The Ocala evening star

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Ocala evening star
Uniform Title:
Ocala Evening Star
Alternate Title:
Evening star
Star
Physical Description:
v. : ; 61 cm.
Language:
English
Publisher:
Porter & Harding
Place of Publication:
Ocala, Fla.
Ocala Fla
Publication Date:
Frequency:
daily (except sunday)
daily
normalized irregular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Newspapers -- Ocala (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Marion County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Marion -- Ocala
Coordinates:
29.187778 x -82.130556 ( Place of Publication )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1895; ceased in 1943.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 1, no. 5 (June 24, 1895).
Funding:
Funded by NEH in support of the National Digital Newspaper Project (NDNP), NEH Award Number: Project #00110855

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Holding Location:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
This item is presumed to be in the public domain. The University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries respect the intellectual property rights of others and do not claim any copyright interest in this item.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 11319113
alephbibnum - 2052267
lccn - sn 84027621
lccn - sn 84027621
System ID:
UF00075908:04679

Related Items

Related Items:
Ocala weekly star

Full Text
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FURNISHINGS
For All of the Gomes
T1S-MM CO.
AT MIT PRICES
Theuslachry Co.
VOL. 19.
OCALA, FLORIDA, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY I, 1913.
I mo. 188
THE FURNITURE
S
' : : r-

1' u.

! 1 r I

S.LOW COMPLEXION comes from bilious

iijrities in the blood, and

li It is torpid.-
! 5 I fI IV3 O N S
RED 2
LlfER REGULATOR
(THE POWDER FOEM)
Is the grest of all liver medicines. Its powerful purifying and
strengthen; influence is at once apparent in an improved appetite,
good digejn and a feeling of strength and energy in the body.
When theistem has been put in order the yellow cast in the skin
gradually dppears and the complexion becomes clear and healthy.
, solo my dmlim. pmick. unci ncio(. si.oo.
Aik for tfcnulne with the Eed Z on the label. It you rannot (r-t it. remit to at, we will tend
It by mail.tvofl- bimmont Liver fcrgalator ia pat up aio in liquid form lor thoae who prefer it.

rrue w.uu per"". tor tee cea label.

J. H. ZEILIN &. CO.. PROPS., ST. LOUIS. MO.

VLetnauer Or
Great Reduction Sale

OF

Lalies9 Ready-to -Wear
i
LA11 the Remaining Models from the
i
Best Eastern Markets offered at Prices
The Lowest Ever Known for
Apparel of Equal Value

Tailored Suits
Tailored Suits
Co a f s

Formerly
Up to $25.00
Formerly
Up to 17.S0

resses

Childrens' Dresses and Coats
prinpofi Prices

F. E. McGLAKrlM. D.
Specialist in Chronic Diseases
THE DR. IVTCLANE MEDICAL, SURGICAL AND
ELECTRICAL INSTITUTE

Ocala,
puoniJs:
Office, 333.
Dr. McClane's Residence, 407.

TVotet CnllA made by ftperlal appointment. Special Genft Urinary Cllal.
after 7 p. m. each day.

W.J. SHERIDAN
CEMENT AND CONCRETE CONTRACTOR

All kinds of Concrete, Cement and Brick
construction work done. Sidewalks and Cul Culvert
vert Culvert construction a specialty.
Will make close estimates on any job in
Brick of concrete construction, and none are
too Large or too Small to be given careful at attention
tention attention and executed promptly. A card in
the Ocala postoffice will bring me to you.

ALL WORK GUARANTEED
W. J. SHERIDAN

0CAIA

KOLD

WE

We have the largest and best stock of Lap Robes an J Storm Aprons
ever brought to this part of the state. To neglect to prepare yourself
with protection against the cold,, disagreeable days that will soon be
here would be an unforgivable act when It Is so easy to come here anl
let us fix you up. Our stock of uggy tops, canopies and awnings Is
also complete and we have enough horse blankets for all the "old Dob Dobbins"
bins" Dobbins" in this section. Don't fall to call on us when In need of any anything
thing anything in our line.

IGHT

MOTEL CHURCHILL
BROADWAY AND 14th ST.
Union Square
NEW YORK
Clean, Comfortable, Convenient and Home-Like Hotel, no
the American and European Plans.
American rian, 2 per day and up. European Plan, 11.00 per day and up.
Special Weekly Rates.

Churchill & Co.

the fault lies with the

(Bo.,
0
Formerly
$20.00 to 30.00
Formerly
91S.OO to $10.00
$15.00
$12.50
$12.50
$10.00
Florida
OFFICE:
Bults 1 to 7 Holder Block, Southwest
Corner of Public Iquare

ATHER KOMFORTS

& LANG

US 1 BIS

Of Florida in Ocala Assembled
Opened the Twenty-Eifthth An Annual
nual Annual Meeting of Their
Association
The State Teachers' Association
began its sessions at the Temple the theater
ater theater last night. Over 200 teachers
were present and as many or more
of the people of the city, filling the
house. The teachers were welcomed
to the city by Judge Bullock, who
said:
Judge Bullock's Address
Mr. Chairman, Members of the Flor Florida
ida Florida Educational Association, and
My Fellow Townsmen:
By reason of our central location
and the various transportation lines
that are accessible to us, and the
recognized hospitality of our people,
and the various gatherings that have
honored us by holding their delibera deliberations
tions deliberations in our midst, we are known as
the "City of Conventions," and very
justly so, too, for in our midst have
been held some of the most impor important
tant important gatherings of this age.
We are always glad to welcome our
friends and have them come amongst
us and share our blessings, pleasures
and joys, and to you, members of this
association, we desire to express our
great appreciation for the honor yon
have conferred upon us by the selec selection
tion selection of our city for the holding of
your annual convention for this year.
We recognize in this association thai
class of men and women who have
consecrated their talents, their ener energies
gies energies and activities in a work for the
betterment of mankind, devising
those plans, inaugurating that system
best calculated to impart knowledge,
thereby qualifying us for citizenship
and the uplifting of humanity gener generally.
ally. generally. You have no selfish ends to at attain,
tain, attain, no poiltical goal is sought, only
prompted by an earnest desire to dis discover
cover discover those means by which knowl knowledge
edge knowledge may be best acquired and im imparted
parted imparted to others.
vtMonm .is the principal thing.
i
Next to the servants of the living
God, these men and women who have
given their lives and service to the
cause of education, are entitled to
our highest esteem.
To you, members of the Florida
Educational Association, we run to
meet you at the threshold of our mu
nicipality, we greet you with glad
ness and great joy. We welcome you
to our city, to our homes, our fire firesides
sides firesides and to all the joys and blessings
of our happiness. Our homes are
our homes, and our firesides are your
firesides. The latch string of wel welcome
come welcome hangs on the outer border of
our city, and we bid you pull and en enter
ter enter in and abide with us.
Our people are and always have
been an educational people, and your
coming in our midst on this occasion
quickens our zeal and stirs our en enthusiasm
thusiasm enthusiasm on these lines.
Away, long years back, before J
ever saw the light of day, this state
was alive to the matter of education.
On the 24th of February, 1851, the
legislature of the state of Florida
dealt with the subject of education
actively, and created institutions of
learning, .and in addition to other pro provisions,
visions, provisions, created two institutions of
learning named seminaries, one, lo located
cated located east and the other west aof the
Suwannee river, and known as the
East Florida Seminary and the Wwt
Florida Seminary. Ocala and the
surrounding country had already man manifested
ifested manifested such an interest in education educational
al educational matters and her people made such
contributions to the cause, that the
legislature, at its succeeding session,
on the 6th day of January, 1S52, es-
tab1". hd the East Florida Seminary
at Ocala. Prior to the war between
the states, Ocala had established.
j through this seminary, a reputation
e as a great educational center, and
f from that institution have issued fort
: some of our noted men and women.
whose names and deeds adorn the
i history of this state.
i In addition to these two seminaries
j the legislature also created other in in-j
j in-j stitutions of learning, of less dignity
I than seminaries, called academies.
! One of these academies was located
at what we now proudly call our
"University City," our sister city of
Gainesville.
Then came the cruel fates of war.
Our fathers and our older brothers
heard the call of duty, left thesr
homes, their children and their
schools, and, as patriotic citizens,
shouldered their rifles and marched
to the armies. Years of deprivation
ensued, and when the bloody stm?
gle ended the few scattering remnant
of the flower of our land, poor in
health, footsore, weary and desti destitute,
tute, destitute, with empty sleeve and halting
gait, limped to their former homes,
there to help comfort the weeping
widows and the crying orphans of
their comrades whose bleaching
bones were scattered on the battle battlefield.
field. battlefield. What a scene of desolation and

waste greeted their eyes, for in the! behalf of the association. ;A31 these fT
wake of the victorious armies came, (addresses were attentively heard andJ

also, a horde of vandals who seize!
upon our institutions of government
and took charge of the political af affairs
fairs affairs of the stat.
Where the soldier left his beautiful
colonial home, with broad veranda
and green lawn, now he gazed upon
a heap of smouldering ashes. Hi
lands had been washed in the bloc
of his fellow man and his neighbor?
his cattle scattered and gone, h'k
fields desolate and barren, his l)2r.
empty, the school houses gone into
decay, and the playgrounds where
the children had romped in gleeful
pleasure had grown up with brush
and briar. Poverty, hunger and dis distress
tress distress gazed at him from every nook
and corner, and desolation and ruin
was abroad in the land.
But, my friends, the noble spirit of
patriotism had not been quenched,
for these noble men, heroes that they
were, recognizing that the struggle
was forever over and done, "beat
their swords into plowshares and
their spears into pruning hooks" and
started again.
In this condition something had to
be done. Our little resources that
were left to us had to be utilized by
centralization and combining the
fragments. In our sister city of
Gainesville was an academy of learn learning
ing learning with nice buildings and furni furniture,
ture, furniture, which the noble people of that
section had preserved, Lr their in indomitable
domitable indomitable will, through all these try trying,
ing, trying, times of war, and all of which
they offered as a donation to the sem seminary
inary seminary east of the Suwannee river, on
the condition that it was located
there. This offer the legislature ac accepted,
cepted, accepted, by chapter 14S7, acts of 1S65,
and the East Florida Seminary was
transferred to Gainesville.
Our people had 'done much for the
cause of education while the semi seminary
nary seminary was here, by way of donations
and otherwise, and while the people
of the state recognized the fact, the
state was then too poor to compen compensate
sate compensate us for the loss that we had sus sustained
tained sustained by the removal of the semi semi-nary
nary semi-nary from Ocala.
f -Amm-ai was one of ex-
"""
in constitutional con rent ion asc-cn. ;
bjpd, by section 2G of article 10, of
the constitution of the state of Folr Folr-ida
ida Folr-ida of 1S85, authorize and empower
the legislature to make a "provision
for the proper adjustment and settle settlement
ment settlement of the claims." Pursuant to this
authority the legislature of 1SS7 did
make compensation to the citizens of
Ocala for such claim.
What has been Ocala's loss by the
fates of war has been Gainesville's
gain. How magnificently and grace gracefully
fully gracefully has our sister city worn her
honors, for the. nucleus thus begun
fired the zeal of her citizens to great greater
er greater efforts, and today we have in her
midst institutions of learning in
which the whole state of Florida takes
delight, and the whole state of Flor Florida,
ida, Florida, now in this convention assem assembled,
bled, assembled, recognizing her deeds of valor,
sends greetings to our University
City. May her star of intelligence
grow brighter and rise higher and
higher, and its luster never be
Now, agMT to ha member? cf the
Florida Euucatic:;ai Association, on
behalf of ih:? citizens of this city, I
extend to you a hearty v:eIcome ?o
our city, to our homes and firesides,
and may the bleFsings of an all-wise
Providence lead and direct you in all
of your deliberations.
Following Judge Bullock, Mr. R.
C. Muncaster, ecretary of the Board
of Trade, gave the teachers a wel welcome
come welcome from the commercial bodies of
the city. Dr. W. F. Blackman of
Rollins College then responded in
ANY BODY CARS
SHOO THE FOES"
BUT i! TAKES
m EXPERIENCED
SHOE THE FEET9'
it
if rrri rm if Tp
IS TtfE M AN'
Bedroom Slippers,
Slumber Slippers.
We Slice 'fm" From
Infancy to Old Age.
OUR SHOES
I
Fit" and "BeneliL"
FULL. LIXE
DURS0N SEAMIESS HOSE.
LITTLE'S SHOE PARLOR
S est Broatlvray
Oci.:. r : : : : Florida

warmly applauded.

Mr. W. M. II olio way, state super- j
made his annual address, ,5rn'ch V.-a3-.'
as usual full of informcion. Mr.
Hollo way said:
Mr. Holloway's Ade$s
Ten years count for littk&i the life
of a state, or the work of a mibhe
school system. The duty and' im importance
portance importance of free public education ar
.so generally conceded that little in inquiry
quiry inquiry is made into the work of the
schools, except from year to year.
The annual reports of school officers
are accepted as a matter of course,
and comparisons are sometimes made
between the results accomplished in
consecutive years." A comparison
covering ten years reveals some sig significant
nificant significant facts barely recognized by
school officers themselves.
From almost every viewpoint edu education
cation education is today the chief business of
the state. Its support is the privilege
of every taxpayer, and its advantages
the heritage of every child. Though
the progress of the last ten years fur furnishes
nishes furnishes the finest index to the life and
spirit of our people. I
Increase in the Number of Schoo.
On July 1, 1901, there were opeia opeia-ed2470
ed2470 opeia-ed2470 schools, while on July 1, 191 1
there were maintained 2G05 schools:
This shows an increase of only 12o
schools, but the small increase in the
number of schools is due to the aban abandonment
donment abandonment of many small schools and
their consolidation into a compara comparatively
tively comparatively few larger ones. The discov discovery
ery discovery of this fact is one of the surest
signs of progress. The false cry of
more and better schools has not been
unheard in the meantime, but it is
more than gratifying to observe that
its siren influence has attracted only
a few victims. This condition indi indicates
cates indicates that the citizens of the state
have already established approxi approximately
mately approximately the number of schools they
consider necessary. The problem of
the present time is not to increase,
but to improve the schools, and al already
ready already a strong tendency toward con
solidation and an increased teachin
the number of ;o!s tor iue na.i.v
period was onlv?5, thus showing
better gradation jid furnishing an
opportunity forpre thorough in instruction,
struction, instruction, j
In 1001 the nutr of white teach teachers
ers teachers employed whrere graduates of
normal schools wi59, and the num number
ber number of negro tears 77. In 1911
the number of ie teachers who
were graduates normal schools
was 5G2, and negreachers 1S5. The
number of whiteteachers holding
first grade certifies in 1901 was
557, while the ni)er in 1911 was
1053.
High iools
In 1901 there wf only three four-
year high schoolgmploying three
Y
?
V
?
V
f
I
Y
Y
Y
teachers for their hole time, while
in 1911 there wer.hirtv schools of
this character.
In 1901 there ve no three-year
high schools with o teachers each
for their whole ti-, while in 1911
i tviorrt "-nfo tor ?chis meeting these
reouirements. In ll there were no
two-year high s-choc with one teach
or for h's whole tir, and one teach
r for half of his ?e, while in 1911
there were thirty-ri? such schools.
In 11 there was i high school in in-tpc
tpc in-tpc ccr, but in 190Siis position was
created, and his saly and expenses
have been and are i.v being paid by
the general educatic board and the
state board of conol. The state
legislature has neve been asked to
appropriate one centjr this purpose.
This splendid showii in the matter
of high schools is nde in the face
cf the fact that, as t as I am in
t
Y
Y
Y
?
formed, Florida is U only state in
the Union whose leslature is for-
I bidden by the consvation to make
i
appropriations for tl support of its
j pu-'lic schools.
! Rat" cf Levy for Siol Purposes
j m !:.", 'wo CO"." ni: 3 a.-'-sesseu a-. i
I mil If. and fort y-t hree -.nun ies assess-1
r?rDr-"r? f mi-Is. fory-five counties
f;.-LcLSKl 7 mill? ar' cr. county v
mi'ls. At t rr- seL ti or-o com;-
tv assesses 1 mil': two cut!'
a5.?es-
r i
on? o 'r. t
v 1 -'!'
sess 7 mills,
ptntf i-. now
r.l jt vim'" Tn
creas-.c- of ic-
foity-rar couniies ;
Fhf- Avraae frr t
mills, r. convtitntion convtitntion-Th:3
Th:3 convtitntion-Th:3 ?narkablo in infer
fer infer scV-o! purposes
shows the great conTience which
th? p"-oP'j of the stat' have in the
ire no longer seri-iP". aected
the cry of '"too much axe?,"' which
has been made in this o'lntry frri
the daps of th stamp act to the pres
ent time. It b -h roves the people to
gaa rl carefully the public treasury,
but economy in education fc like the
seductive flattery of the serpent :n
Eden, or the blighting sugg-tions of
the tempter in the wilderness.

Y
Y

i Buildings, Furniture Hd Apparatus
In the value rthe -mihlic
' (Concluded on Fourth Pai?f)

'SATISFACTI

.?& A
Thiuk a moiMit about

4,a11 you want, ur 'Expect, that is all there is to it for
yen. So many our customers have expressed their
satisfaction iu having a check account here, that you
can seelrom that one word just how they feel abot it.
It is a most excellent convenience to have aL(5:eck
account, if you vnll step into the bank any dn we
will show you the advantage, as well as the satisfaction
of paying by check. l

THE MUNROE &
Ocala,
ESTATE

n

WML

INSURANCE DEPARTMENT
Agent for a dozen of the best Fire Insurance Companies in the land
Thoroughly competent to care for your insurance business.
Will be pleased to care for your business in any of these lines.

W. DITTO

Phone 285

A.
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: ..." ''32' 'I
.: : ,':..:';',:;."'-';
! ilMMMIllilBIl I
ilMGlIMSi' :

HAfTS the use of having a gun
and using poor ammunition?

F you do you can't have much fun
or luck or even satisfaction, and

I

it takes all of these to constitute
good sport.
We are Headquarters for Shells, Cartridges, Powder
and all Kinds of Ammunition Supplies.

n rr

Ocala, -

ST. JOSEPH'S ACADEMY j
'
T ",..-'-.'" .- ..' .'
i- ... .. ? .. : .-.-: ., ,, .,-..

LOHETTO (Xear Mandarin) Florida

ftowriinor cnM fnr Bovs. Conducted by thfe Sisters ot St.

Boys froi Eight to Fourteen Years Received, and Carefully Trained on
Physical, Intellectual. Moral and Social Lines. Healthy Location. Mu Munificent
nificent Munificent Swimming Pool. Complete Equipment in Seihoolrooms. Dorm
itories, Dining Hail end Recreation Rooms.
Apply for Prospectus to the Sister Superior
ST JOSEPH'S ACADEMY LORETTO. FLORIDA

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tltfs word. "SaMgraction
CBAMBUSS BAM
Florida
AND WSURANQLf
EEAlpSTATE
Town property i-timproved and un
improved, for sale. Real' pr-jfit
bringing instments.
Small Far: as, Timber Tracts, gr grange
ange grange Groves for a3e &t most aay aay-"
" aay-" fhiifg that you wish, on terms to
suit. ; t
RENTAL DEPAUTMSOT4 ?
We have housed for reOtior will
take charge o. property collect
the rent, keep up repairs sfrnfc ay
taxes. i
OCALA, FLA.
-.

ffiariware Co.

Florida

'

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JL
..
OCALA pTE5(iS6 StAIl, WEDVESDAV, JAXCA&t i 1913
OGALA EVENING STAR
Bittinger & Carroll Proprietors.
B. R, Carroll, Uuslness Manager.

- -- ; :n-6X:'

J. II. Benjamin, Editor.

Entered In the p03tofflce at Ocala,
Fla., as second class mall matter.

A 3ILCH NEEDED LESSON

The conviction of the iron workers
at Indianapolis Is a lesson that the
Star hopes union workmen will heed.
Labor unions are formed to help
members in particular and uplift soci society
ety society in general, and they have daone a
powerful work for both. Sometimes,
' they make the great mistake of of offering
fering offering violent opposition to consti constituted
tuted constituted authority. It Is very true, that

they are generally goaded to this by
Injustice, but It never fails to do them
more harm than good. The iron work workers'
ers' workers' union is a very powerful organi organization,
zation, organization, and its leaders became drunken
with the sense of their power. The In Instituted
stituted Instituted the campaign of dynamite
against those who oppressed their un union,
ion, union, forgetful or careless that they
were also making war on society in
general, and their policy would lead
to their own ruin, or a state of affairs
worse than the evil they professed to
be combating.
There Is no doubt that the accused

men had a fair trial. They had plenty
of money and employed the best coun counsel.
sel. counsel. It is not likely that the jury
would have convicted them on the tes testimony
timony testimony of McManigal. Unfortunately
for them, there was plenty of other
evidence that they hadnot only made
war on those they believed wronged
them, but had been very careless of
the lives of the neople in general.
Laboring men should organise, they
should help each olher on the plan of
other frateru&Vsocieties, they should
vote forfhe men and measures who

wrLLfrj,rrv out their oolicies. for the

welfare of the working men and the
welfare of the world are bound up in
each other. They should strike when
they cannot obtain their rights in no
other way, but they should never re resort
sort resort to violence. Whenever they do so
they transgress the rights of socity in
general, which is bigger, than any la labor
bor labor union or'any combination of Capi Capital,
tal, Capital, and never fails to vent its wrath
on anything that causes it trouble.

Speaking of the conviction of the

leaders of the iron workers' union re

minds the Star that a couple of years

aero It became wise to the identity of

a government agent who was in thi3

territory on the trail of a couple of

men whom it was believed either in

tended doing harm to some structure
in this vicinity or went thru on their

way to some other section. They went

down to Dunnellon on the "short one
morning carrying a valse, In which

was enough dynamite to have blown
the train to pieces. This was one of
the most serious offenses alleged
agaist these people they carried ex

plosives on the trains and boats at

tha deadly peril of all who were any

where In their neighborhood. Quite a

number of Industrial plants in Citrus
and Levy counties are carried on wUh
non-union labor, and the dynamiters
may have intended to make an object
lesson of one of them, but changed
lheir minds. The government agent

Si

pit account Oj

lowest

yoiiF Convention in our City, we are placing
Mf Ti HI tm

irices ever aiiempiea in urns or any omer

state our entire line of

on sale 'at
part of.tti

the

THIS SALE IS HOW Of AfID WILL CONTINUE TILL THE END
Bear in mind that this is a sale of high class goods.

OF THIS WEEK. IT MEANS FIVE OF THE BIGGEST MONEY JUG DAYS.
Our garments are made by the best manufacturers in his coun

try. At the price we are selling them this week you will save about half.

Here Aire a Few if Time Speeni

In this assortment you will find the very latest in Suits. Some
of them sold up to $25. We have a very large assortment in all wool
fabrics and all sizes. Owing to the fact that we had a very mild
winter, we have decided to offer these suits for

T H D

Hi

At

We have other Suits to go in this sale at $0.30 to $15. These
Suits formerly were sold by us at $12.50 to $30. They are all wool.

$10

LONG

COAT

In this assortment you will find the newest that is made, in
Coats. Some are of the fancy mixtures. In the lot we have put in
a number of Silk Plush Coats. Some are lined with Satin. They are
worth from $15 to $25. They go in the

T H 1

WEEK
$1

We havte a lot of other Coats that go in this sale at $2.0 to
$12.50 that were sold by us for exactly double the amount. We must
rid our store of all winter goods.

$150 For I

1 Serge Breses

These Dresses are made up to now and sold for -$5.S to $9.98.
Most of them are Blue Serge and are strictly ALL WOOl We have
nearly every size. They v.V.1 be sold on

T H I

K

We have a very large line of other Dresses that go inthis sale
at nearly half of their former prices. We must sell out of his line
as we will not carry anything over.

Remember that Everything in Ready-to-Wear Top Clothes for Ladies' go in this Sale for
this week. : : : : : : : :

O O A. TL, A.

1

STERLING SILVER FLATWARE

OPEX DAY AXD XIGIir

was here for two days JQji-rw-of.J.M
Ocala U"

lyaitor Frank Harris announces tha

he has taken his son, Frank Harris, Jr,
into partnership inhis paper. Almos

born and raised J the Banner office

ana learning the 3 business from the

ground up, Mr. Jprank Harris, Jr., i
sure to be successful in his profes

sion. The Star Irishes for him as long

and useful a life as the one that i.s
being honorable and actively lived by

his distinguished father and
sake.

name

ine lurks have proposed to the

Balkan allies that the entire question
of a treaty of peace be turned over to
the great powers.. If the allies expect
to obtain their rights, they may as well

recommence the war.

TheC andy of Character

On the Character of Candy
depends its fitness for
gift making.

No Candy is so well fitted
and graciously accepted as

Candies of Rare Quality.

T.

vci-fCovU worth of Sterling

Silver flatware in the store the latest,
most stylish silver and the very best
grade manufactured. The prices are
as attractive as the goods. Come in
and look over the stock and select
such articles as you want for your yourself,
self, yourself, the family or friends. Gifts from
this stock last a lifetime and are" al always
ways always a source of pleasure and satisfac satisfaction,
tion, satisfaction, both to the giver and those who
receive them. A. E. Burnett,
(Ad. tf) The Jeweler.

SEED OATS

Merchants'fe, A. C. L.
ner. Meals a carte and
any hour.

depot cor cor-lunches
lunches cor-lunches nt

I V. IC. LAE

Specialist i Ear,
Office, Lavibrary

Xo.e and Throat
BIdg, Ccala Ad.

AUTOMOE FOR SALE CHEAP
A four-cider, two-passenger car
in first clasondition in every respect.
Cheap for h. Apply at this office.

Ninety Day and Texas

for sale by Ocala Seed Store. Ad. Bakery. A

We willke any sl-e or kind of

Rust Proof I cake to y special order. Carter's

FOR RENT

FOR RENT Two furnished rooms
for light housekeeping, modern con conveniences.
veniences. conveniences. Apply 161 S. 3rd street,
east. Ad. 12-17-tf
FOR RENT Six room house for col colored
ored colored tenant, near Brick church. See
Gillen, No. 1, South 5th street.
FOR RENT Two-story house with
every modern convenience. Apply to
Joseph Bell. 12-13-6t
FOR RENT Offices 'n Holder build building.
ing. building. Apply to Davis & Martin.

THIS READS TO AVE

LIKE AX L-I-E

CONFESSED TO THE CRIME

Torn Smith Acknowledged that he

Alone wrm Concerned In the
Murder of Dr. Spencer
Gainesville, Jan. 1. Tom Smith, the

negro who in his confession a week

o declared that he was only a pawn

in the murder here on February 26 last

of Dr. H. C. Spencer, and that A. A.

Hampton, a white man, woodsman for

Gainey's turpentine camp, was the man

who assassinated Spencer, has made a

complete confession. Smith exonerates

Hampton and says he alone was con concerned
cerned concerned in the murder, luring Spencer

o a lonely place in the woods and

shooting the top of his head off with a

shotgun.

Smith says his motive for the mur mur-er
er mur-er was not revenge, as was at firsi

upposed, but that through continued

llness of his wife he had been unable

o meet his bills and thought he might

get considerable money from Spencer's

person. rins prompted him to commit

the murder. Smith took $3 in money
and a gold watch from the body.

DR. L. BLALOCK
PHY9AN and SURGEON
OFFICIOVER THE
COMMERCIAL DAXK

DR. F. BLALOCK
D4TAL SURGEON
Thon.211 Ocala. Fla.

Green Cove Springs, Dec. 31. The
quickest incubation ever witnessed
here occurred yesterday when a huge
hawk swooped down, fastening its tal tal-lons
lons tal-lons in a hen, bearing the squeaking
bird high up in the air.
During the hen's struggle she drop dropped
ped dropped an egg. The friction of the air

i was so great that by the time the egg

struck the earth, a downy chicken
peeped and waddled out of the shell. It
was supposed the hen was setting and
the egg due to hatch, and in some way
became entangled in the claws of the
fighting birds.

PARCELS POST IX OPERATIOX

W. TROXLER

24 Alain Slreel
SALES AGENT
for

HUYLEir

M'lVER & MAG KAY
. Funeral Directors
Undertakers and Embalmcrs
Fine Caskets and Burial Robes
I). E. McIYEIt and C. V. ROBERTS
Funeral Directors
ll Work Done by Licensed Km.

balmers and Fully Guaranteed.
PHONES:

-fm tJ. -ULV. a ei ...... .... . . J U o

XC. V. Roberts 30 &
TDiertaking Office 47

IV. G. BLANCHARD
CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER
PLANS FURNISHED
ON APPLICATION

P. O..ROX 40 OCALA. FLA

AVEJVOUR CAR PAIXTED

FIrM Package -Mailed from Washing Washington
ton Washington at Midnight
Washington, Jan. 1. The first pack package
age package to be mailed in Washington under
the provisions of the new parcels post
system was deposited in the city post post-office
office post-office immediately after midnight by

I'ostmaster-General Hitchcock.
Reports to the postoffice department
from all divisions throughout the
country indicate that the equipment
and the workmen are ready for the
great increase of package mail mat matters.
ters. matters. The system became operative at
midnight.

WLL LEE'S

NEXT TO
iioga;& co's. new

SALOON

AX UXOESin ADLK EMIGRAXT

Ie-

Ex-Dirtator Catro of Venezuela

taineil at Ellis Island
New York, Jan. 1. Cipriano Castro,
ex-president of Venezuela, seeking en entrance
trance entrance to this country after a lonir

residence abroad, was taken off the
steamship La Touraine at quarantine
yesterday and removed to Kllis Island,
pending a decision whether he will 1
allowed to enter the United States.

West Sle of Public Square
Evening Brand New,
Clesand First Class.

Excellnt Tabic Board

Quick. nd Efficient Service
Best Shrt Order House, and
Most Ulcerate Prices in the City
ANYTHING
YJ WANT TO EAT,
WIIEX YV WAXT IT AXD AS YOU
LIKE IT
DETWEN HOGAX & CARLISLE

Charge for

(if you want

the advice you hand
eople to take it.

out

READ THIS
The Texas Wonder cures kidney and

oiaaaer trouble, removing gravel,
cures diabetes, weak and lame backs. J
rheumatism and aH irregularities of
the kidneys and bladder in both men j
and women. Regulates bladder trou-
bles in children. If not sold by your I
druggist, will be sent by mail on re

ceipt of $1. One small bottle is"' two

months' treatment and seldom fails to
perfect a cure. Send for testimonials

from this and other states. Dr. E. W.

Hall, 2096 Olive street, St. Louis, Mo.

Sold by all druggists. All.

WE CAN"

MANUSCRIPT COVERS

An elegant line of lawyers' manu manuscript
script manuscript covers, in any color that could
be desired, just received at the Star
office. Ad.

ROOMS WANTED

Three or four unfurnished rooms on
ground floor wanted by couple with no
children. Apply at Star office. 12-24

BOARD AXD LODGIXG

We are prepared to take a few
boarders; good fare and comfortable
rooms for $4.75 per week. Mrs. J. A.
Mooney, No. 160 North Magnolia street.

FOR REXT

Three furnished and two unfurnish unfurnished
ed unfurnished rooms, desirable location. Apply at
53 South Fourth street. Ad.

HAY

LMSTED

Inverness, Fla., Dec. 27. Curtis E.
Hay, son of former City Marshal Hay
of Crystal River, but now foreman of
the Dunnellon Advocate, was married
to Miss Ethyl Olmsted of Alachua.
Alachua county, Wednesday. Gaines Gainesville
ville Gainesville Sun.

REAL ESTATE LOANS WANTED

Parties with money to loan can
into communication v ith demand
same on gilt-edged security by
dressing the Star office. Ad.

get
for
ad-

CITY POUND PROPERTY FOR SALE

WITH

SUPPLY YOU

PUKE ICE
For All Purposes, Whether Your
Requirements are for Home Use
.pQr for a Carload.
PLACBsbR ORDERS WITH US.
OCALA ICE & PACKING CO.
OCALA . FLORIDA

Notice is hereby given that the city
council will receive bids on the 7th
day of January, A. D. 1313, for the
sale of the following described prop property
erty property situate, lying and being in the
city of Ocala, Florida, to-wit: Com Commence
mence Commence 12S.25 feet w of ne comer of
block 47, Old Survey, Ocala, w 46.75
feet, s 124 feet, e 46.75 feet, n 124 feet.
This being the property known as the
pound lot, or the old city stables lot.
Council reserves the right to reject
any or all bids. IL C. Sistrunk,
12-18-tf City Clerk.

Reel?, lines and all kinds of fishing
tackle of the kind that give3 satisfac satisfaction
tion satisfaction at the Marion Hardware Co. Ad.

iSTL'.-'im.irvi im,i,mr

MTM(

TO

ii IDJrlivuMMiijlm

In order to increase our Mail Order busi business
ness business through out the State, we will give a
discount of 25 per cent to all the visiting Tea Teachers,
chers, Teachers, on our large line of Valises, Jewelry.
Leather Bags, Grips, Music Rolls, Card Cases
and numerous other Articles.
Our prices are always the Lowest, and by
deducting an extra 25 per cent, we are prac practically
tically practically Giving you a New Years Gift, to gain
your trade and good will.
A large line of Unredeemed Pledges al always
ways always on hand,

lave 25 per cent By Buying From

(EOLPMAKl

The Man Who Wants To Loan You money
WHY PAY MORE?

A fine line of guns, ammunition,
hunting- coats and legrins? at the Ma Marion
rion Marion Hardware Company. Ad.

J, E. GHAOE
DENTAL SURGEON
Rooms 9, 10 and 11, Sewnd Floor,
Holder Block,
OCALA FLORIDA
TERMS. CASH.

XOTICC

A regular annual meeting of the
stockholders of the Marion Hardware
Co. will be held in the office of R. S.
Hall, Ocala, Fla., on Jan. 14th, 1913, at
10 o'clock for the transaction of such
business as shall come before the
meeting. Ii. S. Hall, President.
C. E. Nelson, Assistant Secretary.

M, C. IZLAR
DENTAL SURGEON
Law Library Buildin
Phone 444

OCALA,

FLORIDA

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OC1L4 ETESTSCi ST.4K, WT.D.VESDAV, JASUAIir 1, 1013
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ieml-Annua! Mafcment of
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begwith si.oo

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I thought sure "y fcank book recently. I called up the cash-

Even if a dishonest

lor. Mr. Elitch. an

mnnPv. He tc was no danger of that

erson should nndpoi he cannot withdraw the money without a
written orde'r from?416. m? signature on file so no one can forge
my name.
I found the bcb hen 1 ot V V&Y envelope, I deposited ten
dollars firt thing. that ten foolishly. I think I can bank fif fifteen
teen fifteen next monthf fm not spending as much as I used to, but this
bank book sure lo;me-
THE WAY t: HAVE AN ACCOUNT WITH

tilt

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Be Sum Get the Best in

OCEMEE

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The Uindcoinpelled to sell, because;
if wit vc would lose our
!

x nana extensive trade.

1 inspect our stock.

It is not FINEST In town but it Is
BEST selected.

HERE FEW OF OUR SPECIALS

(Continued from First Page)

"The Community and the School"
was the subject discussed by the first
four speakers of the morning.
Hon. II. H. Richardson. the first
speaker, paid a high tribute to the edu educational
cational educational school system of Florida. Mr.
Richardson gave a general outline of
the system, calling attention to some
of the remaining weaknesses, and
making suggestions as to what might
be done in order to eliminate those
weaknesses.
The second speaker. Major L T.
Izlar, pointed out some of the flaws as
he saw them, He was not satisfied, he
said, with the ability of the average
high school graduate in the matter of
expressing his thoughts in good Eng

lish a-hdtticr eT.ril-cn c,r written TV,e'Eank building

ability to write and speak the English

language correctly was held up as onej

he i mm,
in (

OCALA, FLORIDA.
'
t the CIoe of IJ?iine.4 December
3lMt, 15)12, Ituel Indrr Infrac Infraction;
tion; Infraction; from Comptroller
ASSETS

Loans and discounts ....

County warrants
Stocks and bonds
Overdrafts

furniture and

fixtures . .
Cash:

i
Iot Chocs
Uric Choc
Club Choej
Biiek Che!
Edam Che!
Curry Pof
rimento C
Pickled
Pineapple;
Limhurgef
Caniembe
Yezet I) ut
Self BMn
Grated Pte
Hen-ins iace
Xo. 1 ane?l
l'hiladclpheose
Macedoniteetables)
L

Cod Fisli
Pimentos
Anchovies
Mushrooms
French Peas
Swiss Cheese
Bloater Paste
Graham Flour
Anchovy Paste
Cod Fish Balls
Pickled Salmon
Kitchen Bouquet
Smoked Halibut
Findon Haddopk
Holland Herring
Smoked Bloaters
Kippered Herring
Roquefort Cheese
Whole Wheat Flour

HUNDREDS THINGS TOO NUMEROUS TO MENTION
!
i
0. la Pot CiFocery

OCALA,iiones 16-174

FLORIDA

4 zi:rti C W

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Hotel Astor
Corner Bay and Hogan Sts.
Jacksonville, Florida
niTrc. 1 !!
Ilot and Cold Running Water and
Telephone in Each Room. Free Baths
COOLEST ROOMS, REST BEDS
LARGE SAMPLE ROOMS
Take Street Car at Union Station and
Get off at Hogan Street

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AL IAND CO,

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EVEL0PE1 QF
ORTH OCjla

Jor Quick Sar
Jiave placed on sale 25 oose
iv lots in our New Subdkon
I NORTH OCALA
L- hplow value, k

ale of 25 lots the remainder
vanced $50. per lot. Buy a

'and save $50. This is a beau
liece of property, and we tak
jure in showing it to you whethei
ivisli to buy or not.

OFFICE:

On Mt. two Doors in. oi n.unIJ5-.

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s j. iuc w t j til c t. u.i.vii.iJiiiiuiLiiv v.
be sought and secured in our public
schools. The major then referred to
some of the imperfections connected
with our system, suggesting that those
things touching closely the life of the
student should be presented in such a
manner, in the school room, that they
could not be forgotten.
Miss Mays of the Ocala High School
faculty, was the third speaker on the
subject of the community and the
school. Miss Mays attacked the clas classical
sical classical course, as not meeting the re requirements
quirements requirements of the masses of children.
Such a course, she maintained, was not
sufficiently practical to b pursued by
all. More fresh air, more exercise and
an opportunity to use the natural gifts
and follow certain well-defined natural

inclinations, were some of the speaker's
recommendations.
Mrs. H. C. Richard, the last speaker
on the subject, was very earnest in
warning those who had not thought
seriously upon the subject, that the:
school is not a machine but rather that
it is an organism, of seemingly delicate
parts, yet possessing great pov-r.
The lecture, "The Home and the
School in Relation to Moral Training,"
given by Dr. Lotus D. Coffman, of the
University of Illinois, was the last
number enjoyed during the morning.
The doctor believes our school are
alive and informed the. audience that
the girls "and boys leaving our public
schools were more efficient in reading,
writing, spelling and computing than
; were the girls and boys who went out
f rom the public schools twenty-five or
thirty-five years ago. This was no
speculation, but had been proven in Il Illinois
linois Illinois at least. Affection in the home
and respect in the school were laid
j down as fundamentals, if the aims of
. educators are to materialize.
I
) This week while the teachers are
holding their convention in Ocala the
Woman's Club is having "at homes"
and has extended a warm invitation to
:each visitor to make the club rooms
headquarters. The large room is at at-:
: at-: traetively decorated with bamboo, hol hol-.
. hol-. ly and flowers, both growing and cut.
; Tables have been placed and fitted out
with writing materials and newsp'a newsp'a-i
i newsp'a-i pers and magazines are there for the
enjoyment of all. Emphasizing the
fact that a.11 are welcome a green ban banner
ner banner with "The Woman's Club Eids You
. Welcome," done in red, the club color,
is stretched across the room. Yester Yesterday
day Yesterday afternoon the following ladies,
Mrs. E. Van Hood. Mrs. D. W. Davis.
Mrs. G. T. Gary, Mrs. Harry Dozier,
Mrs. T. H. Johnson and Mrs. Kdw'n

Spencer served sandwiches and tea.
Mrs. Walter Hood, Mrs. E. T. Terduo
and Mrs. L. M. Murray received the.
j guests and by their gracious marmef
Imade each caller feel at home. This
afternoon sandwiches and tea will be

.served by the hostesses and the young

ladles In the club.
Iist evening after the business had

been attended to and. the exercises car carried
ried carried out by the teachers who met at the
Templf Theater, an informal reception

was held. Miss Nellie Stevens, who is

one of the noted educators of the state.

Introduced the guests to the receiving
line, which stood In the back of the
theater and included the following
noted people: Mr. W. M. Holloway, Mr.
W. X. Sheats, Mr. R. L. Turner, Dr. and
Mrs. W. F. Blackman, Mr. L. B. Ed Edwards,
wards, Edwards, Mrs. William Hocker, state
president of the Federation of Woman's
Clubs and Mrs. Charles Lloyd, vice
president of Ocala's Woman's Club, who
stood at the left of the entrance and
gave to each a most cordial and hearty
greeting. It is a matter of sincere re regret
gret regret that Mrs. Jack Camp, president of
the club, was detained at home on ac-

In vauls-
Due from banks.

81,6.64

29,030.00
142.61
27.000.00

121.2S6.C0

LIABILITIES

Capital stock s 30,000.00
Surplus and undivided profits 30,368.53

Dividend unpaid

Tbe Ford-Weather Wedding
f One of the moste&utlful weddings
ever solemnize lfn 0;ala and a mar marriage
riage marriage of unusual interest throughout
Florida occurred last evening at 5
o'clock in Grace Episcopal church,
when Miss Mari?rsther Weathers,
eldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Erant Erant-ley
ley Erant-ley Alexander -Weathers was united In
the holy bonds of matrimony t' Mr.
&z,Qrge Horace Ford ot Jacksonville.

Grace church was simply v tt effect-!

ively decorated with ferns in hoses an

asparagus ferns and white tulle. The

low screen, on enter ng the chancel,
was wrapped with white and trimmed
with asparagus fern. The chancel rail
was twined with the fern and tulle
and on the altar were placed two vases
of gorgeous bridesmaid roses. Num Numbers
bers Numbers of lighted candles, the same which
were used five years ago at Miss
Weathers cousin's wedding, Miss Hat Hat-tie
tie Hat-tie Dye, and made by an aunt of the
two brides, burned brightly. The ec ecclesiastical
clesiastical ecclesiastical hangings, which were on
the altar and the pulpit, were done by
a very dear friend of Miss Weathers,
Miss Margaret Eagleton of Tottstown,
ra.
Invited to the church were only the

1,320.00 relatives

the couple and a few of

Bills payable
Re-discounts
Deposits .

10.000.00 j their very intimate friends, and while
6.000.00 they were assembling to witness the
333,274.39 ceremony Miss Byrd Wartmann, organ

ist of the church and also an intimate

II I AC CIDEXT TO
nit. IttTSSELIS LITTLE HOY

The Star office received a lonsr dis distance
tance distance phone message this morning at
10 o'clock from Fernandina, asking it

f

1633, 362. S8 friend, rendered the following most
- pleasing musical program, the selec
tions being favorites of the bride bride-:
: bride-: elect:

Two French Noels, by Ginlmar.t.
Autumn 'Sketch, by Brewer.
The Swan, by Saint Lacus.
Promptly at 5 o'clock the strains of
he Bridal Chorus from Lohengrim by

to call Dr. V. II. Russell from the; Wagner pealed forth, heraldic s: the
teachers' convention hall ;nd inform approach of the bridal party. First
him that his little son had been fatally entered Messrs. Paul and Brantley
burned. Before the doctor could re-j Weathers, followed by Miss Mabel
ceive the message, a second message Taylor of Glendale, O., and Miss Edna
came, saying that the child was out jCushing- of East Orange. N. J. The
of danger, tho he had been badly burn- former wore a handsome gown of bro bro-ed
ed bro-ed and shocked by a live electric lightheaded charmeuse with lace trimmings,
wire. The little fellow is nine years The latter, an imported gray blue
old and named after his father. The charmeuse with a band of black velvet
relief to Dr. Russell and his friends around the bottom and trimmed hand hand-was
was hand-was grat when it was learned that soniely. Both carried arm bouquets of
tlte child would recover. Dr. Russell pink roses and wore a pink and white
is the principal of the Fernandina i rose in their coiffure. Next entered

High School. .Messrs. Benjie and Hibbert Weathers.
.Mrs. Vernie Stevens and Mr. Neil A.

; Weathers followed. Mrs. Stevens wore
:her own beautiful wedding gown and
carried an arm bouquet of bridesmaid
'roses.
1 Next came the maid of bono?, Miss
j Janet Ferguson Weathers, the only
I sister of the. biide-elect, who was
! gowned in white silk marquisette over
: white mescaline, 'fashionc d on a draped
j model and trimmed with accordian
'plaited rufsles and many pink rose rose-Jbuds.
Jbuds. rose-Jbuds. A wreath of rosebuds v;ere in
'her pretty nair and she carried pink

in banking and money matters as well! as
books. The best way to teach them is to let
them have a savings account in this bank.'
Habits of industry and thrift -developed
in early youth will give them a start to suc success
cess success at a time when their whole lives are still
before them.
THE OCALA NATIONAL BANK

JNO. L.

CAPITAL, FUL.LT IX 975,000
H. D. STOKES. Cashier.
EDWARDS, Pres. CLARENCE CAMP. Vic ITes.

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THE BEST

CHOOI

IN FLORIDA
FOR EASY, RAPID ADVANCEMENT,
AND THOROUGH INTELLECTUAL
EDUCATION.

ODIJ FELLOWS ELECTION

At the meeting of the Odd Fellows
last night, the following were elected:
Noble Grand R. V. Hendricks.
Vice Grand F. C. Goodwin.
Secretary W. L Colbert.
Treasurer .7. II. Benjamin.
Trustee A. M. Lansford.
Delegate to Grand Lodge r. V.
Leavengood.
Alternate J. F. Thompson.
These officers and the appointive of

ficers will be installed at next Tuesday roses

night's meeting, and after the business The bride-elect entered wi'.h her
of the evening is over, the members father and was joined at the front pew
will partake of a banquet. I by her. mother, both of whom gave her
away,
KING'S IJAKHITEKS. MEETING No more lovely young woman has
ever been led to the altar in this city
The King's Daughters will meet to-j than the bride of last evening-. She
morrow morning at .JO o'clock in the! was radiant in her handsome wedding

Methodist church.

STltAWnEHHIES IN THE CITY

Stra wherries
price is right.

at Ballard's and. ie

10 Yi lbs. Meal or Grits 25c
14 lbs. Whole Kiee $1.00
Targe liurket Snowdrift 91.10
Pure Home Made Lard per can. .30c
Irish Potatoes per peck .30c
Sweet Potatoes per peck 20c
Cream of Wheat 13c
Five Gallons Oil GOc

gown, the keynote of which was ex

quisite simplicity. It was fashioned of
white satin crepe meteor, draped, the
w;i ist being formed of beautiful rose
point and duchess waist, a fall of lace
edging the drapery. Orange blossoms
formed a wreath holding in place the
veil of tulle which fell to the end of
her long train. She carried an ivory
prayerbook, a gift from the groom,
with a shower bouquet of valley lilies
and wore a rope of pearls with a pearl
pendant.
The bride-elect was met by the
groom-elect, who had as his best man
his only brother, Mr. Donald Ford.
Rev. George Hendree Harrison of
Jacksonville, an intimate friend of
both, officiated, reading impressively
from the bride-elect's prayerbook the
beautiful ring ceremony of the Epis Episcopal
copal Episcopal church. The bridal party, each
member of the bride-elect's family tak-in--;-
part, made a deep and solemn im impression
pression impression on every one present which
will always be remembered tenderly.
During the ceremony Miss Wart Wartmann
mann Wartmann played softly and when the
words had been spoken that made Miss
Marian Esther Y"eathers Mrs. George

Horace Ford, the joyous strains of

I GEO. C. LOONEY

v

2 Cans Sunbeam Shrimp.
1-lb. Pkg. Sunbeam Soda
3 Pkgs. Sunbeam Mince Meat,

count of sickness.

Mrs. Frank Harris stood in the left's Cans Hominy

aisle and In the right one was Mrs.
Emily Green and Mrs. Walter Hood.
Receiving in the vestibule were Mrs.
L M. Murray, Mrs. W. D. Richie, Mrs.
J. C. Kirkland and Frof. J. H. Work

man. The gowns worn ry each or the j
ladies assisting during the evening-'3 Pkgs. Sunbeam Corn Flakes
were exquisitely handsome and most j
becoming to the wearers. d Pkff. Sunbeam Oatmeal...

The reception hour passed all too
quickly and was thoroughly enjoyed
by all present, who were many for the
entire building was packed to its utmost.

Seven Bars Lenox Soap o-c ; Mendelssohn's Wedding March pealed
forth and the bridal party left the
Six Bars Ex post Borax Soap 23c j church.
I Immediately after the 'ceremony the
2 Cans J-lh. Ocean Gem Salmon. 23c we lding party drove to the home of
t i o- the bride's parents, 35 Fine street,
3 Cans Sunbeam Salmon Soc! vhere a recei,tion was held from 6 to
3 Pkgs. Jello or Tee Cream Pw(lr.23c 8 o'clock, and the happy couple receiv-
, iJ the cuiigra luiations and bet wishes

23c of their many friends.

Receiving with the bride and groom
re the parents of the bride. Mrs.

an unusually handsome

.25cj w,

j Weathers.
.to

matron, was charmingly attired in

Mr. Frank O. Reagan of Brooksville,

Ocala, is in the

1 Bottle Sunbeam Boiled Cider.

lb Van llouteu's Cocoa
lb. Van Hotiten's Cocoa. .

1 lb. Van llouteu's Cocoa

white imported Japanese hand-em

broidered crepe, trimmed with rich lace
.23c i and she carried a bouquet of brides

maid roses.
Mrs. Nancy Brooks Ferguson of Old-

grandmother, who is

. 23C

10c

43c Ford

. 83c

a former resident of

city with the teachers. Mr. Reagan is

a member of the board of trustees of,2 Bots. 10e Size Vanila Extract

the Brooksville sub-school board. He
says they have five teachers in their
school with an enrollment of 300 and

attendance of over 1T0

Y I an average

, uj.ila.

Among the most enjoyable events of

the meeting at the Temple last eve- j
ning were the two beautiful solos, j2 lbs

!2 Bots. 10c Size Lemon Extract. 13c

. 13c

1 Bot. 23c. Size Lemon Extract. .20c
1 Bot. 23c. Size Vanila Extract. .20c

1 lb. Cracker Boy Coffee. .
1 lb. White House Coffee

' town, the bride

: m her eignty-sixth year, witnessed the
.23c i weddinsr and looked very sweet in

black satin with lace trimmings. Mrs.

1 T J 1 .... 1 i. . . : 1

(with lace.

The Weathers home, which is one of

line nan-'. -omest in ucaia. was r,eautl-

fully decorated. Quantities of luxur luxuriant
iant luxuriant bamboo was used graceful!- over
all the wsndows. doors and arches. The
chandeliers were all trimmed with as asparagus
paragus asparagus fern and in wall vases every everywhere
where everywhere w-re frazrant and gorgeous

3QC roses. A tall arrangement of lilies ol
I the valley centered the dining table. I

40c

Y j 'Tarla," in Italian and "Good-Bye" in
English, sung by Miss Marguerite For For-vjter.
vjter. For-vjter. Every heart in the audience was
j I thrilled by the exquisite music.

Mr. Thomas J. Appleyard of Talla Tallahassee,
hassee, Tallahassee, state printer, editor of the
Florida School Exponent and secretary
of the State Fress Association, and his
daughter, Miss Charlotte Amelia, are
visitors to the teachers' association.
Miss Mabel T. Rogers of Daytona
and MJss Amy Irene Shaw of Ormond
are among the teachers at the Ocala
House. Miss Rogers is a daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. D. D. Rogers, who were

residents of Ocala In the early nineties,
and was for some years a student of
the Ocala High School.
Miss Nellie Mann, teacher at Daytona
Beach, and Mrs. J. M. Dickinson and
pretty little daughter, May Elizabeth,
of Narcoossee, are among the visitors
to the city.

roe:

.81.03

White House Coffee.

i3 lbs. White House Coffee
i

1 Glass Beachnut Bacon .
1 Glass Beachnut Beef. .
1 Can Beachnut Beans. .

Beachnut Peanut Butter 10c 13c 23c
Beachnut 13-pint Catsup. ..... .13c

which was laid with a handsome cloth j
of drawn work. On the table were sil- i

ver dis'iT- filled with almonds, crystal
compotes filled with pink and white
mints and silver candlesticks holding

o-l lighted tapers shaded with pink. Sil-'

Lloyd, Mrs. II. A. Ford, Mr. and Mrs.
Ralph Birdsey, Miss Emily Stotesbury
and Rev. and Mrs. Harrison. Mr. Wood Wood-row
row Wood-row and Dr. Chace saw that each call caller
er caller registered in a book which will be
bound in material like the bride's
wedding gown.
At 8:15 o'clock Mrs. Ford donned her
traveling costume, which was a coat
suit of amathyst broadcloth with which
was worn a pretty waist of the same
color. Her chic hat was also of that
shade and trimmed with autumn leaves.
Mr. and Mrs. Ford left on the 8:15 train
for an extended wedding trip, no one
knowing their destination except" Mrs.
Weathers.
They were the recipients of many
handsome presents of linen, china, cut

glass and silver.
The bride is a woman of rare culture
and charm and has enjoyed .unusual
popularity. She possesses a sweet,
gentle nature which has won for her
a large circle of friends, who wish her
happiness but regret that her new
home will be in Jacksonville.
The groom, a well known young
business man, is the older son of the
late II. A. Ford and Mrs. Ford of this
city and has spent most of his life
here, having moved two years ago to
Jacksonville. He is prominent In bus business
iness business and social circles and is being
heartily congratulated on winning so
lovely a bride.
The couple were accompanied to- the
station by their attendants and many
friends and left amid a shower of rice
and best wishes for their future hap happiness.
piness. happiness. Nw Year's Party at the Welhe Home
For more than a quarter of a cen century,
tury, century, or ever since their marriage, Mr.
and Mrs. Fred G. B. Weihe have invited
in a few friends each year to celebrate
with them the departure of the old
year and the coming in of the new. In
keeping with this custom, Mr. and Mrs.
Weihe informally Invited a number of
their friends, several of whom have
attended these occasions for many
years, to come and be merry.
The pretty home of the Weihes was
beautifully decorated in holly, ever evergreen
green evergreen and red and green Christmas
decorations and other kinds and the en entire
tire entire ground floor, from parlor to kit kitchen,
chen, kitchen, was opened to the use of the
guests. The pretty Christmas tree,
given Master Fred Weihe III., was
still in the parlor with its pretty dec decorations
orations decorations and fresh candles lighted as
the years changed.
In the kitchen Mr. Weihe had a
punch bowl, almost as large as the
crater of Vesuvius, but it.s contents
unlike the fruits of that ancient
menace to the Mediterraneaus it did
not turn to ashes on the lips.
In the dining room, Mrs. Weihe had
another bowl filled with fruit punch
for those who did not love the time time-honored
honored time-honored American Christmas and New
Year's beverage eggnog. Several
kinds of cake, nuts and fruits were
served all through the evening.
There was music, games, story tell telling,
ing, telling, fireworks and after all a flashlight
picture of the group gathered about

the Christmas tree, closing with a re record
cord record made on the phonograph, to
which all contributed a share. The re record
cord record was afterwards played and the re-

jsult created a great deal of laughter.

(The Weihes have these records dating
j back for six years, valued souvenirs

of the happy occasions.
Each of the thirty guests who spent

Mrs. C. T. Hodges in the third ward,

returned home yesterday. They iad a

most delightful visit and made many
friends here.
Miss Fejer'i Card Party
Miss Gertrude Peyser gave a large
and elegant card party last evenl.ig at
the pretty home of her parents Mr.
and Mrs. Charles Peyser, on South
Third street
The rooms were exquisitely decorat decorated
ed decorated "in holly, bamboo, cut flowers and
potted plants with red Christmas bells,
all carrying out the color scheme of
the holiday dance red and green.
The tables for the card players, of
which there were eighteen, were ar arranged
ranged arranged in the parlor, the sitting room
and dining room, and on each were
dainty dishes of red and green mints.
The tally cards were in red and green.
The prizes were neckties for the gen gentlemen
tlemen gentlemen and silk hose for the ladles?'
Little Misses Carolyn and Babetio
Teyser passed the score cards, tied
with pretty green ribbons with rd
bells attached.
Dainty refreshments were served In
courses, first, chicken salad on lettuce
leaves, salted almonds and potato
chips, p'ckles, olives and saltines. The
second course consisted of coffee with
whipped cream, cream cheese and wal walnut
nut walnut sandwiches. Cigars and cigarettes
were passed after luncheon to the
gentlemen guests.
Most of the young society people of
the city attended Miss Peyser'a party,
which was a most enjoyable affair.
Miss Peyser met her guests at the
door, and Miss Josie Bullock intro introduced
duced introduced the guests to the receiving line,
composed of Mr. and Mrs. Leon FIshel.
Miss Clara Rentz of Georgia, Miss

(Frances Smith of Plant City, Miss
Maggie Lytle of Stanton and Miss Lei

la Wood of Birmingham, four charm charming
ing charming visiting girls, and Mr. and Mrs.
Joe Wolf of Albany, Ga.
The luncheon was served by Misses
Lois Dame, Ruth Rentz, Musie Bull Bullock
ock Bullock and Theo and Gladys Wallis.
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Peyser and Mr. Mr.-Nathan
Nathan Mr.-Nathan Peyser assisted Miss Peyser In
entertaining her guests.

The guesst will long remember with

pleasure the delightful evening spent

at Miss Peyser's party.

Mrs. Mary Eagleton has returned

from a visit to her daughter in Phila Philadelphia.
delphia. Philadelphia. She found the little girl well
and happy and hopes to have her at
home soon.

Mrs. Emmett McKeown and young

son, who have been the holiday guests
of the former's daughter, Mrs. Emmett

Robinson, have returned to their home

in Baton Rouge, La.

, ine evening wun Jir, ana jirs. erne

with many

.35c adorned the bu
! salad and ice c
10c j salad was serv

e cream was

Beachnut Apple Jelly.

Beachnut Grape Jelly 20c
Beachnut Quince. Bed Currant
and Grape (individual size).. 10c

cream was the groo
. . ....

I :y iiie :).ri ;r, ;ci

15c! cake, w h c h w a .- m a

...

ns. t oeir: oeir:-Irs.
Irs. oeir:-Irs. Frank

Weat

MOOE SPECIAL, MEETING

A special meeting of the Moose will
be held at the lodge room Thursday
evening, Jan. 2, at 8 o'clock. All mem members
bers members requested to be present, as busi business
ness business of Importance must be attended
to. E. I Stapp, Secy.

Beachnut Cranberry Sauce

GARM-T

CO

23c!

' " 'bade them good-morning

. . ' "r wishes for a happy New Year and ex ex-1
1 ex-1 in p:nk rose cups and . ,

as frozen m tr.e snape ofi1 ... V.
. evening with them.
r-jt .-. served with the!

n's fruit cake made

)fj.;r ar.1! some oi trse orio s u

in three tiers and iced by; parents at Daytona.
Dra -ce. Or. top was a
lies of the valley. Miss i Mr. W. M. Wilson, who is with the
rrs cut the slipper. Miss 'Florida Abstract Co., went to Jack Jack-himMe
himMe Jack-himMe and the ring andsonvilIe last night to meet his family,
ere found later and the who will come here from Texas. They
givei. to little Miss Mar-, are expected to arrive in Ocala tonight

trinket was mark-'and vill make their home here,
initials and the j
I Mr. and Mrs. W. II. Dodge, Jr., came

hall Mis.s L'ettie Melver and down from Jacksonville last night to
ale Atkinson, a cousin of the spend a few days with Rev. W. II.
served delicious champ aign Dodge and fam'ly.

i T-uneh. The cake of "ce in the bowl :

I was topped with a cluster of lilies of i Mrs. Mazie and little daughter
I the valley. 'Dorothy are V.r-re from Gainesville,

The bride gave to each of her at- j visiting Mr. and Mrs. F. G. B. Weihe.

tenants a pretty t old veil pin in the Mrs. Lyles Is making her home In

e

e n c r

-, r -n r w as i

! garet Stevens, iia
I -d with the bri 1
fwedding date.

I In
i Miss

POON'E

163

shar e of a W set in pearls.

Assisting aurmg trie reception were
Dr. and Mrs. J. E. Chace, Mr. and Mrs.
D. S. Woodrow, Judge and Mrs. Rich Richard
ard Richard McConathy, Mr and Mrs. Charles

i Gainesville for the present.

Mrs. J. D. Lawrence and Miss Jessie
Lawrence of Salisbury, N. C. who have

been visiting-tlm' "' ""f.-r and sfster.

THE FIHE

NIGiiT

The firemen who were up and about

the station late last night saw a

blaze in the southern part of town and

responded without ringing the belL

The bell was afterwards rung by some
citizen who saw the blaze. When the
department reached the fire, which

was in a negro shanty, on Orange ave avenue,
nue, avenue, between South Fifth and Sixth

streets, the little house was entirely
wrapped in flames. There was another
house not over six feet from it and
the firemen with their hooks pulled

down the walls of the burning house
and saved the other one. The shanty

and its furnishings were H total loss.
It was owned by Lenona Edwards, a

colored woman, who was away from

home at the time.

MULE FOR SALE
A good dray mule, good as a general
purpose animaL Apply to the Ocala

Iron Works. l-l-6t

Fine watches in any style for ladies

and gentlemen at any price desired, at

A. E. Burnett's. Ad.

"Superba," Queen of Light, Temple,
Friday and Saturday.

"Superba," Qaten ot Light, Temple,
Friday and Saturday.

On band 100 gallons kme palet sj

Mrted colors to dispose of at a

rlSce. Call on Jos. W. Dodge. 12-10-tf

All &ind3 of fancy cakes and cookies
in stock each d iy or baked to order
at Carrier's Bakery. Ad.

Great "values In ladies -at ; suits,
cloaks, bath .rotes and komorms at
Ilelvenston & Fisteur s. Ad.

4

V ;
?i?W-
r
If



-4 .-,y-Btfi

OCALA EVEXIXG STAR, TUESDAY", DECEiLBETi 31, 1013

f
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Call up Phone 300 and JLet us Give an Estimate on Your

on n IIEMIOEK

li ii i ii it vv h 13 m n u

AND ELECTRICAL

WORK

We Guarantee to Save You Money on Any Work in Our Lines

Am we emptor none bat expert we are In position tt guarantee ev every
ery every piece of work vre cosmtrarl to Msnrt the inspection of the mo.
rlKltl Inapertorw. It eot nothing to Kl our figure, and yon ire tne
winner, whether we eeure tbe contract nr not. Give ua a trial.
M. W. TUCKER

FOnT KING BLOCK

OCA LA, FLORIDA

DUTIFUL

pa" W C&
hsJ rt-Tqi isasr as

V

PUNDITS II PUMAS

(Continued from First Page)

i : :

We have One of the Prettiest Line of Beds
in the State, Without Excepting any Firm.

We carry over fifty differ different
ent different styles, and nearly as
many different prices.
There are handsome white
enameled, with little or no
brass trimmings, then there
are solid brass beds, the

kind that do not tarnish, and there are pretty dark

green and blue ones, and many other colors and
shades and all of the different shapes and trimmings.
We will take great pleasure in showing you our
line of beds, and can certainly please you ;in this
department.
Respectfully,
McIVER & McKAY
THE FURNITURE AND HOUSE FURNISHINGS STORE

Wll

JACKSONVILLE'S F!
AND

NEST

FLORIDA'S LARGEST Hi BEST YEAH- ROUND HOTEL
The Hotel you take your Mother, Wife or
Sister to.
HOME-HOTEL OF THE STATE
R A TIES
AMERICAN PLAN $4.00 PER DAY AND UP-WARD
EUROPEAN PLAN $1.50 PER DAY AND UP-WARD
A. F. WILSON. Ass'l Mgr. THOS. M. WILSON. Prop, and M(jr
JACKSONVILLE FLA.

r

. ,- -.t-jtr.... ...

Take no chances "with a pain in the chest.
Every case of consumption began with that
eynptom. Stop It at once with

Ballard s

Syru

It is a Fine Healing Remedy for
Sere Lungs, Coughs and
Hoarseness.
It promptly Checks inflammation, relaxes tightness, clears the
air passages, restores tone and strength to the bronchial tubes.
Relieves hoarseness, irrltatinjr coughs, tickling sensations in the
throat; removes congestion and enables the patient to breathe
easily and rest comfortably at night.
Price 25c, 50c and $1.00 per B0HI3.
Buy the $1.00 size. It contains five timeg as much
as the 25c size, and yon ?et with each bottle a Dr.
ITerrlck's Red Pepper porous plaster for the chest.
JAl'ES F. BALLARD PSGrTJETSa ST. LOUIS, KG.

Stephens Eye Salve la a aafe and speedy remedy for Sore Eye.

school buildings was G4G,4S2, and in
mi it was $2,231,C11. The value of
furniture in 1901 was $114,477, while
in 1911 it was $372,S3C. In 1901 the
value of apparatus was $39,068, and
in 1911 it was $68,26S. In 1901 there
were 207 log buildings, 2112 frame
buildings, and 17 brick buildings; in
1911 there were 37 log buildings, 2441
frame buildings and 65 brick build buildings.
ings. buildings. Cost Per Pupil in Daily Attendance,
Average Monthly Salary of
Teachers, Etc.

In 1901 there was expended for

each pupil in daily attendance upon
the public schools the sum of $7.03,
while in 1911 there was expended for
the same purpose, $19.19. In 1901

the average monthly salary of teach

ers was $35.37; in 1910, it was $52.1 6.

In 1901 the average annual salary of

teachers was $lCO.0G; in 1910 it was
$270.49.

In 1901 the total sum expended for
all school purposes was $S55, 101.52;

in 1911 the total sum expended for

all scnool purposes was $2,47S,430.1C.
The average annual salary of the

county superintendents of public in instruction
struction instruction was $719 in 1901, while in

1911 it was $1302.20. It is probable
that the average salary of a Florida

county superintendent or public in

struction is now on a par with the sal

ary of this class of officials in any

other part of the United States.

During the scholastic year ending

June 30, 1901, there was expended for
the ecection of public school build

ings the sum of $72,354; during the

scholastic year ending June 30, 1911,
the sum of $295,153.39 was expended
for this purpose; during the same pe period
riod period there were spent for furniture
the sums of $2,120.C9 and $30,073.13.
and for apparatus, $2,0S7.C9 and $11. $11.-338.95,
338.95, $11.-338.95, respectively.
In 1901 the amount of county taxes
collected for school purposes was
$440,798, while in 1911 it was $959 $959-700.
700. $959-700. The state one-mill tax collected
in 1901 amounted to $91,705.45, while
in 1911 the amount collected was
$173,1 85.50.
In 1901 the principal of the state
school fund amounted to $743,100,
while in 1911 it aggregated the sum
of $1,420,407. This fund practically

doubled in ten years, or, in other
words, it increased as much in the
last decade as it had in 33 years be before
fore before that time. The remarkable in

crease in this fund during the de decade
cade decade is due to the sale of a large
acreage of school lands at better
prices than they had hitherto
brought, and the fact that beginning
in November, 190S, there began to be
placed in the fund, for the first time,
25 per centum of the proceeds of the
sale of public lands. This is in com compliance
pliance compliance with a provision of the con constitution
stitution constitution now nearly fifty years old,
but it had been overlooked or neg neglected
lected neglected by the state officials whose
duty it was to enforce it.
In a little over three years the in increase
crease increase from this source amounted to
$148,000.13, and it is safe to predict
that during the next decade it will
easily exceed $2,000,000. The trus trustees
tees trustees of the internal improvement fund
are now considering the sale of all
their lands in the Everglades for $S. $S.-000,000,
000,000, $S.-000,000, and if this sale be consum consummated
mated consummated it .will at once place $2,000,000
in the permanent school fund.

In 1901 the principal of the state
school fund was invested only in
state and federal bonds, but for about
three years this fund has been invest invested
ed invested also in county and municipal
bonds, thus keeping the money at
home and enabling the state board of
education to secure a better rate of
interest.
Enrollment and Attendance

$2,000,0u0, and their curricula are in
keeping with those of the standard
colleges of this country.

I predict that the next decade will
witness greater progress than the
preceding one, as the people are be becoming
coming becoming more and more concerned

about the education of their children.
Among the things that the next de decade
cade decade will no doubt have to its credit
will be a compulsory attendance law,
free books furnished by the state, a
law providing for educational and
professional disqualification for all
school officers, a state course of
study, in which the life, environment
and vocation of the child will be con considered,
sidered, considered, medical inspection of the pu pupils,
pils, pupils, professionally-trained teachers
for all of the schools, or at least for
the great majority of them, and an
amendment to the constitution, allow allowing
ing allowing the legislature to make appropria appropriations
tions appropriations for the support of the public
schools, and thereby manifest an in interest
terest interest in the education of all of the
children as well as in the education
of the few whq are fortunate enough
to attend the institutions of higher
learning, and last, but not least, bet better
ter better salaries for all the teachers.
In conclusion, permit me to thank
all the presidents of the institutions
of higher learning, both public and
private, for their uniform kindness
and cordial sympathy; the county su superintendents
perintendents superintendents of public instruction
for their hearty and willing co-operation
at all times; the teacviers for

their earnest work and self-sacrificing

spirit which they have ever manifest manifested,
ed, manifested, and all the people of the state

who conferred upon me the very
great honor of allowing me to be their
servant for the past eight years.
I congratulate the gentleman who
on the 7th of January will become my
successor. There will be conferred

upon him an honor second to none in
this country, and reposed in him a
trust which is more sacred than that
which on the same date will be as assumed
sumed assumed by Governor Trammell, or on
the 4th of March will be placed in the
hands of President Wilson.
In all of his efforts which shall have
for their object the advancement of
education and the uplift of humanity.
I pledge my support, and on this ba basis
sis basis I bespeak for Superintendent
Sheats the co-operation of every joyal
citizen and real friend of education in
the state.
President Edwards Address

Mi

ALS DRUGGISTS

-X frt V1.' jSJr-

ROUND TRIP
TAMPA TO

Panama-Jamaica-Cuba
VIA
A. C. L R. P.. and P. & 0. S. S. Co.
The elegant new S. S. "Evan geline" will sail from Key West every
other Tuesday during January, February and March. l s?inning Jan January
uary January 7th, stopping two days at Colon, C. Z two days at Kingston,
Jamaica, and at Havana. Fourteen days trip from T.rmpa. Rate in includes
cludes includes meals and berth both at sea and in port. Stop-overs allowed.
Tickets limited to A aril 1st.
For further information cal on or write i?

In 1901 there were enrolled in all

of the public schools of the state 111,-

007 pupils, with an average daily at attendance
tendance attendance of 75,325 pupils. In 1911
there were enrolled in all of the pub public
lic public schools of the state 149,051 pupils,
with an average daily attendance of
103,930 pupils. This shows that dur during
ing during the decade the enrollment of pu pupils
pils pupils increased 34 per cent., and the
average daily attendance increased
3S per cent. During the same time
the federal census shows that the to total
tal total population of the tate increased
42.1 per cent. These facts seem to
argue strongly for a law providing
for compulsory attendance upon the
public schools.
State Institutions of Higher Learning
In 1901 the state was supporting
the Florida Agricultural College at
Lake City, the Florida State College
at Tallahassee, the East Florida Semi Seminary
nary Seminary at Gainesville, the State Nor Normal
mal Normal School at DeFuniak Springs, the
South Florida Military and Educa Educational
tional Educational Institution at Bartow, the Sc.
Petersburg Normal and Industrial
School at St. Petersburg, The Florida
Normal and Industrial School at Tal

lahassee. These institutions mi

Following is the address made by
Mr. L. C. Edwards of Live Oak, pres

ident of the association:
I am admonished that it is danger

ous to tread on ground made sacred by

long usage. But I am willing to risk
this danger, if I may lead you to con consider,
sider, consider, seriously, some practical condi conditions
tions conditions of vital importance to our school
system. The duties and practical
work of our county superintendents
have been fixed by law and long cus custom,
tom, custom, and the method of their election
is as old as the constitution. In such
case to make changes is difficult and
must meet with strong opposition. Yet,
changes must come. f
We are living in the midst of a won wonderful
derful wonderful revolution of thought, touching
every phase of life. The spirit of
constructive democracy is abroad,

striving with utmost energy to bring
every man within the reach of a fuller
reform in child labor conditions, re reforms
forms reforms in the housing of the city's poor,
reforms in the methods of doing busi business
ness business by great corporations, various
political reforms, reforms in educa educational
tional educational methods and systems, or other otherwise,
wise, otherwise, it is the same sp'rit drawing all
men into closer ties of living and
closer bonds of sympathy. From
whatever angle it touches life It is
bringing rapid changes. Its influence
upon our educational ideas is as yet
scarcely comprehended by any of us,
and the ultimate changes to be wrought
are beyond our imagination.
From the standpoint of the educator
the rural school Is at present the cen center
ter center of its movement More thought
and effort is being put, forth to bring
the rural school into closer relation to
the life of the masses of the people
than to any other educational problem.
We seek to make the school the center
of community life; we demand changes
in curriculum that will adapt school
work more directly to the environ environment
ment environment of the children, changes by which
boys will be taught not only some something
thing something of better methods of tilling the
soil, but better business methods of
farming, changes that will give them

greater respect for the calling of the
farmer and a greater hope for the
future of country life. Indeed, the de demand
mand demand for change in "rural school con conditions
ditions conditions is so great that me may easily
be driven into fads and fallacies. The
very ablest leadership is-needed to re restrain
strain restrain the movement from haste to
revolution and give to it the common common-sense
sense common-sense of reform.
The soul and inspiration of the rural
school is the county superintendent.
To him we must look for this master masterful
ful masterful leadership. It is he that must de decide
cide decide how much of the old shall be torn
away, and it is he that must mould
and Jauild into practical form the new
that is to take its place. He should
be an organizing, creative and ex executive
ecutive executive genius, freed from every un unnecessary
necessary unnecessary restraint in shaping the
policy of his school administration.
Far be it from me to criticize ad adversely
versely adversely the work of the county super superintendents
intendents superintendents of this state. As a rule
they are men of high ideals and pur purposes
poses purposes and are doing a magnificent
work. But in many respects, it seems
to me, they are limited in their work
and from these limitations I would see
them free.
Perhaps the greatest need of the
rural school is more efficient super supervision.
vision. supervision. There is no business or en enterprise
terprise enterprise that can be successful with

out careful and efiective supervision.

be of vast advantage to scattered
country schools. I am likewise sure
that, if rural schools are ever to re realize
alize realize the Ideals inspired by the best
educational thought of today, better
methods of supervision are a first nec necessity.
essity. necessity.
The most serious limitation to the

efficiency of the superintendent is found
in our method of electing him. Under
our present method we make his posi

tion a political office. In no sense
should politics enter Into the selection
of a man for this work. He is chosen,
or should be chosen, because of his
organizing ability and his special
training for school work. On the other

hand, county offices are filled with
men whose work is mechanical and
clerical. Election by popular vote
places on a par with the man who does
such mechanical work as making tax
receipts the man whose creative
imagination must construct a system
for the development of childhood Into
manhood and womanhood; it classes
the man who does such clerical work
as copying- legal papers with the man
whose purpose is to organize the moral,
intellectual and spiritual forces of
his county into a great, efficient work working
ing working system- A change should be made.
The time has come when this position
should be made professional and not
political. It Is beneath the dignity- of
his position and belittles his calling
when he is forced to buy space in the
papers as a medium of begging votes
or attacking his opponent. It is a dis disgrace
grace disgrace to his profession when he finds

it necessary, as Is sometimes the case, I

to employ men in the various precincts j
to hang around the polls on election
day, for the purpose of Influencing
men with persuasive words and possi possibly
bly possibly otherwise to vote for him. It is
no my purpose to suggest a method,
but I believe the county superintend superintendents
ents superintendents themselves should take up the
question and work out some satisfac satisfactory
tory satisfactory plan.

But, if we are to secure the high
type of leadership necessary to crys crys-talize
talize crys-talize into realities the new ideals that
are beginning to shape the policy of
our rural schools, we must be relieved
of another restriction in the election
of coanty superintendents. Under pres present
ent present conditions, we are not only confin confined
ed confined to, a selection from such talent as
we may chance to find in the county,
but we are still further limited to
such of that talent as we are willing

to make a personal sacrifice of their
professional dignity by undergoing
the hardships of a heated political cam campaign.
paign. campaign. When we fill the principalship
of a county high school, we are at
liberty to search the country for the
man whose qualifications seem best
for the position; yet, when we would
fill the highest position in the county
school system, when we would choose
the man upon whom rests the respon responsibility
sibility responsibility for the success or failure of all
the schools, we are limited to the
talent within the county. The limita limitation
tion limitation is not only not necessary, but is
unreasonable. Our common sense
should lead us to join in a great ef

fort to effect such changes in our law

as will leave us an opportunity to se secure,
cure, secure, wherever he may be found, the

best qualified man for the highest and
most responsible position in the coun county
ty county schools.

Let me close by stating, concisely,

my suggestions.
1st. Relieve the county superintend

ent of clerical work, giving all his

time to supervision.

2nd. In the larger counties give him

one or more assistant supervisors.

3rd. Take the election of superin superintendents
tendents superintendents out of politics, by placing his
aDDointment in the hands of a small

board of representative citizens.

4th. Give the board the advantage of
an unlimited territory from which to

select the best possible man for the

position.

XOTICE OF INCOnPORATIO

To Whom It May Concern: Not
is hereby given that we, the und
signed, will apply to his excellen
the governor of the state of Flori
at his office in Tallahassee, the ca
tal, on the'llth day of January. A.

lvis, ior letters patent, incorporat
us, our associates and successors, un

the law, by the name, and for the p
pose, and upon the terms set forth,
our proposed charter hereinafter
forth, and as now appears from

original which is on file in the office
the seeretary of state of the state
Florida.
This the 10th day of December, A.

1912.
Baxter Carn, (S-jal).
Charlie E. Thomas, (i?sal).
A. C. Cuthill, tSal)
By Baxter Cam, Atty. in fa

3.

thomas compaw A$ pure, Sweet and dainty as
The undersigned, Baxter Carn, Chahe name implies; made from
lie K. Thomas and A. C. Cuthill, fleeted uheat; ;cientif'C"v
hereby associate themselves togeth.3r.died, producing a Hour ihV
for the purpose of becoming inccr-j-j.pe ai'i ,u"w-V ,V
porated, and transacting divers biS1"5 ALL ,heJ'3 or and nu

ness as a corporation for profit,. und. "r"3"5-" y uouninuiiv sup sup-the
the sup-the laws of the state of Florida, und!" by nature. There is none
the following proposed charier. Ctter it costs no mere whv

u i .. -i

vi, ai icdM, pive a sn impa.

ARTICLE I.

be

pri

i lie name of this corporation shd trial? Satisfaction puirin

incipal place of business shall h. "cu' cr raoney reiunfled.'

the city of Ocala. Florida, in Mari.vArTn rnnorn r r,
county, with branch offices or plaelOjUR GROCER HAS IT

be from time to time necessary or coi ;

venient, to re hxed in the by-laws f
the corporation.
ARTICLE IL

The general nature of the buslne

tnis corporation proposed to be enga
ed in or transacted by it is as follow
1. To conduct general mercha

dise and commissary stores buying ai

renins oy wnoiesaie ana retail, ir

porting ana exporting all kinds

goods, wares, merchandise, grocerie

For first class automobile service

by the trip, hour or day. phone No.

327. First class car and uniformly

low prices to all. J. C. Geiger. Ad.

XOTICE OF JIASTEIl'S SALE
Notice is hereby given that under
and by virtue of a certain decree of
foreclosure issued out of the circuit
court of the fifth judicial circuit of
Florida, in and for Marion county,
made and entered on the 26th day of
October, A. D. 1912, in that certain
cause pending wherein C. A. Scandrett
is complainant and A. B. Edwards and
Susan Edwards defendants, I, Bradford
Williams, special master in said cause,
shall offer for sale and sell at public
outcry in front of the west door of the
court house of Marion county, Florida,
between the legal hours of sale on
rule day
Monilav, the Gth day of January A. D.
1913,
the same being the first Monday in said
month, to the highest and best bidder
for cash, the following described prop property,
erty, property, to-wit: The southeast quarter of
the northeast quarter, section eleven
(11), township fifteen (15), range
twenty (20) east, containing forty (40)
acres more or less, situated lying and
being in Marion county, Florida, or so
much thereof as may be necessary to
satisfy said decree.
Bradford Williams,
Wm. M. Gober, Special Master.
Complainant's Solicitor.

tv : r s

Attn u n v

mercnanaise, grocene y ffCr.A
drugs, chemicals, foods, feed sUufitfG ;VAn -ft HT
fruits, vegetables, farm product, far1 ;-V.;iSv !AI

oil n.t V.

ail utit

r

implements, fertilizers, and

nu-reiiantable commodities.

To own and operate boat lin

.steamooats, ireight boats, steam shir
sailing vessels, and all kinds of

craft, and the docks, harbors, wham

piers ana snipyaras connected then
with.

3. To deal in any and all kinds e

personal nronertv bv buvinr. hni.ifn

letting to hire, and selling same, ii
eluding livestock, farm imnlcmpnt

FOR sale

machinery, vehicles, automobiles hir-ouse on rniieitrt-

cles, motorcycles, and other person ,,

property. "uhhc on uenry af.

i. To deal m any and all kinds rrm t, mil.

real estate by Durchasinsr. holdin- in 1 "

proving, letting to rent, flvl.min or "cala

and selling the same, or nrodurira ., .1 t r-

thereof or therefrom, and bv doW an... ?

and all things incident to such bus1"" outa nI UcaIa

ness; ana to exercise any and all pow
ers incident to the powers abo FOU ItEXT
enumerated, and all other powers gii
en corporations in general by the lav Roo,B n Oklwaha Are-

oi me state oi ioriaa; and, in adds Three Squares from
Hon to the foregoing powers, the co: rri irmi
poration shall have the power to leas,, llou,,e
purchase, hold, sell and convey ar"'

ana an property necessary or conver

lent to tne transaction of any of sail

purposes, or wnicn tne business of tli
corporation mav reciuire. or whlfh

shall or may acquire in satisfaction t'

partial satisfaction, or debts due t!f7 l?f nr?n A
corporation, under sales, judgments i-i W JtV 1 Lr
mortgages; or in settlement or partis
settlement, of debts due the eorpor8rjtnrvT Afr'v-rs
tion by any of its debtors. ,LMULT AGENTS

The capital stoek of this corporatio
FIRE AND CASUALITY
shall be fifty thousand dollars, dividTD vrr rnifnavu rnifnavu-into
into rnifnavu-into two thousand shares of the pdUilAIVCfc COMPANY
value of twenty-five dollars each; te
per cent of which capital stock shalrCnnvHIf tin

oe paia in as soon as letters paterw,J v"

i ACCOUNTING CO.,

are issued, and the balance as calle
for by the board of directors uno

thirty days notice of such call, and nc

Carn Block

more than twenty-five per cent shaKSIDEXT OFFICE

oe cauea ior at any one time. Proi nnww m.2
erty, labor or services may also be pu III r JLURIUVl.
chased or paid for with capital
at a just valuation of such propert-" -
labor or services. -to be fixed bv tl I

' - ' v v u. v v u ah. a. uictri

li".

ini

M

OSE!

NOTICE

to Sell

I In fact, whatever we do, success de-

buildings and equipment represented pends upon the supervising manager,
a total money value of not more than j It is too often the case that our
S.-r.atM.ii nnd thp curricula of the ma-1 superintendent is practically the clerk

or tne Doara, ana noinir.g more, mis

jority of them were not higher and
broader than the courses of study

should not be true. It would be
economy for every county board to

now offered in our best high schools. ; employ some one to do its clerical

But in 105, under the provisions ofwork and leave the superintendent

J. G. KI.RKLAND, D. P. A.,
A. C. I II. TL, Tampa.

DERS, G. F. A.

C, Jacksonville,

P. J

j

the Buckman bill, they were abolish abolished,
ed, abolished, and in their stead were establish-

I ed the University of Florida at

Gainesville, the Florida State College
for Women at Tallahassee, the Flor Florida
ida Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind
at St. Augustine, and the Florida Ag Agricultural
ricultural Agricultural and Mechanical College for
Negroes at Tallahassee. These insti institutions
tutions institutions in buildings and .equipment
now represent a money value of fully

free

rive his time and thought to

conservative organization and super

vision, maee-i, in most or me coun counties
ties counties it would pay in efficiency if some
of the funds were spent for the em employment
ployment employment of a force of assistant super supervisors.
visors. supervisors. The movement made in this
direction by the present state superin superintendent
tendent superintendent is one of the most promising
of the distinctive policies of his ad administration.
ministration. administration. We should each study
carefully this question. I am sure you
will conclude with me that any changes
giving more effective supervision will

Of Application for Leave

llnor' Land
Xotice is hereby given that on the
3rd day of January, A. D. 1913
I will apply to Honorable Joseph Bell,
county judge in and for Marion coun county,
ty, county, state of Florida, at his office in
Ocala, in said county, for an order au authorising
thorising authorising me," as guardian of Thos. W.
and Dorothy Crawford, the minor heirs
of the estate of John F. Crawford, de deceased,
ceased, deceased, to sell at private sale the fol following
lowing following property belonging to said es estate,
tate, estate, to-wit: Commencing at the
northwest corner of lot number twenty-nine
of Smith & Dougherty's add to
the city of Ocala, Marion county, Fla.,
thence east one hundred feet, south
one hundred and twenty-five feet, west
one hundred feet, north one hundred
and twenty-five feet to p. 6. b. ; also
the north half of lot number twenty twenty-eight
eight twenty-eight of Smith & Dougherty's add to
the citv of Ocala, Marion county, Flor Florida:
ida: Florida: and also all of lot number nine of
Smith & Dougherty's add to Ocala,
Marion eountv, Florida: also the south
half of lot number twelve of Smith &
Doughertv's add to Ocala, Marion
county. Florida. Said lands belonging
to the estate of the said John F. Craw Crawford,
ford, Crawford, deceased, to be sold for the best
interest of said minor heirs.
This 2nd day of December, 1912.
Ketura E. Crawford, Guardian.

NOTICE OF MASTER'S SALE

Xotice is hereby given that under
and by virtue of a final decree of fore foreclosure
closure foreclosure made and entered by the cir circuit
cuit circuit court of the fifth judicial circuit
of Florida, in and for Marion county,
in chancery, on the 19th day of Octo October,
ber, October, A. D. 1912, in a certain cause late lately
ly lately pending in said court wherein
Nathan Mayo was complainant and
Thomas H. Seaman and Lidia Seaman,
his wife, were defendants, the under undersigned
signed undersigned was appointed special master In
chancery in sail cause to execute said
final decree, and that pursuant there thereto
to thereto I will on the first Monday in De December,
cember, December, A. D. 1912, viz:
the 2nd day of Deeember, A. D. 1012
during the legal hours of sale, offer

for sale and sell to the highest an

best bidder for cash at public outcry

m front of the west door or tne cou

house of Marion county. Florida, th

following described property, situa
lving and being in Marion coun

Florida, to-wit: One hundred
forty yards north and south by
enty yards east and west In the n
east corner of the northwest qu

of the southwest onarter or se

nine, township seventeen south,
twenty-three east, or so much t

as may be necessary to satis

mm DRAKE

FLORIDA

called for such purpose,

Ali i MULE IV,

This corporation shall exist for
period of ninety-nine years from U fm;; l!,,W.l,nnl
date of its letters patent. tORinilSSIOn iWCrCliani
ARTICLE V.
The business or tnis corporatlcOnd DClller III
shall be managed and conducted by
president, secretary, treasurer at, -Tr--i
board of directors, and such other o Oflfl PlllTlITn
fleers and agents as the corporaticj (11 1 U 1 iluliUvL
may authorize, by its by-laws hereaf .
er to be adopted. The annual meererins: the following Rood.
ing of the stockholders shall be hel
on the first Tuesday in February, i9ileale trade onlyi
and annually thereafter, at which tin
said officers shall be elected in sucj(,.Inll riven to nt of
manner as shall be prescribed by tP"en,,wn EMcn to out of
said by-laws, and in conformity to tlfnK order. Fresh Mock al alia
ia alia wh of Florida. That either the presnnd. Telephone 209. Xest
?itarrvtht7atSvUrevf my be electe of Florida Auto Sale Co.,
secretary. That the board of director .. ,.
shall consist of not less than three, nd10'1 "trect, Ocala, I- la.
more than seven; and until the officei

elected at the first annual electio

snau nave quannea. tne Business qii
the ffirnnratinn shall hn findnnto a-n.FI

t - vat... - V J t. I V '. 11-

carried on by the following named of

fleers: Baxter Carn, president: Charli

E. Thomas, secretary and treasurer, vrrs?
and Baxter Carn, Charlie E. Thoma"1'1'11'
and A. C. Cuthill as a board of direc.jjjjGHTSM "N
lS, u ARTICLE VI. AXI) CONTRACTOR
The highest amount of Indebtedness
nr liability, to whih this eorporatior.jinntT rMne It ne Prints
can subject Itself shall be the sum ol1:.0 1 a,n' tV i
fifty thousand dollars. .ations made. Lands sur-
article VII. platted. Close estimates
The names and residences of theefction of buildings of any
subscribing Incorporators of this cor-w' rnntract or on a com
poration, and the amount of capita?, f
stock subscribed for by each, are as ,;- nte or consult me at
follows: (rner Ocala Houe Ulock

U.IXter fTarn. OpjiI!. farlnn onimd-

' .-. in

r in., zuv snares.

Charlie E. Thomas, Ocala, Marion

county, r ia., 100 shares.

A. C. Cuthill, Martel. Marlon county,

ria., rorty snares.

IX WITNESS WHEREOF, the .!d
incorporators have hereunto set ffr

hands and affixed their seals this the'

10th day or December, A- D. 191?
Baxter Carn. (SD.
Charlie E. Thomas, (SI).
A. C. Cuthill. (pal).

, By Baxter Carn, Atty,i fact

Mgnea ana seaiea in our prince:
W. K. Zewadskl.
Mamie E. Fox. j
State of Florida! 1
Marion County.

I, the undersigned, a nc- Public,

do hereby certify that Pi t-arn,
Charlie E. Thomas, and 7C- Cuthill,
by Baxter Carn, his attcey n fact,
who are known to me v?e the per persons
sons persons described in the forin articles
of incorporation, this Y aPPeared
before me in said countan' each ac acknowledged
knowledged acknowledged that he sig,, fiail articles
for the purpose of f rIng the cor corporation
poration corporation therein nameA

Witness my hand ouiciai seal
this the 10th day ot?,Cer?.be A- D D-192.
192. D-192. I116 E. Fox,
(Notary Seal) 7otary Public.
My commission e5e.sQ "n the 10th
day of February. A: tai-

SPECIAL M" s "K
Xotice is here)7lven. hat under
and by virtue etfSerlP Anal de decree,
cree, decree, rendered J"'3? of the
circuit court oflntth Judicial cir circuit
cuit circuit of Florida,vancer;.sittln2T. in

a certain cause. jiumg where

in C. E. Adarrfl '-"PJamant and

Robert II. IW7,f;ienint. eafd

final decree bir"v- A. D.
1912, I. the Ar-t!5"ed SPecial mas

ter, will ofTe ,"ie 1:T cale, and

IE FLORIDA

D WESTERN

Erk and Mutton
FRESH
AICI3LA OYSTERS
and Sail Water
cd Every Day

prrvice.- Good Goods

a'sonable Prices
J HOLLAND
Pfio stall No.
Market

,T.i. cell llfU.

best bidderV -erore.the south

est bidder.
oor of tha
ounty. FIfia
Monday,

the folloy.

of section

.outh'. east

ind tV, "2.

in

and
uth

Marion

1013

rt house

on

ry Gth, A. I)

- -v, r i iann? W

O O SJ

much thai e needed to

satisfy trJ and costs, to-

wit: iac

'The I ''u.a"er of th

r, ort h ea nf M OI, tn sou t h wes

one 2a r-.,lownsnip 1

of the New

South1 0) ome Company, con
taini;. cr?s more or less

ThlrfcefAn i ach section

es." Brad ;n .1 7,77

tor Master.

:en of Sea Routes"

final decree and cost. E. L. StauL D. JOVF'si r

Charfl

Special Master in Ch

The above sale Is continu

Monday, January 191

E. L. fctapp, bpecial j

dA-

r r

4- M

r

1

7

f

i

f

7 I

HANTS JC- ITVr..,

TR I Vt ff

-.uou.wiLLE TO

nnah, Baltimore, Philadelnhii
Boston and IWMeiE? P

me steamers- i,...

es- "l service: low
es, wireless telov

kets to xnA e,ii. xnrouga
"eis to and from nr,-r, i

i for booklet, Joints

C- AVERY. Agent.

Jacksonville, Fla.

L. EXANDER

ACTiCAL
CARER AND BUiLDER
Cartfates Male on All Con Contract
tract Contract Gie3 more and better
work mcnev taan jny other

3nntratJie c!ty.

FofOfey Piils
fOHICI.4 QUICK li RESULTS
Give lt!:tf from 3ACKACHE,

KIDNE 13 LADDER TROUBLE,

RHEUM

fV T"TN T 99

?!lnJe "otel- umTllie. Fla.

VUMims Trip, 4, fbe Wprld

llaulsj al, ,cnoyins URINARt

KIDDLED and ELDERLY

KAVI MIL RCOMMcNDATIOH

ad. ii ii Li "&"! "J" l-, voi)nerii

WkS too QUlV, -s",s D kid-y actio

Mn. I took! -tjrT 'MWMftid
nd am now f v '"J111' hjrn tim
6 cp andaf ail tt'tJhl and fninblto
kixkMt rwotV '-ley iJts.-j L'u ttt mt
For Sal
. S-Btl-SXoaopoly Drv gntT9

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