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Group Title: Cool season legume production in South Central Florida.
Title: Cool season legume production in South Central Florida. 1978-79
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075794/00002
 Material Information
Title: Cool season legume production in South Central Florida. 1978-79
Series Title: Cool season legume production in South Central Florida.
Translated Title: Research Report - University of Florida Agricultural Research Center ; 1979-10 ( English )
Physical Description: Serial
Language: English
Creator: Mislevy, P.
Kalmbacher, R. S.
Everett, P. H.
Publisher: University of Florida Agricultural Research Center
Publication Date: 1979
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075794
Volume ID: VID00002
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 143660028

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        Page 6
        Page 7
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        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
    Historic note
        Unnumbered ( 12 )
Full Text






Agricultural Research Center *
Research Report RC-1979-10 November 1979






COOL SEASON LEGUME PRODUCTION IN SOUTH CENTRAL FLORIDA, 978-79



P. Mislevy, R. S. Kalmbacher and P. H. Everett' JAN 4 1980

'' .


The legumes, red and white clover, Persian clover, annual vetch and
alfalfa, can provide a source of high-quality forage when permanent
pastures are producing very little. Production can begin in late
January and continue through May, depending on plant species. These
legumes may be rotationally grazed, harvested as green chop, or made
into hay. Red clover, alfalfa and Persian clover are upright, bunch-
type plants that can attain a height of 12 to 24 inches. These species
are well adapted for hay which can be made during the dry months of
March, April or May. White clover is strongly stoloniferous, generally
attaining a height of 6 to 12 inches. Its prostrate habit of growth makes
this plant most adapted to grazing. Annual vetch is a bunch-type plant
which develops a decumbant, viney habit of growth.

Regardless of intended use, the production of high yielding,
quality legume forage depends on the selection of proper varieties,
followed by good fertilization and water control practices.

The purpose of this study was to evaluate cool season legumes for
forage production and persistence in south Central Florida. Where
trade names are used no endorsement is intended.







Associate and Assistant Professors, respectively. Agricultural
Research Center, Ona; and Professor, Agricultural Research Center,
Immokalee.













Experimental


Procedure


Five
season.


legume


Four


studies were


studies were at


conduct
the Ona


id


during


the 1978-79


Agricultural Research


growing
Center


(ARC)


one at


the Immokalee ARC.


The alfalfa,


ARC were


vetch and


seeded November


the Immokalee ARC was


studies will


clover


seeded


be referred


and vetch


field-plot
block with


experiments


layout of


all five


clover
and 8,


experiments


1978.


on October
as alfalfa


The
12.


conducted


experiment
SThroughout


variety,


Ona and alfalfa
experiments was


alfalfa


experiment


a randomized,


at the Ona


conducted


this


paper


at
the


inoculation,
Immokalee.


complete


four replications.


Seeding rates


of the Ona


experiments were as


follows:


red clover


10 lb/A,
and vetch


legume


white
30 1


seed


clover


b/A.


4 ib/A,


In Immoka lee


at both


of Rhizobium bacteria.


combination with


locations


alfalfa


lb/A,


the alfalfa


was


In Immokalee


proper


Persian


clover 6


seeding rate was


inocula ted wi th
the Pelinoc(R) s


proper


system was


lb/A


20 lb/A.


strain


used


Rhizobium.


The vetch


experiment at


was broadcast-seeded,


disked


lightly


double


experiments


cultipacked


at Ona


to obtain good


and Immokalee


seed


to soil


were drilled with a


contact. All other
Planet Junior R)


seeder


rows


inches


apart


to a


depth


of 0.5


inches


and double


cultipacked.


The Ona


experiments were


irrigated


immediately


after


seeding with


an overhead


About one-hal
January with
Rainfall duri
adequate.


system.


A total


the water


the remaining 2
ng February and


of 4.4


was apple
.2 inche


inches of water was
led between mid-Nove


s


applied


March of


after


1978-79


earl


growing


applied at Ona.
mber and mid-
y April.
g season was


At Immokalee


system with


laterals


the alfalfa


on 40


foo


Calcium and magnesium con


experiment was
t centers. Wa

tent in all On


irriga ted


ter was


supply


a experiments


a seepage
ed as needed.

was adequate.


However,


in Immokalee


2,000


lb/A dolomite was


applied


prior


to seeding


Fertilization


seeding.


practices


In early


at Ona were 475


February,


lb/A of


an additional 50


0-1


lb/A


0-20 (N-P205-K20) a
of K20 was applied.


In Immokalee 400
FTE 5032 was app


lb/A


lied


a. it


of 0-10-20


prior


nl f


plus


feeding.
Snnf^ 4 fSa


20 lb/A
After


fritted micronutrient


the second


harvest an


~~~AAJ~~~~~C 4.J nan -I C -,I -a n al


fk i n


rl


f%


-I #k |










All experiments were harvested when the forage attained a height
of 6 to 25 inches, depending on plant species. White clover was generally
harvested when plants ranged from 6 to 12 inches, whereas alfalfa, red and
Persian clover and vetch ranged from 10 to 25 inches (early bloom or bud
stage). All legumes harvested at Ona and Immokalee were cut back to a
3 inch stubble.

Approximately one week prior to the seeding of legumes atOna and
immediately before seeding at Immokalee the herbicide, Eptam was
applied at a rate of 5.0 and 3.0 Ibs active/A, respectively. The chemical
at both locations was applied to the cultivated soil and disked into the
seedbed immediately to control broadleaf and grassy weeds.

In the alfalfa inoculation study the following four Rhizobium carriers
were used: 1) liquid (water) 2) granular 3) dormal and 4) Peat base.

Results and Discussion

Ona ARC

Total dry matter yields of alfalfa ranged from a high of 5.3 T/A
for 'Fla 77' to a low of 1.7 T/A for the Northrup King experimental
'K6-11' (Table 1). Generally, the highest yielding varieties were those
that were "non-dormant" (Fla 77, 'Hairy peruvian', 'Waterman Loomis 600',
'Dekalb 185' and 'NDRI selection 1'). Even though the above "non-dormant"
entries all had excellent seedling vigor 40 days after seeding and were
the only entries to exhibit rapid plant development 65 days after seeding,
harvest 1 dry matter yields were not different from most dormant-type
entries (Table 1). These data indicated that dormant and non-dormant
entries yielded similarly in the first two harvests, however the non-
dormant entries appear to be superior from March to July. Tiller estimates
of all 18 alfalfa varieties tested at Ona in 1978-79 indicated that the
5 non-dormant varieties averaged more than twice as many tillers and
flowered earlier than the dormant entries.

Many of the alfalfa varieties did contain leaf spot disease,
Stemphylium botryiosum, during the February to May growing period.

Significant differences among cool season clovers were observed during
the 1978-79 growing season at Ona (Table 2). 'Nolins' and 'Pennscott'
red clover were the highest yielding clover entries, averaging 3.6 and
3.5 T/A, respectively. Average total dry matter yield over all red
clover entries was 2.9 T/A, which was similar to that of Persian clover
(2.8 T/A). 'Arcadia' and 'Florida' were the highest yielding white clovers
averaging 2.3 T/A dry matter over three harvests.

When comparing the better alfalfa and red clover varieties for forage
production through May 16, 1979, Pennscott and Nolins red clover generally
produced higher yields in 3 harvests than alfalfa in 4 harvests.











Therefore, if forage needs are critical through April, red clover may
be a better selection than alfalfa.

All cool season clovers died after the third (May 16) harvest due
to a rootknot nematode infestation.

No difference in total seasonal yield was observed among the annual
vetch varieties grown at Ona during the winter of 1978-79 (Table 3).
Total dry matter yield for two harvests averaged 1.7 T/A. Average dry
matter production for harvest 1 and 2 was 1.0 and 0.7 T/A, respectively.
These data indicated that annual vetch production in south Florida appeared
to be limited to a span of 60 to 80 days, with respectable yields over a
short time period. The Woodford variety appeared to have a more decumbent
habit of growth, when compared with other entries. This entry contained
many more tillers and had better regrowth, which may lend itself better
to grazing. No diseases were observed on any of the vetch entries.

Total dry matter yields of alfalfa were not different when treated
with various types of Rhizobium carries (Table 4). Since 'Dekalb 185'
was the alfalfa variety used for all inoculation treatments no difference
was observed between carriers for any harvest. This preliminary informa-
tion indicated that alfalfa treated with fresh, peat base inoculation
may be as effective as liquid, granular or dormal carriers.

Immokalee ARC

There were significant differences in the total yield of alfalfas
grown at Immokalee (Table 5). Yield ranged from a high of 4.6 T/A
(Fla 77) to a low of 1.6 T/A (Northrup King K6-11) and all 24 varieties
averaged 3.4 T/A.

Most entries were harvested seven times, beginning on January 3,
which was 83 days after seeding. At harvest 1 there was little difference
in yield among the entries, but the "dormant" types such as Northrup
King K6-11, NAPB 'Vangard', NAPB, 'Apollo', etc. were 0.2 T/A lower in
yield than most "non-dormant" entries. Yields of all entries were lower
at harvest 2, which reflectthe small amount of growth that occurred in
the 51 day, January-February period between harvest 1 and 2. Even in
south Florida, 80 miles north of the Everglades, little growth from
alfalfa can be expected in mid-winter.

Yields of all entries reached a peak in the April to June period.
After June (harvest 5) production from all entries dropped off drastically.

Disease, mainly Rhizoctonia, was believed to be the major reason
for alfalfa stand decline. The incidence of Rhizoctonia was coincidental
with the drop in yield due to thinning of the plant stand. During cool
weather Stemhylium (leaf spot) appeared to be a major problem (Table 6).
Although the leaf-spot covered the leaves and lowered yields both by











reducing plant photosynthetic efficiency and through actual leaf-drop,
Stemphylium probably did not result in plant mortality. Heavy rain,
which resulted in saturated soil in mid-August and September helped
to eliminate the experiment.

Plant height, percent canopy cover and percent bloom were
evaluated for each entry at each harvest. Plant height for all 24
entries ranged from an average of 10 inches at harvest 2 to a high of 24
inches at harvest 5, which was when the alfalfas were in peak production.
Canopy cover ranged from a low of 38% at harvest 1 to 90% at harvest 4.
The non-dormant entries flowered more than dormant types, and together
the range of percent bloom of the 24 entries averaged a low of 0.0%
during harvest 1, 2 and 3 to a high of 35 percent bloom at harvest
5 and 6.

Conclusions

Ona ARC

Significant differences in dry matter production were obtained among
various alfalfa and clover entries. Fla. 77 alfalfa and Nolins red
clover were the highest yielding entries averaging 5.3 and 3.6 T/A. In
the January harvest the non-dormant alfalfa varieties did not produce
more forage than the dormant varieties, but the non-dormant entries
produced more forage over a longer period of time (7 harvests). If
legume forage production is desired for only a short period of time
(March to May) the annual vetch and red clover entries may be more
desirable than alfalfa.

Immokalee ARC

There were differences in dry matter yield among the 24 alfalfa
varieties tested. Higher yields were produced by Florida 77, Hairy
Peruvian, Lew, K6-5, WL508, Mesa-Sirsa, WL600, WL514, WL512 and Moapa 69.
These entries encompass a range in yield of 4.6 to 3.5 T/A.

In Immokalee alfalfa can produce forage for about a 6 month period,
with peak production from April to June. Little January and February
production can be expected, and the entries tested in this trial should
not be expected to live through the summer.













Table 1. Dry matter yields of alfalfa varieties grown at the ARC Ona,
1978-79.


Dry matter yi
Harvests


Variety


Flat
Fla Seed & Feed
WL
Dekalb
NDRI
N. Carolina AES
Asgrow
NK

WL
NAPB
NAPB
NAPB
NK
USDA/SEA/AR
NK
NK
NK
Average


Hairy Peruvian
WL600
185
Selection 1t
Liberty
Aztec II
K6-5+
Olympic
WL318
Trident
Vangard
Apollo
Phytor
ARC
Delta
Dominor
K6-11l


1 2 3 4


0.3
0.3
0.3
0.2
0.2
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.3
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.3
0.2
0.2
0.2
0.3


0.7
0.7
0.6
0.6
0.4
0.6
0.6
0.6
0.7
0.5
0.5
0.7
0.6
0.5
0.7
0.5
0.5
0.2
0.5


1.0
0.9
0.8
0.9
0.7
0.9
0.9
0.8
0.8
0.7
0.7
0.9
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.3
0.7


1.1
0.
1.0
0.9
0.9
0.9
0.9
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.8
0.9
0.8
0.5
0.8


eld
Total
5 6 7 Yield


tons/A
0.9
0.8
0.7
0.7
0.7
0.6
0.6
0.7
0.5
0.7
0.7
0.6
0.6
0.7
0.4
0.5
0.5
0.3
0.6


0.9
0.8
0.7
0.6
0.8
0.6
0.5
0.6
0.5
0.6
0.6
0.4
0.5
0.5
0.4
0.4
0.5
0.2
0.5


0.4
0.4
0.2
0.2
0.4














0.3


5.3a*
4.8ab
4.3bc
4.1b-d
4.1b-d
3.9c-e
3.8c-e
3.8c-e
3.6c-e
3.6c-e
3.6c-e
3.6c-e
3.5c-e
3.5c-e
3.4de
3.3e
3.3e
1.7f
3.7


Means within a column followed
different at the 0.05 level of
Range Test.


by the same letter are not significantly
probability according to Duncans Multiple


tNAPB is North American Plant Breeders; NK is Northrup King; Fla is Florida
Experiment Station and WL is Waterman and Loomis.

tExperimental varieties, seed not commercially available.

Soil type: Ona fine sand.
Date seeded: November 7, 1978
Seeding rate: 15 Ib/A.
Fertilization rate: 475 Ib/A 0-10-20 (N-P 05-K 0) respectively prior to
seeding, followed by 50 lb/A K20 on February 1, 1979.
Pre-plant herbicide: Eptam 6.0 pints commercial product/A followed by
immediate incorporation.
Harvest dates: 1=1-25, 2=3-19, 3=4-19, 4=5-16, 5=6-18, 6=7-16 and 7=8-13-79.
Irrigation: applied 4.4 inches of water through overhead sprinklers.


Brand


. .. .. . I













Table 2. Dry matter yield of cool season clover varieties at the ARC, Ona,
1978-79.

Dry matter yield
Harvest
Brand Variety 1 2 3 Total
tons/A
Red clover
Nolins 1.6 1.6 0.4 3.6a*
Pennscott 1.1 1.8 0.6 3.5ab
NKt 78042t 0.9 1.6 0.7 3.2a-c
NK 78122f 1.0 1.5 0.5 3.0a-c
NAPB Redland 0.8 1.6 0.6 3.0a-c
NK Florie 0.9 1.5 0.5 2.9b-d
NAPB Redland II 0.9 1.4 0.5 2.8cd
NK 78001t 0.7 1.2 0.5 2.4de
NK Florex 0.8 0.9 0.4 2.1ef
Average 1.0 1.5 0.5 2.9

White clover
NK Arcadia 1.0 1.0 0.3 2.3de
Flat white clovert 0.9 1.0 0.4 2.3de
La S-1 0.9 1.0 0.2 2.1ef
NK K7-5 0.3 0.9 0.4 1.6f
Average 0.8 1.0 0.3 2.1

Persian clover 0.9 1.2 0.7 2.8cd


Means within a column followed by the
different at the 0.05 level according


same letter are not significantly
to Duncans Multiple Range Test.


tNAPB is North American Plant Breeders, NK is Northrup King and Fla is
Florida Experiment Station.
tExperimental entry, seed not commercially available.

Soil type: Ona fine sand.
Date seeded: November 8, 1978.
Seeding rate: Red clover 10 lb/A, white clover 4 Ib/A and Persian clover
6 Ib/A.
Fertilization rate: 475 Ib/A 0-10-20 (N-P205-K20) respectively, prior to
seeding, followed by 50 lb/A K20 on February 1, 1979.
Pre-plant herbicide: Eptam 6.0 pints commercial product/A followed by
immediate incorporation.
Harvest dates: 1=3-6, 2=4-18, and 3=5-16-79.
Irrigation: 4.4 inches through overhead sprinklers.












Table 3. Dry matter production of annual vetch varieties grown at Ona
ARC, 1978-79.
Dry matter yield
Harvest
Variety 1 2 Total
tons/A

Cahaba white 1.1 0.7 1.8 a*

Nova II 1.0 0.5 1.5 a

Vangard 1.0 0.7 1.7 a

Vantage 1.1 0.8 1.9 a

Woodford 0.9 0.7 1.6 a

Average 1.0 0.7 1.7

*f


Means within the column followed by
significantly different at the 0.05
Multiple Range Test.


the same letter are not
level according to Duncans


Soil type: Ona fine sand.
Date seeded: November 8, 1978.
Seeding rate: 30 Ib/A
Fertilization rate: 475 Ib/A 0-10-20 N-P205-K20 respectively, prior
to seeding.
Harvest dates: 1=3-2, and 2=4-16-79.
Irrigation: 4.4 inches through overhead sprinklers.












Table 4. Effect of inoculation types on alfalfa dry matter production
at the ARC, Ona, 1978-79.


Dry matter yield
Inoculation Harvests Total
type 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 yield
tons/A


Liquid


0.3 0.6 0.9 0.8 0.9 0.7 0.4


Granular

Dormal

Peat

Average


0.3 0.5


0.9 0.9 1.0 0.7 0.5


0.3 0.6 0.9 0.9 0.9 0.7 0.5


0.3

0.3


0.6

0.6


0.9

0.9


0.9 1.0

0.9 0.9


0.7 0.4

0.7 0.5


4.6 a*

4.8 a

4.8 a

4.8 a

4.8


Means within
different at


a column followed by the same letter are not significantly
the 0.05 level according to Duncans Multiple Range Test.


tInoculation type refers to the carrier of the Rhizobium.

Soil type: Ona fine sand.
Date seeded: November 8, 1978.
Seeding rate: 15 Ib/A.
Fertilization rate: 475 Ib/A 0-10-20 (N-P205-K20), respectively, prior
to seeding followed by 50 lb/A, K20 on February 1, 1979.
Irrigation: 4.4 inches applied through overhead sprinklers.












Table 5. Dry matter yield of alfalfa varieties grown at the Immokalee ARC, 1979.

Harvest
Brand Variety 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Total
1-3 2-23 4-9 5-9 6-7 7-10 8-13 9-14
yield tons/A

Fla AES Florida 77 0.4 0.2 0.8 0.9 0.9 0.5 0.5 0.4 4.6at
Fla Feed & Seed Hairy Peruvian 0.5 0.3 0.7 0.9 0.9 0.4 0.4 0.3 4.4ab
Arizona AES Lew 0.4 0.2 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.4 0.4 0.4 4.2ab
Northrup-King K6-5 0.4 0.2 0.8 0.9 1.1 0.4 0.3 --- 4.lab
Waterman-Loomis WL508 0.4 0.2 0.7 1.0 0.9 0.4 0.3 --- 3.9abc
Arizona AES Mesa-Sirsa 0.5 0.2 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.4 0.4 --- 3.8a-d
Waterman-Loomis WL600 0.5 0.2 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.4 0.4 --- 3.8a-d
Experimental NDRI Sel. I 0.4 0.2 0.6 0.8 0.9 0.5 0.4 --- 3.8a-d
Waterman-Loomis WL514 0.4 0.2 0.6 0.9 0.9 0.4 0.3 --- 3.7a-d
Waterman-Loomis WL512 0.2 0.6 1.0 0.9 0.3 0.3 0.3 --- 3.6a-d
USDA/SEA/AR Moapa 69 0.4 0.2 0.5 0.8 0.8 0.4 0.4 --- 3.5a-e
Ferry Morse Ardiente 0.3 0.1 0.6 0.7 1.0 0.4 0.3 --- 3.4b-e
Ferry Morse AS 13-R 0.3 0.1 0.6 0.7 0.9 0.5 0.3 --- 3.4b-e
Northrup-King Delta 0.4 0.1 0.6 0.8 0.9 0.5 0.1 --- 3.4b-e
USDA/SEA/AR ARC 0.3 0.1 -.6 0.8 0.8 0.3 0.3 --- 3.2cde
Dekalb 185 0.4 0.1 0.5 0.7 0.8 0.4 0.3 --- 3.2cde
NAPB Vangard 0.2 --- 0.6 0.9 0.8 0.4 0.3 --- 3.2cde
Northrup-King Phytor 0.2 0.1 0.5 0.7 0.9 0.4 0.4 --- 3.2cde
NAPB Apollo 0.2 0.1 0.5 0.9 0.8 0.3 0.3 --- 3.1def
USDA/SEA/AR Lahontan 0.2 0.1 0.5 0.8 0.9 0.2 0.3 --- 3.0ef
Calif.AES Caliverde 65 0.3 0.2 0.4 0.7 0.8 0.3 0.3 --- 3.0ef
Calif.AES Cargo 0.3 0.1 0.5 0.7 0.6 0.3 --- -- 2.5f
N. Mexico AES Mesilla 0.2 0.1 0.5 0.7 0.8 0.2 --- -- 2.5f
Northrup-King K6-11 0.2 --- 0.3 0.6 0.5 --- --- --- 1.6g

Average 0.3 0.2 0.6 0.8 0.8 0.4 0.3 0.0 3.4

tMeans followed by the same letter are not significantly different (DLSD, K=100).

Date seeded: October 12, 1978.
Seeding rate: 20 Ib/A.
Fertilization: At seeding 400 Ib/A of 0-10-20 + 20 Ib/A FTE 503. After harvest
2 (2-23-79) 275 Ib/A 0-10-20.
Herbicide: Pre-emergence incorporated application of 3.5 pints/A
(commercial product)of Eptam.
Irrigation: Seepage with laterals on 40 foot centers.












Table 6. Disease ratings of alfalfa varieties grown at the Immokalee ARC,
1979.

Harvest
1t 2t 3t 4+ 5t 6t 7t 8t
Brand Variety 1-3 2-23 4-9 5-9 6-7 7-10 8-13 9-14


Fla AES Florida 77 4.0 2.8 2.2 2.8 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0
Fla Feed & Seed Hairy Peruvian 3.8 3.5 4.0 3.3 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0
Arizona AES Lew 3.3 4.5 2.8 3.5 4.0 4.0 4.0 4.0
Northrup-King K6-5 2.5 2.5 2.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 ---
Waterman-Loomis WL508 3.5 4.0 2.3 3.0 4.0 4.0 4.0
Arizona AES Mesa-Sirsa 4.0 3.8 3.5 3.5 4.0 4.0 4.0
Waterman-Loomis WL600 3.3 3.3 2.5 2.8 4.0 4.0 4.0
Experimental NDRI Sel. I 2.5 2.5 2.0 2.0 4.0 4.0 4.0 ---
Waterman-Loomis WL514 4.3 3.3 2.8 3.3 4.0 4.0 4.0
Waterman-Loomis WL512 2.8 4.3 2.3 2.5 4.0 4.0 4.0
USDA/SEA/AR Moapa 69 3.5 4.0 3.0 2.8 4.0 4.0 4.0
Ferry Morse Ardiente 4.3 3.8 2.5 3.2 4.0 4.0 4.0 ---
Ferry Morse AS 13R 5.3 3.5 2.5 3.5 4.0 4.0 4.0 ---
Northrup-King Delta 3.8 3.0 2.8 2.8 4.0 4.0 4.0 ---
USDA/SEA/AR ARC 3.3 2.8 2.8 2.8 4.0 4.0 4.0 -
Dekalb 185 3.5 3.3 2.8 3.0 4.0 4.0 4.0
NAPB Vangard 3.8 --- 2.3 2.5 4.0 4.0 4.0 ---
Northrup-King Phytor 4.3 2.8 2.3 2.5 4.0 4.0 4.0 --
NAPB Apollo 4.8 1.3 2.3 2.3 4.0 4.0 4.0 --
USDA/SEA/AR Lahontan 4.8 5.0 2.3 3.3 4.0 4.0 4.0 --
Calif. AES Caliverde 65 4.0 3.3 2.3 3.3 4.0 4.0 4.0 --
Calif. AES Cargo 4.3 3.8 2.3 3.5 4.0 4.0 4.0 ---
N. Mexico AES Mesilla 6.0 2.8 2.3 3.3 4.0 4.0 4.0 ---
Northrup-King K6-11 4.0 --- 2.0 2.5 4.0 4.0 4.0 ---

Average 3.9 3.3 2.5 2.9 4.0 4.0 4.0


Disease rated on a scale of 0
or total plant loss.


to 10, with 0 none, 10 total plant coverage


tDisease was Stemphylium leaf spot.

tRhizoctonia aerial blight and anthracnose were found


in all entries.









HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






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