The Ocala evening star

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Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:05179

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STAIR

Weather Forecast: Fair, continued cold tonight, freezing
temperature north portion, heavy frost central portion, pos possibly
sibly possibly light frost to twenty-sixth parallel; Tuesday fair and
slightly warmer north portion.
ocala, elorida; Monday, February io, 1919.
VOL. 26, NO. 37
u

A.

AGITATORS 1ST

LEAVE
Over Half a Hundred "I Won't
Works" will be Immediately
Deported to Europe
(Associated Pressj
Chicago, Feb. 10.Fifty-four mem members
bers members of the Industrial Workers of the
World passed throug Chicago last
night on a special train, under heavy
guard, en route to an Atlantic port,
where it is said they will be deported.
Forty of them came direct from Seat Seat-tie,
tie, Seat-tie, and a majority of them were
alien labor agitators. The cars that
carried them detoured around Butte,
Montana, on account of reports that
a mob there would try to release
them.
WORK OR FIGHT
Butte, Feb. 10.- Strikers in the
mines of Butte who object to the re recent
cent recent reduction of a" dollar a day in
wages and who insisted on abolition
of the "rustling" f card system, were
baited on the way to the mines by
guards and United States soldiers.
Those who decided to go to work
were permitted to pass.
STRIKE OFF IN TACOMA
Tacoma, Feb. 10. Following a de decision
cision decision of the Central Labor Council
last night, the general strike is off in
Tacoma today, and the members of
the union went back to work this
morning.
TRYING TO STOP THE TROUBLE
Seattle, Feb. 10. Conservative
leaders of union labor met at 9:30 this
morning with the general strike con conference
ference conference in an effort to induce the
committee to recommend that the
general sympathetic strike in pro progress
gress progress here be called off.
SHUT DENVER SCHOOLS
Denver,- Feb 10.- Twenty-five ; of
the sixty-five public schools here clos closed
ed closed today as a result of the' strike of
stationary engineers which started at
8 o'clock this morning. Failure of th.
school board to meet the engineers'
demands for 'increased pay brought
about the strike. ;
NO DECISION MADE I
New York, Feb. 10. Up to noon no
order had been issued for a strike of
the hoisting engineers and bricklay bricklayers,
ers, bricklayers, employed by the Building Trades
Employers' Association in 112 cities,
who it was reported would strike this
morning in sympathy with the car carpenters,
penters, carpenters, who are asking for an in increase
crease increase in pay.
HUNTED UP HIS PAPERS
Lawrence, Feb. 10. Ime Kaplan,
secretary of the committee directing
the textile strike here, was arrested
today on a federal charge of evading
the draft.
Later Kaplan's wife appeared with
his registration card.
ARMY AND NAVY ALLOTMENTS
Suggestions Regarding Correspond Correspondence
ence Correspondence Concerning Allotments and
Allowances Compensation or In Insurance
surance Insurance Claims.
Elach subject should be taken up in
a separate letter and accurate infor information
mation information furnished in order to insure
prompt attention.
State full name and home address
of the soldier or ; sailor, when and
where he entered the service, rank
and organization and branch in which
now serving or last served, army or
navy serial number, the number and
amount of allotment, compensation or
insurance claim as case may be, full
name and postof fice address of allot allottee
tee allottee ar beneficiary; and relationship to
the soldier or sailor, and, such other
information as will make the inquiry
or complaint easily understood.
Urge soldiers and sailors to keep
government insurance.
Duncan U. Fletcher.
COTTON SEED
Editor Star: I have 800 quart pack packages
ages packages of a fine variety of cotton seed
which I am very anxious to distribute
among the cotton growers of the Sec Second
ond Second Congressional district. Will you
not give publicity to this fact in the
columns of your paper and say that I
will be glad to send out a package of
this seed free to each applicant, so
long as the supply lasts..
.Yours sincerely,
Frank Clark, M. C.
Washington, February 7th.
A Wonderful Cast in

IB A

FREIGHT RATES
ARE TOO FIERCE

Cottress of Atlanta Presents Cause
of Southern Business Men to the
Commerce Committee
(Associated Press)
Washington, Feb. 10. Charles E.
Cottrell, of Atlanta, representing the
Southern Traffic League, told the In Interstate
terstate Interstate Commerce committee today
that many Southern business men
would be forced into bankruptcy "if
the wholesale revision of freight
lates initiated under the arbitrary
power of the director general of "rail "railroads
roads "railroads was continued." He said it is
now proposed to establish mileage
rates on eighty southern commodi commodities,
ties, commodities, for which he declared there is no
justification. He declared he-was au authorized
thorized authorized to announce that 95 per cent
of 2100 members of the Southern
Wholesale Grocers Association desh
ed a prompt return of the railroads to
private management because of "pov "pov-ert
ert "pov-ert yof service.' :
GEORGE K. WILLIAMS
Ocala mourns a good and useful
citizen, Mr. George K. Williams, who
died at his home on South Lime street
Saturday night.
Mr. Williams had been a citizen. of
Ocala for more than ten years, com coming
ing coming heretn 1908, as a member of the
firm of Jenkins & Williams, to erect
the federal building, and liking our
town so well that he made his home
here. u. ,
Mr. Williams was born in Rock Rockland
land Rockland Me., March 4, 1849, and was
therefore almost seventy years of age.
He was married in 1881 to Miss Ida
C Edwards, who survives him, with
their two children, Mr. Edward M.
Williams and Miss Edith Williams. He
also has two brothers,- Mr. John Will Will-ians
ians Will-ians of Worcester, Mass., and Mr.
Edward Williams tof Burlington, la.
'Mr. Williams, who was a building
contractor by"' profession, has left
handsome and enduring monuments' to
his memory in this city. The federal
building, the Ocala .National Bank,
the Harrington hotel, the public li library
brary library and the county jail are rall his
work. At the same time he built for
himself a reputation for integrity,
kindness and broadness of : mind
worth more; than anything that could
be fabricated in brick or stone. -":c
He has left similar monuments 1 in
many parts of the state and nation,
for his work 'was always in demand,
and no sooner was one contract com complete
plete complete than he was called on to fill an another.
other. another.
Mr. Williams had been ill for some
time, but had seemingly improved,
and his death came as a great sur surprise.
prise. surprise. His funeral services will, take
place at his late residence at 12 :30 p.
m. tomorrow, after, which his remains
will be taken to Chicago for burial in
Rose Hill cemetery. His son, Mr. E.
M. Williams, will accompany the
body.
Many have "called at the home to today
day today to express their sympathy with
the family, and for a last look at the
placid features of their departed
friend. r
MAKING ARRANGEMENTS
At the office of the Metropolitan
Realty company Saturday, the follow following
ing following white and colored citizens met to
discuss and arrange for the conven convention
tion convention of the Florida Uplift Association,
which, is scheduled for a two days'
session, beginning April 23, at 10 a.
m.: Mayor J. E. Chace, Postmaster R.
F. Rogers, Rev. H. L. Stephens,; Rev.
Shaw, Dr. R. R. Williams, Prof. J. D.
McCall, George Giles, J. S. LaRoche,
F. P. Gadson, J. D. McDuffy, .L. K.
Smith, R. S. Mitchell, S. L. Johnson
and Lieut. R. F. S. Toomey, attorney
at law, of Miami, who is the organize! organize!-for
for organize!-for the convention.
The purpose of the gathering was
stated by reading the call, after which
expressions were heard from those
present, all endorsing and approving
the convention and the purpose for
which it is called and pledging them themselves
selves themselves to give to it their whole and
unqualified endorsement and support.
Each one pledged to do his utmost, in
order that the gathering might be the
most notable event in the history of
the colored people of the state of
Florida.
The addresses of Mayor Chace and
Postmaster Rogers upon the purpose
for which the convention is to be held
were sincere earnest, helpful and en encouraging."
couraging." encouraging." The call, issued over the signature
of R. G. Lee of Palm Beach, presi president
dent president of the association, and Rev. S.
H. Savage, the secretary, hrfs already
been printed in the Star.
Lieut. Toomey stated Hhat the: re
ception and consideration ,c accorded
him by the Hvhite and- colored 'citizens
of Ocala 'equals that showjiJiim any anywhere
where anywhere he has been over the state.

ARMS HE BE

SENT TO OMSK
By Japan to Russians in West Siberia
to Battle Against the
Bolshevik
Vladivostok, Saturday. Feb. 8 (By
Canadian Press) Reports frdm Omsk
state that the Russian government
there has accepted an offer made by
Japan of men, money and arms to set settle
tle settle the bolshevik difficulties.
STRIKERS HAD NO SYMPATHY
(Associated Press)
Tacoma, Feb. 10. The general
strike in Tacoma was officially called
off yesterday by the general strike
committee, effective at 8 a. m.. today.
The collapse of the general strike
here was not unexpected, as the
movement lacked public support and
sympathy.
:
MURDER OF TWO
AMERICANS IN MEXICO
Washington, Feb. 9. The recent
murder of two Americans on an island
in Tampico Lake was reported yes yesterday
terday yesterday in advices from Mexico thru
official channels. Names are not givr
en. They also told of the robbery and
beating of two other Americans:
BIG CONTRACT AT BREST
It Has Been or Will be Headquarters
for More than a Million
Americans
Brest, Feb. 10. With a native pop population
ulation population of 90,000, this city is con confronted
fronted confronted with the problem of caring
for something like one million Amer American
ican American soldiers, heading westward, in
the first quarter of this year. Brest
is the largest American city on the
eastern shores of the Atlantic ocean.
It was a tremendous problem, but
Brest not only has managed to feed
and house the enormous transient
population thus far,-but also has pro-;
vided entertainment. -Among the en
tertainers was Miss Margaret Wil-J
son, daughter oi the president, who
was in Brest several days waiting for
the arrival- of the George Washing
ton, bearing the presidential party to
the peace conference.
The feeding and housing problems
were largely, solved by the Y. M. C.
A'., which had established thirteen
canteens; three restaurants, three
hotels,- and a "hut"
entire city block.
that occupied an
RULES OF THE FOltEST RESERVE
Game Laws Must be Strictly Observed
on Government Ground
Lyne, Fla., Feb. 8.
Editor Star: Realizing that one of
the highest services, that can be ren rendered
dered rendered the public by the national for forest
est forest is in the direction of preservation
oi wild life, the duties-of all the ad administrative
ministrative administrative forest officers have been
extended to cover enforcement of lo local
cal local game laws. The regulation as laid
down by the secretary of agriculture,
ar.d which has the force and effect of
federal law is as follows:
Regulation T-7 a. "The going or
being upon any land of the United
States, or in or on the waters there thereof,
of, thereof, within a national forest, with in intent
tent intent to hunt, catch, trap, wilfully dis disturb
turb disturb or kill any kind of game, animal,
game or non-game bird, or. fish, or to
take the eggs of any such bird, in vio violation
lation violation of the laws of the state in
which such land or waters are situat situated,
ed, situated, is hereby prohibited."
The game policy ofhe forest ser service
vice service is broader than jit protection.
The plan includes game culture, game
introduction, stocking of streams and
the establishment of game and bird
refuges. The future importance of
such work is more appreciated when it
is remembered that the national for forests
ests forests are administered on the basis that
the areas shall always remain in
their wild state and thus suited for
fostering wild life. Within a few
years it is altogether probable that
the national forests will contain a
large per centage of the game of the
country and the overflow will form
the stocking supply for surrounding
areas.
The forest service wishes to in initiate
itiate initiate its newly adopted game policy
by asking the support and c.o-opera-tion
of all interested in game protec protection
tion protection in this section. It is not desired
to prohibit legitimate hunting in the
forest, but hunters there must be
sure that they carry the necessary li licenses
censes licenses and "keep within the limits' of
the game laws. See Florida Chap Chapter
ter Chapter 6960 (No. 163) and amendment
Chapter 7311, (No. 53.)
Very truly yours, j
C IL Rogers,
.... Deputy Forest Supervisor.
Jonteel Power "Compact." All col colors
ors colors in vanity boxes at Gerig.'s Drug
Store. 1-tf

IT ALE DEPENDS

00 AMERICA
Premier Clemenceau Expressed his
Belief in Our Country's Mag Magnanimity
nanimity Magnanimity and Power
Paris, Feb. 9. (By the Associated
Press.) "yhile I have said that the
war has been won, it would perhaps
be more accurate to say that there is
a lull in the storm," said George
Clemenceau, the French, premier, in
the course of an interview with the
Associated Press today. "At least." he
added, "it, is as well to face squarely
all the' possibilities."
Although Germany has been beaten
militarily an'had been largely dis dis-aimed,
aimed, dis-aimed, there still remained, the pre premier
mier premier pointed out, "a chaotic but fruit fruitful
ful fruitful Russia from which great help
may be drawn by the Teutons." There
would be danger, he thought of a "re "reopening
opening "reopening of the military debate, if it
were not for the assurance" President
Wilson had voiced recently that when whenever
ever whenever France or any other free people
weer menaced the whole world would
b ready to vindicate its liberty,"
In the society cf nations, said "the
premier, each nation must be willing
to renounce its traditional aloofness
and be willing to employ the national
strength outside its own country, both
ia war and in peace.
Premier Clemenceau warmly prais praised
ed praised the help the American troops had
given in winning the war for democ democracy
racy democracy and expressed disbelief that
there -was a man in the American
army who regretted that he had
"fought on the side of freedom" be because
cause because he had found more creature
comforts in Germany than in France.
TIGHTEN THE SCREWS
Paris, Feb. 9. (Havas.) The su
preme war council is reported to have
reached a decision at yesterday's
meeting that it was necessary to im impose
pose impose more severe conditions upon
Qermany for. the renewal of the arm armistice
istice armistice because of Germany's attitude
towards the fulfillment of her obliga obligations.
tions. obligations. Decisions are also said to have
been reached for the condition of
German demobilization and of the
production of plants formerly engag engaged
ed engaged in producing war material.
WILSON CANT VISIT BELGIUM
Paris, Feb. .9. Feverish haste is
marking the proceedings of .the peace
delegates in the few days remaining
before the return of President Wilson
to the United States. Themost diffi difficult
cult difficult problems relate to new boundar boundaries
ies boundaries to be created, which has aroused
the aspirations of many nations, espe especially
cially especially the little ones, for territory of
their neighbors.
President Wilson definitely post postponing
poning postponing his visit to Belgium is being
regarded necessary by the associated
powers to present a united front when
the Central Powers' delegates are ad admitted
mitted admitted to the conference, otherwise
the latter might cause dissension by
tempting trades or alliances.
The Belgians have been anxious for
the president to inspect their, ruined
country and industries, and be con convinced
vinced convinced of the justice of their claims
for reparation. The French, too,
would have been glad if the president
had visited Belgium, and also con continued
tinued continued his visits to the devastated
regions of France, but the matter of
reaching a common agreement in the
peace conference is regarded as more
important.
OKLAWAHA RIVER ORDERS
Silver Springs, Feb. 7 The Silver
Springs of the Daylight Line, left
Jacksonville; lost propeller near Shirt
Tail Bend. Oregonian, Captain W. IL
Mason, towed her to Silver Springs.
The Wekiwa will soon go in com commission.
mission. commission. She did not clear on the 1st
This vessel will leave for Palatka on
the 15th.
The Okahumkee was .due here, the
4th, which trip was annuled. Her day
of arrival here is uncertain.
The dredge Oklawaha is out of
commission at present She is at
Moss Bluff.
The complement of the City of
Ocala's crew is made up. of expert
river navigators: John Long, captain;
Victor Mason, pilot; Capron Smith,
engineer.
Mr. Columbus Carmichael will do
his best to pick from the river men to
man : the Wekiwa and the Silver
Springs.
Clarence White will soon place the
dredge Oklawaha in commission.
The power boat Captain McGuire is
laid up at Jacksonville.
A raft of pine logs is on its way
down stream. Vessels and rafts do
not mix very well, and the raft has
the right of way. A. A. G.
A new and absolutely complete line
of Dr. Scholl's foot comfort appli appliances
ances appliances now ready. M. M. little. Prac Prac-tipedist,
tipedist, Prac-tipedist, at Little's Shoe Parlor, Com-

imercial Bank building. T-tf

BLOODSHED AC

Alll

Sparta cans Have Again Broken Out
and Receive a Fierce Reception
from Government Soldiers
(Associated Press)
Zurich, Feb. 10. Spartacan disor disorders
ders disorders of a grave nature broke out in
Berlin Saturday evening, according to
advices, received here. .Soldiers and
sailors, commanded by former1' Chief
of 'Police Eichhorn. are reported to
have occupied Alexander Platz. Gov Government
ernment Government troops, it is stated, fired on
them, killing six and wounding 40.
The German censdrship is withholding
details.
HENRIQUE WAS HIT
(Associated Press i
Lisbon, Feb. 10. It is reported
from Aveiro that Captain Henrique
De Paiva Couceiro, the royalist lead leader,
er, leader, was wounded, probably in the
fighting at Lamego or Vizue; which
were taken, by the republican forces.
DAVID IS PRESIDENT
(Associated reas)
Weimar, Friday, Feb. 7. Dr. Ed Edward
ward Edward David, for many years one of
the leaders of the German social dem democratic
ocratic democratic party; was almost unanimous unanimously
ly unanimously elected president of the German
national assembly.
MISSIONARY VISITORS
Tomorrow' evening at 8 o'clock Rev.
VV. D. Reynolds, D. D., of Chunju,
Korea, will deliver a stereopticon lec lecture
ture lecture at the Presbyterian church on
Korea and the work of the Presbyter Presbyterian
ian Presbyterian mission there. Dr. Reynolds is
one of the ablest of the, missionaries
of the Presbyterian church, and his
long experience and observation in
Korea guarantees that his lecture to tomorrow
morrow tomorrow night will be interesting and
instructive.- The public is invited to
hear him. "There is -no charge for ad admittance.
mittance. admittance.
On Thursday afternoon at the Pres Presbyterian
byterian Presbyterian church Mrs. Motte Martin,
of Luebo, Africa, will address the
missionary society. The women and
girls of the. churches of Ocala are
cordially", invited to hear Mrs. Martin,
who is a woman of rare personality
and charm, i After the 'address the
women of the community are invited
to meet Mrs. Martin at the manse.
Mrs. Martin is a collegemate of Mrs.
John Taylor and Miss Eugenia Fuller
of this cityr when they studied at
Agnes Scott College, Atlanta. "She
will tell of the remarkable work of the
Presbyterian mission in the Congo
valley, one of the most remarkable m
missionary history.
The Presbyterian church is also to
be favored with a visit from Rev. S.
I. Woodbridge, D. D., and his wife, of
Shanghai, China. Dr. Woodbridge will
speak both morning and evening on
the first Sunday in March. Dr. Wood Wood-bridge
bridge Wood-bridge has done an effective work in
China as the editor of the Chinese In Intelligencer,
telligencer, Intelligencer, a paper which has had
wide influence in China. He has been
a participant and observer in the
many changes that have taken place
in that, ancient land, and it will be
good to hear him tell about them.
Ancient and Modern Roads.
Modern road engineers seem to have
great difficulty in determining how a
really good and substantial road
should be built This Is hard for the
layman to understand, when we con consider
sider consider the roads built by the Romans a
thousand years 'ago, which, except for
neglect of the surface, are still giving
good service., Then there are the not notable
able notable roads of the Continent that have
survived hundreds of years traffic
It would seem that a study of such
roads would furnish much needed In Information;
formation; Information; but possibly the trouble
lies In a futile attempt to get some something
thing something for nothing,, by spreading the
cost of one mile of good road over ten
miles of makeshift Scientific Amer American.
ican. American. Nine Kinds of Bread In Sweden.
Only nine types of wpr bread are
permitted in Sweden, according to In Information
formation Information furnished by commerce re reports.
ports. reports. A decree has been issued restricting
the breads to be made to the following
types: Dry, hard bread J and so so-called
called so-called coffee cake," and their weight
prices are prescribed by law. In
making bread only wheat rye, barley,
or oat flour may be used and flour
tubstltates are prohibited. For vrdl vrdl-oary
oary vrdl-oary bread no butter, lard, or other
fat milk, or cream may be used.
Soft bread -may not be 'sold until It
ts at least 12 hours old.
Fifty leading brands of cigars are
on sale atthe Anti-Monopoly Drug
store. From five cents to thirty cents
each- 10-t

SUFFRAGE BEFORE
THE SENATE

It is Expected to Come to a Decisive
Vote Before that Body Adjourns
this Evening
(Associated Press)
Washington, Feb. 10. Another ef-
fort to pass the equal suffrage amend-
rnent resolution is being made today
in the Senate. The Senate convened
with the galleries crowded, admission
by card only being the rule because of
the great demand. Advocates of the
measure are hopeful of winninc over
cne vote necessary to give them the
required two-thirds majority.
BOTH SIDES CONFIDENT
Washington, D. C Feb. 10. Be
fore crowded galleries and with most
of the senators in their seats, the
House resolution proposing submis submission
sion submission of an equal suffrage amendment
to the federal constitution was called
up in the Senate today at 12:40. Both
sides were prepared for the final test,
confident of a decision before adjourn adjournment
ment adjournment Before the debate started, petitions
in behalf of the resolution from Kan Kansas,
sas, Kansas, Michigan, Nevada, Maine and
the Missouri legislatures were pre presented
sented presented by senators from those states.
Because the bill is up for passage
on third reading, it is not subject to
amendment except by unanimous con consent
sent consent PURE BRED SWINE REFLACING
NATIVE SCRUBS IN FLORIDA
Gainesville, Feb. 9. The increase
in pure bred swine in Florida during
the past year has put the scrub on
the go, and it is pretty certain that
Mr. Scrub will and at the bottom of
the hill before he stop3.
Mr. L. II. Highfill, of the extension
division of the college of agriculture,
cc-operating with the bureau of ani animal
mal animal industry, recently compiled some
reports which show just how much
progress has been made along this
line during the past year. The 27
hog; growing counties reporting show showed
ed showed an average incerase of 58.54 per
cent in pure bred swine during the
year 1918. Holmes, Brevard, Taylor
and Madison led in this increase.
These records further show the very
great difference between the increase
of pure breeds and the increase of
scrubs. Twenty-three of the above
counties reported an increase of grade
and scrub' hogs averaging only 16 for
the same period. Two counties did
not report, w;hile Hernando county re reported
ported reported a 50 per cent, decrease cf
scrub and grade hogs. Mr. Highfill
says it is a noticeable fact that once
a man begins to raise pure breds he
usually getn rids of his scrub stock
soon.
All counties reported that the farm farmers
ers farmers were actually and successfully
growing and feeding to a more or
less extent, corn, peanuts, cowpeas,
chufas, rape, oats, rye. sweet pota potatoes
toes potatoes and cansava.
This increase in pure bred swine is
no doubt largely due to the, work of
the boys' pijr clubs. Records on file in
the office of the state boys' club agent
show that in those counties reporting
the greatest increase in pure bred
swine and the lowest increase in
scrub and grade hogs are those coun counties
ties counties in which the boys' pig club work
has been established longest and la
being pushed hardest by the county
agents.
Members of the swine growers' as association
sociation association have a right to resent hav having
ing having post cards go out of the state ad advertising
vertising advertising Florida as growing razor
bac kand scrub hogs. That dajr is past
The pure bred ha's come to stay.
HAMS AND SHOULDERS
FOR SALE

We have a limited number of ham
and shoulders that we will sell for
cash at 35c. per pound for the hams
and 30c. per pound for the shoulders,
at our factory.
4-tf Ocala Ice & Packing Co.
Home, Sweet, Heme.
Home is the on place In all this
world where hearts are pure of each
other. It Is the place of confidence;
It Is the place where we tear ofl that
mask of guarded and suspicious cold coldness
ness coldness which this world forces us to
wear in pelf-ilefease. and where we
pour out the unreserved communica communications
tions communications of full anl confiding hearts. It
is the spot w here expressions of ten tenderness
derness tenderness gush oat without unj sensa
tlon of awkwardne. and without any
dread of ridicule. Exchange-
Temple Felj. 10
t..- Tsii is,. -"Vr J



OCA LA EVENING STAR, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1919

I

OCALA EVENING STAR
Publlnbrd Every Day Except Sunday by
STAR PUBLISHING C03IPANY
OF OCALA, FLA.
.
'- II. Ft. Carroll, Prexident
P. V. I4a vencood, .ecrrtnr7-TreMnrer
v J. H, Henjamln, Editor

Entered at Ocala, Fla,. -vostoffice as
4econd-class matter.
TELEPHONES
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THE HONOR SYSTEM
IN THE FLORIDA PRISON
In the past dozen years or so, we
have heard much of the honor system
in penal institutions, and have been
skeptical of its efficiency. The shackle
and the lash have always been repug repugnant
nant repugnant to us, but it has seemed impos
sible that men and women condemned
to servitude because they broke the
law could be kept in order without
coercion atfd. rigid restraint.
But we have seen a fair, sample' of
the honor system, and can conscien conscientiously
tiously conscientiously pronounce it good. And we
saw it, not in one of the highly en enlightened
lightened enlightened and progressive states that
adopt the fads as fast" as they come
along, but in our own Florida, looked
upon as henighted by a proportion of
the Union and considered as some somewhat
what somewhat backward even by its dearest
friends.
Sunday we visited the state prison
and farm at Raiford,; went over much
of the farm and thru all the prison.
We found there at least five hundred
men and women who are serving
terms for breaking the laws. We
found them well eared for and most
'of them reasonably contented. We
might say that many were happy.
During the day., we did not' see .a
guard nor a gun. We found the in inmates
mates inmates bound to certain limits only by
rules that they mainly enforced
themselves and seemed to cheerfully.
We saw the superintendent and his
assistants going around among he
prisoners unarmed, and greeted by
all as friends and not as masters. We
saw, in fact, what we" would not have
believed if we hadn't seen it.
In, company with Mr. and Mrs. B.
E. Raysor, we went on the morning
A. C. L. train Sunday to Raiford,
where we were met by the superin superintendent,
tendent, superintendent, Mr. J. S. Biitchi and his son
Clifford, in an auto, and taken to the
farm. The Raiford farm is an ex extensive
tensive extensive tract of land on both sides of
New river in Bradford county. Nature
did not intend it to be a farm. It w;as
mostly flatwoods. and the men who
unloaded it on the state should be
doing time in the prison. It is one
of the monumental swindles that the
stupidity of our, legislators has allow allowed
ed allowed to be perpetrated on the taxpay taxpayers.
ers. taxpayers. With much hard work and at
great expense the present superin superintendent
tendent superintendent and his predecessor have
made something out of it, but there
are many other places in the state,
wher half the labor and money would
have repaid tenfold. The prospect is
that by-expending a great deal more
in scientific drainage, the farm may
be made to do nearly as well as some
other place could have done from the
start.
: However, this isn't the fault of Sim
Blitch. ; He took his visitors around
over much of the farm and showed
them with justifiable pride thousands
of broad, clean acres and much cood
stock. He made .-good crops last year
and is preparing for better ones this
year. There are some things the
soil around Raiford are wejl adapted
tOj others with which it will do fairly,
and these are being utilized to the
best advantage.
The human element at the farm, as,
elsewhere, is the principal feature of
interest, and to this Mr. Blitch led
his visitors. The prison is in an en enclosure
closure enclosure called the stockade, covering
several acres and including a number
of buildings. The stockade is. a high
wooden wall, on top of which are a
number of sentry boxes, in which up
to a few months ago armed guards
stood ready day and night. They are
empty now, only some of the prison prisoners,
ers, prisoners, enjoying 'their Sunday rest, nad
climbed up in them to look around.
The big gate was not locked, but as it

was very heavy a couple of convicts
stood by to open and shut it.
The stockade -is divided into four
compartments by wide corridors run running
ning running at right angles. In the center
is the pumping station with a water
tank on top of it. In one of the com compartments
partments compartments is the hospital and the
women's quarters." In two are the
barracks for the colored men, and in
one the department for white men.
Beginning with one of the colored
barracks, Mr. Blitch Jed the way thru
them all.
One thing that struck the ye at
once was a number of signs asking
the inmates to be clean and careful
with the premises. And the big word
cn top of each sign was."Please." The
superintendent's name was at the bot bottom
tom bottom ,and there was every indication
that his request was being obeyed.
The three barracks or wards for
the men were very much alike. In
each the men slept in big dormitories.
They have comfortable iron cots with
mattresses, pillows and blankets.
Each has its dining, room and kitchen
adjoining. Everything is clean.. The
floors are kept swept and are often
scrubbed, the 'tables in the", dining
rooms are scoured, the windows are
screened, and flies are conspicuous by
their absence. We have been in many
prisons, and this is the first one that
ve could not smell almost' as soon as
w e saw it. The strench arising from
the uncleanly habitation of hundreds
cf humans is absent. The prisoners
are supplied with bathing facilities
ar.d required to use them, and their
clothes are kept clean. i
The kitchens were a pleasure to
see. They are well managed and neat
almost to perfection. The Sunday din dinner
ner dinner was cooking while we were there.
Huge kettles were filled with ride,
others with gravy, meat was being
sliced from juicy hams, good whole wholesome
some wholesome bread was piled up in hills and
huge pots of coffee were steaming on
the ranges. It being Sunday,, there
was dessert also. ',
, There is a bakery presided over by
an artist in his profession. He know
how to make the best of bread and
bake it quickly. ; His huge oven would
make that of most city bakeries look
small. He took great pleasure' in
showing the visitors how he kept his

"family" of 500 or more supplied with
the staff of life.
There is a" laundry to keep, the
clothing of the prisoners clean. This
is part of the work of the women,
who also do the sewing for the big
establishment.
It was Sunday, and all the prisoners
who did not have to attend to- the
necessary tasks were taking their
rest. Many, were sitting on their cots,
reading or writing, some were playing
checkers, some talking to each other
and a few asleep. Everywhere, the
superintendent went he was greeted
with plea sure and several of the pris prisoners
oners prisoners stopped him to prefer requests,
all of which received his attention.
The women'squarters were visited
last.' There are only four white wom women
en women in the "prison, and probably forty
colored girls. Thes received some of
the indulgence due to their sex, and
it was noticeable that most of them
in the space alloted for their cots in indulged
dulged indulged in the little vanities dear to
the feminine heart.
At Mr. Blitch's request, the colored
girls gathered in the dining room and
sang several songs. "Nearer, my God,
to Thee," "The Half has Never Been
Told," and other old familiar hymns
were sung with the spirit and melody
that the colored race always puts into
music. As the visitors rose the girls
bade them adieu with "God be with
you till we meet again." It was not
only a pretty but a touching farewell.
Mr. Blitch says that when he took
charge of the farm several months
ago his predecessor;" told' him this
bunch of girls was more trouble than
all the rest of the prisoners put to together.
gether. together. The overseer of the depart department
ment department was a women specially imported
from Tennessee to look after it. She
spelt discipline with a big, red D, and
was always punishing the girls, often
calling in guards to have them whip whipped.
ped. whipped. One day, Mr. Blitch, after con considering
sidering considering one of her requests for pun punishment,
ishment, punishment, told her he thought he could
get along better without her. He
shipped her back to Tennessee, and
put in her place one of the prisoners,
,a big, muscular, but good natured
white woman. And he told the girls to
behave themselves and they should be
helped instead of punished. Since
them, be has had little or? no 'trouble
with the women, and the Florida girl,
serving her time, has proven a very
satisfactory overseer.
Certainly all the girls looked com comfortable,
fortable, comfortable, contented and by no means
unhappy.
The party then visited the hospital.
This has a Very complete operating
room and stock of medicines, and is
presided over by Dr. Kennedy, a com competent
petent competent young physician. There "were
only a few inmates, none of them
veiy sick. The ward is roomy, well
lighted and well ventilated,, and sup supplied
plied supplied with comfortable beds.
(To be Continued)
.
The war didn't make the world safe
for democracy. Democracy now has
tcx defend itself against anarchy.
One of these "progressive" papers
says that the main principle of bol bol-shevism
shevism bol-shevism is that only those .who work
shall vote. That wouldn't suit a lot
of people we know who claim to be
firm supporters of democracy. But
before we embrace the idea -with en
thusiasm, we want to know how much
i work do t.hp hnlsfiAviVi rnncior o
I work. There are lots of people now

who might vote under the bolshevik
system, yet they do not do enough
work to pay for their keep. If the
bols will proclaim and enforce a prin.
ciple that onTy those who work indus industriously
triously industriously and effectively shall vote, we
are with them.

After all, one hundred million dol dollars
lars dollars is not going to feed very many
Europeans unless the food can be
bcught cheaper than home folks have
to pay. Tampa Tribune.
It takes almost that much to feed
heme folks one day.
If Mr. Wilson would not recognize
Huerta and will not treat with Will William
iam William Hohenzollern, how is he going to
recognize Lenine and Trotzky? Huerta
was much -better and Bill Kaiser fully
as good.
i
; The most efficacious cure for Bol Bolshevism
shevism Bolshevism is the simplest. Feed the
brute! St. Petersburg Times.
And sec him. grow? Shooting is
more simple.
"MY SAMMY GIRL"
A glittering, whirlie girlie, military
spectacle called "My Sammy Girl"
will be the attraction at the Temple
this evening. No battles -just fun,
song," music with a cutenilitary love
story. Miss Madeline ( Jfere is the
bright shining star of the company
and is considered one of .the most
popular of the younger school of ac actresses
tresses actresses and her appearance will un undoubtedly
doubtedly undoubtedly be widely welcomed by the
theater going publicl
- UNCLASSIFIED
ADVERTISEMENTS
WANTED, LOST, FOUND, FOR
, SALE, FOR RENT AND SIM SIMILAR
ILAR SIMILAR LOCAL NEEDS
OR SALE Small smart sawmill
complete, or parts, all in excellent
condition. One 80 .H." P. Atlas high
pressure boiler, one 40 H. P. Farqu Farqu-har
har Farqu-har engine, one 25 II. P. Erie City en engine,
gine, engine, 40 ft. carriage complete, one No.
2 Soule, steam feed, one edger, one
Perkins shingle machine, two log
carts. Nathan Mayo, Summerfield,
Fla. 7-6t
LOST Bunch of keys on ring, en enclosed
closed enclosed in leather case. 'Supposed to
have been lost on Fort King avenue.
Return to Star office and receive re reward.
ward. reward. 7-3t
FOR SALE--Five-acre farm in North
Oeala, comprising five-room cottage,
horse and buggy, wagon, twelve hogs
and one Jersey cow. Apply to G. W.
Stephens, Ocala. 6-6t
LOST Sunday night between East East-lake
lake East-lake Weirx and Mrs. T. M. Moore's
residence on Fort King, a fur neck
piece. Reward to finder by applying to
Miss Blair Woodrow, 316 Fort King
avenue. .. 3-tf
WANTED A family on farm at
Lake Kerr;. 60 acres under fence. On
shares or standing wages. Can give
woman some work in the house. See
T. B. Crossley, Lake 'Kerr, or write
F, J; Cooledge & Sons, Atlanta, Ga.M
WANTED We offer one individual
representative, or any ladies' aid, mis missionary,;
sionary,; missionary,; church or woman's club, in
each town, exclusively, a conservative,
dignified, permanent means of income.
U. S. Carbon Co., Birmingham, Ala
bama.
. 20-lm
WANTED -All kinds of second-hand
furniture, guns, beds, etc. Notify
me and I will send for them. J. W.
Hunter, Gunsmith, South Main St. tf
BARGAINS IN
USED CARS
1 Chevrolet New Tires $450
1 Ford Roadster $275
1 4Buick new tires $250
1 Olds 8 new tires $900
1 Ford Touring $350
1 Ford Truck $350
1 Ford Roadster $350
... 1
. .Watch this list change
AtifQ : Sales Co.
MACK TAYLOR
1 PHONE 348
OCALA, FLORIDA.
liEWRlViSAYAGE OFFERS
- THE COMIC OPERA
Wednesday
February

HStTT

BULLETS CUT SMOKESTACK-

Unique Method Used to Remove Dan Dangerous
gerous Dangerous Portion.
nigh-powered rifles, operated by
crack marksmen, have been used to
rtwiove a portion of a dangerous
Fmoketack 1C5 feet high, at the plant
of the Richards Urlck company at
EdwardsvIIIe, 111. The stack has tfeen
p menace for some time, owing to Its
damaged condition from being struck
by lightning.
It was necessary to reduce the
height of the stack 20 feet and recap
It, but. owing to its dangerous condi condition,
tion, condition, workmen could not be sent to
the top. -The problem, was solved by
picking off the loose fragments by
bombarding them with rifles.
HUNTS FOR YANKEE SLANG
British Reporter Thinks He Find It
in Officer' Talk.
The search of the British reporter
for little stories of American slang
pr American mannerism never ceases.
Here's the latest unanthentlcated.
Seated at a table at a leading res restaurant
taurant restaurant was an American officer eat eating
ing eating lunch. Arriving at an item called
oyster patties" on the menu, he
tastet. a bit, then very, deliberately
laid down his fork and called for the
waiter.
"Say, waiter;" he said, 'something
very nasty seems to have died In the
Interior of this bun."
Childrea on Farms.
Twenty-one thousand children In the
state of Washington are enrolled in ag agricultural
ricultural agricultural and stock clubs through the
efforts of Mrs. Elizabeth Jones, in
charge of boys and girls agricultural
clubs In that state under the direction
of the United States .department of
agriculture. Mrs. Jones Is now going
to British Columbia to organize clubs
Junons the children there.
Visit our store. Our fountain is
loaded with good things to dring. The
Anti-Monopoly Drug Store. 10-6t

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: ATuncful Military Musical Treat Sparkling With Fun, Song and Girls

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THE ROLAND SISTERS

Qnnrrv nawrFQ supreme

YOU'LL BE SORRY lFYOUMlSS THIS ITS REALLY WORTH WHILE
PRICES-S.75, $1.00 and 81.50 PLUS WAR TAX.

THE

Christian Science Society
of Ocala Announces a
FREE. LECTURE
ON
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
By John Randall Dunn, C. S. of St. Louis, Member of the
Hoard of Lectureship cf the Mother C :urch. The First Church of
Christ,Scientist, in Boston, Mass.
AT THE
WOMAN'S CLUB, Tuesday, February 11th. at Eight
O'clock P. M.
.
The Public is.Cordially Invited

suskdI Press leg

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! Phone 102 I

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'H ONE BIG HlIM

LIl might fiyjll
" 'rffiA cute
C : ) LOlE
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Afh PEOPLE Mfh CAR LOAD OF NOVELTIES

livrjosTLY girlsiv
'MOSTLY GIRJ5

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ILLUMINATED SPRING BOARD

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OCALA EVENING STAB, MONDAY. FEBRUARY 10. 1919

OCALA OCCURRENCES
' 1 1 11 m m mm
. :
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W
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AND
mum good thing to eat

Smoked Bloaters
Dried Salt Mullet v
Bloater Paste
Salomi
. Dill Pickles
Pickled Salmon

Shrimp
. Lobster
Philaoelphia Scrapple
peviled Crab Meat
Crab Meat
i t Hening Roe

Mexican Frijoleswith Con Chili Gravy
Spaghetti and Chili with Cheese
Rice with Chili and Meat

" Ob.

M 11

1-

Real vs.;False Economy
At This Time

Resist the mental suggestion to curtail your regular taking of ice
until "the weather turns warm again." Your refrigerator is going
nicely now; it is well chilled and it is doing full duty as your1 prac practical
tical practical SAVER." v ;
Don't let it lapse even a little bit it may sulk on you all the
remainder 6f the season.
OCALA ICE AND PACKING COMPANY

Mr. and Mrs. Becker of Holder
were visitors in the city today.
Misses Lois Epperson and Florence
Moore were in Ocala shopping Friday.
Don't fret. Get a handy auto cleaner
from the Anti-Monopoly and you can
clean your car with ease. lQ-6t
Miss Mary Gates spent the week weekend
end weekend in Gainesville, the guest of
friends.

The -friends of Mrs. Kate Brinkley
will be sorry to hear of her illness,
although she is reported better.
Mrs. Akin, who has been making
her home with her daughter, Mrs. J.
C. Lanier, has moved to Dunnellon.
A new shipment of Dr. Edison's
Cushion Sole and "Ezall" Arch Pro Protecting
tecting Protecting Shoes for ladies just received
at the Little Shoe Parlor. 7-tf

Coming Feb. 19'

Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Williams came
up from Brooksville Saturday to be at
the bedside of Mr. Williams' father.

it

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Lieut. Commander Norman Kirk, J

who has been in, Ocala for the past
week, left Sunday to resume his com

mand.

Drza

Let us quote you prices
on a r1onument or Head Headstone
stone Headstone to mark the last rest resting
ing resting place of your ioved
ones. ' - -
r.lAHBLE QR GRAfJITE.
OCALA MARBLE WORKS
; E. W. LEAVENGOOD, Mgr.
N. Magnolia .St.
OCALA, FLORIDA.

Officers, tan, pink, blue and white
stationery. At .the Anti-Monopoly
Drug Store. 10-6t
Mrsl Ida Mathews of Columbus,
Ga arrived in Ocala Saturday to be
the guest of her daughter, Mrs. H. C.
Cameron, for the remainder of the
winter;

Dr. J. Walter Hood, who has been
at Miami for several weeks, "kinder
flirting around", with a faint idea of
a longer stay there, has returned
home and both he arid his many
friends are glad to see him back
again.

Mrs. Jean Conley, who has been in
New York for the past two weeks, has
returned. While away Mrs. Conley
has been buying new springs things
for the ready-to-wear department of
Rheinauer & Co.' 1 -.

, We are now ready to- offer BEAN SEED,
Wadwell and Davis Kidney Wax per bu. $14.
Valentine and other ..-"green beans per bu. $13.
Also have Fresh Peas, Water Melons Canta Cantaloupe,
loupe, Cantaloupe, Cucumber and other seeds.
OCALA SEED STORE

4 MEAT WITH GAS !;' v
RO' BEIT RO Dl)ST RO SMOKE
The THERMOPHORE Radiant Gas Heater Is the
- Best and Most Economical, Made.
A Full Line of Resnor and Hot Spot Heaters.
Let Us Demonstrate These To You.
FLORIDA UTILITIES CO.
Harrington Block, Fort King Ave.
OCALA, FLORIDA.

Liggett's Chocolate Cowered Whole
Brazil Nuts are always good. Gcrig's
Drugstore. tf
ii lll.ll. W III. Ill linn HI .
; A few couples of young folks met
et the home of Miss Onie Chazal Sat Saturday
urday Saturday night and .passed the time most
pleasantly. These congenial friends

meet once a week and most informal informally
ly informally while away the hours in dancing.
. An excellent assortment of Writ Writing
ing Writing Tablets. Come in and see the
line. .Gerig's Drug Store. tf
. ... L
Mr. and Mrs. Frank Drake enter entertained
tained entertained at dinner last week in honor
of Lieut, and Mrs; Norman Kirk and
Mrs. Abner Black. Those who were
asked to. enjoy the hospitality of Mr.
and Mrs. Drake were Mrs. Herbert
Ford, Miss Emily Stotesbury and
Mrs. Edward Drake.
' Those who haven't been to the auc

tion sale that is being held at the
store of Mr. A. E. Burnett have miss

ed the most exciting event of the

winter. The sale has been well at attended.
tended. attended. Every one besides being well

satisfied with the purchases seems to
thoroughly enjoy the excitement of

the sale. The sale commenced last

Tuesday and will continue until all of

the stock has been disposed of.

Special Co. Orchestra

5

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Illuminated Spring Board. One of the Many
Novelties in "My Sammy Girl," the Big Mus Musical
ical Musical Comedy at the Temple Theater Tonight.

TOE WIMBSOM HQ3PEL
X Jaclcsdnvillc, Florida.

In the heart of the city with Hemming Park for a front yard.
Every modern convenience in each room. Dining room service is
second to none.
RATES From $1.50 per day per person to $6.
ROBERT M. MEYER, J. E. KAVANAUGH
Manager. Proprietor.

Progressive business men are represented In our advertising column.

!" r7i TrN A. J-

mmm

Mr. M. H. Leville of Tampa with

his family have moved to Ocala, and
are located at Mrs: B. T. Perdue's
residence on Fort King avenue. Mr.
Leville is traveling for the American
Supply Company of "Tampa the larg

est automobile accessory house in the

South, and this is his firm's first move

to keep a man located at Ocala, which

is the, center' of its vast trade.

Just arrived, another large ship

ment of Nunnally's, "The Candy of

the South." Always fresh at Gerig's

Drug tSore. tf
Lieut. Commander and Mrs. Nor

man Kirk entertained at the Harring

ton Hall for a few intimate friends
Saturday night, at a dinner party.
The table was daintily and attractive attractively
ly attractively arrayed for. six. The following
tempting menu was served in courses,
ovster cocktail, tomato soup with

olives and pickles, crawfish, chicken,
peas, mashed potatoes, asparagus,
salad, ice cream, cake, coffee, cheese
and wafers. Those who enjoyed the
hospitality of Lieut. Commander and
Mrs. Kirk were Mr. and Mrs. Frank
Drake, Miss Louise. Gamsby and Miss
Alice Bullock. The time passed only
too swiftly and this delightful affair
will be remembered as one of the
pleasant events of Lieut. KirVs short
visit here.

Daily llealth-TQlIio
GOING BACK TO NATURE.
BY DR. W. LUCAS.
People get sick because they go away
from Nature, and the only tray to get
well is to go back. Something grows out
of the ground in the form of vegetation
to cure almost every ill. Some of these
vegetable growths are understood 'by
man, and some are not. Animals, it.
would eeem," know what to do when
they, are sick "better than men and
women. Observers have noted that a
sick horse, dog or cat will stop eating
food and seek out some vegetable
growth in the field or yard, which, when
found and eaten, often restores appetite
and health. Haven't you seen these
animals do this very thing yourself ?
r Dr.' Pierce, of Buffalo, Ni Y.t long
since found the herbs and roots pro provided
vided provided by Nature to overcome constipa constipation,
tion, constipation, and he had these vegetables col

lected and made up of Mayapple, leaves
of Aloe, root of Jalap, into little white
sugar-coated pills, that he. called Dr.'
Pierce'a-Pleasant Pellets. You must
understand .that when your intestines
are stopped up, poisons. and decayed
matter are imprisoned in your system,
and these are carried by the blood
throughout your body.. Thus does
your head ache, you get ditiy, yoa
can't sleep, your skin may break out,
your appetite declines, you get tired
and despondent. As a matter of fact,
you may get sick all over. Don't yoa
see bow useless all this suffering is T
AH that is often needed is a few of
Dr. Pierce's Pleasant Pellets, whlcbT he
has placed in all drug stores for your
convenience and health. Try them, by
all means. They, are probably the vcrj
thing you need right now.

life;

. FIRE

A. E. GERIG I
INSURANCE
Ocala, Florida ;
ACCIDENT AUTOMOBILE

EMveF

UNDERTAKERS end ELI3AU3ERS

PHONES 47. 101. $23
OCALA, FLORIDA

L. ALEXiUSTDER
PRACTICAL CARPENTEH
AND BUILDER

Careful Estimates made on all Con

tract work. Gives Hore and "Better
Work for the Honey than any other

contractor to the city.

iLyXperience
has tauht
thousands
that

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is better rbr

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Than comree

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'

E, Co dTOEIQ)AM'(S CO,
I Foneral Directors and Embalmers
AUTO MEARSE SERVICE
We deliver caskets free anywhere in the county.
Calls promptly answered night or day.
: rHDUR csnna .sai r.pyles, jr.
: LICENSED ETilBALIllERS.
Day Phone 10 Night Phones 223 and 423
9

Second Hand
BAGS'

Bought and Sold.
We Pay ilie Hlolicst Cash, Prices.
Write for Prices to
TAMP A. BAG COMPANY
POSTOFFICE BOX 532 Long Distance" Phone 4 175
Tampa, Florida.



OCALA EVENING STAB, MONDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1919

OCALA FBATERHAL ORDERS

K. OF P. MEETING
There will be a district meeting of
the K. of P. next Monday night, Feb.
10th, at eight o'clock, at the K. of P.
hall.
''WOODMEN OF THE WORLD
Fort King Camp No. 14 meets at
K. of P. hall at 7:30 p. m. every iec iec-ond
ond iec-ond and fourth Friday. Visiting sov sovereigns
ereigns sovereigns are always welcome.
W. W. Stripling, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage, Clerk.
ODD FELLOWS
' Tulula Lodge No. 22, I. O. O; F.,
meets every Tuesday evening in the
Odd Fellows' hall on the third floor of
the Star office building at 7:30 o'clock
promptly. A warm, welcome always
extended to visiting brothers. x
Joe Poter, N. G.
J. D. McCaskill, Secretary.
MIRIAM REBEKAH LODGE NO. 15
Miriam Rebekah Lodge No. 15
meets the first and third Monday eve evenings
nings evenings in each month in the Odd Fel Fellows'
lows' Fellows' hall at 7:30 o'clock.
Claire Moremen, N. G.
Eloise Bouvier, Secretary.
R. A. M. CHAPTER NO. 13
Regular convocations of the Ocala
Chapter No. 13, R. A. M., on the first
Friday in every month at 7:30 p. m..
J. A. Bouvier, H. P.
Jake Brown, Secretary.
KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
Ocala Lodge No. 19. Conventions
held every Monday evening at 7:30
at the Castle Hall, over the G. C.
Greene Co. drugstore. A cordial wel welcome
come welcome to visiting brothers.
W. W. Stripling, C. C.
Chas. K. Sage, K. of R. & S.
MARION-DUNN MASONIC LODGE
Marion-Dunn Lodge No. 19, F. & A.
M., meets ., on the first and thira
Thursday evenings of each month at
8 o'clock until further notice.
H. O. Cole, W. M.
J ake Brown, Secretarv.
ORDER Or Ji ASTERN STAR
Ocala Chapter No. 29, O. E. S.,
meets at Yonge's hall the second and
fourth Thursday evenings of each
month at 7:30 o'clock.
Mrs. Isabel Wesson, W. M.
Mrs. Susan Cook, Secretary-
OCALA LODGE NO. 286. B. P. O. E.
Ocala Lodge No. 286, Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, mets
the second and fourth Tuesday eve-'
nings in each month. Visiting breth brethren
ren brethren always welcome. Club house oppo opposite
site opposite postoffice, east side.
C. W. Hunter, E R.
E.J. Crock, Secretary.
ARRIVAL AND DEPARTURE
OF TRAINS AT OCALA
Seaboard Ay Line, Northbound
No. 4: Arrives 1:41 p.-m. Departs
1:56 p. m.
No. 16 (Limited): Arrives and de de-departs
departs de-departs at 4:07 p. m.
No. 2: Arrives 2:50 a. m.H Departs
2:55 a. m. ;
aeaooara Air L.ine, QoumDouna
No. 3: Arrives 3:06 p. m. Departs
3:26 p. m.-
No. 15 (limited) : Arrives end de departs
parts departs 5:10 p. m.
No. 1: Arrives 2:45 a. m. Departs
2:50 a. m.
Atlantic Coast Line (Main Line)
Northbound
No. 10: Arrives and departs 6:42 a.
No. 40: Arrives 2 p. m. Departs
2:20 p. m.
No. 38 :x Arrives and departs 3:27
a. m.
Atlantic Coast Line (Slain Line)
Southbound
No. 37 : Arrives and departs 3 :16
a. m.
No. 39: Arrives and departs 3:35
p. m.
No. 9: Arrives and departs 10:13
p. m.
Atlantic .Coast Line Branches, South
bound
No. 151 (Sunny Jim) : For Wilcox,
Monday, Wednesday and Friday,
leaves 7:10 a. m.
No. 35 (Sunny Jim): For Lakeland,
Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday,
leaves 7:40 a. m.
No. 141: Daily except Sunday, ;ar
rives 11:50 a. m. from, Wilcox.
No. 49: For Homosassa, leaves 3:25
p. a. v
Atlantic Coast Line Branches, North
bound
No. 48: From Homosassa:, Arrives
1:53 p. m.
No. 150 (Sunny Jim): From Wil Wilcox,
cox, Wilcox, Monday, Wednesday and Friday,
arrives 6:45 p. m. j :
No. 32 (Sunny Jim): I From Lake Lakeland,
land, Lakeland, Tuesday, Thursday and Satur Saturday,
day, Saturday, arrives 10:48 p. m.
No. 140: Daily except Sunday,
leaves for Wilcox at 4:45 p m.
Oklawaha Valley
No. 71 (southbound): Arrives 1 pjn.
No. 72: (northbound): Leaves 3:36
Enroll now for the Evening Star.

Mr. H. D. Stokes and Miss Edith
Edwards spent Sunday, at Mr. Stokes'
old home in Alachua county.
'
The company which plays "My
Sammy Girl," came in from Palatka
Sunday and put up at the Harrington.
It presents its live "show" at the
Temple tonight.
Imported perfumes, Djerkiss, Azu Azu-rea,
rea, Azu-rea, Mary Garden Sachets. Face pow pow-des,
des, pow-des, toilet waters, etc. Complete line
Anti-Monopoly Drug Store. 1016t.
That sturdy young soldier, Tom
McGahagin, passed thru town last
night on his way from Camp Sevier
to his home at Oklawaha. After Tom
has rested a few days from drilling,
he will resume his work with the A.

C L.
The temperature was at 30 degree
this morning, and is likely to be lower
tomorrow.
Capt. A. V. Hamill, the veteran A.
C. L. conductor, is now running be between
tween between Gainesville and Leesburg on
Nos. 9 and 10.
Don't forget to get our prices on
wax and green bean seed, garden peas
and all other seed. Ocala Seed Store,
Ocala, Fla. tf
Everybody in Ocala regrets that
Lieut. M. L. Mershon, one of our
clever, young lawyers, intends to re remove
move remove to Miami. He probably leaves
this week.
; Born, to Mr. and Mrs. G. D. Pas Pasteur
teur Pasteur Jr., of Anthony, at the Marion
County Hospital; Saturday, a fine son
and heir.
Rexall Cold Tablets will break up
any cold, and may prevent "flu." 25
cents the box at Gerig's Drugstore, tf
Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Harriss and
Mrs. Annie Van Deman left today for
Salt Springs, where they will spend a
few days.
Mrs. Annie Van Deman returned
yesterday from Jacksonville, where
she has been visiting f or the past
three weeks. ...
Mrs. J. M. Thompson leaves this
afternoon for a visit of some time to
her son and daughter-in-law, Dr. and
Mrs. Tom Thompson in Jacksonville.
' Dr. C. W. Moremen, dental surgeon,
Commercial Bank building. OCce
phone 211. Residence phone 238.
Ocala, Fla. , tf
Mrs. Dorothy Schaub of Chicago,
arrived in Burbank Saturday for a
visit to her father. Mr. Adams. Later
Mrs. Schaub will, visit friends ;, in
Ocala. V
The union Bible study class meets
at the Presbyterian manse Friday at
3 p.m. Subject continued from Rom.
viii chapter. All Bible students cor cordially
dially cordially invited, v L
Candy f6r the whole family. Five
cents to three dollars a box. Jacobs'
sold by the Anti-Monopoly Drug
Store. ' J0-6t
Mrs. M.N. Dunn and little daugh daughter
ter daughter Helen, who have been visiting
Mrs. Dunn's mother, Mrs. J. J. Wal Wallace
lace Wallace in Tampa for some time, have
returned to Ocala and are -again oc occupying
cupying occupying their apartments at Mrs.
Sinclair's residence. Mr. and Mrs.
Dunn have as their guest Mr. Dunn's
mothers Mrs. H. G. Dunn of Tampa,
who will be with them for a lengthy
visit. Mr. Dunn is the deputy inter internal
nal internal revenue collector for this district,
and has made- himself very popular
here.
Another shipment of Lord Balti Baltimore
more Baltimore paper and envelopes, in. Come
and get a supply. Gerig's Drug
Store. tf
W. K. Lane M. D., Physician and
Surgeon, specialist Eye, Ear, Nose and
Throat. Law, Library Building, Ocala,
Florida. .tf
Mr. Reynolds CrooTc, traveling
salesman for the South for the Hoge Hoge-Montgomery
Montgomery Hoge-Montgomery Co., shoe manufacturers
of Frankfort, Ky., Mr. James Brown,
president of the Cowpens Manufac Manufacturing
turing Manufacturing Co., cotton mill operators of
Cowpensy S. C, and Mr. S. T. Reed,
president of the Converse Savings
Bank of Spartanburg, S. C, arrived
in town yesterday afternoon. They
visited Silver Springs, and this morn morning
ing morning went to Fairy Island with Mr. J.
M Thomas to see" the Thomas-Crook
orange grove there. This afternoon,
Messrs. Crook, Brown and Reed went
on to Tampa, where Messrs. Brown
and Reed wish to look over the De De-Soto
Soto De-Soto hotel, which they have under
lease. The gentlemen were much im impressed
pressed impressed with this section of the, state.
; Back to First Principles.
Every once in a while, when human humanity
ity humanity pets scared, it abides by the sens sensible
ible sensible laws of cleanliness and physical
care laid down when the first trees
bloomed. Newark News.
r5 You are as big as the
&-VfS things you can do no
j&$52j bigger. -
&sg& Is your eyesight "big" "big"-enough
enough "big"-enough for you ?
Dr. K. J. Weihe, 4
Eyesight Specialist
Graduate Optometrist
With Weihe Co., Jewelers, Ocala, Fla.

TEMPLE ATTRACTIONS
FOR THE WEEK

Tonight: "My Sammy Girl."
Tuesday: Constance Talmadge in
"A Pair of Silk Stockings."
Wednesday: Tom Mix in "Fame and
Fortune."
Thursday: William S. Hart in
"Shark Monroe."
MEMORIAL SERVICES
Under the -auspices of the Marion
County Welfare League, of which J.
S. LaRoche is president, an interest interesting
ing interesting and affecting "memorial service
was held Sunday, honoring the mem memory
ory memory of the late Theodore Roosevelt.
The services were held at the Mount
Zion, A. M E. church, at 3 p. m., -with
President LaRoche presiding. The
following program was carried out:
Song, "America"- Congregation.
. Invocation by Rev. E. M. Arnold.
Scripture lesson, by Rev. H. L.
Stephens.
Introduction of master of cere ceremonies
monies ceremonies by Prof. J. H. Bonner.
Remarks by the master of ceremon ceremonies,
ies, ceremonies, J. S. LaRoche.
Duett by Phillips and Mrs. Graham.
"Col. Roosevelt as a Soldier" Prof.
J. D. McCall.
"Col. Roosevelt as Governor of New
York" Dr. W. P. Wilson.
"CoL Roosevelt as a Father" R. S.
Mitchell.
Music by the congregation.
"Col. Roosevelt as President" By
Prof. St. George Richardson.
"Col. Roosevelt as an Explorer"
Dr. R. R. Williams.
"Col. Roosevelt as a Husband"
Mrs. M. H. Powers. 1
Music by congregation.
Lieut. R. E. S. Toomey of Miami,
was called on and spoke briefly.
The following paper was read by
Mrs. M. H. Powers:
Mr. Roosevelt was twice married.
His first wife was Miss Alice Lee of
Boston. His first married life was a
brief one, his young wife dying is lit little
tle little over a year. She left a daughter,
Alice, who was dear to him. His
mother-died the same w&k with his
wife, leaving him doubly alone, ilis
second marriage, to Miss Edith, K.
Carow, took place in 1886. She is the
women he proved the husband to the
end. She it was who said by home is
where pure, love reigns, and is the
dearest spot of earth. So many time's
he said jny wife loves me. To this
marriage four sons and one daughter
were born. And this dear wife still
survivesMr. Roosevelt. It seems I
can hear um say ciy wife loves me.
She rushes quickly to defend any ac accusation
cusation accusation aaginst my character or mo motive,
tive, motive, which makes me believe her af affections
fections affections are as true as the compas
needle and as firm as a thousand
fathom rockj My wife truly was a
gift from God, he said so many times.
Tc me she is a strong tower, an an anchor,
chor, anchor, a fortress. Oh. that home of
Mr. Roosevelt must have been an
ideal home, which added greatly to
his -life.- Though he was a skilled,
trained hunter and though during his
later years the love of wild life clung
to him, he : was a man of steady
nerves and though he roamed among
the wild beasts in the jungles -of Af Africa,
rica, Africa, he never forgot the dear wife at
home, and some day I will come back
to her the dear husband I always
have been. Let me say that love is al always
ways always the ruler, .for love is kind. The
mosly excellent of all graces accom accompanied
panied accompanied by firmness and decision. Such
was the character of Mr. Roosevelt to
his dear wife and, children. Oh, well
may the dear, wife say, how we miss
you since you left us.
A little word in kindness spoken, a
motion or a tear
Has often healed the heart that's
broken, and made a friend sin sincere.
cere. sincere. Then deem it not an idle tiling a
pleasant word to speak,
The face you wear, the thought you
bring, a heart may heal or
break.
Lives of great men best will teach
us to make our lives sublime.
FACING FITTED TO JACKET
Value of Invention by New York Den.
tist Will Not Need a Great Deal
of Explanation.
A porcelain Jacket crown for a tooth
Li commonly preferred to a gold crown.
particularly if the
artificial membez
is conspicuous!;
situated, but th
former is costlj
'and difficult to
mount. As a sub substitute
stitute substitute for the
.iim 41 ye OX
porcelain jacket
. crown, a new
York dentist, has
invented a porce porcelain
lain porcelain facing that
can easily be fit
DEPRESSIONS
57
SECTION
FACING
N RIGHT
SECTION MOUNTED
ted to a metal jacket set on the natur natural
al natural tooth.
Each of these facings is provided
with four depressions on its inner sur surface,
face, surface, and protruding near the cutting
end is a T-shaped anchor. After a
facing of the desired color and shape
has been' selected it is held next to the
tooth to be crowned while a wax jacket
la fashioned around the latter, the wax
filling the depressions in the facing ant!
inclosing the anchor. Then the facing
and wax jacket are removed and placed
in a plaster mold, after which the wax
Is melted and metal cast in its place place-In
In place-In this comparatively -simple manner a
perfectly fitting jacket, with a well well-matched
matched well-matched facing, Is produced.
' Drop in and see the Jonteel Rouge.
Three colors. Gerig's Drug Store, tf

A

m 1

JACKET

ji OCT ft

JillLlBiyWiS
GOOD HIGHWAYS HELP TRADE
Act as a Spur to Business Besides Giv Giving
ing Giving Pleasure to Motorist- Bene Benefit
fit Benefit Everybody.
To some people good roads mean
simply an advantage for the motorist,
a convenience that was created and Is
maintained for the motorist's benefit,
enabling him to get from place to
place without racking his car to pieces
or experiencing the necessity of being
towed out of hub-deep mud.
Yet there Is another side to this sub subject
ject subject of the value of good roads, writes
L. J. Oilier in Chicago Tribune. Good
roads mean more than an opportunity
to get out on tours from the health
giving and pleasure standpoints.
Good roads are closely allied with
progress and prosperity. They pro promote
mote promote the more widespread use of au au-toinoblles,
toinoblles, au-toinoblles, and statistics prove automo automobiles
biles automobiles and prosperity always go to toother.
other. toother. It Is fair to say that good roads ben benefit
efit benefit everybody: the city dwellers, those
who live in towns, and th'ose who live
on farms. Of course, the fast-growing
use of motorcars the fact that auto automobiles
mobiles automobiles are now considered practical practically
ly practically a necessity for everybody has been
the biggest single Influence in awak awakening
ening awakening this country to the fact that
money expended in good roads exten extensions
sions extensions and Improvements Is money well
spent.
We can all remember how only a
few years ago city people paid little
attention to good roads, and how farm farmers
ers farmers were even opposed to the expendi expenditure
ture expenditure of funds for the betterment of
highways. That, of course, was before
automobiles came Into such wide widespread
spread widespread usage. In the days when motor motorcars
cars motorcars were considered an extravagance
:ind were owned only by the rich.
Good roads and the automobile have
taken people out Into the country.
They have banished forever the isola isolation
tion isolation of farm life. They have Increased
health and prolonged life. They have
enabled people to dig In and put better
r-'f
-V v.-
Highway Traffic Follows Development.
,
efforts into their work as a result of
the relaxation and broadenlng-out ex experiences
periences experiences of the week-end trip into the
country.
The, prospect of being able to buy
an automobile and receive the benefits
of good roads has spurred the ambi ambition
tion ambition and quickened the imagination of
the man who walks or uses street cars.
He wants to be Independent.
He wants to get away from the lim limited
ited limited vision that of necessity must be
his just as long as he Is bound to a
life-of pounding pavements and cling clinging
ing clinging to street-car straps. He works
harder and achieves more, with the
prospect of spinning over good roads
in his own automobile. For travel traveling
ing traveling only around townvhe may feel that
he cannot afford an automobile; that
he cannot get his money's worth.
There is where good roads jcome in,
enabling 'just such a man to get out
Into the country and broaden out.
Good roads have been a stimulator
of business. By means of good roads
an outlet to the congestion of cities
has been afforded. New towns have
sprung up.
FUTURE NEEDS OF HIGHWAYS
Road Built Today May Ho Stand Re Requirements
quirements Requirements of Tomorrow Truck
Will Show Weakness.
Roads should be built with an eye
to the future needs as closely as the
future needs can be -figured. A road
built for today may not stand the re requirements
quirements requirements of tomorrow. The same
holds true of bridges and culverts. The
truck will soon show up this weakness
of the old road policy.
Work Needed After Rains.
There are many times when a day's
work can be spared on the road. After
heavy rains the road may need certain
repairs or improvements when the
overseer is not ready to call out the
hands.
Crooked Road Dangerous.
With modern means of traffic a
crooked road Is a dangerous road,
therefore, every road builder should
endeavor to straighten his gutters. J
Besides, crooked gutters have a bad 1
appearance.

v,

ATTENTION FAKMSMS2

Wc are now prepared to furnish you with
a great variety of the best labor saving
- Farming Tools. Our line is complete
with a big line of ;
' BRINLY AND BLUEBIRD PLOWS,
MOINE RIDING PLOWS,
MOLINE RIDING DISC PLOWS,
INTERNATIONAL DISC RIDING CULTIVA CULTIVATORS,
TORS, CULTIVATORS, SIX SHOVEL RIDING CULTIVA CULTIVATORS,
TORS, CULTIVATORS, DISC, DRAG 'AND SPRING-
TOOTH HARROWS,
PLANET JUN OR CULTIVATORS, SEEDERS
AND HAND TOOLS,
LEDBETTER ONE-SEED PLANTER, x
CLARK CUTAWAY HARROWS,
ACME HARROW AND PULVERIZER.

CLARKSOT
Sonth Magnolia SI.
GOODRICH TIRES
ARE AHEAD
Just as are all our other auto 'sup 'supplies.
plies. 'supplies. To say that you get .your sup supplied
plied supplied here is to show that you know
what your car or you should have and
where to get it at its best and at the
right price.
GOODRICH "EXCLUSIVELY-
BLAL0CK BROTHERS
107 Oklawaha Avenue

WHITE STAR LINE
TRANSFER STORAGE

AUTO
TRUCK
SERVICE
Long Distance
Moving

c

PHONE 296

COLLIER
. ... 0
Edith Thayer and Tom Walsh, Two
Savage's Comic Apera Gem, "Pom
Henry W. Savage's
A merchant who advertises uraa.llv
customers, and you can depend oa hit
sell' It off. by advertising, before It

v

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ARDWA:RE C.
Ocala, Florida.

-e

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COVERED
MOVING
VANS
Teaming Packing
Hosting
BROTHERS
'
Important Characters in Henry W.
-Pern, Temple Theater February 19th
EdUtla TSiayer m
h something of merit to offer hti
merchandise belrrr fresh, bec&uza hm
grows old on fcls shelves. rxaer tl:'



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UF00075908_05179.mets
METS:structMap STRUCT1 physical
METS:div DMDID ADMID The ORDER 0 main
PDIV1 Main
PAGE1 Page
METS:fptr FILEID
PAGE2
PAGE3
PAGE4 4
STRUCT2 other
ODIV1
FILES1