The Ocala evening star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:05112

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star

Full Text
I i

EVENING

V

VOL. 21.

iseici fie his I y v
ASK IB Hi 8fg2$
DICTATOR'S MEII MAY FOIL MEDIATION BY THEIR &gR3s

ASK AMEfllCANS
TO
UP
FORCE
THEIR
Niagara Falls, May 25. The de demands
mands demands upon the American govern government
ment government by Huerta delegates at 'the
mediation conference today point to
a quick end of the -negotiations. Un Unless
less Unless Huerta's men recede from their
position, its believed the conference
will .soon terminate in failure.
The Mexican delegates demand
that President Wilson force the
constitutionalists to give up most of
the fruits of their military triumphs,
threatening to disrupt negations as
an alternative.
f
US ESCAPE
RELATIONS OF TITANIC VICTIMS
CANT COLLECT ANY -DAMAGES
Washington, May 25. The. Ocean Oceanic
ic Oceanic Steam Navigation Company, own owner
er owner of the wrecked Titanic, Is not lia liable
ble liable for the millions of dollars of
damage claims filed against it for
loss of life and property in the great
disaster. According to a decision of
the supreme court today, damages
are limited to passage money.
HOME RULE BILL
LACKS ONLY KING'S SIGNATURE
OF BECOMING LAW.
r
London, May 25. The home rule
bill on its third and final reading
passed the House of Commons this
afternoon .by a vote of 351 to 274.
The bill becomes law upon being
signed by the king.
MORE GOOD MEXICANS
Assassination and Execution is Tinn Tinning
ing Tinning Them Out
El Paso, May 25. An unconfirm unconfirmed
ed unconfirmed report today stated that General
Rascon and Frederick Gamboa were
assassinated in Mexico City Sunday.
General Rascon was minister of war
in President Madero's cabinet, and
Gamboa was foreign minister in
Huerta's .cabinet.
Vera Cruz, May 25. Gen. Aubert,
who- has been held a prisoner in
Santiago prison, Mexico City, for
several weeks, for failing to aid the
federals at Torreon, is reported to

. ....
Six Lots soW Last Week A MlUf M YdDIF IPdDCGM B. H. SEYMOUR
in Block is. North NgS' Carn Building,
. Magnolia St. is worth only 100 cents. A dollar on time deposit in a bank
is worth after 12 months 104 cents. A dollar loaned on real (fllf A II A IP II A
xj tr lmCk l11v estate security after 12 months is worth 108 cents. A dollar VviLR ITILTl
iNOW IS tne time lO DUy. invested in one of those LOTS IN NORTH OCALA NOW
Is Wopttli 200 CEinLtts. LET ME SHOW YOU.

CONSTITUTIONALISTS TO GIVE
ADVANTAGES

have been executed by an order of
General Huerta's. Mexicans who re refuse
fuse refuse to enlist in the federal army army-are
are army-are being executed as traitors.
THE MARKETS
PRICES ON TURPENTINE GOOD.
STOCKS DULL AND PROVIS PROVISIONS
IONS PROVISIONS STEADY
New York, May 25. Turpetotine
forty-nine to half. Rosin, four to
four ten.
.Chicago May 25.- 'July wheat
eighty-seven and a half; pork twen twenty
ty twenty ; lard nominal ; ribs eleven twen twenty.,
ty., twenty.,
New York, May 25. Stocks dull,
irregular,; small fraction either way.
Anaconda lost a point. Cotton one
to nine points lower, later recover recovering
ing recovering slowly. May, eleven higher on
heavy buying at Liverpool. July,
twelve j seventy-two; October, twelve
twenty-six.
TV0 FILIPIIIOS
Supreme Court Decides Conviction
for Libel Must Stand
Washington, May 25. The con con-.viction
.viction con-.viction of Martin O'Campo and Teo Teo-doro
doro Teo-doro Calaw, newspaper proprietors,
of Manila, charged with criminally
libeling Dean Worcester, a member
of the Philippine commission, upheld
by supreme court of the United
States today.
NOT A CASE FOR
THE KING'S DAUGHTERS
The King's Daughters held a meet meeting
ing meeting this morning at which the case
was discussed of the family said to
be destitute, and it was decided that
it wa3 not a case for the Daughters.
FEDERAL RESERVE MEN
HARD TO FIND,'
'Washington, D. C, May 25.
President Wilson has offered one of
the vacancies on the federal reserve
board to B. C. Simmons, a St. Louis
hardware merchant.
A first class dinner at Rodoff's
Cafe from 12 to 2:30 every day ex except
cept except Sunday for 35 cents. 5-18-tf

III TROUBLE

OCALA FLORIDA, MONDAY, MAY 25, 19U

Photo copyright, 1914. by American Press Association,
Train With Refugees Arriving at Vera Cruz.
United States marines guarded trains with refugees when they arrived
at the Vera Cruz outposts. The picture shows a train arriving from Mexico
Cijy. It was feared that the train might le attacked as it neared the city,
and it was guarded by United States sailors.

VILLA S VETERANS

GONE ON SOUTH TO DRIVE FED
ERALS OUT OF ZACATECAS
Torreon, May 25. Special trains
carrying constitutionalist troops who
participated in the Saltillo campaign,
left today, going southward. It is
understood that they are being mov moved
ed moved to Guadalajara, where the large
foreign colony is reported in a des desperate
perate desperate plight. Constitutionalists re reported
ported reported to have defeated the federal
outposts at Zacatecas and are now
demanding the surrender of the city.
MAYO LEFT TWENTY MILLION
Willed an Immense Fortune to His
Widow
Paintsville, Ky.. May 25. The
will of the late Col. John Mayo,
democratic national committeeman,
will be probated June 1st. His for fortune
tune fortune estimated at $20,000,000 was
left to his widow.
EXPLANATION OF
FEDERAL ACTIVITY
Washington. May 25. The Span Spanish
ish Spanish ambassador notified Secretary
Bryan today, tha't the activity at
Vera Cruz by Mexican federals was
not aimed at American forces, but
was made necessary to meet the ad advance
vance advance of Villa's army which is head headed
ed headed southward.
COURT DECIDED
AGAINST COMMISSION
Washington, May 25. The su supreme
preme supreme court today decided that the
'Interstate Commerce Commission
was wrong in holding that so-called
taplines or proprietary railroads
should not be classed as common
carriers.
PANKY CANNOT
STAND PUNISHMENT
London, May 25. Mrs. Emmeline
Pankhurst, leader of the suffragettes,
has been released from custody for
the eighth time because of illness
caused by a hunger strike.
UNION SUNDAY SCHOOL PICNIC
The various Sunday schools of our
city "will hold their annual union
picnic next Thursday, the 2Sth, at
Lake Weir. Low railroad fare is
provided; free refreshments will be
served, and everybody is invited.

FIRE III ATLANTA

' IMMENSE LOSS OF PROPERTY
AND LITTLE INSURANCE
Atlanta, May 25. Two large
buildings in the National Stock
Yards burned this morning. Seventy-five
horses, 90 cattle, 300 car carcasses
casses carcasses of beef were incinerated. The
loss will reach $350,00. The prin principal
cipal principal losers were F. S. Halt, L. J.
Jernigan, B. Bettis, A. L. Suttles,
Isaac Schoen, Cudahy & Co. The
insurance is small.
NAVAL STORES CASE
I UP THIS AFTERNOON
Savannah, May 25. The naval
stores case will be called this after after-i
i after-i noon but it is practically certain it
j will go over for this term of court.
PRESIDENT WILL CONFER
WITH THE EX-PRESIDENT
Washington, May 25. President
Willson will receive former Presi President
dent President Roosevelt at the White House
tomorrow afternoon.
WILFRED SMITH
Mr. Wilfred Smith died at the
hospital yesterday after an illness of
eight weeks. He came from Cali California
fornia California three years ago and settled at
Orange Springs. When his health
failed his brother was sent for, and
upon his arrival he immediately re removed
moved removed the sick man to the hospital,
where he died in less than forty forty-eight
eight forty-eight hours after. Mclver & Mac Mac-Kay
Kay Mac-Kay buried the remains today in
Evergreen cemetery. The brother
of the deceased leaves tonight for
his home in the west.
OAK'S DATE ABANDONED
The date fixed for the people of
Oak jo hear the county candidates
was last Saturday evening, but it
was called off by mutual understand understanding
ing understanding between the citizens and a num number
ber number of the candidates. As there Is
no open date between now and the
election day the good people of this
prosperous neighborhood will be
forced to forego the pleasure of
hearing the orators unless they can
arrange to come to Ocala on the eve evening
ning evening before the election, when the
whole aggregation will be on hand
to present their claims to serve us
during the coming two years.

m

BUM MARKSMANSHIP SAVED THE DIM) ISO FU
BULLETS

Americans

AT VERA CRUZ PREPARKI6 FOR D0U3LE
ATTACK

Vera Cruz, May 25. Navy hydro hydroaeroplanes
aeroplanes hydroaeroplanes were fired on yesterday
afternoon oy juexican outposts just
beyond the American lines. A dozen
shots were sent after the aviators,
who were high in the air. The
bullets failed to reach their marks.
SMUGGLERS FAILED
An attezxfpt to smuggle arms and
ammunition to Mexicans in Vera
Cruz was frustrated today, when two
milk men were halted by American
outposts, who searched their cans,
which contained cartridges.
EXPECT A DOUBLE ASSAULT
Americans are convinced a plot
has been formed by Mexicans in the
city to attack the troops at the same
time that the federals move against
Vera Cruz.
KICKING ABOUT AX
OUT OF DATE COACH

, i .. I Ada Askew, bigamy, two years in
A number of the traveling menl8tate prIgon
who travel on Sunny jim, the POP"!! MarIon cw,,,, breaking and en entrain
train entrain between Ocala and Lakeland, terng tnree years n prilKm;
are kicking on coach No. 200, in use Char,es GmtLTdt horse
on that run. They allege that the three years ,n state prilKm
springs under the car are In suchl Tomao

bad shape that riding in it Is un
comfortable, and that the toilets are
in a very unsanitary condition. Mr.
M. E. Robinson is circulating a peti petition
tion petition to the A. C. L, officials to have
200 replaced with a better coach.
Sunnyjim is a popular train,
with a specially clever set of men to
run it, and the Coast Line should
give it proper equipment.
A FINE DAY'S SPORT

J tional, and will remain t closed on
Judge Lester Warner and Dr. J. those days. -."
E. Chace went to Half Moon lake George Giles, President.
Saturday in the judge's car and j Frank P. Gadson, Cashier. 3-19-tf
spent the day fishing. They had
Judge Warner's usual fine luck, J County Judge Smith yesterday
catching nearly fifty fine trout, which morning received a telegram from
they brought in and divided among w. J. Booth of Center Hill, asking
their triends. The largest of the nim to refuse to issue a license to
fish weighed twelve and one-half ns SOUt Horace Booth, who was an an-pounds,
pounds, an-pounds, and is a record breaker for jer age. During the day Mr. Booth
the season. This fish gave the judge applied for a license to marry Miss
some great sport. j Bessie Sigmon, and was refused.

KNIGHTS OF PYTHIAS
Ocala Lodge No. 19.
held every Monday at
Conventions
7:30 p. m., at'

Castle Hall, over the James Carlisle wood Saturday night, her little baby
drugstore. A cordiaj welcome to vis- dieing at the same time. Mrs. Mar Marking
king Marking brothers. Wm. M. Gober C. C. tin was only 17 years of age and was
Chas. K. Sage, K. R. S. Ad afflicted with dropsy. An Ocala phy-
j sician labored with her all day Sat-
Messrs. G. F. Finger and Claude' urday to save her life, but In vainl
Wells and Misses Beatrice and Olive,

Porter" of Bay Lake were guests of
the Harrington yesterday.

XO.121

PC

ft
M
III THE CIRCUIT C01T
Five Criminals Received
Aggregating Ten Year Three
... Go to the State Priaon
The first case taken up today in
the circuit court was one against
Joe Anderson, charged with aggra aggravated
vated aggravated assault. The following jurors
were selected:' C. T. Strickland, J.
F. Simon, J. A. Scott, WT. A. Kelly
G. T. LIddon and J. M. Neely. Mr.
W. K. Zewadski defended Anderson,
while State Attorney Scofield prose prosecuted
cuted prosecuted the case.
A verdict of guilty was rendered
by the jury, and Anderson was sen sentenced
tenced sentenced to one year in the county jail,
at hardJabor.
Sentences were also passed on the-
! following, all of whom had pleaded:
i guilty to the charges preferred:-
I J A 9AJ V 6e"' iVU BOOUifc
one year in state prison.
All the above are colored.
THE METROPOLITAN
SAVINGS BANK
This bank is always open until 8
o'clock in the evening on Saturdays
aqd Mondays; on other days of the'
week it closes at 3 o'clock in the aft-'
ernoon. The bank will observe all
i legal holidays, both state and na-
The young people went on to Inver Inverness,
ness, Inverness, it is supposed, where, perhaps
they had better luck.
Mrs. Mack Martin died at Wild-
Icy-Hot bottles at Mclver
& Mac-,
ad.
i Kay's.

A



TEE OCALA EVENING ST AH, 3IO'DAY. LY 23, 1014-

2 J 1 J 4. rf-k 1 l
OCALA EVENING STAR
PUBLISHED EVERY DAY EXCEPT SUNDAY
,i I, . i i i i I,
BITTIXGER H CARROLL, PROPRIETORS V.
i' 1J- Carroll. Gct'ivl ?lank'r Port I -ea veil good, Iioiness Manager
J. II. Benjamin, Editor
uiiiij eer uuj) mat me vcaia mu-:
nicipally-owned electric plant has
everything in this part of the coun-'
try beaten in low rate and high
quality of service. (
Soundest Micatioe c5 Maoly Cfian
One of the best indications of manly character is prud
ence in the use of money. -'
Economy is the forerunner of thrift and saving leads to
prosperity.
By starting an account wit ti the Munroe and Chambliss
Bank and depositing your money regularly, you will accomp accomplish
lish accomplish something worthevery effort.
!
THE TAMPA TRIBUNE'S
Entered at Oc.IaFIa., posto'fice as second class natter.
PHOXE 51

SIBSCRIPTIOX RATES

(Dozuestic)
One year, In advance .$5.00
tlx months, In ad ranee. ... 2.5
Three months, in advance. 1.25
One month, ja advance. .-. .SO

i

(Foreign)
One year, in advance. .
Six months, in advance...
Three months, in advance,
f One month, 'in advance. .

.$8.00

.80

THE BACCALAUREATE SERMON

MARION COUNTY EDITION
!
i
The Marion county edition of the
Tampa Tribune came to hand Sun-
day and very well bore out the ex-,
pectations that had been formed of
;t
I
It filled the regular Sunday mag-f
azine section of the Tribune, and it
is no more than the truth to say J
fhat it is the best gotten up Marion j
county edition ever yet printed by by-any
any by-any paper outside of the county.
It is not the usual huddle of cuts

Total
Ecsoarccs
Over
$700,000.00

INCORPORATED

OCALA, FLORI

"THE BEST IN BANKING."

and hot-air write-ups thrown to

gether at random by men who take j
no real interest in their subject and and political production

If the Ocala Methodist church
ever had its seating capacity taxed
to the limit it was yesterday when
the graduating class of the high
school together with their hosts of
friends assembled to listen to the
baccalaureate sermon of the Rev.
Bunyan Stephens of the Baptist
church. Not only was every availa available
ble available seat occupied, but rows of extra
chairs were arranged in front of the
pews and the kneeling bench aroiund
the communion rail was filled by the
little folks, and then there were
enough people standing around the
various dpors to form a good-sized
-congregation. Surely the people of
Ocala are a church going people.
We have before remarked that
there are few cities in which the
communion of Christian fellowship
Is more prevalent than In Ocala.
Yesterday was another exemplifica exemplification
tion exemplification of that fact; every congrega congregation
tion congregation in the city was represented, both
by pastor and people, each of the
former taking part in the service.
Rev. James G. Glass, rector of
"Grace Episcopal church, read the
lesson. Dr. W. H. Dodge, pastor of
the Presbyterian church, made the
opening prayer. Pastor Stephens of
the Baptist church preached the
sermon and the Rev. Roy Bowers of
the Christian church delivered the
"benediction, the whole ceremonies
.'being under -the direction of Dr.
"Gross, the pastor of the church in
-which the service was held.
To mention the name of 'Mr. Albert
""Gerig as having charge of the mus musical
ical musical features of the occasion is
-equivalent to saying that that part
of the service was as near perfect as
-rany musical organization of its size
in the state could possibly be, and
-tho Ocala is noted for its talent in
this direction, the rendering of the
- anthem from the creation "The
Heavens are Falling," In its time,
fKolume and harmony was certainly
. ;a -revelation to every one present,
-:and like Oliver 'Twist, we ask for
umore.
, After everybody (who could get
was seated, the graduates-filed
in and took the seats reserved for
them. They certainly -made a pretty
picture and when Prof. J. H. Work Workman
man Workman brought up the rear he looked
as tho he must have had an extra
pair of O'Sullivan's on' his shoes or
bad grown a couple of inches taller

lately, as as for the smile on his
face, well, "it Wouldn't come off."
The theme of Mr. Stephens dis discourse
course discourse was founded on the choice of
King Solomon, "Wisdom." At the
time that God offered him his choice
of gifts he was a young king, sur surrounded
rounded surrounded by difficulties. Two houses
-were intriguing for his throne but
-with the wisdom given him from God
be was enabled to reconcile these
two houses and fix his throne on a
firmer basis than it ever had been
before. Solomon not only chose
wisely but his choice pleased God
and so he urged on his hearers that

in the choice of their future careers
they choose that which will be pleas pleasing
ing pleasing in His 'sight and thus choose
-well. All wise men have been called
dreamers; they have visions of won wonderful
derful wonderful possibilities. Joseph was
called a dreamer by his brethren, but
when in after years he was raised to
the highest office in the gift of the
( Egyptian king his visions v became
realities.
Today there are as wonderful
possibilities for those who choose
the rath of wisdom as there were in
the days of Joseph, Jacob or Daniel,
all of whom were dreamers, having
- visions. We speak of the wonders
of Greece and Rome but what were
they in comparison with the wonders
of our own day and time, which are
dreams realized, but our dreamers
must visualize our ideals to go for forward.
ward. forward. Another point of wisdom was for
the young graduates not to consider
that as the days of school were past
there was little or nothing left for
them to learn, when in fact they
rrere merely on the threshhold of
JtnoTv-edge. Angelo at the age of 91
Is quoted as saying he was still
learning, and that a man with one
foot in the grave still wished to

learn more. Knowledge today means

and do a
the state's

work. Some one said that it was

no use praying without trying, in

... . ithnse ?nvprnm m of i voa aro nnrrr'irroat wm-It in olvarHcin

wnicn case nravers ana work zo : uu,v-' --"o

hand in hand. j to get thru' and get hold of their ( resources. Polk county has had two
There were many fields of work money- Tne TriDune boys put their or three creditable exhibitions of
today for the young to choose from J hearts into their work and the result this kind, and is preparing for an-

but those fields should be explored

does them credit.

other next winter that will surpass

at as early a day as possible Bovs The menanical work is first class, any of her previous attempts in this

and young men make the most ex- and wel1 calculated to catch the eye line.

After the

of the reader and hold his attention.

The Star hopes our people will

all the

difficult for

it is orclr aI1 tne extra copies the Tn-

i bune has of this edition and send

them abroad. It is due the Tribune

men for their good work, and it will ing been convicted of the crime of

do our county good wherever the burning a building with intent to

papers are sent.

pert telegraph operators,
age of 21 it is more

them to learn and after 30

nearly impossible, so in all thin

the choice of wisdom leads to work
and service, and. that dreams and
visions today must lead to opportun opportunities
ities opportunities and practical results. .That
those who chose the path of wisdom
would find those opportunities right
here in Ocala as they would in
places thousands of miles away, and
the speaker illustrated his meaning
by quoting from Russell Conwell's
Chautauqua lecture' on "Acres of
Diamonds," where a man cold a

piece of land and left the country in Marion County Fair, which will hold

search of gold, and the parties who its seventh annual exhibition next!

NOTICE
C. P. Akins lately, to-wit: on the
20th day of June, A. D. 1913, hav-

POWERFUL AIDS

TO PROSPERITY

i

Lakeland Telegram: The premium
list of the Marion County Fair has
just been issued, and it is some list,

embracing one thousand pages. The j u a
Marinn Pnnntv Vur wliiVh will hnl1 i 1914.1

Injure the insurer, in the circuit
court for Marion county, Florida,
hereby gives notice of his intention
to apply for a pardon at the meet meeting
ing meeting on June 10th, 1914, of the
Board of Pardons for .'the state of
Florida, at Tallahassee.
C. P. Akins.

This the 23rd day of May, A. D.

5-25-mon-3t

iiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiimif if imifiiif i iiiiiiiiimii
We Age IHIeaidlaininsigtes
For Buggies, Carriages, Cart.. Wagons and Automobiles, Harness
and all Leather Goods. We have the largest line of Vehicles and
Harness and Saddlery in Central Florida and offer them at the
lowest figures: We lead in all kinds of Farming Machinery;
Agents for the Fom'ous all Steel Moline Plows, one horse Disc
Cultivators, McCormick Binders, Mowers, Rakes, Reapers and
IHC Binder Twine. Agents for the Fairbanks Morse Gas and
Oil Engines and Outfits. We have a full line of Automobile sup-
plies and accessories. We lead in our line and can save yon money
on anything -you buy from us.

itttiiliiiiiiitiiiiiliillllltllltltliiltAitii

bought the land dug a prospector's
shaft on it and opened up the cele celebrated
brated celebrated Comstock mine with its mill millions
ions millions of gold, the richest mine the
world has ever known. Another man
searching for oil sold his farm and
started for the northwest prospecting
for that commodity, while the "new

fall, is one of the big institutions of
the state. Starting from small be beginnings,
ginnings, beginnings, it has attained remarka remarkable
ble remarkable proportions, and the premium
list covers every product of farm
and garden, besides those of the
shop and many branches of industry
and domestic economy. It is also

owner put down a well and in a Kt- self-sustaining, and the stock in fact,
tie while was drawing out thousands has been paying a dividend. This
of barrels of the crude but valuable should encourage other counties to
article. j foster such exhibits, which are a
The choice of wisdom puts tools tremendous stimulus to agriculture
into our hands but not the ability to
use them. Tools in the hands of a : i

drunken man become -dangers, but
with the sober man using them with

wisdom, they become instruments j
for God's service, and in that service
tho at times we can see little before
us but clouds we must remember
that God's face is shining on the
other side of those clouds and that
the choice ff -wisdom, heading to
work and service, will finally remove
those clouds from our sight and we
shall see him "face to face." i
The potter starts to make a beau beautiful
tiful beautiful vase from a lump of clay. After
endless trouble and work and when
the work is near completion he dis discovers
covers discovers a flaw in it that cannot be
remedied so he begins his work over
again, not with another lump of
clay, but with the same clay with
which the imperfect vase was made,
land this time with patience and skill

he turns out a vase that is the ad

miration of all who see it, and so
with us, we make mistakes and there
are flaws and errors in our life and
character, hut even as the potter
uses the same clay to make the per-
feet vessel so God uses us in his ser-;

vice to lead to better and higher

things.
Let us then choose as did Solomon
of old that wisdom that is pleasing
in God's sight.

BIG BARGAIN IX LAND

A tract of 120 acres of good pine
land one mile north towards Ocala
from .Montague station on the A.
C. L. Railway; unimproved. Best of
watermelon, cabbage and gardening
land.. Apply at Star office for further
information. ' 5-6-dw tf

New line of bathing caps just ar

rived; all colors and styles. Court
Pharmacy. 5-2 2-4 1

There Are Two Sides
to every question, but there can be
only one opinion of 'our Cleaning and
Pressing. It is commended in the
very highest terms by those who
have favored us with their patron patronage
age patronage in the past. We have the most
up-to-date methods and can do work
quicker and better than our rivals,
because we are better equipped to do
the work. And we charge very mod moderately
erately moderately for our services, too.

TODD& (COTMUPAMlf,
Opposite Harrinjton Hall Hotel .

OCALA,

FLORIDA

SHOE OEIP.IRTriViIEIJT

EES 2

You will find the New
stores to show you the

Styles here. This is one of the few
Extreme Styles for Ladies.

Inland waterways are the people's

most efficient remedy against rail-!

road monopoly. What member of

ed harder for the development of
our waterways than Fletcher?

If the republican party wants to

stand any show in 1916, it had best'
nominate Lafolette for president. He
has more 'brains and character and j
more devotion to the public weal

than any other republican. He also

has more than some democrats.

After a long illness, Senator Wil William
liam William O. Bradley of Kentucky is dead.

He was a man of great popularity
and force of character, as is proven

by his being elected, tho a republi republican,
can, republican, governor of the southern dem

ocratic state of Kentucky, and later
representing it in the Senate. He
was 67 years of age, and -his death

probably means that a democrat will

take his place in the Senate.

Colonial Pumps
Like Illustration in Pat., Kid,
Colt., Dull Kid and Satin.
Widths A to D. Sizes lto 7
Price $3 $5

Rubber and Juniper
Sole Oxfords
White Xu-Buck, Canvas, Tan,

Calf and Gun Metal. Spring or Slight Heel. A practical walking
Shoe. Widths B to E, Sizes 1 to 7 g JQ

a x

Almost everybody who has visited
Lakeland praises the town, and

some Ocala people nave even gone
so far as to say it excels their home
city in several things. But the
Lakeland Telegram speaks of. the

rate for electric current being al

most prohibitive, which condition of
affairs is a discouragement to pro

spective manufacturing enterprises,

and the Star again begs leave to re-

Childrens White Shoes

A CHHj WELL DRESSED

I5s. Must have White Shoes. New

"ti, yv'A line just arrived in Canvas and

AN22f$S Xu-Buck.
Infants sizes from 2 to 6 d and d E0
Prices P
Childrens sizes from 6 to 8 J L.50 $2
Price .-W
Childrens sizes from 8 to 11 $1 ,75 $2
Prices
Mises sizes from 11 to 2 IjO $2 50
Prices.. .. ....V ,UV

While Pumps
Xa-Buck, Linen and Canvas, Coloni Colonials,
als, Colonials, Button Oxford and Strap Pumps

Spanish, Military and Low Heels.

$1.75, $3

All sizes and all
widths. Prices

Cm

Childrens Play Oxfords

$1.50

Misses sizes WVz to 2
prices

Misses sizes from 2 to 6

Prices

Tan, Russett and Gun Metal, Guar

anteed Soles.

Childrens sizes (M and

6 to 8 Prices P A

Childrens sizes from 8 to 11
. prtcr:$ i.25 and$ i.5o
$1.50 and $2

$1.75 and $2.50

Baby DoMs
Wp TiavA thAm frnm Tnfantt

siz, lo ix i Lie women s sizes in rau,

U' ff.iin on I I'QnrQfl

Infants sizes from 2 to 1. Black and

t I

f Price.. V

Childrens sizes from 6" o 8. Black d1 and dt E?

and white Prices. P X aJ VT

Childrens sizes ftom 8 to 11. fll np tf0

Black and white Price A

Mises sizes from Vz to 2. Black d1 Cf dOEf

and white Prices yl.OU) O.UU

Womens eizes from 2 to 7. Black d 7C and o

and white Prices P X O J0

Sole Agents for the WICHERT and QUEEN QUALITY Shoes
FOR LADIES
Shoes in all leathers for Men. Bannister $6, Howard & Foster $4

1 1



THE OCALA EVENING STAR. MONDAY, MAY 25, 1914

rim!-

l'flT

t:

u

ill 3

PM

mil

I

MISS WYNOXA WETHERBEE

MISS GLADYS MARTIN

MISS ALICE SEXTOX

MISS GLADYS WALLIS

MISS THEO WALLIS

i

MISS NELLIE BECKHAM

MISS 1: MISS REXIEODD HOMER SMALL CARELTOX ERVIX MISS AXX1E EAGLETOX

of the ; ) Jj(Uildlli j

: nnni a mnn nniinni ; i i f ss

r uuftLft nihn DunuuL
TEiPLE THEATER "THIS EVENING .MMMMCTIMlSltl
i .
-

.

UNCLASSIFIED ADS

Lost Found, Wanted, For Sale
For Rant and Similar Local Needs
WANTED- Clean cotton rags at
the Star office.

FOR SALE Remington iypewriter.
Xo. 10; visible writer; in perfect
condition in every respect. Ap Apply
ply Apply at Star office. 4-2S-tf
TO HIRE A young man wants to
hire himself out as a teamster.
Apply at the Star office.
FOR RENT Two or three connect connecting
ing connecting rooms furnished for light
housekeeping. Apply to 614 East
Adams street. 5-14-tf
FOR SALE Modern bungalow in
Linwood Heights. Inquire of the
Ocala Lumber & Supply Co.o-15 tl
LOST OR STOLEX Black repainted
coaster brake child's bicycle. Re Reward
ward Reward for return to Rev. J. G.

Glass, ail E. Broadway. 5-lS-6t

FOR SALE Double oven five bur burner
ner burner gas range;, upright Everett
piano; cheap fo rcash. Address
B., care Star. 5-18-tf

Invocation Dr. J. M. Gross
Piano Solo: Fantaisie Impromptu Chopin op. 66
Marie Burnett

. i m i a V If J T"

Oration: ine uawn oi me uoriu s reace

Alice Sexton

Recitation:

'King Robert of Sicily"

Anna Pope Eagleton

FOR SALE-

-Strlctly first class

team of mules. Apply at Star of
flee. 5-19-tf

HOUSE FOR REXT Xew, five-
room house, with up-to-date con-
veniences, near the new school-
house site. Apply to Mrs. Jessie'
Haycraft. 519-6t
.. : ; I
STRAYED OR STOLEX A black black-horse
horse black-horse hitched to a silver tipped j
top buggy; disappeared from the j
vacant lot back of Masters store
Saturday night. May 16. A re-j
ward will be paid for information
of whereabouts or the return4 of
same to Goddard's stable in Ocala,'
or T. E. Cranford Lumber Co.,
Ocala. 5 20 tf j
WAXTED Subscribers of the Star j

to tell their neighbors of the plan
now in force for giving cash cou coupons
pons coupons to subscribers. 5-20-tf

Essay: ; "An Appreciation of Sidney Lanier"
Nellie Beckham
Chorus: The Cunning Fox : De Reef
Oration: "Florida. Yesterday and Today"
Rexie Todd
Oration: "Humble Origin of Great Men"
Homer Small
Class History Wynona Wetherbee
Class Poem Gladys Martin
Overture: Phedre Massenet
JLorayne Kemp and Carleton Ervin
Class Will Theo Wallis
Class Prophecy Gladys Wallis
Presentation of Diplomas Supt. J. H. Brinson
Chorus: Carmena Arranged by Mildenberg
Benediction 1 Dr. W. H. Dodge

opultryman or will rent few acres
land. Prefer Texas. For details,
address -Box 60, Physical Culture,
9015 Metropolitan Building, Xew
York. 5-23-?

WAXTED 100 MEX to join the.
Brotherhood Baraca Class, city j
hall. May 31, 10:15 a. m. See R.
B. Bowers. 5-20-tf -j
FOR SALE One large horse in
good condition; one good work
mule. Ocala Lumber & Supply
Company. 5-23-tf i
FOR REXT Six room cotage with ;
three acres of pasturage, in city t
limits of Xorth Ocala. Apply to
Star office. 5-20-6t i

FOUND A large bird dog; white
with large red spots; a crook in
end of tail. Call at Waldron's
Market. 522-6t
FOR RENT Furnished rooms for
housekeeping, or two large bed
rooms with connecting bath. All
- modern conveniences. One block
north of postolfice, on Main street.
Apply at Star office or phone No.
257. 5-23-tf

OPEN ALL XlfiKT
Tie Merchant's Cafe ts a first class
place to take your meals. Open night
and day. J. R. Dewey, p"oprie
for. 2-2S-tf

SICK HEADACHE

ACCOUNT HfEALTH Young man
desires job with physical culture

Sl'GAK HAMMOCK LANDS
Selling Agents
Partridge-Woodrow Compin
Merchant's Block. Ocala

Mrs. A: L. Luckie, East Rochester,
N. Y., was a victim of sick headache
and despondency, caused by a badly
weakened and debilitated condition
of her stomach, when she began tak taking
ing taking Chamberlain's Tablets. She says.
"I found them pleasant to take, also
mild and effective. In a few weeks
time I was restored to my former

igood health." For sale by all deal

ers. Adv.

Ice cream freezers of all sizes at
Mclver & MacKay's. ad.

HE OCALA BUSINESS COLLEGE opens this evening at 7:30
P. M. A corps of competent instructors has been secured and not
only will the Commercial Branches be taught, but also all High
School Studies and German, French and Spanish. WE HAVE

COME TO STAY, and we therefore make you this offer.
Come to school and if after the expira expiration
tion expiration of THIRTY DAYS you are not
thoroughly satisfied you are out noth nothing
ing nothing but your time.
We know we can please an benefit you and are willing to demonstrate the
fact. Let us help you prepare yourself for a business career. Within a few
weeks our Telegraph Department will be open for the enrollment of students
interested in telegraphy and "WIRELESS." ;
a
It is our purpose to make this one of the Largest and Best schools in the South,
but to do this we need your co-operation and support. CAN WE COUNT ON
YOU?

(taHa lifii(B CdDfep

L. E. EifllC, Presided

SEND IN YOUR NOTICES SOONER
If you have an advertisement or
item for the Star, send it in as early
in the morning as possible. We can cannot
not cannot set much except telegraph after
noon.

Advertise In the Star for results.
Valuable Witness.
A witness being sworn in Shoredltcb
(Eng.) county court said he would tell
"ths truth, the whole truth, and any anything
thing anything but the trith

Notice la hereby given to all cred creditors,
itors, creditors, heirs, distributees and all per persons
sons persons having claims or demands against
the estate of Patrick IL Gillen. deceas deceased,
ed, deceased, to present same, duly proven, to
the undersigned, within one year from
the first publication of this notice.
. This March 30. 1S14.
I MRS. PATP.ICK TL GILLEN.
J Administrator of the Estate of Patrick
I : IL Gillen. Deceased. 3-20-St-mon.



rouB

THE OCA LA EVENING STAR. MOXDAY, 3IAY 25, 1914

OCALA SOCIAL AFFAIRS f
-

(IiyyX'lrare.ar-item3frtl3 department call phone 106)

.NOTICE TO FRIENDS
OF THE GRADUATES

Mr. Wallace O. Stovall arrived on

the limited ifrom Tampa Saturday
for a brief isit to his mother Mrs.

M I s

nie Stovall.

Columbus, Ga. They stopped for a
brief visit to Doctors J. W. and Van
H$od on their way.

Mrs. Walter Marsh and Mrs.
Harry Whittington and baby
left thi3 afternoon for a two months'
sojourn at Woodmar, having leased
Argyle cottage. Mr. Marsh will join
his family twice a week and Mr.
Whittington will go down for Sun Sundays.
days. Sundays.
Mr. John Long returned to Tampa
Sunday afternoon after a brief visit
to friends In the city.

Messrs. P, D. Camp, Ryland Camp
of Franklin, Va., and .G. F. Arm Armstrong
strong Armstrong of Savannah, have returned
home .after a few days' business visit
to Ocala.
Mrs. Etta Hood Robinson visited
her father at Archer last week, re returning
turning returning home Friday night.
Mr. John Lindsey, a visitor for
the week-end, returned to Lakeland
this afternoon where he ha3 a posi position
tion position as bookkeeper.
V
Mr. and Mrs.. J. L. Smith of Mar Mar-tel
tel Mar-tel visited their daughters, Mrs.
Louis Pillans and Mrs. Johnson yes yesterday.
terday. yesterday. ? ;
'
Several couples of the dancing
contingent enjoyed an impromptu
dance at the home of Miss Clara

jonnson aaiuruay evtmus. iiiv ai
fair was most informal and very de delightful.
lightful. delightful. v
.
Mrs. Claude Gates arrived this af af-terrrbon
terrrbon af-terrrbon from (Marathon to visit her

father, Mr. E. C. Smith for EeveralJ

weeks.

Mr. and Mrs. Jake Brown arrived
In Lynchburg, Va., today to attend,
the commencement exercises of Ran-
'dolphrMacon College, from which
their daughter. Miss Helen Brown,
"will receive a diploma.

.Mrs. Frank Hudson and daughtet

I'!eae Send Flowers and Ire-ent to
Homes of the Young People
ami Not to Hie Stage
Principal Workman asks the Star
to renuest the friends of the gradu graduates
ates graduates to send flowers and presents for

the young people to their homes in

stead of trying to give them at the

theater this evening. This request
is made to prevent confusion, as
there i3 no room on the stage for the
articles referred to.

THE TWELFTH MEMBER

OF THE CLASS

XewMm-Taj'Ior

The culmination of a romance, be began
gan began last March, was the marriage
Sunday of Mr. William Virgil New New-son!,
son!, New-son!, Jr., to Miss Mary Taylor ,of
Jacksonville. The wedding was so solemnized
lemnized solemnized at the Springfield Presby Presbyterian
terian Presbyterian church, in the presence of
only witnesses; and not until after
the ceremony when the news was
flashed over the wire to the parents
of the groom in this city, did the
friends of Mr. Newsom know that he
was out of town.
The result of his mission to Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville came as a distinct surprise,
not only to the circle of friends of
both Mr. and Mrs. Newsom in Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville and in this city, but to their
immediate families, for their parents
and friends knew nothing of the
secret movements of Cupid and the
important part. he was to play.
Mrs. Newsom visited Miss Rose Rose-hud
hud Rose-hud Robinson in March, and it was
'then that she met her young hus husband.
band. husband. She is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs, A. K. Taylor, her father be being
ing being the gifte.d cartoonist for The
State, Jacksonville's new paper, and
is an attractive, lovely young wo

man yet in her teens.

Mr. Newsom is the eldest son of
Dr. and Mrs. Newsom, a young man
of splendid qualities, -with scores of
friends, and is connected with the
Commercial Bank.
The happy young couple arrived
in Ocala last night and at present
are making their home with the
groom's parents. They are being
showered with congratulations and
best wishes for a longhand happy
wedded life by their many friends.

e I'ytman &isiers ujueu

very "pleasant afternoon with Mrs.
E. T. Spencer laJst Thursday. Music

.and refreshment&&dded to 4he

joyineno the occasion.

Miss Vida Parker, one of the K Mrs. W. A. Roxby, formerly Miss
bright young carfn&ig club enthus- Mamie Wilcox of this city.hut now

ma- a

lasts of Kendrickr sent in this morn-

JT Til

Svinz i

ffcass-

One member of the graduating
class for 1914 of the Ocala High
School, who has not his name on the
program, but is nevertheless entitled
to high honors, is Mr. Robert AngU3
Dudley MacKay.
Mr. MacKay has been delayed in
his -studies, and it was not believed
when the programs were made up
and the invitations sent out that he
would pass. However, by diligent
study, aided by his inherited sturdy
Scotch persistence, he closed up the
gap and came In during the last
week abreast with the other eleven.
The Star wa3 not informed until
Friday afternoon that Mr. MacKay
would be with the graduates. Had
it known one day sooner, it" would
have had his picture with those of
the other bright scholars of 1914.
As it is, it will lead his other friends
in congratulating him on his well
earned success.

f lo EL fcfel (CtfDo

Hardware Depairttnimeell

hf Davtnna. accomoanied by her

.Mrs. Frank Hudson and daughtet v r ,
Margaret who have been visiting theJ lns a crate of tomatoes- to be usedWll daughter is in Gainesville for
Margaret, v, ho have Deen siting tne j. the dem0nstration Wednesday. yfa f0rtniKht visit.

former's c a rents. Mr. and Mrs. R. F.

Bridges, left this afternoon for their
home in Thpmasville, Ga.
'
Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Martin and
Mr. and Mrs. Fred McAteer return returned
ed returned today from Wild wood, where they

Attended the funeral yesterday of

:Mr. Martin's sister-in-law, Mrs.

Ufartin who died Saturday nighr

after a short illness.

Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Carney reeiv-

a wire this morning from jtheii

: nurihpw. Carnev MIms. i conv

the, welcome news that he had
'ed his final examinations at

Kentucky Medical University, Lex Lexington,
ington, Lexington, Ky., and would traduate
with honors. Mrs. MIms, after
spending the winter with her par parents
ents parents In San Antonio, Texas, taking a
Bpeclal course in vocal and instru instrumental
mental instrumental music and china painting,
Joined Dr. Mims last month and
after commencement they will proh proh-ably
ably proh-ably go to Estelle Springs, Tenn., for
a sojourn of several weeks before
Dr. Mims locates permanently. Mrs.

Mims was an admired guest at the
home of her uncle and aunt last
winter and Df. Mims has visited in
the city and their circle of friends
extend congratulations.
Miss Louise Atkinson was hostess
Friday at a pretty party for Misses
Bessie McKay and Janet Weathers,
of Florida.' who are the guests of

Miss Frances Arnold. Miss Atkin Atkinson
son Atkinson was assisted In entertaining by
Misses Margaret and Mary Atkinson
and Virginia Glover. Newnan notes
In Atlanta American.
m m m
Mr. Louis Long and interesting
family, consisting of Mrs. Long, the
Misses Dorothy and Marion Long

nri at aster Iouis Lone, arrived in

the city Saturday afternoon over the

Seaboard from Fernandina, and are

now at home at the Ocala House

Mr. Long's family will be quite an
acquisition to the social life of the

--it v and our- Deonle will welcome

them.
Henry Lawrence Peabody arrived
last night at the home of Mr. and
Mrs. H. H. Peabody, in Sanford Sun Sunday
day Sunday evening. Mr. and Mrs. Peabody
are brother and sister-in-law of Mr.
Clifford Peabody of Ocala, and both
have been welcome visitors In this
city. Master Henry is their second
child.
Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Hood passed

Tnrh the city last week in tneir

Miss Omera Holloway of Tallahas Tallahassee,
see, Tallahassee, who has frequently visited Miss
Josie Bullock, has concluded her
school duties in Daytona and is now

twh-earoute home.

visiting injehn

nui via

Clara Johnson leaves today

e snrinss to spena tw

weeks there. Sfte Iwill be join

Tuesday by Mis flargaret Jackson

and tegeTlrer will stop with
Mrs. R. A. Carle&nan-4frke-nnrer
bailis. Orange Springs has quite a

local reputation for its medicinal

qualities.

Mrs. J. F. Redman and daughter
left yesterday for a two months'
visit to friends and relatives in
Pennsylvania. They will be in
Washington during this week, and
will go to Pittsburg the early part
of next week, Mr. Redman will
leave the latter part of June to be
with his family for a' few weeks In
the north and they will return home
together. (
m m m
Mr. E. F. Coney, Jr., of Tampa,
after spending the week end in town
With friends, returned to Tampa last

r'ight. Mr. Coney says Ocala seems

like home to him. His friends gave
him a warm welcome.

a fortnight visit.

Miss Ruby Wilson of Apopka is
the guest of Miss Lorayne Kemp,
one of the "sweet girl" graduates ,of

the evening

Mr."

-Mrs. B. F. Condon is spending the
week at North Lake Weir .occupy .occupying
ing .occupying one of the Connor cottages. She
has as her guests Mrs. Smith and
little daughter. Misses Mary Con Connor,
nor, Connor, Annie Laurie Perry, Messrs.
Smith and Condon and B. Nl Dosh
spent Sunday with the party.
Mrs. C. V. Miller, who was quite
sick for two weeks, was able to be

out Saturday, and will soon regain

her usual health, much to the delight

of her many friends.

Dr. H. L. Merriday of Palatka,
who has on several occasions been a
visitor to this city, will be graduat

ed from the University of Kentucky,

Lexington, next week and on June

27th will be united in marriage to

Miss Sallie Walton of Gallatin, Tenn.
Miss Inez Fridy, who has made
her home with Mrs. Jessie Bishop
during the winter, while attending
the high school, has returned to her
home in Reddick.

The following lines appeared In
Sunday's. Times-Union beneath a
lovely picture of Miss Ophelia Gray:
"Beautiful young woman of St. Pe Petersburg
tersburg Petersburg who recently enjoyed a
visit In this city as the house guest
of Mrs. W. A. Redding, at her home
In Springfield- Miss Gray is the
daughter of Rev. and Mrs. Charles
Gray and a niece of Bishop Gray, for
over twenty years bishop of the
Southern diocese of Florida. Rev.

Gray was formerly rector of the
Episcopal church in Ocala, recently
going to St Petersburg to reside."
'
Miss Lee Bowers, daughter of
Mrs. Celestial Hinks of Daytona, has
numbers of friends in this city who
will be delighted to learn that she
is to enjoy this summer a three-
. v. ni,r tirrii!-h Enrone ac-

,lIlJlll.Ua lUlii iuiuo- r

A. Walters

fgirrvisit, to their

L. Armour at

and Mrs.

r

"home from a for

daughter. Mrs. v

Panasoffkee.

J

The studv class of the woman s

"auxiliary of Grace church .will, meet
tomorrow at 4 o'clock at the rec

tory

Mr. and Mrs. D. S. Woodrow and
Mr. and Mrs. L. R. Chazal and fam family
ily family jyere week-end visitors to Wood Wood-mar.
mar. Wood-mar.
Miss Florence 'Bettman, a former
governess for the four young daugh daughters
ters daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Camp,
will be a member of the class grad graduating
uating graduating June 3rd from the School of
Domestic Science, Boston.
Mrs. I. V. Stevens and daughter,
Margaret, of Lakeland, are guests

of their uncle and aunt, Mr. and
Mrs. B. A. Weathers, arriving Sat Saturday
urday Saturday from Jacksonville, where

X7 7
AIDS TO

U'inniinnier

Comfort

f
Complete stock of GALVANIZED and BLACK
SCREEN WIRE. Different mesh and all widths.
When the flies do get in, use our

TRAPS,

i 1

Ice Boxes Water Coolers
and
Ice Cream Freezers.

IBo

MaisQcEiPS Cod

esillsio HodifMsi

111' 1 m

-4
1

they visited their cousin, Mrs. C H.
Ford for a few days en" route from
White Springs.
Mrs. J. G. Swaim who was operat operated
ed operated on at the hospital last week, is

doing well today, and her friends
hope to see her out in a few days.
I Miss Hallie Ley, who has just
completed her school year In tit
English classical school, at Tampa,
which last Thursday closed the most
successful year of its history, will he
at home today for the summer It
will be gratifying to her many
friends to know that Miss Ley has

been re-elected to the superlntend superlntend-ency
ency superlntend-ency of. the kindergarten department

or another year. Lakeland Tele

gram.

x
Mrs. E. H. Swain of Anthony, is

the ,guest of her daughter, Mrs.

Jack Halton, and son, Chas. V.

Swain. Sarasota notes in Tribune.

r from Leesburg. en route home In 1 complied by six: Stetson classmates.

SCHOOLBOY WANTED
FOR steady, summer,
part time, easy work.
Must be bright, neatly
dressed, and under four fourteen
teen fourteen years of age. Give
references and mention
day and hour when par parent
ent parent will come with boy
for interwiew. Good pay
Splendid training, Write
to box 606, Evening Star
Office.

WOOD
PHONE 503
For Good Wood
BIG Load for $1.
Your Order will have
Immediate Attention.
r. L. SMOAK
At Smoak's Wagon Shop.

ACCURACY

!

Marlon County Abstract Germany
ESTABLISHED 18S2.
GRAHAM baOTIIEnS, Lessees,
OCAIiA FTiA.

Fisst consideration and especial attention siren to amab trmcta.

70AST LINE SCHEDULE

Jacksonville and St. Petersburg
No 9 Leave Jacksonville 4 p. m.;

arrive Ocala 9:05; arrive St. Peters

burg 3 a. m.

No. 10 Leave St. Petersburg 11

p. m.,, arrive Ocala 6:05; arrive
Jacksonville, 10:55.

No. 39 Leaves Jacksonville at

9:30 a. m.; arrives Ocala at 2:40 p.
m.; arrives St. Petersburg at 9:10.

Xo. 40 Leaves St. Petersburg at

6:30 a. m.; arrives Ocala 12:o4 p.

m; leaves Ocala 1:14 p. m.; arrives

Jacksonville at 6:30 p. m.

Ocala and Lakeland
No. 35 Leaves Ocala 6:40 a. m.;

arrives Lakeland 11:05 a. m.

No. 32 Leaves Lakeland 5:48 p.

m.; arrives ucaia y:ou p. m.

Ocala and Homosassa
No. 4 9 Leave Ocala, 8:20 a. m.;

arrive Homosassa, l p. m.

No. 4 7 Leave Ocala, 2:20; arrive
Homosassa, -5:20.
No. 4 4 Leave Homosassa, 10 a.
m.; arrive Ocala, 12:50 p. m.
No. Leave Homosassa, 1:30 p.
m.; arrive Ocala, 6 p. m.

fit Wj r Jo InV OAIUV 8CTWCCN

THE GREAT SHIP -SEEANDBEET

Lmgtfc S00 fort; brewltlt 93 feet, 6 fadm; SlO ata

pn. Oraater ta coat uijeru ail

taaJlai

ialaad watan at th world. la mttk J una lSUa.

Magnificent Stmmmtmn "SEEAND3EE." "City of Erta" and "Cty of BtaffaJo"
Daily BUFFALO and CLEVELAND May it to Dei .t
LearBa&a UwOwilai - :O0 P. M.
ArrWCWeUn4 7 JO A. M. AmBasU 7MA.il.
fEaatccs Standard Hase)

Coanacdoaa itCWIaal tor P1-i-BT. TolU. Drtrait mmd H aotata YaatandSoartk
tfeketa rtmdimm tctww Bnftalo mmd 2trntmmd mrm foe liaanparlatlaai
. - - ... n w WT . 1 i II I

Aak your bckat afeatt lor Ucuu via a. b. i rmm, nw w 11 1
THE CLEVELAND & BUFFALO TRANSIT CO,' Clmlui' O.-

OIi FELLOWS

Tuluia L.odge No. 22, Independent
Order of Odd Fellows, meet3 every
Tuesday evening f 1 7:30 o'clock ( In
itors in the city Invited to be with as
Yonge's Hall, Fort King avenue. Vis Vis-H.
H. Vis-H. D. Stokes, X. G..

4 ToniiFiistt p?afiim 41
MjfUIIii ainidl Moirtllliiwesft

"DIXIE FLY'EU"
"SOUTH ATLA XTIC. LI3IITED

"SE3IIXOLE LIMITED
4MOTGOMEV ROUTE

VIA

AST LDIkI

STANDARD RADL ROAD OP THE SOUTH
Pullman Cars Jacksonville to Chicago, St. Louis, Cincinnati, Louis Louisville,
ville, Louisville, Indianapolis, Cleveland, Grand Rapids and intermediate "points.
. DINING AND OBSERVATION CARS
For rates and information call on any A. C. L. Ticket Agent.
31. R. WILLTA3IS, Ticket Agent, Ocala.
V. R. REASLEY, J. G. Kirkland,
Division Passenger Agent Traveling Passenger Agent.
Tampa Florida.

!!MD



THE OCA LA EVENING STAR, MONDAY, 3LY 23, 1914

i

MIEIISE FUHHITURE
SALE AHEAD
I REAL ESTATE
MEN ill THE CITY

HA

Capital - $50,000.00
Surplus and Profits $41,500.00

t
i

OCALA, FLORIDA.

GEO. J. BLITCH, President

W. II. McRAINEY,
Vice Presides..
D. E. McIVER,
Vice President.

B. C. WEBB, Chairman of the Board.

'

?
V
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:

. C. STILES, Jr.,
Cashier.
W. V. WHEELER,
Assistant Cashier.

Sound, Safe, Conservative

y
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Special Department lor Savings, f

y
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The large party of Citrus Fruit
Exchange men who spent Sunday
viewing Ocala and its surroundings
were much pleased with our town
and county, and pronounced Ocala
one of the best little burgs they had
ever seen.
The party arrived from Eustis in
cars Saturday afternoon, and put up
at the Harrington hotel, where they
were visited and given the glad
hand by many of our leading citi citizens.
zens. citizens. There was no formal recep reception
tion reception or ceremonies, but they were
made to feel at home.
During the evening a concert was
given from the bandstand by the
band, which was an event to "our
own people as well as the visitors.
There were a great many people on
the square, attending to their reg regular
ular regular Saturday evening affairs, and
many being of the class who are too
busy or too tired to come out to the
Friday evening concerts, they found

Marcus Frank Has Bought the Mc McLaughlin
Laughlin McLaughlin & Tolar Stock, and
Will Double His Business
Space
Mr. Marcus Frank has bought the
Tolar & McLaughlin furniture stock,
located next door to his store, from
the -Theus-Zachry Co., and has a
lease on the store room for a term
of years.
The furniture store will be closed
until June 13th, at which time Mr.
Frank will open it with a clearance
sale to last for 15 days. Under his
contract with Mr. Theus, he cannqt
sell furniture after July 1st, so the
entire stock must be sold by that
time and Mr. Frank says, "Believe
me, it will be ONE sale."
On or about Sept. '1st, Mr. Frank
will open the store with a large and
up-to-date line of gent's furnishings,
clothing 'and shoes. Men's, and
youth's goods only will be carried in
this store and Mr. Frank thoroughly
understands the line and will do a
big business. Mr. Frank will cut a

We have completed the survey of this
rich trad: and will soon publish an exact
cut showing the subdivision.
WATCH FOR THE PLAT.

PARTRIDGE-IV00DR017 COMPANY,
MERCHANT'S BLOCK.

J)o Yo'WaFiK,
tovb Too ZX

EVERY UP-TO-DATE FARMER HAS A GASOLINE ENGINE
TO DO HIS WORK. WHY? BECAUSE IT SAVES ITS COST IN
TIME AND IiABOR MANY TIMES A YEAR. IT IS THE BEST
INVESTMENT HE CAN MAKE.
YOU CAN RUN YOUR CREAM SEPARATORS, FEED
. GRINDERS, FANNING MILLS WASHING MACHINES, GRtND GRtND-'
' GRtND-' STONES, PUMPS, SAWS AND OTHER BACK-BREAKING
WORK AT A VERY SMALL COST.
COME IX AND TALK rr OVER. THEY ARE PRICED BY
THE HORSE-POWER :AND THEY ARE PRICED VERY
REASONABLE. ? ;

Phone 118, Ocala, Fla.

X 11.1. i i

piui5 vuuasiuu an extra treat.

y

I rt fnllAirlnir- f T 01.11 T T V. t xi J ..

me lununuift. i iJ. oncucj li. i. uig cuuuwuug uuur o i area in me
Jones, Edgar A. Wright, Tampa; X. j division walls of the two stores at

I. Ives, Chas. A. Price, Philadelphia; the rear so that communication be-

C. W. Chewming, Indianapolis; J. tween the two may be easily had.

Uraig Allen, Dallas; A H. Moody, j Mr. Frank's business has been

Ford Moody, Harrisburg, Pa.-; C. A. growing v so rapidly that he cannot

Williams, Washington; Geo. A. Scott, longer conduct it in the space he has

Boston; R. H. Holland, New York; The entire second floor of his store

H. L. Borland, Citra; F. M. Gaugh-,is filled with goods and he has no
roi, Memphis. j space for the new lines, hence the

All these gentlemen found them- necessity of the other store room.

selves much at home at the Har- The front of the new store will be
rington, and were well pleased with remodeled to accommodate the class
the fine service of that excellent ho- of business to be done there and

tel. handsome shelving and fixtures will

Sunday morning, escorted by he put in so that it will be one of

Messrs. T.-T. Munroe, Z. C. Cham- the most attractive as. well as the

bliss,-F. T. Schreiber, D. W. Davis, best stocked stores in town.

F. Bennett and the indefatigable .

Secretary Rooney, the party went to ( UNION 'MEMORIAL SERVICE
Lake Weir, where they had a good;

ook at the big Carney grove and the odd Fellows, Knights of Pytliias and

model Carney packing house. They

had a treat of Florida peaches,
washed down with oft Lake Weir
water, and then (we are threatened

with death for telling it on them, Renresentatives of the Odd Fel-

but it is too good to keep) they ad- lows. Knights of Pythias and Wood-

ourned to the lakeside and, screen- men met in .Mr. Charles Goddard's

ed by the packing house, shucked office Saturday afternoon, and made

their raiment and went in bathing, plans, for a union memorial service

au natural, just like they -went in by their three lodges Sunday after after-the
the after-the old swimming holes when they noon June 7th.

were boys, ages and ages ago. They -t The members of the three lodges,

had one great time ducking each also, the Pythian Sisters, auxiliary to

other, and if they had not watched the K. of P., will meet at the K. of

each other extra close some one or p. i0de room at 3:20 n. m. and

two would probably have slipped out proceed to the Temple theater,
and tied the clothing of the others where appropriate services will be

in knots. It is reported that there held.' After these services, corn-

was a great demand on the drug- Tnittees from the lodges -will go to

stores for vaseline and cold cream the cemeteries and place flowers on
shortly after the party returned to the graves of departed members.

town. I All mumhora nf th thrAA Indies

After dinner at the Harrington, ani their families are specially re-

the visitors, accompanied "by Mr. rmested to be resent, and to con-

Rooney and some other citizens, tribute as many flowers as possible.

went out to Silver Springs, where Tho nnhllc is also invited to attend.

, if

I The
I
I Laundry
I That
X Made
f
I Ocala
&
Famous

V

To a Person Who Prides
Himself on His Appearance

; Clean, Fresh, Well Laundered Linen

g is a necessity. To supply that ne ne-t
t ne-t cessky is Our Business,

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Ocala Steam Laundry

j' 102-404 S. Main Street

OCALA, FLORIDA

Phone 101.

FRESH EGGS. THAT ARE FRESH
. EVERY ONE GUARANTEED.
Callll IPlhioinie lOS.
W. E MARSH City Market

Woodmen AVill Join in PayinR
Tribute to tlieir Departed
Rrethren

EC OUR RARE CHINA WARE.

i

No regalia will be worn.
DEATH OF AX AGED CITIZEN

they took the City of Ocala and went

down the run. They saw all the

beauties of Silver river and some of
the darker attractions of the Okla-

waha, the magnificent Carmichael Mr. Rod Morrison, an aged citizen

farm, and returned to the city In the wfc0 moved from his farm in the

evening, delighted with their trip. western part of the county to Trilby

They left for Citra In cars this two months ago, died at that place

morning, and after looking over the yesterday and his body was chipped
great orange groves and packing to this county and will he burled in
houses of that section, will scatter cedar Grove cemetery, west of Mar-

out to return home. tMr. Rooney, !tei several miles, this afternoon. Mr.

who induced them to visit Ocala, 1 Morrison, we understand, spent his
and who has been pre-eminent in entire life .in the western part of
their entertainment, accompanied Marion oountr. and has many rela-

them to Citra, and will return this tives there.

afternoon.

WHEN YOUR WEDDING
.' PRESENT COMES FROM US
THE Y KNO W "IT IS FINE"
WHEN YOU MAKE AN ANNIVERSARY GIFT, BE IT FOR A
BIRTHDAY, WEDDING OR ANY KIND OF AN EVENT, GIVE AN
EXQ UISITE PIECE OF JE WELR Y. THIS WILL END URE AND BE
CHERISHED FOR ALL TIME; AND EACH TIME THE RECIPIENT
SEES IT, IT WILL RECALL THE HAPPY OCCASION OF WHICH
IT WAS A MEMENTO.
WHEN A GIFT COMES FROM OUR ESTABLISHMENT, THE
GIRL WHO GETS IT KNOWS .THE QUALITY-IS SUPERB.

A. E. BURNETT

RELIABLE JEWELER
OCALA, FLORIDA

CARD FROM MR. McCONN

NOTICE TO BOY SCOUTS

Ocala, Fla., May 25, 1914.

In reference to the North Ocala,

Sunday school, I wish to state in he-

half of the citizens of our neighbor

hood that we appreciate in its full

ness the action of our Methodist

friends in wanting to organize a
Sunday school in our part of town.

But at this time Rev. Woodward,

state evangelist for the Christian de

nomination was holding a series of
meetings and so much interest was
being manifested which resulted in
the conversion of thirteen of our cit citizens
izens citizens that no attention was given the

The Ocala Boy Scouts will meet at

I the Board of Trade rooms Tuesday

afternoon at 4:30 o'clock. Every

'scout and those who expect to be are
' requested to be present.

Bunyan Stephens,
Scout Commissioner.

ITINERARY
For County Candidates as Adopted
. .by Campaign Committee of Mar

ion Conuty Democratic Executive

Committee
Tuesday May 26 Electra.

Wednesday. May 27 Pedro. (At

generous action of our Methodist night.)
friends, and besides it would be al-j Thursday, May 2S Flemington.

most impossible for any one denom-i Friday, May 29 Shady (Williams

ination to operate a Sunday school Springs).

nut. hp fnr npithpr of thm have' Friday. May 29 Summerfield,

members enough to support their ; (night.)
own school. Saturday, May SO Fairfield, day

I believe I speak the sentiments of Saturday, May 30 .Ocala, night,

our part of town when I say that we t all candidates for state senate and

all feel very grateful for the assist-; house of representatives.
ance so generously offered and ex-j Monday, June 1 Ocala. For al

tend to our .friends a welcome invi-. candidates except candidates for

tation to come over and give us their states senate and house of represen-

hearty support in the work.
Most respectfully,
W. H. McConn.
Supt. North Ocala Sunday School.

Ice cream freezers of all sizes at
Mclver & MacKay's. ad.

tatives). W- T. oary.
Cham. Campaign Committee,
5-6-dw tf Ocala, Fla.

IF YOUR Indestructo Trunk
should be destroyed to today;
day; today; you would receive one
just like it, free.
You would not be forced
to buy a new trunk; because
you would be protected by
the rigid 5 year Indestructo
Guarantee
Your trunk is built to stand the
severest travel usage, regardless of
-what happens, or how far you travel.
That protection is the biggest rea reason
son reason why you should own an Inde Indestructo.
structo. Indestructo. There are many others; chief
among which is the indestructo
Trunk Itself.
The Indestructo Is built with the
Idea of your comfort and conven convenience
ience convenience uppermost in our mind; you
will agree to this after you hare
seen the trunk.
B. GOLDMAN
Why Pay .More Ocala, Fla,

' Porch swings, porch chains, ham hammocks
mocks hammocks and Vudor porch shades at
Mclver & MacKay's. ad.

1 FORE 0NSURA:NE
! Is a Present Day Necessity.
is I represent a strong line of Companies
That will carry your risks.
1 F. Wn ODTTT

H Phones 285 and 214
re

OCALA, FLORIDA

I



SIX

THE OCALA EVENING STAR. MONDAY, JIAY 23, 1914
MARION JUL'NTT DIRECTORY

AMES

AD

0 DOS

ECU EOT
I
Used exclusively in the con-
str action of the Panama
Canal and the great Keokuk
dam in Iowa.
Government Engineers know
their business.
Fresh stock always on hand.
Woodmar Sand
& Stone Co.
PHONE 331.
Mclver fi MacKay
Funeral Directors
UNDERTAKERS and EMBAIMERS
Fine Caskets and Burial Robes
D. E. McIVER and C. V. ROBERTS
Funeral Directors
ill Work Done by. Licensed. Em Em-balmers
balmers Em-balmers and Fully Guaranteed
PHONES:
D. E. McIVER. . ... ......... 104
O. V. ROBERTS .1 ...... . .805
Undertaking Office .... ..... 47
O
i P. D. 0DE1UL
CONTRACTOR and BUILDER.
"Rstimntp.s nn nnv kind
of Building furnished on
short notice. All work
guaranteed.
117 N. SANCHEZ STREET.
P. O. BOX. NO. 438.
PHONE NO. 368 OCALA Y

1 U0W f
PHONE -3L
9
, Ocala Iron Works
; -.'. L

QmlcSf Relief When
Utterly Worn Out
Getting the Blood in Order
Is Required By Most
People.
If yon think you hare gone to smash and
flt only for the discard, try S. S. S. for the
blood. It will surprise you to know what
can be done for health once the blood is
released of the excess of body wastes that
keep it from exercising Its full measure of
bodily repair.
If you feel played out, go to any drug
tore and ask for a bottle of S. S. S. Here
Is a remedy that gets at work in a twink twinkling;
ling; twinkling; it just naturally rushes right into
your blood, scatters germs right and left
up and down and sideways.
Tou feci better at once, not from a stim stimulant,
ulant, stimulant, not from the action of drugs,- but
from the rational effect of a natural medi medicine.
cine. medicine.
The ingredients in S. S. S. serve the
active purpose of so stimulating the cellular
tissues cf the body that they pick out from
the blood their own essential nutriment and
thus repair work begins at once. The relief
is general all over the system.
Do not neglect to get a bottle of S. S. S.
today. It will make you feel better in just
a few minutes. It is prepared only in the
laboratory of The Swift Specific Co., 530
Swift Bldg., Atlanta. Ga. Send for their
ire bock telling of the many strange con conditions
ditions conditions that afiliot the human family by
r--aswn of impoverished blood.
SUGAR HA31MOCK LANDS
Partridge-Woodrow Company
spelling Agents
Merchant's Block. Ocala 1-13-tf

Of Institutions, Firms, People and
Phones Most Often Called in
; Ocala ;
The following condensed tele telephone
phone telephone directory is published for the
benefit of the Star's readers. No
charge is made for any of the entries
in. It. It covers the city depart departments,
ments, departments, the railroads and telegraph
offices, the offices and residences of
all the doctors In the city, the hos hospital
pital hospital and trained nurse3 in fact, all
the points likely to be most needed.
A directory is attached to each
phone, but people often have occas occasion
ion occasion to learn a telephone number
when they are at a distance from
both the phone and the book, and it
is principally, for the convenience of
these that the directory 13 published.

A. C. L. "passenger station
A. C. L. freight office. .
Annex Drugstore
Anti-Monopoly Drugstore
Banner .
Brigance, City Marshal. .....
Board of Trade. ... . ........
Brinson, school superintendent
Carlisle's Drugstore ". .......
Court Pharmacy
City Hall ....... .. ..
Commercial Bank ..........
County jail .
Dr. Dozier .'. .... ..........
Dr, Dozier, residence ........
Dr. E. Van Wood . ... .
Dr. E. Van Hood, residence.
Dr. Counts .-. . ...... i ...
Dr. Counts, residence .". .... ...
Dr. J. W. Hood . . . ....
Dr. J. W. Hood, residence. ...
Dr. Izlar ........... . .
Dr. Izlar, residence. ..........
Dr. Land
Dr. Lane, residence. ...... ...
Dr. Lindner. :
Dr. McClane .
Dr. McClane, residence. ......
Dr." Newsom.
Dr. Newsom,- residence. .....
Dr. Peek ...... ... .........
Dr. Peek, residence. .. .......
Dr. Smith .... . . .. ......
Dr. Smith, residence. .......
Dr. Thompson .............
Dr. Von Engelken. .
Dr. Von Engelken, residence.
Dr. Watt ... ... ..........
370
99
279
123
1
361
381
141
424
284
303
122
35
41
69
324
164
427
349
203
295
11
i
71
422
477
78
333
407
512
186
468
301
53
74
139
286
2d0
53
472
78
495
404
"185
369
51
66x
176
60
133
91
32M
Dr. Watt, residence. .........
Dr. Walters. . ... . ."
Dr. Walters, residence.
Dr. Wilson, colored
Dr. Hughes, colored
Dr. R. R. Williams (colored)
EVENING STAR
Electric Light Plant. . . . .
Elks Club
FIRE STATION
Florida House. '.
Galloway, sheriff, residence. .
Harrington Hall Hotel.
INFORMATION OPERATOR
TELEPHONE EXCHANGE.
Marion County Fair Grounds.
Marion County Board of Trade
MARION COUNTY HOSPITAL
Miss Gerard, trained nurse ....
Mies Harwell, trained nurse
Miss Washburn, trained nurse
Munroe &.Chambliss Bank. .
Moose Club
Metropolitan Bank
OCALA EVENING STAR. ....
Ocala Gas Co., office.
Ocala Gas Co., plant. ........
Ocala House
Ocala National Bank ......
Ocala Northern Railway. .....
Ocala Southwestern Railway..
Ocala City office.
Ocala Heights Dairy ........
Ocala Telephone Company
POSTOFFICE
POLICE ALARM
Postoffice Drugstore
Postal Telegraph office.
Sheriff's office
Seaboard Air Line City Ticket
office
Seaboard Airline freight .office
STAR OFFICE .............
Southern Express Co ........
Tydings Drugstore .........
Western Union Telegraph office
142
243
381
33
472
472
206
18
460
363
51
61
478
52
334
249
367
303
421
142
515
195
20
217
49
129
38
51
42
30
136
FOR A TORPID LIVER
"I have used Chamberlain's Tab Tablets
lets Tablets off and on for the past six .years
wherever my liver shows signs of
being in a disordered condition. They
have always acted quickly and given
me the desired relief," writes Mrs.
F. H. Trubus, Springfield, N. Y. For
sale by all dealers. Adv.
A full line of Spalding baseball
goods just in at Gerig's Reliable
Drug Stores. 5-16-tf
XOTICE TO CREDITORS AXD OTHERS
All creditors, distributees and leg legatees,
atees, legatees, and all persons having claims
or demands against the estate of
Thomas C. Hall, deceased, are hereby
called upon and required to present,
their said claims or demands to the un undersigned
dersigned undersigned as administrator of the es estate
tate estate of said Thomas C. Hall, within
two years from the date of the first
publication of this notice, to-wit:
March 16th, 1914,,, otherwise they will
be barred in accordance with the
statute in such cases made and pro provided.
vided. provided. W. T. HALL.
Adm'nitrtor of the Estate of Thomas
a HalL 3-lC-St mon

Judge Circuit Court W, S. Bul Bul-ock.
ock. Bul-ock. Ocala,
Clerk Circuit Court P. H. Nugent.
Ocala.
Sheriff J. P. Galloway, Ocala.
Tax Collector W. L. Colbert,
Ocala.
Tax Assessor Alfred Ayer, Ocala.
Treasurer John M. Graham
Ocala.
Surveyor W. A. Moorhead, Ocala
Judge of Prouate Wm. E. Smith
Ocala.
County Commissioners C. Carml
chael, Ocaia; J. W. Davis. Summer
field; W t. Henderson. Lynne; D. G
Watkik.., Dunnellon; Walte Luf
man, Sparr.
Board Public Irn:ction -J. Zl
Brinson Superintenatnt. Ocala: B
ti. Blitch. Biitchton: J. S. Grautham

HOW'S THIS
We offer One Hundred Dollars Re Reward
ward Reward for any case of Catarrh that
cannot be cured by Hall's Catarrh
Cure. F. J. Chenney & Co., Toledo,
Ohio.
We the undersigned, have known
F. J. Cheney for the last 15 years,
and believe him perfectly honorable
in all business transactions and fi financially
nancially financially able to carry out any ob obligations
ligations obligations made by his firm.
National Bank of Commerce,
Toledo, Ohio.
Hall's Catarrh Cure is taken internal internally
ly internally directly upon the blood and mu mucous
cous mucous surfaces of the system. Testi Testimonials
monials Testimonials sent free. Price 75 cents
per bottle. Sold by all druggists.
Take Hall's Family Pills for con constipation.
stipation. constipation. Adv.
ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS
Notice is hereby giv-en that the
board of public Instruction for the
county of Marion, state of Florida,
until 2 o'clock p. m., June 5, 1914,
will receive sealed bids for the erec erection
tion erection of an addition to Ocala primary
school building, and plumbing of
said addition, situated in the city of
Ocala, Florida, according to plans
and specifications prepared by Mc Mclver
lver Mclver & MacKay, which will be on file
in the office of the superintendent of
public instruction at the Marion
county courthouse, in Ocala, Florida,
on and after May 9, 1914, copies of
which may be obtained from the ar architects
chitects architects by making deposit for same
at their office in Ocala, Florida. Bids
may be made for either the erection
of said addition, or the plumbing of
same, separately, or bids may be
made for both jointly. A deposit in
the form of a certified check in the
sum of "five per cent' of the amount
thereof much- accompany each bid.
The said beard reserves the right to
J reject any or all bids. Bid3 should
!be mailed to J. H. Brinson," secre secre-jtary,
jtary, secre-jtary, Ocala, Florida.
' mi -r. a i-k 1.11 T" ..i I
x lit: coaru ui x-uuiiu liisiruciiuu lur
the County of Marion, State of
Florida, By J. H. Brinson,
5-6-tf Secretary.
DEATH OF, A WELL WELL-KNOWN
KNOWN WELL-KNOWN UNION VETERAN
Zephyrhills, May 22. Captain W.
B. Lowry, a well known veteran of
the civil war, died here last night.
after an illness, from kidney troub-
le. 'He was captain of the Sixty Sixty-j
j Sixty-j second O. V. I. He was 76 years
'old. His body was shipped to his old
-home In Roseville, Ohio, for burial.
' His wife and son accompanied the
remains home.
SUGAR HAMMOCK LANDS
Part ridge-Wood row Company
Selling Agents
Merchant's Block. Ocala
I. E. CHACE
Dental Surgeon
Rooms 9, 10, 11, Holder Block
Phone 250
OCALA, FLORIDA
Terms cash.
L. F. BLALOCK
Dental Surgeon
Office Over Commercial Ban
Phone 211
OCALA, FLORIDA
PIANO TUNING
J. E. FRAMPTON
formerly of Lamar, Mo., is ,now
located in Ocala. Expert work
guaranteed. References given. Call
or address 229 Daugherty Street,
Ocala, Fla.
Coming South?
For sale 50 improved farms,
10 to 600 acres, northern
Marion County, Florida. Al Also
so Also 2,000 acres cut-over land
well located; fine truck and
orange section. Write for
description and prices. Come
see me.
JOHN L. DAVIS,
IRVINE. FLORID

1

wm
V

These Magnificent
14 -room dwelling, barn-and out
all cost over $12,000.

I(D1 MS
fkiraiaiy, Sflay Wk, &St f, M. J
C ly I
,...

Evans Improvements ,
8-room frame dwelling, 100. feet from river, barn 30x40, cow barn, 20x30, tool house, potato store storehouse,
house, storehouse, swimming pool, 6-inch flowing artesian well and 10 acres irrigated, 300 citrus trees, and.
pack ing house, all coet $10,000.

JHE QUICKEST, SAFEST AND SUREST ROAD TO WEALTH IS THE DIRT ROAD!
Terms: 10 per cent to 25 per cemitL Caslta
Balance from Three to Five Years
SEVEN PER CENT. DISCOUNT FOR CASH
Yoar Price is Ours UaUl the Last Lot is Sold ;.;
You Know Federal Point Farmers Get Best Prices and Early tlariict
Water transportation at yoar door. Rail within 1 H miles. H mile to Federal Point. 7 miles to
Palatka. 1 H miles to Hastings. 4
A GREAT OPPORTUNITY FOR THE HOMESEEKER, INVESTOR AND SPECULATOR
400 ACRES OF VALUABLE POTATO LAND, IMPROVED AND UNIMPROVED.
-
In Case oi Rain Sale Will Be Held Following Day

References: Barnett National

A

Estates will be Sacrificed-

Farms and As Whole

(GiMiimall
Door improvements
houses, 250 citrus trees, good dock
Bank

A no 7M TI X

Iii Little

. ''."'
and -6-inch flowing artesian well,
.
JACKSONVILLE, FL..



THE OCALA EVEXIXG STAC, Zl&S ZZ.

AIAj DAY WEDNESDAY
OCALA church, directory
SEABOARD AIR LTXE CCUCDTJIZI

mm

things
mil

W7

New Irish Potatoes New String Beans
Fresh Apples Oranges
Bananas
Marion County Fresh Smoked Hams
MarionCounty Fresh Smoked Sides
Brick City Coffee, 40c.
First ProductiCoffee, 30 cents
Fresh Roasted and Ground in Our Own Machine Every Day.
' ;
Sliced Breakfast Bacon Dried Sliced Beef
Sliced Roiled Ham, for Lunches
Eggs, Fresh from the Country, always in stock
New Salt Mackerel

Grape Juice
Olive Oil

Csiri-ltiKiwiisis CdDo
Cam Building.
Phone 163 OCALA, FLORIDA

.l "m,m mlamm """

"an honest man may hare a bad title through no fault of his own"
a good man does not always mean a good title'
"men pass away, titles run on forever
"an abstract of title is the only means by whirb u can determine
whether you are baying land or a lawsuit

florida title & abstract company,

Choice Fresh Meats,
Salt Water and Lake Fish, received each day.
Prompt delivery. Only First-class products handled.
Our market is lined inside with white enameled metal,
is thoroughly screened from flies, and is the only sanitary
market in town. Ice boxes for fish and refrigerators for
meat, always clean and thoroughly iced.
PHONE 380
South 2d St., Opposite rear of City Market.

;illllMIIIIHM!imillllH?ttTl!l",'"11""1'

Mi Promptt Scrace
are two principal causes of our success during the first six months
of our existence, and we are determined to continue as we began.
Our place is always open to the public for inspection, and we al always
ways always appreciate a visit J There's no special time of day for visi visitors.
tors. visitors. Just come in at any time and in this way catch us without
our "company clothes" on; the same rules for absolute cleanli cleanliness
ness cleanliness among "our working force prevails in the early morning as in
mid-day or just before the "whistle blows." If our delivery
wagons are not calling for your work, just call phone 21 and they
will be there before the wires have ceased to vibrate.

bp Rim

STEM i i

"Ocala's Up to

TO

Ginger Ale
SalaoVDressing
ocala, fla.
MHninnnimimimimiimm
- Date One."

LAUNDRY

Canning Demonstration on the New
High School Lot
Editor Star: There will be an all
day canning demonstration on the
new high school lot Wednesday,
May 27th, for the benefit of club
members andothers "who may be In Interested
terested Interested in the irork. I hope to see

many or my club members present
on that day and fi cordial invitation
is extended to the general public to
visit and inspect the methods of the
club girls work.
Respectfully,
Caroline H. Moorhead, Agent.
MAKIOX-DUXX MA50XIC LODGE
Marion-Dunn Lodge No. 19, V. 4t
A. M. meets on the first and thira
Thursday evenings of each moith at
7:30 o'clock, until further notice.
Baxter Carn, W. M.
Jake Brown. Secretary. Ad
IX) Y AIi ORDER OF MOOSE
Ocala Lodge No. 699, L. O. O. M.,
meets every Thursday at 8:30 p. m.
Visiting brethren always welcome to
the lodge and club house, on Mag Magnolia
nolia Magnolia street near postoffice.
J. D. Rooney, Dictator.
J. E. Gates, Secretary. ad
GOING AWAY THIS SUMMER ?
If eo, insure your baggage against
loss by fire, theft or wreck In hotels
or steamers, on trains, docks, plat
forms or wagons. Rates extremely
low. E. M. Osborn, Holder. Budd
ing. 5-19-tf
BIDS WANTED
Notice is hereby given that the
board of public instruction, at Its
meeting on Monday, June 1, 1914,
will receive and open bids for the
erection of a school house at the Fel
lowship school, according to plans
and specifications on. file at the office
of the superintendent of public in
struction In the court house at Ocala,
Florida.
Bids will be received for a general
contract covering the furnishing all
the supplies and labor for completing
the building or for the work of erect
ing the house only.
The board reserves the right to
reject any and all bids. Communica
tions should be addressed to
J. H. Brinson, Secretary,
mon-wed-fri Ocala, Fla.
EXAMINATION OF TEACHERS
Notice is .hereby given that the
regular state uniform examination
for teachers will be held in Ocala be
ginning on Tuesday, at 9 a. m., on
June 2, 1914. The examination for
whites will be held at the Ocala high
school building and that for colored
at Howard Academy.
Applicants will supply themselves
with legal cap paper, pens and ink
and the legal fee of $1 will be col
lected at the beginnig of the work.
Very respectfully,
J. H. Brinson,
' Superintendent.
dly mor-thrs-fri and wkly.
FOR GRADUATION CLASS 1014
Class flower, white carnation, spec
ial $1.50 per dozen; American
Beauty, 15-inch stem, S3 per dozenf
20 Inches, ?3.50; 24 inches, ?5 up
to per dozen. Orders taken up
to May the 20th. Heintz. the flor
ist 5-15-6t
DANGER IN DELAY
Kidney Diseases are too Dangerous
for Ocala People to Neglect
The great danger of kidney troub
les is that they often get a firm hold
before the sufferer recognizes them.
Health will be gradually undermin
ed. Backache, headache nervousness,
lameness, soreness, lumbago, urinary
troubles, dropsy, gravel and Bright's
disease often follow in merciless suc
cession. Don't neglect your kidneys.
Help the kidneys with Doar TCMney
Fills, wnien are so stron' r-1 om-
mended right here in hir
Richard G. NecK, 609J Hawkins dt.
Palatka, Fla., says: "My kidneys
gave me a great deal of trouble and
the kidney secretions were too fre frequent
quent frequent in passage. I used Doan's Kid Kidney
ney Kidney Pills and they acted just as rep represented,
resented, represented, giving me relief. Since
then, others of my family have taken
Doan's Kidney Pills and the results
have always been satisfactory."
Price 50c, at all dealers. Don't
simply ask for a kidney remedy
get Doan's Kidney Pills the same
that Mr. Neck had. Foster-Milburn
Co., Props., Buffalo, N. Y. Adv. 8
ROYAL ARCn LASJS

Regular convocations of the Ocala
Chapter No. 13 R. A. M., on the
fourth Friday in every month at
7:30 p. m. C. E. Simmons, H. P.
Jake Brown, Secretary. Ad.

PRESBYTERIAN Corner of. Ft
King avenue and Watula street: pas pastor
tor pastor W. H. Dodge; residence 309 Ft.
King avenue; phone 233. Sunday
services: Sunday school 9:30 a.m.;
iuperintendent W..H. Dodge; morn morning
ing morning sermon 1 1 o'clock; Junior Mis Mission
sion Mission Society 3 p. m.; evening sermon
7:15 o'clock. Midweek prayer meet meeting
ing meeting Wednesday evening, 7:30.
CATHOLIC North Magnolia St.;
priest, D. Bottolacio; residence 327
North Orange street; Sunday ser services:
vices: services: High mass 10 a. m.; vespers
5 p. m ; Sunday school 3 to 5 p. m.;
communion services second Sundays
6:30 a. m.; also regular service.
EPISCOPAL Corner S. Broadway
and Watula streets; rector, Rev. Jas.
G. Glass; residence 311 S. Broadway;

phone 415. Sunday services: Holy
communion 7:30 a. m.; Sunday
school, 9:45 a. m.; morning prayer,
titany and sermon 11 a. m.; evening
prayer 7:30 p. m.; choir practice
?:30 p. m. Friday; meetings of ves vestry
try vestry and societies at hours appointed.
METHODIST Cornel r'ort King
avenue and South Main street; pas pastor
tor pastor J. M. Gross; residence 4vd Foit
King avenue; phone 157; Sunday
services: Sunday school 9:30 a. m.,
superintendent L. N. Green; morn
ing sermon 11 o'clock; Junior Ep-
worth League 4 p. m.; Senior Ep Ep-worth
worth Ep-worth League 3 p. m.; Senior Ep Ep-worth
worth Ep-worth League, 4 p. m.; evening
sermon 7:30 o'clock. Midweek prayer
meeting Wednesday evening 7:30.
Choir practice Friday evening at the
church.
BAPTIST Corner North ITagno-
lia and North Second streets; pastor
Bunyan Stephens; residence 52C Ok-
iawaha avenue; phone 314; Sunday
services: Sunday school 9:30 a. m.
superintendent W. T. Gary; morning
sermon 11 o'clock; Junior Baptist
Young People's Union 4 p. m.; Sen-
tor Baptist Young People's Union
J:45 p. m.; evening sermon "7:30 p.
m. Midweek prayer meeting Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday evening 7:30 o'clock
Church of Christ
East Broadway, next to City Hall.
Roy B. Bowers, minister. Residence
708 Lime street. Office and study
at the church, entrance to the rear.
Hours: 8 to 12 a. m., (except Mon Mondays)
days) Mondays) and 2 to 5 p. m. Wednesdays
and Saturdays. "At Home" to the
congregation and others Mondays, 7
to 10 p. m.
Services Sunday: Sunday school
10 a. m. Preaching and communion
11 a. m. Junior society 2:30 p. m.
Christian Endeavor Society 6:45 p.
m. Preaching 8 p. m. Wednesday,
7:30 p. m. training class, conference
and prayer. Business meetings the
last Tuesday of each month. All
seats free, and everybody welcome.
PICKING BASKETS
Picking baskets for tomatoes,
cantaloupes, enkes or beans. We
buy in carload lots. Mclver & Mac-
Kay, mon-eat dly wky
THE METROPOLITAN
SAVINGS BANK
This bank Is always open until 8
o'clock in the evening on Saturdays
and Mondays; on other days of the
week it closes at 3 o'clock In the aft
ernoon. The bank will observe all
legal holidays, both state and na
tional, and will remain closed on
those days.
George Giles, President.
Frank P. Gadson, Cashier. 3-19-tf
Icy-Hot bottles at Mclver & Mac-
Kay's, ad.
OCALA PUJbUC LIBRARY'
Open daily except Sunday from 3
to 5 p. m. Board of Trade rooms,
Ocala House block.
Louise E. Gamsby, Librarian.
TOMATO WRAPPERS
Tomato wrappers may be obtained
in any quantity at close prices from
Mclver & MacKay. mon-satdly wky
Phone 481
If you want to bay or sell"
FURNITURE.
New and Second Hand
Household Goods
Farm Tools, Harness Etc
Easy Payments if Desired.
A M. BOBBITT,
310 S. Main St. Ocala Fla.
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL,
Carpenter and Builder
Carer ul Estimates Mr.de on All Con
fract Work. Gives more and better
otctacio- in the city.

Southbound
Xo. 1, local leaves Jacksonville
9:30 p. m.; arrives Ocala 1:40 a
in. ; arrives Tampa 6:30 a. m.
..No. 3 local leaves Jacksonville
a:30 a. m.; arrives Ocala 1:05 p. m.;
arrives Tampa 5:40 p. m.
No. 9 limited leaves Jacksonville
11:39 a. m.; arrives Ocala 2:30 p
m.; arrives Tampa 6 p. m.
Northbound
No. 2. local leaves Tampa 9 p. m.;
arrives Ocala 2:30 a. m.; arrives
Jacksonville 6:45 a. m;
No. 4 local leaves Tampa 9 a. m.;
arrives Ocala 1:12 p. m.; leaves
Ocala 1:30 p. m.; arrives Jackson Jacksonville
ville Jacksonville 5:20 p. m.
No. 10 limited leaves Tampa J p.
m.; arrives Ocala 4:20 p. m.; arrives

Jacksonville 7:30 p. ru.
OCALA NORTHERN SCHEDULE
No. 72 Leave Ocala daily 1:15
p. m. Arrive Palatka daily except
Sunday, 4:45 p. m. Arrive Palatka
Sunday, 4:15 p. m.
No. 71 Leave Palatka daily ex except
cept except Sunday, 7:40 a. m. Arrive
Ocala 11 at. m.
No. 73 Leave Palatka Sunday, 8
a. m. Arrive Ocala. 11 a. m.
Summer weight lap robes and fly
nets for horses at Mclver & Mac Mac-Kay's.
Kay's. Mac-Kay's. ad.
OCALA LODGE XO. 286, B. P. O. E.
Ocala Lodge No. 286, Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, meets
the second and fourth Tuesday even evenings
ings evenings in each month. .Visiting breth brethren
ren brethren always welcome. Club house
opposite postoffice, east side.
David S. Williams, E. R.
Joseph Bell, Secretary. A a.
Refrigerators in many styles and a
wide range of prices, at Mclver &
MacKay's. M-S-dly wky tf
WOOD3IEN OF THE .WORLD
Fort King Camp No. 14 meets in
Yonge's Hall at 8 p. m. every second
and fourth Friday. Visiting sov sovereigns
ereigns sovereigns always welcome. Adv.
F. J. Burden. C. C .-Chas
Chas .-Chas K. Sage, Clerk.
Perfection oil and National gaso
line etoves; hot water comforts, at
Mclver. & MacKay's. ad.
SUGAR HAMMOCK LANDS
Partridge-Woodrovr Company
Selling Agents
Merchant'n Block, OcaU 1-13-tf

(D)IFS(E mi KMeo I

EL JJo MdkDfls

Phone 356

(Geo, Meimflz & Commpaimy
Wholesale Dealers in
LUMBER, SHINGLES, LATH, LIME, BElICEi
-
AND CEMENT

We Make a Specialty of House' Bills.
See Us Before Placing Your Orders

Rooms 22 and 23
Second Floor
Ocala,

Reed Onr f ASS1HED AES z? ycz? nczb

A crisp, clean, nutri nutri-tious
tious nutri-tious food. For
everybody every-
where. Fresh in'the ; ;
moisture-proof pack-
ae, 5 cents.
The funny little name
of the famous little
ginger snap that puts
fresh snap" and
ginge,, into jaded
'appetites. 5 cents.
Grahat.1 Crackers
The natural sweet-
ness and nutriment
of the wheat are re retained,
tained, retained, giving them
a delightful flavor.
'" xo cents. -A" ..
baked by
NATIONAL
BISCUIT
COMPANY
Altxxys look for that
I have on hand at all times
'at the barns and lot on. West
Exposition St, (Broadway) a
bis drove of first class horses
. and males for you to make
jour, selections from." .Every
head of this stock has been
selected by me personally in
the markets. I will guarantee
to give you as good stock at
as low price as can be had in
the state. Every animal Is
warranted to he as
sented.
renre-
OCALA, FLOQIOA

MoMer Mock-

iFflonidlsi

MHIIIHHIHUI

1 vork for the money than any othei



Kit itrAliA PVEXSO CTAIi. 3, 1014

DAILY WEATHER REPORT
9

OCALA OCCURRENCES

K. of P. meet tonight.
Elks meet tomorrow night.
Odd Fellows meet tomorrow night.

Moose meet Thursday night.
7 f
i j j
Board of Trade Thursday evening.

R. A. JJ. meets Friday night.
? ; .;
Own your own home by buying a
modern bungalow on easy terms of
the Ocala Lumber & Supply Com Company.
pany. Company. 5-15-tf

Mr. M. T. LaHatte, the enterpris enterprising
ing enterprising printers supply man, from At Atlanta,
lanta, Atlanta, was' in town today.

Dr. W. K. LaneSpecialist, Eye,
Ear, Nose and Throat. Office, Law
Library Building, Ocala. Adv.

Mr. Edgar F. Smith of the Dun Dun-nellon
nellon Dun-nellon Bottling Works, is in the city
attending court.

"If it Isn't an Eastman it isn's a
kodak." Gerig's Drug Stores,

agents.

5-16-tf

Mr. Joseph Dodge has bought Mr.
Geo. K. Williams fruit and candy
stand in the Robinson block. Mr.

Williams has been doing a good bus business,
iness, business, and sold simply because his

health requires him to take up some

occupation that will give him more
exercise. Mr. Dodge will increase

his stock and expects to make his

business much larger. Already high

ly successful as a sign painter and
decorator, and investing in real es estate,
tate, estate, Mr. Dodger has time for another
enterprise, or two, which his friends
are certain he will make successful.

Mr. W.. L. Colbert, not knowing

of the cancellation of the date for

hearing the candidates at Oak Sat Saturday
urday Saturday night, spent several hours

there circulating among the voters

and citizens presenting his claims to
the collector's office. 1

Mr. Jesse Emerson of Gainesville,
a former resident of Ocala, has been
at Hot Springs, Ark., for the past
two months. Mr. Emerson has been
suffering with rheumatism and al almost
most almost helpless during that time.

New line of bathing caps just ar arrived;
rived; arrived; all colors and styles. Court
Pharmacy. 5-22-4t

A great many Ocala people went
to Lake Weir yesterday to spend the
day or the afternoon.

Mr. William Kirkbride, who' is
making a marked success of the
newspaper at High Springs, was in
the city last night.

The Lake Weir road is certainly
in bad condition and in need of the
repair work that is being done on it
ty Mr. Henry Gordon and his con convict
vict convict crew.

Mrs. T. C. Carter, accompanied
by Miss Weiss, a trained nurse,
went to St. Petersburg this after
noon to spend some time. Mrs: Car
ter has been suffering with asthma

lorseyeral .4ay

Our good farmer friend, Mr. Jt5sC

day. With him was another veteran,

Mr. J. W. Collins, of Osceola, S. C,
who attended the 'reunion in Jack Jacksonville,
sonville, Jacksonville, and then came to Marion

county to see the best part of Flori-f

da and visit Mr. Stevens, 'who is'a

itlve by marriage.

r Mr. E. P. Thagard, our esteemed
x-citizens, now bank examiner, was
In town yesterday. Mr. Thagard,
who goes all over the state, says it
looks to him like the seatorlal race
Is very close.

. 'Mr. Harrold Dunn, of the Ocala
Lumber & Supply Company's branch
-office in Gainesville," was in town
Sunday on' a visit to his parents, Mr.
and Mrs. J. H. Dunn.

Mr. R. F. Brown, a first class me mechanic
chanic mechanic from' Arches, was in the city
Sunday visiting his pld frle'nds, the
Luckies. They were all "brought. up
together in the splendid country
around Newnan, Ga.

Messrs. W. M. Wilson and Don
Peabody, of the Florida Title and
Abstract Corporation, are represent representing
ing representing their company at Palatka at the
meeting of the abstract and title
men's association of Florida. Men
from most ; of the counties In the
state will .be there and quite a large
attendance is expected.

New line of bathing caps just ar arrived;
rived; arrived; all colors and styles. Court
Pharmacy. 5-2 2-4 1

Mrs. Wade, who resides seven
miles south of town, was brought to
the hospital Friday and operated on
immediately to save her life. She
is doing as well as could be hoped
for under the circumstances.

To make your trip a real pleasure
a Thermos bottle is a necessity. We
sell them. Gerig's, The Reliable

Drug Store.

5-16-tf

The case In the circuit court a few
days ago of the Anthony Farms
against the Seaboard railroad result resulted
ed resulted in a verdict for the complainant
in the sum of $6,000. An appeal has
been entered and the case will be
taken to the higher court.

ORDER OF EASTERN STAR

Ocala Chapter, No. 29, O. E. S..
meets at Yonge's hall the second and
fourth Thursday evenings of each

)

, Mrs. Flora Brown, W. M.
Miss Florrie Condon, Sec'y.

whooping COUGH

"About a year ago my three boys
had whooping cough and I found
Chamberlain's Cough Remedy i the
only one that would relieve their
coughing and whooping spells. I
continued this treatment and was
surprised to find that it cured the
disease in a very short time," writes
Mrs.' Archie Dalrymple, Crooksville,
Ohio. For sale by all dealers. Adv.

SUGAR HAMMOCK LANDS
Partridge-Woodrow Company
Selling Agents
Merchant's Block, Ocala

!' TYPEWRITER FOR SALE
A Remington typewriter, No. 10;
visible writing, in perfect condition
In every respect. Apply at b.-r of office.
fice. office. 4-28-tf

THE TAX COMMISSION
" : AND TAX ASSESSORS

You Don't Know
Beans
Until you have tried
Heinz Baked Beans
Special by the dozen for
this week only
No. 1 tins (10c) ... .81.02
No. 2 tins (15c)- $1.56
No. 3 tins (20c) .$2.16
Good to Eat.
Nourishing:. r
Ready to Serve.
Order Today.

0. K. Teapot Grocery
X2ALA, FLA. t
PHONKS 16 and 174

The tax commission created by
the last legislature is an absolute
necessity, for there is no equality or
justice in the present assessments in
different counties.
It devolves on the assessor to see

that his county gets a fair deal in

the shuffle, for there will be a tre

mendous shaking up. I .believe that
I understand my job and will see
that the taxpayers of Marion county

pay no more than their just pr6por-

tion, and while I am looking out
for your Interests, I hope you will

look out for mine. The tax com

mission may fire me, as it has the

power, but I don't believe that you

will do it. Respectfully,
w 5 22 dl9-26 Alfred Ayer.

CHAMBERLAIN'S LINIMENT

This preparation is intended es

pecially for rheumatism, lame back,
sprains and like ailments. It is a
favorite with people who are well ac

quainted with its splendid qualities

Mrs. Charles Tanner, Wabash, Ind.,

says of it, "I have found Chamber

Iain's Liniment the best thing for
lame back and sprains I have ever

used. It works like a charm and re

lieves pain and soreness. It has been

used by others of my family as well
as myself for upwards of twenty
years." 25 and 50 cent bottles. For
sale by all dealers. Adv.

SUGAR HAMMOCK LANDS
Partridge-Woodrow Company
Selling Agents
3Ierchants Block, Ocalr

The following weather report is
furnished the Star every afternoon
by Mr. F. G. B. Weihe, local report reporter
er reporter for the weather bureau operated
by the United States department of
agriculture, showing maximum and
minimum temperature and rainfall
luring the twenty-four hours end ending
ing ending at 3 p. m.:

Max.

March average.. 74
April average. .SI

May 1 -.
May 2..
May 3.
May 4 .
May 5. .
May 6 .
May 7...
May 8 .
May 9 .
May 10..
May 11..
May 12.
May 13..
May 14.
May 15.
May 16..
May 17.
May 18.
May 19.
May 20.
May 21.
May 22..
May 23.
May 24.
May 25.

... -.87
. . .81
. . .S5

...85
. . .85
87
.'...90
S 9
... S 7
m .S3
. .. .S8
. .88
. .'. .86
93
...90
. ... 68
. .94
. ,84
...81
77
. ...81
. .82
. ..'83
...87
...92

Forecast for Tonight and Tomorrow
Partly cloudy tonight and Tues Tuesday;
day; Tuesday; probably local showers south
portion.

Min.
48
60
65
61
51
55
55
61
61
60
68
63
33
60
62
63
69
94
66
67
67
62
60
59
59
60
65

R. F.
.03
.09
.02

.45
.49

.10
.03

GOING AWAY THIS SUM

If so, insure your baggage against
loss by fire, theft or wreck in hotels
or steamers, on trains, docks, plat platforms
forms platforms or wagons. Rates extremely
low. E. M. Osborn, Holder Build Building.
ing. Building. 5-19-tf

BIDS WANTED

Notice Is hereby given that the
board of public instruction, at its

meeting on Monday, June 5, 1914,

will receive and open bids for the

erection of a school house at theFel

lowship school, according to plans

and specifications on file at the office
of the superintendent of public in

struction in the court house at Ocala,

Florida. -Bids
will be received for a general

contract covering the furnishing 'all

the supplies and labor for completing

the building or for the work o( erect

ing the house only. -s ;

The board reserves the right to

reject any and all bids. Communica

tions should be addressed to' 2, r

J. H. Brinson, Secretary.

mon-wed-fri Ocala, Fla

MARION-DUNN MASONIC LODGE

Marion-Dunn Lodge No. 19, F. 4

A. M. meets on the first and third

fhursday. evenings of each month at

7:30 o'clock, until further notice-

Baxter Carn, W. M.
Jake Brown. Secretary. Ad

LOYAL ORDER OF MOOSE

Ocala Lodge No. 699, L. O. O. M.,

meets "every Thursday at 8:30 p. m.
Visiting brethren always welcome to
the lodge and club house, on Mag Magnolia
nolia Magnolia street near postofflce.

J. D. Rooney, Dictator.
J. E. Gates, Secretary. ad

SUGAR HAMMOCK LANDS
Partridge-Woodrow Company
Selling Agents
Merchant's Block, Ocala 1-13-tf

?09

We seek an opportunity to convince yon thatthis ctroccf, ccccctv ccccctv-ative,
ative, ccccctv-ative, but progressive institution can help you increcss your rcco;ircc3
and make your business grow. Will you grant us the opportunity ?

1

The

Ocala Natioimal Baek.

Capital, Snrplas and Protlts CC5.CC0.C0. N :J
ACTIVE TJ. S. DEPOSIT jCRY. ii
JNO. L. EDWARDS, President. CLARENCE CAMP, VKE-Pmsssrrr. 2
H. D. STOKES, Cashiers

To the

Marion

Ievestoiri.(D)f
CoMinitys

AM proud enough of the record which the FLORIDA TITLE & ABSTRACT COtt-
n P ANY has inade during the past two. years to be willing to assume that yon are
fairly well acquainted with tSe company ind ts record, ilfj you are. not, then ask the
I banks, attorney nd big land owners of the County a to: its work and reputation.
To develop Its business possibilities to a greater degree requires a larger capital
than it now has, and to provide for such development the FLORIDA TITLE: ft ABSTRACT
CORPORATION has been formsd with greater and broader powers and a capital of
$50,000.00 (one-half of the toUl capitalization) as a Preferred 8r)per-cent. Cumulative stock,
and will share in the further pronts of the business until It ntyjfe paid 12 per cent. In
any one year. -:-.
The new .Company will succeed to the old Company's planthusiness and asseta of
every character and every dollar of Its worth will be pledged to secure the safety, of the
stockholders of shares of its Preferred stock, and the annual 8. per-cent dividend accruing
thereon. ; vv,. V : ;. :
In disposing of the $5U,vuu.uo Preferred Capital Stock, it Is my desire to sell at least
one-fourth to Marion County investors HOME PEOPLC -who .have a knowledge of and
faith in local conditions, the pecuniary profits as can be demonstrated by our books, have
been thus far satisfactory and may be considerably enhanced by Increased capital stock In
order to extend the business beyond its presenT limits. -
I am so certain of -financial success for all Investors that I am content to take my own
personal profits from the earnings to accrue on the Common Stock of the corporation, after
the preferred share holders, have been secured their profits, as above outlined.
The support thus furnished by our home people in addition to the thoroughness,
promptness and reliability of our work, as evidenced by approval of local bankers and at attorneys,
torneys, attorneys, as well as by big land owners of the County and State, will enable me to command
sufficient funds and control sufficient business, from within and without .Marlon County, to
make the Florida Title ft Abstract Corporation, a truly State-wide, permanent and profit profitable
able profitable institution. ... r A 7
Tour pledge to any portion of the Preferred Stock subscription .made promptly, will
be' appreciated. . ; ... .
Youry very.truly, -t ; ;
R. S. RbGERS.

- ';

It. S. ROGERS.
; Ocala Florida.

You are authorized to enter my name for a subscription of ............... shares
(Par 'value $100.00 each) of Sl Preferred 8 per cent Cumulative Stock of the FLORIDA.
TITLE ft ABSTRACT CORPORATION V r ; '
Payment of this subscription to be made on call of the Icompany, in the following
manner, viz:. ' : ,'
..ALL OR. ................. ..........
In four equal installments, viz: On demand and in two, four and six months with Interest
at 8 per cent., note to be given for the deferred payments and stock to. be Issued and at-

tacnea to note as collateral security.

(Mark out the manner of payment not used).

mi:..'

Name of Subscriber rvv. ; . : .". ........
l 5xc-.' :-'.-;" ; .; :
Address

I, U Jav. "

SICK HEADACHE

AVE HAVE THE BEST GARAGE
In the city to put your automobile in
first-class running order. We have
skilled workmen at our garage, who
pride themselves in putting every everything
thing everything in order, so you can feel as assured
sured assured you can travel with safety and
pleasure after our work is com completed.
pleted. completed. Send at once to 17 North
Main street or phone, or send messenger.

LucEde's Garage
17 N. Main Street

Mrs. A. L. Luckie," East Rochester,
N: Y., was a victim of sick headache
and despondency, caused by a badly

weakened and debilitated condition
of her stomach, when she began tak taking
ing taking Chamberlain's Tablets. She says,
"I found them pleasant to take, also
mild and effective. In a few weeks
time I was restored to my former
good health." For sale by all deal dealers.
ers. dealers. Adv.

EXAMINATION OF TEACHERS

Notice i3 hereby given that the
regular state uniform examination
for teachers will be held in Ocala be beginning
ginning beginning on Tuesday, at 9 a. m., on
June 2, 1914. The examination for
whites will be held at the Ocala high
school building and that for colored
at Howard Academy.'
Applicants will supply themselves
with legal cap paper, pens and ink
and the legal fee of $1 will be col collected
lected collected at the beginnig of the work.
Very respectfully,
. J. H. Brinson,
. Superintendent.'
dly moi-thrs-fri and. wkly.

FOR GRADUATION CLASS 1914

Class flower, white carnation, spec special
ial special $1.50 per dozen; American
Beauty, 15-inch stem, $3 per dozen;
20 inches, $3.50; 24 inches, $5 up
to $7 per dozen. Orders taken up
to May the 20th. Heintz, the flor florist
ist florist 5-15-6t

Es Duni? ncenmsum

cp

2 J-

We mean are you getting the service we wish to give you and which
you ought to have? We believe you-are. !. Most of our customers are
satisfied, and we are proud of the fact. ; : But if there Is anything wrong
in our relations we want to know it NOW, so we can do our part in
straightening it out before the rush days come.
dDcaHai Ice & IPsieEdiimfnj

Loaf Cake, Layer Cake
Cookies, Doughnuts, etc.
FREE DELIVERY : I EVERY MORNING
IB AKEIRiV
NORTH MAGNOLIA STREET

Put It Up to the Hogs.
A blacksmith in a small Connecticut
town who occasionally goes o pro protracted
tracted protracted sprees was seen figuring on
the barn door and later throwing five
bushels of core on the ear into the
pen where be had six hogs, and as
he turned away he was heard to say:
Tbre, blast you. if you are prudent
that will last ye."

' 5 j Too Obliging. -"Conductor,
can you tell me

that brakeman lost his finger V naked
the inquisitive woman. "He. seems to
be a very nice fellow. It Is a pity he
should be crippled." '"That's just it,
mum. He -Is & good fellow. He la
so obliging that he wore his finger off
pointing out the scenery along the
line." Chicago News.

f



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0(1 ALA FLORIDA. )K)XAY. 31 AY 25. IUU
NO. 121

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MISS REXIE TODD
FLORIDA
Y ESTER I ) A Y
TODAY
AND
REXIE TODD
The Indians TmIIpva that the
white men first came from the foam!

I

of the ocean thrown upon the beachJsome of the land on which yesterday
After lying awhile in the sunshine Florida buried her explorers who

the foam melted away and the white

men wre seen where it'-had lain! Florida was the mysterious land o mere are nuiuau uue. uear ineuu. um:u uww lo evr? snure,
and they arose and they walked into in which one's dreams were believed Th' on the sands of time, rise high and then ebb out once more,
i be interior. This is only a beautiful to be fulfilled. Not only was it a
Indian myth yet the real coming of country to be explored and colonized, And tnus lt is us classmates, whose lives have led this way,
the white man was almost as wond-' a country whose waters imparted w gather on the shores of life to work, to laugh, and play,
erful. immortal youth to all, but also was Creeping tides irom out the deep roll in. and just so we
, In Spain there was a gray-haired a country abounding in wealth. Mingle with cares of life, then back to the boundless sea.
old warrior, a lion by name, and still There were nuggets of gold that But lt us leave Priceless gift to man before we part,
more so by nature, who since his one might find lying around on the Some word or smile or solden deed, to cheer some lonely heart,
childhood, had carried arms. He had shores; there were dazzling gems
been faithful to his king at all times, that one might find hanging from Attracted by the white-capped waves. Ambition in their roar,
fighting hard before, the walls of the trees, so it was fondly believed. ne throws himself into .the spray of earth's great reservoir,
Granada that the honour and victory And expecting to reap wealth Her- Heeding not the rugged rocks 'gainst which they dash and break;
might go to Spain. He sailed with nando De Soto came to repair his Blindly yielding to that voice which calls a course to take.
Columbus on his second voyage to fortune and to gain great glory for Though rough it be. conquer that wave, plunge on with strength of soul,
the New World. After seeing part himself. The latter he accomplish Let not the obstacles of life make shipwreck of your goal.
of it he was still more eager to see ed, but In the former he was bitter-1 )
more of, lt. He conquered Cuba and ly disappointed. He explored Flori- Vain Popularity comes dashing in with haughty sweep,
became its governor; he explored the da all Its length but did not find the With naught upon its sparkling wave but wreckage from the deep deep-coast
coast deep-coast of South America, every day fabulous gold nor gems. He con- Storm-tossed victims once allured by its deceitful roar roar-adding
adding roar-adding to Spain new possessions and quered the tribes and stripped them High-capped wave which swells and falls and then is seen no more,
to himself greater fame. But now of all their golden ornaments. Even Like emPty -bubbles in the air for which we madly reach
this cavalier was growing old and then he was not satisfied. Yesterday To them onl break as foam uPn the pebbly beach,
many of his cherished dreams -were De Soto was denied the wealth he
unfulfilled. Me wished to 'reap even sought; today there is wealth for all And oft the sea ls treacherous when breaking waves dash high
greater honours for his country and who seek it. There is wealth in the As if in &ery to fling their spray back to the sky.
himself. So, when he heard of a kaolin mines and there is wealth in And then as if repenting of mischief idly done
marvelous fountain whose clear wa- the lime pits, but best and richest of Calm' deceWn8. there she lies beneath the golden sun.
ters would heal the sick, make the all are the mines which are veritable h let us not be as lhe froth at sea uPon th CTest'
old young again and bestow immor- gold mines in themselves, the phos-j2 strive to be and not to seem and leave to God the rest rest-tal
tal rest-tal youth on all who bathed therein phate mines. Everyday ships laden
he set out in quest of it. He heard with this money-bringing mineral Xow as we stand- dear classmates upon Future's brink tonight,
that Indians from Cuba, and even cross the ocean. Yet De Soto died a And gaz over the sea of lif with ev'r' Prospect bright,
Yucatan had gone in search of it and disappointed man, and the fortune WIsel may we choose the tide, which if at flood Is taken
as they had never returned, it waff for which he sought, for which he ,Leads on to Fortune," so 'tis said, if not forsaken.
fondly believed that they were liv- gave his life and which the Florida of And may we- as our Tide returns so blithsome and so free.
ing in beautiful Florida in the en- yesterday, so niggardly withheld Brins witn us treasures choice and fine from out the deep blue sea.
joyment of perpetual youth. So eager from him, the Florida of to-day : ; :

was Ponce de Leon to find this mag-
ical water .that at his own expense
he fitted out three vessels and "set
out In quest of it. He filled the
ships with catholic priests and brave
soldiers that they, too. might share
his wonderful discovery. And full
of wild hope3 they reached Florida,
But though they sailed the length
and breadth of Florida they never
found the fountain of youth of which
they had heard so much and on
which they had built so many fond
hopes. What would this old warrior
of yesterday say it he could see me
people wno nocK to our nowerj iana
of to-day, the sick to be healed, the
old to be kept from growing older
and the youthful to retain their
youth? For this purpose there are
sanitariums scattered all about, in

.he woods and on the sea coast, tor them, kidnap their children, scalp bread. The rivers alone have with-J their indomitable courage is mani mani-our
our mani-our fountain of youth to-day i3 not the missionaries sent to convert stood the beckoning of time in the fested in the gigantic schemes they
alone in our clear, sparkling waters, them, then disappear into their aqua- passage of Florida from yesterday to 'undertake. They go into the swamps
but also in the sweet, balmy, air tin jungle haunted by noisome rep- to-day, and they alone are the same. enduring the dangers and diseases,
laden with the perfume of the flow- tiles. Here fallen trees and a mat-! Courage was required of the peo-! draining them of their stagnant wa-

ers and the odor of the pine needles,
Though Ponce.de Leon went away
dissatisfied there are thousands to-
day who come and are satisfied and
come again. For what the Florida
of yesterday refused to one man, the
Florida of to-day gives freely to
'thousands.
De Narvaez was fired with ambi-

tion to conquer a land that would after repeated efforts and the em- tile savages required still more. For Ailment of all it3 wonderful dream 'ers. The stars shine with no more
rival even the splendid conquests of ployment of their own strategy that a full century after the discovery j Though the Florida of to-day satis- luster than whn they sang together
Cortez in Mexico. So he too came to they were finally captured and sub- there was no settlement. but'fies the people now. there will be a in the glory of their birth. The flow flow-Florida.
Florida. flow-Florida. He had heard strange tales dued. But the completeness of their in 1565 Menendez with a little com- to-morrow for Florida whose dawn ers that gemmed the fields and for for-of
of for-of this wonderful land so he, with a subjugation may be seen in the Flor- pany of courageous followers made a : will be rosier than ever with prom- sts before Florida was discovered,
small band of faithful followers set ida of today. The Indian trails are settlement in Florida and they call- ises that the wildest fancy will be- now bloom around us In their season.

, oui w u wuhuci it.
But as they advanced into the heart
of the country De Narvaez's compan-
ions grew weaker and weaker on ac-
count of lack of provisions. Their
food supply was exhausted and at

each stopping place a few oi the
. i
small ban i hacl to be left behind1
either dead or dying of hunger. The

remainder pushed on to the villages :
toping to find food there, but found;
instead of the villages, only smoking'
heaps of ashes and the hostile In-,1
dians fied. Of this bandf three hun-;
idred who set out with such courage
and with such ambitious purposes in
search of a fancied empire only four,
escaped alive to tell their tale of peril
j and hunger. But that was the Flori-:
da of yesterday which refused food
to her sons. Behold the Florida of
to-day! Her fields green with celery
and crimson with strawberries,
i which not only supply her needs, but
I also help to satisfy the needs of her
sister states. Her groves from which
-1
her people and other people are fed
pineapples and oranges in abund-
'ance. Behold her truck farms, her
rich fields of potatoes, which would
f not only supply several bands the
? size of De Narvaez's but help to sup-
ply the nation for her land is fertile.!
Having heard of its fertility there are
people who are searching for our
Florida of today, anxious to gain
'died -of hunger.

generously lavishes upon her sons, .villages of wigwams are transformed
There being no gold mines ready into magnificent winter resorts. The
for the Spaniards, no .precious stones Florida of yesterday, which was the
with which to fill their greedy pock- dumping ground for criminals and
ets and especially since the Indians runaway slaves, has now become a
were so hostile to all invaders, Flori- Florida which is the playground for
da was not colonized as soon as the the multi-millionaires,
other portions of the new world.' Yesterday the rivers with their
The thirteen colonies had been set- clear waters were the goals to which
tied yet Florida was only a dumping eventually all the forest paths led.
ground for run-away slaves, and a The bears, wild-cats, and panthers
refuge for the hunted criminals, to traverse the same paths to quench
Here they mingled and intermarried their thirst. But that was in the
with the native Indians and defied all Florida of yesterday. The deer do

their pursurers. And out of them
the Seminoles sprung. The impass-
able forests and pathless swamps
were known only to them. They
would rush out of their hiding places
with weird war chants and descend-
in? on the scattered settlers murder
ted underbrush lay submerged ia
dank, black water. Cypress gloom-
ed in forbidding shadows above the
stagnant pools, the swamp itself wa3
rife with horrible quacks and croaks
an(j 0fj somewhere the distant bel-
low of an alligator. The Seminoles
were cunning and thev were the ter-
ror of every inhabitant. It was only
v
now Droau nignways iraveiiea ny
honking automobiles; the little plots
of ground where they used to plant
their maize are now luxuriant tropi-
ical gardens in which there are
flowers of all hues, and the Indian

til f V A

MISS GLADYS
CLASS lOKM

GLADYS NAXETTE MARTIN
As sweeping tides of oceans surge in from the misty deep

And linger there along the shores before they outward creep.
Leaving traces on the sands to tell of their short stay,

: Marks they stamp which though dim,
not go to the same place as former-j

ly to satisfy their thirst. For where 'has changed into a vastly different 'greatest men of all ages for war,
the paths" through the forest once lay I Florida of to-day there is the sameUnd their desire for peace. It is only
are today broad highways and by! spirit in the people. There is the .'necessary to study the record of
the same clear rivers are thriving 'same tenacity of purpose embodied! war from the earliest times, to trace
towns where men of all naUonali-iin them now as when thev braved 'its course through the ages and then

ties are mingled to earn their daily!

pie who discovered the New World Iter, and lo.nhey change the "Ever
and who faced the hardships, the'glaies into a true garden spot. Nor
perils and the taunts of their friends.' are they daunted by the vastness of
For the boats were frail nd small, the deep but they span it with bands
and the way was uncertain. The of steel and drive their locomotives
men who discovered the New World 'on the railroad over the sea.
required a vast amount of courage' The Florida of yesterday full of
yet to settle it. to leave one's friends mvths and lpmnris hac o-cainrA

-
and to cast one's lot among the hos-
ea n ain Augusuae. i ney erected
their fort near the ocean yet on three
sides it was surrounded by dark,
gloomy forests festooned with moss,
And out of these forests at any time
might leap the painted savages, wav-

MARTIN

OF 1914
abide to eternal day.
ing their tomahawks and giving
their blood-curdling yells, as they
came to destroy the settlers. When
the colonists went to bed at night

they never knew what horror they j John Hay, one of the greatest Am Am-would
would Am-would face before morning. Yet'erican secretaries of state, denounc denounc-these
these denounc-these forests in which yesterday the es war as, "the most futile and fero fero-Indians
Indians fero-Indians eluded their pursurers and, clous of human follies." Men whose
perpetrated their blood-thirsty crim- names lie hidden in obscurity, as
es are today studded with towns and well as men whose names are writ writ-villages.
villages. writ-villages. The little settlement which I ten In the book of fame proclaim
j t

was made in loo6 has grown andtnat war is inhuman: that it is a

changed so that Florida to-day
claims it as one of her own cities.
But though the Florida of yesterday
the unfriendly
tine umntfiiaiy savages. lO-Oay
- WW
o XV.WWS. 4 U

to a Florida of to-dav which is a fni.!.),,n it nnr in t nnv.

come a reality. But though the peo-
pie will pass away and the scenes
will change the spirit of the people
which comes from nature itself will
remain forever. For as Bancroft
says: "The material worldrdoes not

MISS ALICE SEXTON
THE DAWN OF UNIVERSAL
PKACFJ
ALICE SEXTON
i
Peace has its victories
'No less renowned than
war.
'
Peace, peace of the civilized na nations,
tions, nations, of the universe, is the move
ment that is stirring, awakening the!
world today. The Idea of peace, of
arbitration, is not new. For count countless
less countless ages philosophers have hoped
j for, poets have dreamed of, and
prophets have seen in holy vision
that all-conquering day when calm
peace shall reign supreme from the
mightiest continent to the smallest
and most insignificant island of the
Pacific
War has received the fiercest de denunciations
nunciations denunciations from the greatest and
holiest men of all times. The Creek
Euripides exclaims. "O fools all ye
who try to win the meed of valor
through war, seeking thus to" still
this mortal coil, for if bloody con contests
tests contests 'are to decide, strife will never
cease." Aristides praises Pericles,
because to avoid war, "he is willing
to accept arbitration." Cicero says:
"There are two ways of ending a
dispute discussion and force;- the
latter manner is simply that of brute
beats; the former is proper to be beings
ings beings gifted with reason." St. Martin
replied to Julian, the apostate, "I
am a Christian and I cannot fight."
Christ gives peace as a heritage to
the world when he says, "Peace be
with you."
War has been denounced not only
by the ancients, but iby the great
moderns, who realize that war is,
and always will be barbaric. Thus
in the words of Rosseau, "War is
the foullest fiend ever vomited from
the mouth of hell." Hume says,
"The rage and violence of public
war, what is it but a suspension of
justice among warring parties?"
great illusion to beltye that it can
be otherwise.
To understand this hatred of the
place in contrast
the record and
progress of peace.
The pages of history are stained
with the crimes and horrors of war,
with the stories of prisoners mas massacred,
sacred, massacred, of enemies tortured, and of
' women and children sold Into slav-
cry. The only law was -"might
makes right." The history of Greece
is merely the story of war for its
own sake. Alexander's conquest of
jAsia was waged for the purpose of
plunder. This accomplished, what
' -
The sun that shone on Ponce de
Leon shines on us in unchanging lus-
ter; the bow that gleamed on the
patriarch still glitters in the clouds,
for nature and the spirit of nature
is always the same.

jwas the result? -For after conquer-,
jlng and devastating a large part of
Asia, he met an Ignoble and pre-"

mature death. The vast territory
that he had conquered with -ruthless
los3 of life and unwarranted blood-
shed In a few years was dissolved
and torn by war.
The path of war is clearly mark-
jed by the sacrifice of human life.
disease, crime, mangled bodies. :
j death, desolation. The trail that
peace has left is blazed by epochs
ol prosperity and happiness. The
golden age1 of peace is conducive to
a glorious literature. During the
Augustan age, noble men- produced
works of literature which" will hold
a place of honor after the victories
of 'Pompey and Scipio have lost
their luster. In this era of peace,
civilization and education have ad advanced
vanced advanced by leaps and bounds. Man
has.now come to the realization that
war is barbaric. Paint It in glowing;
colors; surround it with romance
and poetry; dazzle by its pomp and
false glitter, yet you cannot remove
the barbaric stain from it. for the
slaughter of human beings is the
trade of barbarism.
War shows neither mercy nor
justice; it strips the country of its
youth; it drains the country of its
wealth ; it leaves the poisonous
seeds of disease and immorality,
which continue to germinate and
diffuse their baneful influence long,
after the war itself has ceased.
It is the common people, the mass masses
es masses of every nation, that are crying crying-out
out crying-out against the barbarism and tyran tyranny
ny tyranny of war, for they bear the burden,:
the poverty, the sorrows. The prep preparations
arations preparations for war. are costly: the the-country
country the-country must be taxed and taxed.
heavily to support an efficient army
and navy. Seventy-three per cent or
the revenue of the United States Is Is-used
used Is-used In connection with war. Ger Germany
many Germany and the, other European coun countries
tries countries vie with one another in the In Invention
vention Invention and production of new in instruments
struments instruments of war, more deadly and
costly than the last. A few yearsv
ago it was the dreadnaught, now It
is the aeroplane with its possibili possibilities
ties possibilities in times of war that engages the the-attention
attention the-attention of the world. Already
there is bitter rivalry between Ger--many
and France for the control of
the air. This ceaseless building of
the monster engines is slowly under undermining
mining undermining the strength of the nations;
the realization is borne to them that
some immediate action must be tak taken
en taken to crush the growth of arma armaments.
ments. armaments. The commercial growth of a
country is retarded by the ravages
of war; its progress and wealth re receive
ceive receive a fatal blow which only the
lapse of time can retrieve. The pos possibility
sibility possibility of investing in or trading:
with a country that is ceaselessly
waging 'war is not to be considered.
Business men and the great banking
houses realize the fact that it is not
a safe policy. Investments in coun
tries, such as Holland and Sweden,
that are not wasting their energies
In warlike preparations are pro pronounced
nounced pronounced twenty per cent, safer than
those in any other country. When
George III., of England, announced
the independence of the United
States, he expressed the prayer that
the ties of language, commeiw and
common Interest might bind the two
countries together In a union ot
peace. The same prayer might be
uttered for all nations. Countries
bound together by bands of financial
development, through fear of loss
will control their passions and re refrain
frain refrain rrom war.
When will the people of all na nations
tions nations acknowledge that there should
be peace, not war; that the settle settlement
ment settlement of their dispute by arbitration
is less costly; that war means com commercial
mercial commercial as well as national suicide?
As long as war continues and we
bow before the warrior god, hard hardships,
ships, hardships, poverty and suffering must be
endured.
In olden times, war was the train training
ing training field for men; it furnished a
pastime for the nobles and the mail mail-clad
clad mail-clad knights. Today men are train trained
ed trained in the nobler arts of life, and are
taught to live at peace with their
fellow men. The desire for war and
its excitement is gradually passing
away. Men, who are. soldiers, whose
ancestors were mighty warriors.

(Concluded on Page Four)



TWO

THE OCALA CVELAG STAR. MONDAY. MAY 23, 1014

OCALA EVENING STAR
PUBLISHED EVERY DAY EXCEPT SUNDAY
rJITTIN-GEli Jt.C.i:iOLL, PROPRIETORS
it. VartfAU deterM .MaTjauer Vuit V. J.eaveiiKd. Iiixiiit-vs Managtr
J. It. Ueujaniin, Editor

Erne-re- at OcpIz. F2a poitoffice as second cl:

:ai.3r.

SIKSCRIPTIOX RATES
(Donjestic)

Dne year, in advance $5.00
lx months, in adfance.... 2.5
Three months, in advance.. 1.25
One month, m advance.... .50 I

I

mind everybody that the Oeala municipals-owned
electric plant ha3
everything in this part of the coun

try beaten in low rate and high

quality of service.

4
a

THE TAMPA TRIBUXirs
MAKIOX COUNTY EDITION

(Foreign)
One year, in advance $8.00
Six months, in advance.... 4.25
Three months, in advance.. 2.23
On month, in advance 80

THE BACCALAUREATE SERMON

If the-Ocala Methodist church
ever had its seating capacity taxed
to the limit it was yesterday when
the graduating class of the high
school together with their hosts of
friends assembled to listen to the
baccalaureate sermon of the Rev.
Bunyan Stephens of the Baptist
church. Not only was every availa available
ble available seat occupied, but rows of extra
Chairs were arranged in front of the
pews and the kneeling bench around
the communion rail was filled by the
little folks and then there were
enough people standing around the
various doors to form a good-sized
congregation. Surely the people of
Oeala are a church going people.
. We have before remarked that
there are few cities in which the
communion of Christian fellowship
Is more prevalent than in Oeala.
Yesterday was another exemplifica exemplification
tion exemplification of that fact; every congrega congregation
tion congregation in the city was represented, both
by paistor and people, each of the
former taking part in the service.
Rev. James G. Glass, rector of
Grace Episcopal church, read the
lesson. Dr. W. H. Dodge, pastor of
.the Presbyterian church, made the
"Opening prayer. Pastor Stephens of i

tne Baptist church preached the
r rk m rw snv s-1 6 l. T T" n 1 m

. dc: i iiiijii i 1 1 1 1 i.iih ri Mi n f v i(iu,'pru nr

the Christian church delivered the
benediction, the whole ceremonies
being under the direction of Dr.
Gross,' the pastor. of the church in
.which the service was held.
To mention the name of Mr. Albert
Gerlg as having charge of the mus musical
ical musical features of the occasion i3
equivalent to saying that that part

anv musical nrs'an'zaMrm nf its &Ito

:Tn the state could possibly be, and
tho Oeala is noted for its talent in
ithis direction, the rendering of the
-anthem from the creation "The
Heavens are Falling," in its time, I
volume and harmony was certainly
revelation to every one present,
'ATtrf Hlro Oliver T-wict uro aclr fnr

more.
-After everybody (who could get
in) was seated, the graduates filed
in and took the seats reserved for
them. They certainly made a pretty
.picture and when Prof. J. H. Work Workman
man Workman brought up the rear he looked
as tho he must have had an extra
pair of O'SulIivan's on his shoes or
liad grown a couple of Inches taller
lately, as as for the smile on his
Tace, well, "it wouldn't come off."
'The theme of Mr. Stephens dis discourse
course discourse was founded on the choice of
' King Solomon, "Wisdom." At the
time that God offered him his choice
of gifts he was a young king, sur-
rounded by difficulties. Two houses
were intriguing for his throne but
with the wisdom given him from God
'he was enabled to reconcile these
two houses and fix his throne on a
firmer basis .than it ever had been
before. Solomon not only chose
wisely but his choice pleased God
.-and so he urged on his hearers that

'in the choice of their future careers
they choose that which will be pleas pleasing
ing pleasing In His sight and thus choose
well. All wise men have been called
dreamers; they have visions of won wonderful
derful wonderful possibilities. Joseph was
-called a dreamer by his brethren, but
when in after years he was raised to
.the highest office in the gift of the
Egyptian king his visions became
realities.
Today there are as wonderful
possibilities for those who choose
tne path of wisdom as there were in
.the. days of Joseph, Jacob or Daniel,
all of whom were dreamers, having
visions. We speak of the wonders
of Greece and Rome but what were
they in comparison with the wonders
of our own day and time, which are
'dreams realized,' but our dreamers
must visualize our ideals to go for forward.
ward. forward. Another point of wisdom was for
the young graduates not to consider
that as the days of school' were past
there was little or nothing left for
them to learn, when in fact they
evere merely on the threshhold of
iiLOwledge. Angelo at the age of 91
Is quoted as saying he was still
learning, and that a man with one
foot in the grave still wished to
learn more. Knowledge today means

The Marion count- edition of the
Tampa Tribune came to hand Sun Sunday
day Sunday and very, well bore out the ex-'
peetations that had been formed of
it.
It filled the regular Sunday mag-'

fazine section of the Tribune, and it

is no more' than the truth to say;
that it is the best gotten up Marion j
county edition ever yet printed by j

! any paper outside of the county.

It is not the usual huddle of cuts -and
hot-air write-UD thrown to-!

gether at random by men who take

Soundest Indicate d Manly Cfcorcsisir
One of the best indications of manly character is prud prudence
ence prudence in the use of money.
Economy is the forerunner of thrift and saving leads to
prosperity.
By starting an account wita the Munroe and Chambliss
Bank and depositing your money regularly, you will accomp accomplish
lish accomplish something worth every effort.

Total
Fesoarccs
Over
S7OO.COO.0O

ir : fiL

mi rag feicflan

INCORPORATE O

OCALA FLORI

iiss MM

"THE BEST IN BANKING."

work. Some one said that it was

no use praying without trying, In no reaI interest in tneir subject and ( and political production and do a
which case prayers and work go whose governing motives are hurry great work in advertising the state's
hand in hand. i to St thru and get noId of their j resources. Polk county has had two
There were many fields of work j monev- The Tribune boys put their J or three creditable exhibitions of
today for the young to choose from, j fte2rts into their wrk and the result j thi3 kind, and Is preparing for an an-but
but an-but -those fields should be explored does them credit- ot&er next winter that will surpass
at as early a day as possible. Boys; The mechanical wrk is first class, j any of her. previous attempts in this
and voiinsr men 'mako th mn and we" calculated to catch the eye! line.

pert telegraph operators. After the '' of the reader and hold his attention,
age of 21 it is more difficult for1 Tne star nopes our people will
them to loarn and aftPr ?.n it i order all the extra copies the Tri-

nearly impossible, so in all things

bune has of this edition and send f

NOTICE

C. P. Akins lately, to-wit: on the

the choice of wisdom leads to work luem auroatl- 11 IS uue me iriDune-uin aay oi jnne, a. u. iyi3, nav-
and service, and that dreams and men for their sood work and il w.i11 inS been convicted of the crime of
visions today must lead to opportun- do our county Sod wherever the burning a building with intent to
ities and practical results. That Pa.Pers are sent- j injure the insurer, in the circuit

court for Marlon county, Florida,

those who chose the path of wisdom

; hereby gives notice of his intention

here in Oeala as they would in TO PROSPERITY,10 apply for a Pardon at the meet meet-places
places meet-places thousands of miles away, and; J in on June 10tn' 1914 of the
the speaker "illustrated his meaning' Lakeland Telegram: The premium. Board of Pardons for the state of

Florida, at Tallahassee.

C P. Akins.
This the 2Crd day of May, A. D.

1914.1

5-23-mon-3t

by quoting from Russell Conwell's list of the Marion County Fair has
Chautauqua lecture on "Acres of just been issued, and it is some list,
Diamonds," where a man cold a embracing one thousand pages. The j
piece of land and left the country in Marion County Fair, which will hold-;
search of gold, and the parties who its seventh annual exhib'tion next j
bougflt the land dug a prospector's fall, is one of the big institutions of!

shaft on it and opened up the cele- the state. Starting from small be-:
brated Comstock mine with its mill- ginnings, it has attained remarka- A tract of 120 acres of gopd pine
ions of gold, the richest mine the ble proportions, and the premium i land one mile north towards Oeala

RIG BARGAIN IN LAND

from Montague station on the A.

C. L. Railway; unimproved. Best of
watermelon, cabbage and gardening
land. Apply at Star office for further
information. 5-6-dw tf

IE EE IMA

world has ever known. Another man list covers every product of farm
searching for oil sold his farm and and garden, besides those of the
started for the northwest prospecting shop and many branches of industry

Tor that commodity, while the new and domestic economy. It is also
owner' put down a well and in a lit- self-sustaining, and the stock in fact,
tie while was drawing out thousands has been paying a, dividend. This

or barrels of the crude but valuable should encourage other counties, to j New line of bathing caps just ar ar-article.
article. ar-article. i foster such exhibits, which are a. rived; all colors and styles. Court
The choice of wisdom puts tools tremendous stimulus to agriculture Pharmacy. 5-22-4t
into our hands but not the ability to
USe them. Tools in the hands Of a mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmtmmmmmmmimmmmm
j 1
drunken man become dangers, bntj
wjth the sober man using them with I

wisdom, they become instruments!
for God's service, and in that service
tho at times we can see little before
us but, clouds we -must remember
that God's face is shining on the
other side of those clouds and that
t,he choice tl wisdom, leading to
work and service, will finally remove
those clouds from our-sight and we
shall see him "face to face." t
The. potter starts to make a beau beautiful
tiful beautiful rase from a lump of clay. After
endless trouble and work and when
the work is near completion he dis discovers
covers discovers a flaw in It that cannot be
remedied so he begins his work over
again, not with another lump of
clay, but with the same clay with
which the imperfect vase was made, i
and this time with patience and skill
he turns out a vase that i3 the ad-
miration of all who see it, and so

with us, we make mistakes and there
are flaws and errors in our life and
character, but even as the potter
uses the same clay to make the per-j
feet vessel so God uses us in his ser- j

vice to lead to better and higher!

things.
Let us then choose as did Solomon

of old that wisdom that is pleasing ;

in God's sight.

We Ace IHIeaidlquiiiaFtleii's
4
For Buggies, Carriages, Cart.. Wagons and 'Automobiles, Harness
and all Leather Goods. We have the largest line of Vehicles and
Harness and Saddlery in Central Florida and offer them at the
lowest figures. We lead in all kinds of Farming Machinery;
Agents for the Fomous all Steel Moline Plows, one horse Disc
Cultivators, McCormick Binders, Mowers, Rakes. Reapers and
IHC Binder Twine. Agents for the Fairbanks Morse Gas and
Oil Engines and Outfits. We have a full line of Automobile sup supplies
plies supplies and accessories. We lead in our line and can save yon money
on anything you. buy from us.

TTiere Are Two Sides
to every question, but there can be
enly criti opinion of our Cleaning and
Pressing. It is commended in the
very highest terms by those who
have favored, us with their patron patronage
age patronage in the past. We have the most
up-to-date methods and can do work
quicker and better than our rivals,
because we are better equipped to do
the work. 'And we charge very mod moderately
erately moderately for our services, too.

TODD r (COIVIIIPAMY,
. .....
Opposite Harrington Hall Hotel

OCALA,

FLORIDA

Inland waterways are the people's
most efficient remedy against rail railroad
road railroad monopoly. WThat member of
the United States Senate has work worked
ed worked harder for the development of
our waterways than Fletcher?

If the republican party wants to,
stand any show in. 1916, It had best'

nominate Lafolette for president. He
has more brains and character and
more devotion to the public weal
than any other republican. : He also
has more than some democrats.

After a long illness, Senator Wil

liam O. Bradley of Kentucky is dead, j

He was a man of ; great popularity
and force of character, as is proven

by his being elected, tho a republi-;

can, governor of the southern dem-,
ocratic state of Kentucky, and later
representing it in the Senate. He
was 67 years of age, and his death
probably means that a democrat will
take his place in the Senate.

Almost everybody who has visited
Lakeland praises the town, and
some Oeala people have even gone
so far as to say it excels their home
city in several things. But the
Lakeland Telegram speaks of the
rate for electric current being al almost
most almost prohibitive, which condition of
affairs is a discouragement to pro prospective
spective prospective manufacturing enterprises,
and the Star again begs leave to re-

SHOE DEfP.JRTTIMIEFJTr

EES

You will find the New
stores to show you the

Styles here. This is one of the few
Extreme Styles for Ladies.

Colonial Pumps
Like Illustration in Pat., Kid,
Coll, Dull Kid and Satin.
Widths A to D. Sizes lto 7
Price $3 to$5

Rubber and Juniper
Sole Oxfords
!! Lasts
White Xu-Buck, Canvas, Tan,

Calf and Gun Metal. Spring or Slight Heel. A practical walking

Shoe. Widths B to E, Sizes 1 to 7
Prices

$2, $3.50 $4

Childrens White Shoes
A CHIL WELL DRESSED

Must have White Shoes. New

,feFj Iine JU3t arrived in Canvas and
H73e Nu-Buck.
Infants sizes from 2 to 6 d and d f C
Prices ...1 31.QU
Childrens sizes from 6 to 8 $ 50 and"$2
Childrens sizes from 8 to 11 IVa aQ!i
Prices P
Mises sizes from 11 to 2 $2 $2 50

We taps

Na-Buck, Linen and Canvas, Coloni Colonials,
als, Colonials, Button Oxford and Strap Pumps.
Spanish, Military and Low Heels.

All sizes and all
widths. Prices

$1.75, $3

Childrens Play Oxfords
vv Tan Russett and Gun Metal, Guar-
Nv auteed Soles.
Childrens sizes and (Jl Ci
VV x 6 to 8 PrIces
Childrens sizes from 8 to 11
23 Prts $1 .25 ind $1 .50
Misses sizes 11 to 2 $X 50 $2
Misses sizes from 2 to 6 7C and CiX
Prices ipl.D P.OU

Baby Polls

Childrens sizes from 6 to S. Black

and white Prices

Childrens sizes fiom 8 to 11.

Black and white Price

Mises sizes from iu to 2. Black

and white Prices

Womens sizes from 2 to 7. Black

and white Prices......

We have them from Infants
sizes to little women's sizes in Pat.,
Gun., and Canvas.
Infants sizes from 2 to 1. Black and

white
Price

S1 and

... ..$1

1 "d $1.50

$1.25 $2
$1.50, $2.50
. .$1.75 and $3

Sole Agents for the WICHERT and QUEEN QUALITY Shoes
FOR LADIES
Shoes in all leathers for Men. Bannister $6, Howard & Foster $4



PDA

A

G

MISS WYNOXA WETHERBEB
MISS LORAYNE
UNCLASSIFIED ADS
Lost Found, Wanted, For Sale
For tent and Similar Local Keens
y WANTED Clean cotton rgs at
the Star office.
FOR SALE Remington typewriter.
No. 10; visible writer; in perfect
condition in every respect. Ap Apply
ply Apply at Star office. 4-28-tf
-:
TO HIRE A young man wants to
hire himself out as a teamster.
Apply at the Star office.
"FOR RRVT Tivn nr thrpp pnnnprt-
ing rooms furnished for light
housekeeping. Apply to 6 1 4 East
Adams street. 5-14-tf
FOR SALE Modern bungalow in
Linwood Heights. Inquire of the
Ocala Lumber & Supply Co.5-15 tl
LOST OR STOLEN Black repainted
coaster brake child's bicycle. Re Reward
ward Reward for return to Rev. J. G.
Glass, 311 E. Broadway. 5-lS-6t
FOR SALE Double oven five bur burner
ner burner gas range; upright Everett
piano; cheap fo rcash. Address
B., care Star. 5-18-tf
FOR SALE Strictly first class
team of mules. Apply at Star of office.
fice. office. 5-19-tf
HOUSE FOR RENT New, five-
room house, with up-to-date con conveniences,
veniences, conveniences, near the new school school-.
. school-. house site. Apply to Mrs. Jessie
Haycraft. 519-6t
STRAYED OR STOLEN A black
horse hitched to a silver tipped
top buggy; disappeared from the
vacant lot back of Masters store
Saturday night. May 16. A re reward
ward reward will be paid for information
of whereabouts or the .return-of
came to Goddard's stable in Ocala,
or T. E. Cranford Lumber Co.,
Ocala. 5 20 tf
-T 1
WANTED Subscribers of the Star
to tell their neighbors of the plan
now. in force for giving cash cou coupons
pons coupons to subscribers. 5-20-tf
WANTED 100 MEN to join the
Brotherhood Baraca Class, city
ball, May 31, 10:15 a. m. See R.
B. Bowers. 5-20-tf
FOR SALE One large horse in
good condition; one good work
mule. Ocala Lumber & Supply
Company. 5-23-tf
FOR RENT Six room cotage with
three acres of pasturage, in city
limits of North Ocala. Apply to
Star office. 5-20-6t
ACCOUNT HEALTH Young man
desires job with physical culture

P
j

MISS GLADYS -MARTIN
KEMP
MISS REXIE

CUHl

OF THE

OCALA HIGH SCHOOL

AT THE

TERflPLE THEATER
Invocation

Piano Solo: Fantaisie Impromptu. .Chopin op. 66
Marie Burnett
Oration: ; . .."The Dawn ot the World's Peace"
Alice Sexton
Recitation: ... ......... ..."King Robert of Sicily"
Anna Pope Eagleton
Essay: "An Appreciation of Sidney Lanier"
Nellie "Beckham
Chorus: The Cunning Fox. ...... De Reef

Oration : ......................
Oration:
Class History
Class Poem
Overture: Phedre
Lorayne Kemp and
Class Will
Class Prophecy
Presentation of Diplomas.
i Chorus: Carmena
Benediction
opultryman or will rent few acres
land. Prefer Texas. For details,
address Box 60,Physical Culture,
9015 Metropolitan Building, New
York. 5-23-?
FOUND A large bird dog; white
with large red spots; a crook in
end of tail. Call at Waldron's
Market. 522-6t
FOR RENT Furnished rooms for
housekeeping, or two large bed
rooms with connecting bath. All
modern conveniences. One block
north of postoffice. on Main street.
Apply at Star office or phone No.
257. 5-23-tf
SUGAK HAMMOCK LANDS
Selling Agents
Partridge-Wood row Compnnj
Merchant's Block, Ocala

TUB OCALA EVEM.NU hIAK.

C
MISS ALICE SEXTON
TODD
HOMER
T
Dr. J. M. Gross

" X

i

HIS

Rexie Todd
.......... ."Humble Origin of Great Men"
Homer Small

Wynona Wetherbee
Gladys Martin
Massenet
Carleton Ervin
Theo Wallis
Gladys Wallis
. ...Siipt. J. H. Brinson
Arranged by Mildenberg
Dr. W. H. Dodge
OPEN ALL XTfiHT
Tie Merchant's Cafe Is a first das
place to take your meals. Open night
and day. J. R. Deey. proprie proprietor.
tor. proprietor. 2-28-tf
SICK HEADACHE
Mrs. A. L. Luckie, East Rochester,
N. Y., was a victim of sick headache
and despondency, caused by a baily
weakened and debilitated condition
of her stomach, when she began tak taking
ing taking Chamberlain's Tablets. She says.
"I found them pleasant to take, also
mild and effective. In a few weeks'
time I was restored to my forniex
good health." For sale by all deal dealers.
ers. dealers. Adv.
Ice cream freezers o! all sizes at

jMcIver & MacKay's. al.

MONDAY, MAY 23, 1014

u
MISS GLADYS WALLIS
SMALL
CARELTOX

I

MM

HE OCALA BUSINESS COLLEGE opens this evening 'at 7:30
P. M. A corps of competent instructors has been secured and not
only will the Commercial Branches be taught, but also all High
School Studies and German, French and Spanish. WE HAVE

T

COME TO STAY, and we therefore make you this offer.
Come to school and if after the expira expiration
tion expiration of THIRTY DAYS you are not
thoroughly satisfied you are out noth nothing
ing nothing but your time.
We know we can please and benefit you and are willing to demonstrate the
fact. Let us help you prepare yourself for a business career. v Within a few
weeks our Telegraph Department will be open for the enrollment of students
interested in telegraphy and "WIRELESS."
It is our purpose to make this one of the Largest and Best schools in the South,
but to do this we need your co-operation and support. CAN WE COUNT ON
YOU?

tea

Q
SEND IN YOUR NOTICES SOONER
If you have an advertisement or
Item for the Star, send it in as early
in the morning as possible. We can cannot
not cannot set much except telegraph after
noon.

5
IPIU1
MISS THEO WALLIS
ERVIX

1

MISS AXXIE POPE EAGLETOX

KMKE1

Dan IiMim

L. E. EigHc, PrcsIdcnt-

Advertise In the Star for results.
Valuable Witness.
A witness being sworn In Shoreditcb
(Eng.) county court said he would tell
"th3 truth, the Trhole truth, and any anything
thing anything but the truth

TMIIKI-

Ml
to
MISS NELLIE BECKHAM
r-i'
ii
t
Mtae

i
'

Notice Is hereby given to all cred creditors,
itors, creditors, heirs, distributees and all per persons
sons persons bavin? claims or demands against
the estate of Patrick IL Gillen. deceas deceased,
ed, deceased, to present same, duly prorm. ta
the undersigned, within one year from
t!?e first publication of tbis notice.
. This March 30. 114.
I MRS. PATRICK IL GILLEN.
Administrator of the Estate of Patrick
I H. Gllleo. Deceased. 3-29-tt-moa



THE OCA LA EVENING STAR, MONDAY. LY 25, 1014

THE DAWN OF UNIVERSAL PEACE

(Continued from First Page)
when given the opportunity, vote for'
peace.
Immigration has welded all the
nations of the universe together by
the links'- cf blood and brotherly
love: Race prejudice and bittsr
hatreds are fast dissolving under
these influences for ."Truth and
light, love and law, justice and
mercy, liberty, humanity and broth brotherhood
erhood brotherhood know no national boun boundaries."
daries." boundaries." A spirit of justice and a
sense of fairness prevails among the
nations of today. The world unites
in denouncing any persecution or
outrage perpetrated on men, regard regardless
less regardless of their nationality. Peace is
now sought not through the medium
of war, but peace in the spirit of
. peace.
The downfall of Napoleon taught
not only Europe, -but the world, the
lesson of war. Sickened by slaugh slaughter,
ter, slaughter, disgusted with murder and in intrigue,
trigue, intrigue, the world since the battle of
Waterloo, has had a tendency to towards
wards towards peace. Out of war, wicked wickedness
ness wickedness and waste, there came a uni universal
versal universal desire for peace through law.
If war Is abolished, something must
be substituted. That something is
ftrhHTatfnn tho mnst rntnt frtnr
of the twentieth century. Arbitra Arbitration,
tion, Arbitration, the dream of all lovers of
peace, promises to sweep aside war
forever, and to settle disputes by
amicable agreement. It is the only only-means
means only-means of conciliation, the only sub substitute
stitute substitute for war. -
Universal arbitration, regarded a
few years ago with skepticism Is
now demanded. That arbitration is
not an experiment, 'but that it is
practical is proven by the fact that
In the last century more than two
hundred and fifty disputes have been
settled by this means.
The year of 1898 is always to bei
remembered as an epoch year, for in
that year the first organized move movement
ment movement towards arbitration was made.
The czar of Russia at this time is issued
sued issued a communication to the twenty twenty-six
six twenty-six nations having ambassadors at
the Russian court, proposing a peace
conferenp e. These nations readily
accepted the proposal, and the Hague
was chosen as the meeting place.
While all the questions -discussed
-were not satisfactorily settled, i yet
-there was one momentous outcome
Mhe establishment of the Interna--llonal
Court of Arbitration.. It is a
'Court of justice, where important
questions and differences are settled
-with impartiality.
The South American republics of
'Chile and Argentine have set an ex-
me jong-sianamg oounaary aispuie
o a court of arbitration.-War which
"won id nave upturned and torn the
countries asunder was avoided, and j
between the republics a spirit of
'.brotherly love, was promoted. In j
commemoration of the treaty a
bronze statue of Christ was erected
on the Andes bearing this inscrip inscription:
tion: inscription: "Sooner shall these mountains
&auEunuxt; iuiu uusl luau Argeuiiuvs
"and Chileans break the peace to
which they have pledged themselves
at the foot of Christ, the redeemer."
as uui 10 uc wuu uj a
show' of strength. Strong countries
are regarded with suspicion, and
where there is neither trust nor faith
there can be no, peaceable settlement
of differences! A general feeling of
good will and friendliness must exist.
This cannot he obtained so long as
nations persist in the building of
Armaments. So long as the nations
have not the sense of international
peace and personal justice in their
hearts, world peace will be but a
dream broken by bloody awaken awakenings.
ings. awakenings. To men of this day of enlighten enlightenment
ment enlightenment and learning, the question of
peace should overshadow and subor subordinate
dinate subordinate all other questions. The
Hague court is firmly established;
leagues for the suppression of war
have been formed in all countries.
Much has been done; there remains
still more to be done.
Christianity Is the greatest assist
ance to the cause of peace, strength
ening as It does the bonds of love.
Its influence has permeated the
darkest regions of Africa and Asia
The missionaries of the Prince of
Peace are carrying this message of
universal brotherhood and ood will
towards men to all points of the
globe.
The day is fast approaching when
the contests between the nations
shall be contests, not of arms, but
of love; when nations shall stretch
forth the hand of friendship; when
the false idol of war shall be cast
down from its pedestal. Let then
the strength of our nation be, not in
a standing army and fully equipped
navy, but in justice and fair deal dealing.
ing. dealing. Let our heroes be those, who
have striven manfully for the cause
I peace, our battles those fought in
the defense of arbitration. Let the
building of warships and fortifica fortifications
tions fortifications cease, and let the wealth of the
aiatlon be spent for the improve-

'it
ti
MISS WYNONA
HISTORY OF THE

ll 4 ..ri'.,
if -A '
' - j
ML w .W
V

WYXOXA WETHERBEE
Honored audience, I approach you, with respectful air and mien,.
And ask of you great patience, while I spin my little theme
'Tis a history not of battles, bloody wars, or conquered lands,
But a history more enduring, of a fair, heroic band.
Xot one here'but who deserving all the honor, all the fame.
Greater class than 1914 never was, nor can be named.
To the teachers of this high school must be given first the praise,
First the honor, first the credit, of these great and wonderous days.
Mr. Workman, honored teacher, first of all you live enthroned,
In the hearts of all these class-mates, who to stature now have grown,
By your patience and your wisdom, by your manhood noble true,
You have done us lasting service, and we give you honor due.
And tonight we stand before you, best of teachers, truest friend,
In our hearts we humbly thank you, and will love you to the end,
And to all our other teachers, honor praise and love is given,
By this class of 1914, who for victory have striven.
As all great things have small beginnings, so began this class I ween
From the dear old kindergarten, where Miss Bettie reigned as queen,
Proudly tripped three small maidens to Miss Stevens' room to find
Greater truths and greater problems to extract each tender mind.
Friends, as now we stand before you, and in wonderous amaze
You pause and question, whence this Vast knowledge of these glad gladsome
some gladsome days.
To Miss Stevens we will lead you, for just here as well you know
First began this vast knowledge as large oaks from small acorns grow
Likened now unto a ladder, with its rounds one dozen strong.
Reaching ever, onward, upward, casting out all thoughts of wrong.
On the first round of this ladder studded o'er with pearls anew
Theo stepped one glad morning in her little creaking shoe,
Every morn came happy Theo, through the rain, and through the dew,
Bringing with her the glad, sweet music of her little creaking shoe.
On and on climbed happy Theo 'till she reached the seventh round
Of this jeweled ladder where we all our skirts let down
Our tangled tresses tightly braided now we reached another round
All but Theo.
Would she braid those golden tresses, while her hair she yet could bob?
Would she lengthen her short dresses, would she? No, though we
sob
Our loud entreaties all in vain, our implorings all for naught,
Knowledge only filled her brain, independence was all she sought.
From the ladder's lowest round came two maidens fair to see--
Both of them by name Gladys, both of them so blithe and free,
Day by day we've watched them closely as we've journeyed right along,
Gladys, with the golden tresses; Gladys, with the Jove for song.
Steadily they have climbed each round, each vieing with the other.
In their many lovely virtues all wrong thoughts and deeds to
;; smother.
Gladys with the dark brown hair, the land of music in her choice,
Gloomy days she has made more fair by the magic of her voice.
And Gladys Wallis sunny smile has cheered us these twelve years thru,
Not soon shall we forget this friend, ever faithful, kind and-true,
"Now at this portal thou dost stand, and with small, but kindly hand,
Dost ope the mysterious gate Into the future's undiscovered land."
Yet scarcely would I be complete in chanting of this ode.
Did I not forthwith here explain that this same girl Is pigeon-toed.
This same year of 1902, well remembered by us all.
Sent to us a boy companion, who had fears of study hall.
One fault only he possessed, his great height mismatched his desk
How his useless hands he folded, his long limbs were such a pest.
His tall form seemed scarcely moulded for the seat where he did rest,
Carlton's ears were trained for music, but for Latin, never. No,
How he studied, how he pondered, 'twas of no avail we know.
But to Nellie Beckham's desk we now see him creeping, creeping
Her kind help Imploring, and his Latin translation seeking.
Did he get it, Ah yes, ever; no secrets I am telling,
Or no news am I now giving, when I say before you all,
That Nellie was quite willing to help this boy so straight and tall.
Now again upon this ladder, born with purpose to advance.
Steps our Rexie, grave and thoughtful, never with a backward glance,
Rund by round she climbed this ladder, till we introduce this lass
To you all as the book-worm of this year's graduating class.
Guided by the hand so kind, of Miss Clark, a teacher dear,
The second round we left behind and entered on our third grand year.
Thus we studied, thus labored, and gained our fourth round without fear,
Then came a maiden fair and slender upon one sunny morn,
Joined us in the same glad year of the reign of our Miss Cam,
What a worthy climber she, laughing at each dire disaster
Nothing daunted, on she went, climbing onward faster.
As she wrestled with her science, with her math, and with her history
Climbing e'er upward, faster as she solved each new-found mystery
Nellie Beckham as you see her is this modest maiden's name,
And by deep and earnest effort she at last has reached her aim.
Bedecked with gayest of flowers, the long sweet years glide on,
As with effort we climbed the fifth round of our ladder so strong.
Then there came to us upon the way a maiden young and fair,.
With the merry twinkle in her bright eve, and ringlets in her hair.
The present held for her no fears, the future gleamed with hope,
And since she did her best, dear friends, I bow to Annie Pope;
While climbing up the ladder she has daily grown in beauty.
Has ever on the way fulfilled with cheerfulness each duty.
"So like the swell of some sweet tune, morning rises into noon,
May glides onward into June, thus our fifth year did pass so soon
Childhood is the bough where slumbered birds and blossoms many num

bered,";

So while we gathered up our blossoms ,and watched them as they grew
There came to us another maiden, and asked to join our crew.
Of all the blossoms we had gathered on this jewel-studded round,
Not a fairer, purer blossom than our Alice had we found.
She it is whose heart is golden, with our love she now is crowned,
And our Alice climbing upward on this ladder of renown,
Had a sad and serious accident as she played around,

ment and betterment of mankind.
Let then our land of the Stars and
Stripes, whicn during the nineteenth
century was an emblem of liberty to
all the world, be ,ln the twentieth,
the leader in the day, when strong

WETHERBEE

CLASS OP 1914
and proud nations, "Shall beat their
swords into plow shares, and their
spears into pruning hooks, when
nation shall not lift up sword against
nation, neither shall they learn war
any more."

How we pitied our pocr Alice, as everybody knows.
While she played one day at basket ball, she fell and broke her nose;
She now went to Dr. Dozier, and to him poured forth her woes.
Then he plastered, and he doctored, and he straightened out the blows
Now I can to you explain, away hath Ced all signs of pain.
And playing still at basket ball, Alice has not yet been slain.
Gone is every thought of trouble, gone are all her cares and woes,
And now just as good as ever is this darling little nose.
Then cnward ?e clirr.Led the ladder, when we had reached the eighth
rounl.
Miss Border ha le us rai? our eyes to heights as yet unfound,
"To be rather than to seem," her motto, this our guiding star.
Which s:ade our path of duty brighter, and shed its gleam afar.
Now day by day our ladder, with timber fashioned strong and true.
Till framed with perfect symmetry the high school came to our view.
Sublime now our high school visions loomed aloft and shadowy glowed.
Regrets for leaving friends we love, now both joy and pain on flowed.
Xow how proudly we clung as after many a year at length,
(Every hour with us well spent), our ladder had grown in form and
strength,
If the interest in our lessons languished just a little here.
If the anger of great teachers did not rouse in us great fear.
Kind friends and fellow citizens, can you blame ns scarce at all.
For making this commotion over a boy named Homer Small?
For he had reached our ladder, and his energies he did bend
To beat us all in the climbing to this great and noble end, r:
And let me explain to you, It takes a grand good fight
It takes some hard, true studying and working with your might
To keep upon the golden ladder, and not expect to fall.
When you are working by the side of a boy named Homer Small
Then here was our class increased by a maid entering the High School,
Lorayne Kemp who helped us faithfully to keep each day the rule,
A most reserved and quiet maiden she journeying apart
Though helping always when she could, in the goodness of her heart.
Then with what joy and glad surprise, no artist's pen can portray.
When, another lad appeared, gave hi3 name as Robert McKay.
This friend of our adoption tried, has proved he has greater worth.
Than many other boys of his age not blessed with fun and mirth.
Robert so manly, true, and strong, never cries when hi -?c sing,
We have learned to try his rule, and laugh like him iv,-,ry thing.
Scarce would be this ode complete, without mention of one maiden,
With whom I am quite familiar, she this ladder too did laden,
She has ever journeyed with me, ever journeyed by my side.
And I am not ashamed to say that in her I felt great pride pride-That
That pride-That she has at least been able up the ladder thus to follow
For you've read the little story that all children's heads are hollow?
Often times has Wynona felt was this legend true of her.
As with hygiene and history, and with astromomic mystery
Algebra and geometry, latin and trigonometry, she has rammed it In and
crammed it in
And still her head is hollow.
Filled with Latin and with French a toilsome March began for u
How the midnight oil we burned, that our teachers might not fuss
Though Miss Reynolds and Miss Sims -helped make the fight seem less
severe,
A helping hand they always gave, for they ruled by love, not by fear.
Xow Miss Reynolds and Miss McKeowen held for us a strong light
Mr. Milne led us 'onward helped us rise to a loftier height,
Then two teachers much respected our Miss Bartlett and Miss Mays
In our Cicero and physics encouraged us by their praise.
And as we the immortal class stand poised for an unknown fight
Misses Abernathy, Scott and Dean hold for us the glad light.
Now at last we have reached the end of our most beloved High School
To our companions I should say, we have gladly kept each rule.
How hard to think we now must part with dear teachers true and kind,
Of our lives they have been a part, to our faults they have been
most blind.
Never shall this class forget them, who by their kindness cheered us.
Though many cares beset them, they have by their wisdom steered. us.
Thus 'tis finished and now on to victory is our glad cry,
With our strong faith undaunted, as our banner we wave on high
"As with much pain and sadness, much of joy and much of gladness
With all that fills the hearts of friends, when first they feel With
secret pain, their lives henceforth have separated ends and never
can be one again."
"For one thing thou perceivest, which makes thy love most strong.
To love that well which thou must leave ere long."

PROPHECY FOR THE CLASS OP
1914
GLADYS WALLIS
Ocala, Fla., July 10, 1928.
Dear Mr. Workman:
I hear that you are now spending
your summer months teaching at
Peabody College 'and selecting your
famous Tennessee teachers for the
next year's session of the Ocala high
school. Please do not make any ar arrangements
rangements arrangements for teaching there next
year, for we just must have a reun reunion
ion reunion of our class, and it would be in incomplete
complete incomplete without you.
I am now in Ocala again, having
just returned from a trip around the
world. Last night I took down my
old grammar school geography from
a high shelf, and as I gently pulled
it down, dozens of Its ragged leaves
fell fluttering to the floor In a cloud
of dust. Naturally I turned to a
map of the world and with a pencil
traced my journey along the page,
which was dirty with childish finger fingerprints.
prints. fingerprints. To think, that we the class
of 1914 once many years ago, when
its girls wore pig tails and its boys
wore short trousers, bent over that
very map and wished that the world
were not so large, for then there
would be less study. Large Indeed,
it seemed then arid they little dream dreamed
ed dreamed that some day in the near future
the members of that class would be
scattered far and wide over its sur surface.
face. surface. While on my trip I either met
or heard of all my classmates, but
all were many miles apart. I would
enjoy giving you a minute account
of my various experiences, but since
it is impossible, I shall only tell you
of the record since 1914 of those
students of that class, of whom you
will still think whenever you view
your gray hairs in your mirror.
Before starting out I paid a shor
visit to my sister, Theodosia, in Al Albany,
bany, Albany, N. Y. As I suppose you have
heard that Theodosia married a wid widower
ower widower about sixty years old who has
seventeen children. He is quite
wealthy, however, and is a model
husband. Theodosia is perfectly
happy rearing model children. Their
table manners are perfect, and they

always answer her "yes, mam,' and
"thank you." ,.t .'
After leaving NewYork, I started
for Alaska, stopping on my way to
spend a few days in each of the larg largest
est largest cities thru which I passed. A
week was spent in that cold country,
after which I crossed the Bering
Strait, by way of the new Bering
Strait tunnel, which has recently
been completed. As I sat comfort comfortably
ably comfortably on the train and knew that
great blocks of Ice floated over my
head, I thought how great Is man,
and how great was the man who car carried
ried carried this work thru. Did you real realize
ize realize when you were teaching Homer
Small the fundamentals of measures
and angles, that you were laying the
foundation of the success of the
greatest civil engineer of modern
times? No doubt, some day in the
near future, the entire map of the
world will be altered by this wonder wonderful
ful wonderful brain.
The climate in northern Siberia
was even colder than Alaska, but
when I reached China I found it to
be delightful. I next made a quick
visit to sunny Japan. One day I was
attracted by an arch of blooming
flowers. After I had passed under
the fragrant shelter, I came to an
equally picturesque cottage. My
guide pointed out to me a sign on
the door, "The American Beauty
Doctor. Come In and learn' how Am American
erican American women grow beautiful.r I had
read a number of magazine articles
on the fad of Japanese women, who
wished to look like Americans. As
I was anxious to know how this was
done, I entered the cottage. A num number
ber number of Japanese women were reclin reclining
ing reclining in chairs before large mirrors.
One patient was undergoing the pro process
cess process of having her face peeled. An Another
other Another had tiny weights fastened to
the end of her eyes and eye brows,
which seemed to be causing her
much suffering. These and all of
the other patients were undergoing
equally painful operations and were
attended by young Japanese girls,
whom I at first thought were Ameri Americans.
cans. Americans. When the wonderful beauty
doctor stepped forth to meet us, I
recognized her as my old classmate.

MISS GLADYS WALLIS
Lcrayne Kemp. She was quite as
surprised to see me as I was to find
her in this queer business. We spent
the rest "of the day talking over our
good old school days, when our
hearts knew no care- and no sorrow
had never knocked at our door.
That evening I reluctantly parted
from Lorayne and the next day I left
Japan.
My next visit was to the Philip Philippine
pine Philippine Islands. Manila is a second
New York, and one night as I sat in
a brilliantly lighted restaurant, I
felt as though I were In the United
States once again. At that moment
several United States naval officers
entered and took the table next to
us. A few minutes later a beautiful
young girl entered and cast a smile
in the direction of the officers.
l"Oh, they all do that," remarked
the tall officer with his back turned
to us. "There must be some thing
very compelling- about my appear appearance.
ance. appearance. When I was a boy In high
school I had a terrible time dodging
the girls, for I did not find it at all
convenient to keep up wth.more
than six in the same town at the
same time. Although I never was a
Latin student, the girls all flocked
around my desk during the period to
read Latin; and when I played the
piano I had difficulty in breathing,
UU HVV.UUU L Ul LUC H11UU Ul gll 19 VUI
lected." "Carlton Irvin," I scream screamed
ed screamed aloud. "See," he remarked care carelessly,
lessly, carelessly, "there goes another one after
me." Then he turned around and
recognized me. The next day Carl Carlton
ton Carlton showed me the U. S. fleet which
rested in the port of -Manila, and
some of his -brother' officers told me
of Carlton's bravery in the great war
our country had with Mexico a few few-years
years few-years ago.
" After leaving the Philippine Is Islands
lands Islands I made a long, Interesting trip
thru A6ia and 'Europe. I did not
meet another classmate until I was
on English soil. While in Westmin Westminster
ster Westminster Abbey, viewing the graves of
those grand old poets, who contrib contributed
uted contributed so mch to our world's litera literature;
ture; literature; and the name of not only king kingly
ly kingly kings, but those from whose
names our memory recoils, I met an another
other another of that class, who with me had
struggled thru the lives of those
very great men. This classmate was
Annie Pope Eagleton. The third year
after she graduated, she was pre
sented at the English court and the
next year she married the Duke of
Bellerose. I spent several days with
Annie Pope at her magnificent castle
on the Thames, be'fore I left Eng England.
land. England. My next lengthy stop after cross crossing
ing crossing the English channel, was in gay
Paris. One night when I was worn
out by my day's sightseeing, I sought
a theater for the evening's entertain entertainment.
ment. entertainment. The main feature of the pro-
A. l .1 l M
Parisian artist. The curtain rose; a
faint red light shown on the stage; a
crash of music, and from one side of
the stage appeared a wonderful fiery'
flash, after encircling the stage, stop stopped
ped stopped for a moment before the foot footlights.
lights. footlights. I caught my breath, 'for the
beautiful creature in the red-spangled
ballet dress was no other than
Gladys Martin. I had no time to
ponder over my surprise, for my
Tit"i1ti van fn a whirl fnllrtwfnv
quick movements of the dancer as
she twirled now here, and now there,
on the stage. After the performance
I had a long conversation with
Gladys, who said, "No wonder I was
never able to read Virgil. I have
heard of books giving people pleas pleasure,
ure, pleasure, but none have ever inspired me
like the glow of the footlights."
"Yes," she continued, "I have at
last found my vocation in life and
never intend to desert it."
Well, as to my own thoughts, I al
ways knew that Gladys would at attempt
tempt attempt to make a name for herself,
but I never dreamed she would do it
by toe dancing.
Although Paris was wonderful, I
visited many other cities throughout
Europe which were quite as interest interesting.
ing. interesting. I had intended going to Naples,
bu the city was quarantined because
or a piague wnicn nad been raging
for several months.
While passing thru Italy I picked



THE C.I, KVKVIVO STAR. 3IOXDAT, 3LY 25, 1914

l a

4 "if
.5 fi.
2 "S ?
j
MISS LORAYNE KEMP
up a paper with the bold headlines:
"A Second Florence Nightengale,
the Florida Girl who Saved so Many Many-lives,
lives, Many-lives, in the American-Mexican .War,
Is now devoting her life to fever
stricken Italians! Her common
name thruout the hospital is Saint
Rexiel This did not surprise me,
for Rexie's sweet, amiable disposi disposition
tion disposition had caused her to be loved by
all who knew her in her school days,
and had learned before of her work
In America.
Of all the historical places I had
seen, none thrilled me like the town
of Bethlehem. As I visited its ruins
I thought of the beautiful story of
the star that guided the three wise
men to the manger, where the little
Christ child lay. How vividly Miss
Nellie Stevens had. In her sweet
clear voice, told it many years ago
to that room full of little tots, who,
with eager ear3 and shining eyes,
had received the glad message of
Christmas-tide. Though they may
be scattered over the world and vex vexed
ed vexed by many troubles, none can for forget
get forget the words of the angels repeated
'by their first teacher, "Peace on
earth and good will unto men."
After viewing other places of the
Holy Land, I crossed to Africa by
way of the tunnel under the Isthmus
of Suez. -Strange to say, I met Wyn Wyn-ona
ona Wyn-ona Wtatherbee on the, train. She
had gone to Africa to do missionary
work. There are a band of savages
called 'Bushmen, who live in and
around the Kalahari desert. These
men have never been fully civilized
and in the last few years they have
sunk into an even lower state, for
they are now massacreing all who
dare approach their territory. When
I met Wynona I did not know this
for r would never have allowed my
self to become bo interested in her
work as to accompany her on this
special mission. I did not know it,
however, and Wynona and I arrived
at one of their little villages. The
village seemed deserted, but loud
shouts came from a near-by! forest
We directed our course towaTds the
noise, but mine was suddenly stop
ned short by the sight of 'several
hundred black men brandishing kniv
es and dancing around a big fire. As
the fire burned more fiercely, the
water boiled more furiously and I
srew more frightened for on the
ground near the fire lay a white man
with bound hands and feet. I shud shuddered
dered shuddered and grew faint for I could al almost
most almost see myself boiling in that very
pot. In my fright I; had forgotten
Wynona until I saw the savages bru brutally
tally brutally binding her hands. I shudder
ed again as I thought of the rich
soup that three people would, make
so I closed my eyes and began to
pray expecting at any moment to be
pitched in the boiling pot. As I
prayed I became conscious that the
shrieks had ceased and looking out
from my hiding place I was amazed
to see the natives prostrating them
selves on the ground before Wynona.
I could not hear what she wras saying
but I knew that she was delivering
her message and it was being well
received. Soon- the chief cut the
bonds from Wynona's hands and re released
leased released the other captive. In the
meantime I quietly left the scene.
Late that afternoon I wias joined by
Wynona whom I immediately inform informed
ed informed that I intended leaving for Africa
as soon as I could.
I continued my journey by Tail un until
til until I reached the Cape of Cood Hope.
From there I crossed to Cape Horn
by means of an areoplane. The trip
was. delightful and the longest that
I had ever taken through the air. I
spent one night in a little village of
Argentina. I say village, well it con consisted
sisted consisted of a station, general variety
store and post-office combined and
boarding house. At the station a
cow-boy from a neighboring ranch
who had come In a rickety old wagon
for the mail, seeing my bewilder bewilderment,
ment, bewilderment, offered to drive me to the
boarding house, he entertained me on
the road by teling me about his land landlady.
lady. landlady. "Yes mam," he said, "she is
a fine lady she is and that woman's
got more book sense than any one
in South America. Yes mam she
married and that's the trouble. You
see her husband he is so lazy that
he don't see no use in him working

at all when she can make so much
money taking boarders so all he
does is just sit around the store and
talk about what a smart wife he's

jifCL Yes, 'all of us cow-boys board
I with her." As I approached the
1 house. I' saw a very stout woman in a
j blue pereal dress and a red sunbon sunbon-j
j sunbon-j net sleeping the front steps. When
I she saw me she exclaimed, "Bless
my soul if it is not Gladys-Wallis."
lit wa3 then I recognized Alice Sex-
l ton. After 'supper Alice anl I dis
cussed the ups and downs of 1913
and 14 and the various fortunes of
our school mates. Her husband is
not at all tad. Why he can tell the
funniest jokes I have ever heard and
play the mouthharp beautifully.
It grieved me to leave Alice but I
was homesick for the United States
so I postponed all the sight seeing
which I had planned in South Amer America
ica America and hastened to Florida. I did
not return by water, but came up
through Mexico, across" the Rio
Grande and the Southern states.
On my way to Ocala I was delay delayed
ed delayed a few hours In Chattahoochee by
a train wreck, and there I went
through the asylum. While, view viewing
ing viewing the building I was disturbed by
one shriek after another. As they in increased
creased increased I was reminded of the
screams of little Nellie Beckham in
the days of so long ago. Uust then
on. my tour through the building I
came to the cell where the shrieking
patient was confined. There was a
little thin woman tearing her gol golden
den golden hair and screaming, ."Stop it, I
say quit!" The keeper remarked,
"They say when she was a girl she
was cruelly tantalized by her friends
who were more fortunate in size, so
she had a continual struggle to de defend
fend defend herself. Later in life she lost
her mind on the subject of woman's
rights and. is now in a serious con condition."
dition." condition." This remark of the keeper
made me sure that the patient was
really Nellie Beckham so I begged to
be admitted. Rushing in I took the
pathetic little figure In my arms,
"Nellie," I said, "don't you remem remember
ber remember me?" She at once recognized me
and grew quiet. Then we discussed
those good old school days. She
seemed perfectly happy as I recalled
to her mind Miss Abernathy's scheme
of putting one student on a bench so
that no one might hear his neigh neighbor
bor neighbor think aloud in Latin, Miss Scott's
order. "Every one who is chewing
gum go to the window and throw it
out." iMiss Dean's byword, "Rise
quietly in your seats," and then last
but'not least your own expression,
"Students ycu have these parts ball balled
ed balled up In your head just like scrambl scrambled
ed scrambled eggs." All these things she re
membered well, and then I told her
the fortune of each of her classmates.
"Carlton," I said, "is the same old
Carlton." At that, she at once began
shrieking again and the keeper sent
me away, feeling quite blue over the
late of my once gay little school
chum.
I reached home today and made
a visit to the O. H. S. Not the
splendid building which the Ocala
students attend to-day, but our dear
old wooden 'building where our class
spent its happiest hours together. Al Although
though Although the present structure of brick
may contain many brave hearts, with
all of its size and grandeur will nev never
er never produce a greater number who
struggled more bravely to do their
duty and to reach their goal, for on
the roll "of fame there are the names
of many of those, who received
their first inspiration for nobler
things in the walls of that old build building.
ing. building. As I passed out of the gate I
looked down at my feet expecting
to see a deep sink in the limestone
walk. That sink which had in rainy
weather formed an impassable pond
was there no longer but in its place
was an evenly built cement walk. I
lingered to view that once lively girls
campus. No spot over all the world
seems so beautiful to my eyes.
Those trees, under which we once
in picnic fashion, enjoyed our mid midday
day midday lunch, have spread their shading
branches above the now overgrown
basket-ball grounds. The basket basketball
ball basketball posts are lying on the ground,
and the benches on which we once
gathered to translate Virgil are there
no more. I then turned my eyes to
the boys campus. That ground
which was once deep dust, caused by
many boyish feet attempting to the
loved foot-ball, is now overgrown
with grass; and the fence, the cause
of many boys punishment for jump jumping
ing jumping it, is now falling to pieces.
I turned away from the deserted
scene with a feeling of sadness as I
realized, as I stood there the sole rep
resentative of the class of 1914, that
never again would ihose walls re
sound with our noisy tramp, nor the
campus with our merry shrieks.
Now let me tell you the plan for
the summer. When 1 was in Eng England
land England Annie Pope told me that she
intends to have a house party next
May at her castle to celebrate the
fifteenth anniversary of the com commencement
mencement commencement of the class of 1914.;
am writing to beg you to accept
her invitation, and to take with you 1
your red back Montgomery's English

Y
It 1 -'.; l

MISS NELLIE BECKHAM
AX APPRECIATION OF j
SIDNEY LANIER
NELLIE BECKHAM
"As the marsh-hen secretly builds
on the watery sod.
Behold I will build me a nest on the
greatness of God,
I will fly In the greatness of Cod, as
the marsh-hen flies.
In the freedom that fills all the
space 'twixt the marsh and
the skies;
By so many roots as" the marsh
grass sends in the sod,
I will heartily lay me a hold on the
greatness of God."
To some souls it is given to at attain
tain attain heights of spiritual beauty that
are too high and too far for the av average
erage average mortal to do more than
glimpse; but these favored ones
with their divinely bestowed gifts
have a message which opens to us
wide horizons of transcendant beau beauty,
ty, beauty, If we keep our hearts pure to
feel and mr vision clear to see.
Such a one of these favored spirits
was Sidney Lanier. His life, all too
brief, was, with jthe exception of
the last few yars, given to a con continual
tinual continual struggle against adverse cir circumstances.
cumstances. circumstances. Thii struggle was not so
much against poverty as against un uncongenial
congenial uncongenial surroundings..
At the age of fourteen he entered
Oglethorpe College, and here began
the development of his consciousness
of possessing real genius. One with
this gift has a right to know it, just
as others know if they possess tal tal-lent
lent tal-lent or versatility. Only once or
twice in his own private note book
when it was needful in sickness and
in loneliness to strengthen her will
and his by testifying his own deep deepest
est deepest consciousness of power, did he
whisper the assurance of his
strength. iBut he knew it and she
kenw it, and It gave his will a peace
in toil, a sunlit peace, notwithstand notwithstanding
ing notwithstanding sickness and want and misap misapprehension,
prehension, misapprehension, calm above the zone of
clouds.
When only a boy eighteen years
old, after having discovered his gen genius
ius genius for music and having debated
the question of his life work he
wrote in his college note book:
"The point I wish to settle is mere merely
ly merely hy what method shall I ascertain
what I am fit for, as preliminary, to
ascertaining God's will with refer reference
ence reference to me; or what my inclinations
are as Introductory to finding out
what my capacities are, that is,
what I am fit for. I cannot bring
myself to believe that I was intended
for a musician, because it seems so
small a business in comparison with
other things which it seems to me I
might do. Question here: 'What is
the province of music in the econo economy
my economy of the world?'
His earliest passion was for music,
and as a child he learned to play
almost without instruction on every
instrument he could find. He de devoted
voted devoted himself to the flute in defer deference
ence deference to his father who feared for
him the powerful fascination of the
violin. In after years more than
one listener remarked the strange
violin effects which he conquered
from the flute. His devotion to mus music
ic music rather alarmed than pleased his
friends, and, while it was here that
he first discovered that he possessed
decided genius, he for some time
shared the early notion of his par parents
ents parents that it was an unworthy pur pursuit,
suit, pursuit, and he rather supressed. his
taste. He did not know by what in inheritance
heritance inheritance it had come to him, nor
did he realize how worthy is the art.
The breaking out of the war sum summoned
moned summoned Lanier from books to the
army, and during those years of
strife he played the part of a true
soldier of the South. Lanier's con constitution
stitution constitution was delicate; the exposures
and hardships of war developed the
seeds of tuberculosis, which he
fought heroically through young
manhood and into middle life, and
to which he finally succumbed.
History and there amid the histori historical
cal historical surroundings we will tell you once
why kings have their heads cut off
and together we will make pilgrim pilgrimages
ages pilgrimages to their graves.

1
I In December 1S67, he was mar married
ried married to Miss Mary Day. Their mar marriage
riage marriage was ideal. His affection to toward
ward toward his wife is expressed in several
poems. What could be more beau-
tiful than the love -voiced in the
, "Evenin? Song." or in the poem
r called "My Springs," in which he
coameamorates the beaury of her
eyes?
; "Dear eyesdear eyes and rare com com-i
i com-i plete,
Being heavenly-sweet and earthly-
sweet,
' I marvel that God made you mine,
j For when he frowns 'tis then ye

shine."
During the last ten years of his
life, although suffering from great
bodily weakness and in the clutches
of a fatal malady, he claimed for
himself the privilege of devotion to
the twin arts,( music and poetry.
In 1873, in a letter to his wife from
San Antonio, whither he had gone
in search of health, he wrote:
"Were it not for some circum circumstances
stances circumstances which make such a propo proposition
sition proposition absurd In the highest degree,
I would think that I am shortly to
die, and that my spirit hath been
singing Its swan-song before disso dissolution.
lution. dissolution. All day my soul hath been
cutting swiftly into the great space
of the subtle unspeakable deep driv driven
en driven by wind after wind of heavenly
melody. The inner spirit and es essence
sence essence of all windsongs, bird-songs,
and body-songs hath blown upon me
in 'quick gusts like the breath of
passion, and sailed me into a. sea of
vast dreams, whereof each wave is
at once a vision and a melody."
Again in the fall of the same year
he wrote from Baltimore to his
father, who would have had him re return
turn return to his home in Macon, prac practice
tice practice law with him and share his in income:
come: income: "I have given your last letter the
fullest and most careful considera consideration.
tion. consideration. After doing so I feel sure that
Macon is not the place for me. If
you could taste the delicious crys crystalline
talline crystalline air and the champagne breeze
that I've just been1 rushing about in,
I am equally sure that In point of
climate you would agree with me
that my chance for life is ten times
as great here as in Macon. Then,
as to business, why should I, nay,
how can I settle myself down to a
third rate struggling lawyer for the
balance of my little life, as long as
there is a certainty almost absolute
that I can do something so much
better? My dear father, think how
for twenty years through poverty,
through pain, through weariness,
through sickness, through all dis discouragement
couragement discouragement of being wholly unac unacquainted
quainted unacquainted with literary people and lit literary
erary literary ways, I say, think how In
spite of all these depressing circum circumstances,
stances, circumstances, and of a thousand more
which I could enumerate, these two
figures of music and poetry have
steadily kept in my heart, so that I
could not banish them. Does it not
seem to you as to me, that I begin to
have the right to enroll myself
among the devotees of these two
sublime arts, after having followed
them so long and so humbly, and
through so much bitterness?"
One can well believe that with a
man like Lanier such a choice had in
it the solemnity of a consecration.
His ideal of art in the broad sense,
whether literary or other, was so lof
ty that a dedication of himself to the
service was the most serious of acts
Nor, through adversity, stress and
failure, did he for a moment swerve
from that ideal; he held himself as
a very priest of beauty dignifying
at once himself and his calling.
Thought not what would be call
ed a religious writer, Lanier's large
and deep thought took him to deep
est spiritual faiths and the vastness
of nature drew him to a trust in the
infinite above us. How naturally
his great faith in God finds expres expression
sion expression In his "Marshes" of Glynn."
"Ye lisperers, whisperers, singers in
storms,
Ye consciences murmuring faiths un under
der under forms,
Ye ministers meet for each passion
that grieves.
Friendly, sisteTly, sweetheart leaves.
Oh rain me down from your darks
that contain me,
Wisdoms ye winnow from winds that
pain me,
Sift down tremors of sweet-withln-sweet.
That advise me of more than they
bring repeat
Me the wood smell that swiftly but
now brought breath
From the heaven side bank of the
river of death,
Teach me the terms of silence,
preach me
The passion of patience, sift me, im-
. peach me,
And there. Oh there.
As ye hang with your myriad palms
upturned in the air,
Pray me myriad prayer."
With such words upon his lips
Sidney Lanier would embrace his
great man-bodied oak in the marsh-j

MISS ANNIE POPE "EAGLETON
es which is known today as Lanier's
Oak, and with these feelings In his
breast he would worship God through
nature.
Some years ago a band of pilgrims
journeyed to the Holy Land. Sitting
upon the Mount of Olives they dis discussed
cussed discussed what in all secular litera literature
ture literature was the supreme expression of
Calvary.. Of the forty-four pilgrims
all but .Wo wrote Sidney Lanier's
"Ballad of Trees and the Master."
"Into the woods my Master went.
Clean forspent, forspent.
Into the woods my Master came.
Forspent with love and shame.
Rut th rHv thev vrero not hllnH tn
Him
1 1
The little gray leaves were kind to
...
AAA f
The thorn-tree had a mind to Him,
When out of the woods He came."
Out of the woods my Master went.
And He was well content.
Out of the woods my Master came
Content with death and' shame.
When Death and Shame would woo j
Him last,
From under the
trees they drew
Him last. j
'Twas on a tree they slew Him last
1
When out of the woods He came.
His life at this time reminds us of
Robert Louis Stevenson. Both La Lanier
nier Lanier and Stevenson did their great greatest
est greatest literary work while' making a
pitifully brave fight for life.- Each
realized he had a message for the
world, and they equally realized how
short was their time. To some of
the elect of the earth is given the
means of expressing the beautiful
through the medium of one art, but
Sidney Lanier was given the power
to express himself equally well in
music and in' literature.
Death came all too soon and in
1881, in North Carolina where he
had gone in his endless search for
health, Lanier ceased to be and be became
came became a 'beautiful memory.
How short was his day, and how
slender his opportunity! From the
time he was of age he waged a con constant,
stant, constant, courageous fight against phy physical
sical physical weakness and misfortune for
freedom to live and write. Much
very dear and sweet and sympathet sympathetic
ic sympathetic helpfulness, he met in the city of
his adoption and from friends else elsewhere,
where, elsewhere, "but he could not command
the time and leisure which might
have lengthened his life, and given
him opportunity to write the music
and verses with which his soul was
teeming. Yet short as was his lit literary
erary literary life and hindered though it
was, its fruit will fill a large space
in the garnering of the poetic art ot
his country.
The culmination of Lanier's art
and thought and spiritual force
found in the "Hymns of the Marsh Marshes"
es" Marshes" two of which "Sunrise" and
"The Marshes of Glynn" are magni magnificent
ficent magnificent organ chants of a dying man,
never so strong of soul as when his
body hung by a thread of life. The
finest of this great series, a'majestic
swan-song, his "Sunrise," was writ written
ten written when Lanier lay so weak that he
could scarcely lift his hand:
"Ever the artist, ever more large
and bright
Than the eye. of a man may avail of
manifold one,
I must pass from thy face, I must
pass from the face of the
sun.
Old Want is awake and agog, every
wrinkle a frown;
The worker must pass to his work
in the terrible town;
But I fear not, nay, I fear not the
thing to be done;
I am strong with the strength of my
Lord, the Sun;
How dark, how dark soever the race
that must needs be run
I am lit with the Sun."
"And ever my heart through the
night shall with knowledge
abide thee,
And ever by day shall my spirit as
one that hath tried thee,
Labor at leisure, In art, till yonder
beside thee.
My soul shall float, friend Sun,
The day being done."
With this consummate expression
of his genius still under his hand,

t -
j the pen fell from his grasp, and
! Lanier's radiant .spirit freed from
the frail body that held it so lightlj.
j returned to ba'sk forever, in .the light'
"of the sun he loved.

THE HUMKLK ORIGIN OF GREAT
HOMER SMALL :
Great men! Who are the world's
great men? How have they achiev achieved
ed achieved greatness? Some, when conditions
were favorable, when everything-
the world at large seemed to lend
aid; others, when no conditfons were
favorable, when their whole lives
were a struggle, and the path to
w HW UQa UU
toilsome.
Men are always eager to hear the
stories of heroes and great men; of :
those who have overcome dlQcul dlQcul-ites,
ites, dlQcul-ites, surmounted obstacles, and won
the race in the face of all discourage discouragement;
ment; discouragement; the stories of men who, by
their ceaseless and undaunted strag straggles,
gles, straggles, have lifted the liberty loving
nations from the depths of bondage
and oppression, and have brought
k m era Liirr iim rniu ni a w rm
and independence.
We admire the success of men
who start with many : advantages.',.
and. TPfnslnP tn cnpnH t)ir rlira In
indolent ease, are stimulated to
great .exertion oy great opportunl-
ties. But we stand amazed before -the
success of those who begin .with"'
-nothing except the capital. of charac-'
jter and capacity for hard work and
'end on the heights of usefulness and
-
.honor; men who have no encourage-
ment except that Innate feeling and
desire for success and fame; men
who are striving not for wealth and.
luxuries, but for the uplift' of the
human race; men who begin life in
(the lowest depths of obscurity and
(finish in the searchlight of fame.
j There is no mystery about suc
cess; no intervention of genii or
I fairies; no luck nor chance. The
theory that success is a matter of ac accident
cident accident and that opportunities come
lunsougni, nas Deen aisprovea 07 ute
lives of heroes, who have aspired,
labored, dared and "achieved; heroes
who knew nothing of luck and acci-
dent, but who knew all of eaercy.
Integrity, courage and faith.
' The world looks very hard to the
poor, uneducated young man; every everybody
body everybody is preoccupied; all places ar
filled. He feels that all men are
banded together to Keep him out.
But let him show a little heroic qual quality
ity quality and men are quick to make place
for him; let him put vigor, pluck.
hnnaolv nnn inrAilfMnoa Intn nil
work, and doors begin to open, un
der the pressure of hit strong hand
Far back in the northern bill of
Minnesota rises the mighty ?tf l!fi?
slppi, a river noted, not for ber
scenery- and beauty, but for her
enormous influence on commerce,
agriculture and transportation; a
river which penetrates the heart of
the greatest grain producing sectloa
of fw world, and hv whn wittrt
the grain of this section is' conveyed
into the Gulf of Mexico and theno
to all oarts of the world.' The oeov
pie near the source of this great rir rir-er
er rir-er receive comparatively little value
from her but as her mlzfctv water
pursue their course and she is Join-
ed by many sister rivers she becomes
of inestimable value not only to this
a, . .
section, uui 10 tue wnoie worm, a ub -farther
she flows, the wider becomes
her bed, the greater her depth, the
more powerful her force, the liff-
thef towns, the richer the fields and
f h flnpr thp rrnn r mi rf sttarl liv tisr
So it is with thea: great man of
humble origin; in his early life. of -poverty
and hardships, he is of lit little
tle little importance to -his neighbors, but
as time passes his great deeds and
n-nrVi hjwnma nhrlnm m nnlanl.'
ble to the people and to the world;
Vi a la Tin lAnnr trtn stHlott nf
tempt and scorn, but Is honored and
venerated by all. But this is not the
end of his unceasing glory and re renown,
nown, renown, for his name is recorded in
the histories of great men, and his
memory is held sacred more and
more, by each succeeding generation.
In the words of Carlyle: "An educat educated
ed educated man stands,' as it were. In the
midst of a boundless arsenal and
Uia$UiUV, UI1CU HiLU Bti cue cajjuu,
in4 onirlnoa irTiirTi man's k11 hft
been able to devise from the earliest
time; and he works, accordingly,
with the strength borrowed from all
past ages. How different Is his state
who stands on the outside of the
storehouse, and feels that its gates
must be stormed, or remain forever
closed against him! His means are
the commonest and rudest; the mere
work done is no measure of bis
strength. A dwarf behind his steam
engine may remove mountains; but
no dwarf will hew them down with,
a pickaxe; and he must be a Titan
that hurls them abroad with his.
arms."
In this image of a Titan, Robert
Burns presents himself, with no
greater incentive to knowledge than,
(Conculded on "Eight Page)



SIX

THK OCALu EVENING STAR, MONDAY, MAY 25. 1914
MARIO "JUL NTT DIRECTORY

AMES

AD

UK

Used exclusively In the con construction
struction construction of the Panama
Canal and the great Keokuk
dam in Iowa.
Government Engineers know
their business.
Fresh stock always on hand.

lnvcodmar Sand
& Stone Co.

PHONE 331.

Of Institutions, Finns, People and
Phones Most Often Called in
Ocala
The following condensed tele telephone
phone telephone directory is published for the
benefit of the Star's readers. No
charge is made for any of the entries

in it. It covers the city depart

ments, the railroads and telegraph

Bul-

Judge Circuit Court S.

ock. Ocala.
Clerk Circuit Conrt P. H. Xngent.
Ocala.
Sheriff J. P. Galloway, Ocala.
lax Collector V. L. Colbert,
Ocala.
Tax Assessor Alfred Ayer, Ocala
Treasurer John M. Graham
Ocala.
Surveyor W. A. Moorhead. Ocala
Judge of Prolate Wm. E. Smith
Ocala.
County Commissioners C. Carmi

jchael, Ocaia; J. W. Davis. Summer

field; V, t. Henderson. Lynne; D. G
Watkii. Dunnellon; Walte- LuF
man, Sparr.
Board Public lEructica -J. n

Mclver & MacKay
, Funeral Directors
UUDERTAKERS and EMBALMERS
Fine Caskets and Burial Robes
D. E. McIVER and C V. ROBERTS
Funeral Directors
HI Work Done by. Licensed. Em Em-balmers
balmers Em-balmers and Fully Guaranteed
PHONES:
D. E. McIVER. .104
C V. ROBERTS. 805
Undertaking Office 47

offices, the offices and residences of

on j r, f . Brinson, Superintenatnc. Ocala: ,B
all the doctors in the city, the hos- mitcn BiVtchtoa: j. 5. Grantham

pital and trained nurses in fact, all
the poitts likely to be most needed. iiows THIS
A directory i3 attached to each! We offer One Hundred Dollars Re-
. ward for any case of Catarrh that
phone, but people often have occas-cannot be cJred by Hairs Catarfh
ion to learn a telephone number j Cure. F. J. Chenney & Co., Toledo,

when they are at a distance from t Ohio.

PdDIMir

both the 'phone and the book, and it
is principally for the convenience of
these that the directory is published.
A. C. Li. passenger station 370

A. C. L. freight office

99

Annex Drugstore 279

123
1
361
381
141

Anti-Monopoly Drugstore ....
Banner
Brigance, City Marshal. . J.
Board of Trade
Brinson, school superintendent

Carlisle's Drugstore 424

Court Pharmacy

284

City Hall 303

Commercial Bank .

County jail

Dr. Dozier
Dr. Dozier, residence

122
35
41
69

We the undersigned, have known

F. J. Cheney for the last 15 years,
and believe him perfectly honorable
in all business transactions and fi financially
nancially financially able to carry out any ob obligations
ligations obligations made by his firm.
National Bank of Commerce,
Toledo. Ohio.
Hall's Catarrh Cure is taken internal internally
ly internally directly upon the biood and mu mucous
cous mucous surfaces of the system. Testi Testimonials
monials Testimonials sent free. Price 75 cents
per bottle. Sold by all druggists.
Take Hall's Family Pills for con constipation.
stipation. constipation. Adv.

ADVERTISEMENT FOR RIDS

Dr. E. Van Hood 324
Dr. E. Van Hood, residence. 164

'Dr. Counts .' '. 427

P. D. DELL
CONTRACTOR and BUILDER.
Estimates on any kind 4
of Building furnished on
short notice. AH work
guaranteed.
117 N. SANCHEZ STREET.
P. O. BOX. NO. 438.
PHONE NO. 368 OCALA ?

Notice is hereby fe'en that the
board of public Instruction for the
county of. Marion, state of Florida,
until 2 o'clock p. m., June 5, 1914,
will receive sealed bids for the erec erection
tion erection of an addition to Ocala primary

These Magnificent Estates will be Sacrificed In Little
Farms and As Whole ;
The EffigDn Ktolsu? Warns

Awmm

m ip, ua.

Dr. Counts, residence 349! school building, and plumbing of

Dr. J. W. Hood
Dr. J. W. Hood, residence...
Dr. Izlar t
Dr. Izlar, residence
Dr. Land
Dr. Lane, residence
Dr. Lindner
Dr. McClane
Dr. McClane, residence.
Dr. Newsom
Dr. Xewsom, residence
Dr. Peek .
Dr. Peekj residence.
Dr. Smith
Dr. Smith, residence
Dr. Thompson
Dr. Von Engelken
Dr. Von Engelken, residence.
Dr. Watt

1 uii I
niiAMr tt

rnuwt
c Ocala Iron Works
...

Dr. Walters... 78
Dr. Walters, residence 495
Dr. Wilson, colored. .......... 404
Dr. Hughes, colored. ....... 185
Dr. R. R. Williams (colored). 369
EVENING STAR 51
Electric Light Plant......... 66x
Elks Club 176
FIRE STATION ... 60
Florida House 133

203; said addition, situated in the city of
295 Ocala, Florida, according to plans
11 and specifications prepared by Mc Mc-71
71 Mc-71 'iver & MacKay, which will be on file

in the office of the superintendent of
public instruction at the Marion
county courthouse, in Ocala, Florida,
on and after May 9, 1914, copies of
which may be obtained from the ar architects
chitects architects by making deposit for same
at their office in Ocala, Florida. Bids
may be made for either the erection
of said addition, or the plumbing of
same, separately, or bids may be
made for both jointly. A deposit in
the form of a certified check in the
sum of five per cent of the amount
thereof much accompany each bid.
The said beard reserves the right to
reject any or all bids. Bids should
be mailed to J. H. Brinson, secre secretary,
tary, secretary, Ocala, Florida.
The Board of Public Instruction for
the County of Marion, State of
Florida, By J. H. Brinson,
5-6-tf Secretary.

422
477
78
333
407
512
186
468
301
53
74
139
286
290
53

(iuidf Relief When
Utterly Worn 0t

Galloway, sheriff, residence
Harrington 'Hall Hotel
INFORMATION OPERATOR
TELEPHONE EXCHANGE .
Marion County Fair Grounds .

Avu W UU .J U-PVC&l U, KM Ml A. A CLU
MARION COUNTY HOSPITAL
Miss Gerard, trained nurse.
Miss Harwell, trained nurse .
Miss Washburn, trained nurse
Munroe & Chambliss Bank. .
Moose Club
Metropolitan Bank .........
OCALA EVENING STAR
Ocala Gas Co., office. ....

91

DEATH OP A WELD.
KNOWN UNION VETERAN

Zephyrhills, May 22. Captain W.

1- T A

32M wjwry, a wen- Known vieraasoi
the civil war, -died here last night,
142 after an Illness, from kidney troub troub-24?;le.
24?;le. troub-24?;le. 'He was" captain of the Sixty-

381 f second O..V. I.. He was 76 years
33 'old. His body -was shipped to his old
472nome iQ Roseville, Ohio, for burial.
4Y2S w' an son accompanied the

206
18

46a

363
51
61

Getting the Blood in Order
Is Required By Most
People.

If yoa think you have gone to smash and
lit only for the discard, try S. S. S. for the
blood. It will surprise you to know what
can be done for health once the blood is
released of the excess of body wastes that
keep it from exercising Its full measure of
bodily repair.
If -you feel played out, go to any drug
tore and ask for a bottle of S. S. S. Here
Is & remedy that gets at work In a twink twinkling
ling twinkling ; It just naturally rushes right into
your blood, scatters germs right and left,
up and down and sideways.
You feci better at once, not from a stim stimulant,
ulant, stimulant, not from the action of drugs, but
from the rational effect of a natural medi medicine.
cine. medicine. The Ingredients in S. S. S. serve the
active purpose of so stimulating the cellular
tissues of the body that they pick out from
the blood their own essential nutriment and
thus repair work begins at once. The relief
is general all over the system.
. Do not neglect to get a bottle of S. S. S.
today. It will make yon feel better In just
a few minutes. It Is prepared only In the
Icboratcry of The Swift Specific Co., 530
Swift BIdg.. Atlanta, Ga. Send for their
free bock telling of the many strange con conditions
ditions conditions that afnict the human family by
"ison of impoverished blood.

SUGAR HAMMOCK LANDS
Partridge Woodrow Company
gelling Agent
Merrfuurt's Block. Ocala 1-13-tf

Ocala Gas Co., plant ....... 478
Ocala House..... 52
Ocala National Bank. 334
Ocala Northern Railway 249

Ocala Southwestern Railway.. 367
Ocala City office. 303
Ocala Heights Dairy 421
Ocala Telephone Company. ... 142
POSTOFFICE .. 515
POLICE ALARM 195
Postoffice Drugstore 20
Postal Telegraph office 217
Sheriff's office. 49
Seaboard Air Line City Ticket
office 129
Seaboard Airline freight office 38
STAR OFFICE 51
Southern Express Co 42
Ty dings' Drugstore 30
Western Union Telegraph office 136

remains home.

SUGAR HAMMOCK LA XI) 9
Partridge-Wood row Company
Selling Agents
Merchant' Block, Ocala

J. E. CHACE
Dental Surgeon

Rooms 9, 10, 11, Holder Block
Phone 250

OCALA, FLORIDA
Terms cash.

j
' ft. Johns Mve" fi
' Sj

Door Improvements
14 -room dwelling, barn and out houses, 250 citrus trees, good dock and 6-inch flowing artesian well,
. all cost over $12,000.

Evans Improvements
8-room frame dwelling, 100 feet from river, barn 30x40, cow barn,. 20x30, tool house, potato store storehouse,
house, storehouse, swimming pool, 6-inch flowing artesian well and 10 acres irrigated, 300 citrus trees, and
pack ing house, all cost $10,000.

L. F. BLALOCK
Dental Surgeon

Office Over Commercial BanK
. Phone 211

FOR A TORPID LIVER

I

OCALA, FLORIDA

"I have used Chamberlain's Tab-!
lets off and on for the past six years,
whenever my liver shows signs of ;
being in a disordered condition. They j
have always acted quickly and given i
me the desired relief," writes Mrs.

f ii. lruDus, springneia, .n. i. ror
sale by all dealers. Adv.

A full line of Spalding baseball
goods just in at Gerig's Reliable
Drug Stores. 5-16-tf

XOTICE TO CREDITORS AXD OTHERS
All creditors, distributees and leg legatees,
atees, legatees, and all persons having claims
or demands against the estate of
Thomas C. Hall, deceased, are hereby
called upon and required to present
their said claims or demands to the un undersigned
dersigned undersigned as administrator of the es estate
tate estate of said Thomas C Hall, within
two years from the date of the first
publication of this -notice, to-wit:
March 16th, 1914, otherwise they will
be barred in accordance with the
statute In such cases made and pro provided.
vided. provided. W. T. HALL,
Adm'nitrtor of the Estate of Thomas
C. HalL 3-16-8t moo

PIANO TUNING
J. E. FRAMPTOX
formerly of Lamar, Mo., is now
located in Ocala. Expert work
guaranteed. References given. Call
or address 229 Daugherty Street,
Ocala, Fla.

Coming South?
For sale 50 improved farms,
10 to 600 acres, northern
Marion County, Florida. Al Also
so Also 2,000 acres cut-over land
well located; fine truck and
orange section. Write for
description and prices. Come
see me.
JOHN L. DAVIS,
IRVINE, FLORID

THE QUICKEST, SAFEST AND SUREST ROAD TO WEALTH IS THE DIRT ROAD!

Terms:

HO per cent, to 25 per cesiL (CasSn
Balance from Three to Five Years

SEVEN PER CENT. DISCOUNT FOR CASH

You Know1 Federal Point Farmers Get Best Prices and Early Market

Water transportation at your door. Rail within 1 H miles. ? mile to Federal Point. 7 miles to

Palatka. lit miles to Hastings.
A GREAT OPPORTUNITY FOR THE HOMESEEKER, INVESTOR AND SPECULATOR
400 ACRES OF VALUABLE POTATO LAND, IMPROVED AND UNIMPROVED.

In Case of Rain Sale Will Be Held Following Day

References: Harnett National Bank

Ml Cdpupnyl

JACKSONVHiLE, FXA.

i



THE OCALA EVENING STAR, MONDAY, 3IAY 25, 1914

ALL DAY WEDNESDAY
OCALA CHURCH DIRECTORY
SEABOARD AIR LINE SCI
ULE

THnaes
EAT:

mm

New Irish Potatoes New String Beans
Fresh Apples Oranges
. Bananas
-
Marion County Fresh Smoked Hams
MarionXounty Fresh Smoked Sides
Brick City Coffee, 40c.
First ProductJCoffee, 30 cents
Fresh Roasted and Ground in Our Own Machine Every Day.
Sliced Breakfast Bacon Dried Sliced Beef
Sliced Boiled Ham, for Lunches
Eggs, Fresh from the Country, always in stock
New Salt Mackerel

Grape Juice
Olive Oil

Cara-f iiMuiis
Cam Building.
Phone 163 OCALA, FLORIDA

Man honest man may haire a bad title through no fault of hi9 own"
'a good man does not always mean a good title'
"men pass away, titles run on forever.
an abstract of title is the only means by which ti can determine
whether you are baying land r a lawsuit"

florida title & abstract company,

Saiipasotta VttaiHke1U
Choice Fresh Meats,
Salt Water and Lake Fish, received each day.
Prompt delivery. Only First-class products handled.
Our market is lined inside with white enameled metal,
is thoroughly screened from flies, and is the only sanitary
market in town. Ice boxes for fish and refrigerators for
meat, always clean and thoroughly iced.
IPHIOME 380
South 2d St., Opposite rear ot City Market.

itiiMMiifiiiiitittiiMiiinMiitgB"a""""""",aaBl,t,,,"a"l,ag",t"""""a,agq

lii Prompt cracc
are two principal causes of our success during the first six months
of our existence, and we are determined to continue as we began.
Our place is always open to the public for inspection, and we "al "always
ways "always appreciate a visit. There's no special time of day., for visi visitors.
tors. visitors. Just come in at any time and in this way catch us without
our "company clothes' on; the same rules for absolute cleanli cleanliness
ness cleanliness among our working force prevails in the early morning as in
mid-day or Just before the "whistle blows." If our delivery
wagons are not calling for your work,. just call phone 21 and they
will be there before he wires have ceased to vibrate.

IMPERIAL STEAi.'l LAUNDRY,

"Ocnln's Up to

TO

Ginger Ale
SalaoVDressing
ocala, fla.
- Date One." I

Canning Demonstration on the Xew
High School Lot
Editor Star: There will be an all
day canning demonstration on the
new high school lot Wednesday,
May 27th, for the benefit of club
members and others who may be in interested
terested interested in the work. I hope to see

many of my club members present
on that day and a cordial invitation
is extended to the general public to
visit and inspect the methods of the
club girls work.
Respectfully,
Caroline H. Moorhead, Agent.
MAIUOX-UUXX MASONIC LODGE
Marion-Dunn Lodge No. 19, r. A
A. M. meets on the first and third
Thursday evenings of each moith at
7:30 o'clock, Until further notice.
Baxter Cam, W. M.
Jake Brown, Secretary. Ad
LOYAL ORDER OF MOOSE
Ocala Lodge No. 699, L. O. O. M.,
meets every Thursday at 8:30 p. m.
Visiting brethren always welcome to
the lodge and club house! on Mag Magnolia
nolia Magnolia street near postoffice.
J. D. Rooner, Dictator.
J. E. Gates, Secretary. ad
GOING AWAY THIS SUMMER ?
If so, insure your baggage against
loss by fire, theft or wreck in hotels
or steamers, on trains, docks, plat platforms
forms platforms or wagons. Rates extremely
low. E. M. Osborn, Holder. Build Building.
ing. Building. 5-19-tf
BIDS WANTED
Notice is hereby given that the
board of public instruction, at its
meeting on Monday, June 1, 1914,
will receive and open bids for the
erection of a school house at the Fel Fellowship
lowship Fellowship school, according to plans
and specifications on file at the office
of the superintendent of public in instruction
struction instruction in the court house at Ocala,
Florida.
Bids will be received for a general
contract covering the furnishing all
the supplies and labor for completing
the building or for the work of erect erecting
ing erecting the house only.
The board reserves the right to
reject any and all bids. Communica Communications
tions Communications should be addressed to
J. H. Brinson, Secretary,
mon-wed-fri Ocala, Fla.
EXAMINATION OF TEACHERS
Notice is hereby given that the
regular state uniform examination
for teachers will be held in Ocala be beginning
ginning beginning on Tuesday, at 9 a. m., on
June 2, 1914. The examination for
whites will be held at the Ocala high
school building and that for colored
at Howard Academy.
Applicants will supply themselves
with legal cap paper, pens and ink
and the legal fee of $1 will be col collected
lected collected at the beginnig of the work.
Very respectfully,
J. H. Brinson,
Superintendent,
dly moi-thrs-fri and wkly.
FOR GRADUATION CLASS 1914
Class flower, white carnation, spec special
ial special $1.50 per dozen; American
Beauty," 15-inch stem, $3 per dozen;
20 inches, $3.50; 24 inches, $5 up
to per dozen. Orders taken up
to May the 20th. Heintz, the flor
ist
5-15-6t
DANGER IN DELAY
Kidney Diseases are too Dangerous
for Ocala People to Neglect
The great danger of kidney troub troubles
les troubles is that they often get a firm hold
before the sufferer recognizes them.
Health will be gradually undermin undermined.
ed. undermined. Backache, headache nervousness,
lameness, soreness, lumbago, urinary
troubles, dropsy, gravel and Bright's
disease often follow in merciless suc succession.
cession. succession. Don't neglect your kidneys.
Help the kidneys with Doan's Kidney
Pills, which are so strongly recom recommended
mended recommended right here in this locality.
Richard G. NecK, 609 Hawkins St.,
Palatka, Fla., says: "My kidneys
gave me a great deal of trouble and
the kidney secretions were too fre frequent
quent frequent in passage. I used Doan's Kid Kidney
ney Kidney Pills and they acted just as rep represented,
resented, represented, giving me relief. Since
then, others of my family have taken
Doan's Kidney Pills and the results
have always been satisfactory."
Price 50c, at all dealers. Don't
simply ask for a kidney remedy
get Doan's Kidney Pills the same
that Mr. Neck had. Foster-Milburn
Co., Props., Buffalo, N. Y. Adv. S
HOVAL ARCH MASONS

Regular convocations of the Ocala
Chapter No. 13, R. A. M.t on the
fourth Friday in every month at
7:30 p. m. C. E. Simmons, H. P.
Jake Brown, Secretary. Ad.

PRESBYTERIAN Corner of Ft
iving avenue and Watula street: pas pas-cor
cor pas-cor W. H. Dodge; residence 309 Ft.
King avenue; phone 233. Sunday
services: Sunday school 9:30 a.m.;
superintendent W. H. Dodge; morn morning
ing morning sermon 11 o'clock; Junior Mis Mission
sion Mission Society 3 p. m.; evening sermon
7:15 o'clock. Midweek prayer meet meeting
ing meeting Wednesday evening, 7:30.
CATHOLIC North Magnolia St;
priest, D. Bottolacio; residence 327
North Orange street; Sunday ser services:
vices: services: High mass 10 a. m.; vespers
5 p. m ; Sunday school 3 to 5 p. m.;
communion services second Sundays
6:30 a. m.; also regular service.
EPISCOPAL Corner S. Broadway
and Watula streets; rector, Rev. Jas.
G. Glass: residence 311 S. Broadway;

phone 415. Sunday services: Holy
communion 7:30 a. m.; Sunday
school, 9:45 a. m.; morning prayer,
litany and sermon 11 a. m.; evening
prayer 7:30 p. m.; choir practice
"O p. m. Friday; meetings of ves vestry
try vestry and societies at hours appointed.
METHODIST Cornet Fort King
avenue and South Main street; pas pastor
tor pastor J. M. Gross; residence Avi Fo:t
King avenue; phone 157; Sunday
services: Sunday school 9:30 a. m.,
superintendent L. N. Green; morn morning
ing morning sermon 11 o'clock; Junior Ep-
worth League 4 p. m.; Senior Ep Ep-worth
worth Ep-worth League 3 p. m.; Senior Ep Ep-worth
worth Ep-worth League, 4 p. m.; evening
sermon'7:30 o'clock. Midweek prayer
meeting Wednesday evening 7:30.
Choir practice Fridav evening at the
church.
BAPTIST Corner North Magno
lia and North Second streets; pastor
Bunyan Stephens; residence 52C Ok Ok-lawaha
lawaha Ok-lawaha avenue; phone 314; Sunday
services: Sunday school 9:30 a. m.
superintendent W. T. Gary; uorning
sermon 11 o'clock; Junior Baptist
Young People's Union 4 p. m.; Sen
ior Baptist Young People's Union
:45 p. m.; evening sermon 7:30 p.
m. Midweek prayer meeting Wed Wednesday
nesday Wednesday evening 7:30 o'clock
Church of Christ
East Broadway, next tP City Hall.
Roy B. Bowers, minister. Residence
708 Lime street. Office and study
at the church, entrance to the rear.
Hours: 8 to 12 a. m., (except Mon Mondays)
days) Mondays) and 2 to ,5 p. m. Wednesdays
and Saturdays. "At Home" to the
congregation and others Mondays, 7
to 10 p. m.
Services Sunday: Sunday school
10 a. m. Preaching and communion
11 a. m. Junior society 2:30 p. m.
Christian Endeavor Society 6:45 p.
m. Preaching 8 p. m. Wednesday,
7:30 p. m. training class, conference
and prayer. Business meetings the
last Tuesday of each month. AH
seats free, and everybody welcome.
PICKING BASKETS
. Picking baskets for tomatoes,
cantaloupes, cukes or beans. We
buy in carload lots. Mclver & Mac Mac-Kay,
Kay, Mac-Kay, mon-sat dly wky
THE METROPOLITAN
SAVINGS BANK
This bank is always open until 8
o'clock in the evening on Saturdays
and Mondays; on other days of the
week it closes at 3 o'clock In the aft aft-ernoo'n.
ernoo'n. aft-ernoo'n. The bank will observe all
legal holidays, both state and na national,
tional, national, and will remain closed on
those days.
George Giles, President.
Frank P. Gadson, Cashier. 3-19-tf
Icy-Hot bottles at Mclver & Mac MacKay's.
Kay's. MacKay's. ad.
OCALA i-UnLIC LIBRARY
Open daily except Sunday from 3
to 5 p. m. Board of Trade rooms,
Ocala House block.
Louise E. Gamsby, Librarian.
TOMATO WRAPPERS
Tomato wrappers may be obtained
in any quantity at close prices from
Mclver & MacKay. mon-satdly wky
Phone 481
If you want to bay or sell
FURNITURE.
Xew and Second Hand
Household Good3
Farm Tools, Harness Etc
Easy Payments if Desired.
A. M. BOB BITT,
310 S. Main St. Ocala Fla.
L. ALEXANDER
PRACTICAL,
Carpenter and Builder
Jarerul Estimates Mr d on All Con
ract Work. Gives more and better
oLuacio- In the city.

South bo and
No. 1, local leaves Jacksonville
9:30 p. m.; arrives Ocala 1:40 a
in.; arrives Tampa 6:30 a. m.
No. 3 local leaves Jacksonville
a: 30 a. m.; arrives Ocala 1:05 p. m.;
arrives Tampa 5:40 p. m.

No. 9 limited leaves Jacksonville
11:20 a. m.; arrives Ocala 2:30 p
ni.; arrives Tampa 6 p. m.
t Northbound
No. 2. local leaves Tampa 9 p. m.;
arrives Ocala 2:30 a. m.; arrives
Jacksonville 6:45 a. m.
No. 4 local leaves Tampa 9 a. m.;
arrives Ocala 1:12 p. m.; leaves
Ocala 1:30 p. m.; arrives Jackson Jacksonville
ville Jacksonville 5:20 p. m.
No. 10 limited leaves Tampa 1 p.
m.; arrives Ocala 4:20 p. m.; arrives
Jacksonville 7:30 p. ro.
OCALA NORTHERN SCHEDULE
No. 72 Leave Ocala daily 1:15
p. m. Arrive Palatka daily except
Sunday, 4:45 p. m. Arrive Palatka
Sunday, 4:15 p. m.
No. 71 Leave Palatka daily ex except
cept except Sunday, 7:40 a. m. Arrive
Ocala 11 m.
No. 73 Leave PalatLa Sunday, 8
a. m. Arrive Ocala. 11 a. m.
Summer weight lap robes and fly
nets for horses at Mclver & Mac-
Kay's. ad.
OCALA LODGE NO. 286, B. P. O. E.
Ocala Lodge No. 286, Benevolent
and Protective Order of Elks, meets
the second and fourth Tuesday even
ings in each month. .Visiting breth
ren .always welcome. Club house
opposite postoffice, east side.
David S. Williams, E. R..
Joseph Bell, Secretary. Aou
Refrigerators in many styles and a
wide range of prices, at Mclver &
MacKay's. M-S-dly :wky tf
WOODMEN OF THE WORLD
Fort King Camp No. 14 meets in
Tonge's Hall at 8 p. m. every second
and fourth Friday. Visiting sov sovereigns
ereigns sovereigns always welcome. Adv.
F. J. Burden, C C
Chas K. Sage, Clerk.
Perfection oil and National gaso gasoline
line gasoline 6toves; hot water comforts, at
Mclver & MacKay's. ad.
SUGAR HAMMOCK LANDS
Part ridge-Wood row Company
Selling Agents
Merchant's Block, Ocala 1-13-tf

EL X
I Phone 356

(Ceo, fifceinittz & Coinmpsnmy
Wholesale Dealers in
LUMBER, SHINGLES, LATH, LIME, BRICK
AND CEMENT

We Make a Specialty of House Bills.
See Us Before Placing Your Orders

SSSr423 HoUte Block
Ocala, IFlopadlsi

CJnocdQ Clccull
A crisp, dean, nutri-
tious food. For
everybody every everywhere.
where. everywhere. Fresh in the
moisture-proof pack- I
age, 5 cents.
The funny little name
of the famous little
ginger snap that puts
fresh "snip" and
ginger" into jaded
appetites. 5 cents.
Graham Crackers
The natural sweet sweetness
ness sweetness and nutriment
of the wheat are re- -tained,
giving them
a delightful flavor.
10 cents.
Buy biscuit baked by
NATIONAL
BISCUIT
COMPANY
Alioays look fjr that
I have on hand at all times)
at the haras and lot on West
Exposition St, (Broadway) a
Dig drove of first class horses
and mules for you to- make
your selections from. Every
head of this stock -has been
selected by me personally In
the markets. I will guarantee
to give yon as good stock at
as low price as can be had in
the state. Every animal is
warranted to be as repre represented.
sented. represented. OCALA, FLORIDA $

n

3

Reed 0or UNCLASSIFIED ADS lor yczr

THIg;:s:mn:ilTlMM'IUIf'"1 "mmnmnmmmmiiimiinmim
i vork for the money than any othei



BllsH

THE OCALA FVENLXU STAK. MONDAY, MAY 25, 1914

.
if i

HOMER SMALL
THE HU.MRLE ORIGIN OF GREAT
MEN
(Continued from Fifth Page)
dwells in a poor Scotch peasant's
hut. The mountains of obscurity,
ignorance and poverty were hurled
abroad with hfs gigantic strength,
his own hands fashioning the tools
with which he worked. He was
born poor and born to remain poor;
all his life he fought a hand to hand
fight with poverty from the deepest
obscurity; without help, without In Instruction,
struction, Instruction, and without a model; with
only his "spark of nature's fire" he
fought his way in the heart of hu humanity.
manity. humanity. Some may question hia
right to be called great on the
grounds that he did little, but is it
little to voice the emotions the
ideals of the common man? Is it
little to have gained the name of the
poet of the unlettered human heart?
A brave mausoleum shines over his
dust, and more than one splendid
monument has been reared to his
fame, but far nobler is the admira admiration
tion admiration which lies enshrined in all our
hearts.
The true poet, the man -who brings
'us face to face with the great Ideals,
who increases our sense of Indlv Indlv-ual
ual Indlv-ual resDonsibilitv. who seeks to raise
the level of our achievements, who
gives us nobler loves and nobler
cares, Is the most precious gift that
can be bestowed upon a generation.
'Shakespeare, compelled by pover poverty
ty poverty to leave school at the age of four fourteen,
teen, fourteen, received his education at the
hands of nature ; his real teachers
were the men, the women, and the
natural influences which surrounded
him. From a stage hand he rose to
an actor; from an actor to one of
the greatest writers the world has
ever seen. He is the genius of Eng English
lish English literature; he is the one person personality
ality personality In modern history known to us;
tie it wise without emphasis or as assertion;
sertion; assertion; he is strong as nature is
strong;.
This man of men was the lumin luminous
ous luminous chief of a hand of poets whose
subject was man. By the voice of
the whole civilized world, priceless
Shakespeare's name is the first in all
literature, imagination, fancy and
knowledge of men, and he stands
unapproacbed and seemingly unap unapproachable.
proachable. unapproachable. The world moves so fast and new
phases of art succeed each other
with such surprising rapidity in the
present day, that to many the name
of Jean Francois Millet has a remote
and antiquated sound. A peasant by
birth and education, he has already
taken his place among the classics,
and he stands supreme among the
first painters of humanity who gave
expression to modern ideas in a no noble
ble noble and enduring form, and whose
works will live when the passing
fashions and momentary fancies of
the day are forgotten. His place with
the immortals Is sure; his pictures
of seed and harvest of morning and
evening will rank with the great
art of all times with the frieze of
the Parthenon and the frescoes of
Michael Angelo. He belongs to the
Great company of Grief" who have
stamped their thoughts on the hearts
of "this generation; who learned In
- MB 1 X. lit. n-V 4 tn r-rfVV r
suueriug wuai mej luuugui iu sous,
and who, out of seeming failures of
short and sorrowful lives, have" rear reared
ed reared the fabric that will live for all
times.
It is upon military foundation that
the fame of one of the most widely
known men of modern times must
rest. Napoleon Bonaparte a strang
er to royalty by birth, and a scholar

by charity- began his miraculous ed the wilderness; he defeated the
career" with no friend but his sword. savage; he triumphed over. the bra brain
in brain some respects his career was the vest veterans trained in the battle battle-most
most battle-most extraordinary, his destiny most field of Europe; everywhere he con con-wonderful
wonderful con-wonderful of any recorded in the an- quered in statesmanship; and when
nals of mankind. Other rulers may death came to claim the mastery
wield a power as extensive and even over him, he turned the last enemy
more absolute, but they cannot, like aside tranquilly as he had done
Napoleon, boast of having risen from the feeblest of his adversaries and
an absolutely private station to the passed from earth in the triumphant
highest pinnacle of greatness. That consciousness of immortality.
Napoleon possessed greatness of ac- No man in the record of history
tion we need not prove, for no one ever faced a more unpromising fu fu-will
will fu-will be hardy enough to deny it. His ture than Abraham Lincoln. By some

story i3 that of a man who raised
(himself from obscurity to a throne;
a man who changed the face of the

'.
political world; a man who sent the

' sea; a man whose will was feared as erty and TesPect fr rights of man. j
'.t-j. i. v. lQ infancy, his energetic soul was:
destiny-; a man who broke down the ' ,
nourished hv poverty. Of scholas scholas-barriers
barriers scholas-barriers of the Alps and made them tic opportunities he had only the
a highway;, a man whose fame was slightest. But in spite of all this!
spread beyond the boundaries of civ- there was that indorninabIe inspira-.j
Uization to the steppes of the Cos- tion of determination and growth, t
sack and the deserts of the Arabs. wMch cherished and pursued culml-l
That he did-much evil there is little nated In the summit3 of honor and
doubt; that he has been the origin success I
of much good, there is just as little. Lincoln, martvr to the broad pn-
j Through his means? intentional or ciples wnicn he represented went
cot, Spain, Portugal and France forth from the log cabin to the White 1
have risen to the blessings of free House; from the lowest depths ofj
j constitutions and the feudal system poverty to the highest ranks of hon-j
.with its whole train .of tyrannic or; and he carried the gorrow f w

jsaiexmes.- nas uea ioreyer. ivings COUntry as truly as he bore its bur bur-;.
;. bur-;. may learn from him that their safest den. Lincon wa3 tne ruling hand
study is the welfare of the people; at a most Critioal time, a time when
and the people are taught by him our 6tateg were engaged in a civil
that there is no despotism so stupen- war; and there by his COUrage, his

i 1C
course.
When the. Mayflower departed
from European shore she took
thence the seed, which transplanted
on the soil of the new world, was
destined to grow and ripen into the
greatest liberty-loving nation of the
universe. From these colonies col-
onies planted in poverty and taxa-
tion, and fated to remain so for
many years came forth some of the
greatest men tne worm nas ever
produced; men who were born
who had many obstacles to
Poor.
ur-
mount; but men, who in spite
luwe "--uiue.f uj, iucu uuiu auu
ceaseless work raised the name of
their country from the depths of in-
significance and obscurity to a po-
sition honored by every nation in the
ii.... j ; ac; 1; i. i : i j j
woriu'
riors and great civilians who illuml-
imiu uie uistuijr ui tue uuueu
i. J iV. X- 1 i. 41 TTli.J
states, none snoum stana in orignter
light than the diplomats or the Kev-
olution. The life of Benjamin Frank-
lin is one of the most extraordinary
instances on record 01 wnat can oe
accomplished by study, resolution

and a conscientious nurture or tne see greatness ln its true proportions,
faculties. He was born in a humble for as men ris and bring fortn
sphere; he began his career as an ap- their theorie'he tendency is to ig ig-prentice;
prentice; ig-prentice; he mastered almost all nore and deride tnem But iEdjson
branches of knowledge, aided alone u a great exception, for few ..men
by his own perseverance and deter- have accomplislied more and few
mination; he rose to become the ar- have mmo appreciated and
biter of nations; the champion of justly so for tQ no maDf dead or
sovereigns; ascending step by step alive ,g tne world more indebted
from the humble printer's shop to tnan tQ Edison
these exalted positions. While He has worked nIs way tQ the tQp
Washington was fighting our battles of ladder of fame and haa be.

for us at (home, Franklin was abroad
obtaining loans, ana otnerwise ad
vancing the cause of American
independence. As a philosopher his
fame spread to the uttermost ends
of the earth; as a diplomat he re-
ceived a hearing In the most polished
uuui.v .uw. v oo.uu,
conducted the affairs of his country
through perplexities and difficulties
of the most trying kinds; and as a
patriot he gained the love and
miration of all virtuous and honor-
able men. ..
me uwu w ui iu "66 """
pendence, so was the back woods
man, Andrew Jackson the hero of j
the second struggle fought for the
same cause. He learned to reaa ana
write in a log cabin school house in
the piny woods of North Carolina;
and the first great political truth
that reached his heart "was that all
men are free and equal." The first
great fact that beamed on his under understanding
standing understanding was his country's independ independence.
ence. independence. As a boy of thirteen he wit witnessed
nessed witnessed the scenes and horrors that
accompany war and when but a year
older, with an elder brother, he
shouldered his musket and went
forth to strike a blow for his coun country.
try. country. A joyous era for American hu humanity;
manity; humanity; but for him the events of
war were full of agony and grief, for
the war deprived him of brother,
father and mother. Behold then!
Our orphan hero sternly earnest,
consecrated to humanity from child childhood
hood childhood by sorrow, so young and yet so
solitary, and therefore, bound the
more closely to collective man. Be Behold
hold Behold him elect for his lot to go forth
and to assist in laying the founda foundation
tion foundation of society in the great valley of
the Mississippi.1 Before the nation,
before the world, before coming ages,
he slnds forth the representative for
his generation of the American mind.
Heroes of antiquity would have con contemplated
templated contemplated with awe, the hardi-
hood of his character. He master-
he has been called an accident; but
few men ever more definitely and
persistently worked out by clear in-

t
telligence what was in them. He

justice, his even temper, his fertile
counsel, and his humanity, he stood
,like an heroic fifure in the KQter of
an heroiC epoch
Xor do W have to turn to the
history of the past to find grat.men
who without the assistance of wealth
and schoiastic education, have won
fame and honor by tneir own abm
ty and genius, ,We have them in our
midst Gf the- present day heroes
none deserve more praise than Thos.
Edison
At the. age of seven, on ac

count of ni3 father's misfortune, he' former wills mad by Us at any
was Sent out to earn his own way.timf; '
With a vision of the "wonders that Ue the.membe" of the aforesaid

were tQ be he utllized every gpar
moment for the development of his
mind strange as it may Sem,
young Edison, who is known by many
as the ..poor newsDoy became an
electrician by chance, a chemist
by
everything but the barest necessities
of
of Ufe ,We can hardly conceive it
possible tnat a man with Ms firgt
laboratory in a box caFf should In
some way by ig may Inventlon.
assist almost every industry and bus-
lnss n art It usua,ly th
perspective of years to enable us to
come one of the greatest men of this
( In our memories are the names of
many great men; we treasure all
tneir liveg ln he consecrated ground
an(, w te ame each ls
ed we anfiwer flowers ..deadltip.
on the field of honor." We cherish
the nameg of those great men, who
have WOn fame and honor which the
. nf lmtt Qrx ... .n
were stimulated to action, not by

ad-Jwealth and scholastlc ODDOrtunRiea.

. fc tnoge priceIess gIftsambi.
jtion and duty upon whlch tb sun
they had once felt the scorpion sting
of ambition were never satisfied
with a limit less than the circle of
I U U k. IflfllirTL auu WUU. WllHIl UllLV
whispered low ..Thou mU6t answ.
!ered boldly, I can." To the hum
ble sphere of life we are indebted far
more than we can ever Tepay by a
lavish gift of honor and praise, for
from, this lowly sphere has come
forth a class of men, whose works
are of incalulable value, not only to
their native land but to the whole
world. Men who have left behind
them a work and influence which
will be enduring as If "Their names
were written in letters of light, form formed
ed formed by the stars upon the midnight
sky."
THE TWELFTH MEMBER
OF THE CLASS
One member of the graduating
class for 1914 of the Ocala High
School, who has not his name on the
program, but is nevertheless entitled
to high honors, is .Mr. Robert Angus
Dudley. MacKay.
Mr. MacKay has been delayed In
his studies, and it was not believed
Lwhen the programs were made up
and the .invitations sent out that he
would pass. However, by diligent
study, aided by his inherited sturdy
Scotch persistence, he closed up the
gap and came in during the last
week abreast with the other eleven.
The Star was not informed until
Friday afternoon that Mr. MacKay
would be with the graduates. Had
it known one day sooner, it would
have had his picture with those of
the other bright scholars of 1914.
As it is, it will lead his other friends
in -congratulating him on his well
earned success.
PANKY CANNOT
STAND PUNISHMENT
London, May 25. Mrs. Emmeline
Pankhurst, leaderof the suffragettes.
has been released from custody for
the eighth time because of illness
caused by a hunger strike

MISS THEO WALLIS
THE CUSS WILL
THEODOSIA WALLIS
We, the members of the Senior
Class of the Ocala High School, of
tne county or Jiarion, ana State or
Florida, being of a disposing mind
and memory, and realizing that we
are about to depart this life to make
public, declare this to be our last
will and testament; hereby revoking
ciass, cio nereDy win and bequeath to
the forth-coming Senior Class the ex-
cellent records of scholarship that
we, as a class, have maintained to-
gether with the dignity which has
been the object of the admir-
Jation of many freshmen boys, and
I t0 those would e scientists in the
Junior Class, we the Senior Science

Class do will those well beloved and did one fine day in the past, and in
much abused pieces of apparatus for j consequence of his thirst for scien scien-creating
creating scien-creating electricity, and to those tifiec knowledge, had to stay from
self centered Junior boys, we be-! school three days.
queath the rear seats in study hall, I, Gladys Nordica Martin, do be be-and
and be-and the exclusive right of conducting J quest to Mabel Akin, my middle
the Agatherldan Society, which duty name and position as leader of the
was formerly performed hy the Sen-4 chorus. I also will to Frank Gale

lor girls. To the forth-coming class
in French, we, Alice Sexton, Nellie

Beckham, Rexie Todd, Annette Pope a former high school student which
Eagleton and Theo Wallis do be- I count dearer than life Itself, ; a
queath the right of entertaining the 'fountain pen and letter writing ma ma-freshman
freshman ma-freshman boys with appropriate terial. He may have these as his
love stories. These stories must be own (and he may get some valuable

interesting and amusing so the above
mentioned boys will yawn over them,
or have to exert themselves to catch
the point.
I, Rex Caroline Todd, do hereby
willa to Annie Moorehead my studious
ways, punctual habits, and my repu-
tation as an altogether shy and de-
mure student. And if "'time will
ovpr afvknmnlieh cuVi an nn A T mill
have to hear ihy pocket editions of
three French stories which I have
thoroughly enjoyed while slowly
wending my way to school about
eight forty-five in the morning.
With the exception of various names
and illustrations of birds, these
books are in perfect condition.
I, Majorie Wynona Wetherbee, do
hereby bequeath to Oliver Toffalleti
my flirtatious inclinations and my
naughty ways. These said smiles
and glances have been tried on bash bashful
ful bashful Juniors in both history and phy physics,
sics, physics, with marked results. I also will
to Welch Dewey a list of familiar
Virgilian expressions.
The meanings of these Latin phra phrases,
ses, phrases, have never before been heard,
in High School, and are absolutely
original. I have given them all In
class, and I can assure you, your
fellow-toilers in Latin will be favor favorably
ably favorably expressed.
I, Thomas Carleton Ervln, do wijl
to John Batts my envied reputation
as "Heart Breaker" of the High
School. To Sam Burford I bequeath
one package of spearminty, from
which three pieces only have been re removed.
moved. removed. With this gift goes a circu circular
lar circular which gives various methods of
getting rid of the gum when the
teacher asks you to throw it out of
the window. It also gives hints on
time, place and manner of chewing
gum in fashionable society, English
classes, however, are most fitting
places.
I, Annette Pope Eagleton, do be
queath to Ruby Cappleman, my
I
perfectly new vanity set. I have not
had time to use my treasure, on
count of trig, troubles. It contains a
generous supply of powder, rouge,
one package of kid hair curlers, an
eye-brow pencil and a beautiful cha cha-moise
moise cha-moise skin poweder rag. These ar articles
ticles articles may be easily hid In the li library
brary library and effectively used, when
there are not more than five ot your
class-mates begging in one breath
for the powder rag Here, in the
library the recipient of this bequest
may hold impromptu receptions with
v. Ar. iTf.
Kay, I bequeath my trig, instru-
ments and card board figures, and j
the privilege of flying off at a tan-
gent when Mr. v orkman corrects,
I. Nellie Wilkes Beckham, do will
to Catherine Strunk, my megaphone,
which I have used every time I ap-
peared on the program of the Agath-
eridan society. My voice is natural-

!y very soft, and Is now rather worn
from constant use, and so this in instrument
strument instrument was very necessary when
I wished to'command attention; and
to Beulah Hobbs. who like myself
and many other good things which
comes in small packages, I will my
ladder, so that when she takes part
In such" affairs as choruses, etc, she
may be seen above the crowd. To
her, also. I will a pair of shoes, ab absolutely
solutely absolutely guaranteed to fqueaki It
is with. regret that I part with? this
Sift, but I realize that the dear. old
study hall with its scarred desks and
familiar wood-bcx would not be the
I same . pface, without the sqeak,
squeak of the shoe brigade.
In the study hall, ye students,
. when the "boys come duly slow and
the squeak of Beulah's shoes softly
comes,, and softly goes. 'When the
girls and boys are singing in a deep
and solemn flow, will she thinks to
. squeak. Freshmen, as shs did one
"year ago?
I I. Marie Gladys Wallis, do here-

by bequeath to Marzaret Jackson
my much loved and often used rest
ing place on the cellar steps. This
place has often been' us"d by me,
when I came too late for school, and
I have whiled away many pleasant
hours, listening to the hl.?h school
singing those familiar songs in the
yellow-back song books, and hearing
j the chorus of old Amherst resound
along the halls.' To her I will my
iucky number forty-three, so seldom
heard at roll call, my Big Ben, and
one bundle of excuses for being so
tardy to school.
i I. Melba Lorayne Kemp, do will to
Welsh Dewey, my share of the lit-
mus water in the laboratory. With
this bequest goes the warning, not
to drink so much in one dose, as he
who knows the hiding places of my
treasures, my bunch of letters from
hints on letter writing etiquette),
with the reservation that if at any
time he reveals my secrets he for forfeits
feits forfeits this bequest.
I, Homer Small, bequeath to WT11-
, Ham (better known as 'Buster)
jCamp, a very valuable recipe, which,
if applied properly is positively
guaranteed to grow a perfect pompa-
(tnnr nvav n crVi t c-f n.l f
'tions of starch and olive oil until tto
mixture becomes gluey. Then apply
A. .
thfl ctt hat a Tsa in trie tins1 K Ik
r, :.:r -v
luuiuusmj ttuu uuiu me uair oe

comes stiff. Now brush the leU side
... . JL, I only witnesses, and not until after
similarly, put on a close-fitting canf.. .
. . vT . 1 the ceremony when the news was
and the next morning the result l!flashed 0r the wire to the
remarkable Th s muia was ; groom

giveu we ujr vua.u wauKi, ana
knowing that Buster is always inter interested
ested interested in things pertaining to style, 'I
do will hhn this valuable legacy. I
have used it myself and its results
have caused me to be the recipient
of. many compliments.
I, Alice Estelle Sexton, do will to
Susie Ervin, my patent for a special specially
ly specially built desk, which is a combination
of a Morris chair and old-fashioned
desk' as we now have In high school.
While I have not yet had my ideal
constructed, I have often reclined in
my dear old battered desk in school,
and dreamed of the joys of a semi-Morris-chair-desk.
And to VIvienne Ecyleshimer, I
bequeath the privilege of missing
my lessons. on Monday morning. I
have had a monopoly on 'Blue Mon Monday"
day" Monday" this year, but have been ex excused
cused excused on account of past records.

With this bequest goes the right offriends and ,g mnwM with the

inauiging in a nap tne nrst period
, in the morning, as It is rather dlffi
cult to keep awake after having
been up until ten the night before.
We, the senior class of 1914, on
the 25th anniversary of the building
of our school, do will, for a dorml-!
tory for our school, our moss cover-
ed oaks and school grounds, from j

the spirits of the hundreds who have
ac-lgone out from its walls, the desire
for knowledge. i

To the new high school, we be bequeath
queath bequeath our pictures, flowers and
books; the recipients of these valu valuable
able valuable legacies must treat them with
tender care, else they forfeit them to
the Class of 1914, whose happiest
days were spent with them,
Dear school-mates, these trifles
are simple indeed, yet go with them
best wishes to bid you Godspeed.
"When fame's at the zenith, and j
-t tho-o
gifts and recall days of yore,
Our express will Is, and we hereby
order and appoint, if any differences
shall arise or happen concerning
anygift or bequest contained in this
will, no suit shall be brought con-
cerning same, but the same shall be
wholly referred to our dearly be-
loved faculty, and what they shall

?i

CARELTON ERVIN
order and direct therein shall be
binding on the persons concerned.
In witness thereof, we, the afore-
i said class, have to this, our last will
'aQd testament subscribed our names.
this the twenty-fifth day of May, In
the year of oar Lord, one thousand
nine hundred and rourteen.
Class of 1914.
Witnesses: Florence 1-ieitner,
Paul Brinson.
Attorney: Theodosia Wallis.
UNION MEMORIAL SERVICE
pdd Fellows, Knights of Pythias and
. Woodmen Will Join in Paying
, Tribute to their Departed
Brethren
.
Representatives of the Odd Fel Fellows,
lows, Fellows, Knights of Pythias and Wood Woodmen
men Woodmen met In ,Mr. Charles Goddard's
office Saturday afternoon, and made
plans for. a union memorial service
by their three lodges Sunday after afternoon,
noon, afternoon, June 7th.
The members of the three lodges,
also" the Pythian Sisters, auxiliary to
the K. of P., will meet at the K. of
P. lodge room at 3:30 p. m. and
proceed to the Temple theater,
where appropriate services will be
held. t After these services, com committees
mittees committees from the lodges will go to
the' cemeteries and place flowers on
the graves of departed members.
' All members of the three lodges
and their families are specially re requested
quested requested to be present, and to con contribute
tribute contribute as many flowers as possible.
The public is also invited to attend.
No regalia will be worn.
Newsom-Taylor
- The culmination of a romance, be began
gan began last JMarch, was the marriage
,'M!;i W"1Iam Virgil New-
T ... "...
Jacksonville. The wedding was so-
t
ionized the sprmgneid presby-
friends of Mr. Newsom know that be
as' out of town.
The result of his mission to Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville came as a distinct surprise,
not only to the circle of friends of
bpth Mr. and Mrs. Newsom in Jack Jacksonville
sonville Jacksonville and in this city, but to their
immediate families, for their parents
and friends knew nothing of the
secret movements of Cupid and the
important part he. was to play.
Mrs. Newsom visited Miss Rose Rosebud
bud Rosebud Robinson in March, and it was
then that she met her young hus husband.
band. husband. She is the daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. A. K. Taylor, her father be being
ing being the gifted cartoonist for The
State, Jacksonville's new paper, and
is an attractive, lovely young wo woman
man woman yet in her teens.
Mr. Newsom is the eldest son of
Dr. and' Mrs. Newsom, a young man
of splendid-qualities, with scores of
CommercIal Bank.
The happy young couple arrived
in Ocala last night and at present
are making their home with the
groom's parents. They are being
showered with congratulations And
wlshea for a ,ong and happy
we;lded jffe by tner many frJends.
NOT A CASE FOR
THE KING'S DAUGHTERS
The King's Daughters held a meet meeting
ing meeting this morning at which the case
was discussed of the family said' to
be destitute, and it was decided that
it was not a case for the Daughters.
FEDERAL RESERVE HEX
HARD TO FIND
Washington. D. C, May 25.
PresIdent Witeon offered one of
the vacancies on the federal reserve
board to E. C. Simmons, a St. Louis
hardware merchant.
PRESIDENT WILL CONFER
WITH THE EX-PRESIDENT
Washington, May 25. President
Willson will receive former Presi President
dent President Roosevelt at the White House
tomorrow afternoon.