVERS, PISTOLS, LOCKS. LAWN MOWERS, UM-
BREILAS, ETC., REPAIRED.
SAWS AND SCISSORS
We Buy and Sell All Kinds of Second Hand Articles. Only Ex Ex-elusive
elusive Ex-elusive Second Hand Store in Town.
301 SOUTH MAIN ST.

E. C. JOE AM & CO.
Funeral Directors and Embalmers
AUTO HEA&SE SERVICE
We deliver caskets fre;? anywhere in the county.
Calls promptly answered night or day.
wildur c. ssurn SAM r. pyles, jr.

LICENSED
i
Day Phone 10

I-C-E2
Real vs. False Ecoiioiry
At This Time

Resist the mental suggestion to curtail your regular taking of ice
until "the weather turns warm again." Yoar refrigerator is going
nicely now; it U well chilled and it is doinsr full duty as your prac practical
tical practical SAVER.
Don't let it lapse even a little bit it ay aulk on you all the
remainder of the season.
OCALA ICE AND PACKING COMPANY

STAR JOB
PHONE 51

LETTERHEADS, BILLHEADS, CARDS.
CIRCULARS, FOLDERS, FINE BOOKLETS, ETC.

WEN EVER DISAPOINT A-CUSTOMER ON A
PROMISE. YOU GET THE JOB WHEN ITS DUE.

FOR SALE A thoroughbred Hamp Hampshire
shire Hampshire boar, one year old. Apply to
Nathan Mayo, Summerfield, Fla. 12t
FOR SALE A medium large fire fireproof
proof fireproof safe in fine condition for less
than half pi ice. Combination outer
lock and key locked inner steel door.
Inside cabinet compartments. Call
phone 211 or 298. 4-5-6t
LOST Thursday, Aril 3rd, small
black leather purse; containing small
diamond ring, ladies' watch, cameo
lavallier, etc. Liberal reward for its
return to II. H. Henderson at Ocala
National Bank. 4-6t

RAILROAD SCHEDULES
Arrival and Departure of passenger
trains at OCALA UNION STATION.
The following schedule figures pub published
lished published as information and not guar guaranteed.
anteed. guaranteed. (Eastern Standard Time)
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILROAD
2:50 am. J'cksonville-NewYork 2:50 am.
1:36 pm. Jacksonville 3:21 pro.
4:07 pm.- Jacksonville 5:10 p.m
S
Tampa )
2:50 a.m
Manatee
2:50 am.
( St. Petersburg )
3:28 pm. Tampa-Manatee
5:10 pm. Tampa-St. Petersburg:
1:41 pm.
4:07 pm.
ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD
Leave Arrive
2:12 pm J'cksonvllle-New York 3:15 am.
2:20 pm. J'ksonvllle-G'inesvllle 2:35 pm.
6:42 am. J'ksonville-G'nesvllle 10:13 pm.
3:15 am. St. Fet'sbrg-Lakeland 2:12 am.
2:35 pm. St. Pet'8brg--Lkelanl 2:00 pm.
7:10 am. Duimellon-Wilcox -7.40
am. Du'nellon-L.'keland 11:03 pm.
3.25 pm. Homosaasa 1:45 pm.
10:13 pm. Leesburg 6:42 am.
1:45 pm. Gainesville 11:50 am.
Monday, Wednesday, Friday.
Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday.
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
Ocala Lodge No. 19. Conventions
held every Monday evening at 8
at tho Castle Hall, over' the G. C.
1 Greene Co. drugstore. A cordial wel-
come to visiting brothers.
W. W. Stripling, C. C.
Chaa. K. Sage. K. of R. & S.
EMBALMERS.
XJght Phones 225 and 423
P. O. BOX COO

DEPARTMENT



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