The Ocala evening star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:05125

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star

Full Text
OCALA

EVENINfi

A. TTV

VOL. 21.
OCALA FLORIDA, TUESDAY, JUNE 9, 1914
NO. 134
P
W

IT

i

ft

b.

1

CAT

Afl

MADE Itn TO Hfll!
MEDIATORS

FEDERALS BY

COIISIITOHUSIS MAY SIOP HIIIG, BUT ARE Ull Ull-ALTERABLY
ALTERABLY Ull-ALTERABLY OPPOSED 10 COMPROMISE

Niagara Fall3, June 9. American
suggestions for effecting peace with
Mexico were presented to the Huer Huer-ta
ta Huer-ta delegates today by the Argentine,

Brazilian and Chilean mediators. It

is reported the American plan pro provides
vides provides for the recognition of the dele delegates
gates delegates from President Carranza with without
out without requiring a formal 'armistice and
regardless of the constitutionalist
protestations that no provisional
government for Mexico will be ar arranged
ranged arranged here. The mediators are
now convinced that Carranza may
be trusted to stop actual fighting
while officially denying that a truce
exists. This concession has been
made because the constitutionalist
army is unfavorable to any compro compromise
mise compromise with Huerta.

LADOR TROUBLES
III 1 FALV

TKOOP8 MASSED IN THE CITIES
TO HOLD THE WORKING
MEN DOWN
Rome, June 9. Labor troubles
are paralyzing Italy today. Working
men in the cities are on a strike,
and the government Is massing
troops at points -where violence is
threatened. The king's palace is be being
ing being strongly guarded. Many news newspapers
papers newspapers were unable to Issue on ac account
count account of printers going on strike
A general railroad strike is threat threatened.

CLEAII BILL
OF

CHARACTER

WITH DIVORCE' FROM HER HUS HUS--
- HUS-- BAND GRANTED MADAME
SCH UMA X N-1 1 E INK

Chicago, June 9. Madame Sehu-

, mann-Heink was today granted a

- divorce from her husband, William
Rapp, Jr. The verdict was render rendered
ed rendered upon instructions of the court.
The judge declared "there was not a
scintilla of evidence introduced
against the plaintiff." .The Diva,
radiantly happy, declared she would
never marry again.

ADLAI

STEVE SON

HEAD THE END

DISTINGUISHED DEMOCRAT DY DYING
ING DYING AT A HOSPITAL IN
CHICAGO
' Chicago, June 9 Adlai Stevenson,
former vice president of the United
States, is gradually sinking at the
Presbyterian 'Hospital today. All
hope of his recovery has been aban abandoned.
doned. abandoned.

SEVERE REVERSES
IN THE SOUTH

FOR HUERTA'S FACTION RE REPORTED
PORTED REPORTED FROM MEXICO
CITY -'
Vera Cruz, June 9. There were
unconfirmed reports tqday of. the
capture of Cuernavaca and Puebla
by rebels. If' this is true, Huerta
will suffer severe reverses in 'the
south and his downfall will likely be
accomplished hy Zapata before the
constitutionalists start their cam campaign
paign campaign against .Mexico City. The Mex Mexican
ican Mexican gunboats are today returning
to Puerto. They have not received
any official communication rescind rescinding
ing rescinding the 'blockade at Tampico, but
were warned by the American war warships
ships warships that the blockade would ,not
be allowed.

11

limit

,11

AM G

RICH

T TO REPEAL TOLLS Oil

000

0

AO II

ADDED TO THE MEASURE i'ILL PROBABLY

OF THE REPEAL BILL THIS

IIISURE PASSAGE

EVENING

Washington, June 9. The Senate
expects to vote on the Panama canal
repeal bill tonight. The adoption of
the second Simmons amendment,
providing passage of the bill will not
be a waiver of any right the United
States may possess to exempt its
ships from the payment of tolls, is
probable, and this will be followed
by a vote on a probable passage of
the bill.

ISN'T THIS AWFUL?

In Spite of Hot Air About Flagler's
Generosity, Florida Shippers Most
Pay for His Key West Extension.
Washington, June 9. By decision
of the supreme court the Florida
East Coast Railway will be permit permitted
ted permitted for the present to charge a rate
on Florida fruit and vegetables -based
on the large expenditure of ex extending
tending extending the road over-sea to Key

West.

A A ZA'S

FJ

ARE WIG

You get good, genuine coca-cola at
I rt J An

WILSON AND BRYAN EXPECT TO
SOON SEE THEM AT THE
CONFERENCE
Washington, Juno 9. President
Wilson and Secretary Bryan are
hopeful that Carranza will soon be
represented at the mediation con conference,
ference, conference, was the announcement -made
from the White House today. No
statement could be secured whether
the steamer Antilla will be allowed
to land her cargo of war munitions
for the rebels at Tampico.

Litem
THRU THE LOCKS

EVERYTHING vORKED EASY
FOR PASSAGE OF THE
ALLIANCA
Panama, June 9. The first pas passage
sage passage through the Gatun locks by an
ocean liner was successfully carried
out today by the Panama Railroad
steamship Allianca, a vessel of 4,000
tons.

DREADFUL DEATH OF
A TENNESSEE GIRL

Covington. Tenn,. June 9. Miss
Delia Williams, age 15 years, Was
killed by lightning here this morn morning.
ing. morning. The young girl was completely
enveloped in blue flames.

The Ocala Business College, under
the management of Prof. Eigle, is
rapidly becoming one of Ocala3
solid business institutions. It has be become
come become necessary to aid another
teacher to his staff. Miss Annie R.
Martin, of Augusta, Ga who has
been most successful in this line of
work, has accepted a position with
the college. !Miss Martin comes to
Ocala with the highest recommen recommendations
dations recommendations from the superintendent of
schools of Augusta, and other promi prominent
nent prominent citizens..

"If it Isn't an Eastman it isa's a
kodak." Gerig's Drug Stores,
agents. 5-16-tf

FIREMEIIOID
IIOBLE FIGHTItIG

Saved Much Valuable Property on
North Magnolia Street this
Afternoon
-
A little after 1 o'clock this after afternoon
noon afternoon a. fire alarm came In from the
Linwood Apartments, leased and
opearjed as an apartment house by
Mrs. Beaton, the widowed sister of
.Mrs. Joseph 'Malever. The fire was
in the ceiling of the two-story ell at
the rear of the house and spread
with Incredible rapidity so that when
the firemen arrived at the scene,
that portion of the roof was in a
great blaze.
One stream of Water was soon
playing oir the fire from the hydrant
at- the front corner of the house.
There was some little delay in cou coupling
pling coupling the one at the next corner on
Main street. In a very, short time,
ho wever, there were three streams
of water on the house and the roof
and inside were covered with men,
paid and 'volunteer firemen and citi citizens.
zens. citizens. A great deal of the furniture was
taken out, as it looked like the
house would burn up in a few min minutes.
utes. minutes. "When the water began to
play on the fire, the, flames on the
outside was extinguished in a few
minutes, but smoke poured from ev every
ery every crevice, indicating that there
was smouldering fire inside the roof.
This, however, was soon out. The
damage Is considerable to both house
and furniture, probably more done
by water than fire. Much of the
goods carried out. was damaged.
Mrs. Beaton has some insurance
of her household goods, but whether
enough to make the damage good
or not we do not know. The house,
which is owned by the Edwards es estate,
tate, estate, was insured and the loss will
be fully covered.
The house was formerly the home
of the late Mr. and Mrs. Judson Ed
wards and of the Edwards brothers
of this city and Mrs. Henry Stokes,
and is a very large residence and
quite valuable.
The firemen did good work and
fast work and many people who did
not know what we home folks ex expect
pect expect of our firemen, never expected
to vsee the house saved. The dam damage
age damage to the clothing of the volunteer
firemen, who dashed in regardless of
their clothes, will be considerable,!

as the reporter saw a number of
ruined suits.

nil

m

I1ETY DEGREES OF DRV HEAT GEDEH11

THE HI

OR OVER FRE0UEI1T HI THE 'DIDDLE WEST

AND MY DEATHS CAUSED DV THE HEAT

IIU1IDRED

Chicago, June 9. The entire
country today is sweltering under
an intense heat wave, the tempera temperature
ture temperature being generally over 90 degrees.
In many places in the middle West
the theremometer registered oevr
100, and at Evansville, Ind., yester yesterday
day yesterday it reached 108 In the shade. At
Logansport, same state, It was 102.
Two suicides at Fort Wayne, one
death at Southbend,'one at Wabash,
a drowning at North Vernon and
three deaths in Chicago today are
all attributed to the terrific heat.
There is no relief in sight.
PROSTRATIONS IN PITTSBURG
Pittsburg, Pa., June 9. Five
deaths and a dozen prostrations are
the total up to date of the present
torrid wave.
. ATLANTA AN INFERNO
Atlanta, Ga., June 9. Atlanta is
suffering today from the hottest
weather of the year. The mercury
stood at 95 degrees.

SUFFERING GREAT IN
CRESCENT CITY

THE

New Orleans, June 9. Nine are
dead and five persons suffering ser serious
ious serious injuries as the result of the in intense
tense intense heat today in Louisiana and
Mississippi. There were eight at attempted
tempted attempted suicides and scores of pros prostrations
trations prostrations during the last twenty-four
hours.

CRAZED Of HEAT
LOUISVILLE MAN DASHED HIM HIM-v
v HIM-v SELF TO DEATH
Louisville, -Ivy., June 9. Crazed
by the Intense heat, Julius Bronson,
a janitor, leaped from the sixth story
of the Kenyon building today, and
was crushed to death on the pavement.

E

HUB

OP
THE RESULTS

Canvassing Board for the Primary
Election Has Completed
Its Count 1
, Supervisor Barco, aided by three
of the commissioners, finished reck recking
ing recking up the primary, returns this
morning.- with the .following result:
Commissioner, District No. 2
Coulter, 285; Kutchins 418; Parker."

1 35; Smith, 143; Watk Ins, 368.

, Commissioner, District No. 1
Carmichael, 724; Carn, 806.
Commissioner, District No. 3 t
Davis, 728; Pyles. 733.
Senator Fletcher 931; Stockton,"
590.
Congressman Clark, 1012; Den Denton.
ton. Denton. 271. ' v ":
Commissioner of Agriculture
Appleyard, 417; MoRae, 905. ; '"
Justice Supreme Court -Avery,
607; Ellis. 738; Shackleford. 694.
' Representatives Crosby, 1223;
Henderson, 892; Light, 741.
State Attorney Koonce, 524;
Scofield, 973.
Assessor Ayer, 887;. Moorhead,
646.
CollectorColbert; 1034; Strip Stripling,
ling, Stripling, 525.
Board of Public" Instruction
Blltch, 1157; Nettles. 254." I.
Executive Committeeman Gary,
281; Gober, 213.

ARE

FREE G

snow flying in paris and the
"mercury is ikwn to
FORTY
Paris, June 9. rA phenomenal
snowstorm struck Paris this morn morning.
ing. morning. Ove- two inches of snow fell.
The temperature dropped to 40 de degrees.
grees. degrees. In some places the snow
drifted and filled low places.

SILVEii JIKDAL CONTEST
The Woman's Christian Temper Temperance
ance Temperance Union will hold a silver medal
declamatory contest this' evening,
June 9th. at the Airdome, in
conectlon with the moving pictures.
We have the promise of some extra
good pictures for that night, and one
price, 10 cents, will -pay for 'the
whole program.

The following program will be
carried out:
A Drunkard's Child Flora Bell
Polly.
My Son Alethea Ashley.
The Cost of a License Maryela
Bray.
The Volunteer Organist Cevie
Roberts.
An Incident of the Crusade Eliza Elizabeth
beth Elizabeth Cowdrick.
A Stray Sunbeam Esther Perry.
Good music will be furnished with
this. Everybody come to encourage
the young people in the good work.
Committee.

A LESSON ON CITIZENSHIP.
Teacher Can anyone tell me who are citizens of the United States?
Johnnie Anyone born on Uncle Sam's territory 21 years ago or any foreigner who has lived here long enough and has taken the oath of allegiance.
Teacher Correct Now tell me who of our citizens are wholly of partly disfranchised? Johnnie Our women, our convicts and men who own no real estate
Teacher Correct. Now Johnnie, can you tell me why they do not vote?
Johnnie Our forefathers thought our mothers too pure and good to mix in politics, and our convicts too bad; our lawmakers think that no man who does not
own a portion of old mother earth has a right to vote on Bond issues for public improvements. For instance, a man lives in Florida and the state should vote for
bonds to build a highway, and he owned no real estate, he would not be allowed a vote; or if he lives in Marion County, and owns no real estate in this county, he
could not vdte for county bonds, for hard roads or other improvements; or, if he lived in the City of Ocala, and is not a freeholder, as bad as we need streets a sew sewerage
erage sewerage system and a larger electric .light plant, and we should vote for bonds for these purposes, he would be disfranchised.
Teacher Now, Johnnie, can you tell me how a man with only a little money can own a piece of real estate?
Johnnie No Mam; but B. H. Seymour can. His office is in the Cam Building at 21 North Magnolia Street.

17 LOTS SOLD IN THE LAST TWO WEEKS; $25 DOWN, $10 A MONTH.



TWO

THE OCALA EVENING STAR. TUESDAY, JTNE 9, 1014
OCALA EVENING STAR
PUBLIC OWNERSHIP OP
RAILROADS, WATERWAYS
AND WATER POWER
tCL
PUBLISHED EVERY DAY EXCEPT SUNDAY

(Continued from Yesterday)

BITTINGER & CARROLL, PROPRIETORS
R. Carroll, General Manager Port V. Lea Ten good. Business Manager
J. H. Benjamin, Editor

Entered at Ocala, Fla., postofflce

PHONE 51

SUI5SCI1IPTION RATES

(Domestic)
Dne year, in advance.. ....$5.00
fix months, in adance. . 2.5
Three months, in advance. 1.25
One month, jx advance. .. .50
PUBLICITY PREVENTS PANIC
One of the Star's good friends,
an eminent physician gave it a hless hless-Ing
Ing hless-Ing out the other day because, like
ano3t other papers, when anybodj' of
Its acquaintance is sick, or is recov recovering
ering recovering from an illness, it make3 note
of the fact.
"It give3 people a false impression
of the health of the town," said he.
'Anybody in another town or an another
other another state, especially at the sickly
season of the year, or the reason that
people not acquainted with Florida
believe to be sickly, reading items to
the effect that people in Ocala are
sick, or have been sick, jump to the
conclusion that they are or have been
sick with fever, or some other dread dreaded
ed dreaded disease, and form an opinion of
the health of the town accordingly.
You shouldn't,'' he went on, "ever
report anybody as being sick. Their
iriends all know when they are sick,
and when they recover; it isn't any any-body
body any-body else's business, and it not only
gives a false impression of the health
of the' town to people at a distance.
but it alarms many timid and excita excitable
ble excitable people in the city."
There is much merit in what the
."gentleman says, and if the practice
'Co old become universal we -would be
2heartlly in favor of it. Its a beau beautiful
tiful beautiful theory to strictly avoid spread spread-ling
ling spread-ling the report of' anything harmful,
and JX it could he extended to in include
clude include error and crime as well as dis disease,
ease, disease, we would gladly do our little
J part in trying to kill the weeds in
."' life's garden by smothering them
with flowers. It would be a much
r nicer world if there was no scandal,
and misfortune was only mentioned
.in subdued whispers of sympathy.
-But we are afraid it -wouldn't
nrofk, and we are quite sure that if
we suppressed all reports of sick sickness,
ness, sickness, about the only result would be
rthat we would be blamed sby a great
many people for lack of interest in
them or their friends. We are also
1 9 J 1 A. 1 A. A
jiol ouiy axraia, uut aiiuust ssurt? iuai
J -J. Jl-A--.- ... l J

tice rafter awhile that -we never re re-:
: re-: ported anybody sick, and with the
"vsicnal perversity of human nature
"would say, "There must be an epi epidemic
demic epidemic in Ocala."
rFor:snch is unavoidably the result
of trying to suppress ill report.
Years ago, the writer dwelt awhile
In a city in which there were many
cases of smallpox, then a much more
fpiTftd and misunderstood disease

than now. The city was a place of
some fifteen thousand people there
were perhaps fifty or sixty cases of
smallpox, about twenty of which
were fatal.
The newspapers of the city ta tabooed
booed tabooed the -word "smallpox." They
never let on that there was such a
thing. Their silence on the subject
was so dense that it could be cut
.with a knife.
:But everybody in that city shud shuddered
dered shuddered with dread of the disease, and
,; almost everybody in hundreds of
miles of the town believed it was
i scourged with an epidemic of the
plague. The newspapers in nearly
-cities told of it; it was common talk
. on all the trains in and out of the
"towns people didn't go there unless
vtaey had to; people from there were
vwatched with unfriendly interest;
fsome of the smaller towns quaran quarantined
tined quarantined against it; and even in the lit little
tle little mountain valleys for a couple of
hundred miles everybody was on the
Soofcout for strangers and, contrary
:to Their usual hospitality shut their
doors against many unlucky travel travellers
lers travellers whom they suspected of fleeing
.Tram the afflicted city.
The worst element of this partic particular
ular particular case was the exaggeration. The
least of the reports circulated was
that the disease was ten times as
bad as it really was. According to
most of the rumors there were hun hundreds
dreds hundreds of cases of the disease, and
people were dying of It in the streets.
The Star is very conservative of
Its reports of sickness. In most of
them, it puts off saying people have
been sick till t can say they are con convalescent.
valescent. convalescent. It never reports a case
ml contagious disease without per permission
mission permission of the board of health, and
-never reports sickness as being
hopeless except at the last and then
At the request of relatives. It doesn't

as second class matter.

(Foreign)
Oce year, in advance. .$8.00
Six months, in advance 4.25
Three months, in advance. 2.25
One moD'h, in advance.... .SO
see what more it could reasonably
do, and moreover, it can't agree with
its eminent friend that the policy of
suppression i3 beneficial.
We have a law in' Florida, a relic
of yellow fever times, that makes it
a misdemeanor to report cases of
contagious disease. This law is gen generally
erally generally observed by the newspapers,
and entirely disregarded by every everybody
body everybody else. A newspaper, unless the
editor is a newcomer to the state,
will not print a report of a conta contagious
gious contagious disease without authority of a
physician an authority which the
physician seldom gives. But every
other person circulates the report,
without authority and sometimes
without reason. And the law is nev never
er never invoked against them. If a news newspaper
paper newspaper reported a case of contagious
disease, and was called up in court,
and had proof of its assertion, it
ould knock the law higher than a
kite.
Charles A. Dana, the greatest ed editor
itor editor who ever lived, made it one of
his principles that it was right for
a newspaper to print anything that
the Almighty allowed to happen,
and, except that it does not believe
in printing things of small import importance
ance importance to the public that may hurt in innocent
nocent innocent people, the Star thinks he
was right.
If exactly the opposite course to toward
ward toward cases of sickness was followed;
if it was made the duty of every
physician to at once report every
case of serious sickness to the near nearest
est nearest newspaper, and it was the cus custom
tom custom of such newspapers to publish
such reports without comment, there
would be less public alarm than
there now is. Everybody would
know who was sick, of course. But
the benefit of such a policy would be
that they would also know who
wasn't sick.
For instance: "Mr. Blank is sick
at his home in the second ward. The
attending physician pronounces- hl3
disease to be smallpox. The usual
precautions have been taken," etc.
Or ".Mr. Bl2nk has ben taken; to
the hospital. His physician an announces
nounces announces that his trouble is typhoid-"
The last case of smallpox in Ocala
was not published as smallpox, until
after the patient 'was dead, and
buried, but everybody in town knew
it was smallpox, and exaggerated
tumors about it were scattered all
over half a dozen counties. Rumors
of typhoid fever were rife fn Ocala
last week. We have no official au
thority to say there was even one
case, but the rumors gave out sev
eral, including one citizen, who was?
quietly attending to business at his
store at the time some of his- friends
said he was in a dying condition at
his home.
It is seldom that we disagree with
one physician, let alone the whole
profession, but in this matter we
beg to inform it, and have plenty of
history to back the assertion, that
publicity prevents and mystery pro
motes popular panics.
OCAIA PUBMC LIBRARY
Open dally except Sunday from 3
to 5 p. m. Board of Trade rooms,
Ocala House block.
Louise E. Gamsby, Librarian.
ORDER OF EASTERN STAR
Ocala Chapter, No. 29, O. E. S-
meets at Yonge's hall the second and
fourth Thursday evenings of each
month at 7:30 o'clock.
Mrs. Flora Brown, W. M.
Miss Florrie Condon, Sec'y.
CURES STUBBORN
ITCHY SKIN TROUBLES
"I could scratch myself to pieces"
Is often heard from sufferers of Ec Eczema,
zema, Eczema, tetter. Itch and similar skin
eruptions. Don't scratch stop the
itching at once with Dr. Ho&son's
Eczema Ointment. Its first applica application
tion application starts healing; Ted rough, scaly.
itching skin is soothed by the heal-
ine and cooling medicines. Mrs. C.
A. Einfeldt, Rock Island, 111., after
using Dr. Hobson's Eczema Ointment,
writes: "This is the first time in
nine years I have been free from the
dreadful ailment." Guaranteed. 50c,
at your druggist. Tue Thur fri w
DeLuxe Initial correspondence
rards- the verv latest out, at the
Court Pharmacy. 6-6-6t

Railroads Under Receivership
In spite of these enormous public
subsidies, in spite of high rates, in
spite of the frequent control by rail railway
way railway politicians in Congress and leg legislatures
islatures legislatures and courts, 735 railway
companies, operating 136,165 miles
of road and involving nearly eight
billion dollars of stock and bonds,
have gone in to the hands of receiv receivers.
ers. receivers. In other words, until agencies
of the government took hold of
more than half of the roads,
squeezed the water out of them and
compelled them to be temporarily
honest, they could not run success successfully.
fully. successfully. The operation of railways
under government receivership has
ben surprisingly successful and fur furnishes
nishes furnishes an argument of no small val value
ue value for government ownership. The
actual general manager of some of
these railways under receiverships
has been a federal judge, not a
trained railroad man.
Efficiency? Has not Mr. Louis
Brandeis, in his brief to the inter interstate
state interstate commerce commission, pointed
out the leaks of many million dollars
not to mention the assertion of ex experts
perts experts he examined, who declared
that three hundred million dollars a
year could be saved to the railways
by more efficient management?
Efficiency? Is it efficient man management
agement management to kill or injure every year
one trainman for every nine train trainmen
men trainmen employed? Think of it! In
nine years every trainman employed
in the operation of the railway trains
in the United States would be injur injured
ed injured or killed if there were no new
men to fill the gaps and share the
burden of killings and injuries. And
inefficiency is only one -indictment
of the American people against the
railways.
Waste goes along as one factor of
inefficiencj'. Waste Is inherent In the
system itself, waste that would be
almost entirely eliminated by the
mere fact of changing from private
ownership to the unity of national
public operation. For their legal
departments alone the railways ex expended
pended expended last year about twelve bil billion
lion billion dollars; and that sum did not
include the salaries of many highly
paid general solicitors and counsel counselors.
ors. counselors. A large share of this expense
would be unnecessary if a Bureau of
the government, with its corps of"

assfstants from the department of
justice had the management of the
rail highways of the country.
The Cos of Getting Business
The Interstate Commerce Commis Commission
sion Commission asserted recently, that the rail railways
ways railways lost annually fifteen j million
dollars by giving free service to in
dustrial companies. This is not
only waste, it Is also a fraud our the
shippers who are competing with
such industrial.
Simply getting' the- business by
their traffic departments, the rail railways
ways railways are spending fifty-six million
dollars annually. The soliciting that
mekes up the bulk of this expanse
simply enables one railway to take
business away from another. For the
most part It is pure waste. For the
year ending June 30, 1911, the peo people
ple people thru the United States govern government
ment government paid the railways fifty 'million
dollars for transporting the mails.
Tn the same year, the people, thru
the express companies, paid the rail railways
ways railways seventy million dollars for
transporting packages. The railways'
middlemen profits in these transac transactions
tions transactions amounted to many million dol dollars.
lars. dollars. The enormous profits made by the
Pullman Car Company, enabling it
to swell its capitalization from one
million dollars in 1867 to one hun
dred and twenty million dollars in
1910, are waste, chargeable to pri
vate ownership of railways. In this
country the railways pay the Pull
man Car Company for routing sleep
ing cars over their tracks. In some
European countries the sleeping car
owners pay the railways. So, also
are the great profits taken by private
refrigerator companies and express
companies chargeable to waste. It
the railway had owned and operated
the Pullman, express and refrigera refrigerator
tor refrigerator car companies, the enormous
profits of these companies have ab
sorbed could have been used to low
er freight rates for the benefit of
the public.
The total of these wastes run be
tween two and three hundred mil
lion dollars annually. Some of them
cannot be stated in exact figures, be
cause of the juggled accounts and
the varying contracts of the rail
ways with the allied companies.
I have mentioned larceny as one
count in the indictment of the meth
ods that have been so generally used
in financing railways nroDerties. Is
that too harsh a word for the al
most countless repetitions of acts in
finitely worse in their effects on gen-

Total
Resources
Over
$700,000.00
eral property rights and more crimi criminal
nal criminal in their intent than most of the
acts for which common criminals
fill our jails and penitentiaries?
"Reliable authorities have stat
ed," said Secretary Lane in his letter
to a congressman, already referred
too, "that the actual cost of con construction
struction construction of the Union pacific Rail Railroad
road Railroad was approximately fifty million
dollars. The cost to the railroad
company of this construction was
ninety-three and a half million dol dollars,
lars, dollars, nearly forty-three million dol dollars
lars dollars being taken in profit by the con contractors
tractors contractors and the Credit Mobiler." A
long time ago that some one may
say. Yes, It was; and railway high
finance ha3 not improved since then.
Instead of the Union Pacific's beg beggarly
garly beggarly plunder and swag of forty forty-three
three forty-three million dollars, the swag and
plunder wrecked the Xew Haven
road in this present period has been
estimated at two hundred million
dollars. The Frisco's wreckage was
brought about in the same by the
grafting of still unenumerated but
certainly many millions. If such
things be not larceny they are as
flat burglary as was ever committed.
Thru all the railroad years the
way Is. marked 'by such deals as
these and by sucfi so-called legiti
mate deals as Jay Gould's watering
of the Erie to half a million dollars
a mile; by E. H, Harriman's water watering
ing watering of the Chicago and Alton, and by
hf use of the credit of the Oregon
Short Line to traffic in stocks ami
bonds of other lines, and pile new
milfion ozr millions of fictitously cre created
ated created wealth, on which the public
pays interest. The space of a mag
azine article can scarcely enumerate
the. deals by which the railways of
the country have been used to pile
up ill-gotten fortunes instead of to
develop the land for the people..
Even waiving every other advan
tage and need of governmnt owner
ship and operation, I believe- firmly
that private ownership and opera opera-tfon
tfon opera-tfon carmot much longer' perform
the necessary function. I mearn that
tFie present system will break down
if it has not already broken down.
I mean that tf?e government itself is
ths only organization strong enough
to perform- the transportation ser service
vice service adequately" as adequately as it
will have to be performed to meet
the demands of our commerce..
Ofr: HTTTs Prediction
Consider- the statement made by
Mr. James X. Hill, of the Great Nor Northern
thern Northern and Northern Pacific and' Bur Bur-liragton
liragton Bur-liragton Railroads. It was made in
an open letter to the late Governor
Johnson or Minnesota, In lif06,. the
year- of the- memcraoly disastrous
car shortage. It was repeated in;
November,. 1967, in an address by
Mr; Hill to the Commercial Club of
Kansas City. In that speech he said r
"A year ago I said ft would requfre
five and a half billion dollars,, or one
billion one hundred million dollars
a year for five years, to make ur
railroad facilities equal to the de
mands on them. The figures are
staggerlagv 'but twelve months have
confirmed them and enhanced the
difficulty of securing such Invest Investment.
ment. Investment. In the last year the railroads
have raised in one way and another
in the neighborhood of one billion
dollars. Much of this has been ob
tained on short-time notes at a high
rate of interest. Most of it has
gone Into terminals, renewal of old
equipment and purchase of new,
and other necessary Improvements.
It was a forced investment, the
funds for which were raised not to
make our railroads adequate to
their task but simply to keep them
at their present working level.
"It has Deen used 10 keep the
wheels of Industry from slipping
backward, but there has been very
little new construction. The needs
of the moment were too severe for
that: and, though substantially the
amount of money suggested by me
as indispensable has been collected
and spent, the railroads have barely
held their own and the future re remains
mains remains to be provided for. Not less,
but In the opinion of competent
judges perhaps fifty per cent, more
(Continued on Third Page)

Characterize every transaction with the Munroc end
Chambliss Bank Bank-Nothing
Nothing Bank-Nothing is omitted in rendering a service that is cordial,
prompt and satisfactory.
Make this your depository by starting a Checking Account

'MM

CORPORATE O

OCALAi FLORI
"THE BEST IN
ACCURACY
t

Marlon County Abstract Cozzzmy
ESTABLISHED 1&&2.Z
GRAHAM BROTHERS. Lessees,
OCALA FLA.

Fl.at onsiif A?a.tlon S.n1 astmmHaI

QETT TMUS IB(0)(0)IIS

.Pole O I
the: pol)

of Poignant Appeal A drama of
human suffering. A wonderful story
of splendid, single-handed victory ;
over countless difficulties.
Over 650 Finely IHncteiica TOV-0 J 5a
This book will be mailed, postage prepaid, to any ad
dress in the United States, to Star subscribers, upon cd
vance payment as follows:

vemng Star 1-year and "My
Evening Star 6 months and
of the Pole"
Weekly Star 1 year and "My
Pole'
" ;
Fill Out
The Ocala Star, Ocala, Fla.
Sirs: Enclosed find $
the Star for
Pole," as per your combined offer.
Name

DA
BANKING."
tlAnrtnn Hrr..tn amah H.r V
t

Attainment of the gjjy-

"My Attainment
2.75
Attainment of the ?9 en
and Mail:
1914
for which send
and "My Attainment of tha

Street or Route No
r
Post Oflce
State..............



TH3 OCAIA ErESCJO riTAR, TUESDAY, JTCXE O. 1014

I

Fresh
Shrimp,
Fresh and
Deviled
Tk
Crabs
at
loM'fs
Cafe
Today.
i
5-28-tf dly
WE HAVE TUB BEST GARAGE
In the city to put your automobile in
first-class running order. We have
skilled workmen at our garage, who
pride themselves in putting every everything
thing everything In order, so you can feel as assured
sured assured you can travel with safety and
pleasure after our work Is com completed.
pleted. completed. Send at once to 17 North
Main street or phone, or send mes messenger.
senger. messenger. LucEde's Garage
17 N. Main Street
Coming South?
For sale 50 improved farms,
10 to 600 acres, northern
Marion County, Florida. Al Also
so Also 2,000 acres cut-over land
well located; fine truck and
orange section. Write for
description and prices. Come
see me.
JOHN L. DAVIS,
IRVINE, FLORIDA
WISHED SHE
COULD DIE
And Be Free From Her Troubles,
bet Finds Belter Way.
Columbia, Tenn. "Many a time.
says Mrs. Jessie Sharp, ot this place,
4,1 wished f would die and be relieved
. of my suffering, from womanly troubles.
I could not get up. without pulling zX
something to help me, and stayed in Ded
most of the time. 1 could not do my
housework.
The least amount of work tired me
out. My head would swim, and I would
f tremble for an hour or more. Finally. I
v look Cardui, the woman's tonic, and I
my
Cardui goes to all the weak spots and
helps to make them strong. It acts with
nature not against her. It is for the
tired, nervous, irritable women, who feel
as if everything were wrong, and need
something to quiet their nerves and
strengthen the worn-out system.
If you are a woman, suffering from any
of the numerous symptoms of womanly

and 1 don't have to go to bed. In fact,
' 1 am sound and well of all my troubles."

vs uuuuic, uikc taruui. it wiu neip you.
ry At all druggists.

Write to: Chattanoogra Medicine Co.. Ladies'
; Advisory Dept.. Chattanooga. Tenn., for Sttciat
Instructions on your case and 64-page book. THome
Treatment for Women, in plain wrapper. N.C. 1 22
'KNIGHTS OP rYTIIIAS
Ocala Lodge No. 19. Conventions
held every Monday at 7:30 p. m., at
Castle Hall, over the James Carlisle
drugstore. A cordial welcome to vis visiting
iting visiting brothers. Wm. M. Gober C. C.
Chas. K. Sage, K..R. S. Ad
SUGAlt HAMMOCK LANDS
Partridge-Wood row Company
,4 Selling Agents
' Merchant's Block, OcaU

PUBLIC 'OWNERSHIP OF
- RAILROADS, WATERWAYS
A XI) WATER POWER

(Continued from Page Two)
should be spent annually for the five
years to come
That was more than six years
ago, and the indispensable demands
on traffic facilities have increased.
On their own showing the private
railroad 'companies are utterly un unable
able unable to perform the functions that
must be performed. If that is not
true then they and their spokesmen
must stand Convicted of the. grossest
misrepresentation In order to force
increasing rates to support new
stock and bond deals.
The railways themselves fear their
own deficiencies and ,the conse consequences
quences consequences of their own wrongdoings.
They fought the Alaska railroad bill
as they fought the Panama canal,
for they do not wish the proof given
of what the government can do in
the way of railway construction and
railway management, even under
the most unfavorable conditions.
Tho railways themselves have
brought the government ownership
issue to the front fn seeking to head
off that step by a persistent cam campaign
paign campaign of misrepresentation and one onesided
sided onesided discussion of it.
The experience of other countries
those having government owner ownership
ship ownership has borne out the teachings
of our opposite experience. "The
rapid extension of industry in Ger Germany
many Germany has called for a parallel de development
velopment development in facilities for transpor transportation,"
tation," transportation," Consul Norton, writing from
Chemnitz in 1907, reported. "In
most respects," he continued, "the
growth has been more harmonious
and better adapted to meet the
natural economic needs than has
been the case in the United States
under corresponding conditions.
This is due in large measure to the
fact that, most of the railroad lines
are under government control and to
the consequent uniformity In man management
agement management and avoidance of un unhealthy
healthy unhealthy rivalry."
The square-deal effect on railway
labor, and incidentally on all labor,
with one central management of the
whole transportation system in gov government
ernment government hands, would be a prodig prodigious
ious prodigious benefit of government owner ownership.
ship. ownership.
United States statistics show, as
Professor Scott Nearing has set out
in his Wages in the United States,
that twenty-two per cent of the near nearly
ly nearly three-quarter million railway
workers in the United States receive
a wage of less than eight dollars a
week. The figures are for 1909, "but
they have not changed sufficiently
since more than to make up for the
increase in the cost of living.
Fifty-one per cent, of the railway
employes of the entire country re receive
ceive receive less than six hundred twenty twenty-five
five twenty-five dollars a year. Only seven per
cent, receive more than a thousand
dollars; and of the few high-priced
railway men or operatives none re receives
ceives receives more than all in that limited
class would receive under govern government
ment government ownership, and probably, none
of them receives as much.
It is a real menace to the country
that more than half of the work workers
ers workers in one of the most useful occu occupations
pations occupations in the world should receive
less than a living wage.
Saving on Bond Interest
If it owned tho railroads, the
United States government could
guarantee to every railroad worker
a wage that would at least support
him and, his family up to the stand standard
ard standard of the average American home.
It would not get the money for this
'by leveling down the wages of the
high-priced, better skilled operativ operatives.
es. operatives. It would get it from the savings
represented by the. lower rate of in interest
terest interest that the railways would have
to pay on railway ibonds, principal
and interest guaranteed by the Unit United
ed United States, as compared with the sum
total, of interest, dividends and sur surplus
plus surplus earnings the railwa3s now pay
to their stock and bondholders; and
from the savings of the vast waste
that has teen partly- enumerated
earlier in this article, resulting
from inefficiency, the duplication of
expenses, the traffic departments,
the virtual rebates to industrials,
the profits over the actual cost taken
for mail transportation, express car carriage,
riage, carriage, Pullman and refrigerator car
lervice, and so on. Who shall state
with complete accuracy just the
number of hundreds of millicfns of
dollars thesepossible present sav savings
ings savings would represent?
Of the first item alone, consider
that the railway interests, dividends
and surplus earnings for private
benefit amounted to $833,734,571
for the year ending June 30, 14)11,
as shown by the last published re report
port report of the interstate commerce com commission.
mission. commission. Now In a letter read to the
United States Senate by Senator
Kenyon, of Iowa, on January 21, of
this year, Mr. Clifford Thorne, of the

Iowa railroad commission, states
that the United States government
would have to pay in yearly inter interest
est interest on bonds representing the full
market value of all the railway se se-caritie's,
caritie's, se-caritie's, including stocks and bonds,
$419,075,210. The difference be between
tween between this latter sum and the $833, $833,-734,571
734,571 $833,-734,571 now paid to private bene beneficiaries
ficiaries beneficiaries is $414,659,370. Mr.
Thome's figures are based on a gov government
ernment government rate of interest of three
per cent.; but using a four per cent.
basi3 for railway bonds guaranteed
by the government, the saving would
be approximately three hundred
million dollars annually.
The saving, regardless of the in interest
terest interest rates, in that one item would
be vast, nor does all this offered
present saving take into account the
future saving. Here and now I can
only indicate these. The "unearned
Increment" of land values in city
terminals, country right of way, and
so forth, are piling up hundreds of
millions of "capital values" that the
railroad rates under private owner ownership
ship ownership must also return interest upon.
The other "increases", that result
from the great tractive power of
locomotives and the vast increase in
carrying capacity of -freight cars
these benefits now inure to private

parties Instead of to the people, as
would be the case if the pubic were
the owner.
With these increments piled up on
top of speculations and excessive
capitalization, is it any wonder that
the following dialogue concerning
the railways' present demand for in
creased rates took place in an inter interstate
state interstate commerce hearing?
Commissioner Lane: Is there
any reason to "believe that these in increases
creases increases would stop with the present
Increase if it should be allowed?
President Willard, of the Balti Baltimore
more Baltimore & Ohio: Increases the rates?
Commissioner Lane: Increases
the rates; yes, sir.
President Willard: No; I think
not. I think the tendency of rates
will be to continue upward.
Commissioner Lane: You think
there will have to be a progressive
increase?
President Willard: Yes. sir.
I wonder whether the tremendous
importance of an increase in freight
rates, with further advances In pros prospect,
pect, prospect, is generally appreciated. I fear
not. Many regard the proposed in increase
crease increase of five per cent, as a very
slight matter; but the cold facts are:
A five per cent increase for the East Eastern
ern Eastern roads, involving fifty million dol dollars,
lars, dollars, is but an opening wedge, that
in the end will mean a general in increase
crease increase for all the railroads in the
country, aggregating one hundred
fifty million dollars. These increas increased
ed increased 'charges will be paid primarily by
the merchants, and finally, in the
higher cost of food, clothing, shelter,
coal, lumber, and so on. by the pub public.
lic. public. The most prosperous year for
the railways was 1913. Their total
Income was the largest, and their
profits would have been he greatest
in history if they had used the same
portion of their revenue for perma permanent
nent permanent improvements and maintenance
that had been. expended during pre pre-ceeding
ceeding pre-ceeding years. The excessive propo propo-ticn
ticn propo-ticn of railway revenues invested in
cars, engines, terminals, tracks and
improvements during 1913 represents
profits, but in the form of property
instead of cash. There was not the
slightest justification for the advance
in freight rates demanded by the rail railways
ways railways and refused by the commission
in 1910 and there is now no justifi justification
cation justification for an increase. The facts
submitted by the railway officials
themselves condemn tho whole
scheme.
The Public Suspicion
There has been an immeasurable
increase in the wealth of the world
and we are enjoying comforts and
luxuries undreamed of by our ances ancestors,
tors, ancestors, chiefly on account of useful in inventions
ventions inventions and the advance from the
cruder methods of transportation to
Planning for the
Stork's Arrival
Among, thoso things which all women
should know of. and many of them do,
is a splendid ex
ternal application
I1 in most drug
store3 under the
name of "Mother's
Friend." It 13 a
penetrating liquid
3 and manr and many
a motner tells how
it so wonderfully
the period of expec expectancy.
tancy. expectancy. Its chief purpose is t- render the
tendons, ligaments an mu?cle3 so pliant
that nature's expansion may be accom accomplished
plished accomplished without the .'ntens-s strain so
often characteristic of the period of
expectancy.
At any rate it is reasonable to believe
that since "Mother's Friend" has been a
companion to motherhood for more than
half a century no more timely advice
could be given the inexperienced mother
than to suggest i's daily use during ex expectancy.
pectancy. expectancy. Ask at any drug store for "Mother's
Friend." a penetrating, external liquid
of great help and value. And write to
Bradfield Regulator Co.. 302 Lamar Bldg
Atlanta. Ca., for their book of useful
and timely information to expectant
mothers. It contains many suggestion
that are of Interest to all vgxea.

SdhMtbz

1P(D)WIIII

lottfe:

TLfjimlk
I
yA
sr.-

If s your safeguard against impurity. It con conserves
serves conserves the effort arid integrity put into the
brewing.
It protects the beer from light
No matter how pure the beer light plays
havoc with the purity, and starts decay.
Pure beer is a healthful food,

V'
aaa
AA.
'AAA
'AA
1
AsAi
AAA.
m.-7A:
VS.
''
A'Z
:

Beer in light bottles is???

m m m mm a i i i -mm i m

l-" M IA

nn n r n n
uiira
the present system. These are the
factors which have contributed most
largely to the marvelous advance in
our material civilization during the
past hundred years. But are we
ecme to an end of this advance so
far as aid from cheaper transporta
tion is concerned? After the age
long forward march, are we now to
face the other way and retrace our
steps? If the cost of everything we
buy, including transportation, is
to advance, it cannot mean anything
else but that we are nearing the end
of the increase in the comforts and
luxuries of civilization. And I for
one refuse to telieve that transpor
tation cannot be made very much
cheaper an 3 very much better than
it now is. I believe it can be ma 3e
so under government ownership and
control. I see no such hopeful
prospect otherwise.
Even if an increase in freight
rates were a3 imperatively required
as the railway people claim, it would
be exceedingly difficult to secure the
higher rates sought. The people are
justly suspicious of the correctness
of the arguments advanced for the
proposed increase. They do not be believe
lieve believe all the facts are in their pos possession.
session. possession. They think it is likely that
the Xew Haven and Frisco, and pos possibly
sibly possibly other roads, need more money
right now, but they are exceedingly
reluctant to furnish the added mon money
ey money in the shape of higher freight
rates. Under government owner ownership
ship ownership the people would know or could
learn all the facts at any time. If an
advance or reduction in rates were
neeiel it could be easily made. In
Belgium and Germany the fullest
publicity is given regarding railroad
rates and finances. Is it any won wonder
der wonder that Mr. Brandeis, in his brief
for the shippers and consumers
against the increase, said: "Let the
consumer beware of the vicious cir
cle of eveMncreasing freight rates!

Brovn Bottles

rv noi
you
and ever-Increasing cost of living."
All this illustrates, too. tho de deceitful
ceitful deceitful character of the arguments of
pnvaie railway advocates, in one
breath, when talking to those out of
sympathy with the rights of labor,
they say government ownership would
make railway employees politically
arrogant and economically overpaid
and lazy. In another breath, when
talking to the railway workers, they
say the employees under the govern government
ment government ownership would be underpaid,
servile and afraid to finite and strike
for their rights,
The courtesy, efficiency and man manliness
liness manliness of the employees of the post post-oHice
oHice post-oHice department is a sufficient re reply
ply reply to such charges. :
Would there not be a much great greater
er greater incentive 'to diligent work in all
departments of railway employment
when the men were given a square

flfe. mm mm m m Mm m m. m m. m 'm h

deal than now when a preponderant j vell, gentlemen, I have told you
propotion of the men do not earn ajOVr. anJ over again that I do not
fair wage, and when most of the realJa3ge 5y figure3 gvea by interested

ueneuis go to muse was are uul
workers at all? Wo-Id there not
also be a greater incentive in- the in increase
crease increase .safety to life under .govern .government
ment .government operation?
It is said that railway service
would not he developed to its full ca capacity
pacity capacity without the Incentive of pri private
vate private profits. The truth, proved over
and over again, is that the govern
ments of the world have to do those
things they dare not Intrust to the
incentive of private profits. They
have to chart the 6eas and light the
shores to keep the ships operated by
private owners for profit from being
wrecked.
Block signals were opposed, -and
now steel car3 are 'being opposed, be
cause they Interfere with profits. The
government of the United States
built the Panama Canal under the di
rection of a man who was paid fif fifteen
teen fifteen thousand dollars a year, and it

.

See that Crown is
branded "Scttlitz."
Telephone 37
The Carmichael & Sons Co.
xx6 N. Magnolia Street
Ocala, Fla.
will ibe operated for the world's ben benefit
efit benefit and convenience, regardless of.
profit. In Alaska, private railway
J building failed and the government
had to go into that pioneer field.
What public convenience or service
that is in private hands ha3 been run
as efficiently and with such wide wideawake
awake wideawake enterprise as has the postal
service, without regard to profit?
And so one might go cn.
3.1 r. Andrew Carnegie said to the
Ways and Means Committee of the
House of Representatives fn the tar-'
iff hearing of 190S: "Gentlemen of
the Committee, allow me to address
1 you in cue word: Figures will do
nothing but mislead you if you do
not apply your brains to such ques questions
tions questions as these on which I address
you." iHe said aleo: "There are more
ways of figuring cost than there are
ways of killing a cat. It Is a simple
matter of hooking." And he added:
parties
Ana so, in Keeping wnn mat ao-
vice, I have laid the emphasis in
thi3 paper on the broader facts and
principles involved facts and prin principles
ciples principles that no clever bookkeeping
can get around. I have used figures
only as they have told their own un un-evadeable
evadeable un-evadeable story. And it is on the
broad physical facts that the Amer American
ican American people are going to solve this
issue between transportation for ser service
vice service and transportation as only an
incident to profit. And let me say say-that
that say-that the figures, too, yield to analysis
and tell the same story as do the
broad physical facts. They tell that
the railways capitalization in Europe
is larger than the average capitaliza capitalization
tion capitalization here, because, not only do the
railroads have to buy expensive
rights of way through thichly popu-

( Continued on Fourth Page)



rouo

THE OCA. LA EVKNLKG STAK. TUESDAY, JUNE 9. 1014

PUBLIC OWNERSHIP OP
IA ILHOADS, WATERWAYS
AND WATER POWER

(Continued From Page Three)
ated regions, 'but the road3 there
have been brought to a far greater
standard of efficiency than have the
roads here.
The official report of President Ar Arthur
thur Arthur Twining Hadley and others of
Air. Taft's railroad -securities com commission
mission commission furnished ample evidence of
thU.
The average capitalization of the
railroads of the United States is
about ninety thousand dollars a
mile," said Secretary Lane, of the
department of the interior, in a let letter,
ter, letter, dated January 19, 1914, to Con Congressman
gressman Congressman Houston.
"The 2042 miles of government
owned and operated railroads in Can Canada
ada Canada show a capital cost to the gov government
ernment government of an average of $47,237 a
mile." ;
Wisconsin made a physical valua valuation
tion valuation of all the railways in that state
and found the present valuation per
mile to be $35,490 on June 30, 1911.
The railways of Wisconsin represent
more than an average in cost of con construction
struction construction and equipment to the mile
as compared with the average cost
per mile of all the railways in the
country. In making their valuation
the engineers In the employ of that
state included within that valuation
Wisconsin's proportionate share of
the cost of he terminals In Chicago,
St. Paul and -.Minneapolis, and also
of all the terminals in the cities
.within Wisconsin. They also made
an estimate of' the cost of reproduc reproducing
ing reproducing all the railway lines in Wiscon-'
Bin from absolutely new material,
paying the present price for mater materials
ials materials and rights of way, and found
ithat cost to be $44,897 a mile.
s -i
The Union Pacific Railroad in
Kansas Is a high-grade property. The
state railroad commission, under
. state laws, placed the physical value
of. this -railway at less than forty
thousand dollars a mile. The total
capitalization of the Union Pacific
..System per mile is $146,012.60.
. Increases in Dividends
"There are very few railways in the
r United .States that are so well built,
equipped and managed as the Santa
- Fe. It 'has extensive and expensive
- terminals at Chicago, Kansas City,
Los Angeles, San Francisco, Denver,
Fort -Worth, Dallas, Houston and
UMlvestota. It traverses the mountain
! ranges .west of the .Mississippi, and
its cost per mile of construction and
equipment is certainly higher than
the average cost of all the railways
of the country. The total capitali capitalization
zation capitalization of the Santa Fe amounts to
ony $58,346 a mile and Its stock
sells on the market at about par. It
.Js well known that a large amount
stfi ithe common stock issues of the
' Santa Fe was used for promotion
purposes and does not represent
K cash paid into the treasury of the
i rwlwuy or any physical : property
xalue. .
ftiter making fair allowance for
depreciation in the value of cars, en engines,
gines, engines, tracks, bridges, Tmildings and
- so oh, on account of age, service and
wear and tear, fifty thousand dollars
a mile -would be an extravagant es estimate
timate estimate of the reproduction value of
all the railroads in the United States.
Statistics show that .the amount
of railroad stocks yielding dividends
Increased from $2,668,969,895 in
1900 to $5,730,250,326 in 1911, how
the average rate on dividend-yielding
stock has increased from o.23 per
.cent in 1900 to 8.03 per cent In 1911,
.-and how the average rate of return
on all stock has increased from 2.39
:per cent in 1900 to 5.43 per cent in
11911.
The figures on all the hodgepodge
of rates will show the most glaring
injustices, absurdities and wrongs
that most communities know of and
.fight against.
If It be said that all these evils
-will yield to regulation, the fact re-
' -mains' that they have not yielded to
: regulation.
Taxation? The Tailroads merely
-charge it as one of their expenses
ihat freieht and passenger rates
:smnst pay.
TTranrhise taxation? The courts
thave held, notably in the Consolidat Consolidated
ed Consolidated Gas case, that if the people tax a
corporation -franchise they have ad admitted
mitted admitted Its value for rate-making pur-
- 'poses."'"
Court review of railway charges?
Why, that is one of the chief weap
ons of the railway against the pub pub-Tic
Tic pub-Tic 'Mr. Justice Brewer, In deciding
the case of Smith versus Ames, said:
-Tf it "be said that the rates must be
such as to secure to the owners a
reasonable percentage on the money
Invested, it will be remembered that
many things have happened to make
fa vestment far in excess of the actual
ttra&ue of the property Injudicious
contracts, poor engineering, unusual-,
ly nigh cost of materials, rascality
on the part of those engaged In the
construction or management, of the
property. These and many other

things, as is well known, arte factors

that have largely entered into the
investment with which railroad
properties stand charged." Contrast
that record with the clean, honest,
efficient government construction of
the Panama canal.
Regulation? Right now the rail railroads
roads railroads are trying to have the Inter Interstate
state Interstate Commerce Commission empow empowered
ered empowered to pass, on all their stock and
bond issues, in order that, as the
railroad securities commission warn warned
ed warned and a3 others have warned, their
securities shall have a practical guar guaranty
anty guaranty of face value by the United
States government.
Regulation? Xo; it does not reg regulate
ulate regulate in spite of the splendid service
of the Interstate Commerce Commis Commission
sion Commission and the lesser though able ser service
vice service of the several state commissions.
A few years ago, as some one has
pointed out, everything was going to
be made all right by allowing the
railways to cooperate, pool or unite
with the interlocking directorates,
under government supervision and
regulation; but now everything is
going to be made all right by break breaking
ing breaking up railway cooperation and pool pooling
ing pooling and unity of interests through
interlocking directorates. And so it
has gone!
President Ripley, of the Santa Fe,
and many lesser lights in the railway
world are stating -without reserva reservation
tion reservation that government ownership of
railways is coming, and they are pre predicting
dicting predicting that all kinds of disasters
will happen when it does come.
If private ownership is a success,
if regulation is effective and satisfac satisfactory,
tory, satisfactory, why is there such a widespread
demand for government ownership
of railways and no demand at all for
private ownership of parcel post?
Universally, railway systems have
been founded "by private capital; but
today practically every country in
the world, except the United States
and Great Britain, have entered on
the project of public ownership.
No railway system once taken by
the government has been permanent permanently
ly permanently returned to private ownership.
According to Professor Richard
T. (Ely: "Our American railroads are
incomparably more In politics than
the German railroads."
, President Hadley, who is opposed
to public ownership, says: "In judg judging
ing judging the railroad policy of Belgium
by its results, all must unite in ad admitting
mitting admitting that they are in many re respects
spects respects extraordinarily good."
Travel In Germany is 'six times
safer than in the United States, and
it Is fifteen times safer in Belgium.
Mr. Acworth, the leading English
authority, admits, as do other Eng English
lish English authorities, that. in spit of
over three thousand regulative en
actments 'by parliament in a country
where laws are made to be enforced
regulation does not regulate.- Private
ownership in England emphasizes'
the tendency everywhere UEder such;
ownership and control toward con concentration
centration concentration of wealth; while public
ownership and control, as in Bel Belgium,
gium, Belgium, Germany, Denmark and New
Zealand, tend toward diffusion of
wealth.
If the qu&stlon were submitted, to
the voters of the United States, how
many men and women would vote to
turn over our postal service and par
cel post to the express companies or
to Mr. Rockefeller or to Mr. Hill? A
fair comparison of the postoffice de
partment, where service is the end
and aim of its methods, manage
ments and operation, with the rail
way companies and their parasitical
parlor car and express companies,.
where profits are of first and service
of secondary importance wflT iBe
valuable to those who are unpreju
diced and interested only in the
greatest good to the greatest num number.
ber. number. Is there anything so blind and"
stupid as the familiar but unthink unthinking
ing unthinking statement made by defenders of
private privilege in this country that
the failure of public ownership and
operation Is proved by the postal ser
vice?
If Rockefeller Carried the Mails
Where did these critics of the pos
tal service get the idea that this ser
vice compares unfavorably with rail railway
way railway service or with big business of
any kind in private management?
In what respect does it compare
unfavorably? Not in price; if any
thing is self-evident it is the state
ment that if Wall street financiers
were running the postal business of
the world today the cost of postage
for a letter from Chicago to Liver
pool or London would not be two
cents, hut nearer ten cents.
Nothing in the world Is more cer certain
tain certain than that if John D. Rockefeller
or J. J. Hill were running the pos postal
tal postal business, and iJ anybody were
daring enough to suggest that they
extend free daily delivery to the
farms, Mr. Rockefeller and Mr. Hill
would reply that the suggestion is
ridiculous on its face; that any one
should know that free rural delivery
every morning could not possibly
pay; that it must result in a constant
deficit and therefore is not even to
be considered by a sane business

manager. Free
daily rural delivery
under private postal management
would not be introduced in this
country before the year U000, if
it were ever introduced.
The best proof, however, that the
postal business is well managed lies
not alone in the fact of constantly
declining charges at a time when the
price of everything else has advanc
ed; it i3 not in the fact that the pos
tal service is a real service and con considers
siders considers the convenience and the inter interest
est interest of the whole public first and the
profit afterward; it is not in the fact
that, though constantly reducing
charges for postage, the service 13
constantly broadening, as in the case
of the free rural delivery. It i3
rather in the decisive fact that the
postal service is the only big busi business
ness business that touches everybody in the
United States against which is no
general complaint.
Consider these remarkable facts a
moment: Your mail does not go
astray. It is not unduly delayed. It
is brought directly and promptly to
the very door of your house.
It Is, considered as a system, sat satisfactory
isfactory satisfactory service. The American peo people
ple people are not slow to complain when
things do not go right and they
woud raise loud complaint if .the pos postal
tal postal service were unsatisfactory.
To many government ownership
seems new and strange. Even if it
were new, that would not necessar necessarily
ily necessarily be a presumption against it; but,
as a principle, it Is not new. The
government that may regulate rail railway
way railway rates and service may own and
operate railways if such ownership
and operation be in the public Inter Interest.
est. Interest. It is a principle always recog recognized
nized recognized by our courts that the railway
right of way is a public highway, to
be used not primarily for the benefit
of the owners of the railway hut pri primarily
marily primarily in the interest of the people.
The Paramount Question
A railway company may get Its
property by condemnation proceed proceedings.
ings. proceedings. The property it gets and prop properly
erly properly gets for its own use in this way
was evidently not the property of the
previous private owners in such a
sense that they could do with it what
they choose; in fact, no such property
rights exist. Much less is railway railway-owned
owned railway-owned property the property of the
railway to do with as they choose.
Property acquired by the railways by
condemnation proceedings may sure surely
ly surely be taken over by the people col collectively
lectively collectively under similar proceedings.
The public interests the general
welfare of the preamble to our-constitution
s-really the only question
involved. ..
The implication of t&e word gen general
eral general welfare is pretty wide. It fs be becoming
coming becoming increasingly clearr to all our
people that there is nothing that
makes for the general welfare which
the people mar not do. We are bear bearing:
ing: bearing: less often than formerly that the
people the government may not
do this or that whfch it is .desirable
fix the public interest to d:
Occasionally some belated person
heard to say regarding some pro proposed
posed proposed measure that it doubtless
would bring benefit to tti public, J
hut that it cannot he put in force be
cause it is against our form of gov
ernment.
What is our foam of government
for? Do we exist for the sxke of a
fornu of government or is our gov-
ermment in all its forms simply an
instrument by which we may serve
the bst public Interest?
In considering this queaion. Jt
government ownership of railways
and of the municipal ownership f
local public utilities, it should, be re-
me inhered, that the only really im
portant question ia the peoples
rights and interests-
We shall do well to keep steadily
in miad the famous saying, of Lin Lincoln
coln Lincoln that "There are no rigMs
against the rights at the people." Of
course it must be understood all the
time in this discussion that there is
no intention of doing any- injury to
any one. It has always been reeog
nized by our courts- that to. take over
any property for a public or a quasi-
public purpose, at a fair rate of com
pensation, works no injury no legal
injury to the dispossessed owner
There are two main functions of
government one is restraint,, the
other service. Doubtless there should
be as little restraint on individuals
as possible, and none at all, except in
the public interest; but who shall set
limits on the service the government
may render the people? Certainly
no one except the people themselves.
The limit cannot be set by any phil philosophical
osophical philosophical theory of government.
There are numberless sound and
valid reasons not referred to in this
paper wny tne public snouia own
and operate railways, waterways and
water power; but it must always be
remembered in discussing this sub subject
ject subject that the only way success can
be assured 13 to keep these utilities
absolutely free from politics, and ap apply
ply apply the same business principles to
their management which were used
in the construction of
the Panama
. canal

I

A BIG MID-SUMMER EVENT

As will be seen in today's paper,
the Globe has inaugurated a big mid midsummer
summer midsummer clearance sale to start on
Wednesday, the 10th. The Globe,
ever since its entry Into the Ocala
mercantile field has carried as its
motto, "Ocala's Underselling Store,"
and judging from it3 continued suc
cess it is making every effort to live
up to the motto. The prices named
In the advertisement speak for them themselves,
selves, themselves, and the special bargains of offered
fered offered on certain days during the
sale period are bound to bring big
crowds to this popular establish establishment.
ment. establishment. The time necessary to read
this advertisement -will be well spent
in returns by those who take ad advantage
vantage advantage of the opportunity offered.
Mr. Malever, the proprietor, assures
the Star that the goods are new and
up to date, having nearly all been
purchased within the past sixty or
ninety days especially for this spring
and summer's business.
COUGHS AND COLDS
WEAKEN THE SYSTEM
Continued coughs, colds and bron bronchial
chial bronchial troubles are depressing and
weaken the system. Loss of weight
and appetite generally follow. Get
a 50c. bottle of Dr. King's New Dis Discovery
covery Discovery today. It will stop your
cough. The first dose helps. The
best medicine for stubborn coughs,
colds and all throat and lung trou
bles. Mr. O. H. Brown, Muscatine,
Ala., writes: "My wife was sick
during the hot summer months and
I honestly believe Dr. King's New
Discovery saved her life." Good for
children. 50c. and $1 at your drug druggist,
gist, druggist, tues-thurs-f rl&wky
ROYAL ARCH MaSOS
Regular convocations of the Ocala
Chapter No. 13,' R. A. M., ..on the
fourth Friday In every month at
7:30 p. m. C. E. Simmons, H. P.
Jake Brown, Secretary. Ad.
ESTRAY NOTICE
On April 7th I took up a dark bay
mare, blind in one eye, both front
feet scarred. Owner can have same
by payingfor this advertisement and
cost of keep. .- J. B.- Stanley, Morris Morris-ton,
ton, Morris-ton, Fla. 6-3-lm
Alpine Flax linene paper by the
pound, white envelopes to match, at
the Court Pharmacy. 6-6-6t
Remember we
Note ttfine

ftiif y Sped

9 TO 12 'A. 31. -During these three hours we will sell Ladies' Untrlm-
med Hat Shapes all colors and styles, ralues from $2 to

$3.50 at,
10 TO 12 A. M.
11 TO 12 A. 31.

On Account ot Extreme Imv Mees
We reserve tne right to Hid cpanltes

LdDdDK ATT TUflE WMBXDW

Our Store Closes at ONE O'CLOCK on THURSDAYS.
Please do your shopping before that time and encour encourage
age encourage other merchants to 0lve their clcrlxo a ball holiday

You'll

M HIHtHIMlMBimillHIWHIUBHmiHHHI-MHl .MI-

Wires!
Docjttcrs
mi

A woman's organism is a very delicate thing it very "c2r'
gets oat of order jast like a delicate piece of machinery, &
requires more than ordinary care and attention.

There are many signs which pointtodisorder.soehasl

abt psjns m various parts of the body,
airannwi, rainnwiw, Dacaacne, loss ox

has been the mesas of restoring thousands of snfferinxwomeatonataral health
and strength. For more than forty years it has been successfully carrying oa
this great work. Today it is known throughout the length and breadth of every

i
uu. i" uaea eTerywnere ioos upon it

J for SO cuts from Dr. flwt'i Diapuuary. Bmffmm, it Y,

I:
3?

Evcutaaiy Ycrt rEy a
F(DISIII):-
WHY NOT NOW? V
Not because it is cheaper, but because
it is BETTER and more economical ; will
stand more rough usage, will go and
COME BACK where many other cars will
NOT. Lighter on tires, more economical
on upkeep, gas and oil. than any automo automobile
bile automobile in the world.
ROADSTER. $500; 5-PASSENGER. $550.00.
F. O. B. DETROIT. FULLY EQUIPPED.
EIDWAE5ID. TUCKER, kzcSi
PHONE 439 Ot ALA. FLORIDA v

Read Our UNQASSKTED ADS loryonr ivcnlo

(Jane 11)
AT

must do a H day's
in laM The Tfese

Specials. RIofte
each

During these two hours we will sell 32 inch Fast Col Colored
ored Colored Woven Stripe Madras, suitable for Dresses,
Shirts and Blouses, value 15 and 19 cents per yard
at .........
During this hour we will sell Fast Colored Dress
Crepe, In all the newest patterns, goods we are sell selling
ing selling daily at 10 and 12 cents per yard at, per
yard . ....

A

TM TO

A

eventually trade

listiessness, nerroosnesa, irri

appetite, oepreesion, and
i j others.

s Favorite Frozzbtii

as a neipnu xriend. Imt it M
IIISSHHHHHHUMHIHS
f
tun
ii.
ttDne Tfae.
m
here.
99

is



riIK OCALA FVENING ST A 11. 1 UESDAY, JUNE 9. 1914

5n

I

AL With

Give "bxr

WE HAVE BUILT UP OUR HARDWARE BUSINESS (AND
IT IS A GOOD ONE, THANK YOU) BY GIVING AN ABSOLUTE ABSOLUTE-LY
LY ABSOLUTE-LY SUQARE IEAL TO EVERYONE WHO TRADES WITH US.
WE HAVE SOLD GOOD STUFF AND CHARGED ONLY A
FAIR AND SQUARE PRICE FOR IT.
AND WE ARE NOT GOING TO CHANGE OUR SYSTEM.

Phone 118, Ocala, Fla.

U HIRED

High Iegree Conferred on George I
Mac Kay by a Leading Xev
England School
Boston, Mass.. June 9.- At the
graduating exercises today of the
Massachusetts Institute of Technol Technology,
ogy, Technology, President Richard C. Maclaurin
conferred on George Lewis MacKay

of Ocala, Fla., the degree, B. S.,

(Bachelor of Science).
The title of 31 r. MacKay's gradua graduation
tion graduation thesis was: A Comparison of
Theories of Reinforced Concrete

Arch Design," in which his fellow
i worker was Ralph R. Salisbury of
i .

Chicago.

I
1KREGER HAS OPENED

HIS UPTOWN PLACE

Star Subseripton Coupons
WILL BE REDEEMED BY
TYPINGS & GO.
AT 10 PER CENT
For Any Cash Purchase Made During June 1914
TYDINGS & COMPANY

.Mr. C. R. Kreger, who several
weeks ago -purchased the fountain
and fixtures of the Anderson Phar Pharmacy,
macy, Pharmacy, opened up his new place of
business Saturday night. The ap appearance
pearance appearance of the new store in the
Munroe & Chambllss Bank building
on Main street would do credit to
any city many times the size of
Ocala, and it goes without saying
that success will crown his venture.
The room is excellently lighted,
has the very latest of fixtures for ice.
cream and soda water dispensing,
and is thoroughly fitted up with elec electric
tric electric fans to keep the place exceed exceedingly
ingly exceedingly cool and pleasant during the
warm summer days.
Beside the equipment for serving
all the cool beverages invented, a
large stock of books, stationery, fish fishing
ing fishing tackle and other sporting goods
will be kept on sale. A neat menu
card adorns each table and counter
in the place and the list of good
things enumerated thereon is bound
to create a desire on the part of
those reading it to partake of them.
Mr. George Davis and Master
Richard Dewey preside at the foun fountain
tain fountain and make a combination that i3
hard to beat.

OCALA SCHOOL
BOARD MONEY COMING

The money for the Ocala sub sub-school
school sub-school building bonds will be here in
a few days,' the details for the sale
of the bonds having been completed,
and the money i3 now available.
The money will probably come In one
draft of $73,125, which will repre represent
sent represent the net proceeds of the sale of
the $75,000 or bonds, $1876 being
the 2 per cent discount at which
the bonds were sold. This will be
one of the largest single drafts
handled by local banks In some time.
With this money sure to come the
board has been going ahead with the
building, -making short time loans to
meet the expenses of the building
as it progressed.

I REAL ESTATE

EASTERLING'S FINE SHIPMENTS

Mr. G. W. Easterling has com commenced
menced commenced shipping in earnest from his
big farm west of town. Strange to
say, Mr. Easterling has had rains all
along, when many sections of the
country have suffered severely. He
has had fine rains when none fell a
mile from him. Mr. Easterling had
shipped up to last night, five cars of
choice tomatoes, two cars of water watermelons
melons watermelons and two cars of cantaloupes.
His fruit is fine and the yield will
be large. He has sold all of his stuff
up to the close of the season at a
very satisfactory price.

BOARD OF TRADE -MEETS
TOMORROW EVENING

The first meeting for the month
of the Board of Trade will be held
tomorrow evening. There is plenty
of material for a most interesting
meeting, and if the members will
turn out in force, it can be worked

DUNNELLON SCHOOL
MONEY RECEIVED

The Choice of Economical Travelers.
A trunk is the poorest thing in the world to save money on
You .must pay the right price for real quality to be sure of service
and satisfaction The Indestructo trunk is not
the cheapest trunk to buy, 'but it isthe cheapest trunk to travel with
The Indestructo i3 a guaranteed trunk one that must make good
If, by accident your Indesrtucto trunk s is destroyed within five
years from the day you 'buy it, we will replace it with a new one without
a penny's cost to you
Indestructo trunks have won the favor of travelers by actual per performance
formance performance by an honest expression of value when the unusual hap happens
pens happens ". '
Indestructo trunks are the choice of 200,000 careful travelers
because they have proved their fitness by always giving the "most miles
for the least money."
Compare the Indestructo with every other trunk and you will see
that the Indestructo means the best possible value for the present and
the future ;,
We have a full line of Indestructo truinks and will be pleased "to
show them to you the next time you are in town
B. GOLDMAN,

"WHY' PAY MORE?"

OCALA. FLORIDA.

Read Our UNO ASSIHED AOS tor your' wants

FINISHED MOVING THE -SAFE

The Messrs. Collier Brothers to today
day today finished moving the huge safety
deposit vault from the Commercial
Bank building, which it has stood
for nearly a quarter of a century, to
its new quarters in the Metropolitan
Savings Bank, where it will be used
in the safety deposit department.
This safe required three days to
move, weighs 22,000 pounds and is
by far the heaviest safe in the city;
In fact, safes of this kind are no
longer made, as when this size or
weight safe is made it is built in
sections of steel and concrete, right
on the ground.

ANOTHER GAME WITH
CTTRA THURSDAY" AFTERNOON

There will probably be another
game -with Citra on the Ocala dia diamond
mond diamond Thursday afternoon. Tie Citra
and Ocala boys are getting wise to
each other's play, and like each
other very well, so the outlook is
good for a fine game. These young
fellows from the north end of our
own county are much better players
than some from a greater distance,
and its always a pleasure to have
them visit us. The Star hopes the
crowd will be large and the game
close.

WOODMEN OF THE WORLD

Fort King Camp No. 14 meets In
Yonge's Hall at 8 p. m. every second
and fourth Friday. Visiting sov sovereigns
ereigns sovereigns alwayr welcome. Adv.
F. j. Burden, C. C
Chas K. Sage, Clerk.

The proceeds of the sale of the
Dunnellon high school .building
bonds were received In this city yes yesterday
terday yesterday through the Commercial
Bank. The net proceeds amounted
to $11,533.04 and Prof. Brinson,
secretary of the county school board,
gave County Treasurer J. M. Graham
a check for the amount.

yAC3 DOAI?JLg(o)CI
We have completed the survey of this
rich trad: and will soon publish an exadt
cut showing the subdivision.
WATCH FOR THE PLAT.
PARTRIDGE-UOOSnpU C0"jPLrjVf
MERCHANTS CLOCK.

oooc

NORTH OCALA SUNDAY SCHOOL

Friends of the North Ocala Sun Sunday
day Sunday school will be glad to know that
it is growing In interest and num numbers.
bers. numbers. Sunday there were 55 pres present
ent present and much interest -manifested.
The meetings have been held under
the trees but the men are now talk talking
ing talking of erecting some kind of a
building within the next two week?
so we may be prepared for any kind
of weather. Next Sunday a new class
will be organized with Mr. J. E.
Frampton as teacher. 'We have been
having an unlimited seating capa capacity
city capacity under the trees.
One of the Teachers.

A CORRECTION

A few days since, in mentioning
the huge shipment of wholesale mail
order catalogues shipped to F. P.
Gadson by C. B. Rouss of New York
for Gadson to mail from here, we
stated that the shipment weighed
1500 pounds, when we intended to
say 5,000. Thi3 was the first of
monthly shipments to be made here,
and the New York house is much
pleased with the rapidity that Gad Gadson
son Gadson handled the business for them.

NICE OUT OF TOWN DEPOSIT

The Metropolitan Savings Bank
people were much gratified today to
receive a time deposit from a St.
Augustine man of an even $1,000.

I. O. O. F.

Order of Odd Fellows, meets even
Tuesday evening at S- o'clock, in
Yonge's Hall, Fort King avenue. Vis
itors in the city invited to be with as
H. D. Stokes. X. G.

LA I JO R OF LOVE AT FELLOWSHIP
" .
The people of the Fellowship
neighborhood will meet at the church

next Wednesday, June 17, for their
annual task of paying the proper at attention
tention attention to their pretty and well-kept

We highly recommend Rexall Nice graveyard. All are requested to at at-for
for at-for excessive perspiration. 25 cents j tend and come prepared with dinner

at Gerig's drug store.

6-2

baskets to stay all day.

OVR RARE CHINA WARE.
TOO

WHEN YOUR WEDDING
PRESENT COMES FROM US

THEY KNOW "IT IS FINE

WHEN YOU MAKE AN ANNIVERSARY GIFT, BE IT FOR A
BIRTHDAY, WEDDING OR ANY KIND OF AN EVENT, GIVE AN
EXQUISITE PIECE. OF JEWELRY. THIS WILL ENDURE AND BE
CHFRISHED FOR ALL TIME? AND EACH TIME THE RECIPIENT
SEES IT, IT WILL RECALL THE HAPPY OCCASION OF WHICH
IT WAS A MEMENTO,
WHEN A GIFT COMES FROM OUR ESTABLISHMENT, THE
1IRL WHO GETS IT KNOWS THE QUALITY IS SUPERB.
A. E. BURNETT-

CLASSIFIED

ADS

Lost Found, Wanted, For Sale
For Rent and Similar Local Needs

WANTED Small second hand safe.
Apply at this office. 6-4-tf

FOR SALE -Modern bungalow in
Linwood Heights. Inquire of the
Ocala Lumber & Supply Co. 5-1 5 tf
STORES FOR RENT Two stores
for rent; one on the Main street
front and one on Fort King ave avenue
nue avenue from of Harrington Hall. Ap Apply
ply Apply at ofilce of hotel. 6-l-6t

WANTED Subscribers of the Star
to tell their neighbors of the plan
now in force for giving cash cou coupons
pons coupons to subscribers. 5-20-tf

WANTED 69 MEN to join the
Brotherhood Baraca Class, city
hall. See R. B. Bowers. 5-20-tf

good condition; one good work
mule. Ocala Lumber & Supply
Company. 5-23-tf.
FOR RENT $10 per month to the
right party, a new 5-roozn cot cottage;
tage; cottage; best neighborhood. Address,
Star offlce. 5-29-tf
FOR SALE A $25 gas stove with
double oven, in first class condi condi-ion;
ion; condi-ion; will be sold for $10 cash.
Address P. O. B 406. Ocala,
Florida. 6-4-6t
FOR RENT Three furnished rooms
. with all modern conveniences; de desirably
sirably desirably located. Apply to 600
Fcrt King avenue or phone No.
502. 6-6-t

FOR SALE A six foot wall case:
cu aboard and six drawers; glass
front. F. G. B. Weihe. 6-6-3t

LOST Black ribbon watch fob with
Greek letter fraternity pin. Re Return
turn Return to Star office and receive re--ai-d.
6-6-Ct

FOR SALE One large hcrse In

PoKshes
Black, Tan
and Wbli3

la 03? Gay Patent

TvrcltSa Coin"

9

The F.F. Dallzy Co.. Ltd. Buffalo-N.Y. Hamilton. Ont.

FOR RENT Seven room house;
deiratly located, all modern con conveniences;
veniences; conveniences; also, flat of four rooms.
Apply to 'Mrs. T. H. Wallls, 603
East Second street. Phone 97.9 6t
OPEN DAY f- ;T 7CIUHT

Merchant' Cafe. A. C. L.. depot
corner. Meals a la carte and lunches
at any hour. Adv.

Jnst received, another carload of
tomato cans. The Marion Hardware
Company. 5-3 0-1 2 1

Own your own home by buying a
modern bungalow on easy terms of
the Ocala Lumber & Supply Com Company.
pany. Company. 5-15-tf

NOTICE
C. P. Aklns lately, to-wit: on the
20th day of June, A. D. 1913, hav having
ing having been convicted of the crime of
burning a building with Intent to
injure the insurer, In the circuit
court for Marion county, Florida,,
hereby gives notice of his intention
to apply for a pardon tat the meet meeting
ing meeting on June 10th, 1914, of the
Board of Pardons for the state of
Florida, at Tallahassee.
C. P. Akins.
This the 23rd day of May, A. D
1914.1 5-25-mon-3t

SUGAR HAMMOCK LANT8
Partrldjre-Wood row Company
Selling Agents
; Merchast's E3ocX OesU 1-lS-tt

:.



iiiiiillllllllllH

HllUii..itiu IVIliftlMMIlilllluVH
until you find the store with the
SLOE S0KIS
v)

LI

W

THE GLOBE, well known in Central
Florida as the "Underselling Store of
Florida"

Extra Special!
Genuine Elastic Seam Scriven Drawers,
which sell everywhere for 75 cents, during
this sale for only 50 cents.
Imitation Scrivens for 35 ceiits.

r7 M

MUM

r S r

I -.

ZD

1

II 1

ifiiiiiiiiiiifiiiiicfiiiifiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifiiiiiififfiiiiiiiiiiifffiffiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiifirmiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifiiiiiiiiifziiiiiiiitiit

The next important event on our business calendar is the Semi-Annual Inventory, which takes place in a few vn' ::':Thsre9nlotaof;
work necessary in trimming down our stocky for this event. Then again the thought came to us that our patrons would appreciate an oppor opportunity
tunity opportunity to buy real seasonable merchandise while it is SEASONABLE, at prices that would likely prevail at the tag end of tne summer vhen
such goods are less desirable. It is our desire to reduce the stock before talcing inventory, so we will cut and slash prices in such a manner that
people must see the great advantage to be gained in buying now. 7
Don't Forget The Opening Daft Off Th Sale!

3

0

3

' U
y

hi
LA

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIHIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII

Muslin Underwear

1.98
$2.49

All well made and all worth more
for the material alone than we ask
for the complete garment.

Silk Underskirts,
Sale price..
J 3. 50 Underskirts
Sale price.

trawers, circular, extra nice, jio
Sale price ......... TlOC
One lot of new petticoats d TCk
Sale price . . . . . V 1
Combination suits in the newest

crepe designs,
Sale price. . .
Gowns, 69 cent values
Sale price.

One lot of Crepe Gowns, 75c ACkg
. values, sale price. ..... X7w

One lot of Crepe Gowns,
$1.24 values, sale price.
Night Gowns,
Sale price ...........
Chemise, $1 quality,
Sale price. . .". .....

Short Chemise, 50c quality, OQ.
a1 nrlce. ........... OJV

Chemise, $1.25 quality,
Sale price. ..........
Embroidered Underskirts,
Sale price.
Black Satin Underskirts.
$1 values for. .
Underskirts, $1.50 quality,
Sale price

Underskirts, 50c values,
Sale price. ...........
Corset Covers, 25c values,
Sale price.'.
Corset Covers, 39c values.
Sale price. .
Corset Covers, 50c. values.
Sale price............
Drawers, umbrella flounce,
Sale price . .... ...

39c
19c
25c
39 c
23c

NOTIONS

Children's Hose, 10c value?

t

sale prfcce.

WE HAVE A NOTION Several
hundred notions, in fact, that we

no notion how cheap we are selling Children's Hose. 15c values.
notions until you investigate. sale PrIce
' Children's Hose 20c values,

sale price.
Children's Hose, 25c values,
sale price

98c
43c

98c
43c
79c

98c
69c
49c
98c

Here we have a beautiful Embroid

ered Petticoat. Sale
price.

43 c

9c
12c
17c

7c

will be a rush in our corset depart- T
ment Ladles Hose, 15c values, sale

price j

Corsets For A Song
Never was such a set of special
prices made on corsets as in this sale.
Make your selection early, for there

7'c
15 c

Ladies Hose 10c values, sale

price

One lot cf beautiful Lace and Em

. broidered Petticoats, sale
price.
Children's Drawers,
Sale price .............
$1.50 Night Gowns,
Sale price.
Corset Covers, nicely trim trimmed,
med, trimmed, sale price ......
59c Corset Covers, very neat neatly
ly neatly trimmed, sale price.

98c

9c
98c
15c
39c

ment

$2.00 Corset in this sale
for

$1.50 Corsets in this
sale for.

$1.25 Corsets in this sale
for

$1.69
$1.29

98c
89c

Ladies' Hose,' 25c
sale price ......

Ladies' Hose, 50c values,
sale price.
Ladies' Hose, 75c values
sale price.

19c

39c
59c

Dress Ginghams, 15c values,. j
sale price 1C
Dress Ginghams, 12 He values,
sale price. C

Dress Ginghams, 10c values
sale price

Charmeuse in all the new
shades, 25c values at..
Charmeuse, 35c values, sale
price
Voiles in the new stripes
. and shades, 35c values..
Marquisette in all shades,
35c values, sale price..
1000 yards figured and

' Lawns, 15c and 12 He
values, sale price.....

'1000 yards figured and
Lawns, 19c and 25c val val-.
. val-. ues, sale price........

striped
7'Ac

striped
15c

UNBLEACHED SHEETING

$1.00 Corsets in this sale
for

60c Corsets to go in this sale

Lace Front Corsets,
$2.50 values, for. .

$1.49

$1.00

Unbleached Sheeting. 36 inches

' wide, 18 yards, sale
price.

Bleaching, 36 inches wide, 10c. val value,
ue, value, 15 yards, sale 00

Table Oil Cloth, 25c values,
sale price

A Harvest of Bargains
Ladies' Waists

Ladies' Dresses and
Waists
One lot Crepe and Ratine in all

shades and styles, $9.98 and $7.98

values, go in this sale

Crepe in stripes and all shades, 15c

values, sale ........
price.

at.

$5.98

ues. sale price
One lot of White Lawn
Dresses to go at. .

15c

. Extra Specials
John B. Stetson Men's Hats, the $3.50,

$4. and $5.00 kind,
during this sale for only

pecial

Extra 8

A big lot of Stacy-Adams Shoes for Men;

mm

fnn well known tor oomm-

ent; during this sale only

fnCo)

Everything in the Ladies' Fur Furnishing
nishing Furnishing Section is marked so low
that without a doubt this depart department
ment department will be closed out within the

next few days. It would be ques- We have a lot of Walsts 69c

uoning your gooa sense 10 auuut
that you would come and get your
share of these bargains. A most al alluring
luring alluring array of Fancy Waists and
Shirt Waists, and the prices are al almost
most almost cut in two. A big variety in
materials and makes, insuring you
any style you want.

98c Shirt Waits, sale
price
69c Shirt Waists, sale
price

25c to $1.98 in all colors. We also

price. Linen Waists with Sailor hav a beautiful line of white dress-

One lot Embroidered Voile Dresses,
$7.50 and $6.50 val- 0 AO

1.98

43c
89c
98c

10c

Voile, new shades, 50c Q7
values, sale price ul C
Crepe de Chene in all new shades.
50c values, sale o yi
price OC
Silk Crepe de Chene at 4 Q
per yard D X X

WEDrJEODAY

From 9 to 10, Fancy iJ

From 10&0 to 1109
. for 25c Only 5ya
From 2:30 to 3309 Eraprc'
values, 5c per yd. 101

From 9 to 10-30, Curtain I

10-1 5c value, 10 yds 49c

THURODAV

FRIDAY CL

From 10-30 to 1130, Drcca

Only 10, yard
o ati inn nvV

From 1030 to 11, Embrcr!
230 to 330, Fruit of the Ld
Only 10 yards trj

values, sale price
$1.25 values, sale
price.......
$1.50 values, sale
price

79c
44c

Children's Dresses
We have a beautiful line of Chil-.
dren's Dresses, prices ranging' from

Collars, Middy Blouses,

worth $1.25. Sale price
$1.50 Values, sale
price
Chinese Middies, latest
styles, sale price
$1.25 Shirt Waists, sale
price. ?
$1.00 Shirt .Waists, sale
price

$2.50 Shirt Waists, sale
price

79c

98c
98c
98c
89c
$1.69

es at greatly reduced prices.

Dress Goods

Silk Poplin in the latest i)Q
shade, 50c values, price mC

Pongee, all shades, 25c
values, sale price

Pongee, all shades. 17c val- c
ues, sale price JLC

Madras in stripes, 15c values,
sale price

19c

9c

J

in""i!i,'imr,",ii!iiH,,MHl
......jj,;,-....,......
5
4

'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiillllllllllllllllllllllllllll

............. i........ .. 5



- I ,4 i

. J ----- " 1

ill.tt..
...

Si r S r M r' S r in j i t
yuuVuLJuU 0 0 :

I I N LJ l I I I L

J 1 ,r-i UN D ER S E LL E M G

5 SPECIALS 5
From 8 to 10, 10 ycrds 3G-inch Dlccshina, Q1.00
Only 1 8 yards to a customer.
From 9:30 to 10, 4-Strinc Droom, 15 cento.
From 10:30 to 11, Matting Hues, 0 cento CZcch
Only 1 to a cuctomer.
From 2 to 3, 40-inch White Sheer Lawn, 5 yards 2Ge
Only 5 yards to a customer.
From 3:30 to 4, .20 yds. Unbleached Chceting f or Q1.00
Only 20 yards to a customer.
. .... 8
None of the above Specials will be sold to Men, Merchants, Clerks
or Children.

xtira SpeeoaDS

There is no use of us telling you
the world-over price on Coats

Thread. This sale, spool

fa Md.ua s

STORE

IllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllUlllllllltllllllllllllllUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIISIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIU

13

MISEC3I

eason's best goods were being

urchased for that very purpose.

urely upon its merits to be

nefit of this condition.

That this is not a whole lot of stock accumulated from various bankrupt and fire sales for the purpose of
holding a "big sale", but every article is the very best that could be secured on an open market when the
made up. There have been in the past and will be in the future "big special sales" made on stocks of goods
We want to impress upon the public that our stock is not that kind, but that every article was purchased
sold in the regular course of our business. We are simply overstocked and our patrons will get

n

LTJ

V7

3

5

IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIU

ALS.
10 yards 23c

lingham, 5 yds.

ntnniAi

112 inch. 15.25c

w
customer.

II color borders,

Is. to a customer

10 yards 25c.

ter.

1

15a in. wide, 39c.

Jinff, 10 yds 75c.
er.

Men's Furnishings

and
4c
3c

Men's Handkerchiefs, White
Colored Borders, sale -price.
..............
Men's Handkerchiefs,"
: sale price

Men's Handkerchiefs that were
cheap at 10 cents each, going dur during
ing during the sale py
for .......... .... ;.... C
Men's Half Hose, 10c values, y
' during sale for. ." C
Men's Half Hose, 15c values, Q
during sale for. . . . C
Men's Half Hose, 25c values, 4
during1 sale for ....... IvC
Men's Shirts, with or without col collars,
lars, collars, regular 65c sellers, OQ
now going at ... 1'. . . OJrC
Men's Nainsook Coat Shirts and
Knee Length Drawers, no
sale price. ..... ..... mOC
Men's Night" Shirts, Plain White
Muslin, double stiched with mil military
itary military collars, sale jo
price ......... . ..... TrO C
Men's Wash Ties, to go in this Q
sale for.............. JC
15c Five-ply Collars in this 1 A
sale for......'........ 1UC
10c Four-ply Collars, sale Q

69c

price

Men's-50c Belts, to go in this
sale for.............
Men's 25c Belts to go in
this sale for. ..........
Men's $1 Shirts, sale
price.
Men's 89c Shirts, sale
price. ............ ...
Men's 50c Shirts, sale
price. ..... ..... .....

500 Shirts with or without collars,
, 50c and 75c values, sale oo
price Os3 C
Men's odd Pants. Great range of
patterns to select fc QO
from sale price. . . u) X saO
Ladies' 10c Handkerchiefs, y
sale price ............ C
One lot of Pants consisting of 250
pairs; materials and workmanship
fully guaranteed; none formerly
sold formless than $5, fcO 7r7
sale price. ....... Df
A line of Pants that formerly sold
upward of $6.50, will go in the
special Clearance (Jo Ak
sale for. ..... .... Ds3sfr

100 pairs of Overalls, blue and pin

checks, regular $1 values,
sale price. ... ... ....

A splendid line of Neckwear in all
the latest styles and shades, for formerly
merly formerly sold for upward of in
50c, sale price 39c to.. XaC
We have a lot of Otis' best made
Underwear, $1 kind,, sale on
price............... 0C
Men's B. V. D. Underwear, OQ
50c values. Sale price.. uC
100 dozen Underwear, sale Q
price................ JLC
Men's Half Hose, 50c values on
during sale for. ....... 07 C
Men's Blue Chambray (and other
colors ) extra full sizes, formerly
50c a garment, sale qq
price Os3C

Men's latest patterns In Dress Shirts
that formerly sold for $1, TQ
sale price 5C

Boys' all Wool Suits, extra fine qual

Ity, during the sale

upward from ......

A lot of Boys' Wash Suits,
69c values, sale price..

Lot Boys' Suits that formerly sold

for $1.24, are now going
for........
Lot small boys 75c suits,
excellent values, price.
Children's Overalls, up to
age 12. Sale price.'...
Children's Rompers, 35o
values, sale price. .....

39c Towels, Sheeting; Etc.

19c
79c
69 c
39c

59c

79c

90-inch Pure White Linen, $1.25
values, sale price per Q
yard. 05JC
36-inch -Pure White Linen, suitable
for dresses, sale price Pr.OQ Pr.OQ-yard
yard Pr.OQ-yard OSJC
36-inch Pure White Linens, suitable
for Dresses or Waists, sale no
price per yard st&OC
36-inch Linen, all shades, sale price
per yard, 17o Ol
and... AlC
27-inch Linen, sale price per
yard 7C
Sheets with reinforced seams, 50c
values, sale price OQ
each...... OJJC

81x90 Sheets, no seams, splendid

values, sale
price.
81x90 Sheets, extra good
values, sale price......

72x90 Sheets, exceptionally good
values for the money, sale fiQ
price.. OJJC
Pillow Cases, all splendid values at
the price. During the sale 7
for 9c, 11c, 13c and.. X f C
Good towels, and very cheap at the
price during the sale for Q
4c and 7C
Pure Linen Towels, extra large and
fine quality, during the OO
sale for C
Extra Large Bath Towels, Ol
sale price only lv
Beautiful Linen Towels, with Em Embroidered
broidered Embroidered ends, during the QQ
sale for 02C
10-4 Bleached Sheeting, during the
Clearance Sale, per QP
yard OC
9-4 Bleached Sheeting, during the
Clearance Sale, per Ol
yard 1C
Ticking, during the sale for f yg
per yard 8c. 12c and XrC
A. A. Feather Ticking, sale rr
price XC
BlueDenim, splendid values at the
price, during the sale, per
yard, 9c, 13c and. ..... X f C

$2.00

49 c

98c
59c
21c
23 c

SHOES AT SCREA3HXG PRICES
Prices screaming to be rescued
from deeper cuts. Screaming to the
heard above the din made by the
thousands of other startling value3
demanding attention In thl3 big sale.
Scores of styles, and every size with within
in within reason. No mater what you want
In the footwear line, we have it, and
everything is going at prices that
mean you'd better be here early If
you want some of these shoe bar bargains.
gains. bargains. You will hardly believe your
eyes.

and Lace,
Tan. $3.00
$1.98
$1.69

Men's Oxfords, Button
Patent Leather and
quality, sale
price
One lot
sale price ...........

One hundred pair Stacey Adams,
Regal and Nettle ton Shoes, $4, $5
and $6.00 values, sale (1 AO
price DXsJO
200 pair Ladies Two Strap Low Low-quarters,
quarters, Low-quarters, Vice and Gun Metal,
$2.00 values, sale QO
price 2JOC
150 pairs Ladies Button and Lace
Low-quarters, Gun Metal and Pat.
Guaranteed, $2 values, 31 1 Q
sale price DXX7
One lot of Ladies' White Pumps,
$1.50 values, sale QA
price 02JC
One lot Ladies Low-quarters in all
leathers and styles, J Qfi
sale price. .......... .D X iO
One lot old Ladles' Common Sense
Shoes, sale 1 1 Q
price jiDXXJ7
One lot of Men's Elk Shoes, the
world known $2 and $2.25 values,
sale. 4Q
price D X J7
One lot men Elk Shoes, $1.75 val values,
ues, values, sale (jji n("
price jiPXss&O
One lot Men's Oxfords, G0 QO
Patent and Tan, price PsCsJO
Boy's all leather shoes, J Oi
all styles and shapes P X trT

LADIES' SKIRTS, ETC
We advise the ladies to take advant advantage
age advantage of this liberal offer. We have'
just received a beautiful, up to
date line In the newest plaids and
stripes. Skirts that sell 0 ACk
for $5, sale price. ...
You will have to look these skirts
over to apperciate their valnes.
Skirts that sold for CC QO
$10, sale price OOmUO

15c

mSCELLAXEOUS
Fancy Table Oilcloth, 25c
values, sale price per yd.

Nottingham Lace. Curtains, white,
length 3 yards, width 28 Inches,
handsome inner border of yf
scroll design. Pr pr. TfJJC

Perfection Mosquito Canopy

able to beds, best of
its kind. Sale price. .'.

Good Pearl Buttons, first
quality. Sale price doz.

One lot of Men's all Wool Blue Serge

atach-

$1.98

4c
Serge

Suits, $12.50 values, Aiy ga
sale price. VI 0J

'I. $8.48

100 Men's Suits, all shades and
styles, from $12.50 to $18 values.

to be closed out

this sale at.

One big lot of real up to date La Ladies
dies Ladies Ready to Wear and Dress Hats
at your own prices..
We have thousands of different
items on sale which we cannot men mention
tion mention for the lack of space. The only
way to appreciate this offer Is to
come and make your dollar bring
double its value. .

Extra Specials
400 Pairs of the Famous Keith Konqueror and A. E.
Nettleton Men's Shoes, $3.50 to I
$6.00Values, during this sale at only U a C2

A Large Lot of Hart Schaffner & Marx Suits in all
Shades and Styles, Your ("0 (Cft ffT(TT
Choice during this sale for U SaJJ
These will not be exchanged or altered.

Mr

fpMP"-""i"""MlW.l--Mtl--- -MM



TCIGIIT

THE OCALA EVENING STAR, TUESDAY, JUNE 9. 1914

(If you have any items for this department call phone 106)

OCALA SOCIAL AFFAIRS

Voice Recital by Pupils of Miss
Downs
The last of the series of delightful
spring musicals was given last eve evening
ning evening at the spacious home of Mr.
and Mrs. H. B. Clarkson, when the
annual voice recital by the pupils of
Miss Cecile 'Downs was heldV An au audience
dience audience of nearly a hundred friends
and admirers assembled to hear the
rendering of the attractively arrang arranged
ed arranged program, including nineteen num numbers.
bers. numbers.
The Clarkson home on Tuscawilla
street was attractively decorated
with cut flowers and ferns. Chairs
were placed in rows on the broad
veranda, reception hall, dining room
and library, all of the rooms except
the latter commanding a splendid
view of the drawing room where the
piano was placed.
Miss Downs teaches only voice but
she is a splendid pianist as was
shown in her sympathetic playing
of the many accompaniments for her
pupils last evening.
All of those taking part on the
program revealed voices of surpass surpassing
ing surpassing sweetness, reflecting credit upon
their talented teacher, who possesses
a rich voice of remarkable bril brilliancy.
liancy. brilliancy. In making the evening one
of the most enjoyable during the
"music season" Miss Downs was as assisted
sisted assisted by Miss Hill, a clever reader,
whose number was greatly 'enjoyed.
The program was as follows:
Her Rose Mrs. George Blitch.
A Winter Lullaby-Mrs. H. B.
Clarkson.
Two Lyrics Mrs. C IE. Nelson.
When Love is Kind; Drink to Me
Only With Thine Eyes -OHiss Annie
Davis., .'
Daisies; The Pine; Cloud Shad Shadows
ows Shadows Miss Stella Camp.
The Soul of the Violin Miss Hill.
All Through the Night; The Two
Grenadiers Mr. William Camp.

Norman Lullaby; The Rose in the
Garden 'Miss Elizabeth Davis.
(Love Is Spring; I Am Thy Harp;
LaSerenata (in Italian) Mr. Fred Frederick
erick Frederick Pezullo.
A Love Note; Entreaty; Calm as
the Night Mrs. Raymond Sapp.
Mrs. A. L. Izlar, Mrs. W. K. Lane
and Mrs. R. 'H. Purdom were on the
program, but were unable to be pres present,
ent, present, much to the regret of their
friends.
Miss Downs shortly leaves for
New York to begin studying for
grand opera and it is the sincere
wish of all her Ocala friends that
success may ever attend her efforts
and that her name may be one of the
best known and loved among the
American grand opera singers of the
near future.
Mrs. J. B. Borland, 'Misses Louise
and Ethel Borland, of Citra, and Mr.
D. S. Borland, of Fort Myers, were
visitors in Ocala Monday afternoon.

Accompaniment

of Seeling's Lorely on a Kimball

Player-Piano and hear this beau beautiful
tiful beautiful melody played by an invis

ible soloist.

The simple pressure ol one of

two buttons or keys brings out
the melody in either register.
This is done without the use of
awkward, complicated levers, or
specially cut rolls.

A

MR

j

pair

One of the TEX features of the
Kimball Player Piano
"Never played" pianos taken in
exchange.
Sold on partial payment plan If
desired.

Herbert Lattner,

"Artistic Pianos"

OCALA

FLORIDA

pjEsTpa r entsal B el 1 e-

J rfrT E. E. Converse will leave to- Ie

Mrs. Borland and daughters expect
to leave the first week In Junly for
Chautauqua, N. Y., Pittsburg and
Beavei, Pa.
.....
Mrs, Carney to Entertain

Thursday afternoon from 5 to

6:30 o'clock, Mrs. E. L. Carney will

be hostess to a delightful party hon honoring
oring honoring Misses Bess Bocage of Houma,
La., Marion Hampton of Laurens, S.
C, who are the attractive guests of

Miss Mildred Pyles, Mrs. R. A. Bur Bur-ford,
ford, Bur-ford, Jr., of Boston, Mrs. W. V.
Newsom, Jr., a recent bride, and

Mrs. Richard Dodge of Cape Charles,
Va., whose "wedding anniversary

comes on that day, June 11th

Approaching Marriage of Miss Pearl

Pearson
The friends of Mr. and Mrs. J. W

Pearson, iformerly of this city, but
now of Kansas City, Mo., are receiv receiving
ing receiving invitations to the approaching
marriage of their daughter, Miss

Pearl Jane Pearson, to Mr.- John O
Brison, Thursday evening, June 18

rne Driae-eie'ct grew to young

womanhood in this city and her

many girlhood friends extend best

wishes. Mr. and Mrs. Brison will
make their home in Kansas City.
. :
Meeting of Pythian Sisters
The Pythian Sisters will hold an
important meeting this eve evening
ning evening at 7:30 o'clock at the K. of P.
hall, and it is urgently requested
that every member will be present.
Mrs. J. H. McClymonds left today
for a few days' visit to CMrs. J. A.
Waters, who lives In the Moss Bluff
community.
Miss Legle Blitch will come in in a
few days from her home at Blitch Blitch-ton
ton Blitch-ton to visit Miss Clara Johnson for

a week or ten days.
Miss Marian Dewey, who has been
attending St. Genevieve Con vent, in
Asheville, N. C, has returned home
for the vacation.
Mrs. (Maude Home, and children,
her another, Mrs. Edwards, and Mr.
Bernard Koonce were guests to day
of relatives at Williston.
Rev. Richard Dodge, of Cape
Charles, Va., reached Anderson, S.
C, last night, and will visit his
brother, .Rev. Witherspoon Dodge,
until tomorrow night, leaving then
for this city.
,
Mrs. Anderson Turner, who has
been visiting her sisters, Mrs. W. K.
Zewadski and Mrs. Walter Hood,
since Wednesday, returned to her
home at Dunnellon yesterday.
Miss Mary Gates returned yester yesterday
day yesterday from a pleasant visit, to Lady
Lake and in a few days will leave
for St. Petersburg to visit friends.
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Maddox and
baby came up from St. Petersburg
and spent a few days with Mr. and
Mrs. I. I. Strong, and are now visit

ing Mrs. Madd

vi

morrow night for NewYork and will

visit friends at New Haven until July
1st, when he will ail for Europe,

and will not return to Oeala until

the first of October.

for some time, was married Thurs

day in Cleveland, S. C, to Lieuten Lieutenant
ant Lieutenant Charles C. Benton, U. S. A. The
bride under the stage name of Vir Virginia
ginia Virginia Howell has been playing in

Ben ilur for several years, a produc production
tion production that demands only the very best
actors and actresses.
In the May number of the Talis

man, isaaed by the Florida State

College for Women, and which is a

bright publication that we always
welcome gladly on our desk, we note
that Miss Ruth Reynolds, who
taught for one term in the Ocala
high school, is president of the
Alumnae Association, a position
which carries much honor and great
responsibility.
The King's Daughters will give a
silver tea Wednesday afternoon from
3:30 to 6 o'clock at the residence
of -Mrs. F. G. B. Weihe, 304 North
Orange street. The public is cor cordially
dially cordially invited to attend a n d help the

Daughtersirtheir worthy wot;

Irs. J. C. Smith and two interesrn

ng children, India and DejtaJ, left
ast nighjf for Bowling Green, where

they wilLsmakeaif extended visit to
the formersarents before going to
Kathleen tor a visit to relatives.'
During his family's absence Mr.

Smith has rented their cottage tol

Mrs. Gaulding and two daughters of
Hattiesburg, Miss., who took posses possession
sion possession today.

a
LJLLo

.Bo

V

Shoe Beprtiieit

OCALA CHURCH DIRECTORY

PRESBYTERIAN Corner of Ft
King avenue and Watula street; pas pastor
tor pastor W. H. Dodge; residence 309 Ft.
King avenue; phone 233. Sunday
services: Sunday school 9:30 a.m.;

superintendent W. H. Dodge; morn

ing sermon 1 1 o'clock-; Junior Mis Mission
sion Mission Society 3 p. m.; evening sermon

7:15 o'clock. Midweek prayer meet

ing Wednesday evening, 7:30.
CATHOLIC North Magnolia St;
priest, D. Bottolacio; residence 327
North Orange street; i Sunday ser services:
vices: services: High mass 10 a. m.; vespers
5 p. m ; Sunday school 3 to 5 p. m.;

communion services second Sundays

6:30 a. m.; also regular service.
EPISCOPAL Corner S. Broadway

and Watula streets; rector, Rev. Jas.
G. Glass; residence 311 S. Broadway;
phone 415. Sunday services: Holy

communion 7:30 a. m.; Sunday
school, 9:45 a. m.; morning prayer,
litany and sermon 11 a. m.; evening

prayer 7:30 p. m.; choir practice

7:30 p. m. Friday; meetings of ves

try and societies at hours appointed.

METHODIST Cornel 'ort King

avenue and South Main street: pas pastor
tor pastor J. M. Gross; residence 4vd Foit

King avenue; phone 157; Sunday

services: Sunday school 9:30 a. m.,
superintendent L. N. Green; morn morning
ing morning sermon 11 o'clock; Junior Ep-

worth League 4 p. m.; Senior Ep Ep-worth
worth Ep-worth League 3 p. m.; Senior Ep Ep-worth
worth Ep-worth League, 4 p. m.; evening

sermon 7:30 o'clock. Midweek prayer

meeting Wednesday evening 7:30.

Choir practice Friday evening at the
church.

BAPTIST Corner North Magno

lia and North Second streets; pastor

Bunyan Stephens; residence 520 Ok Ok-lawaha
lawaha Ok-lawaha avenue; phone 314; Sunday

services: Sunday school 9:30 a. xu.
superintendent W. T. Gary; morning

sermon 11 o'clock; Junior Baptist
Young People's Union 4 p. m.; Sen Senior
ior Senior Baptist Young People's Union
6:45 p. m.; evening sermon 7:30 p.
m. Midweek prayer meeting Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday evening 7:30 o'clock

Church of Christ
ast Broadway, next t6 City Hall.

RoyB. Bowers, minister. Residence
70S Lime street. Office and study
at tile church, entrance to the rear.

JJours: 8 to 12 a. m.f (except Mon-

Mrs'. William Wolff and daughter
Rose, went to Wood mar yesterday
afternoon to spend several days with
Mrs. J. D. Rooney at Commodore
Goodwin's .bungalow, "The Oaks."
The family of Mr. George Ma'eKay
are now occupying their beautiful
summer home on Lake Weir, and
Mr. D. W. Davis and family are
moving into their attractive lakeside
home today.
The friends of Mr. and Mrs. L. M.
Murray rejoice with them that their
little daughter Elizabeth, after sev several
eral several weeks of illness, was able to re return
turn return home from, the hospital today.
Members of the Kappa Alpha fra fraternity
ternity fraternity at the University of Florida
gave their annual frat ball Friday
evenin? in Gainesville. The ball was
opened with a grand march lei bv
iMiss Eleanor Crom, formerly of this
city, dancing with Mr. Albion Knight
of Jacksonville. Attending were a
large number of out of town girls,
among them being Miss Hope Robin Robinson
son Robinson of this ity.
Miss -SoBhie Kuker, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Theo Kuker of Flor Florence,
ence, Florence, S. C. and sister to Mr. D .T.
Keuker, who made Ocala his home

DgJIcjouls

Fresh TJailvk

-.'-ALSO-.-
Made by Machinery and
Baked by Steam
GARTER'S BAKERY
Phone 306

J. E. FRAMPTON
PIANO TUNER

Located In Ocala. Fla., Expert work
i,i:aranteed. References given.
Associated with Herbert Lattner
distributor
W. AV. Kimball Co.. Ocala.

ens

English Walking Last
Arome, tan and rubber sole.

lennis uxioras
Button Oxfords

frumps

Colonials
Straps

CHILDREN S

ens

ORB

From the smallest size to
-
Big Misses.
In the infant sizes we have canvas.
T
shoes. Get these cool shoes I for the
little tots. They feel the heat more than

mi

we do.

111 . V I I
i. B. MASTE8S OB.
OCALA, - FLORIDA

C. L. ANDERSON W. Y. WOOD
' Aini(ffl(2iFS(D)im Liiiiinnilbcsrp Co

Plans, Specifications and Estimates
Furnished on Application
QUALITY IS OUn MOTTO.
ASK OUR CUSTOMERS.
Room 8- Merchant's Block.
Telephone 165

days) and 2 to 5 p. m. Wednesdays
and Saturdays. "At Home" to the
congregation and others Mondays, 7
to 1.0 p. m.
Services Sunday:. Sunday school
10 a. m. Preaching and communion
11 a. m. Junior society 2:30 p. m.
Christian Endeavor Society 6:45 p.
m. Preaching 8 p. m. Wednesday,
7:30 p. m. training class conference
and prayer. Business meetings the
last Tuesday of each month. All
seats free, and everybody welcome.

OCAIiA LODGE XO. 286, B. P. O. E.
I
Ocala Lodge Xo. 286, Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, meets
the second and fourth Tuesday even even-jigs
jigs even-jigs In each month. Visiting breth brethren
ren brethren always welcome. Club house
opposite postoffice, east side.
David S. Williams, E. R-
Joseph Bell, Secretary. Aa.

DAIIll' STOCK FOR SALE
I have had placed in my hands for
sale 100 dairy cows (they are ac acclimated,
climated, acclimated, dehorned and bred to reg registered
istered registered Holstein bull); 50 pure bred
Angora goats; separator; boiler,
milk cans and complete dairy equip equipment;
ment; equipment; also lots of farm implements.
E. C. Beuchler, Anthony Farms, An Anthony,
thony, Anthony, Fla. 6-2-tf

SUGAR HAMMOCK LANDS
Partridge-Woodrow Company
Selling Agents
Merchant's Block. Ocala 1-13-tf

Advertise in th Star for results.

VIA '

E ABOARD
AIR LINE RAILWAY.
The Progressive Railway of tho South.

Round Trips Rates:
Hawthorne
Lochloosa
Island Grove

Citra 2.00
Sparr 2.00
Anthony 2.00
Ocala 2.00
Belleview 2.00
Summerfield 2.00
Oxford 2.00
Wildwod . 2.00
Tickets on sale for all regular trains June 11th, limit returning
June 14th, 1914.

SEE YOUR TICKET AGENT.

JOHX BOISSAEAU, Ticket Agent, Mercliant's Block, Ocala, Fla.
G. Z. PHILLIPS, CHAS. B. BRYAN,
-Asst. Pass. Agt, Gen. Pass Agt.
Jacksonville, Fla Portsmouth, Va.

- 7



THE OCALA EVENING CTAH, 1UESCAY, Z Villi C.

y A" FOWE AM A HALF POLLACK PADK IF PAOTS ITOEtl

tea

We Will Give An Extra
PAIR OFTROUSERS

, A

t
g r

Ordered from our large line of samples on Friday, Saturday and Llonday, Jnnc 12,
13 and 15. Rather than disorganize our splendid working forces during the
next sixty days, when there is bound to be a falling off in the tailoring busi business,
ness, business, we will keep our tailors at work without profit, except to those who take
advantage of this' offer. As an inducement to you to buy your clothes now
we will make you an extra pair of pants FREE to any suit you may select
from our sample display rooms in the Cam Block, Be sure to get your suit
now while the getting is good, as another such opportunity is not likely to
come your way soon. We have on hand too many swell samples in all wool
goods to even attempt to describe them, but we wish to impress upon all that
these suits are guaranteed just the same as though you were not getting the
extra pair of trousers free. Don't forget the date.

linigjll'nslhi

FKIE)M, JUINE 12, 11914 T KaKIB5AY JUKIE 15, HS)H4

"

3

III

UNJUST TO SEMINOLES

WRITER CRITICIZES COURSE OF
THE UNITED STATES.

Indians Justified in Their Resistance
to Removal From Their Lands,
According to the Rev. Thomas
B. Gregory.
It was 68 years ago that the Dade
massacre took place near Fort Drane,
In Florida, writes the Rev. Thomas H.
Gregory. Major Dade and his com command
mand command of 100 men were attacked by the
Seminoles and completely wiped out,
only four of the force escaping.
The head and front of the Seminole
war, in the course of which this
"massacre" occurred, was Osceola, as
pure a patriot and as gallant a
fighter as ever broke into history.
The Seminoles were dissatisfied
with a treaty that a few chiefs had
made for their emigration west of
the Mississippi, and when Gen.
Thompson was sent to remove them
by force they arose, under the leader leadership
ship leadership of Osceola, and began fighting
for the land that had come down
to them from their fathers.
They did just what the Americans
would certainly have done under simi similar
lar similar conditions. The United States
troops were Invaders and the Semi-

coles resisted them. Major Dade and
Ills men were invaders and the Semi Seminoles
noles Seminoles killed them. The fact that a
little bunch of chiefs, assisted by
American "diplomacy" and firewater,
had made a "treaty" giving away
their country did not seem sufficiently
sacred to the red men to justify them
In submitting to the American claims.
Osceola fought like a lion for two
years against vastly superior num numbers,
bers, numbers, and in 1837 was made a prison prisoner
er prisoner by General Jesup, while holding a
conference with him under a flag of
truce, and imprisoned in Fort Moul Moultrie
trie Moultrie until his death which took place
two years later.
Beaten In the field and bereft of
their great leader, the Seminoles re retired
tired retired to the swampy fastnesses of
the everglades and kept up the fight
for five years longer, successfully re resisting
sisting resisting the onslaughts of more than
10,000 American troops. To this day
the descendants of the Seminoles are
to be found in the big Florida swamp,
. preserving in their features and in
their courage the characteristics of
their stalwart and gamy ancestors.
Osceola had every cause to hate the
' white man. His wife was seized as a
- slave, and when he protested and
threatened revenge he was seized by
Gen Thompson and imprisoned for
six days in irons. For this outrage
Osceola killed Thomsson. for doinc

whlcn he was dubbed a "ferocious sav savage"
age" savage" and declared an outlaw.
Great is the mystery of the white
man's justice! It is no wonder that
the children of the forest were never
able to understand the ethics and re religion
ligion religion of the paleface. (

Stung.
London reports the discovery of
the meanest man of whom there is
any record. This Englishman has just
been divorced from hi3 wife for what,
do you guess? Wrong. You couldn't
guess it in a week of Sundays. The
mean fellow carried live bees around
in his pockets. Every time his wife
went to examine his pockets to see if
they needed mending or for other
reasons see any jest book she was
cruelly stung. Unable to endure such
treatment, she secured a divorce. She
felt that one of the most ancient of
wifely duties and privileges that of
inspecting the bottom of her hus husband's
band's husband's pockets was not only inter interfered
fered interfered with, but was made a method of
torture. The man, of course, argued
that he had a right to cany what he
pleased in his pockets but the grant granting
ing granting of the divorce would seem like a
denial of this right. So man may
well begin to ponder this question:
What may a man rightfully carry in
his pockets?

HOT WEATHER TOXIC
AND HEALTH -BUILDER

Are you run down nervous tir tired?
ed? tired? Is everything you do an effort?
You are not lazy you are sick!
stomach, liver, kindeys and whole
system need a tonic. -, A tonic and
health builder to drive out the waste
matter build you up and renew
your strength. Nothing tetter than
Electric Bitters. Start today. Mrs.
James Duncan, Haynesville, Me.,
writes: "Completely cured me after
several doctors gave me up." 50c and

$1, at your druggist.
Bucklen's Arnica Salve : for cuts.
Tues Thurs. Fri. wkly.
." up. p. i. m ni -ii -I. ..I. I.. m
Save money and get a canner. Ifut
up your tomatoes and other fruits.
We have both the cans and canners,
and .all appliances for canning. The
Marion Hardware Co. 5-30-12t

ALWAYS LEAD TO
BETTER HEALTH

Serious sicknessses start in disor disorders
ders disorders of the stomach, liver and kid kidneys.
neys. kidneys. The best corrective and pre preventative
ventative preventative is Dr. King's New Life
Pills. They purify the blood pre prevent
vent prevent constipation, keep liver, kid kidneys
neys kidneys and bowels in healthy condi condition.
tion. condition. Give you better health by rid ridding
ding ridding the system of fermenting and
gassy foods. Effective and mild. 25c
at your druggist, tues-thurs-f ri-wky
Buckien's Arnica Salve for all hurts.

THE METROPOLITAN
SAVINGS BANK

This bank is always open until 8
o'clock in the evening on Saturdays
and Mondays; on other days of the
week it closes at 3 o'clock in the aft afternoon.
ernoon. afternoon. The bank .will observe all
legal holidays, both state and na national,
tional, national, and will .remain closed on
those days.
George Giles, President President-Frank
Frank President-Frank P. Gadson, Cashier. 3-1 9-tf

COAST LINE SCHEDULE

DEPRESSED SPIRITS

Everyone Has It Within His Power
to be Happy
A celebrated French physician has
said that "a man's liver Is the baro barometer
meter barometer of his disposition."
Every man and every woman
knows that a cheerful smile is a big
factor in one's success.
Everyone should know that the
disordered liver is cause of ninety
per cent of human ills. Lazy over overworked
worked overworked livers are the prime causes
of headaches, indigestion, constipa constipation
tion constipation and dozens of other ills.
But the inactive liver always warn
by coated tongue, sour stomach, dull
eye and even laziness. Heed your
warning and you insure happiness
to yourself and reflect it upon your
associates. Calomel used to do.
Modern day science has found a bet better
ter better way in CarswelTs Liver-Aid
which is a pure vegetable remedy on
sale' under guarantee of money re refund
fund refund at 50 cents for large bottle.
Ask the Court Pharmacy about It.
1. Adv.

SUGAR HAMMOCK LAN US
i
Partridge-Woodrow Company
Selling Agents
Merchant's Block, Ocala l-13-tt

Melver & MacKay
FuneraJ Directors
UNDERTAKERS and EMBALMERS
Fine Caskets and Burial Robes.
D. E. McIVER and C. V. ROBERTS
funeral Directors
ill Work Done by. Licensed. Em Em-balmers
balmers Em-balmers and Fully Guaranteed
PHONES:
D. E. McIVEB.. 104
O. V. ROBERTS ......SOS
Undertaking Office.. 4f

Jacksonville and St. Petersburg
No 9- Leave Jacksonville 4 p. m.;
arrive Ocala 9:05; arrive St. Peters Petersburg
burg Petersburg 3 a.(m.
No. 10 Leave St. Petersburg 11
P. m., arrive Ocala 6:05; arrive
Jacksonville, 10:55.
No. 39 Leaves Jacksonville af
9:30 a. m.;arrives Ocala at 2:40 j
m.; arrives St. Petersburg at 9:10.
No. 4 0 Leaves St. Petersburg at
6:30 a. m.; arrives Ocala 12:54 p.
m; leaves Ocala 1:14 p. m.; arrives
Jacksonville at 6:30 p. m.
Ocala and Lakeland
No. 35 Leaves Ocala 6:40 a. m.;
arrives Lakeland 11:05 a. m.
. No. 32 Leaves Lakeland 5:48 p.
m.; arrives Ocala 9:50 p. m.
Ocala and Homosassa
No. 49 Leave Ocala, 8:20 a. m.;
arrive Homosassa, 1 p. m.
No. 47 Leave Ocala, 2:20; arrive
Homosassa, 5:20.
No. 44 Leave Homosassa, 10 a.
m.; arrive Ocala, 12:50 p. m.
No. Leave Homosassa, 1:30 p.
m. ; arrive Ocala, 6 p. m.

SEABOARD AIR LINE SCHEDULE

Southbound
No. 1, local leaves Jacksonville
9:30 p. m.; arrives Ocala 1:40 a
m.J arrives Tampa 6:30 a. m.
No. 3 local leaves Jacksonville
:30 a. m.; arrives Ocala 1:05 p. m.;
arrives Tampa 5:40 p. m.
No. 9 limited leaves Jacksonville
11:30 a. m.; arrives Ocala 2:30 p
m.; arrives Tampa 6 p. m.
Northbound
No. 2. local leaves Tampa 9 p. m.;
arrives Ocala 2:30 a. m.; arrives
Jacksonville 6:45 a. m.
No. 4 local leaves Tampa 9 a. m.;
arrives Ocala 1:12 p. m.; leaves
Ocala 1:30 p. m.; arrives Jackson Jacksonville
ville Jacksonville 5:20 p. m.
No. 10 limited leaves Tampa 1 p.
m.; arrives Ocala 4:20 p. nt.; arrives
Jacksonville 7:30 p m.

OCALA NORTHERN SCHEDULE

No. 72 'Leave Ocala daily 1:15

p. m. Arrive Palatka" daily except
Sunday, 4:45 p. m. Arrive Palatka
Sunday, 4:15 p. m.
No. 71 Leave Palatka dally ex except
cept except Sunday, 7:40 a. m. Arrive
Ocala 11 m.
No. 73 Leave Palatka Sunday, 8
a. m. Arrive Ocala, 11 a. m.

Not a Moving Picture House
' I BUT A PICTURE OF A
MOVING GROCERY HOUSE
YOU'LL WIN OUR GRATITUDE BY TESTING OUR PROMPTITUDE.
TEST THESE
Swift's Premium Ham and Bacon, Sliced Boiled Ham, Sliced Dried Beef
And a Full line of CANNED MEATS.
Twenty-One Pounds of Sugar for $1 with $1 Cash Purchase .of other
Groceries on Saturday and Monday Only.

J. L. SMITH GROCERY COMPANY

PHONE 434

JUICY CHOPS

A FINE STEAK r

mbw n a v a

WHICH WILL BE YOUR CHOICE FOR TODAY OB TOMORROW?
Tell Us By Phone
WE ARE ANXIOUS TO KNOW
PHONE 108 CITY MARKET

We are equipped with the Latest, Largest, Best Vulcanizins T

plant in Central Florida, Any sized tire bandied at one time.
AH work Guaranteed to e FirstCIass.
Bring us your Casings and Tubes to be Vulcanized.
Worn out tires and tubes ught.

F2SK audi FMSES'irORnE TEE5ES

ox au sizes ana runs, always in stocK
BAVEES, TTtoe TiiFe TJlzw.
Phone ASS. OCALA, FLORIDA Main St. near PoatoQee,
OOMO0 0 t0 0 Q0ltD8llMQltlfliimtlimni



Daily, $5 Per Year.
Gets a S5 Coupon Book.
12 Ocala Business Houses
will redeem tb em.

Every Subscriber Gets Iffiie Valine
of lis Subscription pack
in Merchant's Cash
Discounts.

Weekly S1.50 Per-Year.
Gets a Sl.50 Coupon Book,
Redeemable by 14 Ocala
Business Firms.

TMS WILL KfflDT (GIIE AWAY

1

n

UVJ

If

BUT it WILL give each and EVERY subscriber who pays a year for the Daily
Star, a $5 Coupon Book, redeemable at its face value by any of the Ocala
Business Houses mentioned below, or for a Weekly Star subscription a
$1.50 book redeemable for that amount. Past due subscriptions, Daily or
Weekly, will get a book for each year paid.
The following Ocala firms will allow you the discounts set opposite their names on all cash
purchases made when Star Subscription Coupons are presented at the time of making purchases:

Marion Hardware Company, Hardware -, -J.
J. Gerig, Drugs (Postoffice drugstore & Annex drugst
Knight & Lang, Wagons, Buggies, etc -A
E. Burnett, Jewelry -
E. G. Rivers, Gents Furnishings - -
"Smith Grocery Co. (Except Feed Stuffs and Special Sales Day Bargains)
Hayes & Guynn, Dry Goods - -Theus-Zachry
Company, Furniture - -
A. M. Lansford, Music Dealer - - -Miss
Mary Affleck, Millinery - -
B. Goldman, Why Pay More?" - -Little's
Shoe Parlors, Shoes - -

- 5 per
0 5 per

5 per
5 per
5 per
5 per
5 per
10 per
10 per
5 per
5 per
5 per

cent
cent

cent
cent

cent
cent
cent
cent

cent
cent

To illustrate how the plan will save you money and bring back the equivalent in cash, just what the paper
has cost you for either the Evening Star or Weekly.Star: Suppose your first call, after receiving the coupon book is
at the grocery store; you trade twenty dollars worth; you give the clerk $19 or your check, and he will tear out
of your book $1 worth of coupons, and your bill is paid. You have gotten back SI. of your subscription money.
Your next purchase is at the furniture house, whose name you see on the back of the coupon (and you are pleas pleased
ed pleased when you see they will give 10 per cent discount) ; you buy a bed for $10 S9 in cash and $1 worth of cou coupons
pons coupons squares you at this place. You've saved $2 already. Your purchase at the drugstore is $5 $4.75 and a
25c coupon straightens you there. Suppose the purchase is only $1 at the next store ; 95 cents in cash and a 5 cent
coupon pays it. Suppose you buy a wagon and harness amounting to $100; it would take your entire 5 coupon
book, but it would save you a FIXE DOLLAR BILL. V
' '' -
Just keep in mind, when you subscribe for the Star you can "Eat your cake and keep it too," if you take ad advantage
vantage advantage of our MERCHANTS' GASH DISCOUNT COUPON plan. If you owe for your paper, come in', pay up and
get a book. If you are not now taking the Evening Star or the Weekly Star, come in and do it now, and get a
coupon book. You can send your remittance by registered letter, check or express money order, and coupon book
will be mailed to your address.

Daily Star Costs You $5 per year.
Coupon Book is worth $5!

THEY BOTH COST YOU OXL.Y $3.

Weekly Star costs $1.50 per year.
The Coupon Book is worth $1.50.

THEY BOTH COST YOU OXIiY $1.3 O.

nrlTTTTCr
11 JnlL

PDndDime M

1



DOINGS OF THE VAN

I

s-ANfc&UL, I AH MN

r Mir. rr
POWJt TO
U A CRKAT OAU O
OR A
VftftK. AN 4TMEJ. BUT
LOOK
WTTN SO MVN OP US
T PITCH IN AND HEIP
wa owe irr to
WHO!
4L. ntktl IM TlMRl
Used exclusively in the con construction
struction construction of the Panama
Canal and the great Keokuk
dam in Iowa.
Government Engineers know
their business.
Fresh stock always on hand.
Woodmar Sand
& Stone Co.
PHONE 331.
P. D. ODELL
CONTRACTOR and BUILDER.
Estimates on any kind
t
t
T
Y
Y
v
t
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
Y
fUl XJUUUlllg 1U111J.D1J.GU Ull
short notice. All work
guaranteed.
117 N. SANCHEZ STREET.
P. O. BOX. NO. 438.
ITHONE NO. 368 OCALA
Phone 481
If you want to bay or sell
FURNITURE.
New and Second Hand
Household Goods
Farm Tools, Harness Etc.
Easy Payments if Desired.
A. 1. BABBITT,
310 S. Main St. Ocala Fla,
: PHONE 503
: For Good Wood
BIG Load for $1.
Your Order will have
9 Immediate Attention.
! J. L. SMOAK
' At Smoak's Wagon Shop.
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL,
Carpenter and Builder
Careful Estimates Made on All Con
tract Work. Gives more and better
eofc tractor In the city,
work for the money than any othe?
OPEN AXJj NIGHT
The Merchant's Cafe Is a first class
place to take your meals. Open night
and day. J. R. Dewey, poprie-
To make your trip a real pleasure
jl Thermos bottle is a necessity. We
sell them. Gerig's. The Reliable
Drug Store. ... 6-16-tf
SUGAR HAMMOCK LANDS
Selling Agents
Partridge-Woodrow Company

WHJL

.

J

LOONS

OIKSNFiELD
FEW SAYS TO
AFTEK Ml WO'
VOU ARB. MOVING.
I CONSTANCE AND HENRY 1
J By LOUISE OLNEY. J
Constance slid behind the trunk of
a big tree and put her fingers to her
ears. Her neart
beat to sufToca sufToca-tion
tion sufToca-tion with misery
and suspense. She
did not dare to
stay lest she might
hear Henry Pay Pay-ton
ton Pay-ton make love to
Mamie, an old
love of his. She
could not have
borne that. Neith Neither
er Neither did she dare
move lest they
hear her they
were not ten feet
distant.
Constance won wondered
dered wondered why Henry
had brought her
to this picnic
and then let Ma Mamie
mie Mamie Travis absorb
his attention with
her Irish wit and fascination. Con Con-I
I Con-I stance went through an eternity of
torture before she plucked up courage
to take down her hands, remove her
puiups and slide away.
Soon she was safe out of sight. She
stopped near a swift little brook
i where the sunset was mirrored rosily
in the clear water. The stillness of
j the woods soothed her a little, and
. she began to plan how she could find
! the others and get home without ac-
cepting Henry's escort. They were
i all in pairs, and some one would in in-I
I in-I sist on going with her. Jack Manning
; had brought Mamie.
I Her shoes still in her hand, she sat
j down, curling her feet under her, the
tnougnt striking her with shame that
she loved Henry Peyton before he
had spoken of love to heri
As she sat tfeere she heard a crash
in the bushes and in a moment Jack
Manning, whom she hated, came
swaggering up to her.
"Hello! Guess you and I'll have to
console each other. We seem to be
deserted." He seated himself beside
her, scanning her admiringly with his
bold, dark eyes.
She flushed in distress.
"Say, little one, I'll take off my
shoes, -too, and we'll go wading. Is
that what you came for?" She shook
her head.
"I don't like you. Go away! Please
I'm tired and want to think."
"You can think when you're older
and not so pretty. Thinking's no job
for a beauty come, console me for
j Mamie. She wouldn't mind consoling
a fellow."
Constance jumped up, snatching her
shoes, and ran away from him as fast
as she could. It was growing dusk
and she was timid indeed deathly
afraid, but of him more than of a
whole lonely forest. He looked after
her a moment, bit off the end of a
fresh cigar and muttered to himself:
"Turned down, eh? Went too fast
with her. Is Peyton crazy to forget
a peach like that for Mame?" He lit
! his elenr ar.d r-ntcred off. Finally
i he found the others grouped under the
: trees preparing to go home.
Presently Henry brought Mamie
j back, the girl sober-faced, her eyes a
little red, but the man was very quiet.
"Where's Constance?" he demanded.
Mrs. Turner, the chaperon, did not
know.
"I think you're the one to know,"
she remarked, significantly, "and it's
getting dark. Better lock for her
I saw her go pff by herself." Henry
strode off.
A half hour later in the deep dusk,
thoroughly alarmed, he was still
searching. He called her name aloud,
but she did not answer. What had
become of her? His heart failed him.
Why had he left her even a moment?
Why had he bothered to save a girl
like Mame from her own undoing. If
she wanted to play with Manning till
a good chap like Thorne was sick of
heir it was her business.
"Constance," he called. "Connie!"
Then going around a big tree, he came
upon her white little figure huddled
against the trunk. Her hands in her
absurd fashion were over her ears.
She was crying softly. He rushed up
to her, taking down her hands and
shaking her a bit from sheer relief to
find her safe.
"Connie darling! you frightened
me to death! What made you hide?"
He drew her toward him, but she
freed herself firmly, shaking her head.

THE OCALA EVENING STAR. TUESDAY, JUNE 9, 1914

msthsr. auwt -SAixi
NROf KINO TO lM-
(YTTE ME TO 5TW AT
HfcR. HOV5G. WNIU DC
i AS MOVINC. YOU KHOW
MR.ysM-ce-iUR$T here.
IN AU. THn Mfe33
you. 1 didn't Intend to tell you yet yet-but
but yet-but it's out now. Don't you care for
me at all?"
"You were makiag love to her
under a tree I saw but I didn't
listen."
The man laughed and again drew
her to him despite herself.
"Making love to Mamie Travis? I'm
not a fool. I was lecturing her within
an inch of her life about that scamp
Manning! Perhaps she was not worth
it but I've known her a long time."
Constance clung close to him.
"He came down to the brook and
bothered me I ran away."
"I'll settle with him, Connie. But
do you love me, dear?"
She leaned willingly against him.
"You know I do," she said. "You
know. Will you take me home now?"
He had just tucked her hand under his
arm when the others came looking for
them both. Together they walked to toward
ward toward the trolley line, and the night
was sweet to them.
(Copyright. IV. Mie MeClure Xewspa Xewspa-l
l Xewspa-l r s nJir-at.
DEAFNESS CANNOT BE CURED
by local applications, as they cannot
reach the diseased portion of the ear.
There is" only one way to cure deaf
ness, and that is by constitutional
remedies. Deafness is caused by an
inflamed condition of the mucous lin
ing of the eustachian tube. When
this tube Is Inflamed you have a rum
bling sound or imperfect hearing, and
when it is entirely closed, deafness is
the result, and unless the inflamation
can be taken out and this tube re restored
stored restored to its normal condition, hear
ing will be destroyed forever; nine
cases out of ten are caused by catarrh
which is nothing but an inflamed con condition
dition condition of the mucous surfaces.
We will give One Hundred Dollars
for any case of deafness -(caused by
catarrh) that cannot be cured by
Hall's Catarrh Cure. Send for circu circulars,
lars, circulars, free. F. J. CHENEY & CO.,
Toledo, Ohio.
Sold by all druggists, 75c. Take
Hall's Family Pills for constipation.
Adv.
IiOYAIi ORDER OF MOOSE
Ocala Lodge No. 699, L. O. O. M.,
meets every Thursday at 8; 30 p. m.
Visiting brethren always welcome to
the lodge and club house, on Mag Magnolia
nolia Magnolia street near postofflce.
J. D. Rooney, Dictator.
J. E. Gates, Secretary. ad
FOR AN IMPAIRED APPETITE
To improve the appetite and
strengthen the digestion try a few
doses of Chamberlain's Tablets. Mr.
J. H. Seitz, of Detroit, Mich., says:
"They restored my appetite when
impaired, relieved me of a bloated
feeling and caused a pleasant and
satisfactory movement of the bow bowels.
els. bowels. For sale by all dealers, adv.
GOING AWAY THIS SUMMER ?
If so, insure your baggage against
loss by fire, theft or wreck in hotels
or steamers, on trains, docks, plat platforms
forms platforms or wagons. Rates extremely
low. E. M. Osborn, Holder. Build Building.
ing. Building. 5-19-tf
A tract or 120 acres or good pine
land one mile north towards Ocala
from Montague station on the A.
C. L. Railway; unimproved. Best of
watermelon, cabbage and gardening
land. Apply at Star office for further
information. 5-6-dw tf
GET RID OF YOUR RHEUMATISM
Now is the time to get rid of your
rheumatism. You can do it If you
apply Chamberlain's Liniment. W.
A. Lockbard, Homer City, N. Y.,
writes: "Last spring I suffered from
rheumatism with terrible pains in
my arms and shoulders. I got a
bottle of Chamberlain's Liniment and
the first application relieved me. By
using one bottle of it I was entirely
cured." For sale by all dealers. ad.
And When Money Talks?
Sound travels at the rate of 400
yards per second. Exceptions to this
rule: Scandal, 1,000 yards; flattery,
500 yards; truth, 2. yards; alarm
clock,
SUGAR HAMMOCK LANDS
Partridge- Woourow Company
Selling Agents
Merchant's Block, Ocalr
Sufficient Unto Himself.
What the superior man seeks is in
himself; what the. small man seeks Is
In others. Confucius.

rsUJBft T SXM VNTttJ

hn ST SSTIUSD IN f
msn HOUC3. feu I
f' I Atj SPWO 7
STORES. WILL CLOSE THURSDAY
The undersigned merchants here hereby
by hereby agree to close their respective
places of business on Thursdays at
1 p. m., beginning June 4th, and
continuing to and including Septem September
ber September 10th, and also agree to close
their places of business not later
than 6:30 p. m. on other days ex excepting
cepting excepting Saturdays.
H. B. Masters Company.
Rheinauer & Company.
E. T. Helvenston.
Marion Hardware Co.
E. G. Rivers.
O. K. Teapot Grocery.
Counts Grocery Co.
H. A. Waterman.
L. W. Harley.
Mclver & MacKay.
J. L. Smith Grocery Co.
Hayes & Guynn.
Marcus Frank.
The Murray Company.
M. A. Bo stick.
Theus-Zachry Co.
MARION COUNTY DIRECTORY
. Judge Circuit Court W. S. Bul Bul-ock.
ock. Bul-ock. Ocala.
Clerk Circuit Court P. H. Nugent.
Ocala.
Sheriff J.' P. Gallowuy, Ocala.
.Tax Collector W. L. Colbert,
Ocala.
Tax Assessor Alfred Ayer, Ocala.
Treasurer John M. Graham.
Ocala.
Surveyor W. A. Moorhead, Ocala.
Judge of Prooate Wm. E. Smith,
Ocala.
County Commissioners C. Carml Carml-chael,
chael, Carml-chael, Ocaia; J. W. Davis. Summer Summer-Held;
Held; Summer-Held; W t. Henderson. Lynne; D. G.
Watkiii. Dunnellon; Walte Luff Luff-man,
man, Luff-man, Sparr.
Board Public Ic-'ructlon -J. 1.
Brinson, Superintenatnt, icala; B.
i. Blitch. Blitchton: J. S. Grantham.
ONLY ONE
ENTIRELY SATISFACTOY
"I have tried various colic and
diarrhoea remedies, but the only one
that has given me entire satisfac satisfaction
tion satisfaction is Chamberlain's Colic, Cholera
and Diarrhoea Remedy. I recom recommend
mend recommend it to my friends at all times,"
writes S. N. Galloway, Stewart, C. C.
For sale by all dealers. ad
Novel' Union.
Many unimpeachable spouses tad
neglected their Sunday dinner in or order
der order to attend church to hear the banns
read of several approaching weddings.
Rustling and knowing whispers,
and nods and nudgings prevailed
among the feminine portion of the
assembly when came the momentous
moment of the announcements.
The old pastor fumbled among his
notes, and found to his dismay that
the all-important paper containing the
names of the contracting parties was
missing.
However, he desired to trust to
memory.
"I publish the banns," he started,
in a hushed silence, "between be between
tween between or between
There was a shuffling in the aisle
as the old verger hurriedly moved to
the pulpit
"Between the cushion and the seat;
sir!" he said, in a loud whisper.
Deafness as a Heritage.
An examination has been made of
the records of 4,500 marriages of the
deaf, and it has been found that, while
taking the marriages of deaf persons
as a whole, nearly 9 per'cent of the
.offspring are deaf, and contrasted with
less than one-tenth of 1 per cent, of
deaf children as a result of the mar marriages
riages marriages of normal persons, a very dif different
ferent different and much more favorable re result
sult result Is obtained if it be found that the
deaf parents had no trace of previous
deafness In their families, says the
"Family Doctor."
Marriages of deaf persons without
deaf relatives is no more likely to re result
sult result in deaf children than any mar marriage
riage marriage in the community at large, while
marriages of hearing persons who
have deaf relatives is Just as likely
to result In deaf children as the mar marriage
riage marriage of the deaf.
We make special prices to girls'
canning clubs. The Marion Hard Hardware
ware Hardware Company. 5-30-12t
No. Six-Sixty-Sis
This is a prescription prepared especiall;
for MALARIA or CHILLS 4. iCVER
Five or six doses will break any esse, anc
if taken then as s tonic the Fever will no
re torn. It sets on the liver better thai
Calomel sad does not gripe or sicken. 25

r 1 I 1 S I M

No, Elotticr io not cclns to

OH A,MA, IX Clfd"
NW JO

f TO L L-CAISSI
CAISSI L-CAISSI a uroQ

HELP YOU MOVS,2CAS

I HAVE. TO 3TC
toao twmn on.

If You VJmt a fecoio

Poultry Farm, Dairy, Truck Farm, a sub-division, a suburbia
home, land to cut into smaller tracts for suburban homes, to re resell
sell resell now at more money, IF YOU WANT TO BUY. Juxt investi investigate
gate investigate the following 20 acre Improved Good farm, live room hocra,
barn, poultry house, wagon shed, 2 tenement or servant houses
all new, all farm implements, growing crops as follows: 12 acres
peanuts, good; 5 acres corn, 3 acres sweet corn, 1 acre Irish pota potatoes,
toes, potatoes, half acre sweet potatoes, plants for more; orange grape fruit,
peach, grapes 1-8 acre fine strawberries. House and all ready to
move into. Property lies 1 miles from court house and has a
total frontage on two hard roads of over half a mile. This will
be sold within thirty days at somebondy's price.. Make me an
offer and let me show you the property.
IF. W. OITTTO,

PHONES 285 AND 244
Bo You Weed
I An
eeffic Fan
I HAVE

PHONE 300

WMfle Sllar Mme

if

Teams For Rent Light and Heavy naallca

PHONE 206

Packing and Storing
Shipping of Freight,
Furniture, Pianos
and Safes.
Baggage Service
the Best.

COLLIDER BROS., Proprietors.

Is Yonni? ne2inmainii AMgDutl ?
We mean are you getting the service we wish to give you and which
you ought to have? We believe you are. Most of our customers are
satisfied, and we are proud of the fact. But if there is anything wrong
in our relations we want to know it NOW, so we can do our part In
straightening it out before the rush days come.
(Otea&ai ice & PaeMtan

The rest room which the Ocaia merchants maintain for the use
of our ont of town visitors who are in the city for m few boars
with nothing to do is located on the corner of Fort Kins ave3
and South Main street, opposite the Theus-Zachry f antUcre
store. The ladies especially will find Comfort Lodge a convenient
place to rest during the day's shopping. The conveniences we are
able to offer at Comfort Lo5e are free and yon are invited to
take advantage of them.
JUNIOR CIVIC LEAGUE

Co tl:

1
OCALA, FLA.
?
TTl
M AM 2zes
And Pirlces.
We Sell
BEAVER BOARD
Superior to Plaster
or Ceiling In
Quality or Price
INVESIGATE.
hi
a



THE OCALA EVENING STAR, TUESDAY, JUNE O. 1014

A

OCALA OCCURRENCES j

Elks meet this evenins
Odd Fellows meet tonight.
Pythian Sisters meet tonight.
Board of Trade tomorrow evening.
Moose meet Thursday evening.
F. XJ. of A. meets Thursday night.
Woodmen meet Friday evening.
When you want the neatest thing
crut in fancy stationery, ask to see
xrur Tokyo note paper. The Court
Pharmacy 6-6-6t
Trout are beginning to -bite nicely
In Lake Weir.
Mr. Alex Inglis motored up from
Rockwell this morning.
Mr. Sam Reyner, of Charlotte, S.
C, has a position with Mr. B. Gold Goldman.
man. Goldman. Mr. W. J. Frink of Levon was in
town this morning en route to : In Inverness
verness Inverness to attend to business.
Mr. Harley Reynolds, who has
been on the sick list for several
weks, is able to be out again.
The Pythian Sisters will elect of officers
ficers officers at their meeting this evening,
and all members are requested to be
present
Mi. W. Stephens has opened a
shoe repairing shop in the little
liole-in-the-wall between Mrs. Hay Hay-craft's
craft's Hay-craft's millinery store and Hogan's
saloon.
At the meeting of the K. of P. last
, a. r r .-r ft aa
Aicoici biiaioii iusu uwtcu
lessons of the-esa ulre's rank, and
Mr. J. C. Smith finished his courj
and was admitted to full knighthood.
SecretaryRodney came up from
thelake this imorning, to prepare for
the meeting of the Board of Gov Governors
ernors Governors tonight, and ; the Board of
Trade 'tomorrow night.
. Mr. J. J. Brown, one of the oldest
-citizens of Ozello, on the coast of
Citrus county, was in town yester yesterday.
day. yesterday. Mr. Brown lived on the With With-lacoochee
lacoochee With-lacoochee side of this county many
years ago, but for more than thirty
years has resided at Ozello.
Mr. S. P. Burton, the hustling ve vehicle
hicle vehicle agent at Sparr, was in the city
today on business. He has secured
the agency for several high grade
wagons and buggies and will supply
his section with them in the future.
He gets them in car lots and will no
doubt be successful in his venture.
While the Ocala House Is not open
in the full sense of the word, the
management not having the help
necessary to look after guests, a
large number of its rooms are oc occupied,
cupied, occupied, and several additional ten tenants
ants tenants come in every day. The repairs
are rapidly -being pushed to a finish,
and Mr. Long expects to be open on
the 15th, by which time it Is likely
that most of his elegant rooms will
be taken.
This evening there will be a spe spe-.
. spe-. cial business meeting of the Senior
Ep worth League at the Methodist
parsonage on Fort King avenue.
This is the last business meeting 'be
fore the state conference and a large'
attendance is urged. f
A
You Don't Know
Beans
Until you have tried
Heinz Baked Beans
Special by the dozen for
this week only
No. 1 tins (lOc)-.. $1.02
No. 2 tins (15c) $1.56
No. 3 tins (20c) .$2.16
Good to Eat.
Nourishing.
Ready to Serve.
Order Today.
0. K. Teapot Grocery
CALA, FLA.
PHONES 16 and 174

THE MARKETS

NAVAL STORES
New York, June 9. -Turpentine
48 to 48; rosin $4.10.
PROVISIONS
Chicago, June 9. July wheat
864; pork $21;. ribs nominal.
STOCKS
New York, June 9. Stocks irreg irregular,
ular, irregular, later steadying, generally
shade higher.
V COTTON
' Cotton ; quiet, one to four points
higher. July 13 j2 2; October 12.75.
DAILY WEATHER REPORT
The following weather report is
furnished the Star every afternoon
by Mr. F. G. B. Weihe, local report reporter
er reporter for the weather bureau operated
by the United States department of
agriculture, showing maximum and
minimum temperature and rainfall
during the twenty-four hours end ending
ing ending at 3 p. m.:
Max. Mia R. F
March average. 74 : 48 .03
April average. .81 60 .09
May average. .83 61 .05
June 1. .......93 70
June 2. .90 69 .12
June 3 90 70
June 4. . .". .'..91 68 .01
June 5. . . . .93
June 6 93
June 7. ..... .95
June 8. ...... .96
June 9 . ..... .90
74-J
69
69
72
69
.11
Forecast
Generally fair tonight and Wednesday..-
MEETING POSTPONED
The meeting which was to have
been held Wednesday night at the
Board of Trade room for the pur purpose
pose purpose of organizing a city Baraca
union has been postponed.
FISHING FINE AT LAKE WEIR
Secretary J. D. Rooney came up
from Wood mar on Lake Weir this
afternoon and is all excited over the
great catch of fish- at Woodmar yes
terday afternoon from tho docks.
Mrs. R. R. Carroll, Merris Carroll
and their guests, Misses Christine
Hannah and Mary Byfield, Mrs. J.
D. Rooney, Miss Annie and Master
Leland, Mrs. William Wolff and Miss
Rose Wolff, their guests, caught so
many fine trout and bream that aft after
er after keeping all they could eat and
supplying all in reach of them, the
others were dropped back in the
lake as fast as caught. The .tackle
was not at first heavy enough for
the big trout and many hooks were
broken and many escaped on account
of the light tackle. This was rem
edied, however, and then there were
few losses. The famous "Red Mln
nows" made their first appearance
in large numbers and a great scoop
net full was caught and, as it never
fails, large schools ,of trout were
following them and bit just as fast
as the hooks could be thrown into
thewatefv
Mj?r""Claiide A." Haines,
this city and aised here to the ag
6t 18 and with ttfis paper at one
time, is now fin H
avana and has a
fine position
Ir. Haines wa
with the Miami
Metropolis fora
number of years. 1 He is an expert
machinist and linotype mar and
:ommands a fine salary.
- j
Mr. M. Sehrieber, a smart young
telegrapher form Jacksonville, is
aiding Manager Sage and old relia reliable
ble reliable Leby Landers with the melon
rush in the Western Union office.
Mr. R. G. Stevens, of Atlanta, tra traveling
veling traveling auditor for the Western Un Union,
ion, Union, is in the city checking up the
Ocala office.
SUGAR HAMMOCK LANDS
Partridge-Woodrow Company
Selling Agents
Merchant's Block, Oca la
Only Incentive to Good Work.
Good Work, is never dore for hatred,
any more than for hire but for love
onlv. PTliir.
Inseparable.
Health and cheerfulness mutually
beget each oth'- 4n.!Fon.
Thought for Today.
A rolling stone gathers no moss.
But lots of times it takes a fall out
of some nsossback.

bornNin

: SORROWS OF THE SEASON i

Z By GRACE SPARROW. J
"O, thank you, said the girl who
likes to talk. "No chocolates for me!
If you have any lemon juice handy,
however, I'd be obliged!
"What's the idea, now? everybody
demanded.
"I've been down to the spring open opening,
ing, opening, explained the girl who likes to
talk. "And everything is designed for
fragile ghosts and attenuated bean
poles. A perfect lady this season
will be able to take shelter behind a
lath in case of storm. The rest of
femininity is cast into outer darkness
so far as clothes ,. are concerned.
Whatever Is to become of any one who
weighs more than ninety-eight pounds,
I can't imagine! There is absolute absolutely
ly absolutely nothing for the poor creatures
to put on. Having drawn down the
blinds and retired to inner chambers,
they will probably pass a hideous and
secluded life until some millionaire
endows a foundation that shall design
clothes such as may be worn by real
human beings.
The first garment that met my eye
looked like an explosion in, a ruffle
factory. Starting at the middle, it was
a vigorous young ruffle that began
winding around snakily in a diagonal
manner. It continued until it hit the
ground, still traveling diagonally. One
side was up and the other down, but
nobody's skirt hangs straight these
days, so that apparent difficulty didn't
count.
"A little cousin to that ruffle started
from the middle and ran diagonally
upward, wreathing around the should shoulders
ers shoulders and sleeves and flopping in all di directions.
rections. directions. This dress just splashed
"Looked Her Square In the Eye."
ruffles. The saleswoman said it was
the latest thing. I looked her square
In the eye and asked her if she could
conjure up a vision of me in it. No
one would ever think that I weighed
less than the 160 that I do. I don't
think that the saleswoman had been
long in this wicked, soulless cityff
her. eyes faltered and she turned pal.
She said that she had some other
modes she would like to show me,
that of course -every one could not
wear the extremes.
"Just then I paused, horror stricken.
in my tracks. Before a mirror piv
oted a strange sight. It was composed
of pale blue taffeta all bunched up
around the hips like a washerwoman's
skirt. There was a million yards In
that bunch. Streaming over it were
garlands of little roses and fluffs of
tulle and above it a sea of tulle and
puffs and roses and rosebud silk with
more blue. It looked somewhat like
a broad expanse of sunset sky and
then I saw that there was a woman
inside It. She had a .red face and
double rolls on her neck and she was
exactly four feet broad. Before her a
hardened young slip of a salesgirl,
without the hint of a blush, was coo cooing
ing cooing that it was so chic and became
her marvelously.
"I fled from that pool of iniquity. I
felt that nothing less than flight could
save me from a like horrible fate!
T wish," said the girl who likes to
talk, In a voice positively shaken with
emotion, T wish that you could have
seen me in the dress they put on me
in the next place! Gathered around
the waist were exactly fifteen yards
of green taffeta, which on my heroic
form looked like thirty yards cut gen generously.
erously. generously. Bulging over each hip was
what they called a pannier;
"They acted really annoyed when I
inquired just how I was going to get
from one room to another.
"They showed me a hat that re reminded
minded reminded me of the old cellar door on
the farm. It tilted up in the back at
sixty degrees and dipped down in front
till it hit my nose. Perched precari precariously
ously precariously on It, hit or miss, were tight
little bunches of undiscovered flowers.
Why, all the '.little dicky birds would
have whooped at the sight .of that
hat if I had worn it out, and gone
toboganning down the slide. Some Somehow,
how, Somehow, with it on, I reminded myself of
a woman who had been In a fight
and smashed over the head with a
rolling pin. It was what you might
call a disheveled hat. They put a
wrap on me, too, and murmured that
It had just been unpacked from its
Paris box that morning. It was ten
feet in diameter when I had It on.
"But, generally speaking, I was so
depressed that I gave up about then
and came home. I'm not going down
again till I get nice and thin! Please
pass the lemon! Chicago Daily
News.

Vomit IBaimils Acuiiimtt

The more bank depositors there are in a community, the more prosperous
will be both, the individual citizen and the community as a whole.
The bank and its depositors, co-operating, can bring about gratifying re results
sults results in the form of more business. ,
The service of this Bank includes Credit, Advice, Discounts and Safe and
Profitable handling of funds. We are anxious to serve you.

The

Ocala

JAMES AfJIIIUS
Of Institutions, Firms, People and
Phones Most Often Called in
Ocala
The following condensed tele telephone
phone telephone directory is published for the
benefit of the Star's readers. No
charge is made for any of the entries
in it. It covers the city depart departments,
ments, departments, the railroads and telegraph
offices, the offices and residences of
all the doctors in the city, the hos hospital
pital hospital an-' "ined nurses in fact, all
the points likely tc be most needed.
A directory is attached to each
phone, but people often hare occas occasion
ion occasion to learn a telephone number
when they are at a distance from
both the phone and the book, and it
is principally for the convenience of
these that the directory is published.
A. C. L. passenger station...,. 370
A. C. L. freight office... 99
Annex Drugstore ........... 279
Anti-Monopoly Drugstore . : 123
Banner 1
Brigance, City Marshal. . . ., 361
Board of Trade 381
Brinson, school superintendent 141
Carlisle's Drugstore ........ 424
Court Pharmacy ...... ... . 284
City Hall ................. 303
Commercial Bank 122
County jail ...... . . . '35
Dr. Dozier 41
Dr. Dozier, residence 69
Dr. E. Van iHood 324
Dr. E. Van Hood, residence.. 164
Dr. Counts 427
Dr. Counts, residence ........ 349
Dr. J. W. Hood. 203
Dr. J. W. Hood, residence.... 295
Dr. Izlar 11
Dr. Izlar, residence 71
Dr. Lane .' 4?2
Dr. Lane, residence 477
Dr. Lindner...... 78
Dr. McClane .. ......... 333
Dr. McClane, residence. ...... 407
Dr. Newsom 512
Dr. Newsom, residence 186
Dr. Peek .. 468
Dr. Peek, residence. ......... 301
Dr. Smith 53
Dr. Smith, residence 74
Dr. Thompson . .1 ......... 139
Dr. Von Engelken. 286
Dr. Von Engelken, residence. 290
Dr. Watt 53
Dr. Watt, residence 472
Dr. Walters ....... 78
Dr. Walters, residence 495
Dr. Wilson, colored 404
Dr. Hughes, colored 185
Dr. R. R. Williams (colored). 369
EVENING STAR 51
Electric Light Plant 66x
Elks Club. 176
FIRE STATION 60
Florida House 133
Galloway, sheriff, residence... 91
Harrington Hall Hotel. ...... 32M
INFORMATION OPERATOR
TELEPHONE EXCHANGE. 300
Imperial Loundry ........... 21
Marion County Fair Grounds. 243
Marion County Board of Trade 381
MARION COUNTY HOSPITAL 33
Miss Gerard, trained nurse. ... 472
Miso Harwell, trained nurse... 472
Miss Washburn, trained nurse 206
Munroe & Chambliss Bank. ... 18
Moose Club 460
Metropolitan Bank 363
OCALA EVENING STAR 51
Ocala Gas Co., office 61
Ocala Gas Co., plant 478
Ocala House 52
Ocala National Bank. ... . 334
Ocala Northern Railway 249
Ocala Southwestern Railway.. 367
Ocala City office..' 303
Ocala Heights Dairy 421
Ocala Telephone Company.... 142
Ocala Steam 'Laundry 101
POSTOFFICE 515
POLICE ALARM 15
Postoffice Drugstore 20
Postal Telegraph office 217
Sheriff's office 49
Seaboard Air Line City Ticket
office 129
Seaboard Airline freight office 38
STAR OFFICE 51
Southern Express Co 42
Tydings' Drugstore 30
Western Union leiegrapn oifice 136
Dr. W. K. Lane Specialist, Eye,
Ear, Nose and Throat. Office, Law
Library Building, Ocala. Adr.

4

National

Capital, Surplus and Prottto over CC5.CC3.C0.
A CTIVE U. S. DEPOSITARY.

teala
t 4O2-404 S.
And

The
j; Laundry
j: That -I
Made
Ocala
I Famous

ALaKlTD.A LOME!

Tickets good on all regular traipse Final limit June 21st.
Proportionate low rate3 from other points, c

For further information call on or write to any. A. C. L. Agent, or
M. R. WILLIAMS, Ticket Agent,; Ocala Florida.

Y. R. BEAZLEY,
Traveling Passenger Agent.
TAMPA,

lie CemiiieffcM Ifeik
OCALA, FLORIDA.
CAPITAL STOCK $50,000.00.
State. County acd City Bercsitory.

The Manccent c2 3H. LMcCLAW
Medical. Surgical, nydrccCile j

and Electric tustltuCc
Announces the moving of the Institute
offices and treatment rooms to the Z. Butte
Building on Main Street, southeast corner
of Public Square, entrance between ; The
Murray Co., and Troxler's stands.
Larger quarters, more fully equipped Vd will be ru
strictly ethicai lines.
HOURS: 9 A. M. TO 430 P. ML : :l PHONE 33

Our fountain is the pride of our
store. Gerig's, the reliable drugstore.
From a Lover of Gocd Ocoks.
Tes, .o you send me a doob
. not a bargain book bought
from a haberdasher, but a beautiful
book, a book of caress peculiar, dis distinctive,
tinctive, distinctive, individual; a brok that hath
first caught your eye an. Jien pleased
your fancy; written by an author with
a tendc. whim, all right out of his
heart We will read it together in the
gloaming, and when the gathering
dusk doth blur the page, well sit with
hearts too full for speech and think
it over." Dorothy Wordsworiu to
Coleridge
How Warm Is Fairly Warm?
A life preserver of European inven invention
tion invention for sea-going vessels is intended
to keep a person fairly warm and dry
for several days.
Survival of Superstition.
Madaga.- :ar natives have a strange
IdoL It is a piece of wood covered
with silk and attached to a wire which
the priests pull in a certain way. The
god perfi. 3is movements' in aU direc directions,
tions, directions, to the great terror of the faith faithful,
ful, faithful, who believe it Is really alive. The
priests d ell in houses of wood, as the
god will uaye neither stone nor brick.
To distinguish themselves from the
other native?, the faithful wear their
hair rolled in curl-papers like women,
and keep it in the shape of a horn by
aaeans of pins.

SMMtofl,

I
I

Ba

To n Pprsm Ofn PpP

1 meil on Ris 2C7CZ22

Clean, Fresh, Well Laundered Linen
is a. necessity. To supply that ne-

Slleainm Dime(iih?y
Main Street
OCALA, FLORIDA
Pboae JUl.

IFcoinni .:, Ocsillsi tto

Return '
:rr j. g. kirklaxd.
Division Passenger Ageat.
FLORIDA
Knew the Sex.
When ft woman canvasser asked an
old farmer to sign a petition In favor
of a woman's movement, he eyed the
"Kn I'm aefn It. nrp" va ttio tt1t
with thn emnhasis of a man who hxd
had some domestic infelicity. A
woman .who'-s alius a-movin' is alius
a-gettin" in tocuble. If you got any anything
thing anything to keep her quiet 111 sign it-.
INDIGESTION' AND CONSTIPATION
"About five years ago I began tak taking
ing taking Chamberlain's Tablets after suf suffering
fering suffering from lirdigestion and consti constipation
pation constipation for years without finding any
relief to me. Chamberlain's Tablets
helped me at' once end by using
them for several weeks I was cured
of the complaint," writes Mrs. Mary
E. McCullen, Phelps, N. T. For sale
by all dealers. ad
- Cultivate Inflection.
Every one has the power of speak speaking
ing speaking with sweet inflection. Every one
can attain a reposeful utterance and
clear enunciation by training the ear
M I A J .IJ
ua voice i ur& luge er ui ttTuia ttTuia-ing
ing ttTuia-ing harsh tones, and cultivating the
middle and more mellow register in
every voice. Excitement sends It up
to a screaming pitch, but self-control
will lower it agln. and its playground
Ehculd be through the varying har harmonies
monies harmonies or cadences cf five notes.
A full- line of Spalding baseball
goods ;Just in at Gerig's Reliable