The Ocala evening star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:05223

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
STAR

Weather Forecast : Fair tonight,
probably light frost north and inter interior
ior interior central portions; Tuesday fair
and warmer.
OCALA, FLORIDA, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2, 1919.
VOL.26, NO. SI

1 i 7

I H FINISHED

THEIR WORK
All the Delegates Left for Home To Today,
day, Today, Well Pleased with
Visit to Ocala
Last evening at the Temple the theater
ater theater the degree team of Palmetto
camp, Jacksonville, the members of
vhich arrived in the city yesterday
afternoon for that especial purpose,
exemplified the protective degree, in initiating
itiating initiating into the various camps located
in Marion ; county eighty-six new
members. One hundred and ten can candidates
didates candidates composed the class, but some
failed to show up.
Never in the history of the Temple
theater, or of Ocala, xf or that matter,
has there been assembled such a
large and representative audience of
men, the house' being packed and
jammed with delegates to the head
camp, members of the camps adjacent
to Ocala and Fort King camp, the"
home lodge, with not a female of the
species present.
' It was nearly 9 o'clock before the
ceremonies began,, and opening the
program Soverign Watchman Mills of
Jacksonville, presented to the dele delegates
gates delegates represent;ng the three camps in
the state making the greatest gain in
members during the recent drive, the
handsome sill: American flags, offer offered
ed offered by Sovereign Commander Fraser.
Mr. Mills made a. very neat presenta presentation
tion presentation speech, which was replied to in
fitting terms by the delegates from
the winning camps.
Then the "forest" was arranged for
the degree work, which was most
beautifully exemplified by the Palr
metto team. The meeting adjourned
at 11 o'clock, with 86 new members
gathered into the forest of Woodcraft.
CLOSING SESSION
Head Consul Commander Dorman
called the Head Camp W. O. W. to
order at 8:30 this morning, the early
meeting hour having been fixed at
last evening's session so that the bus business
iness business could -be disposed of before
' noon : ; ,", ;:.
The morning's session Was devoted
almost exclusively to the presenting
and adopting of committee reports.
All of the standing and special com committees
mittees committees reported and as the reports
were adopted the members were dis discharged
charged discharged from further service.
- Sovereign Commander Fraser oc occupied
cupied occupied the chair a portion of the time,
and after the regular business of the
camp had been disposed of, installed
the newly elected officers.
A resolution was offered by Sov-

SOVEREIGN COMMANDER FRASER'S GREETING TO FLORIDA
HEAD CAMP W. O. W. AT OCALA
Ocala, Florida, March 31, 1919.
To the officers and Members of the Jurisdiction of Florida: ;
Esteemed Sovereigns: Two years ago while your Head Camp was in
session, Europe was being bathed in blood. The greatest armies ever as assembled
sembled assembled were grappling with each other in a death struggle. We knew
there was great danger of our country being embroiled in this conflict be because
cause because the president had called Congress to meet in extraordinary session to
determine our attitude and take such steps as might be necessary to protect
the lives and property of our citizens both at home and abroad.
It was on April 6th, 1917, that the United States Congress voted the
war resolution. The measure was signed by President Woodrow Wilson and
a formal war proclamation issued. From that time on we saw millions of
young men enlisting and drafted into the service, and on June 26th the ad advance
vance advance guard of our American army reached France and our active participa participation
tion participation in the great world struggle was announced when Sovereign Alex Arch,
of Camp 121 of Indiana fired the first American gun at the enemy.
It was but a few short months from the time bur American boys got
into the scrap until the final end when victory perched upon our banner. All
hail! to the bravery of our self-sacrificing, liberty-loving sons who through
their energy and sacrifice brought to the world what we hope will be ax
everlasting peace. v
Now that the screeching of shot and shell has ceased and the cannon
mouth has grown cold, and the great war is but an echo; now that peace
on earth, good will to men takes the place where grim hatred stalked be before,
fore, before, the joyous reunion, of husband, wife, mother, son, lad and lassie
should make this meeting, as well as all meetings of our organization, the
happiest and most fraternal that has ever been held, for now. we know what
peace and liberty mean. We paid the price to secure it. Woodcraft's part
m the great battles will make a bright page in our history. Many of our
brave boys made the supreme sacrifice
"Somewhere in France where duty led,
They fill the patriot's grave;
, The lark sings nigh above their heads- T
Only the lark knows the hallowed beds
Where lie our sovereigns brave.
"Sacred the ground where our, sovereigns sleep.
Who came. at their country's call.
Only the lark o'er their bosoms weep,
Yet they -gave to the world their all."
Would it not be appropriate for our great, big, magnificent organiza organization,
tion, organization, whose promptness in the past to recognize worth and sterling manhood
has challenged the admiration of the nation, to erect on one of the blood blood-soaked
soaked blood-soaked battlefields of France an imposing monument, mausoleum, or ceno cenotaph
taph cenotaph the latter being literally "an empty tomb" usually erected in memory
of those dying in battle or drowned at sea.
Though mute and motionless, it would tell a story of battles fought and
won by men who loved their homes and enjoyed the liberty of a free nation
and who were willing to lay down their lives so this same liberty would
be extended throughout the world to all mankind.
The unhappy circumstances we are forced to meet in connection with
the erection of monuments to our dead in Europe, are that their bodies
lie in unknown graves or have been scattered on the winds and waters, but
this should not prevent our paying a just tribute to their illustrious deeds.
The erection of a monument would demonstrate to the world our patriotism
and sincere desire to commemorate the heroic virtues and achievments of
our fallen sovereigns. ,
On the graves of the crusaders there is a transvere cross and weapon,
and inscribed thereon these words:
A t "Their swords are rust, s
Their good deeds dust,
' Their souls are with their God, we .trust."
I can picture in my mind's eye the thousands of tourists who will travel
over the battlefields of France, and I can see them stand in front of. Wood-
(Continued on Fourth Page)-

HAVOC WROUGHT

Scenes of Desolation in Northern
France to be Visited by Peace
Delegates Sunday
Paris, April 2. (By the Associated
Press.) The French government ha
invited all delegates to the peace con conference
ference conference to visit the devastated reg regions
ions regions of northern France Sunday. It is
planned to take the delegates to the
former battle zone on a train leaving
Paris Saturday night, going to Lens,
Aras and other cities. Members of
the American delegation will go but
it is yet unknown whether President
Wilson will join the party.
creign, J. F. Dorman thanking the
Sovereign Camp officers for their at attendance
tendance attendance and assistance during the
session. : ; .
At 11:15 a motion to adjoprn was
carried and the 1919 session of Head
Camp Woodmen of the World, Flor Florida
ida Florida jurisdiction, came to a close.
The session was one of the most
harmonious in the history of the
jurisdiction, and the many words of
praise for the manner in which the
delegates were treated during their
stay in our city were greatly appre appre-c:ated
c:ated appre-c:ated by the local delegates on the
convention floor.
In our report yesterday we failed to
mention that Winter Haven Camp No.
106 had been presented with a flag by
the sovereign commander for secur securing
ing securing the most members during the first
three months of this year. Messrs.
Fred W. Oren and W. H. Blackmon
are the delegates. v
THANKS TO DORMAN
The following resolutions were
passed.
Resolved, .That the thanks of the
head camp of the jurisdiction of Flor Florida,
ida, Florida, are hereby tendered to the head
consul, 'W. R. Dorman, for the able,
dignified and impartial manner in
which he .has presided over its deliW
eiations,and tor the other officers and
various committees for the satisfac satisfactory
tory satisfactory manner in which they have dis discharged
charged discharged the duties assigned them;
and,
Resolved, further, that we extend
to Fort King Camp, Woodmen of the
World, the reception committee there thereof,
of, thereof, and the citizens of Ocala our sin sincere
cere sincere appreciation for the hospitable
manner in which they have entertain entertained
ed entertained this session of the head camp; and,
Resolved, further, that a copy of
the foregoing resolutions be furnish furnished
ed furnished the Ocala papers for publication.

ANOTHER CRISIS

IS EXPECTED!
Advocates of Order in Germany Ap Apprehensive
prehensive Apprehensive of a Yet More Dis Disastrous
astrous Disastrous Outbreak
. (Associated Press)
London, ,April2. Describing tht
outlook in Germany, the Berlin cor correspondent
respondent correspondent of the Mail says the crisis
rapidly approaching seems certain to
be graver than either the January or
March outbreaks.
RIOTS AT FRANKFORT
Frankfort, Tuesday, April 1. Riot Rioting
ing Rioting broke out here again this after afternoon.
noon. afternoon. The mob plundered provision
stores. All available military forces
were rushed to the scene. As this
dispatch is sent the fighting con
tinues.
MANY WERE HURT
Paris, April 2. A Zurich disp'atcl)
says that in the Frankfort riots Mon Monday
day Monday eleven were killed and twenty twenty-five
five twenty-five wounded. The police made, four
hundred arrests.
STRIKE AT STUTTGART
Berlin, April 2. In a collision be between
tween between strikers and government troops
at Stuttgart Tuesday, three persons
were killed and many wounded. The
demonstrators were eventually dis dispersed
persed dispersed and order restored.
DISASTROUS COLD
(Associated Tress)
. Washington, April 2. Damage to
fruits and vegetables in the southeast;
by the cold the last few days was re reported
ported reported in advices received here today.
The Virginia peach crop is virtually
ruined.
SCAFFOLD COLLAPSED AND
CAUSED A SLAUGHTER
I
(Associated Press)
i
i
Bristol, Pa., April 1. A number of
persons, reports say ranging from teifr
to' forty, were drowned yesterday,
when the scafford at the Merchant
Shipbuilding Company's yard here
collapsed during the launching of a
freighter. Two bodies wer recovered.
About 150 persons, workmen and I
spectators, were on the scafford, many
of whom were thrown into the .Dela .Delaware
ware .Delaware river when the structure col collapsed,
lapsed, collapsed, t;
A majority of the victims are be
lieved to have been workers at the
Merchant plant, the police say. The
tide may carry the bodies some dis distance
tance distance down the river, and it may be
several days before it is possible to
determine the number of dead. The
police and others are dragging the
the river.
BOARD OF TRADE
TELEPHONE NUMBER
If You Want Information, Call Three-
Eight-One
The telephone number of the Board
of Trade is 381. This is the number,
also, for the Marion County Chapter
of the Red Cross, which has a desk ii
the Board of Trade room. From now
un there will always be someone in
the, room during the day, after 8:30
in the morning. There will be no dif
ficulty about getting in touch with
the secretary of the board, or the Red
Cross officers. Should the secretary
or assistant secretary of the Red
Cross chapter be out, the secretary
of the Board of Trade wUl sladly be
of any service that he can in. assist assisting
ing assisting the Red Cross.
If .this telephone is not in your
directory, write it in.- The new tele
phone directory will not be published
until July.
ELECTRA
Electra, April 2. The farmers are
giad to see some warm, sunshiny
weather for planting.
The Electra Sunday school was held
at the Harmony Baptist church last
Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock. Eve Everybody
rybody Everybody is invited to come and take
part.
Rev. Boatright will fill his regular
appointment next Sunday at 11 a. m.
and evening at 7 p. m. Everybody
come.
We are sorry to lose our winter
visitors, Mr. John R. Avery, wife and
son, but hope to seethem again next
winter.
The Electra school closed Friday,
March 21st. We are sorry to lose our
teacher,-Miss Lillie Brown, but hope
to se her smiling face again soon.
We are sorry to report that little
Ishmael Brant had the misfortune to
get his arm broken last week, and
hope to see him all right again soon.
We have a limited supply of Velvet
Beans for sale. Better buy now, as
they are scarce. Smith Grocery Co. tf
Peptona, the Great Tonic
tf

IE VALLEY
ID REPAflATIO
ARE THE SUBJECTS ON WHICH
THE 4 BIG FOUR" ARE SLOW
TO AGREE
I Associated Press)
Paris, April 2. Consideration of
the reparation question and disposi disposition
tion disposition of the Rhine valley were con continued
tinued continued by the council of four compris comprising
ing comprising President Wilson and the pre premiers
miers premiers of France, Italy and Great
Britain, when the council session was
resumed today. It was understood
that probably at least three more
days would be occupied with these
subjects.
ALBERT TRAVELS BY AIRPLANE
Pari?, April 2. King Albert, who
arrived from Brussels yesterday by
airp'anq, paid President Wilson a visit
today.
HUNS ARE HEDGING
T'r.ris, April 2. Germany will not
pe iist in her opposition to the use of
Danzig by Polish troops en route
fiom France to Poland, according to
advices reaching Paris newspapers.
DISCUSSION ON DANZIG
Zurich, April 2. In view of fresh
negotiations over the Danzig ques question,
tion, question, the German cabinet decided to
gnther the chiefs of all parties of the
national assembly at Berlin tomorrow
to reach an agreement on the policy
to be followed, according to an an announcement
nouncement announcement by a German propaganda
service.
HUNS INVESTIGATE FRYATT
MURDER
: Berlin, April 2. (By the Associat Associated
ed Associated Press.) An 'investigation was be begun
gun begun yesterday before the imperial
military court into the case of Cap Captain
tain Captain Fryatt,. the British mercantile
narine commander who was executed
by the Germans in 1916 after his con
viction -by a German court-martial of
having attempted to ram a submarine
with his vessel.
CANDLER
Candler, April 1 There will be a
community sing next Sunday evening
in the Presbyterian church.
A woman evangelist addressed a
prod congregation in the JJethodist
church last Tuesday evening. Hei
discourse was helpful to Christians
and a true path for sinners.
Mrs. E. C. Marshall and daughter,
Inbelle Maloney, returned Sunday
from a visit to Mr. and Mrs." Harr
Marshall at Bartow.
Rev. Gabard, pastor of the Presby Presbyterian
terian Presbyterian church, delivered an unusually
instructive and helpful sermon Sun Sunday
day Sunday morning. Rev. Gabard will serve
as patsor of the Weirsdale and Cand Candler
ler Candler churches for the ensuing year.
Mrs. Charles Mathews went to
Lecsburg Sunday to visit for several
days, during the absence of Mr.
Robert Mathews, who is autoing "fur "further
ther "further on" in the state.
Mr. and Sirs. G. D. McCullough,
Miss Marion McCullough and Mrs.
McCullough's brother" and sister, Mr.
and M:ss Dalton of Orlando, autoed
through Candler Friday, interviewing
old friends, ere going to Ocala for the
night, and to Silver Springs the fol following
lowing following day.
INCREASED TELEGRAPH RATES
The postmaster general has estab established
lished established increased telegraph rates by all
telegraph companies effective at 2 a.
m. April 1st, as follows:
25 and 2 rate incerased to 30 and 2
30 and 2 rate increased to 36 and 2
35 and 2 rate increased to 42 and 2
40 and 3 rate increased to 48 and 3
50 and 3 rate increased to 60 and 3
CO and 4 rate increased to 72 and 5
75 and 5 rate increased to 90 and 6
100 and 7 rate increased to 120 & 8
The rate on night messages in increased
creased increased 20 per cent. Night letters,
50 words, same rate as 10-word day
messages. Day letter rate one and a
half times night letter rates. This in
crease made necessary on account of
increased cost of operation.
MIRIAM REBEKAH LODGE NO. 15
Mirim Rebekah Lodge No. 15
meets he first and third Monday eve
nings n each month in the Odd Fel Fellows'
lows' Fellows' ball at 7:30 o'clock.
Mrs. W. T. Whitly, N. G.
Eloine Bouvier, Secretary.'
ORDER Or EASTERN STAR
Ocal Chtpt.r No. 20, O. E.
meets nt Yen re's hall the second and
fourth Thursday evenings of each
month at 7:.10 o'clock.
Mr. Isabel Wesson, W. M.
Mrs- Susin Cook, Secretary, f 7 ."
Peptona Tonic
tf

RELAT1QHS iM AY

BE RESUMED
BEGINS TO LOOK LIKE TOAT
HUNGARIAN REVOLUTION
WAS ONLY A BLUFF
(Associated Press)
Paris, April 2. Reports received
by the French foreign office state that
the Bolshevik movement in German
Austria has been generally unsuc
cessful. Reassuring reports have also
been received from Hungary and of officials
ficials officials now believe it possible to re resume
sume resume diplomatic relations from Hun Hungary
gary Hungary leaders.
A JUGO-SLAV REPUBLIC
London, April 2 The newspaper
Vetcherni Listy of A gram, Jugo Jugoslavia,
slavia, Jugoslavia, according to a wireless from
Rome, announces that the Krageor Krageor-gevitz
gevitz Krageor-gevitz dynasty has been deposed and
a republic proclaimed in Belgrade,
the capital of Serbia and J u go-S la via.
STRIKE AGAINST SOVIET
London, April 2. Reports that a
revolution against the soviet govern govern-raent
raent govern-raent has broken out in Petrograd are
supported by an official Russian wire wireless
less wireless received here, which says there
is a serious strike of railway men in
the Petrograd region. The strike, it
is said, was promoted by the Men-
sheviki and social revolutionaries.
STATE OF NORTH
DAKOTA IS STUBBORN
(Associated Press)
Bismark, N. Dak., April 2 The
state supreme court today granted
the application of Attorney General
Langer for a writ restrajiing the rail
roads in North Dakota from charging
the increased passenger rates made
effective June 19th, 1918, by order of
the director general of railroads. An
appeal to the United States supreme
court will be taken by the solicitor for
the railroad administration, it was an
nounced.
FIRST SOLID CAR OF
CUKES FR03I WEBSTER
Webster, March 31. First solid car
of cukes sold here at auction last Fri
day for $5.50 per crate; two more
cars sold today for ?4.75 per crate.
Heavy shipments are expected to
move now daily. Melons, beans, to tomatoes
matoes tomatoes and cukes looking fine.
Times-Union.
TEMPLE ATTRACTIONS
FOR THE WEEK
Today: "Fan Fan." a 1919 ex
travaganza, by the Fox corporation.
Thursday: Mary Pickford in A
Romance of the Redwoods."
Friday: Madge Kennedy in The
Kingdom of Youth."
FORT KING
Fort King, March 30 Mrs. W. J.
Young visited her daughter, Mrs. J.
A. Getford at Eustia last week.
Mr. and Mrs. D. G. Whaley and
children who are just from Arkansas
and have purchased a home here, and
Mrs. Florence Owens and children of
Texas, visited Mr. and Mrs. J. E.
Whaley Sunday.
The young folks here enjoyed a
dance given at the home of Mr. and
Mrs. Allen McDonald Friday night.
School closed here Friday with Miss
Lila Creighton as teacher. Miss
Creighton has returned to her home
in Live Oak.
Mrs. William Vaughn and little
daughter are visiting Mr. and Mrs.
F. C. Clayton this week.
Mr. R. M. Perry of Orlando visited
Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Young this week.
NOTICE TO DISCHARGED
SOLDIERS AND SAILORS
Partirulars as to obtaining the
sixty dollars bonus for discharged
mtn can be had by applying to the
undersigned. D. Niel Ferguson,
Chairman Civilian Relief Committee,
Amsrican Red Cross, Ocala, Fla.
R. A. 11. CHAPTER NO. 13
Regular convocations of the Ocala
Chapter No. 13, R. A. on the first
Friday in every month at 7:30 p. m.
J. A. Bouvier, U. P.
Jake Bnrn, Secretary.
WOOD5IEN OF THE WORLD
Fort King Camp No. 14 meets at
IC of P. hall at 7:30 p. m. every sec second
ond second and fourth Friday. Visiting sov sovereigns
ereigns sovereigns are always welcome.
W. W. Stripling, C. C
Chas. K. Sage, Clerk.
If you want good wood and youi
money's worth, call J. L. Smoak,
phone No. 145. . 2Ca

BEATEN

11

THE LITTLE BID
Bolshevik Hordes Have So Far Made
Nw Prcgifcas ott the Arctic
rront
(ASSOciAlcU ITeSa)
Archangel, luesuay, April 1. (By
the .VA&ocaieci rn.ss.) xne ioisue ioisue-viKi
viKi ioisue-viKi again u.uic.ca .naiita positions
uiong uie railway near ouoi.e baia,
una also ma-ue au uauit against me
lines east ox ioiinoaia aud vteia. yes yes-icruay,
icruay, yes-icruay, but at loui piaccs were re re-iiUised.
iiUised. re-iiUised.
WL.VDY CITY WENT WET
Also Re-Elected Pro-Hun Thciapsca
as lu Chief Uncial
Chicago; April 2. A bulletin issued
by Uie City newa Uureau, wnicn tab tabulated
ulated tabulated the returns, at p. in., gave
tne may oi any eitcion eaauaay to
Mayor Wiiuam liaie lnonison, re re-puuncau
puuncau re-puuncau mcuuioeiit, Dy a piUiuiity of
udwcea etgut SLua iweive thousand
vctes. Cn aie fcas ot incomplete re
turns Iioxa yesttuua s eiect.on po police
lice police retaius Lorn loJ ol tue Ztlo
ptecmct3 gave 'inompoon more thau
iwU leud over txovit M. ijweizer,
democrat, hia nearest opponent.
ALSO VOTED TOR WHISKY
Chicago went wet by a sweeping
major.ty yesteiday on tne face ot in incomplete
complete incomplete letuins. 'lhts is the first
time the liquor question has been
voted on heie. Ihe xatio in the early
returns was four to one.
SALVADOR GOMEZ SAYS
IT ISNT SO
That Japanese Have Purchased Land
in Lower California
Mexico, City, April 1. (By the As Associated
sociated Associated .Tress.) Salvador Gomez, of
the department of agriculture and de development,
velopment, development, denied tonight reports
that Japanees subjects had bought
lands in Lower California.
CROWDED TOO CLOSELY
This is a copy of a letter to a con congressman
gressman congressman from one of hi3 constitu constituents,
ents, constituents, and authentic in every way:
"I have your letter requesting a
donation for whatyou consider a very
worthy cause. I flatter myself that I
have a spirit of loyalty and genei.
ority. I have contributed to each and
every object that has been presented
to me, but I certainly have to decline
to help this cause clong for the 'fol 'following
lowing 'following reasons:
"I have' been, held up, held down,
stnd-bagged, walked on, sat on, roll rolled
ed rolled over, flattened out and squeezed
first by the United States government
for the federal war tax. the excesar
profits tax, the Liberty Loan bonds
and the bonds of matrimony; in the
state of Missouri for the state tax,
the highway tax, the income tax, the
auto tax, school tax, dog tax, cat tax
and syntax, and every society and
organization that the mind of mau
can invent, to extract what you have
or what you may net have, from' the
Society of John the Baptist, the G. A.
R., the Woman's Relief Corps, the
Men's Relief Corps, the Stomach Re Relief,
lief, Relief, the Wifeless, the Husbandless,
the Childless, the Conscienceless, the
Navy League, the Belgian Baby
League, the Red Cross, the Green
Cross, the Double Cross and every
other cross of all colors, and the Chil Children's
dren's Children's Hope, the Dorcas Society, the
various hospitals and the Saturday
Hospital Association.
"My business has decreased in
volume, owing to the fact that goods
I am selling have been restricted in
output by the government and be because
cause because I will not sell all that I have to
fo beg, borrow and steal, I have been
cussed and discussed, boycotted, talk talked
ed talked to and talked about, lied to and
lied about, held up, hung up, robbed
and nearly ruined, and the only rea reason
son reason I am clinging to life i3 to se
what ia hell is coming next.
"Yours truly,
ODD FELLOWS

Tulula Lcdre No. 22, I. O. O. F,
meets ve:y Tuesday evening in the
Odd FtKows' hall on the third floor of
the Star ofllce building at 7:30 o'clock
promptly. A warm welcome always
extendtJ to visiting brothers.
Joe Potter, N. G.
J. D. McCaskil!. -Secretary.
OCALA LODGE NO. 2SG. B. P. O. E.
Ocala Lodge No. 2SG. Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, mets
he second and fourth Tuesday eve evenings
nings evenings la erch month. Visiting breth--en
always welcome. Club house oppo oppo-ite
ite oppo-ite poict3 :e, east side.
J. II. Spencer, E. R.
E. J. Crock, Secretary.



OCALA -EVENING STAR, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2, 1919

0CAU': EVENING STAR
PvblLxhed Every Dy Except Sunday by
STAR PUBLISHING COMPANY
OF OCA LA, FLA.

R. R. Carroll, Prenldent
P. V. Iearencood, Seeretry-Treurer
J. H. Benjamin, Editor
Entered at Ocala, Fla., ostofflce as
lecond-class matter.
TELEPHONES
CvaSaess Office .............. FI ve-Oae
CdUotal Department Two-Seven
MEMBER ASSOCIATED PRESS
- The Associated Press is exclusively
entitled for the use for republication of
all: news dispatches credited to it or
uot' otherwise credjted In this paper
. and also the local news published
herein. All rights of republication of
special dispatches herein are also re re-erred.
erred. re-erred. SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Domestic
One year. In advance. .$6.00
Six months, in advance 3.00
Three months, in advance........ 1.50
One month, in advance .60
Porelrn
One year, in advance.... 18.00
Six months, in advance 4.25
Three months. In advance.. 2.25
One month, In advance .80
ADVERTISING RATES
IMasiays Plate 10c. per inch for con consecutive
secutive consecutive Insertions. Alternate 'inser 'insertions
tions 'insertions 25 per cent, additional. Composi Composition
tion Composition charged on ads. that run less than
tux times 5c. per inch. Special position
20 per cent, additional. Rates based on
4-inch minimum. Less than four Inches
will take higher rate, which will be
furnished on application.
I&cffidlaff Notices s Sc. per line for first
assertion; 3c. per line for eaoh subse subsequent
quent subsequent insertion. One change a week
allowed on readers without extra com com-osltior
osltior com-osltior charges.
RATES. Six line maximum, one
tlma-2c.; thre times 50c.; six times
75c; one mont'i $3. Payable in advance.
Legal advertisements at legal rates.
Electros must be mounted, or charge
will be made for mounting.
; We are willing to place a small bet
that Mr. Wilson will pardon Debs.
yfe hope the Woodmen like Ocala
as well as Ocala likes the Woodmen.
The presence of the Woodmen here
this week has promoted fraternity
among our people.
The American casualty list footb
up 281,403. Casualties now are con con-fihed
fihed con-fihed to men dying of accident, dis disease
ease disease or old wounds.
The question has come up as to
whether pawnshops are a necessity.
They may not be a necessity, but they
ate derned convenient sometimes.
Speaking in a facetious vein, but
none the less telling a solemn truth,
the Times-Union calls attention to
the fact that progress isn't always
improvement."
Bill Hohenzollern says he would
commit suicide rather than be brought
to trial.-If he is ever brought to trial,
he will save himself trouble by com committing
mitting committing suicide.
In opposing the organiaztion of
Poland into a powerful independent
nation, a buffer state against Russia,
the Germans are making another
great mistake.
; Chairman Hurley of the emergency
shipping board is on his way from5
Washington to Tampa for a few days-rest.-
He probably thinks that in the
vicinity of Billy Sunday he won't at attract
tract attract inuch notice.
The St.- Petersburg Independent in intimates
timates intimates plainly that if Florida police
officers were as vigilant as they
Should be, crooks could not operate in
the state as freely as they have been
doing. We agree with it.
j -The United States wants fifty thou thousand
sand thousand young men., preferably trained
soldiers, to volunteer to serve in Eu Europe'.
rope'. Europe'. They are to help the Allies
held, occupied territory until Germany
has paid war indemnity, or so behav-f
jed herself that our government thinks
an armed force is no longer neees- j
-sary. 1 his will be a hne chance for
MICKIE LAYS
'"W A a . m. -
t Yi t. SENT VOll A.
STATEMENT- C J 1 o p
ysiE Kr40'4 NEC GOOD FEfc
rT INfENO TO dan...
"THE FIRMS YvJE BUS OUR
PAPPC AM INK CDDm w ki x.i
WE'RE eooo, but we got
f 0 PAN EM EJERV THIRTV
R SIXTY cans jw-t -rue
SAME, SO WE GOTTA Olf
J OUR
: I TOO.
wis iku n 1 1 w ht n ITS DUE
, tR VME CAN'T PAN
OUR BILUS, SEE.
MICKY IS THE STAR'S DEVIL

some of the boys who wanted to go
across, but were prevented by the
armistice. They will receive good
pay and see more of foreign countries
than they are likely to otherwise.
They will from time to time be given
furloughs that will enable them to
see England, France and Italy and
perhaps other parts of Europe.
Every now and then we hear from
some little Florida paper that is, bat battling
tling battling the league of nations, and when
we run back the political genealogy
of the editor we find he was a repub republican
lican republican way back in some northern
state. "Train up a child." etc., holds
?i3 good in politics as religion Tam Tampa
pa Tampa Tribune.
It's a safe bet that if Hughes was
president he would favor a league of
nations and southern democrats would
help him to form it.
We grow rather weary of these
timid Americans who are forever
dreading the time when Japan or
Siam or some other runt will jump
on U3 and wipe up the earth with us.
St. Petersburg Independent.
The Japanese empire can hardly be
called a runt. It has 72,000,000 popu population,
lation, population, and Japan proper has over
6,000,000. J apan has a larger pop population
ulation population and more fighting men, than
any nation of Europe except disor disorganized
ganized disorganized Russia.
Among the prominent Woodmen in
the city this week was Mr. Cary A.

jHardee of Suwanee county, who is
avowedly a candidate for governor.
Mr. Hardee has an enviable record as
a citizen and a legislator. He is well
acquainted with the needs and the
resources of the state, and if .. the
people chose him for governor we
doubt not that he will make a careful
and competent official. Mr. Hardee
was a welcome visitor to the-Star of office
fice office Tuesday.
Our latest trouble with Mexico is
caused by the Mexican government
selling to a Japanese syndicate land
which it had taken from an Ameri American
can American company. Our government, dur during
ing during the last half a dozen years, has
allowed Americans in Mexico to be
robbed and murdered wholesale by
the Mexicans. We are glad to see
it show.f eeble symptoms of, changing
its policy. V
. i r
That clever boy, Joe Needham, says
that if Ocala erects a community
building in honor of Marion county
soldiers and sailors he will do the
plumbing at cost. Now, if a few
more' artisans, carpenters, bricklay bricklay-eis,
eis, bricklay-eis, electricians, etc., will step into
line with Joe, that community build building
ing building will have a community spirit in
every square inch.
The head camp of Woodmen honor honored
ed honored Ocala and made a wise choice when
it elected Chas. K. Sage head. consul.
A3 clerk of the Fort King camp, Mr.
Sage has proved his efficiency and in integrity,
tegrity, integrity, and those who know him be believe
lieve believe he will serve the Woodmen of
all the. state as carefully and con conscientiously
scientiously conscientiously as he has those of Ocala.
The New York Times compares the
Bolsheviki of today with the Saracens
of thirteen centuries ago, and fears
that they may overrun Europe as the
Mohammedans overran the Roman
empire. The Saracens were fanatics
and their doctrine appealed to the ig ignorant
norant ignorant and depraved. The same may
be said of the Bolsheviki.
We are wondering how many peo people
ple people forgot to put their time up an
hour Sunday night and how they like
the new time. Ocala just sat down
upon the idea completely and- that
city is ignoring it. Many other cities
are operating under two schedules.
Lakeland Star.
Ocala has a will of her own.
Wonder why it is that the govern government
ment government keeps so many Marion county
colored men marking time in the
northern training camps when they
want to come home where good iohs
are awaiting them ? Can't our sena
tors and congressmen do something
about this?
A bunch of Spartacides at Coblenz,
hired to do some work for the Amer American
ican American army, went on strike. Gen. Dick-
man, in command of the army of oc occupation,
cupation, occupation, had all the strikers arrest arrested,
ed, arrested, fined and put to work under mili
tary guard. Wonder how soon Gen
Dickman will come home.
The American delegates to th
peace conference are said to be irri irritated
tated irritated by the desire of the French to
control the Saar coal basin. If the
Americans are easy to irritate, they
should go look-see the ruined r French
mines at Lens.
As soon as the ice breaks, we hope
the little band of American and Al Allied
lied Allied troops in and near Archangel
will either be taken out of that reg region
ion region or heavily reinforced. We would
hate to hear of them being ovei ovei-whelmed.
whelmed. ovei-whelmed.
Say, Benjamin, tell us who's "The
Lndy Contributor. She's either a
josher or an iconoclast. But we bet
she's young and pretty. Clearwater
Sun. :
Kummup and well introduce you.
In a recent issue of the Palm Beach
Posti Joe Earman prints a forecast
cf Gov. Catts message to the legis legislature.
lature. legislature. Joe urobably can forecast the
message with tolerable accuracy. It
is a sate net tnat he wrote it. There-
fore, it is not Catts but himself thar.

!

he praises when he says: "The" mes message
sage message will be constructive, it will be
patriotic, it will be an earnest effort
cn the part of the governor to bring
alout constructive legislation for the
benefit of the great state and its peo people."
ple." people." 3IRS. ROBERT II. SANDERS
Mrs. Sanders was born in Wilming
ton,- N. C. her maiden name being
Miss Agnes Strange. Her father was
a well known citizen of Wilmington, a 1
note. While on a visit to her aunts,
the late Mrs. Jewett and Mrs. Bird Bird-sty,
sty, Bird-sty, she met Mr. Sanders and became
his bride, the wedding taking place at
Silver Springs, last. Friday being the
thirty-fifth anniversary of the mar marriage.
riage. marriage. She leaves to mourn their loss
her husband, Mr. Robert Sanders, her
daughter, Miss Mamie Ruth Sander
and several sisters and brothers.
Mrs. Sanders was removed to At Atlanta
lanta Atlanta a few days ago and seemed to
stand the trip very well and the news
of hear death was a great shock to
her friends. Her daughter, Miss
Mamie Ruth Sanders, left to join her
Saturday afternoon and Mr. Sanders
left Saturday night. Neither arrived
in time to be with her at the last.
The remains of Mrs. Sanders, ac ac-comanied
comanied ac-comanied by her sorrowing husband
and daughter, arrived on Tuesday's 2
p. m. Seaboard train and were taken
directly to the Episcopal church,
where the funeral party was met by
a large congregation of sympathizing
friends, many of whom brought beau beautiful
tiful beautiful floral offerings. Specially worthy
of note was the large sheaf of Eastei
lilies sent by the W. C. T. U. of Ocala,
a testimonial of respect for Mrs.
Sanders, who has been president of
the W. C. T. U. of Dunnellon for
some time.
The services were conducted by Mr.
Kirkby, assisted by Mr. Herndon, and
then the remains were borne to their
final resting place, in "Greenwood. The
pall bearers were Messrs. R. J. Ben Benson
son Benson 'and G. W. Neville of Dunnellon
and M. M. Little, J. H. Leitner, J. H.
Spencer and S. T. Sistrunk of Ocala.
Mrs. Sanders was a most charming charming-and
and charming-and lovable woman, devoted to her
home and a strong influence for good
in her community. The sympathy of
hundreds of friends is with her be bereaved
reaved bereaved husband and daughter.
MAGAZINES WANTED
The signing of the 'armistice has
greatly increased the number of men
in the hospitals in this country and
also the need for current magazines
for them to read, but a great many
people have gotten out of the habit
they formed, while the actual fighting
was going on of putting a one-cent
stamp on the outside of their maga magazines
zines magazines for-delivery to the men either
at the front or in the hospitals. Con Consequently
sequently Consequently some of our convalescent
soldiers have been buying magazines
for themselves when there must be a
reat number, in the homes that could
be sent to them. Magazines sent
from this territory go directly to the
southern camps and hospitals and
may lighten the burden of convales convalescence
cence convalescence for the iriends and neighbors
of the donors. The magazines most
in demand are Harper's, Scribners
Century, McClure's, American, Red
Book, Saturday Evening Post, Ains Ains-lty's,
lty's, Ains-lty's, Everybody's, Collier's, Outlook,
Literary Digest, Current Opinion,
Review of Reviews, World's Work,
Independent, New Republic, Life,
Outing,, Forest fc and Stream, Country
Gentleman, Engineering News Re Record,
cord, Record, House and Garden, Scientific
American and Electrical World.
In the picture show the other night,
we saw where a young lady with an
inherited taste for booze consoled her herself
self herself by dipping lumps of sugar in
cologne and then letting them melt in
her mouth. This, we thought, gave
us an idea. .Next day we obtained
seme cologne and invented a highball.
We can't recommend it.
Austrian strikers held up the trains
that were carrying American pro provisions
visions provisions to the starving people of their
own country. However, they were
not much worse than the marine
strikers in New York harbor.
SEEDS! SEEDS! SEEDS!
Large supply of Pyles and Gist's
seed cornbest grown for this se se-tion.
tion. se-tion. Also rice, gubef and chufa seed.
Phone 435.
tf OCALA SEED STORE.
BOUVIER GARAGE NOW OPEN
This garage has again been opened
and is ready to handle any and all
kinds of automobile repair work and
guarantee satisfaction. Ernest Blair,
a skilled mechanic, is in charge, and
invites your patronage.
J. A.. Bouvier, Owner,
27-6t Anthony Road. Ocala, Fla.
Bring us your automobile repair
work and if we do not satisfy you
your work will not cost you one Dennv.
Try us on this proposition. Ocala Iron
Works Garage. Phone 4. 13-tf
Kelly's Odorless Dye for old and
faded shoes. Lfnle's Shoe Parlor. 6t
IHHV.1CIH.J uicaua gwu
eyes, and good eyes
may mean glasses
Have your eyes ex
amined.
Dr. K. J. Weihe,
Eyesight Specialist
Graduate Optometrist
With Weihe Co Jewelers. Ocala, Fla.

H I
If
3
3
H
hi
M I
it ;
p.

mm

v
U uu

All visiting Woodmen and Woodmen Circle Delegates are
especially invited to make use 61 all our banking facilities

F5
3
3
3
a
PI
TOTAL
H
wltiitili mm it I tiMml li i h -t- mii ITuiIliI II' T' 1 1 ilrl Hill ill M 1T ill US lli! HiM faMf
UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS
i
WANTED, LOST, FOUND, FOR
SALE, FOR RENT AND SIM SIM-.
. SIM-. ILAR LOCAL NEEDS
RATES Six line maximum, one
time, 25c; three times, 50c; six times
75c; one month $3. Payable in ad advance.
vance. advance. WANTED TO RENT A furnished
house, close in. Call at No. 239 Ok Ok-lawaha
lawaha Ok-lawaha avenue, after 6 p. a 2-3t
WANTED To" buy a lot near the
square to build a Masonic home. B.
L. Adams, 115 Monroe street. 1-3 1
FOR RENT Three-room cottage,
modern. City and rain water. Mrs. E.
C. Dorsey, 18 Hazel street. 13-6t
LOST 35x4 Diamond tire, mounted
cn rim; between Fairfield and Lake
Weir, Sunday. Suitable- reward will
be paid for its -return. Dr. C. B.
Ayer, Ocala. 31-3t
DOG LOST A liberal reward will be
paid for return of small black and tan
terrier or fice dog, narrow leather
collar with name of owner on tag
plate. Lost Friday, March 28th. about
six miles west of Ocala. Notify
Robert T. Munroe. 31-tf
BUICKS FOR SALE Two Buickl
touring cars; new tires and new tops.)
r-rice 3uv eaca. auio saies io., xuacK
Taylor. 28-tf
FORDS FOR SALE Six second secondhand
hand secondhand Fords at real bargain prices.
Come in and see them. Auto Sales
Company, Mack Taylor. 28-tf
FOR SALE Three young horses,
double wagon, buggy, harness of all
kinds, plows, cultivators and other
farming tools. Apply, to William
Geerling, 326 N. Magnolia St., or cor corner
ner corner Blitchton road past the fair
grounds. 29-8t
WANTED All kinds of second hand
furniture, guns, beds, etc. Notify me
and I will send for them. J. W. Hun Hunter,
ter, Hunter, Gunsmith, South Main St. tf
FOR SALE Hand sewing machine,
practically as good as new. Cheap
for cash or on easy terms. Apply at
Star office. 27-6t
WANTED When" you have light,
heavy or long distance hauling, call
the Maxwell Transfer Co., phone 376.
L. E. Yonce, Ocala, Fla. 27-m
AUTO REPAIR SERVICE For
quick and reliable automobile service
come to the Florida House Garage. J.
C. Lanier and H. C. Williams. 8-lm
FOR SALF. Small cottage on North
Magnolia street. House and three
lots in Linwood Park. Apply to David
S. Welch. 25-tf
WANTED You to know I repair all I
makes of stoves, gas, wood or coal. I
also buy old stoves. Drop me a card
o rcall at 417 N. Magnolia St. Acme
Stoe Hospital. 20-3t
FOR SALE, CHEAP A second-hand
typewriter. Apoly Star office, editorial
department. tf
"T -'!' '"r'-'!"T"" wrw sm
Fl 1918
1 BUICM SIX
1
1
RUN 2300 MILES
At a Bargain
AUTO SALES CO.
Mack Taylor
Ha
pa
m
una -.4
LIFE
FIRE
A. E. GERIG
INSURANCE
Ocala, Florida
ACCIDENT AUTOMOBILE

IMMmiM.tMMMMIMr

-IilrX liriiit MM 'in ii i Bin r "imt'iMi i nnr '.".r.-'Tr nlll 'ma mi "i"tli3

WW TO ME MUA

vhjlcarii2;m(B

Plaone 78

AOTOMOIBELE
Our equipment for repairir.f: cars is not. surpassed by any
- concern in the state. We are the authorized service station
in this section for the Cht-vrofet, Overland, Reo, International
and Dort cars, and our service is always prompt and efficient.
OCALA IEON GAKAGE

GASOLINE
N. Main St.

. I-C-E t
Real vs. Fase Economy
At This Time

Resist the mental suggestion to curtail your regular taking of ice
until "the weather turns warm again." Your refrigerator is going
nicely now;. it is well chilled an d it is doingr foil duty as your prac practical
tical practical SAVER.
Don't let it lapse even a lit tic bit it i&y sulk on you all the
remainder of the season. n
OCALA ICE AND PACKING COMPANY

Sfieamm
4
djmiek
t n

ft

WHITE STAR LINE
TRANSFER it STORAGE

AUTO
RUCK
SERVICE
Long Distance
lloviug

PHONE til

COLLIER

iQffl 111 fa I

tr MF

Let ui VULCANIZE your old,
used, supposedly worn out tires
and save you money. The extra
service you'll get out of our re rebuilt
built rebuilt rireswill prove the practi practical
cal practical VHlue of 'our VULCANIZ VULCANIZING.
ING. VULCANIZING. Try it on one tire and
convince yourself.
Ocala, Fla,
AND OILS
Ocala, Florida
Cfleaimlinigi
Service
IlUVlIVCj
VANS
Teaming Packing
nesting

T7 V j
W 1 V V f4

BROTHERS

t

n
ii
li
f!
j i
I
i. i
f
i ?
li
0



OCA LA EVENING STAR, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2, 1917

i

SALT FIS

DIRECT FROM OUR FISHING
BOATS TO YOU!
Delicious fresh caught Dry
Salt Fish direct to the consumer
by prepaid parcel post or express
15 lbs. for $2.00
Special price on barrel lots
THE ST. GEORGE
PACKING CO.
St. George on the Gulf
Apalachicola, Florida
NEW FRUIT STAND
(Next to Anti-Monopoly
Drug Store)
FANCY FRUITS
FRESH VEGETABLES
AND GROCERIES
All Prices Reduced
PHONE 399 SAVOY CAFE
Atlantic Hotel
Hay and Iloan Stm. Jackitoavllle, Fla.
All railroad ticket offices In buildjng.
center of everything. All modern im improvements.
provements. improvements. First class in every par particular.
ticular. particular. Hates, one person, $1 to $1.50:
two peraons, $2 to $2.50. Bat.i $1.50, 2;
two people, $2.50, $3.
4-a E. FltANK PIERCK. Prop.
AILHOAD SCHEDULES
Arrival and Departure of passenger
trains at OCALA UNION STATION.
The following schedule figures pub published
lished published as information and not guar
anteed. s
(Eastern Standard Time)
SEABOARD AIR LINE RAILROAD
Leave Arrive
2:50 am. J'cksonvllle-NewYork 2:5.0 am.
1:56 pm. Jacksonville 3:26 pm.
4:07 pm. Jacksonville 5:10 p.m
f Tampa )
2:50 a.m J Manatee C 2:50 am.
- ( St., Petersburg )
3:26 pm. Tampa-Manatee 1:41pm.
5:10 pm. Tampa-St. Petersburg 4:07 pm.
ATLANTIC COAST LINE RAILROAD
Leave Arrive
2-12 pm Jcksonville-New York 3:15 am.
2:20 pm. J'ksonville-OMneaville 3:35 pm.
6:42 am. J'ksonvllle-G'nesville 10:13 pm.
2:15 am. St. Pet'sbrg-Lakeland 2:12 am.
3:35 pm. St. Pefabrg-L-akeland 2:00 pm.
7:10 am. Dunnellon-Wilcox
-7.40 am. Du'nellon-L.'keland 11:03 pm.
3.25 pm. Ilomosassa 1:45 pm.
10:13 pm. Lees burg 6:42 am.
4:45 pm. Gainesville 11:50 am.
Monday, Wednesday, Friday.
Tuesday, Thursday, Saturday.
EAT AT THE
GREEK-AMERICAN CAFE
A la CARTE SERVICE
Everything in the Market
Best Rome Cooking
Qnick Service
C Jeif er s
Props.
H. D. Baxter
Phone 272
114 S. Magnolia St., Next to
Clarkson Hardware Store.
COME TEA 111
FADED OR GRAY HAIR
If Mixed with Sulphur it Darkens
so Naturally Nobody
can TelL
Grandmother kept her hair beautifully
darkened, glossy and attractive with a
brew of Sage Tea and Sulphur. When Whenever
ever Whenever her hair took on that dull, faded or
streaked appearance, this simple mixture
was applied with wonderful effect. By
asking at anv drug store for "Wyeth's
Sage and Sulphur Compound," you will
get a large bottle of this old-time recipe,
improved by the addition of other ingred ingredients,
ients, ingredients, all ready to use, for about 50 cents.
This simple mixture can be depended
upon to restore natural color and beauty
to .the hair.
A well-known downtown druggist says
everybody uses Wyeth's Sage and Sul Sulphur
phur Sulphur Compound now because .it darkens
so naturally and evenly that nobody can
tell it has been applied it's so easy to
use, too. You simply dampen a comb or
soft brush and draw it through your hair,
taking one strand at a time. By morning
the gray hair disappears; after another
application or two, it is restored to its
natural color and looks, glossy, soft and
beautiful. This preparation is a delight delightful
ful delightful toilet requisite. It is not intended for
the cure, mitigation or prevention of dis disease.
ease. disease. L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTER
AND BUILDER
Careful Estimates made on all Con Contract
tract Contract work. Gives More and Better
Work for the Honey than any other
ccatrstor In the city.

OCALA OCCOiFJICES

If you have any society items,
please phone One-Two-One (121).
Dr. W. H. Cox, the very efficient
Kntretiirv Ckt thf Rtfltt hnard of health.
has been in town the last two days.
Fresh BUTTERMILK at the Court
Pharmacy. 41-5t
Major B. A. Weathers arrives today
from Atlanta for a ten-day visit with
his parents, Mr. and Mrs. B. A.
Weathers.
Peptona.
Mr. and Mrs. Sheffield, who have
ben making their home at the Florida
House this winter, expect to leave to tomorrow
morrow tomorrow for their home in Kentucky.
Mr. and Mrs. Si Perkins are again
making their home in OcaLa. They
have rooms at Dr. Van Hood's resi
dence.
Come in and look at the "Seneca
cameras just received. Anti-Monopoly
Drug Store. 29-tf
Mrs. John Brooks expects to leave
Friday for Savannah for a visit of
two or three weeks to her daughter,
Mrs. Eugene Swindell, nee Miss Nan
Brooks. '.
Representative Norman A. Fort left
today for Raiford, where he will in
spect the state farm, and will from
there go on to Tallahassee to prepare
for his legislative -duties.
Mr. Automobile Owner, look at this:
Carbon burned out of four cylinders
for $3; six cylinders, $4, at the Ocala
Iron Works Garage. 13-tf
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Flippen left
on the early morning train for their
new home in Fort Lauderdale, and the
best wishes of their Ocala friends go
with them to thefr new home.
On account of the absence of sever
al members of the King's Daughters,
they will not hold their regular
monthly meeting until next Thursday,
April 10th, at the home of Mrs. M.
A TenEyck.
We are not using. any flour substi substitutes
tutes substitutes in our bread, cakes and pies
now. In fact, they are better than
ever. Let us serve you. Carter's
Bakery. tf
Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Clyatt, Dr,
and Mrs. A. L. Izlar and Mr. Laurie
Izlar left yesterday in the Clyatt car
for Tampa, anticipating hearing Billy
Sunday. They expect to return
Thursday evening.
Kelly's Chain Lightning Shoe
Cream, an absolutely guaranteed
dressing for white, gray and brown
kid shoes. Little's Shoe Parlor. 18-6t
Miss Victoria Raysor arrived in
Ocala yesterday after a two weeks
delightful visit with friends in Jack Jacksonville.
sonville. Jacksonville. She is the guest of her
brother, Mr. Henry Raysor, before re
turning to her home in Lowell.
Mrs. J. W. Harvey of Sarasota, who
is in attendance at the meeting oi
the Voodmen circle as a delegate!
from the Seabreeze grove, is the
guest of her sister, Mrs. Charles Mc-
Lucas, on North Sanchez street.
We now have a complete line of the
famous Seneca Folding Scout Cam Cameras;
eras; Cameras; all sizes; prices from $6 to $15
each. Anti-Monopoly Drug Store, tf
Mr. W. P. Whitesides has received
a telegram from his son, "Jimmy,1
giving the good news of his arrival in
New York from a six months stay;
with the A. E. F. in -France. Jimmy
has been witha motor truck company.
The Ocala Iron Works Garage is at
your service any time night or day.
Your, patronage is solicited, no mat matter,
ter, matter, how 3mall or how large your job
might be. 13-tf
Mr. and Mrs. William Stroud of
Fcrnandina have gone to Atlanta,
where they will remain about a week,
after which they will come to Ocala,
as the guests of Mr. and, Mrs. F. b.
Beckham, and we hope they will de decide
cide decide to remain permanently.
Peptona is sold in Ocala at Gerig's
Drug. Store at one dollar per, bottle, tf
This evening the regular weekly
prayer meeting of the Methodist
church will be conducted by Mr. Shef Sheffield.
field. Sheffield. This will be the last time that
Mr. Sheffield will have charge thh
winter, as he expects to leave Ocala
tomorrow. The meeting will begin
promptly at 7:45 o'clock.
Fresh BUTTERMILK at the Court
Pharmacy. 41-5t
Miss Nannie McGilvary has arrived
in Ocala from Fayetteville, N. C., and
m the future will make her home with
Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Jackson and fam family
ily family on" Sanchez street. Miss McGil McGilvary
vary McGilvary has .visited in Ocala before, and
spent last summer here, and her
friends will be glad to know that
fshe expects to make Ocala her home.
W. K. Lane, 51. D Physician and
Surgeon, specialist Eye. Ear, Nose and
Throat. Law Library Building, Ocala,
Florida. tf

Mrs. Emily Green has received a

very encouraging letter from Miss
Ruth Tuttle, a Red Cross nurse in the
ticsDital at Savernay. where Sergeant
Edward Green has been under treat treatment
ment treatment for several weeks. Miss Tuttle
was acquainted with Mrs. Green and
family when they passed a summer in
Hornell, N. Y., some dozen years ago.
Sergeant Green saw her name in the
Red Cross paper and sent her word i
he was in the hospital, whereupon j
she immediately went to see him. She
reports him in good health and splen
did spurts, his wound steadily ncai-
mg and he is hope of soon returning
home. The letter was dated March
11. and Mrs. Green has reason to hope
hex son will soon be again in America.
we guarantee w uo jour auiuniu auiuniu-bile
bile auiuniu-bile repair work cheaper than any
other garage in town and guarantee
satisfaction on top of this. What
" 1" 1 T TTT 1
more neea we sayi ucaja iron worfc.3
Garage. 13-tf
This afternoon the Wednesday
bridge club was entertained by Miss
Helen Brown. There were only two
tables of players, but the afternoon
was thoroughly enjoyed by all pres present.
ent. present. At the conclusion of the game,
delicious refreshments consisting of
French pastry, coffee and salted nuts.
The prizes consisted of a box of pow
der for club prize and a dainty work
lag. for the visitor's prize. Those
playing with the club and enjoying
Miss Brown's hospitality were Mrs.
C. B. Ayer, Mrs. Harry Walters. Mrs.
W. A. Wilds, Mrs. Peter Mackintosh,
Mrs. O. H. Berger, Mrs. Bert Dosh,
Missess Mary McDowell and Adele
Bjttinger,
: There appeared in Monday's issuw
of the Jacksonville Metropolis a large
picture of Demll Pratt, the sensa sensational
tional sensational second baseman of the New
York Yankees, who gave up his posi
tion with the Steel corporation to re
sume playing baseball with the Am American
erican American League. He is now in Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville training with the team. All
Ocala people are naturally interested
as he married an Ocala girl who later
made her home in St. Petersburg.
Miss Minnie Jones, who has been
the attractive guest at the home of
her uncle and aunt. Dr. and Mrs. W.
K. Lane for several months, leaves.
for her home at Trenton, N. J., to
night. She is returning several days
earlier than she expected, on account
of an accident that her .father had,
but her many friends are glad tt
learn that the accident was. not of a
serious nature.
We have a limited supply of Velvet
Beans, for sale. Better buy now, as
they are jcarce. Smith Grocery Co. tf
Mrs. C. R. Tydings, Miss Annie Da Davis
vis Davis and their brother, Mr. Davis of
Cleevland, Ohio, are expected home
this afternoon from Daytona, where
they have been spending a few days,
going over in their car. Mrs. Davis
accompanied the party but will leave
directly from Daytona for her homv
in Cleveland. Mr. Davis will rema'n
in Ocala a while longer with his sis sisters.
ters. sisters. Remember yo?. get quality service
at quantity price at the Ocala Iron
Works Garage. 13-tf
Mrs. J. A. Bouvier went to Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville Saturday, especially to meet
her son, Marshall who has just been
reelased from the navy in New York,
and to pay a short visit to her hus husband,
band, husband, who is now working there.
Fresh BUTTERMILK at the Court
Pharmacy. 41-5t
Rev. Wm. H. Wrighton, pastor of
the Ocala Baptist church, will preach
at Martel Sunday afternoon at 3:30
o'clock.
DAILY HEALTH TALKS
The Many Mysteries of
Nature
BY L. W. BOWER, M. D.
You can take an onion seed and a pansy
seed, and plant them side by side in the
same spot of ground. In one case, you
get an onion, with its peculiarly strong
odor, and in the other you get a Bower of
rare beauty. You can plant a poppy seed
and get opium (a dangerous, habit-forming
drug), or you can plant a rhubarb seed and
get something that helps constipation.
No scientist, living or dead, con explain
these mysteries of Nature. Behind the
invisible life germ in each seed is hidden
the deep secret that nobody understands.
Everything growing out of the ground
seems intended for some use in establishing
natural conditions. Dr. Pierce, of Buffalo,
N. Y., long since found out what is
naturally, best for women's diseases. lie
learned it all through treating thousands
of cases. The result of his studies was a
medicine called- Dr. Pierce's Favorite
Prescription. This medicine is made of
vegetable growths that nature surely in intended
tended intended for backache, headache, weakening
drains, bearing-down pains, periodical ir irregularities,
regularities, irregularities, pelvic inflammations, and for
the many disorders common to women in
all ages of life. Dr. Pierce's Favorite
Prescription is made of lady's slipper root,
black cohosh root, unicorn root, blue
cohosh root and Oregon grape root.
Women who take this standard remedy
know that in Dr. Pierce's Favorite Pre Prescription
scription Prescription they are getting a safe woman's
tonic so good that druggists everywhere
sell it.
Favorite Prescription should have the
full confidence of every woman in America
because it contains no alcohol and no
narcotic. Dr. Pierce knew, when he first
made this standard medicine, that whiskey
and morphine are injurious, and so he has
always kept them out of his remedies.
Send 10c to Dr. Pierce's Invalids' Hotel,
Buffalo, N. Y. for trial pkg. Tablets.

the federal land banks have for their purpose the furnishing
of capital at a low rate of interest for a long term of years, to sol solvent
vent solvent farmers of good character, the money to be used for con constructive
structive constructive purposes on the property given a3 security.

closed loans in
loans pending

Office Over
Munroe & Chambliss .National. Bank
Building

USED CAR BARGAINS
One 1017 model Overland, flve flve-passcr.ger,
passcr.ger, flve-passcr.ger, in first class condition;
new tires end top. Price, $500.
One 1917 model Maxwell five five-passenger
passenger five-passenger car; new tires, perfect
condition and looks it throughout.
Price, $550.
One Cadillac, 1913 model five five-passenger
passenger five-passenger car; good tires; body, top
and mechanical condition perfect, ex except
cept except storage battery. Price, $200.
One Ford touring car, early 1918
model. Almost as good as new. A
bargain at $450.
The Maxwell-Chalmers Agency,
4-1-Gtdly-ltw Ocala, Fla.
BACKACHE IS DISCOURAGING
But Not So Bad if You Know How to
Reach the Cause I
Nothing more discouraging than, a
constant backache. Lame when you
awaken, pains pierce you when you
bend of lift. It's hard to work or to
rest. Backache of ten indicates bad
kidneys. Ocala people recommend
Doan's Kidney Pills. Read this. case:,
J Allemand, proprietor of jew jewelry
elry jewelry store, 23 -Main St., Ocala, gays:
"About a year ago I wrenched .my
back while working in my garden and
for sometime following, had a con constant
stant constant ache across the small of my
back and in my hips. It .was distress distressing
ing distressing for me to straighten up after-1
had sat in one position for any. length
of time. I began to use Doan's .Kidney
Pills and they surely proved their
merit in a short time, for they caused
every symptom of this trouble to dis
appear. I take a few doses of Doan's
occasionally to keep my kidneys in
good order."
Price 60c. at all dealers. Don't
simply ask for a kidney remedy get
Doan's Kidney Pills the same that
Mr. Allemand had. Foster-Milburn
Co., Mfgrs., Buffalo, N." Y. Adv. 4
drogsIcIIjr
IflDKJSE SALTS
If your Back is sxhing cr Iflsdflcr
bothers, drink lots of vater
and eat ltss neat
When your kidneys hurt and toot back
feels sore, don't get reared and proceed
to load jour stommch with a lot of drugs
that excite tha kldnera &ad irritita th
entire urinary tr&eL Keep your kidney a J
cieaa lulq jou Keep your Doweis clean,
by flushing them with a. mild, harmless
salts which removes the body's urinous
waste and stimulates them to their nor normal
mal normal actirity. The function of the kid kidneys
neys kidneys is to filter the blood. In 24 hours
they strain from it 600 grains of acid
and waste, so we ean readily understand
the vital importance of keeping the kid kidneys
neys kidneys active.
Drink lots of water you can't drink,
too much; also get from any pharmacist
about four ounces of Jad JSalts; take
a tablespoonful in a glass of water
before breakfast each morning for a few
days and your kidneys will act fins.
This famous salts is mads -from the
acid of grapes and lemon juice, combined
with lithia, and has been used for genera generations
tions generations to clean and stimulate elogd kieV
neys; also to neutralize the adds in
urine so it no longer is a source of irri irritation,
tation, irritation, thus ending bladder weakness.
Jad Salts is inexpensive; cannot in-
Jure; makes a delightful effervescent
ithia-water drink which everyone shculd
take now and then to keep their kid kidneys
neys kidneys clean and active. Try this, also
keep up the- water drinking, and no
doubt you will wonder what became of
your kidney trouble and backache.
Ocalans who expect to spend a por portion
tion portion of the coming summer season in
the North Carolina mountains should
make their reservations at once for
the Haywood White Sulphur Springs
Hotel, Waynesville. This is one oi
the most beautiful spots in the North
Carolina mountains and the rates
will be exceptionally low. See Mrs. J.
L. Morgan at the Ocala House, or
phone 52. 26-tf
Fresh BUTTERMILK at the Court
Pharmacy. 41-5t
A nice line of Bathing Caps on sale
at the Anti-Mcnopoly Drug Store. 6t

marion county,

EoCo JJOEBAM & CO..
Funeral Directors and Embalmers
AWT HEA-RSE SERVICE
We deliver caskets free any where in the county.
ChIIs promptly answered night or day.
WILBUR C SMITH SAM R. PYLES, JR.
LICENSED EMBALMERS.

Day Phone 10

THE GUARANTEE VULCANIZING PLANT

We Vulcanize CASINGS

guarantee nvery reace ot Work.
SECOFiD HAND TIRES BOUGHT AND SOLD
JAMES E. ENGESSER, Proprietor
(At the Old Ford Gange)
it ii hi iii mil- i in a i in .i.lilUu. r i il Ti i ii ii i i r l in

MAXWELL TRANSFER COMPANY j

Auto Truck Service
light, Heavy and Long Distance Hauling.
Estimates given on application for
moving vegetables.
CALL PHTOE 376 fe&JPSffi

H f H H
LJLlLJi
Fora few days only,

give one caue oi uixmal vviiiiiL 2uar
Free with every purchase of live cakes -gjj
CI'YSTAL WH.ETE.Jf
"The Perfect Family Soap"
S)

DIRECTIONS
FOR WASHING CLOTHES: Rub Crystal White on the wet,
. garments and let soak for 15 minutes. Then rub lightly if neces necessary
sary necessary ,to remove the dirty spots. Rinse tuoroughly in clear water:
and your clothes will be snowy white.
WASH YOUR FLANNELS with CrysUi White and they will be
as soft as new it contains NO ROSIN.
Use it in the kitchen and for all kinds of cleaning and see
how much better it does the work and why it is so economical.
Its effect on dishes and glassware are surprising.
Made. from PURE VEGETABLE OILS contains no Animal
Fats.
Piics 7c. per cake. One cake FREE with five.

li) Thia nfTfr io dnnd for n

,1. TEAPOT GROCERY J

FRESH GARDEN SEEDS
All kinds of FRESH garden seeds
in any quantity. Ocala Seed Store,
phone 435. tf
Jacob's glace fruits. Anti-Monopoly.

. $188,300.00
. 64,750.00

R. S. Rogers, Secretary.
Ocala National Farm
Loan Associtiano

Nlht Phones 225 and 423
and INNER TUBES atd 'l
ri
we are authorized to
four Hnvi nnlv fipt vmiro' v9
Mdvep & Maeftnv
UNDERTAKERS and EHIBALLIERS
PHONES 47. 104,. 303
OCALA, FLORIDA

n
it
-if-



OCALA EVENING STAR, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2, 1919

WOODMEN FINISHED THEIR WORK

(Concluded from First Page)

craft's memorial reading an inscription such as this: "Go, traveler, tell to
your children and your children's children that we, as Americans and mem members
bers members of the Woodmen of the World, died in obedience to their sacred laws."
At the moment our country declared war and millions of our young men
' entered the service, fraternal societies believed that their growth would be
impeded and on account of the lack of infusion of new blood, their death
rate would increase. But almost with the declaration of war came an an announcement
nouncement announcement from the government that they proposed to issue insurance
Upon the lives of all men and women entering the government service and
when their plans were announced they were based on the plans of fraternal
societies in general, but the Woodmen of the World in particular. This im immediately
mediately immediately attracted the attention of the entire nation "and awakened in the
hearts of men and women a true realization of the necessity of protection
for all, irrespective of whether they were engaged in the hazardous duty
of fighting on the battlefields or remaining at home. Being alert to this
situation, the Woodmen of the World redoubled its efforts; the field men
stood patriotically by their guns and I am proud to announce that with the
closing of 1918 we show a record, conditions considered, unparalleled in the
history of the Woodmen of the World or any other fraternal organization
our net increase being 50,325 members.. The net sain.for the period of 1917
and 1918 being the period since your,last head camp meeting was 89,324,
giving us a total membership of 893,615 January 1, 1919.
The part played by your jurisdiction enabled us to accomplish the above
splendid results.
I am pleased to state that our finances have kept pace with the remark remarkable
able remarkable growth in membership our emergency fund increase for the two years
being $7,040,411.77.
The cost, of managing our society has, as usual, been lower than the
cost of managing any large organization just as it has been durins the last
several years. Our cost of management per member per annum for 1915
was 79c; 1916 81c; 1917 76c; 1918 76c; while the cost of management of
competing societies was from 93c to $3.
I am equally proud of the amounts we have been able to transfer to the
emergency fund during the past two years. In 1917 there was transferred
from the beneficiary fund $800,000 which was not needed to pay death
losses. In 1918 we transferred $900,000, making a total of $1,700,000 for
the two years. At the first meeting of the executive council, following our
last Sovereign Camp, the segregation from our gross collections, for use
of our general fund, was reduced from 15 to 12 per cent., but notwithtsand notwithtsand-Ing
Ing notwithtsand-Ing this enormous reduction, we were able to transfer from our general
fund toour emergency fund $652,803.07 this sum not being needed for
the general conduct of our society. ...
Just about the time we began to believe our excessive death losses,
brought about by the war, would cease, we were confronted with an ex ex-traordinarv
traordinarv ex-traordinarv codition broucht about bv a virulent form of influenza, called

"Spanish influenza," which found its wayto the United States during the
month of September, 1918.
The attention of the nation was first attracted to this terrible disease
on account of the number of soldiers occupying different cantonments being
afflicted, together with the enormous death losses among those stout, strong,
young men who, at the time of entering the service of their country, had
Seen proclaimed physically fit. In Camp Devens, Massachusetts; on Sep September
tember September 27th, which was less than two weeks after the disease was discov discovered
ered discovered in this country, twelve thousand soldiers were afflicted and placed in
the hospitals. On the same day eight thousand sailors at the Great Lakes
were stricken. The Bethlehem Steel Company had over three thousand of
their employes afflicted.
All fraternal societies and life insuring companies began to feel the
effects of the influenza bv the extraordinary number of death claims beiner

filed with them. In fact it has been estimated that life insurance companies
hftV RtiflTprpH a financial lnsa nf nnnrnvimatplv nnp hundred nnrl fiftv millim

dollars.
The Woodmen of the World was no exception to this rule and in a short
; time our mortuary department was flooded with claims which they were
unable to handle with our usual promptness. The matter of approving
death claims is one that requires great care and experienced employees. It
wag impossible to procure help of this character and. so it became necessary
" for our regular employees in the mortuary department to commence work working
ing working nights and this they have been doing ever since in an effort to keep
current with the work' pouring into their department. By October 15th,
our losses had amounted to five times the usual proportion which condition
continued for the balance of the year. From October 15th until December
31st, our excess death losses equaled the entire death losses of the first
, nine and one-half months of the same year.
v-.We had purchased liberally of each issue of Liberty Bonds in an effort
to help our natfcm win the war and when the Fourth Liberty Loan was an-
. nounced we anticipated our receipts to January 31st, 1919. purchasing ONE
MILLION, TWO HUNDRED AND FIFTY THOUSAND DOLLARS of
these bonds. With the excessive death loss we found ourselves without suf sufficient
ficient sufficient funds on hand -to promptly pay the claims and so we were compelled
to leave one million of the one million, two hundred and fifty thousand dol dollars
lars dollars in bonds with the banks as collateral for cash so necessary at that
particular time, otherwise our assets have not been affected and unless the
-influenza should return and again cause an extraordinary abnormal death
loss, my judgment i that our reserve fund will remain intact.
When we consider our financial condition as compared with the condi condition
tion condition of so many life insuring companies, we have reason to be proud. Sev Several
eral Several old line companies have gone out of business entirely. -Several fra fraternal
ternal fraternal societies have been consolidated so as to protect their policy holders.
- The largest of the old line companies have declared all dividends cancelled
hftd the financial report of another of the largest old line companies shows
that oh December 31st they had borrowed from the banks twenty-three mill million
ion million dollars to pay death. claims in addition to millions of dollars of securities
thrown upon the market at great loss to the companies.
: JUVENILE PROTECTION
At my suggestion the last Sovereign Camp amended our laws permit permitting
ting permitting us to write protection on the lives of children. It was January 1918
before we got this department fully organized first on account of the lack
of clerical and field help, and second because it was necessary to lay the
. foundation of this organization, preparing rates, reserves, surrender values,
. together with printing applications, certificates and other forms necessary
before OUr organization Could hp started, finpp. Vinwppvr. Hi a nrcmnWufAnrt

was started the effects began to show as evidenced by the following state statement
ment statement showing the progress by months, cert'ficates being issued as follows:
January, 198; February, 253; March, 427; April, 492; May, 727; June,
.: 971; July, 1456rAurrust, 1478; September, 1719; October, 3018; November,
4086; December, 4825.
. It will be noted that the effects of our organization work did not com-

: mence to show until the last three months of the year and I am happy to say
the record of the last three months is not only being equalled, but surpass-
a. at a. a j : i a i

a at me presem writing ana we estimate xnai our premium collections dur during
ing during 1919 will exceed three hundred' thousand dollars. This record I am sure,
will be very gratifying to our entire membership..
' UNIVERSAL CERTIFICATES
; At my suggestion the Sovereign Camp also enacted a law authorizing
us to issue what might be termed our "Universal Certificate." It is no dif-

mediate effect for its full face value and carries a higher premium or, what
miffht be termed, an "adenuate" rate.

My reason for advocating the issuance of this class of certificate was
my knowledge of the efforts that were being put forth by insurance com commissioners
missioners commissioners to have laws enacted that would prohibit fraternal societies
from doing business in their respective states unless that business was
written upon what might be termed "adequate' rates rates that would en enable
able enable the society to set aside a reserve fund based on. the 4 per cent, table
of mortality and sufficiently high to mature all certificates issued by the
society. New York state was the. first to attempt the passage of this law.
Many of the fraternal societies organized to fight its passage. Our society
. conducted a most aggressive campaign and. thanks to the untiring efforts of

our good sovereigns in New York, we were able to defeat the bill. All ef

forts to pass this law have been frustrated up to the present writing but a

uetcmmieu tuuri is ueiiig luauc uy ceruui interests m Wisconsin to nave
a similar law enacted. What the final results will be we cannot tell. We
are now in position, however, that if such a law is enacted, we have a good,
,. solid, substantial foundation already laid that would enable us to go right

ahead with, the writing of our business because we had 16,639 members in
our society carrying IJniversal Certificates on December 31st, 1918.
I have not attempted to enter into any extensive detailed report regard regarding
ing regarding our society because I realize the enormous amount of work you have
;to do during your head camp session, the duration of which is very limited.
Permit me to say, however, that our assets on December 31st, amounted to
$46,000,000. This is the largest reserve fund carried by any fraternal socie society
ty society in the United States. In fact it is larger than the reserve of many fra fraternal
ternal fraternal societies combined and is far in excess of the reserve carried by a
'great majority of old line companies.
No one realizes more fully than I do that the splendid results portrayed
above could never have been accomplished were it not for the untiring ef efforts
forts efforts and unimpeachable loyalty of our appreciative and enthusiastic mem members
bers members who have never tired of carrying the banner of Woodcraft, emblematic
of freedom, to higher and higher heights each day of our existence. They
are real heroes because they have been responsible for throwing protection
around the homes of our great common people and protecting them against
want and penury. No nobler battle could be fought; no more glorious vic victory
tory victory won! They belong to the Legion of Honor and when they pass from this
earth to the great beyond they will find in their hands the golden. key that
will open the door and admit them into the palace of eternity.
At your last session you displayed your usual good judgment in select selecting
ing selecting as your representatives to the Sovereign Camp, which met at Atlanta,
Ga.; Sovereigns J. S. Blitch, W. R. Dorman, Hal W. Adams, P. L. Rollo and
Geo. F. Cook. I don't mean to say that these were the very best, men you
had in your head camp convention. I believe that you had many just as
able but the number that you could send was limited and the men you did
select did everything in their power to not only promote and maintain har harmony
mony harmony in the Sovereign Camp, but to promote the interests of the Sover Sovereign
eign Sovereign Camp by enacting laws that would make the foundation, on which it

has been built, stronger and more substantial so as to be fully able to meet
in the future just such storms as we met upon the bloody battlefields of
Europe and through the attack of influenza. While we hope these will be
the last we will be called upon to combat, we want to be prepared at all
times to meet and successfully withstand onslaughts ever more furious than
we have ever yet experienced.
The final chapter in the Victory Drive campaign will be brought to a con conclusion
clusion conclusion at this meeting by the awarding of handsome silk flags to the camps,
through their delegates, which were the successful contenders for this dis distinctive
tinctive distinctive honor. Every camp in this jurisdiction has earned my lasting
gratitude for the capable manner in which they supported this greatest of
membership campaigns, but it is a right won by Camp No. 106, located at
Winter Haven, Camp No. 10, located at DeFuniak Springs and Camp No.
21, located at Pensacola, that we hail them as the victors. I know that
when the silken folds of the Emblem of Liberty are unfurled before you in
the presentation which will be under the auspices of Sovereign Watchman
C. D. Mills, every member present will feel the thrill of pride in his affilia affiliation
tion affiliation with this society, which makes the recognition of our National Emblem
imperative in its obligation.
Truly and fraternally yours,
W. A. Fraser, Sovereign Commander.

(MltiG PLACE
OF SUBS MOWH
Allies Had Accurate Knowledge
of Whereabouts.

LEND AT INTEREST
OR PAY MORE TAXES
VE KT CHOOSE
We Cheered For Peace And Now Ws
Mutt Pay For It, In One Way
Or The Other .

KEPT TAB Oil EVER? BOAT
When American Destroyers Started
Out to Convoy Merchant Ships and
Transports They Knew Just Where
to Look for Enemy U-Boats De Destroyer
stroyer Destroyer Crews Have Earned the
Rest They Are Now Getting.
When American destroyers during
the last 18 months of the war steamed
out of Qdeenstown to convoy mer merchant
chant merchant ships and transports through the.
submarine-infested area of the. North
.Atlantic, they went with accurate In Information
formation Information of the whereabouts of the
enemy U-boats as supplied by the Brit British
ish British admiralty.
As a destroyer flotilla moved out to
pea the commodore would be bending
over his maps with his navigators. On
the maps were little rings, sometimes
many and someUmes only a few, each
denoting where a German submarine
vas known to be. The maps also had
a cross mark shqwlng where the flo flotilla
tilla flotilla was to meet the convoy.
"How do you know a submarine Is
about In that locality T a destroyer
captain was asked as he examined his
maps.
"Well, we know, and pretty definite definitely,
ly, definitely, came the reply with a smile. "The
U-boat 76 is about here (pointing to a
ring). She has been there three days

pperatlng within a radius of about SO ;

miles and will return to her base In
four more days if some of us don't get
tier.
Numbers Also Are Known.
"We don't know exactly what vessel
this one is over here (pointing to an another
other another ring), but we think it is the U-C9.
She's going to her base tomorrow.
. The captain pointed out other rings
and he had accounted for all on his
maps.
i- This knowledge of the whereabouts
of the lurking enemy was not unusual,
so accurate was the Information con concerning
cerning concerning the submarines obtained by
the allied naval authorities. Some Some-thing
thing Some-thing was known of every submarine
operating in the waters about the Brit British
ish British Isles. But knowing where a sub submarine
marine submarine might be and sinking it were
two different operations. On the wide

-expanse of water the submarine mlghtj

change Its plans or act against direct
orders. N
All this added to the excitement of
the chase as the destroyers plowed
through the sea toward the cross mark.
The flotilla would go plunging and roll rolling
ing rolling along until it sighted the ships it
was to convoy.
Cheers Give Greeting.
The meeting place reached, the
crews of the -destroyers would answer
the shouts and cheers of those aboard
the convoy and then would turn smart smartly
ly smartly to the task at hand, that of protect protecting
ing protecting the larger vessels from the pirati piratical
cal piratical lurkers within the circles on the
maps.
The crews of the American destroy destroyers
ers destroyers operated from Queenstown through
the entire zone, which had witnessed
most of 'the U-boat crimes against un unarmed
armed unarmed passenger and merchant vessels.
They knew how deadly the submarines

were. All this was an incentive to hard
work and tlie destroyer crews have
well earned the rest they are getting

now after 18 months of activity and
during that time have gained the ad admiration
miration admiration of all naval men.

The Americans are idle now. No
longer do the commanders study maps
and worry over rings and cross marks.
The Hun has gone and the Americans
are enjoying their relaxation to the

fulL
Kelly's white "Heel Edge" enamel
for the soles and heels of white shoes.
Little's Shoe Parlor. 18-6t

The Victory Loan campaign Is
close at hand.
It is only a short time before ire
who threw our hats into the air and
cheered on that November day when
the armistice was signed will be call called
ed called upon to prove that we are as ready
to lend as to cheer.
A soldier returning from France to
his home city, remarked to a d tlx en
who met him with a hand-shake:
"This welcome and flowers are all
very nice. But how about a JobH
Uncle Sam can well say to his peo people:
ple: people: "That cheering for peace was fine.
But how about paying the bills for

bringing it about?"
t"n- a a

.ine war diiis must be paid. Any

body can see that. There are two
ways to pay them.
One is to borrow the money from the
people. The other is to tax it out of

the people.

vru ww uuea moai or in em m

luxuries are heavy enough now. But
unless the Victory Loan is liberally
subscribed they will seem small be besides
sides besides the taxes to come.",,
Uncle sam had rather sell securities
than put on new taxes.'.
He must do one or the other.
It's up to the publlic.

Another of our popular young men
it home. First Lieutenant M. C Iz-

The young men of Ocala will give hard work in France, arrived on a re-

a subscription dance Friday evening. cent transport, received his discharge
at the Woman's Club. jand came on to Ocala, arriving yes-
" jterday morning, since which time he
The Christian Science Society will, has been kept busy greeting his
hod a meeting tonight at 7 :45 at the J friends. Knowing, this thoroughbred
Christian Science hall. J young man as we all do, it is hardly
j necessary to say that his duties have
Mr. L. R. Chazal has gone to New been efficiently and cheerfully per per-Vork,
Vork, per-Vork, where he will be for about ten formed.
days attending to business. :
- The frost of last night was quite
Rev. and Mrs. J. T. Frazier, who J disastrous to the farmers. The tern tern-have
have tern-have been visiting Rev. and Mrs. ', perature fell to 30 and a heavy frost
Smith Hardin, have returned home. prevailed. .It is estimated that over
; half the melon, cantaloupe and cu-
Mr. G. W. Chace is home from a cumber plants were killed and at
visit to North Carolina. He says that least a fifth of the beans. The farm farm-the
the farm-the blizzard chased him clear to the ers have gone to work to replant. The
Ocala platform. j Ocala Seed Store sold out of canta-
j loupe seed before breakfast and alt
Mr. Fabian Cole of Tallahassee, a oilier seeds in season were going fast
delegate to the Woodmen convention, at noon.

was the guest of Mrs. E. Van Hood
and Miss Marguerite. Porter yesterday.

On the register of the public libra-

j ry there appeared 82 names, all vis vis-I
I vis-I itors in the city and who were in at at-'
' at-' tendance at the W. O. W. convention.

Only three men were included in the

number, the rest being the ladies of

Chas. E. Simmons, general man

ager of the Ocala Iron Works, arriv arrived
ed arrived this morning to meet local busi

ness men. He is at the Bay View. t the 'party. Ther were reported to be
Tampa Times. 111 women in attendance in Ocala,
j and 79 of them visited the library.
Mr. and Mrs. T. T. Munroe, accom- j
panied by Sir. and Mrs. T. E. Bridges, Mr. Thomas Pasteur has gone to In In-have
have In-have arrived home from a very de- verness, where he has accepted a po po-lightful
lightful po-lightful motor trip through the south- cition and where in future Mr. and
ern part of the state. : Mrs. Pasteur will make their home.
j Mrs. Pasteur will go as soon as they
At the meeting of the council last are able to find a house. Their many
night, the action of Mayor Chace in Ocala friends will regret to lose them
declaring the city should remain on but will be glad to know that the.
eastern time, as it was previous to will "be so near Ocala.
March 30 was confirmed. i :
- j Mr. and Mrs. Reynolds of New
Mrs. Christian Ax and Miss Adela -York state left yesterday after a few
Ax are expected to arrive in Ocala in days spent in Ocala. Mr. and Mrs.
about a week. Mrs. Ax's mothei-, Reynolds have been touring the state

.iMrS- KeideL of Baltimorp. vehn Mrs. in tViPir wr nnA tn rrmtA VinmA stftn-

Ax went to see, is so much improved ped in Ocala for a short visit to their
that Mrs. Ax will be able to leave her. t cousin, Mr. W. L. Armour.

"FAIR AND SQUARE.

Some of the ground along the Dun- J The Ocala House office and veranda
nellon road needs clearing ud but it is was crowded at noon today with

.ivery expensive to break down trees Woodmen bidding each other good-

with a Buick car, as a popular young bye. All seemed well pleased with
traveling man found out the other that popular hotel, which was their
day. i headquarters, and with Ocala in gen-
: -" j end.
John Z. Reardon, who came from :
Jacksonville, to "attend the Woodmen' Mrs. Isaacs and daughter, who
convention, in hia ice cream clothes, have been visiting Mrs. John Brooks,
had to change back into his winter have returned to their home after a
suit yesterday. However, John great- two weeks stay in Ocala.

ly enjoyed his visit to his old home.

The individual quota system, recog recognized
nized recognized everywhere as th MVli- on

I Rnna rp" rilan la r Ku mm A in 1

yw ..V UUVVi MA lal I Tr
proportion of tfie Sixth Federal .Re .Reserve
serve .Reserve district in the approaching Vic Victory
tory Victory Loan campaign.
Under this plan, a definite quota
based on property and income is as assigned
signed assigned every resident of. the county,
and he is asked to invest that sum
in the Victory Loan. It is intended in
this way to see that every man bears
his. share of the load and knows his
neighbor down the road ahso is carry carrying
ing carrying his share, instead of penalizing the
more patriotic who are willing to take
on an extra load to put their counties
over the top.

Grapelade Sundat.
oly Drug Store.

Anti-Monop-.
28-6t

Peptona.

Fresh BUTTERMILK at the Court

tf Pharmacy. r 41-5t

THE WHPJPSOM HOTEL
Jacksonville, Florida

In the heart of the city wi.h Hemming Park for, a front yard.
Every modern convenience in each room. Dining room service is
second to none.

RATES From $1.50 per day vr person to 56.

J. KAVANAUGIi;
Proprietor.

ROBERT r-L MEYER
Manager.

Films for all sizes and makes of
roll cameras. Anti-Monopoly Drug
Store. 29-tf

We have a limited supply of Velvet
Beans for sale. Bettei buy now, ai
they are scarce. Smith Grocery Co. tf
Kelly's 44White-Right-Off" for no no-buck
buck no-buck and canvas shoes. Little's Shoe
Parlor, Commercial Bank block. 18-Ct
We-have.a limited supply of Velvet
Beans for sale. Better buy now, as
they are scarce. Smith Grocery Co. tf
FOR SALE, CHEAP A second-hand
typewriter. Apply Star office, editorial
department. tf

m
m ZJ
-3
m zJ
- a.
mzJ
p ZJ

TEE dMMLMJP

1

iV:

f

i j
i

W H TOE CAM

i

mil n J i

It is here, asii to ride in if.

A price that discounts them a

a.-

ml

( If
ah

m A light Six, all the goofl poiiifs.of any car.

B ZJ fretniTTOin

q! j 2 v qS o (Q) (D)

DELIVERED

as

R. R. CARROLL, Agent

FLORIDA

Pi

m
m

Z 1 1

MO

1 1



Full Text
xml version 1.0 encoding UTF-8 standalone no
fcla fda yes
!-- Ocala evening star ( Newspaper ) --
METS:mets OBJID UF00075908_05223
xmlns:METS http:www.loc.govMETS
xmlns:xlink http:www.w3.org1999xlink
xmlns:xsi http:www.w3.org2001XMLSchema-instance
xmlns:daitss http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitss
xmlns:mods http:www.loc.govmodsv3
xmlns:sobekcm http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcm
xmlns:gml http:www.opengis.netgml
xmlns:lom http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcm_lom
xsi:schemaLocation
http:www.loc.govstandardsmetsmets.xsd
http:www.fcla.edudlsmddaitssdaitss.xsd
http:www.loc.govmodsv3mods-3-4.xsd
http:digital.uflib.ufl.edumetadatasobekcmsobekcm.xsd
METS:metsHdr CREATEDATE 2014-07-31T22:49:19Z ID LASTMODDATE 2009-04-29T15:57:01Z RECORDSTATUS COMPLETE
METS:agent ROLE CREATOR TYPE ORGANIZATION
METS:name UF,University of Florida
OTHERTYPE SOFTWARE OTHER
Go UFDC FDA Preparation Tool
INDIVIDUAL
UFAD\renner
METS:dmdSec DMD1
METS:mdWrap MDTYPE MODS MIMETYPE textxml LABEL Metadata
METS:xmlData
mods:mods
mods:accessCondition This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
mods:genre authority marcgt newspaper
sobekcm newspaper
mods:identifier type OCLC 11319113
ALEPHBIBNUM 2052267
LCCN sn 84027621
sn 84027621
mods:language
mods:languageTerm text English
code iso639-2b eng
mods:location
mods:physicalLocation University of Florida
UF
mods:note dates or sequential designation Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
funding Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855
mods:originInfo
mods:publisher Porter & Harding
mods:place
mods:placeTerm marccountry flu
mods:dateIssued April 02, 1919
marc point start 1895
end 1943
mods:frequency Daily (except Sunday)
marcfrequency daily
normalized irregular
mods:recordInfo
mods:recordIdentifier source UF00075908_05223
mods:recordCreationDate 841027
mods:recordOrigin Imported from (OCLC)11319113
mods:recordContentSource University of Florida
marcorg NPU
FUG
OCLCQ
mods:languageOfCataloging
English
eng
mods:relatedItem original
mods:physicalDescription
mods:extent v. : ; 61 cm.
series
mods:part
mods:detail Enum1
mods:caption 1919
mods:number 1919
Enum2
April
4
Enum3
2
2
lccn 84027622
oclc 11319138
mods:titleInfo
mods:title Ocala weekly star
mods:subject SUBJ651_1 lcsh
mods:geographic Ocala (Fla.)
Newspapers
SUBJ651_2
Marion County (Fla.)
Newspapers
mods:hierarchicalGeographic
mods:country United States
mods:state Florida
mods:county Marion
mods:city Ocala
mods:nonSort The
Ocala evening star
uniform
Ocala Evening Star
alternative displayLabel Other title
Evening star
Star
mods:typeOfResource text
DMD2
OTHERMDTYPE SOBEKCM SobekCM Custom
sobekcm:procParam
sobekcm:Aggregation FDNL1
FDNLN
NDNP
sobekcm:MainThumbnail 0006thm.jpg
sobekcm:Wordmark UFPKY
NEH
CHRAM
sobekcm:bibDesc
sobekcm:BibID UF00075908
sobekcm:VID 05223
sobekcm:EncodingLevel #
sobekcm:Publisher
sobekcm:Name Porter & Harding
sobekcm:PlaceTerm Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
sobekcm:Source
sobekcm:statement UF University of Florida
sobekcm:SortDate 693595
sobekcm:serial
sobekcm:SerialHierarchy level 1 order 1919 1919
2 4 April
3 2
DMD3
GML Geographic Markup Language
gml:FeatureCollection
gml:featureMember
gml:Point label Place of Publication
gml:Coordinates 29.187778,-82.130556
METS:amdSec
METS:digiprovMD DIGIPROV1
DAITSS Archiving Information
daitss:daitss
daitss:AGREEMENT_INFO ACCOUNT PROJECT UFDC
METS:techMD TECH1
File Technical Details
sobekcm:FileInfo
METS:fileSec
METS:fileGrp USE reference
METS:file GROUPID G1 JP21 imagejp2 CHECKSUM 13023d8c6dd496596f468f225b675f7c CHECKSUMTYPE MD5 SIZE 9413305
METS:FLocat LOCTYPE OTHERLOCTYPE SYSTEM xlink:href 0327.jp2
G2 JP22 82ee0794cf9871cabdaa75c83869b4ab 9503318
0328.jp2
G3 JP23 0e717b5f470273ed152f546f49b43dd1 9394915
0329.jp2
G4 JP24 6e68f3908859e5531f08402977c1e27a 9476415
0330.jp2
archive
TIF1 imagetiff 9517a61cf2ed9cd1ba3dec6d90474fc6 75297315
0327.tif
TIF2 f253e068e976b0b491e194a94d381999 76007278
0328.tif
TIF3 a89394e3f18de66a5ba94164674b02e7 75129987
0329.tif
TIF4 f3a19e70f59b9133e5295d89e22a6a1f 75802227
0330.tif
ALTO1 unknownx-alto 505bf8a3b54a7f0655e349b968e2f2a1 787320
0327.alto
ALTO2 084bd5bf3232572f94a3dd89e1fc1a39 615519
0328.alto
ALTO3 8bc6ceda06b77e565074b1891aa5ece1 621720
0329.alto
ALTO4 0274e8e23ceb9b952474018cd7bbf419 801592
0330.alto
TXT1 textplain ea1898412886c44b0e9b2a6faa41e4b2 26118
0327.txt
TXT2 6f05f723c0f95cf86ff7ddeddcdadbeb 19704
0328.txt
TXT3 69a2f3882f4afdb2e92cc7c48629710e 20257
0329.txt
TXT4 762e4526b7d513bb2269a8231c906e1c 25405
0330.txt
METS1 unknownx-mets d0ea85b70775e63961ae2de72fc80b61 9852
UF00075908_05223.mets
METS:structMap STRUCT1 physical
METS:div DMDID ADMID The ORDER 0 main
PDIV1 Main
PAGE1 Page
METS:fptr FILEID
PAGE2
PAGE3
PAGE4
STRUCT2 other
ODIV1
FILES1