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 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Letter of Transmittal to the...
 Credits
 Report of the Director
 Report of the State Agent
 Report of the East and South District...
 Report of the Boys' Corn Club...
 Report of the Assistant State Agent...
 Report of the Special Silo...
 Report of the Hog Cholera Control...
 Report of the Farmers' institu...
 Index














Cooperative demonstration work in agriculture and home economics
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075775/00001
 Material Information
Title: Cooperative demonstration work in agriculture and home economics
Running title: Annual report
Physical Description: v. : ill. ; 23 cm
Language: English
Creator: University of Florida -- Agricultural Extension Division
United States -- Dept. of Agriculture
Publisher: The Division
Place of Publication: Gainesville Fla
Creation Date: 1915
Frequency: annual
regular
 Subjects
Subjects / Keywords: Agricultural extension work -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Home economics, Rural -- Periodicals -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
serial   ( sobekcm )
 Notes
Statement of Responsibility: University of Florida, Division of Agricultural Extension and United States Department of Agriculture Cooperation.
Dates or Sequential Designation: - 1916.
Dates or Sequential Designation: Began with 1914/15.
Numbering Peculiarities: Report for the fiscal year ending June 30.
General Note: Description based on: 1915.
 Record Information
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 46380724
lccn - 2001229380
System ID: UF00075775:00001
 Related Items
Succeeded by: Cooperative extension work in agriculture and home economics

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Table of Contents
        Page 2
    Letter of Transmittal to the Governor
        Page 3
    Credits
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Report of the Director
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
    Report of the State Agent
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
    Report of the East and South District Agent
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
    Report of the Boys' Corn Club Agent
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
    Report of the Assistant State Agent Home Economics
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
    Report of the Special Silo Agent
        Page 46
        Page 47
    Report of the Hog Cholera Control Agent
        Page 48
        Page 49
    Report of the Farmers' institutes
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
    Index
        Page 1
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
Full Text








Cooperative Demonstration Work
IN

Agriculture and Home Economics
University of Florida Division of Agricultural
Extension and United States Department
of Agriculture Cooperating

P. H. ROLFS, Director



REPORT FOR THE FISCAL YEAR
ENDING JUNE 30th, 1915


NOVEMBER, 1916














CONTENTS
PAGE
LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL TO GOVERNOR OF FLORIDA ...................................... 3
BOARD OF CONTROL--------------------------
BOARD OF CONTROL.. ... ..... ....... .... ..---- ...... .. ... .............. ... 4
EXTENSIOi STAFF .. 4
EXTENSION STAFF .....:............................. .... ...... ... ..... .... .....:....:.... ...:.). .... 4
LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL TO CHAIRMAN BOARD OF CONTROL.......................... 7
REPORT OF DIRECTOR -.....-..... ....... .. .; ....... .... .............. 7
Introduction .. ....... 7
Financial Statem ent-............................. ..... .. .................... .... 11
Demonstration Activities6 ........... ... ... ... ................... 11
Home Economics Extension............. ..... ................. ..... ................. 18
REPORT OF STATE AGENT,.................. ... ...... ......... ................................ 19
Activities of Extension Workers (tabulated)...................................... 19
REPORT OF EAST AND SOUTH DISTRICT AGENT.............................................. 25
Corn Demonstrations ........................... .. ....................... ............. 25
Grasses ... --........................................................... ........ ...
Sorghum ....................................................... .. .. : 27
Japanese Cane................................. .............. .. ..... .... i.; ........... 27
: atgum es ....... ..... .. ........... ....... ....... ...------ ......-- .... --------- 28

Crop. Rotations ........................:.... .. .... ;...:: 29.
Demonstrations in Citrus Groves.. ......... . 30;
Silos and Dipping Vats...................................... ........................... ...... 30
County Agents Urge Better Livestock................................................ 30
REPORT OF NORTH AND WEST DISTRICT AGENT--.................................--------- 32
Cotton ............ ............ .. ......... ............. .... ...... 32
Corn ........ .............. ............. .. ... ..... ............ 32
Oats ........................ --- ------------- .. ....-...-....... ...--. 32
Legumes ------------- ---------------------.......................... ......... 33
Livestock ....... ............. ............................................. ....... 34
Silos, Dipping Vats and Purebred Stock-............................---. ------ 35
Crop Rotations-.............---------------...........--.......... 36
REFORT OF BOYS' CORN CLUB AGENT .......- ....---.....-............... 37
Enrollment, Yields and Production Costs-.....-- .. --......................... 38
Best Ten Records, Yields, Profits------.................. ................... 39
REPORT OF ASSISTANT STATE AGENT HOME ECONOMICS----...............------.. 40
Girls' Clubs ..... ---..........-- ....--.-----.................... 41
Work for Women..............-------..---..- ..---........ 42
County Agents' School .....--------------............... ..------...... 44
REPORT OF SPECIAL SILO AGENT............................................. 46
REPORT OF AGENT HOG CHOLERA CONTROL............-....... ............ 48
FARMERS' INSTITUTES .............................. .......... 50
County Agents' Institutes .... .... ............... .................. .. 50
Field Institutes ..... ........ ... .... ......... .............. ...... 51
Women's Institutes -----....... ............. ------- -.................. 52

























Hon. Park Trammell, .
Governor of Florida, '
Tallahassee, Fla.
SIR: I have the honor to transmit herewith- the report of
the Director of the Extension Division of 'the University of
Florida for the fiscal year endirig Jitine 30, 1915.
Respectfully,
P., K. YONGE,
Chairman of the Board of Control.












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4 -H : Florida Cooperative Extension


BOARD OF CONTROL
P. K. YONGE, Chairman, Pensacola, Fla.
T. B. KING, Arcadia, Fla.
E. L. WARTMANN, Citra, Fla.
W. D. FINLAYSON, Old Town, Fla.
F. E. JENNINGS, Jacksonville, Fla.:
J. G. KELLUM, Secretary, Tallahassee, Fla.


CO-OPERATIVE DEMONSTRATION WORK IN AGRICULTURE AND
HOME ECONOMICS STAFF
A. A. MURPHREE, President of the University.
P. H. ROLFS, Director.
C. K. MCQUARRIE, State Agent.
AGNES ELLEN HARRIS, Assistant State Agent for Home Demonstration Work,
A. P. SPENCER, District Agent for East and South Florida.
E. S. PACE, District Agent for North and West Florida.
G. L. HERRINGTON, Boys' Club Agent.
MAE L. WELLS, Field Instructor Home Economics.
A. H. LOGAN, Veterinary Field Agent, Bureau of Animal Industry, U.S.D.A.
C. L. WILLOUGHBY, Specialist, Silo Construction.
JOHN M. SCOTT, Lecturer, Animal Industry.
B. F. FLOYD, Lecturer, Citrus Diseases.
J. R. WATSON, Lecturer, Insect Pests.
H. E. STEVENS, Lecturer, Plant Pathology.
S. E. COLLISON, Lecturer, Soils and Fertilizers.
M. N. BEELER, Editor.
BESSIE V. GLOVER, Secretary.
K. H. GRAHAM, Auditor.

COUNTY CO-OPERATIVE DEMONSTRATION AGENTS
COUNTY AGENT ADDRESS
Alachua.......................-.......... *S. Burgis..........................Gainesville
Baker.................................... *E. W. Turner....................Macclenny
Bay................... ......-- B. V. Mathis.......................Panama City
Bradford ........................--.---.. *0. L. M izell.........................Dukes
Brevard.............................. ***A. R. Nielsen.....................Melbourne
Calhoun................-.. .........- J. E. Yon........................Blountstown
Citrus..................................... W E. Allen...................... Lecanto
Clay......................-............ .. W E. Brown......................Green Cove Springs
Columbia................................. *J. D. Brown......................Lake City
DeSoto............................ ...... *Jos. Crews..........................W auchula
Duval..................................... W L. W atson.......----.............Jacksonville
Escambia................................ S. W Hiatt........................ Gonzales
Gadsden.................................... M C. Gardner....................Greensboro
Hamilton.................................. *S. S. Smith......................... Jennings
Hernando................................ J. T. Daniel........................ Brooksville
Hillsboro................................ R. T. Kelley...............-----.........Plant City
Holmes...................................... *C. A. Fulford.....................Bonifay
Holmes...................................... R. I. M atthews..................Bonifay






Annual Report, 1915 5

Jackson..................................... G. W. Belser.......................Marianna
Jefferson ................................ *E. W. Lumpkin..................Monticello
Jefferson................................... M. C. Gardner....................Monticello
LaFayette............................... D. C. Geiger ...................... Mayo
Lake--....................................- Wm. Gomme......................Tavares
Leon.......................................... *A. Jackson..........................Tallahassee
Liberty...................................... A. W. Turner.....................Bristol
Madison.................................. D. R. McQuarrie................Madison
Marion...................................... *S. J. McCully..................-.Berlin
Nassau...................................... James Shaw.......................Hilliard
Orange...................................... C. H. Baker.:.....................Orlando
Osceola...................................... B. E. Evans........................ Kissimmee
Pasco......................................***R. T. Weaver.....................Dade City
Polk.......................................... A. A. Lewis...... ........... Kathleen
St. Johns-................................... H. C Lawton......--............Hastings
Sumter..................................... **G. L. Herrington:..............Bushnell
Suwannee ................................ *T. Z. Atkeson.....................Live Oak
Taylor..................................... T. H. Stripling.........-....:...Perry
Wakilla: .:.:....:.....:.:...... A. W. Long........................ Sopchoppy
Walton..................:............... J. C. Smith .... ...................DeFuniak Springs
Washington...............::........... D. G. McQuagge................Chipley
*Resigned during year.
**Transferred to Boys' Club Work.
***Appointed during last month of year.

COUNTY HOME DEMONSTRATION AGENTS
COUNTY AGENT ADDRESS
Alachua.... ---------...........................Miss Lila Fraser........................Gainesville
Bradford------.........................---....Mrs. Emma Waldrup...............--- Lake Butler
Columbia -------..............................Mrs. Irene Henry....................------ Lake City
Clay-----......................................Miss Lonny Landrum-....---.... Green Cove Springs
Hillsboro --------..............................Miss Sarah Partridge...............Plant City
Holmes ----........ ---.......................Mrs. Nevada Reddick---................Bonifay
Leon---......................----........--Mrs. A. H. Roberts--....................Centerville
Pasco..................................Miss Carrie Post.......................Dade City
Walton.. --------...........................Miss Myrtie Warren.................DeFuniak Springs
Marion ----------..................................Mrs. Caroline Moorehead ........Ocala
Suwannee------............................Mrs. Johnny Quarterman........Live Oak
Polk..............----......---.............Miss Verda Thompson..............Lakeland
Osceola.. -------.......................... Miss Anne Carson.................... Kissimmee
Baker..-----...... ................----Miss Lizzie Dowling..................Taylor
Citrus -..........-.................. Miss Nellie McQuarrie.............Inverness
Dade.................--...................----Mrs. A. L. Monroe and
Miss Genevieve Crawford....Miami
DeSoto---......................--------........ Miss Allie Stribling.................. Arcadia
Putnam.............................--------Miss Jessie Burton....................---Palatka
St. Johns---------..............................Miss Lucia Hudson...................St. Augustine
Volusia..... ---------............................Miss Eloise McGriff-----.................DeLand
Seminole..............................Miss Mozelle Durst-.................. Sanford
Duval................................-Mrs. E. Wellington---..................-- Jacksonville







































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Report for Fiscal Year Ending

June 30, 1915


Hon. P. K. Yonge,
Chairman, Board of Control.
SIR: I have the honor to submit herewith my report on the
work and condition of the Extension Division of the University
of Florida for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1915, and I
respectfully request that you transmit the same, in accordance
with the law, to the Governor of the 'State of Florida.
Respectfully,
P. H. ROLFS,
Director.


INTRODUCTION
The Agricultural Extension Division of the University of
Florida concerns itself primarily with giving instructions and
practical demonstrations in agriculture and home economics to
persons not resident on the campus. The Smith-Lever Agri-
cultural Extension Act is the basis for this work. Thru it the
State of Florida receives annually $10,000. An additional sum
of $6,491 became available, July 1, 1915, on condition that an
equal amount be appropriated by the State.
The Legislature of Florida passed an Act, which was ap-
proved by the Governor, May 25, 1915 (Chap. 6839), accepting
these funds and the provisions of the Smith-Lever Act. The
Act provides for co-operation between the agricultural colleges
in the several states and the U. S. Department of Agriculture.
A quotation from it will show the general purposes of this Act:
That cooperative agricultural extension work shall consist of the giving
of instruction and practical demonstrations in agriculture and home econo-
mics to persons not attending or resident in said colleges in the several
communities, and imparting to such persons information on said subjects
through field demonstrations, publications, and otherwise; and this work
shall be carried on in such a manner as may be mutually agreed upon by the
Secretary of Agriculture and the State agricultural college or colleges re-
ceiving the benefits of this act."





Florida Cooperative Extension


The principal work under the provisions of the Smith-Lever
Act is that of agricultural extension with the various counties.
In addition to the act mentioned, the U. S. Department of
Agriculture has co-operated by giving funds amounting to
$26,000 for the fiscal year to carry on the general purposes and
plans of this co-operative agricultural extension work. Thirty-
one counties in the State have been organized for adult work in
agriculture, each county receiving $600 annually from the pre-
viously mentioned funds provided the county appropriates, an
equal amount or more. Authority is granted the county com-
missioners for appropriations of this kind, in the general rev-
enue bill (Chap. 6949) "to levy a tax of not more than one-
half of one mill for the encouragement and protection of agri-
culture." :
The extension work' with the girls' clubs and womin's clubs
in the state has been carried on in twenty-four counties. Home
demonstrations are conducted'in co-operation' with the county
boards of public instruction, who are authorized by 'an act of
the Legislature (Chap. 6833) to hire competent women for this
work. For those counties where the work is just being inaug-
urated, $300 is allotted; in those counties where the work has
been continued for a longer time, $400 has been allotted, pro-
vided the county furnishes an equal or larger amount. Under
these provisions women who have educational qualifications
equal to that of high school teachers have readily been obtained.
The reports from the various departments, or projects, at-
tached hereto will show that .this work has been of great
financial value to the state.
ORGANIZATION
The Federal law calls for the appointment of a director as
head of this work. He is responsible to the Board of Control
and to the Secretary of Agriculture for, carrying 'out the mu-
tually agreed plans. He reports directly to the Board of Con-
trol and to the U. S. Department of Agriculture as to the poli-
cies and work pursued.
The state agent has direct supervision over the various
branches of the work in an executive way. His ivork calls
him to all parts of the state where 'this co-operative work exists.
The assistant state agent for girls' canning clubs and women's
rural work is located at the Florida State College for Women,
Tallahassee. She has direct charge of all home demonstrations
and direct supervision over all those employed in this branch.





Annual Report, 1915


Two district agents assist the state agent in carrying out
the work effectively. These agents make weekly visits to the
counties which are co-operative. They direct the county agents
in the best methods of procedure and the correct technical in-
struction to give to. demonstrators and co-operators. All of the
counties west, of the Suwannee river, and including Columbia,
are in the Northern and Western District; all the other coun-
ties are in the, Eastern and Southern District.
The corn club agent has charge, of the work of the boys'
corn clubs in the state. He .co-operates with the local schools
and superintendents of public instruction in the various com-
munities.. He, also, co-operates ,with the assistant .state. agent
for canning clubs, and with other agencies employed, for the
advancement of agriculture.
The agents who are located, in the counties, either for the
men's or women's work, give their entire time to teaching and
directing demonstrations.. They must .be familiar, with the
latest books and bulletins on farming,, home, economics, horti-
culture and livestock. It .is their duty to enlist the co-opera-
tion of as.many people,in the county as possible. They. keep
complete records of all their operations and file weekly reports
of their activities.. .These county agents, almost without excep-
tion, have had, more co-operators and demonstrators on their
lists than it was possible for them to visit oftener than once a
month. The weekly reports have enabled the state agent and
the district agents to keep.in close touch with the work of the
various counties and to give their attention and assistance
where needed most.
'PLAN OF TIIE WORK
The plan of the work as carried out 'during the last fiscal
year has been divided into, projects. These are special lines or
directions.of work, as provided by the law creating-the fund.
The financial statement attached hereto will .show .the. sources
of all funds and also the directions in which they were expended.
.Project I is designed to carry out the provisions of the act.
It includes the salaries for clerical help, printing, and miscel-
laneous expenses not directly chargeable to other projects. For
the first part of the project, known as A, which includes all of
the disbursements,, except for printing, $9,768.91 was expended
during the last fiscal year. The second portion, B, relates
entirely to printing,,.for which $535.59 was spent during the
same period.





10 Florida Cooperative Extension

Project II is demonstration work with adult farmers. The
aniount expended in" this direction, from all sources, was
$37,209.86: -' ...
'Project III is' known as boys' corn club work. It' concerns
itself with the organization of boys into corn clubs, andgiving
instructions :in'better methods, of raising corn and the,-best
methods foir corserving'the fertility of :the soil. This project
required $540. "
,Project IJV conceris itself. with home:economics, with special
atten'tii to the organization of girls' canning clubs 'and work
amnion rural omeni '.:- The total. amount expended fr. this
project'was $21,209.89'.': '- .. '.
.. .Pi-oject Y.Vs known "as hog cholera' educational work, and
yas carried on in .co-opeatiodnr with the 'Bureau of Animal
Industry. A specialist was sent to th6 'state to hold conferences
with groups of farmers and? to popularize the use of hog cholera i!:;!
serhuniifor the prevention of'hog cholera.'' The total expenditure
for this project from'the extension funds M enumerated hereto*- '/,
Sfore~was $56.90. "The' salary aniid travelifig 'expenses of' this''
s pecialigt: 'ere paid by the U. S. Bureau of Animal, Industry:;
'' Th cost of this was not reported to the director. '
Project VI'is concerned with the construction of, and giving,,
instruction in the methods of filling, silos. The total expense'6:
Sfor this project was $71.75. The small amount used in this
direct ion ,was due t t he .closing of 'the fiscal year before very,
much work could be done. ; ,., 1
Project YVII is devoted to demonstration methods :for .com-
batting citrus diseases and diseaseS of truck crops. The: amount
required for this work was $450,. :,
.;, ~;.' ;. ;SUPERVIgION' '
Before: any of the funds arisirig, from the Smith-Lever': Act
or from the direct appropriation by the U. 'S.' Departlment',bf
Agriculture can be used, specific plans of the work must be
formulated. and, submitted ,to .the Secretary of Agriculture.
.When these! specific, plans, which are known as. projects,, are
accepted iby; the Secretary of Agriculture, expenditure of the
funds may be made accordingly.; -Plans for the last fiscal year
had to be made and accepted before the beginning of, that .year.
In addition to the formulating of these plans, officers of the
Department of Agriculture pay frequent visits to the state,
visiting field demonstrations, and in conference with the direc-
tor agree upon alterations or enlargements in the work. This






Annual Report, 1915 11


keeps the U. S. Department of Agriculture in close contact with
the actual work in the field: "In addition to this relation every
county agent makes'a weekly report to the chief of the division
at' Washington. At'the close of the fiscal year a special agent
was detailed to' examine the finarnial accounts so that, the
Secretary of Agriculture coiold ascertaifi'that the funds were
expended in accordance with the provisions of the Slhith-Lever
Act..
SThe followifig page gives a'tabulated outline of the sources
of all :the moneys 'and the purposess for: which they were spent.
It shows that the total expenditure amounted to $70,535.90.

: ,:.:,' .. FINANCIAL STATEMENT :":


sSMI TH- .-
- S.D. LEVER.: : '; L


STATE COUNIf


RECEIPTS............ $2,000.00 15,000,0001 $10,695'00 $5,00.000 $19,004.78


EXPENDITURES
Administration :... I: 6,200.00
Printing, etc.......... ..............
County Agents.... 14;413.06
Home Economics.. 5,298.06
Boys' Club Work.... .,. -
Hog Cholera Spec. ....:.:
Silo Construction... t ......:.:
Citrus Diseases..................
Balance.......... ........ '88.88
$26,000.400


- 1;168.91'
. 485.59
5,348.80'
S2,;343.05
56.90'
S71.75
S450.00
S75.00


S2,400.00
50.00
1,050600
6,655.00
--540.009

...-..........
........ ... ....


5,000.60

................

.......-.........


........,.......
11,398.00
. 7,;606.78

......-......,...

.-- ...........


MI*.060.ool' $10,695.0$5,0f0.00 1 $19,004.78


TOTAL

.$70;699.78

9,768.91
535.59
37,209.86
21,902.89
540.00
56.90
71.75
450.00
163.88


$70,699.78


PUBLICATIONS ISSUED
': Bulletin :2, Hdg Pastures and Feeds, April, 1915; Ai P. gpehcer- '
-:Bulletin'3, Poultry in Florida, June, 19,5,, A, ,P. Spencer.. :
DEMONSTRATION ACTIVITIES i': ;'-.
In the following pages a very brief summary is given of some
of',the linesi~of extension work carried out by the various agen-
cies, under the direction of the Division;,.. :-, .. .
CORN '
Ten years ago corn was considered :a crop of mino' import-
*ance to the farmer of Florida. The. average yield per acre was
so' low that it was generally considered that Florida was not a
corn-growing state. Demoiistrations have been carried out by
adult farmers and also by'the boys' corn clubs which show that
Florida can grow corn profitably when the farmer gives the
proper attention to cultural practices. Not only have very large
yields been obtained when demonstration methods are followed,
but also large profits have been secured.


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Florida Cooperative Extension


Some facts have been brought out very clearly by the dem-
onstration work. One of, the most striking is that .the same
variety of corn is not equally adapted to various types of soil.
In general the small-eared or prolific varieties produce a larger
yield than the large one-eared varieties; In Middle and East-
ern Florida the poor land .variety has .been extremely satis-
factory, on the flatwoods farms. The richer, hammock lands
have a :small-eared white corn that is better adapted to .that
character of soil. In extreme South Florida, :demonstrations
have given best results :by using yellow Cuban corn. This is
especially useful since ,it is more resistant to attacks of ear-
worm than the ordinary, corn, but fails to produce, as .large
yield in grain as is produced on lands in northern portion of
the state. It is a- small-ear, big-cob, flinty _variety. Typical
ears will shell as high as 85% of grain to the ear. This and
the white Cuban variety have become general favorites among
demonstrators of:,the sections where -they are grown. : :
LEGUME CROPS
Next to corn, the legume crop is probably the most import-
ant for the general farmer in Florida. It is the one crop that
not only conserves the fertility of the soil but is capable of add-
ing materially to it. Grasses, forage and other crops of that
kind are capable of preventing waste of soil fertility,. The
legume crops not only do this but are :capable, of converting
the atmospheric nitrogen into, plant, food andadding this to the
soil. Demonstrations in legume crops, therefore, are of first
importance. A large number of varieties of many kinds of
legumes- have been' used in the' demonstrations and' many of
these have proved successful under limited conditions. A smaller
number of varieties have beein'successful under most conditions.
VELVET BEANS
The velvet bean is the most important' legum' crop that the
Florida farmer can produce.' Eight years ago oily one 'variety
of velvet bean was known in Florida. Since that time the
Florida Experiment Station has introduced more' than sixty
varieties from foreign countriess and' has experimented 'with
hundreds of varieties produced, by hybridization. :
From time to time as -these new varieties' pass 'the 'experi-
mental stage, the Experiment Station furnishes the Extension
Division with a sufficient amount of seed to enable farmers' in
various sections of, the state to make demonstrations with those
particular varieties. The Florida velvet bean, also sometimes








Annual Report, 1915


called the Speckled velvet bean, is an old standard variety. It
is surpassed in productiveness by some other varieties and also
surpassed in earliness of ripening by others.
The Chinese velvet bean is one variety that has been used
for demonstration. This is a somewhat earlier variety than
the Florida velvet bean and so escapes the early frosts more


Fig. 1. Demonstration with Chinese velvet beans, Levy county.

frequently. Under best conditions it is a heavier producer than
the Florida. Its pods, however, shatter more easily than those
of the Florida velvet bean. Demonstrations carried on with the
Chinese show its superiority, especially in Northern and West-
ern Florida.
The Yokohama velvet bean has been used by the Extension
Division for demonstration purposes for a number of years. It
is among the earliest and at the same time a weak grower, but
has proved useful where early maturing seed is desired or
where the land is to be used in early fall crops.
Osceola, Alachua and Wakulla velvet beans are varieties that








14 Florida Cooperative Extension

were originated from hybrids produced on' the Experiment
Station grounds. .A considerable quantity of seed of each of
these varieties has been distributed, to. various county agents
for demonstration purposes,;..g The special point.,of superiority
of these varieties is-that,they are early, apd op.the Experiment
Station plots indicated that they were more productive.
PEANUTS
Demonstrations on peanut culture have been carried on in
almost every county where an agent is employed. In those%
soils where there is a scarcity of lime it becomes necessary to,
make applications of ground limestone to obtain best results.
The higher rolling lands have given better crops than the low
flat lands.
' Peanuts form one of themost valuable crops that the farmer
can produce. The, demonstrations show that. pork can be
cheaply produced by turning the hogs into the peanut pasture.
Hay of oan excellent quality is also made from the tops where
they are harvested.
OTHER LEGUMES
A large number of demonstrations have been made with
various varieties ,of cowpeas. This is the most useful legume
for hay production in the state. In general the Iron, and
BFabhamn have been demonstrated to,.be valuable varieties for.
all se tions of the state. Other varieties may be quite as pro-
ducti.e but'are more subject to attacks by root-knot.
Beggarweed is a native plant and therefore adapted to: all
portions of the state. Demonstrations show, however,, that its
use lies mainly in providing a hay crop. Beggarweed and crab
grass make a good combination, for excellent hay.
COTTON
While Florida is'not ranked as 'a cottbo state, theq rop is of
sufficient importance here to merit considerable attentionI. The
boll weevil is the greatest cotton problem before agents here as
in other cotton states. Since it first' entered Escaibia: county
in 1910, it has been advancing eastward from 5 to 100 miles a
year.
In an effort to lessenlthe damage from this: pest, agents have
been instructing farmers in the best methods of'soil prepara-
tion, and selection of early varieties that will mature before
the migration of weevils. The spacing of rows and plants, col-
lection and destruction of punctured squares, frequent proper








Annual Report, 1915 15

cultivation, and the life history .of the insect and its general
habits, have formed a large part, of demonstrationsn work.
Farmers have been urged to grow a variety of maintenance
crops and thus to become less dependent on cotton.

















Fig. 2. Demonstration plot Sudan grass, Gadsden county.
OATS .
The largest acreage of oats is grown in the northern, and
western counties. However, oats are grown to some extent in
other parts of Florida, chiefly as a winter cover crop, and when
properly handled give satisfaction.
The varieties that have been grown under demonstration are
"Texas Rust-Proof", "Hastings Hundred Bushel", "Fulghum",
"Burt or Ninietj Day Oats". With the exception of the Burt or
Ninety Day variety they should be planted in October or No-
vember, as a long season is required for their maturity. :The
Burt oat may be planted as late as February. It is used almost
entirely for hay.
'SWVET POTATOES
The sweet potato crop is generally grown in the state: and
when the proper methods are practiced in its production it is
quite satisfactory. Sweet potatoes may be divided: into short
period and long period varieties,, the former for summer and
the latter for winter and spring marketing., The best varieties
for early marketing are the, Triumph" and Big Stem Jer-
seys "; for late marketing the Porto Rico Yam", Dooley
Yam", and "Nancy Hall". There are quite a number of








16, Florida Cooperative Extension

others known by different names in various sections. The
" West Indian Yam and Davis Erormous" grow very large
and are the most profitable varieties to grow for stock feeding
purposes.
HAY
The demonstration agents have devised ways ard nieans for
greater hay and forage crop production. Thruout the state
generally, particularly in North .and West Florida, native
grasses, Japanese cane, legumes and sorghum are well suited.
Of the newer grasses, Sudan is proving the best for northern
and western counties.. Under good farming methods these
forages yield heavy crops. On the sandy soils of middle Flor-
ida, particularly in Marion, Sumter, Lake, Hernando, Orange,
Polk and counties farther south, Natal hay is being profitably
grown. On" the heavier and-moist soils, Rhodes grass produces
well but is not as widely grown as Natal.
DAIRY AND BEEF CATTLE
The work accomplished by agents in dairying is particularly
gratifying. Until recently the dairy 'industry of Florida was
almost negligible. Thru the efforts of the county agent, farm-
ers are realizing the possibilities of the state as a dairy section.
Reports show remarkable progress.
Beef production, having been confined almost entirely to
range conditions, has had only a limited amount of attention
from the farmer. The introduction of purebred bulls and selec-
tion of the better females from the range herds is receiving
attention from county agents. There are approximately one
million cattle in Florida, most of which are undersized, due to
the presence of cattle tick and shortage of feed during winter,
months.
HOGS
The hog industry of Florida gains in importance each year.
'County agents' reports show continuous increased interest and
values.
Purebred and high grade hogs are becoming more general
in each farming section. Native hogs are becoming less plenti-
ful. Farmers realize the need of pastures and systematic feed-
ing. Hog cholera and other 'diseases are better understood.
More dare is taken to rid hogs of parasites, since county dem-
,onstrations have been introduced.






Annual Report, 1915


DIPPING VATS
The importance of dipping vats for the eradication of cattle
ticks is forcing itself upon the cattlemen and farmers of Florida
to a larger degree than ever before. Each week brings reports
from county agents of new vats under construction. Judging
by the combined activity of the Bureau of Animal Industry and
the cattle owners of Florida, we may expect substantial pro-
gress in eradication.
Vast areas of tick infected sections of the South have been
cleared of ticks. The cattle tick of Florida can and will be
eliminated from Florida pastures by the same process. County
demonstration agents are aiding in the construction of vats and
moulding sentiment against the pest.
SILO CONSTRUCTION
Until the Farmers' Co-operative Demonstration Work took
up silos and silo construction, there were very few in Florida.
The value of the silo, however, had been demonstrated by the
Florida Experiment Station and a few leading stock raisers,
who realized that silos were needed on Florida farms and that
their operation was as successful as on northern farms.
It was clearly evident that expert advice on silo construction
was needed. This resulted in co-operative arrangements be-
tween the Extension Division of the University of Florida and
the Dairy Division of the U. S. Department of Agriculture. A
silo expert was employed to assist the county agents and
farmers in the erection of silos.
The kind and number of silos built under his supervision
were: Wood, 26; concrete, 15; steel, 4; vitrified tile, 4; total,
49; total capacity, 5110 tons.
DEMONSTRATIONS IN CITRUS GROVES
Spraying demonstrations in citrus groves have been con-
ducted in Lake and Osceola counties. In Lake county about
1,000,000 boxes of citrus fruits are marketed annually. Citrus
fruits are, therefore, the most important agricultural product
of the county. Practically all the groves of these counties are
infested with whitefly, scale, rust mite, and fungus diseases,
making many of them, non-productive and unprofitable., Con-
,sequently, the agents in citrus counties have a big and useful
field for service.







Florida Cooperative Extension


HOME ECONOMICS EXTENSION WORK
Home Economics Extension Work, conducted co-operatively
between the University of Florida, Florida State College for
Women, and the United States Department of Agriculture,
deals directly with the women's part of the rural home. County
agents, efficient in home economics and who can develop leader-
ship are employed in directing these activities. At the outset
the agents deal primarily with tomato canning clubs among
girls of the rural sections.
The total value of the vegetables produced during the year
by the girls was $9,528.59, at a net profit of $6,222.26, and an
average profit for each one-tenth acre plot of $13.41. One girl
in Walton county produced 754 pounds of tomatoes on one-
tenth of an acre at a total cost of $41.55, with net profit of
$27.73.
In addition to receiving instructions in growing and canning
tomatoes, girls are directed in other activities, such as the
preserving of figs, guavas and vegetables that are usually
wasted on Florida farms.
After the girls have mastered the canning and preserving
work, they are organized into sewing and poultry clubs. The
demand for poultry work is so imperative that it will become
one of the important activities of the girls' clubs.
WOMEN'S CLUBS
The lectures and institutes for the rural home have resulted
in women's clubs. Initial work in these clubs begins with
marmalades, jellies and preserves. This has been particularly
useful in the citrus sections, and many have become skillful in
preserving citrus fruits. Additional problems, which required
expert assistance in the manufacture of the by-products of
citrus arose. An appeal to the Bureau of Chemistry of the
United States Department of Agriculture resulted in a special-
ist who placed the best formulas for preserving and jelly
making at the disposal of county agents and rural home makers.
Household Management Clubs have become a part of the
women's work. Many simple appliances necessary in the farm
home have been supplied to farmer's wives at a low cost. These
include the fireless cooker, the iceless refrigerator, home can-
ning machines, better lighting systems, and other conveniences.
The Housekeepers' Short Course is now an annual event of
the State College for Women at Tallahassee.







Annual Report, 1915


REPORT OF THE STATE AGENT
P. H. Rolfs, Director.
SIR: I submit herewith the report of the state agent for the
fiscal year ending June 30, 1915.
One of the most gratifying results in the work is the in-
creased interest of farmers and the general public. The county
agents are in a better position than ever to do efficient work,
in that they are receiving encouragement from bankers and
business men of their respective counties. Most of them now
have cars, which facilitate their work.
The year began with promise of achievements greater than
any previous year. That promise has been fulfilled. Twenty-
six agents reported for the year. A few counties have fallen
out, owing to the failure of commissioners and other local
sources to make the supplementary appropriations to continue
the work. In most of these cases county commissioners did
not realize that this appropriation must be included in their
annual budget. Where appropriations were omitted the money
will not be available until the next time the budget is made up.
The state and district agents met as many of the boards of
county commissioners as possible at their meetings previous to
the time for making this budget, but, owing to the large num-
ber of counties and their wide separation, it was impossible
to meet all. Some of the counties that were considered safe,
neglected to make the appropriation. The work suffered in
consequence. These conditions probably will not exist next
year, as county officials are beginning to realize the necessity of
providing an agent. Several new counties have come in. Thirty-
one are now in active work.
A statement of some of the most important phases of the
work is submitted and a few of the most important activities
are included in the body of this report.

ACTIVITIES OF EXTENSION WORKERS
STATE AND DISTRICT AGENTS
Miles traveled by rail................47230 Group meetings ...------..................- 5
Team and automobile............ 6943 Field meetings ......................... 3
Visits to country agents......... 226 Attendance ............ ......... 204
Visits to demonstrations, ,Conferences with county com-
farmers, corn club plots...... 722 missioners and business in-
Farmers meetings ................... 184 terests .................................... 85
Attendance ....-.......-- --............ 19887 School boards ........................ 18
Corn club meetings ............ .... 14 Fairs, judges at ...................... 17
Attendance ..................... 587 Addresses in public schools.... 40







20 Florida Cooperative Extension

COUNTY AGENTS
Official visits by county agents..................- -- ...... ........... ....32892
to demonstrators .....--.......... .... .................. 9934
cooperators ......... ............................................. 6628
other farmers ...................... --------------------------- 7734
business men .....................---------------------- 4449
boys and girls clubs ............ ...... .................. 4147


Miles traveled .......................-- 145811
Calls on agents..--...........-- 7403
Meetings agents conducted..-- 227
Farmers' meetings addressed 504
Total attendance ----............... 23923
Field meetings held ............... 195
Attendance ............................ 2002
Percent time in office-..--..........16 2-3
In field ..---------................................83 1-3
Official letters written........... 12090
School visits relative to work 827


Schools, agrl. course outlined 44
Short courses assisted-----............. 4
Attendance ............................ 209
Demonstrations truck or
fruits ...................................... 178
Farmers keeping full
cost record ............................ 86
Part record ......................... 387
Wood lots improved.................. 24
Bulletins distributed............... 63258
Agri'l articles prepared............ 388


IMPROVEMENTS SUPERVISED BY AGENTS (27 COUNTIES)


Buildings erected ..-.................
Improved .- ---------
Building plans furnished.......
Bldgs painted or whitewashed
Water systems put in or
improved ..........---------....
Systems before work started..
Number now ........................
Home lighting systems............
Home grounds improved..........
Sanitary conditions improved
Homes screened against pests
Fly traps installed................
Sanitary privies erected........


Acres under proper rotation.. 740
Farmers draining land........... 150
Farmers induced stump land.. 1130
Acres stumped ...................... 11566
Farmers terracing lands ......... 57
Acreage ..........................--- .... 1168
Gardens planted or improved 2771
No. saving surplus produce.... 1970
Road demonst's assisted in.... 23
Resulting miles good road.. 226
No. sowing green manure crops 413
Acreage ................................ 3802
Farming implem'ts purchased 3579
Telephone systems installed.... 19


DEMONSTRATIONS AND CO-OPERATIONS


CORN (30 counties)
Number demonstrators ........... 593
Acreage .................................. 6373
Average yield, bushels..........27 2-3
No. sowing improved seed.... 554
No. doing full plowing............ 372
No. turning under cover crops 115
Number of cooperators .......... 945
Acreage .................................. 8493
Average yield, bushel............ 20
Number selecting seed.............. 703
Amount seed gathered, bu. 2322
Acres harvested for silage...... 818
Average yield, tons........-..... 6.8
Acres hogged down.................. 859
Acres treated diseases, pests 10
No. using better methods........ 4531
COTTON (16 counties)
Demonstrators in short cotton 98
A cres ...................................... 394


Averag- yield, pounds.........
Demonstrators in sea island....
Acres .................... .............
Average yield, pounds ........
No. using, selected seed............
No. doing fall plowing.............
No. turning under crops..........
Number cooperators ...............
No. planting improved seed....
Acres treated diseases, pests..
Farmers using better methods

TOBACCO (2 counties)
Demonstrators ..........................
Acreage .................................
Average yield, pounds..........
Farmers doing fall plowing....
Farmers using cover crops .....
Acres treated for insect pests
Acres under improved methods


.788
42
201
369
140
76
46
222
448
557
943


4
10
1360
4
3
10
51








Annual Report, 1915


OATS (21 counties)
Demonstrators ......................
Acres ............ .................
Average yield, bushels .........
Acres cut for hay -..................
Average yield, tons .............
Acres grazed .........................
No. sowing oats first time........
Number cooperators ................
Acreage .................-............
Average yield, bushels........
Acres treated smut and rust....
Acres plowed under-..........


218
2196
26
579
11/2
534
228
300
2130
17
220
635


LEGUME CROPS (26 counties)


Demonstrators ..........................
Acreage ........ .................
Acres thrashed for seed..........
Acres cut for hay---..................
Acres used green manure......
Acres inoculated ......................
Acres under improved methods


228
2769
1458
932
279
319
5835


HAY, MIXED FORAGE, COVER
CROPS (Mostly Rye) (27 counties)
Demonstrators .......................... 281
Acreage .................................. 787
Acres cut for hay..................... 300
Acres grazed ............................ 176
Acres turned under, soil
improvement ..............-......... 311
Number of cooperators .......... 68
A cres ...................................... 298
Acres sown for future crop...... 170

SWEET POTATOES (19 counties)
Demonstrators -----................. 145
A creage ................................ 364
Average yield, bu................... 166
Acres grown under general
supervision of county agent 1534
Acres treated, insects and
diseases ............................... 359
Increased acreage due to
agent's influence ....-....-..-..- 15939
IRISH POTATOES (2 counties)
Number of demonstrators...... 28
Acreage ....:.........-............ 63
Average yield, bu. ...........-.. 75
Acres treated, diseases, pests 43

STABLE MANURE (22 counties)
Farmers induced to care for
m anure .................................. 987
Farmers providing sheds........ 281
Farmers composting manure.
and waste ............................. 733
Farmers re-inforcing manure
with phosphate ..........--...... 930


Manure spreaders purchased 48
Estimated tons manure saved 167950

GROUND LIME ROCK
(21 counties)


Farmers liming, on agent's
advice ........................
Tons ground lime rock used....
Acres limed .............................


433
2539
1264


FERTILIZERS (24 counties)
Demonstrators .......................... 2
Farmers advised in use
fertilizers .................... .......... 47
No. top-dressing with
fertilizers ............................. 2
Communities buying fertilizers
cooperatively ........................
Farmers home mixing
fertilizers ............................. 6

DAIRY CATTLE (13 counties)
Purebred bulls bought..............
Purebred cows or heifers........ 1
Grade cows or heifers.............. 1
Cows tested, milk production.. 1
Farmers feeding bal. rations.. 4
Cows fed .........----............... 12
Demonstrations in dairying....
Cows handled, imp. methods.... 1
Cow testing asso'ns formed....
Breeders' associations formed
Increase percent purebred bulls 1
Increase percent purebred cows 1

BEEF CATTLE (6 counties)
Purebred bulls purchased........
Purebred cows purchased........
Grade cows purchased..--.......... 1
New herds started .................
Stockers purchased -................ 8
Feeding demonstrations ..........
Cattle fed under agent's adivce 2
Breeders' associations formed
Increased percentage bulls... 3
Increased percentage of cows

HOGS (25 counties)


79

58

51

14

03


35
65
35
17
41
62
5
35
1
1
90
90


28
61
54
15
.66
5
35
1
'75
3


Herds started .......................... .310
Purebred boars bought............ 343
Sows or gilts bought............... 242
P'bred, grade brood sows held 5925
Feeding demonst. supervised.. 51
Hogs in .demonstrations,....-: 1315
Hog pastures planted ........... 214
Farmers demonst. grazing crops 321
Hogs raised improved methods 16955
Increase percent p'bred boars 570
Increased percentage hogs...... 300







Florida Cooperative Extension


LIVE STOCK DISEASES AND PESTS (28 counties)
Hogs treated with serum........507030 Horses treated, various ailm'ts 91
Hogs treated for worms, etc. 19793 I
DIPPING VATS (13 counties) SILOS (17 counties)
Vats built, agent's advice........ 11 Silos built this year.................. 49
Vats built, agent's influence.... 29 Silos built, agent's advice...... 34
Vats built during year........ 32 No. when agents' work began 34
Vats reported to date......... 66 Present number ........................ 110
Estimated cattle dipped......... 16879 Increase since work began, % 324
SPRAYING CITRUS GROVES
Demonstrations ........................ 13 Groves pruned by cooperators 30
Groves sprayed ....... ........... 44 Trees ...-....--..... ..------... 27000
Trees sprayed ......---. ---.. 23400 Groves sprayed .................. 62
Trees ....................................... 45000
Groves insp. for cooperators 45 Groves planted ....................... 5
Trees ...................................... 99000 Trees ...................................... 9000

ESTIMATED VALUES INCREASED PRODUCTION DUE TO
IMPROVED METHODS
CORN-
Demonstration acres----....-..............................------ 6373
Increase 12% bu. over average state yield
81,255.75 bu. at 80c........................ .................. $65,004.60
Co-operators, acres-------....... ...........................--8493
Increase 5 bu. over average state yield 42,465
at 80c .................................... ............................... 33,972.00

Total.............................. ...... .. $ 98,976.60
COTTON-
Short staple, demonstration acres........................ 394
Increase 598 lbs. over average state yield,
235,612 lbs. seed.cotton at 3 ....................... $ 8,246.00
Long staple, demonstration acres........................ 210
Increase 304.6 lbs. over average state yield,
63,969 lbs. seed cotton at 7c.............................. 4,477.00

Total...................... ....... .............. $ 12,723.00
SWEET POTATOES-
364 acres. Increase 66 bu. per acre, 24,023
bu. at 50c ............................................. ......... $ 12,012.00
Total for three leading crops .......................... $123,711.60
LIVESTOCK PURCHASED BY CO-OPERATING FARMERS
BEEF CATTLE-
28 purebred beef bulls at $75.00................-............... 2,100.00
61 purebred cows and heifers at $50.00................... 3,050.00
154 grade cows and heifers at $40.00.......................... 6,160.00

Total................. ......... .... ------$ 11,310.00
DAIRY CATTLE-
35 purebred bulls at $50.00.................................... .$ 1,750.00
165 purebred cows and heifers at $75.00.................... 12,375.00
135 grade cows and heifers at $40.00.......................... 5,400.00

Total................................... ........ $ 19,525.00







Annual Report, 1915 23

HOGS-
343 purebred boars at $12.50.............................. $ 4,287.00
242 purebred sows at $12.50................................... 3,025.00

Total.. .................. ..................... $ 7,312.00

Total value animals bought................... ......................$ 38,147.00

VALUE HOGS SAVED BY TREATMENT FOR DISEASES
HOG CHOLERA-
50,730 vaccinated, estimated 50% actually saved,
25,365 at $5.00 each............. .......................$126,825.00
WORMS, ETC.-
19,793 hogs treated, estimated 10% actually saved,
1,979 at $5.00 each..................... .............. 9,895.00
Total...................-..... .... .... ....$136,720.00

VALUES SILOS AND DIPPING VATS BUILT
29 Dipping vats at $100.00.............................. .$ 2,900.00
49 Silos at $250.00...............-.....................- 12,050.00

Total........................ .... .. ..... $ 14,950.00

GROUP MEETINGS

Several meetings were held during the year for the instruc-
tion of state, district, and county agents. A group assembled


Fig. 3. Instruction to county agents, judging mules.







Florida Cooperative Extension


to inspect successful farming methods and to observe certain
practices that were most successful thruout the state.
Meetings held in the southern district were at Bartow, Polk
*county, to inspect the intensive truck farms; at Winter Haven,
Polk county, to inspect citrus groves, methods of cultivation,
spraying, and organizations for marketing; at Winter Garden,
Orange county, to inspect citrus culture, winter trucking pecu-
liar to that section; at Ocala, Marion county, to inspect stock
farms, silos, and manufacturing plants supplying ground lime
rock to farmers; at Hastings, St. Johns county, to inspect
methods of surface drainage and winter Irish potato culture.
Meetings held in the northern and western district were at
Live Oak, Suwannee county, to inspect general farming and in
particular, winter legumes, hog raising, oat crops and hay
product; at -Quincy, Gadsden county, to inspect tobacco farms,
general farming and livestock; at Pensacola, Escambia county,
to inspect general farming, livestock, winter cover crops, and
dairying.
ANNUAL MEETING
The annual state meeting was held in Gainesville, September
20th to 25th. The entire time was taken with lectures and
demonstrations. Papers from county agents were read or sub-
mitted. Professors from the agricultural division of the Uni-
versity contributed to the program. Specialists not connected
with the University were invited to deliver lectures on their
special subjects. Demonstrations in farm machinery, hog
cholera inoculations and machinery for the manufacture of
ground lime rock were included in the program.
Respectfully,
C. K. McQUARRIE,
State Agent.







Annual Report, 1915


REPORT EAST AND SOUTH DISTRICT AGENT
P. H. Rolfs, Director.
SIR: I herewith submit the following report of the District
of East and South Florida for the fiscal year ending June 30,
1915.
CORN DEMONSTRATIONS
The staple crops have received special attention in all sec-
tions of this district. Those counties where the most general
farming is conducted usually gave best response to better cul-
tural methods. Some noticeable exceptions to this were finally
reported, with corn in particular. The two largest yields pro-
duced in Florida came from counties' where general farming is
not extensive; namely, in Hernando, where 100.57 bushels, at
a cost of 55c per bushel, were produced; and Hillsboro, 99.36
bushels, at a cost of 15c per bushel, on one acre of land. These
yields were made by corn club boys who followed accurately
the instructions of the county agent. By these excellent dem-
onstrations, the county agents were able to illustrate the pos-
sibility of making profitable yields of corn on medium grades of
South Florida lands.
In the same counties several yields of forty to sixty bushels
of corn, which reflected credit on the close personal attention
of the agents, were reported by corn club boys. In the adult
work the practices that gave best results were the same as
those used by boys. Some of this corn followed winter or spring
vegetable crops. A large acreage followed velvet beans or cow-
peas or a winter cover crop. These practices are, in a large
measure, responsible for, the satisfactory yields of corn made
thruout the southern counties last year.
The average yield per acre, of corn made by 242 demon-
strators working in this district was 32 bushels, while the aver-
age in the neighboring fields was 12 to 18 bushels. Most of
the crops were grown on a fair grade of pine land. Others
were on hammock lands.
From 250 to 600 pounds of commercial fertilizer were ap-
plied on about sixty per cent of the crops; forty per cent re-
ceived practically no fertilizer, but were grown on well-prepared
land. Stable manure was applied in comparatively few cases,
but the results obtained were usually good. The applications
were small, usually less than ten tons per acre, and in many
instances from two to five. Seventy-five to 125 pounds of






Florida Cooperative Extension


nitrate of soda were applied just before tasselling, in addition
to the spring application of commercial fertilizer, on about
thirty per cent of the crops.
In conducting these demonstrations, economy of production,
rather than large yield, was emphasized. In most instances the
county agent was able to select the land before planting and
could judge to what extent commercial fertilizers could be
applied profitably.
SEED CORN
Improved seed corn was used in practically every crop grown
by corn club boys, and to a large extent by adult farmers. The
improved varieties most generally used were Prince's Best,
Godbey's Poorland, Hastings' Prolific, and Marion County
White. These varieties produced fairly true to their types, and
much of the crop was selected and sold for seed for the season


Fig. 4. Corn demonstration, Hillsboro county.






Annual Report, 1915


of 1916 at $2 to $4 per bushel. In many instances local corn
of proved worth was used.
Farmers who failed to plant good seed usually made lower
yields. Where mixed varieties were placed on exhibition in
competition with improved corn in the final contest, the value of
careful selection was demonstrated. Where the better native
types were used, the demonstrators reported yields of twenty to
forty bushels per acre with sound, flinty, marketable grains.
A large acreage of corn was grown for silage. This was
planted about twenty per cent thicker than usual.
GRASSES
Comparatively few farmers conducted demonstrations with
grasses. These plots were usually small, varying from a
quarter of an acre to five acres. The grasses used were chiefly
Rhodes, Natal, and Sudan. These demonstrations were con-
ducted to determine the kind of land best suited to the differ-
ent grasses, and the advisability of planting them under various
conditions. Some failures were reported because of poor prepa-
ration, lack of fertilization, and the wrong type of land.
Natal grass was more generally successful than the others
because of more general use. It produced from one-half to
three-fourths of a ton per acre at each cutting on the light
sandy soils. Small plots of Rhodes and Sudan grass made good
growth on the heavier soils of this district and produced from two
to four cuttings at an average yield of one-half to one ton per
acre for each cutting.
SORGHUM
Sorghum, planted at regular intervals between March 10 and
August 1, was especially recommended as a soiling crop for
hogs and grain crop for poultry. In some instances it yielded
from 10 to 15 bushels of grain per acre. The demonstrations
were conducted to determine the best methods of planting the
crop and at what season of the year it is likely to give the best
yield of grain. Sorghum was also planted for silage, as it can
be made to mature at various seasons of the year, thus render-
ing it especially useful for mixing with other silage crops.
JAPANESE CANE
Japanese cane has just been introduced as a forage crop
under demonstration methods. Some improved varieties were
distributed by the Florida Experiment Station thru the county
agents. As the amount available was small, most of the canes
were replanted for seed in 1916; consequently it was difficult to







Florida Cooperative Extension


get comparative yields. The purpose of demonstrations with
Japanese cane was to introduce its general use as a forage
crop, and to determine to what extent it might be used as a
silage crop on different soils. Because of the large amount of
forage and the heavy yields it produces, county agents have
urged its use by livestock farmers to reduce feed bills and to
eliminate the shortage of winter feed for cattle. Dairymen
especially have been asked to grow Japanese cane to eliminate
the purchase of timothy hay. In locations where there is little
or no frost, dairymen cut Japanese cane fresh from fields daily
during the winter, which emphasizes its importance as a forage
crop in South Florida.
OATS
Oats were grown as a demonstration crop in 41 cases and
yielded approximately 26 bushels per acre for grain and an
average of one and a half tons per acre for hay. The season
of 1915 was unusually favorable for oats. The crop matured
in May, coming at an opportune time to supply feed to work
stock when many farmers would otherwise buy grain. The
grain drill for seeding was recommended wherever possible,
because the machine insures a uniform depth of planting and a
good covering for the seed. Much of the seed was obtained
outside the state and was usually of better quality than that
which farmers had saved. The varieties used were Texas Rust
Proof, Burt Ninety Day, Hastings One Hundred Bushel, and
Fulghum. All yielded fair crops. Texas Rust Proof was most
generally grown; Burt Ninety Day gave the best results for
late planting, but yielded below the average when planted in
November; Hastings One Hundred Bushel gave about average
yields. Fulghum oats were planted by only a few farmers, but
gave good results.
LEGUMES
Velvet beans and cowpeas comprised the principal legume
crops grown under demonstration methods. Bur and crimson
clover were grown in a few cases but were generally disap-
pointing. The latter apparently should be restricted to a few
special areas. They made little growth before mid-winter and,
as most farmers wished to plant a spring crop about the first of
March on the same land, these clovers had hardly time to dem-
onstrate what they would do if allowed to mature. Wherever
a successful growth was indicated farmers were hopeful that
these crops would make satisfactory winter legumes. "







Annual Report, 1915


Velvet beans comprise an important part of the demonstra-
tion work with legumes. They were grown quite generally
thruout the district. In some cases they were used as a sepa-
rate demonstration, but in most instances were grown in the
same field with corn. The newer varieties, such as Chinese,
Alachua, Osceola, Wakulla, and Georgia, have been distributed
at various times thru the county agents by the Florida Experi-
ment Station. The Chinese velvet bean has been favorably re-
ceived because of the large amount of foliage it produces early
in the season. A large acreage of this variety was grown.
Alachua, Osceola, and Wakulla were grown on only a small
acreage, altho they had quite a wide distribution. Reports of
these varied, and most of them were favorable; but as the
beans were grown only in a limited way, definite conclusions
could hardly be reached.
Cowpeas, grown in a manner similar to velvet beans, that is,
with the corn or some other crop, were chiefly used for soil
building, altho in many cases they were cut for hay. One hun-
dred and forty farmers demonstrated with legumes under direc-
tion of county agents.
CROP ROTATION DEMONSTRATIONS
Sixty-eight farmers practiced crop rotation. In many sec-
tions of South Florida a continuous rotation of four or five
different crops each year was possible. One generally practiced
consists of winter grain or vegetables followed by corn, with
cowpeas, peanuts or velvet beans planted in the middles; corn
harvest followed by pasture with cattle and hogs; and pasture
planted to winter cereals or spring vegetables; thereby giving
a variety of crops and growing one or more legumes each year
for soil improvement. Farmers are generally deeply interested
in crop rotations, particularly in view of abnormal commercial
fertilizer conditions.
APPLICATION OF LIME
Agents in this district report a total of 1,625 tons of lime
used by 274 farmers. Before the lime was used the county
agent inspected the land to determine whether application was
advisable. Most of it was applied on flatwoods land, while
several tons were used in citrus groves. Ground lime rock was
used almost exclusively and was usually obtained in car lots at
a slightly lower rate than usual quotations because of the rec-
ommendation by the county agent.







Florida Cooperative Extension


DEMONSTRATIONS IN THE CITRUS GROVE
Demonstrations in citrus groves were chiefly to control in-
sects. The work was emphasized in Lake and Osceola counties.
Whitefly, scale, and rust mite were the principal insects con-
trolled. Experiment Station workers gave assistance to agents
in arranging these spraying methods systematically. The co-
operation of W. W. Others, of the U. S. Bureau of Entomology,
was of valuable assistance to the agents in carrying out success-
ful spraying demonstrations. Twelve power sprayers were
purchased by grove owners to combat insects and fungus dis-
eases at the suggestion of county agents. Managers of pack-
ing houses assisted agents in obtaining full co-operation with
growers. Every effort was made to secure the best spraying
materials and in this the packing house managers also gave
their fullest support.
.SILOS AND DIPPING VATS
The co-operative demonstration work has been a potent factor
in arousing interest in better care and handling of livestock in
the eastern and southern Florida district. Twenty-eight silos
were erected and several dipping vats built as a direct result
of these efforts. As this kind of demonstration work requires
considerable money, the agents are compelled to reach those
farmers who are financially able and who have sufficient stock
to justify the expenditure. A much larger number of farmers
are interested who are not financially able to erect vats and who
are without sufficient livestock to warrant securing a loan for
the purpose. As a result of the general interest in better live-
stock, there is a decided movement on the part of a few banking
firms to furnish money to farmers for stock improvement at in-
terest lower than the legal rate. The silos and dipping vats
now in Use are in the hands of the aggressive farmers and stock
raisers, and it is expected that such equipment will come into
general use as rapidly here as it has in other Southern States.
COUNTY AGENTS URGE BETTER LIVE STOCK
Without a single exception the county agents have worked
toward improving dairy, beef, cattle, and hogs. Purebred sires
are becoming more generally appreciated. Demonstration work
in livestock and in a few cases the county agent's personal
efforts are largely responsible for this improved sentiment.
It is hardly possible to estimate the actual amount of increase
from the introduction of better blood or better management of







Annual Report, 1915


stock in general, since it requires two years or longer to realize
from the improvement of cattle and nearly as long to see the
effect of better breeds of hogs.
If Florida comes to her own as an agricultural state, the
livestock industry must receive a stimulus in many directions.
Business interests have realized this for years but have failed
to arouse the sentiment to promote such an industry; owing,
largely, to lack of well-formulated plans, the presence of Texas
fever tick, the inferiority of the average Florida animal, and
the prevalence of cholera and other diseases among hogs. Since
removal of these obstacles has been undertaken in a scientific
manner thru the co-operative forces of the U. S. Department
of Agriculture and the University of Florida, outside and re-
lated interests have awakened to a full realization of the possi-
bilities of Florida livestock and are now forming an active
campaign to further the industry.
HOG CHOLERA CONTROL
Perhaps no part of the work of the county agent has been
more effective or more widely approved than the general dis-
tribution of hog cholera serum and the vaccination treatment.
Each agent has provided the necessary equipment to vaccinate
hogs and much of his time is taken administering serum where
a possibility of an outbreak of cholera exists. Agents in the
southern district vaccinated 24,684 hogs last year. Every agent
is fully instructed on the best methods of carrying out the work
by a special agent from the Bureau of Animal Industry, Wash-
ington, D. C., who is giving his full time to Florida in this
work. Because of range conditions it is practically impossible
to give accurate data on the percentage of losses following vac-
cination. It has been carefully estimated by the agents that
at least eighty per cent are saved by vaccination. Using the
official estimate of the value of Florida hogs as a basis, which is
$5 a head, the value of these hogs vaccinated would be approxi-
mately $98,736. If only 50 per cent of the animals were actu-
ally saved by the use of serum, $61,710 can be credited to hog
cholera vaccination in this district alone. It is further esti-
mated at least half as many more hogs were vaccinated by
farmers themselves and not reported to the agent. This would
make the saving approximately $75,000.
Respectfully,
S A. P. SPENCER,
District Agent.






Florida Cooperative Extension


REPORT NORTH AND WEST DISTRICT AGENT
P. H. Rolfs, Director.
SIR: I submit herewith the following report of the district
of North and West Florida for the fiscal year ending June 30,
1915.
COTTON DEMONSTRATIONS
Owing to the unsettled condition of the cotton market early
in the season, demonstration agents joined with other forces in
urging the reduction of cotton acreage and the substitution of
food and soil building crops. Following instructions from
Washington, no demonstrations in cotton were solicited; such
demonstrations, however, were gladly conducted where farmers
wanted them. Ninety-eight demonstrations in short staple
cotton were reported with a total of 394 acres; the average
yield of seed cotton per acre was 1,048 pounds. Forty-two
demonstrations of sea island cotton were reported with an
acreage of 201; which gave an average yield of 369 pounds
of seed cotton per acre.
With the advance of the boll weevil, county agents are doing
very effective work in showing cotton growers how to overcome
largely the depredations of this insect. Agents have urged
better preparation of the soil, use of improved seed, more thoro
cultivation, direct control of the weevil by hand picking of
weevils and squares, and fall destruction of stalks.
CORN
During the year 2,826 acres of corn were grown by 627
farmers under the supervision of county agents. The yield
averaged 27 bushels. About half of these farmers plowed their
plots in early fall and 108 grew a winter cover crop. Field
selection of seed was urged with the result that 554 farmers
were influenced to thus secure seed for the next year's crop.
OATS
Oats were grown by 177 demonstrators for grain, hay, winter
cover, or, for grazing. The average yield when the crop was
used for grain or hay was 26 bushels and one and a half tons,
respectively. In these demonstrations the importance of the
following practices was brot out: Thoro fall preparation, the
use of improved seed, and cultivation with a weeder or harrow.
In many cases the seed was given the formalin treatment which







Annual Report, 1915.


resulted in crops, entirely free from rsmut,. By listing, the,grow-
ers, who. have, good- seed, agents have, assisted .farmers in.get-
ting pure. strains of seed. This seed, gave much better. yields
thanthat shipped from distant places..


















Fig. 5. Demonstration Essex rate, winter hog pasture, Calhoun county.
LEGUMES
All agents realize the importance of the legumes and urge
that they be grdwn wherever practicable. These have been
grown for the following purposes: Soil building, food for live-
stock, and the reduction of fertilizer bills. All rotations estab-
lished have included one or more legumes. The various legumes
with which work was conducted were grown in demonstrations
'by 152 farmers on 1,247 acres. This incliided many small
plots of new varieties.
COWPEAS
County agents' activities in connection with this crop con-
sisted largely in the. introduction of disease resistant varieties,
Iron and.Brabham, and. in, having a larger acreage grown fpr
hay and soil improving. During the season of 1914-15 a decid-
edly increased acreage. of oats and rye was grown and farmers
were urged to follow these crops with cowpeas or other legumes.
VELVET BEANS
The velvet bean crop is one of the most important of the
district. Its annual worth to the growers, both for livestock







34 Florida Coopcera t ice Extension

feed and soil renovation, would be hard to.estimate....The.vari-,
ety most commonly grown in the past was the Florida or Latei
Speckled. On account of the long growing period required, this
variety is occasionally caught by frost and is not so well suited!
foi growing after spring crops. Varieties more suitable are!
becoming available and during the last two years the China,
Osceola, Wakulla, Alachua, and others have been placed with
farmers who were interested. The three last were bred at the
Florida Experiment Station and indications are that at least.
two of them will prove valuable.
P .... EANUTS
The demonstrations in peanuts were conducted for the most;
part to teach cheaper and better methods of production as a.
hay and hog feed crop. In these demonstrations the peanuts'
were planted in fields to themseles and cultivated with a
weeder or harrow. The cost o-of this method of cultivation is
very low and the land is left in an excellent condition for the
use of a mower in making hay of the vines. The peanuts, are
usually gathered by hogs. An average of about 1,500 pounds
of hay and forty bushels of peanuts was reported.
OTHER LEGUMES
Other summer legumes included in the work of agents were
soybeans, beggarweed, and lespedeza. The soybeans cut for hay
made an average of two tons per acre; other plots were.grazed
off by the .hogs and no accurate, results could be obtained.
These demonstrations were inoculated with material furnished
by the U. S. Department of Agriculture. Beggarweed and
lespedeza are both widely distributed and their good qualities
recognized by farmers generally. More extended use of these
crops for forage and grazing has been urged with excellent
results.
Demonstrations in vetch, bur clover, .ad crims6i clover on
well-drained soils, especially the clay, soils, have shown these
winter legumes to be valuable adjuncts to the summer growing
legumes available for feed and soil renovation.
LIVE STOCK
Agents have been actively fostering livestock production.
This work is considered of great importance for several reasons:
1. The spread of the boll weevil has caused a great decrease







Annual Report, 1915


Fig. 6. Berkshire gilts on Demonstration Farm, Holmes county.

in cotton production, and livestock seems to furnish the best
means of relief from this loss of revenue.
2. The natural advantages in the way of food crops which
can be raised, together with the large areas of cut-over lands
available, make this section admirably suited to livestock pro-
duction.
3. The establishment of packing houses convenient to the
territory, and the high market value of all classes of livestock
insure a ready sale and profitable returns for such products.

INOCULATION OF HOGS
The inoculation of hogs in an educational way was taken up
by extension workers two years ago. This work has been of
immense value to the hog industry in demonstrating the value
of anti-hog cholera serum when properly used. County agents
in the district inoculated 26,046 hogs, practically all of which
received only the single treatment. Along with this the im-
portance of cleanliness and the proper care of the hogs has
been stressed.

SILOS, DIPPING VATS, AND PUREBRED STOCK
As a result of the advice of the agents, twenty-four silos
have been built. In a number of counties these are either the
first or among the first and the indications are good for greatly







Florida Cooperative Extension


increased numbers during following years. Sixteen dipping
vats have been built, and 13,256 cattle dipped. Three hundred
and thirty-eight purebred hogs, 37 purebred beef animals, and
29 purebred dairy animals have been purchased.
CROP ROTATIONS
The suggestions and advice of county agents, have resulted
in the establishment of 295 crop rotations. Some of the objects
in establishing of these rotations have been to build up soil
fertility, to furnish a better food supply for livestock, to better
utilize soil and labor, and to give the farmer additional money
crops.
OTHER ACTIVITIES,
.Twenty-four farmers' clubs of various kinds have been, or-
ganized with a total membership of 956. Five hundred and
sixty-five received agents' advice in home mixing fertilizers.
One hundred and fifty-nine farmers have been induced to use
lime on their soils; the number of tons applied were 914.
In connection with their various duties county agents made
20,763 official visits and traveled 81,956 miles.
Respectfully,
E. S. PACE,
District Agent.






Annual Report, 1915


REPORT OF BOYS' CORN CLUB AGENT
P. H. Rolfs, Director.
SIR: I submit herewith the following report of Boys' Corn
Clubs for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1915.
The Boys' Corn Club work extended into 36 counties. The
clubs in each county are under direct supervision of the county
agent who visits the boys at schools and their homes and gives
them any possible assistance. At the close of the season con-
tests are held in each county. The boys come together with the
results of the year's work, which is judged in a way that every-
one is given credit for the record he has made.
The total value of the prizes given in the state was about
$3,200. Many of these are very valuable. We encourage the
offer of such- prizes as livestock, implements, and expenses to
the boys' short course in agriculture at the University of
Florida.


Fig. 7. Corn Club boys, Nassau county.







38 Florida Cooperative Extension

ENROLLMENT, YIELDS, AND PRODUCTION COSTS


County


Number
of Boys


Marion ...................... 67
Nassau ..................... 15
Osceola .................... 8
Pasco .........-........... 1'
Polk ......................... 23
Santa Rosa .............. 8
St. Johns ............... 10
Sumter .................... 23
Suwannee .................. 10
Taylor ..................... 3
Volusia ...................... 3
Walton ..................... 47
Washington .............. 18
Alachua .: ............ 4
Baker .................... 13
Bay ............................ 2
Bradford ................ 7
Calhoun .................. 31
Citrus ...................... .. 12
Clay ........... ........ 11
Columbia .................. 21
DeSoto ................... 16
Duval ....................... 6
Escambia ............... 25
Hamilton ........:...... 22
Hernando .............. 30
Hillsboro ..... 43
Holmes ................. 5
Jackson .-...............- 4
Jefferson ................ 14,
Lafayette ............ 27
Lake .................... 2
Leon .............--- 7
Liberty -.................. 9
Madison .. ..... 25
No. Counties...... .-36 1325.
Reporting
589
25 ;

[


Highest Average Average Cost
Yield Yield Per Bushel


92
51
40.6
58
62
90
93
79
41
24
54
59.2
90.6
80.7
85.5
34
70.3
73.3
68
50
57.6
80.7
62.3
79.3
79
100.5
99.3
63.2
60.2
57.1
55
28
87.6
38.3
62.7
100.5


35.7
38.7
28.4
58
40.7
50.75
42
33
24.3
22.6
46.6
29.3
28.8
36.2
45.7
32.1
51.1
32.9
44.2
31.3
35.8
41.2
47.1
48.5
38
41.8
45.8
37.8
28
32.2
24.2
20.2
44.8
30
36.1
37.5 V


$0.40
.56
.65
.83
.38
.43
.48
.41
.88
.57
.63
.63
.56
.52
.59
.49
.41
.53
.43
.62
.52
.44
.60
.44
.48
.56
.35
.51
.49
.39
.54
.97
.48
.54
.46
$0.48








Annual Report, 1915 39

BEST TEN RECORDS
(Based on 50% for yield and 50% for profit, value of corn $1)

Cost Profit Profit Yield Yield Per
Name per per per per per cent
County bu. acre cent acre cent rating


Fred Evers-........ Hillsboro...... $0.15 $84.05 50.0 99.36 49.4 99.4
Earl Davis........ Hillsboro ...... .12 83.07 49.2 94.4 46.9 96.1
Palmer Byrd.... Leon ........... 18 67.83 40.2 87.6 43.5 83.7
Henry Parker.. Marion ......- .16 70.56 40.8 84. 41.7 83.5
Lewis .Lee....... Hernando..... .42 55.56 32.9 95.8 47.6 80.6
Coley Mercer.... Washington. .34 59.79 35.4 90.6 45. 80.4
Joel Lundy....... Santa Rosa.. .29 59.80 35.4 90. 44.7 79.5
Reed Mercer.:.. Washington.. .34 .58.74 34.8 89. 44.2 79.0
Isben Colding.. Hillsboro...... .16 65.35 38.7 77.8 38.6 77.4
Wm. Fulton...... Hernando..... .55 45.28 26.8 100.57 50. 76.8
Average.......... $0.194 $65.04 ...... 90.9


BEST TEN YIELDS
NAME POSTOFFICE COUNTY YIELD
Wm. Fulton........... .........Brooksville.. ... Hernando ........... ....100.57
Fred Evers................... ..Alafia ......... ...... Hillsboro ........... ........9.. 99.36
Earl Davis.......................Plant City.......................-Hillsboro ......- -................ 94.4
Lewis Lee..............-........Trilby ...... ..............Hernando ................. 95.8
Osteen Beach...................Hastings....................St. Johns .............-....... 93.0
W P. Crosby ..................Citra..... ..........Marion ...................... 92.0
Coley Mercer...................Chipley.... ........Washington ............... 90.6
Joel Lundy ...... -.. ...... Baker.-.. .............. Santa Rosa ....... ......... 90.0
Reed Mercer............Chipley....-.... ..... Washington ........... 89.0
Palmer Byrd........:...Chaires....... ...:.. .....Leoni ............... 87.6
Average-..................... 93.2
BEST TEN PROFITS
(Corn $1 a Bushel)
NAME:. POSTOFFICE ,COUNTY .. PROFIT
Fred Evers...........-...........Alafia............-........-Hillsboro ................$84.45
Earl Davis. .......... ........ Plant City..... -- ...--..- :Hillsboro .......... ..- 83.07
Henry Parker..................LeRoy.......... ...Marion ........ .......... 70.56
Palmer Byrd.............. ..Chaires .... ....... Leon ........................- 67.83
Isben Colding ..-...:. :.Balm: .....-.. ....Hillsboro .:......'.:.....:.. 65.35
Georgp Parker....... ...LeRoy-.,,........... Marion .......... .._....65.15
Joel Lundy......-..............Baker.......Santa Rosa --...: ....... .59.80
Coley Mercer -....... ..:-:.:. Chipley... ......::...:: .Wshifigton ':..::...-:. 59.79
Porter Bradley............Brooksyille,............... Hernando .............. 59.67
Reed Mercer--..............Chipley.....--------.... Washington :--.:..........- 58.74
Averag&.. ..:-..:. ..... $67:41

Respectfully,,
G. L. HERRINGTON,
B s- Bys" Club 'Agent.






Florida Cooperative Extension


REPORT OF ASSISTANT STATE AGENT HOME ECONOMICS
P. H. Rolfs, Director.
SIR: I submit .herewith the following report of the work
done in home economics extension for the fiscal year ending
June 30, 1915.
The women's and girls' work was in charge of the assistant
state agent and one field instructor in home economics. The
assistant state agent advised with various sources concerning
county appropriations, selected, and recommended for appoint-
ment, the county agents, and had entire charge of the girls'
club work. The field instructor visited the counties where
county agents were employed, assisted them in holding meet-
ings for women and girls, attended farmers' institutes con-
ducted by the University and gave lectures and demonstrations:
She had entire charge of the work with women.
As frequently as possible, the assistant state agent and the
women's institute lecturer visited the counties, inspected the
work of the girls and women, and. gave instructions to the
county agents.

AGENTS EMPLOYED WELL QUALIFIED
The leadership abilities of applicants have been carefully in-
vestigated before agents were employed. In general selection
has not been difficult since women well trained in home eco-
nomics and community leadership.are seeking these positions.
They see in this work greater possibilities of service to their
communities than in the school room. Of the twenty-three
agents employed, ten were graduates of :normal schools or
colleges.
The salaries of county agents are; gradually approaching
those of high school teachers in the state. The average yearly
salary, including traveling expenses, was $702.85,; the' average
monthly salary, including traveling expenses, was $108.13; and
the: average number of months agents were employed was' 61.
PLAN OF WORK
The work carried on by the county :agents falls naturally in
two divisions, for girls and for women. Both are.conducted on
the same general plan, since the women's work developed from
the work with the girls.






Annual Report, 1915


GIRLS' CLUBS
The girls from the ages of 10 to 18 are organized into canning
clubs by the county agents. The agents visit the rural schools,
present the work and leave enrollment cards with the teacher.
The girls then consult their parents. When they have permission
to take up the work, they fill out, sign and mail their enrollment



















Fig. 8. Canning Club girls, Osceola county.

cards to the county agent. Seed, instructions and a record
book are sent to the enrolled club members. As soon as possi-
ble, the county agent visits each club member, measures her
plot, instructs her and plans with her the season's work. Be-
fore the canning season the county agent visits each neighbor-
hood and gives a canning demonstration, so that all club mem-
bers may be supplied with the proper canning equipment when
the fruit is ripe.
The first year club girls plant a one-tenth acre plot in. tonma-
toes, study the methods of cultivation, :and keep an accurate
record of all work done and of the number of pounds gathered.
When the tomatoes are ripe, the club members are urged to
sell them fresh as long as they can get a good price, and to can
all tomatoes which they cannot sell at a profit, for home use or
for the market.
The second year club girls continue to grow tomatoes on one-
half of their plots, and on the other half plant some other crop,






Florida Cooperative Extension


preferably beans, peas, peppers, okra, beets or onions. These
girls .have fall gardens, and some of the club members have
made four crops in a year.
The county agents make monthly or semi-monthly visits to
their club girls, either individually, or in groups, w-len it is
possible for the club girls to have meetings. During the grow-
ing season the girls have time, not only to study the agricul-
tural side of their work; but to study foods, their preparation
and values; sewing as applied to making caps, aprons, holders
and club dresses; home making, in the study of household con-
veniences, home sanitation and other phases of domestic science.
SPECIAL PRODUCTS
After a girl has been a club member for two or three years,
she may select one special product and specialize in the manu-
facture of that product. For instance, the girls of Walton
county, besides planting their one-tenth acre plots, put up five
thousand four-ounce jars of fig preserves. In DeSoto county,
the girls put up two thousand glasses of guava jelly for market.
Floy Brown, of Polk county, made a specialty of canned guavas
in tin, and was unable to supply the demand for her product.

WORK FOR WOMEN
Lectures and demonstrations given at farmers' institutes and
girls' club meetings by the state and county workers resulted
in a demand by the women for assistance in their home-
making. First, women were enrolled as 'demonstrators and
were given individual instructions for conducting some home
project. After following a definite course these women meet
to report the results and plan for future work., Regularly
organized clubs result.
POULTRY CLUBS
In three counties women's poultry clubs have been organ-
ized. The club selects one good breed of poultry, and each
member starts with a .sitting of eggs of that breed. Methods
of poultry and egg production are studied, and marketing or-
ganizations are formed.. Records of the work in these clubs
have been kept this year. Plans are developing for a state
worker who will devote her entire time to poultry clubs. Espe-
cial emphasis will be given to clubs among women, but clubs
for girls and. boys, will be organized also..






Annual Report, 1915


MARMALADE, JELLY AND PRESERVE CLUBS
These clubs have been organized among women, especially
in the citrus section, where many women are becoming skillful
in preserving products from fruits. Especial emphasis is placed
on producing an excellent product, contained in attractive pack-
ages. However, the problem of marketing preserves and such
articles has not yet been solved.
HOUSEHOLD MANAGEMENT CLUBS
In rural communities clubs have been formed for study of
household management. Regular courses of study are made
out and put into effect by club members with the assistance of
the county agent. The programs are arranged by the women,
with occasional assistance from state and county leaders. The
program of some of the most successful clubs in the state this
year has been: Making a fireless cooker, using it, reporting the
results, and arranging a series of meetings for perfecting the
use of the cooker; taking up another household convenience,
usually the iceless refrigerator, and following a ,similar plain;
discussing balanced meals, working out typical meals, and
finally studying home work systems.
Reports of these meetings are made to the county agent if
she is not present.
CANNING CLUBS
A number of women in .the state have enrolled in canning
clubs. They usually take a plot and follow the instruction of
the county agent in planting a garden larger than is necessary
for supplying the vegetables for home use, in order to have a
surplus for canning. Among women in communities newly set-
tled where the members can the surplus vegetables which they
are unable to ship or sell at a profit; the canning clubs have
proven a great help.
TIHE HOUSEKEEPERS' SHORT COURSE
The numbers of homemakers attending the housekeepers'
short course held at the State College for Women annually
during the last week of February, ,is steadily increasing. In
February,, 1915, the women's clubs of Ocala and Tallahassee,
each sent a representative from their county, on condition that
after her return she give instructions to the women in her
home community. ,
.The forenoops of the short course are. spent incooking and
sewing, laboratory work; the afternoons and evenings in lec-







44 Florida Cooperative Extension

tures and demonstrations given by the members of the faculty
of the College on subjects of interest and help to the home-
makers.
SUMMARY OF AGENTS' WORK
Report of the work done by the 23 agents employed for the
year ending June 30, 1915, follows:
Miles traveled by rail and team...... ................................ ...... 51,247
Official visits made to club members-.............................................. 4,070
Visits made to schools and plots.. ........................... ..................... 1,491
Visits made to homes.................................. ........ ........... .. 2,086
Letters written to club members................................. 9,071
Meetings held .....-...................................- .............. ....... 1,123
Attendance at Meetings..---............ .................................... 28,958
Fireless cookers made..................... ................. .. .................... 45
Iceless refrigerators ....................... .................. ....................... 27
Houses screened .............................. ... --................ 47
Home canning machines bought............................ ............... 321

COUNTY AGENTS' SCHOOL
During the week preceding the housekeepers' short course
the annual meeting of county agents was held at the College,
with the following list of instructors and lecturers:
U. S. Department of Agriculture:
O. B. Martin, States Relations Service.
Ola Powell, States Relations Service
Caroline Hunt, States Relations Service.
M. N. Straughn, Bureau of Chemistry.
Univer-sty of Florida:
C. K. McQuarrie, state agent Co-operative Demionstration Work.
A. P. Spencer, district agent.
Florida State College for Women:
Dr. Edwaid Conradi, president.
Members of the college faculty.
State Officials:
W. N. Sheats, superintendent public instruction.
S,.W.A. McRae, state commissioner of agriculture.
R. E. Rose, state chemist.
Teachers College, Columbia University:
S' Ania Barrows.
;: Ten of the county agents attended the short course for the
two weeks following the annual meeting..

SPECIALISTS
Dr. M. N. Straughn, Bureau of Chemistry, U. S. Department
of Agriculture, was detailed to Florida as instructor at the
agents' meeting and later returned for experimental work in
the manufacture of products from the citrus fruits. He was
assisted by Miss Verda Thompson, agent for Polk county. His
work, which has materially increased the value of citrus fruits,







Annual Report, 1915 45

resulted in accurate directions frr theseue u f.,the sour orange
for marmalades and jelly, and directions for extracting the
pectin from the white portion of orange peel in order that this
might be used as the. foundation for jellies from fruits lacking
in pectin.
Miss Ola Powell, States Relations Service, U. S. Department
of Agriculture, worked especially on the guava and.,gave devel-
oped recipes for making preserves:from figs and watermelon
rind. Miss Caroline Hunt, of the Bureau of Home Economics,
U. S. Department of Agriculture, developed recipes for using
the kumquat for marmalades and jellies, and for combining its
juices with those of other fruits.

LEGISLATION
'In May, 1915, the Florida Legislature passed the following
bill authorizing the county: boards of education to make appro-
priations for home demonstration work:
"Be It Enacted by, the Legislature of the State of Florida:
"Sectidn 1. Any county board of public instruction or the board of
trustees of any special tax school district, is thereby authorized and em-
powered to establish and maintain a department of home economics or a
department of home demonstration work in any of the high schools of
this State and to pay the expenses of such departments out of any
public school funds at their disposal.
Section 2. Section 1 of this Act shall extend to and include canning
clubs, corn clubs and departments of agriculture, to acquire land, stock,
fertilizer, seed and implements necessary to maintain the same. And no
person shall be employed to demonstrate, teach or instruct in any of the
departments mentioned herein who does not hold a certificate of gradua-
tion from a recognized college, university or normal school, indicating
special training in home economics, home demonstration work or agricul-
tural work, or any one who has had satisfactory experience in home eco-
nomics or canning club work.
Section 3. County boards of public instruction are further empow-
ered under this Act to employ county agents who shall, under the joint
supervision of the county superintendent of public instruction and the
Florida State College for Women or the University of Florida, conduct
practical demonstration work in home economics, girls' and women's con-
test work, canning club, corn club or agricultural work, and other move-
ments for the advancement of country home life and shall aid the county
superintendent and teachers in giving practical education in home, farm
or garden economics."
Respectfully,
AGNES ELLEN HARRIS,
Assistant State Agent.







Florida Cooperative Extension


REPORT OF SPECIAL SILO AGENT
P: H. Rolfs, Dire tor.
SIR: I herewith submit report of the work in silo construc-
tion for the fiscal year ending June 30,.1915.
In the conduct of this work I have endeavored to direct, with'
all the available knowledge at my command, the erection of
silos that would be suitable to farmers' needsd. I have taken'
into account the number of animals, and probable permanency
of the structure, and the funds available for the erection :of
such a silo. I have particularly urged .the proper dimensions
and convenient location so that when the silo was completed it,
would give the farmer the maximum ,service.
In the territory covered I have been assisted by information
from the.state, district, and county agents in the Farmers' Co-
operative Demonstration Work who are in the best position to,
know the actual needs of the farmer.
The year's work has been particularly gratifying in that
forty-nine silos have been erected with a total capacity of 5,110
tons. It is my opinion that the erection of silos and the build-
ing of dipping vats are two important steps in the development
of the livestock industry of Florida.
These silos are distributed over a very large area, and the
owners will have more or less supervision in filling them. Thus
we have reason to expect that the best 'results will come in re-
turn for the work. .








Annual Report; 1915 47

SILO CONSTRUCTION
The following list shows the silos in the state that have been,
supervised or inspected by the Extension Division.


Name -. Address', IK
Ocala Heights Dairy..........Ocala......................
C.' :P. Howell...........:.Ocala........-..:-...:...
Forest J. Hyde....................Jacksonville. ....
Edw. Niles........................Jacksonville........ ..
J. C. DeBevoise.......... :..:..Jacks6nville ....
C. F. Barber.....................Macclenny........... 2
F. E. Bughbee....................Hastings..............
C. C. Wehmeier.................Pensacola:.................
R. L. 'Atkinson........... .......Pnsacola.... ....:......
Magnolia Farms..................Muscogee.......... 2
John L. Edwards..............Ocala.................... 2
S. C. Mayo..................... Reddick.......... ......-
S. F. Rou,............................Lowell............... ....
C. B. Howell---.....................Lowell.................
Mrs: Ada Varn..................Brooksville............
Miss M. O; Chase..............Valrico.....................
W. W. Powell......................Seffner...................
J. M. DeVane...................Plant City....... ........
J. H. Hughes............ Orlado..........Orlad ..........
W. A. Stacy.........................Orlando..-..........
John Poucher....................Wauchula.................
J. D. Cowden...................Lakeland...--..........
J. P. Eskildsen....................Green Cove Springs.
State Prison Farm..............Raiford............... 2
University of Fla...............Gainesville.................. 3
Lake Land & Livestock Co..Watertown... .....
R. W. Turner.................Fort White ............ .
A. B. Small.........................Fort White.................
B. F. Williamson:.........:-.:Gainesville:......:....
R. G. Johnson..................Tallahassee ........ 2
0. W. Jefferson..................Pensacola...........--
T. L. Atkinson .......::....... Pensacola............ :
R. H. Wehmeyer...........-...Pensacola...........
W. B. Brooks................... Pensacola............
Clark Chavers..................... Century.................
W. M. McCurdy...... .......Century...:. _,..'
Walter H. Johnston.-.......Pine. Barrcn.............
C. G. Elmore................Perisacola.:.....':....
W. C. Barrineau .............. .... ........:;..


" '"


.. Wood. ... ....-...... 26 .
.Concrete ..........-....-. 15
Total --:..... .. Steel .................. 4 I I. 1 tons
l :" iVitrified tile ... ..... 4
S. .. 4- .9. ::. : 9-
Respectfully,
R:es' p" t 'C. L. WILLOUGHBY,''
S Special Agent'Silo Cbnstruction.


Capacity
find ons
Concrete....... 160
Steel......:....: 120
W ood............ ..100
W ood............. 100 .
W ood.........:..' 120
Wood......-. 120,60' :
Steel.............. 150
Wood....... L.... 80
W ood............. 80
Vitrified tile. 100 each
Wood............. 110 each
W ood............. 110
W ood............. 100
Wood............ 100
Wood-........... 120
W ood............. 120 .
W ood............. 100
Concrete........ 120
Concrete........ 90
Steel ----.......... 100
Concrete....... 100
Wood ........ 100
Wood...........- 60
Concrete....... 120 each
Concrete ...... 110, 110, 50
Wood............. 100
Concrete....... 200 each
W ood............ 100
Wood.......-..... 100
Wood............ 120
Tile .......... 110 each
Wood....... 80
Wood. ---....'/ 80
Wood.:.......... 80 .
Wood............. 80
Concrete....... 120 "
Concrete.....:. 100: -:
Concrete....... 110
Colicrete....'... '80'"
Wood,:. ......-100,






Florida Cooperative Extension


REPORT OF AGENT, HOG CHOLERA CONTROL
P. H. Rolfs, Director. "
SIR: I herewith submit"a report of the educational work in
hog cholera control for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1915.
This work was put into effect by an. appropriation, by Con-
gress for the suppression of hog cholera in the United States,
and was placed under the general -supervision of the Bureau
of Animal Industry, Washington, D. C.
It was agreed at the beginning that Project C should in-
clude educational work in hog cholera control, consisting of
lectures at farmers' institutes, demonstrations of methods, of
vaccination, and personal work among the farmers. Until 1913'
there were no laws, on the statute books of Florida relative to
the, control of hog cholera. The Legislature of 1913 passed an
act furnishing serum free to the farmers who made application
on official blanks., This serum is in the hands of the State
Board of Health, and its distribution is under the supervision
of the veterinarian of that office.
I found on my arrival a need for educational work, particu-
laily in the use of serum. It was not well- understood by the
average farmer, and misuse had. led in some cases to bad re-
sults. I was gratified to see, however, that the county demon-
stration agents were well informed and were rendering, val-
uable service to.farmers with whom they came in contact. The
instructions they had. rec'eied from ~y predecessor had guard-
el them against the misuse of serum, and. consequuently good
-reilts were obtained when the farmers would carry out the
instructions of the agents. '
''This ediucational'work has taken me over the major portion
of Florida 'and while the'northern par~t of the state is inore
extensively engaged in hog raising than the southern, I found
farmers deeply interested in hog raising and ready to receive
'instructions in hog cholera control. I find that the-best farmers
gif iosest attention' to' instructions. They show a desire to
lear~, anrd ,'My work hag usually' been welcome in every com-
mihiti~y visited.
The control of hog cholera in Florida is attracting much
attention from the press and interests relative to farming. In
my discussions with farmers, I find the chief obstacle to hog
raising is the possibility of destroying the herd.
In-the short, time that this work has been under way I can







Annual Report, 1915


see a marked improvement and I am indeed optimistic as to
the future of the hog industry in Florida, especially, now that
the farmers are receiving encouragement by better markets as
well.
The following is a tabulated report of the year's work:
Number of counties worked.............. ..... ......... .. .................................... 48'
N um ber of addr es.................................................. ......................... ...... 109
Total attendance----... ................... .............................. 8516
Demonstrations with serum alone....................................... ................... 44
Demonstrations with simultaneous treatment............................................ 19
D em onstrations ............................................................................. 63
Attendance at demonstrations ..... .................... ..... ... ..................... 2774
Number of hogs treated... ...............---........... -............................................ 1398
Number of visits made to farmers to diagnose diseases...................... 152
Number of farmers and hog raisers interviewed-................................... 1344
Farmers individually instructed-.............. ................ ........ ................ 93
County agents individually instructed........................................................ 33
Practicing veterinarians individually instructed----......................... ..... 7
Total persons instructed ...... ..... ......-................-.................................. 133
In conclusion I may say that while the work has made good
progress it is far from complete. Sanitary measures and more
legislation seem to be necessary before hog cholera is under
fairly good control in Florida.
Respectfully,
A. H. LOGAN,
Veterinary Inspector.







Florida Cooperative Extenswon


FARMERS' INSTITUTES
.. H. ROLFS, Superintendent.
C. K. McQUARRIE, Assistant Superintendent.
Farmers' institutes have been conducted in all agricultural
sections of Florida. The total attendance was 22,453, or an
average of 94 at each session. Many of these institutes were
held in country places where the attendance ran from 25 to 40,
practically all of whom were farmers and their families. At
others in the larger centers, the attendance ran from 100 to
300. The meetings were advertised in local newspapers and by
hand bills distributed either by the county agent or by some
one in the community who had the arrangements in charge.
The institute lecturers for the-last year included a number ofl
farmers; representative business interests, aside from the reg-
ular Farmers'' Institute' staff; members' of .the Experiment
Station' staff, and the University teaching force.
As Florida has a "diversity of agricultural interests, it has
been necessary to make distinct divisions of institute topics.
For instance, those in West Florida have pertained to farming
under iboll .weevil .conditions; hog raising as a money crop to
supplant, cotton; velvet beans as a soil improver and winter
cattle feed; soil improvement and fertilizers. In Middle and
North Florida where the boll weevil has not yet gained en-
trance, many farmers are considering cotton as a money crop
and are growing it on a small scale, consequently, there has
been more or less discussion on cotton growing. In the south-
tern and middle sections trucking, citrus growing, and in the
extreme south, sub-tropical horticulture, have received atten-
tion in institute work.
The plan of holding institutes is as follows: The farmers
gather in central communities for the day, holding two ses-
sions and discussing pertinent topics at each. Hog cholera
control and corn raising have been discussed in practically
every county in Florida.
COUNTY AGENTS' INSTITUTES
Since the Farmers' Institutes are a part of the Extension
Division of the University of Florida the county agents have
had no small part in the institute work during the year. Many
county agents have taken the initiative in arranging such
meetings as occasion demanded. These are not held at any par-






Annual Report, 1915,


ticular, season of the year but whenever interest in a subject
justifies action the agent calls the farmers together. He, re-
cives assistance thru the superintendent of institutes for that
particular subject and occasion. This has made it necessary to
supply specialists for special meetings according to the de-
mands of the locality.

FIELD INSTITUTES
County agents have conducted field institutesin their respec-
tive counties from time to time. The agent generally selects a
well-cultivated corn demonstration and requests other farmers
co-operating with him to meet in the field and go over the
demonstration, calling attention to the points that have been
especially emphasized in this demonstration. When there is a
dipping vat just completed he may request stockmen of the
community to come at a stated time and assist in putting the
cattle thru this vat for the first time. This is followed by dis-
cussions and comments by the farmers, usually led by the. agent
or someone designated to handle that meeting. Meetings have
also been called in a similar way to emphasize hog cholera
control. Farmers are requested to gather in some convenient
place and assist in the vaccination of hogs where both the
single and the simultaneous treatment are administered. This
is usually under the direction of the veterinary field agent,
U. S. Department of Agriculture.
In a similar manner institutes are held in the boys' club
work. The boys of the club are requested to meet the county
agent on various occasions thruout the season and are requested
to discuss methods of corn cultivation and draw their own con-
clusions as to what brings the best results.

WOMEN'S INSTITUTES
In conducting women's institutes the county agent in home
economics, selects the meeting place and those speakers who
are familiar with local conditions and in harmony with the
situation. The director of home economics work or the dis-
trict agent is able to .give valuable assistance in conducting
these institutes.
In women's institutes the topics of discussion are: Rural
sanitation, conveniences in the home, home gardening, canning
and preserving vegetables and fruits. In thinly populated com-
muities it is frequently advisable to hold farmers' institutes








52 Florida Cooperative Extension

and women's institutes on the same day and at some local
center.
FARMERS' INSTITUTES
(Calendar Year Ending December 31, 1915)
N um ber of sessions................................ .... ... .............. ......................... 239
Total attendance .............................................................................................. 22,453
Average attendance ....................................................................................... 94
Number of addresses from University staff............................................ 329
Number of addresses from others .............................................................. 122
Total number of addresses................................................................... ... 451
Number of counties entered............... ..... ................ ................. ..29

SUBJECTS DISCUSSED AT INSTITUTES.
Farm Demonstration Work and Saving Waste Products on the Farm
What It Stands For .Preserving Fruits
Sugar Cane Legislation for Farmers
Peanuts Agricultural Education
Rotation of Crops Hog Raising
Soil Improvement Live Stock and Silos
Fertilizers Live Stock Improvement
Safe Farming Standardizing Animals'
Diversified Farming Creamery Possibilities
Marketing Farm Products The Dairy Cow
Standardizing and Marketing Crops Hog Cholera Control
Home Demonstration Work Home Curing of Meats '
What Women's Clubs Stand For Landscape Gardening '
Club .Work Insect Pests
Canning Clubs Boll Weevil
Corn Clubs Diseases of :Truck Crops
Pig Clubs Citrus Canker
Poultry Clubs Lime for Flatwoods Soils
Organization Work of the School Board














I,.. NDEX



extension workers AAdE

Activities, extension workers.............. .....,...:...: .11-1~, 1:-24,44
Agents, home demonstration qualifications ......... ...... ..40 ,
salaries ...................--- ...... ......... .......................................
summary of work;..:..... ........,.......,. --.,...44
Assistant State Agent Home Economics, report..... .:.'...:.....40-45

B

Beef and dairy cattle .:..:.:.. .:.... ...................................... 16, 21,'22
Beggarweed ................-.. -.:.:.....::....' 34..
Boys' Club Agent, report.. ... 37-39.
Bur clover.. .........

C
Cane, Japanese ...... ............ .......... .... ..... .....-..-.....----27
Canning Clubs .... ......... 41.43
Cattle, beef and dairy. ... ..l;,21,22
Cholera, hog......................... ...;:.:.-................................................31, 35, 48-49
Citrus demonstrations ..--.....-..... -:...............- ...................... .....- 17, 30 ,
groves, spraying ...................... -....................................-..22 .
Clover, bur ............... -.....:...-...... .-....... .....................................28, 34 ; .
crimson ................ ......... ..... ........................------.........--------- 28,34
Clubs, canning .............................. ................................................. 41 43 ; ,
Clubs, canning -...--....--.......--.-. ....-....--.-.-..-...-41 43: ,... .
farm ers' .............................................................................. 36
girls' .......................................................................................41
girls', products of...................................... ........................ 42
household management........................................................43
marmalade, jelly, preserves .-- -.....- .................-.---.--- 43
poultry ........................................................ ....... 42
wom men's ........................................ .....-... 18, 42-44
Cooperations and demonstrations..............................................20-22
Corn ....................................................... ....-------------. ...-- 11, 20, 22, 25,32
Corn clubs-................................. ...........-....... .------ 37-39
best ten profits........................... ............................... 39
best ten records..............................................................39
best ten yields.................--............. ........................... 39
enroll ent ......................................................................38
prizes ...................... ............................... .............37
production costs.................................. ...................... 38
Corn club work, counties in...........................................................38
yields ................-------.. ..................----- ......38-39
Corn, seed ....................... .......... .. .. ....................... 26
Cotton ....................................................... .................. .............. 14, 20, 22, 32
County agents' institutes..................................................................50
County agents' school, women--...................................------- 44
Cover crops........................................................ ........................... 21
Cowpeas ....... ----.....---------..------------29, 33
Crimson clover...................................--34
Crop rotations ............................................... .............................29,36







2 Index

D
Dairy and beef cattle-.............................. ....... ............... 16, 21, 22
Demonstration activities .......---.................................... 11-18, 19-24, 44
Demonstrations and cooperations- ...................... ..........20-22
Dipping Vats ................................... ---------- ----- ....17, 22, 23, 36
values of-................. ...................... ..........23
Director, report of .............. .......... ............................ 7-18
Diseases and pests, livestock...................... ............................22
District Agent, north and west, report..................................32-36
District Agent, south and east, report.......................................25-31
Districts for extension work..................... .................... .. 9

E
Extension Activities ............................................ 1-18,19-24
H om e E conom ics .......... .......... ......... .........................18
Legislation .........i..:............ ....... ....... ...... 7;10,45
organization of .. ................- .............. 8, 40
supervision of .-..................... .................. 10, 11,40

F
Farmers' institutes ............. .... ..... .................50-52
Fertilizers ................ ............. .. ........ .21, 36
Field Institutes --.... ---.......------ ----... ......51
Field Instructor home economics........---............. ................40
Financial statement .-................... ....................------ 11
F orage ................... ... ..... .. ......-................ ..................- 21

G
Girls' clubs ...... .................................... ..................... ..... ...41-42
Grasses ....... ........................................... 27

H
Harris, Miss Agnes E., report Assistant State Agent............40-45
H ay ................................ .. ........... 16, 21
Herrington, G. L., report boys' club agent...............................37-39
Hogs ...... ...... .............------....... ---- 16, 21, 23, 35
Hog cholera...--------------.................. 23, 31, 35
Hog cholera agent, report-....-............................. ...........48-49
Hog cholera control ..---... -......... -- ...........31, 48-49
legislation .... ....... ............................ .48
Hogs saved, cholera........... ................ ..-- ................23
Home demonstration agents' activities--....-.......----..............40-44
Home demonstrations, division of work...........---......................40
legislation .... .................. ........... ...... 7, 45
Home economics extension.. ....................... .....18,40-45
field instructor............................. ............. 40
report Assistant State Agent......................40-45
specialists in ....................................... ...........44
Household management clubs ..............-...........--......-- .......43

I
Improvements by agents ............ .. ---....................20
Increased production by agents....................... ......... ...........22
Institutes, county agents' .-..........-... .......................... 50
farmers' .. ...........--.................... 50-52
field ....------- .....--- -.......................51
subjects of ........................... .... ........ ..............52
women's .------.................. ----.............................51
Irish potatoes .................... .......... .......--..... 21








Index 3

J
Japanese cane -..................-...-.. ... ... .....-...---- -............27
Jelly clubs .... ...... ..... ..------ ....--.. ...................43
L
Legislation, hog cholera.......................... ... ...........-.... ........48
extension .................... .........-------.... ........ 7, 10, 45
Legum es .............................. ......... ... ........ ......-.. ......... -12, 14, 21, 28, 33
Lespedeza .......--...................-----.........................- -----------.... 34
Lim e ...................................... ............. ..... .......... 21, 29, 36
application of................... .......- ......................... 29
Livestock ....................... ................- ...............--- 30, 34
diseases and pests, values............------...................--..22
purchased .-------..................... --- -- --...... .....22
Logan, A. H., report, hog cholera agent-...............-.....-- ........48-49
M
McQuarrie, C. K., report of State Agent................................19-24
Manure ..................-..- ......... --- ......-----.....--- .....21
Marmalade clubs............. ............................. ......43
Meetings, annual..................................-----....- ...... -- 24
group ....---..-......--..... .-------............-- ......------23
home demonstration agents .---------.......................................44
women's ................................... ..... ...... -.... 51

0
Oats .......................................-----...-.-------15, 21, 28, 32
Organization of extension.................... ...........- .........-.. 8
P
Pace, E. S., report district agent-.....-- ..............................32-36
Peanuts ........................................------------------...----- 14, 34
Potatoes, Irish.......... .......................... ..... ........... ...... 21
sweet ............ -- ............------------------- .. --...... 15, 21, 22
Poultry clubs .....................................---- --.... ..............................42
Preserve clubs ...... ... ........... ........ .. ................................43
Prizes, corn club .-........................................---- ------ 37
Production, corn clubs...................................................... ........... 38
Profits, corn club...................................--------------..---- 39
Projects ...............------. ........- -.................................. 9-10
Publications ........................................-- ............--------11
Purebred stock.........................................--.. ....... 30, 36
R
Rolfs, P. H., report of director............................. .................. 7-18
Rotation, crop................ .. .. ..... ..... .. ................ 29, 36


Seed corn... ... ......... .. .....................26
Short course, boys'........................ ... ............. ............... 37
Short course, boys'---- -----------------------------37
housekeepers' ..................-------....................--...........18, 43, 44
Silos ..............---.... ........----- ..-- ----- ----...........22, 30, 35, 46-47
Silo agent, report of.............. .........-----------..............46-47
Silos built ........................ ............ ....... ........ ..... ................47
Silo construction .. -------............. ..... ............................17,47
Silos, value of ..........----- .------------------.............. 23
Smith-Lever Act ........---------.-......................------- 7, 10
Sorghum ....................... ............................... .............27
Soybeans ..........................................---------.--------. 34








4. .- Index

Specialists, home economic ......... ........ ........ .......44
Spencer, A.r P., report district agent... .. .... ..25-3S-
.Spraying citrus groves......... .. .. 22
Stite Agent, reportt of.................. ... 19-24
Stock,, purebred ... ......30, 361
Supervision of extension..... .........................................10, 11
Sweet potatoes ........ ...-- .....................-- ................. .....15, 21, 22

T
Tobacco-- -------------------------20
Tobacco ...:::.. ::.... ... ..... ......... .......................................20


Value hogs saved ......-2............... :.. .:'.... ............. .. ..........
Values increased production -...............-......--..... ........................... 22
Value livestock purchased .................................. ...... ...........22
Values silos and -atN. ...... ....23
Velvet bean? ......12,33,28
Vetch .......................-------------....................-.............. 34


Willoughby, C. L., report silo agent................................. ......46-47
Women's clubs 18.42-44
S ; 'institute, ..... .51 ."
S .tinp -.............., ........ -...... ... .....---- ....43,51
work ..............18,40,42

.
Y ields, corn club ..................... ..... ................................................38-39

j ''