• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Historic note
 Table of Contents
 Control of insects attacking...
 Tomato and cantaloupe breeding
 Nematode control
 Stubby-root nematode population...
 Weed control in vegetable...
 New crops for central Florida
 Carrot varieties and vegetable...
 Diseases of vegetable crops
 Cabbage variety trials














Group Title: Annual field day - Central Florida Experiment Station
Title: Annual field day. February 15, 1966
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075825/00001
 Material Information
Title: Annual field day. February 15, 1966
Series Title: Annual field day.
Translated Title: Research Report - University of Florida Central Florida Experiment station ; 1966 ( English )
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Tucker, Cecil
Publisher: Central Florida Experiment Station, University of Florida
Publication Date: 1966
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075825
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 144607730

Table of Contents
    Historic note
        Unnumbered ( 1 )
    Table of Contents
        Table of Contents
    Control of insects attacking cabbage
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Tomato and cantaloupe breeding
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Nematode control
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
    Stubby-root nematode population studies
        Page 9
    Weed control in vegetable crops
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    New crops for central Florida
        Page 14
        Page 15
    Carrot varieties and vegetable crop nutrition
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
    Diseases of vegetable crops
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Cabbage variety trials
        Page 25
        Page 26
Full Text





HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






Copyright 2005, Board of Trustees, University
of Florida













CENTRAL FDlMDA EcPERIMEST STATION


Sanford, Florida
t~j $ -ord/


Annual Field Day
February 15, 1966


Cecil Tucker, County Agent, Presiding


'Assembly and Registration 1:30 P. M.
1,, \, "


Control of Insects Attacking Cabbage . .. J. W. Wilson

Tomato and Cantaloupe Breeding .,. .B . B. F. Whitner, Jr.

Nematode Control . . . . 1hoaes

Stubby-root Nematode Population Studies . H. V. Morton

Weed Control in Vegetable Crops .' . W. T. Scudder

:CoffeBreak (10 minutes)

New Crops for Central Florida, Including Peaches,
Edible Podded Peas, and Blackberries . P J. Westgate

Carrot Varieties and Vegetble Crop Nutrition ... R. B. Forbes"

Diseases od Vegetable Crops .' . .. .. J. F. Darby

bbage Variety Trials .. . . J. C. Walker


Page

1

4

6

9

10






16

21

24


Tour of Experimental Plots 3:00 P. M.


.* -- \ f '


I~.-


/




-1-





THE CONTROL OF THE CABBAGE LOOPER

J. W. Wilson


Market Topper cabbage was transplanted to the field on December 1, 1965.
Although the infestation of cabbage loopers was slow in developing, injury in
the untreated plots was wide spread by January 13. On that date, an inspection
of the plots showed that 85 percent of the plants in check plots had been injured
in some degree by looper feeding.

Thirteen insecticides were included in the list of treatments. They were
applied at 7 day intervals beginning on November 23 and continued until February
8 for a total of eleven applications. On January 13, two days after the eighth
application, an examination of the plots was made. The effectiveness of the
insecticides was evaluated by assigning a value to each of 25 heads of cabbage
in each plot. In this system, values of 1 to 5 were assigned to each of the
heads examined with 1 representing plants free of looper injury and 5 represent-
ing plants severely damaged. An average score of 25 indicates complete freedom
from looper injury.

In this experiment, looper damage in the check plot and two of the in-
secticide treated plots was general and extensive as is indicated by the data in
Table 1.


CONTROL OF THE CORN EARTORM ON SWEET CORN

The variety Gold Cup planted on March 18, 1965, was used for this experi-
ment. Five applications of emulsifiable DDT at the rate of 2 qt per acre were
applied prior to silking for the control of the budworm. Dates of these appli-
cations were April 19, 22, 23, 26, and 30. A rain of 0.81 inches fell soon after
the application on April 22 making it necessary to repeat the spraying on April
23.

The first silks were observed on May 7 and the first application of insec-
ticides for the control of the corn earworm was applied on May 8 with 7.2 percent
of the top ears in silk. Subsequent applications were made at approximately 48
hour intervals for a total of 9 applications, the last occurring on May 24. On
May 28, the corn from the center row of each plot was harvested,weighed, and ex-
amined for earworm injury. The low percentage of worm free ears harvested from
the untreated check indicates a high population of earworms. It is interesting
to note that under the conditions of this experiment, several of the new chemicals
which have not been approved for use on sweet corn performed better than either
DDT or Sevin. Of the 18 insecticides used in this experiment, data for 6 of
those producing the best earworm control are given in Table 2.








-2-


Table 1. Data on cabbage looper control experiment.


Rate of Percent of
application Average plants
Insecticide Formulation per acre score damaged


Geigy 13005

Thuricide

General Chem. 6506

Phosdrin

Azodrin

Thiodan & Sevin

DM & Toxaphene

Parathion & Thiodan

Parathion & Toxaphene

Geigy 13005

Guthion & Oil

Upjohn 24,157

Untreated


E.C. 3 lb/gal

90 TS

E.C. 4 lb/gal

E.C. 2 Ib/gal

Water Soluble 3,2

20 & 40o w.P.

E.C. 2 & 4 lb/gal

E.C. 1 & 2 lb/gal

E.C. 8 lb & 8 lb/gal

E.C. 3 Ib/gal

E.C. 2 Ib/gal & oil

E.C. 4 lb/gal


1.00 Ib

4 qt

1.00 lb

0.5 lb

0.6 lb

1.00 & 2.00 lb

1.00 & 2.00 lb

0.25 & 0.5 lb

0.35 & 1.00 lb

0.5 lb

0.5 Ib and 1 qt

2.00 lb


25.00

25.00

25.00

25.00

25.00

25.00

25.25

25.50

25.75

26.50

31.75

48.00

58.50


- ---- -~-- -- -- --`









- 3 -


Table 2. Data for six of the more effective insecticides used in the
experiment for corn earworm control during the spring of 1965.


Rate per acre Weight unhusked Percent of ears
Insecticide application ears harvested harvested worm free


Gen. Chem. Co. 6506 0.5 lb 122.2 93.9

Shell Dev. 9129 0.6 lb 113.1 88.5

Guthion & oil 1.0 Ib & 1 qt 118.2 86.4

Gen. Chem. Co. 6506 0.25 Ib 110.6 80.8

Sevin 2.0 lb 110.8 73.8

DDT 2.0 lb 117.0 69.9

Untreated 2.3










- 4 -


TOMATO, SOUTHEUPPEA, ATDn CANTALOUPE BREEDING

B. F. Whitner, Jr.

Tomatoes: During the early spring of 1965, a group of growers, processors,
and research men came to the conclusion that growing tomatoes primarily for
processing, under Florida conditions, would not offer a reasonable opportunity
for profit. However, they felt that utilization by canners of the fruit remain-
ing after harvesting for the fresh market was completed would be advantageous to
both the canner and the grower.

Because of the scarcity and increasing costs of good quality labor, interest
in a determinate type plant with most of the fruit ripening at one time that
would be adapted to mechanical harvesting has developed in recent years. This
need for varieties that could be harvested by machine has been recognized. All
of the lines planted for the past two years here at Sanford have been the deter-
minate type. There were 35 of these lines in the planting made in March, 1965.
The highest yielding line produced 339.6 cwt. per acre of ripe marketable fruit
at a single picking.

Southernpeas: Six advanced lines of southernpeas were obtained from
Dr. A. P. Lorz for trial. These were planted February 18. Five hundred pounds
of a 25 percent organic mixed fertilizer analysing 5-5-8 plus 3 of magnesium were
incorporated in the rows before planting. Like applications were made after
considerable rainfall, March 19 and 30, and again, April 12. Each plot was
picked May 24 or 25 and June 1.

The plot number, designation, weight in pods, shelled out weight, and num-
ber of peas per 25 grams of shelled peas are tabulated below:

Table 1


Pods % sellout Shelled No. peas
No. Designation cwt/A 1000 gram cwt/A in 25g

1 366-01210 77.19 67.4 52.03 93 Brown & White Crowder
2 82-0812110 62.25 67.3 41.79 91 Blackeye Crowder
3 345-01110 82.17 61.1 50.21 81 Blackeye Crowder
4 593-0410 64.74 65.3 42.28 96 Prolific Medium Brown
Crowder
5 568-020 114.54 62.9 72.05 45 Speckled Crowder
6 421-0720 99.60 45.6 45.42 78 Best Cream Crowder Pods


No. 5 drew the most favorable comments.











Cantaloupes: During the spring of 1965, 85 varieties and breeding lines of
cantaloupes were planted in the field. During the fall sieral selections from
eight advanced breeding lines were grown. The plastic greer-houc w.s used to grow
about 50 hills of breeding stock in the fall and again in the spring.


Four promising lines, Fla. 44, Fla.
entered in the Southern Trials for 1966.
Experiment Station workers in other parts
tion for releasing this melon to growers.


67, Fla. 84, and Fla. 42 have been
Florids 67 has been distributed to
of the State to gather data in prepara-


A wild melon received from Dr. Norton of Auburn University appears to be
identical to a wild melon found near Sanford. Both of these melons are small and
have no commercial value but their apparent immunity to gummy stem blight may be
a valuable source of resistance to this disease. These two wild melons are being
extensively used in the breeding program.








-6-


NEMATODE CONTROL

H. L. Rhoades


Nematocide Screening: A total of 28 experimental nematocides were compared
with D-D for control of noot-knot nematodcs during 1965. Fourteen of them gave
control comparable to or better than that of the D-D. Results of the experiments
are shown in Table 1.


Table 1. Effectiveness of various experimental
knot nematodes.


nematocides for controlling root-


Spring experiment, 1965


Nematocide


SCompany


Root knot index


Check
D-D
M2633


Shell Chemical Co.
Dow Chemical Co.


NIA 10242
R5467
TH285-N


Niagara Chemical Co.
Stauffer Chemical Co.
Thompson-Hayward Chemical Co.


Fall experiment, 1965


Check
D-D
EP230
EP248


EP257
M2846
M2853
Telone PBC

s6899
UC21149
Zinophos
Zinophos-thimet


Shell Chemical Co.
Morton Chemical Co.
tI It I1


Dow Chemical Co.



Spencer Chemical Division
Union Carbide Corporation
American Cyanamid Co.
I1 II I


a Based on a root galling index on cucumbers of 1,
galling.


no galling, to 5, severe


25 gal
20 gal


25 gal
25 gal
25 gal


3.09
1.53
1.55

1.35
1.63
1.00


4.15
2.08
1.91
1.43

1.48
1.05
1.38
1.25

1.00
1.30
1.65
1.63


gal
gal
gal
gal


-- -` I----~---- -











Cover Crops: The summer cover crops sesbania (Sesbania exaltata) and
crotalaria (Crotalaria spectabilis) were grown on the same land in 1964 and 1965.
Populations of sting, stubby-root, and root-knot nematodes have built up on the
sesbania but not on the crotalaria. Yield of cabbage, with and without soil
fumigation, following the cover crops in 1965 is given in Table 2.


Table 2. Effect of cover crop and soil fumigation on the yield of cabbage.
.- I I LII I l I II ,J I I


Soil treatment


Cabbage yield (50 Ib bags/A)
Following sesbania Following crotalaria


DD-25 gal/A 751 806

DBCP (Nepagon) 2 gal/A 744 774

EDB(W-85) 6 gal/A 694 689

Check 527 731

LSD .05 86 N.S.
.01 120
-- '- -lI I '~ l I I I I' I II L I L J I ] I I I I l I L l I l

Onions: Nematodes were found to be causing a great deal of damage to green
onions produced in the Oviedo, Florida area. To determine the effect of soil
fumigation on onion yield in nematode infested soil, an experiment, using two
rates of D-D, was conducted on the Experiment Station Farm in the spring of 1965.
The planting stock was White Silver Skin sets. Results are shown in Table 3.

Table 3. Effect of soil fumigation on yield of green onions.

Nematode population


Treatment


At planting
sting btubby-root


At harvest
sting Stubby-root


Yieldb


Check 35 27 74 39 3.4
D-D, 20 gal/A 0 7 2 217 12.0
D-D, 30 gal/A 0 1 0 120 13.3
LSD .05 4.0
.01 5.9

a Average number of nematodes extracted from 100 cc of soil.
b Pounds of green onions obtained from 30 feet of row.









- 8--


Cucumbers: A good yield response was obtained for in-row fumigation of
cucumbers in an area infested with root-knot in the fall of 1965. The results
are shown in Table 4. Liquid fumigants (D-D, SDB, Vorlex, and DBCP) were in-
jected beneath the beds, whereas the granular zinophos-thimet was sprinkled on
the surface and chopped in. The variety of cucumbers was the pickling type
Wisconsin SMR18.

Table 4. Effect of soil fumigation on root-knot control and yield of cucumbers.

Treatment Root-knot indexa Yield (bu/A)

Check 4.02 66

D-D, 5 gal/A 2.78 113

D-D, 71 gal/A 1.82 140

EDB(W-85) 1 gal/A 1.92 119
Vorlex, 5 gal/A 2.20 155

Vorlex, 7r gal/A 1.92 145

DBCP (Nemagon) 1/3 gal/A 1.4o 124

DBCP, | gal/A 1.64 109

Zinophos-Thimet J Ib each/A 2.94 86

Zinophos-Thimet 1 lb each/A 2.32 101

a Based on a rating of 1, no galling, to 5, severe galling.

Caladiums: With root-knot nematode control (through hot water treatment of
seed tubers and soil fumigation) and good cultural practices, caladiums have
grown and yielded well for the last three years on sand. Prior to this, growth
and yield was greatly reduced by the attack of root-knot nematodes.









- 9 -


POPULATION STUDIES OF THE STUBBY-ROOT NEMATODE

H. V. Morton

Two field experiments have been conducted on this problem, the first com-
paring fumigation vith non-fumigation under three crops a year; the second con-
cerns the effects of a number of fumigants in a split plot experiment comparing
the build-up and damage of the stubby-root nematode in unfumigated plots with
single and double applications of the fumigants on two consecutive susceptible
crops.

The causes of the field build-up of the stubby-root nematode following
fumigation are also being studied in the greenhouse. The possibilities being
investigated are:

(1) Resistance of the eggs to the commonly used rates of fumigants.
(2) Removal of the biological control of the predaceous nematodes by
fumigants.
(3) Reproductive rates of the stubby-root nematode at the most
favorable soil temperature tested todate (800 F) 25 stubby-root
nematodes increased to 121 thousand in 8 weeks.

Table 1. An example of the build-up of stubby-root nematodes with the corres-
ponding yield data obtained from a crop of field corn following the
application of various fumigants.

Numbers of stubby-
root nematodes in Numbers of stubby- Yield expressed
a pint of soil 2 root nematodes in a as a percentage
Treatment weeks after fumigation pint of soil at harvest of the check

Check 62 811 100


Zinophos
@ 3 Ibs/A 0 257 223


Nemagon
@ 2 gals/A 118 1,856 189


D-D @
15 ga2s/A 6 1,851 222


D-D @
25 gals/A 0 2,185 278








- 10 -


WEED CONTROL IN VEGETABLE CROPS

V. T. Scudder


Several screening trials were conducted to evaluate the new herbicides
which are under development but not yet registered for grower use. Besides these,
replicated studies with yield comparisons were made with cabbage, cucumbers,
onions, peppers, potatoes, and sweet corn.
Cabbage herbicides: All treatments were applied as sprays after trans-
planting. The trifluralin was incorporated into the surface 3/4 inch deep.


Chemical


CDEC
CDAA + CDEC
CP-31393
DCPA
Diphenamid

Diphenamid
TH-052H

Trifluralin
Check (hokd)


Rate
(lbs/A.)


6
3+3
6
12
4


6
6
8
1 ,(inc.)


Weed Control Ratings*
Winter Srin
Di IE r


6.2
6.7
8.5
4.0
6.8


4.2
0


7.5
6.8
6.5
5.7


7.7
8.5
9.0

0


9.5
9.2
9.3
8.5


9.7
9.7
9.2

0


Yield Sacks per A.
Winter arin*


984
965
1056
1110
1128


1008
-1140


607
522
517
602


546
549
566

578


*B1 Broadleaf weeds and Or = grasses.


Cucumber herbicides:
emergent to the crop.


All treatments were applied as surface sprays pre-


Chemical


Diphenamid
Io
CDBC

Amiben
NPA
Check (hoed)


Rate
(IbsAA.)


Weed Control
B -I-


8.7
10.0
10.0

10.0
9
0


9.7
10.0
10.0

10.0
0
0


Crop
Tolerance


10.0
9.0
7.0

4.0
10.0
10.0


Yield
(Ibs/plot)


25.3
18.6
16.1

9.2
23.6
20.3








- 11 -


Onion herbicides: All treatments were applied as surface sprays, using two
applications, the first pre-emergence and the second post-emergence at 7 weeks of
age. The trifluralin at 3 pounds and CIPC were incorporated 3/4 inch deep.


Weed.Control
Pre E Post E
B1 Gr B1


Crop
Tolerance


Yield
(bs/plpot)


CDAA
CP-31393
CDAA + CDEX
DMPA

Trifluralin
CP-31393
Trifluralin
CIPC
DCPA


6
6
3+3
15


(inc.)
(inc.)


Check (hoed)

Pepper herbicides:
others with soil surface
and pebulate were incorp


5.5
6.5
5.1
3.5

5.5
5
8

3


9.0
10.0
8.5
6.4

10.0

10

0


7.5
7.7
7.3
6.7

8.8
7
8
9
1


0 0


6.8
8.0
6.5
9.9

7.0
8.7
6.3
8.3
10.0

10.0


32.9
36.8
34.0
39.1


35.7
Unreplicated,
no yield data


36.4


The amiben treatments were made using granules, the
sprays, all after transplanting. The trifluralin and
orated into the surface 3/4 inch deep,


Chemical


Diphenamid
I"
Trifluralin
'I
Pebulate

Amiben
It
DCPA
Diphenamid +
pebulate
Diphenamid +
Amiben

Check (hoed)


Rate
(lbs/A.)

4
6
2/3 (inc.)
1 (inc.)
4 (inc.)


Weed Control
Bi Gr As*


2.7
3.8
7.3
8.0
7.3

9.8
10.0
8.5


2 + 2 (inc.)7.0


2+2


4.8
4.7
8.3
8.0
7.0

9.7
9.5
9.5

8.0


10.0 9.5


1.8
0.8
2.2
3.7
7.5

9.0
9.5
4.0

8.5

8.0


0 0


Crop
Tolerance


10.0
9.2
9.8
9.2
9.5


5.8
7.0
8.5

9.5


10.0

10.0


Yield
(lbs/plot)

14.0
12.3
15.1
18.0
14.5


3.5
6.6
14.5

14.6

16.0


7.3


*As = Annual sedges.


Chemical


Rate
(lbs/A.)








- 12 -


Potato herbicides: All treatments were applied as soil surface sprays pre-
emergence. The vernolate was incorporated one inch deep.

Fall Trial


Weed Control
B1 Gr


Yield (Ib/plot)
Red White


CDAA + CDEC
Prometryne
Ametryne
Diphenamid

Vernolate
Nia-2995
FW-925
Check (ho.ed)


4 + 4.
4+4
4
4
6


6 (inc.)
6
4


9.8
10.0
10.0
9.1

9.4
10.0
10.0
0


9.8
9.9
10.0
9.9

9.4;
10.0
9.0
0


) No
)


19.2
yield data
18.2


Spring Trial


Chemical


CDAA + CDEC
CP-31393
Prometryne
It


Ametryne
Vernolate
Diphenamid

Diphenamid + DNBP
It + i
DNBP
TH-052H


0-3126
F -925
Check (hoed)


Rate
(lb/A.)

4 + 4'
6
4
3

2
3
6 (inc.)
6


+2
+ i.


Weed Control
B1 Gr


7.3
7.0
9.3
8.5

8.8
9.2
8.0
5.8

7.2
6.5
5.0
7.5

7.3
9.7
7.2
5.8


7.2
8.8
9.0
8.3

7.5
9.0
8.0
7.7

7.5
7.7
4.3
7.8

7.7
8.3
7.2
5.5


Crop
Tolerance


10.0
10.0
10.0
10.0

10.0
10.0
10.0
10.0

10.0
10.0
10.0
10.0

10.0
10.0
10.0
10.0


Rate
(lb/A.)


Chemical


20.8
16.9
14.6
19.4


8.4
8.6
6.4
8.8

9.2


7.8


Yield
(lb/plot)


32.3
23.0
29.0
25.9

22.0
28.8
31.6
22.3

24.9
23.7
22.3
28.0

25.6
28.6
24.7
32.6









- 13 -


Tomato herbicides: The amiben treatments were made using granules, the
others with soil surface sprays, all after transplanting. The trifluralin and
pebulate were incorporated into the surface 3/4 inch deep.

Fall Trial


Chemical


Diphenamid
if
CDEC

Amiben
Solan
Check (hoed)


Rate
(Ib/A.)


6
4
6

4
4
*


Weed Control
B1 Gr


9.3
8.3
8.0

10.0
8.0
.0


Crop
Tolerance


10.0
9.7
8.0

10.0
9.0
0


10.0
10.0
10.0

10.0
10.0
10.0
i0.0


Spring Trial


Chemical


Diphenamid
It
Trifluralin
It

Pebulate
Amiben
Check (hoea)


Rate
(lb/A.)

6
4
1 (inc.)
2/3 (inc.)

4 (inc.)
3


Weed Control
BI Gr


8.7
8.3
9.5
8.8

9.2
10.0
4.0


8.5
8.3
9.0
9.0

7.5
10.0
3.8


Sweet corn herbicides:
surface sprays.


All treatments were applied as pre-emergence


Chemical


CDAA
CDAA + CDEC
CP-31393
Atrazine
Prometryne

GS-14260
Linuron
UC-22463
EPTC-24-D
Check (hoed)


Rate
(lb/A.)

6
3+3
6
3
3

3
3
6
3+ 1


Weed Control
3B Gr


10.0
10.0
9.7
10.0
9.7

9.8
10.0
9.7
9.8
0


Crop
Tolerance


8.2
8.5
9.0
7.2
7.7

8.2
9.2
6.2
6.7
0


10.0
10.0
9.8
10.0
10.0

10.0
9.0
9.7
10.0
10.0


Crop
Tolerance


Yield
(ib/plot)


9.0
6.8
6.8
8.3

9.3
3.3
10.0


110.3
72.0
87.9
108.7

105.6
48.8
101.2


Yield
(Ib/plot)


12.9
13.2
10.2
14.2
14.0

12.4
15.0
14.2
11.9
10.1









- 14 -


NEW CROPS FOR CENTRAL FLORIDA

P. J. Westgate


Sweet Potatoes: Sweet potato tubers, placed in sawdust in the greenhouse
in the middle of February, 1965, produced plants which were transplanted to the
field on April 14, 1965. These varieties included Centennial, Porto Rico -1,
and Georgia Red. Five harvests were made between August 31st and December 1, 1965
Centennial produced 180 bushels (50 pounds each) per acre of marketable sweet
potatoes (U.S. No. l's and U. S. No. 2's) on August 31st. Porto Rico #1 produced
403 bushels per acre of marketable potatoes on October 6, 1965. Georgia Red pro-
duced 477 bushels per acre of marketable tubers on the same date. These sweet
potato variety trials are in cooperation with Dr. V. F. Nettles, University of
Florida, Gainesville.

Dasheens: Dasheens (Colocasia esculenta Schott) were planted on sand at
Sanford on March 23, 1965. On January 18, 1966, the dasheens were harvested and
the tubers weighed. During the ten month growing season, there had been a 25
fold increase in tubers from planting until harvest. The yield of tubers amounted
to 8.9 tons per acre. Dasheens are used as a starch crop, especially in the
tropics.

Bunch Grapes are growing on the trellis south of the barn. These include
Lake Emerald, Blue Lake, St. Pete Niagara, Golden Spanish, and new hybrids from
Leesburg, which include A3-46, A3-55, A3-60, A4-43, and A3-34 grafted on Lake
Emerald. Blue Lake produced 55 pounds of grapes per vine, Lake Emerald, 33 pounds,
and A4-43, 36 pounds of grapes. These grape plantings were established in co-
operation with Mr. Loren Stover of the Watermelon and Grape Investigations
Laboratory, Leesburg, Florida.

Muscadine Grapes: Nineteen varieties of muscadine grapes, namely Wallace,
Tarheel, Magoon, Dearing, Higgins, Scuppernong, Topsail, Yuga, Hunt, Dulcet,
Thomas, Creek, Chowan, Albemarle, Roanoke, Pamlico, Magnolia, Burgaw, and Willard
have been planted on the trellis north of the barn. Of these varieties, Wallace,
Tarheel, Magoon, Dearing, Higgins, Scuppernong, Hunt, Thomas, Creek and Burgaw
have fruited to date.

Blackberries: Flordagrand and the pollinating variety Oklawaha, two named
varieties of Florida hybrid blackberries, continue to give good yields of black-
berries. The first plantings in Sanford were made in 1956. Brazos, an upright
blackberry from Texas, continues to yield well under our conditions. Raven, an
upright blackberry variety from Arkansas has been added to the plantings. Un-
released varieties under observation include a Flordagrand Seedling, J81, j~7
seedling, and a Big Ness Seedling. Other hybrids, half-sisters to Flordagrand
remain under test. These blackberry trials are in cooperation with Dr. J. S.
Shoemaker, University of Florida, Gainesville.







- 15 -


Peaches: Various varieties of peaches have been planted on old celery land
in cooperation with Mr. Ralph Sharpe, University of Florida, Gainesville. Named
varieties, such as Flordawon, Flordasun, Sun Red (nectarine), White Knight #1,
Early Amber, Tejon, Bonita, June Gold, and Rochon are under observation. Peaches
on Okinawa and Nemaguard rootstocks have outlasted peaches on Rancho rootstock.
Unnamed hybrid peaches produced from crosses made by Mr. Ralph Sharpe are being
grown to fruiting under our conditions. The lowest temperature to date this year
was 250 F. on January 31, 1966.

Edible Podded Peas: Five varieties of edible podded peas, namely Chinese
Dwarf, Formosa, Mammoth Melting, Dwarf Gray, and Sweet Pod were planted on sand
at Sanford on September 28, 1965. These peas are also known as "sugar" or "snow"
peas. The first pickings were made 58 days from planting. Twenty pickings have
been made by January 31, 1966. The total yields of edible podded peas to date
from this planting are as follows:

Lbs. per Acre
Variety Edible Podded Peas

Chinese Dwarf 9,183

Formosa (for seed only)

Mammoth Melting 11 229

Dwarf Gray 8,550

Sweet Pod 7,116

These plantings have been subjected to 25 F. on January 31, 1966.







- 16 -


CARROT VARIETIES AND VEGETABLE CROP NUTRITION

R. B. Forbes


Three carrot variety trials are now in progress. The first includes
processor carrots, the second, fresh market carrots and the third is an observa-
tional trial of new hybrid lines.


PROCESSING CARROTS, SANFORD, 1965-66


Variety


Seed Source


Goldinhart
Red Core Chantenay 5287
Chantenay 5354
Tendersweet

Danvers Half Long
Chantenay, Royal 13
Danvers 126
Chantenay, Red Core 5

Royal Chantenay
Red Cored Danvers
Danvers 126
Chantenay 403

Chantenay, Red Core 5
Chantenay, Royal 13
Royal Chantenay 321
Red Core Chantenay


W. Atlee Burpee Co.

I1 It I

It 11 tt
Seed Research Specialists, Inc.
i 1i II Io


Northrup, King & Co.


Keystone Vegetable Seeds


Joseph Harris Co.
Asgrow Seed Co.







- 17 -


FRESH MARKET CARROTS, SANFORD, 1965-66


Seed Source


Long Imperator 4586
Nantes Half Long
Eureka
Imperator 58

Imperator 408
Experimental 01958
Eureka
Imperator 58

Gold Pak
Scarlet Nantes
Nantes, Long Strain
Waltham Hi Color

Hypack 1364
Pioneer
Long Imperator 11
Empress


W. Atlee Burpee Co.
H II tI
Seed Research Specialists, Inc.
if It I oI

Northrup, King & Co.
11 tI Is
Keystone Vegetable Seeds
I t It


21.
22.
23.
24.

25.
26.
27.
28.

29.
30.
31.
32.

33.
34.
35.
36.


Planting date: October 27, 1965. 6 replicates.


NEW CARROTS, OBSERVATIONAL TRIAL, SANFORD 1965-66


Variety Seed Source

1. U.S.D.A. Experimental line via Dr. V. F. Nettles, Vegetable Crops De-
2. apartment, U. of F.
S I It It ti 1t
4. I Io If II
5 11 It II 11 11

6. IIt I II It
7. o
o II II It I1 II
S8.t II II I
Q II II I II II
10. i" "

11. ENHC 65 526 Joseph Harris Co.
12. Pioneer, new selection, 503 "
13. Hypack, new selection, 1354 "
14. Long Imperator 11 Asgrow Seed Co.
15. Royal Chantenay 321 Joseph Harris Co.

Planting date: November 1, 1965.


Variety


Joseph Harris Co.


to It tI


Asgrow Seed Co.
it It Is







- 18 -


Carrot Fertilization Sources of '.N:trg-n

TREATMENTS, NITROGEN SOURCE TRIAL, CARROTS, SANFORD, 1965-66

Treatment (150 lbs. N per acre in all except 15 and 16)


5-5-8-2 (40o organic) @ 3000 Ibs/A.
8-40-0-14 (Magamp) + 240 lbs K20/A.
Ammonium nitrate (33.5% N) + 100 Ibs
Calcium nitrate (15.5% N) "


5. Calcium ammonium nitrate
(20.5% N)
6. Ammonium sulfate (21% N)
7. Sodium nitrate (16% N)
8. Urea (46% N)

9. Uramite (38% N)1
10. Blue Chip (38% N)2
11. Castor Pomace (5.75% N)
12. Hyhite Tankage (10% N)

13. Sludge (5% N)
14. Aqua Humus (14-14-14)3
15. Check, no nitrogen
16. High Nitrogen check, 250


P205/A + 240 lbs K20/A + 60 Ibs MgO/A.
I" i


+ Is
+ 100 Ibs P20g/A + 240 lbs K20A + 60 lbs MgQA.
Ibs N per acre from 5-5-8-2 + ammonium nitrate


Royal Chantenay carrots were planted November 9, 1965.

Fertilizer Schedule: 25 Ibs N and 50 Ibs P205/A applied prior to planting.
Remainder of fertilizer applied as side dressings at
7 weeks and 12 weeks after planting.

urea-formaldahyde fertilizer compound supplied by DuPont.
by Hercules.


SNitrogen derived from Leonardite, a coal-like Wyoming mineral.


1A
2


- __









- 19 -


Carrot Fertilization NeT Contr.olled Release Nitrogen and Pcu,.;!.u,
Materials:

Experimental fertilizer materials* with slow release characteristics,
resistant to leaching are on trial in comparison with fertilizers made up from
standard materials in general use.

All treatments except No. 13, the check, supply 100 pounds of N per acre,
with 100 Ibs P205/A, 160 Ibs K20/A and 40 Ibs MgOA.

CONTROLLED RELEASE FERTILIZER TRIAL, CARROTS, 1965-66

Treatments
,, ,


from X419-67
Is "i


from
from

from
from

from


X519-14
X519-11!

X519-15
X519-15

urea


, 50% from urea


, 50% from urea


, 50% from urea


[ from castor pomace
From 50% from urea

Sfor sludge
I from sludge, 50' from urea

40% organic, mixed fertilizer


13. Check, 0 nitrogen


14. 100% of K20 from X519-19
15. 50% of K20 from X519-19, 50% from K Cl.


100% of
50% of

100' of
5o4 bf

100% of
50% of



100% of
50% of

100% of
50% of

5-5-8-2


Royal Chantenay carrots were planted October 13, 1965.

* Supplied by Sun Oil Company.









- 20 -


Carrot Fertilizations Supplemental Liquid Fertilizers:

These plots all receive normal amounts of a complete fertilizer. The effects
of additional or supplemental nutrients from liquid fertilizers are being
evaluated.

LICJID FERTILIZER TRIAL, CARROTS, SANFORD, 1965-66


Treatments


1. Check, regular fertilizer only (5-5-8-2)
2. 13-13-13 liquid fertilizer applied as pre-plant seed coating
3. Foliar sprays, 13-13-13 @ 1 gal/100 gal/acre.
4. 10-20-10 "
5. 12-4-12 "

Royal Chantenay carrots were planted November 1, 1965.


Cabbage Fertilizer Trial to investigate Possible Relationship between Major
Nutrients and Black Speck of Cabbage (in cooperation with Dr. J. F. Darby):

FERTILIZER TREATMENTS, CABBAGE BLACK SPECK TRIAL 1965-66

Fertilizer Treatments


N P205 K20


1500 lbs/acre
3000 "
6000 "
9000 "


2000 "
4000 "
2000 "
4000 "


Market Topper, a speck susceptible hybrid cabbage was planted December 7,1965.


Fertilizer Utilization in Relation to Plastic and Petroleum Mulches.
operation with Dr. W. T. Scudder, Dr. D. F. Rothwell and B. Bustillo).


(In co-


This experiment includes 3 mulch or seal treatments and 3 fertilizer levels
in all combinations:


Mulches:
(a) Check, no seal
(b) Petroleum mulch @ 600 gpa
(c) Black plastic


Fertilizers:
(a) 6-6-6 @
(b) 66--6 @
(c) 6-6-6 @


500 lbs/A.
1500 lbs/A.
3000 Ibs/A.


The cooperation of Dr. Rothwell and Mr. Bustillo of the Soils Department of
the main station will enable a thorough study of both chemical and microbiologi-
*al factors.









- 21 -


DISEASES OF VEGETABLE COPS

J. F. Darby


Early blight of celery: Two fungicide trials for the control of early
blight of celery -flhT.Fehirted in June, 1965. One trial was in Zellwood and the
other in Sanford.

Du-ter (Thompson Hayward Co.) gave a perfect control of early blight in
Sanford, however, the concentration used (2.0 qt/100 gal) was 4 times the manu-
facturers suggested dosage. As a result, the yield was reduced.

Daconil 2785 (Diamond Alkali) gave an excellent control of early blight in
both Sanford and Zellwood. This is the third year that this chemical has been
tested and each time it has been outstanding in both disease control and yield.

Difolatan (Chevron Chemical, Ortho Division) provided good control and the
highest yield in Sanford.

In previous tests, Dyrene has given excellent control and yield but in these
tests, it was about equal to maneb.

Dyrene and maneb are currently recommended and approved for use on celery,
but Daconil 2785 and Difolatan gave better results in these tests. The latter two
chemicals are not yet approved by the FDA for use on celery.

Sclerotiniose of lettuce (drop), and celery (pinkrot): Drop of lettuce was
reduced and yields were increased by weekly applications of Difolatan, Daconil,
Fermate, and Botran.

Pinkrot and Ehizoctonia stalk rot of celery was reduced and the yields in-
creased by weekly applications of Daconil, Terraclor, Difolatan, Fermate, and
Botran.

Fermate is the only fungicide approved for use on lettuce and celery for
the control of drop and pinkrot. The fungicides which control these diseases best
are not yet on the market. The manufacturers of Daconil, Difolatan, and Botran
are seeking approval from the Federal Food and Drug Administration to market their
fungicides.

A summary of the data collected from these two trials are presented in this
report.

Downy mildew in cabbage seedbeds: A fungicide trial on cabbage seedbeds in
the fall of 1965 was designed to determine if the stunting and distortion caused
by Spergon could be lessened or if another fungicide would control downy mildew
and damping off without stunting. No other fungicide was as good as Spergon for
cabbage seedbeds. The addition of 1.5 Ib of maneb to 3 to 4 Ib of Spergon reduced








- 22 -


Early blight of celery, Sanford and Zellwood, June, 1965. A summary of the data
from 8 of the 18 treatments in two trials.

Early blight Yield, tripped
Treatment & conc/100 gal Zellwood Sanford Zellwood Sanford


Daconilb 2785, 75W, 2.0 lb 0.69 0.56 288 236

Daconil 2785, 75W, 2.0 lb
Poly film, 1.0 qt 0.94 0.31 273 198

Thylate, 65W, 1.0 Ib
Dithane M-22, 80W, 1.0 Ib
TC-90, 2 qt 1.25 0.75 267 250

Difolatanc, 80W, 1.25 lb 1.69 1.06 204 260

TC-90, 2.0 qt
Dyrene, 50W, 2.0 lb 1.31 1.50 260 197

Dithane M-22, 80W, 1.5 lb 1.81 1.62 199 175

Dyrene, 50W, 50W, 2.0 Ib 1.88 1.50 210 141

Du-ter 2F, 2.0 qt 0.00 0.12 202 252

Untreated 3.56 2.75 98 86

LSD 5% 0.4o 0.32 34 56
1% 0.54 0.42 45 75


a
0 = no early blight; 5 = severe

bDiamond Alkali

c Ortho Division, Chevron Chemial


early blight





- 23 -


Sclerotiniose of Great Lakes lettuce (drop) and Florimart celery (pinlroz) c:;
Rhizoctonia stalk rot of celery. Data are averages on totals of 4 replicatas
collected in Zellwood in January, 1956.

Celery _
Lettuce Phizoctonia Pinkrot Yield
Treatment & conc/100 gal Drop ~ Yield, 7b % lb

1. Fermate, 76W, 2.0 lb
Hydrated lime 2.0 lb 43.7 258.3 46.9 23.2 258.7'

2. Fermate, 76W, 2.0 lb 44.5 231.8 46.3 20.2 257.0

3. Terraclor, 75W, 2.0 lb 59.9 137.0 32.0 29.1 291.2
4. Daconil 2878, 75W, 2.0 lb 25.3 282.1 9.1 11.6 329.1

5. Botran, 75W, 1.33-2.66 lb 49.7 197.8 56.7 21.3 255.4
6. Fermate, 76W, 2.0 lb
Sun Foli-Cote 128, 2.0 qt
DuPont Surfactant WK, 2 pt 36.0 226.2 30.5 16.3 310.6

7. Terraclor, 75W, 2.0 lb
Fermate, 76W, 2.0 lb 37.9 193.3 7.0 17.3 299.0

8. Daconil 3787, 75W, 2.0 lb
Sun Foli-Cote 128, 2.0 qt 20.0 280.3 3.2 12.3 310.6

9. Botran, 75W, 1.33 lb 37.7 245.3 35.1 26.2 281.2
10. Sun Foli-Cote 128, 2.0 it 59.9 144.3 49.7 35.1 213.1

11. Difolatan, 80W, 1.25 Ib 27.2 327.5 3.0 22.6 289.1

12. Difolatan, 80W, 1.25 lb
Fermate, 76W, 2.0 lb 27.3 311.1 6.3 10.5 285.9

13. Untreated 69.3 117.1 68.6 32.9 207.7
14. Thylate, 65W, 2.0 lb 27.2 251.8


a All treatments except number 5 were applied on a weekly schedule using 200 gpa of
spray. On lettuce, treatment number 5 which consisted of 1.33 lbs of Botran, 75W,
received only 2 applications and on celery 3 applications at the concentration of
2.66 lb of Botran 75W per 100 gallons.








- 24 -


the distortion and stunting and produced larger more vigorous plants than when
Spergon alone was used. Alternating Maneb with Spergon did not produce as many or
as large transplants as using Spergon alone. Maneb alone did nbt give a satis-
factory control of downy mildew in cabbage seedbeds.

Helminthosporium blight of sweet corn: Dithane M-45, Difolatan, Dithane
M-22 Sp., Polyram, Parzatet .P., Ti-hane- A-4o plus zinc sulfate and Daconil were
among the significantly better treatments in disease control and yield. A mixture
of Nabac and maneb gave a good control of blight but the yield was low.

Cabbage Variety Trials. J. F. Darby and J.C. Walker: Variety Trial I was
transplanted to the field on October 19, 1965. Results of Variety Trial I are
presented in this report.

Variety Trial II, consisting of 83 named and unnamed varieties, was trans-
planted to the field on November 16 to 23, 1965. This trial is now ready for
your inspection and a list of the varieties are presented in this report.

The primary purpose of these variety trials is to determine the resistance
of these varieties to black speck, mainly an internal speaking of cabbage of un-
known origin, and to black spot caused by a bacterium, Pseudomonas maculicola
(McCull.) F. L. Stevens, No bacteriacides or fungicides were used on either trial.

Most varieties showed some black speaking in the field at harvest. All
showed an increase in black speck during 3 weeks storage at 380 400 F. Those
showing least include Marion Market, King Cole, Early Glory, and Hybrid 21. Those
showing the highest black speck rating in storage include Market Topper, Market
Prize, and NK Hybrid 33. In general, the development of black speck was greater
in storage in this test than in the test of 1964-1965, but it should be pointed
out that Trial I was planted and harvested earlier than the 1964-65 trial.

As of this date, we have found no variety which is immune to black speck,
however, we hope to find some in the 83 varieties or lots not yet harvested.

The best way to avoid black speck, with the limited information now available
is to plant Marion Market, Farly Glory, Globe, or King Cole and harvest as early
as possible, because the longer the cabbage remains in the field, the more likely
it is to develop black speck. Badger Market has some resistance to black speck,
but it is very susceptible to black spot. Black spot may be controlled by spray-
ing 2 or 3 times a week with 1.5 lb of maneb and 4.0 lb of Tribasic copper sulfate
per 100 gallons. Begin applications 3 weeks before harvest and continue until one
weck before harvest for a total of six applications.








- 25 -


CABBAGE VARIETY TRIAL I. YIELD, SIZE, MATURITY,
BLACK SPOT, AND BLACK SPECK


Var. First harvest Black Black speckb/
no. Days Yield Avg. spot After
Trial Variety or Seed trans. % sacks no. hds. % at 3 wks
2 lot number source to ready per A per sack a/ harvest storage

40 Early Jer.W. Asg 76 71 621 24 31 2.9 3.6
3 Hybrid 21 Asg 76 76 870 19 9 0.0 2.5
44 Hybrid 32 NK 76 81 685 23 17 0.6 2.9
45 Hybrid 33 NK 76 65 872 18 11 1.2 3.9
47 Cop. Mkt. NK 76 85 878 17 36 1.1 3.1
Badger Mkt. Corneli 82 75 607 24 67 0.5 2.5
Badger Mkt. Harris 82 93 761 21 90 0.6 3.1
5 Marion Mkt. Asg 82 69 668 19 13 0.1 2.9
2 Early Glory Asg 82 68 711 19 12 0.5 2.6
13 King Cole FM 82 83 970 17 1 0.7 2.6
18 E4203 FM 82 83 995 16 8 0.5 3.1
24 Mkt. Topper Harris 82 73 896 18 7 3.8 4.4

25 Mkt. Prize Harris 82 80 942 17 2 3.9 4.0
42 Hybrid 21 NK 82 84 906 18 23 0.0 1.7
43 Hybrid 30 NK 82 77 863 17 2 1.1 3.3
9 Greenback Asg 86 82 766 19 3 3.4 3.9

15 Hybrid 6 FM 86 91 1024 16 2 1.0 2.7
22 Bonanza FM 86 64 948 16 23 1.6 3.2
19 E4204 FM 89 89 879 18 0 3.4 3.9
28 Mkt. Packer Harris 89 68 863 16 2 3.8 4.4

10 Wis. Cop. Corneli 89 74 925 17 21 0.8 3.8
46 TBR Globe NK 89 73 973 15 5 0.3 1.2
21 Res. Glory FM 96 65 757 18 16 0.3
23 Roundup FM 96 81 1064 16 0 1.5
1 Badger B.H. Asg 96 75 651 21 0 0.9
Red Acre Asg 96 57 443 29 0 0.0


a/ Percent unmarketable at first harvest.


V 0 = none; 5 = severe.









- 26 -


0& -1


CABBAGE VAR EIY TRIAL I. HORbTCUImff AL CHARACTESTIcs ,


Var." Head diam.
Sno Leaf base to. top
Trial Variety or- Seedi Wrapper color; Head HRead
2 lot number, -source leaves a/ shape interior core length

40, Early Jersey W, Asg Poor I Pointed Poor 1.2-2.0"
3 Hybrid 21 Asg, I Flat Good 1.8
44 Hybrid 32 Nk YG Pound Po Poor 1.6
45 Hybrid 33 NK YG. 1.8
"7- Cop. kt., ; G Fair 1.6

... Badger. t.t Corneli Ov oid ,. Good' ,. 1.9
S. Badger Mkt.. Harris I Good 1
5 arion Makt. Asg Good .YG Round F.air 1.8
Early Glory Asg I Ovoid .
13 K1ing)Cole FM "I Round Good 1.6
18 E4203 FM "' I,', Semi R air 1.9
24 N. k Topper .Ha1rris-3 / 1.3
25 Ma t. Prize -Harris -ouind 1.5
42 Hybrid 21 K (Poor I Flat Good 1.8
43 Hybrid 30 NK Good Ei G- F. ir 1.9
S9 ; Greenback Asg I 2Round. 2.0 -
15 'Hybrid 6 I I Semi RB Good 2.0
'-22 Bonanza F1' 4 I ,. found Ex 2.0
19 E420k M Semi R Goo 1.6
28 M, market Packer Harris \ I 2.0

10 Wis. Cop. Corneli YG Roundd ir 1.4
46 TR Globe K BG Good 2.0,
21 es. Glory FM I, 1..3
23 Roundup I "1.9
1 Badger B Asg" G 1.8
ed Acre Asg ed 2,0


YG yellow green; BG = nlue green;


I = intexrmediati e between.BG and'YG,




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