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Group Title: Research Report - University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences ; 89-6
Title: Oasis block method of bench grafting grapevines
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075768/00001
 Material Information
Title: Oasis block method of bench grafting grapevines
Series Title: Research Report - University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences ; 89-6
Physical Description: Book
Language: English
Creator: Harris, James W.
Publisher: University of Florida, Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences, Central Florida Research and Education Center,
Publication Date: 1990
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075768
Volume ID: VID00001
Source Institution: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: oclc - 123965158

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UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


CENTRAL FLORIDA RESEARCH
EDUCATION CENTER, LEESBUR
5336 UNIVERSITY AVE.
TELEPHONE: 904/787-3423
(GAINESVILLE LINE 392-7272


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

INSTITUTE OF FOOD AND AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES

Central Science
Library LEESBURG FLORIDA


AND


i tJ 1 1 10t


) University of Florida

OASIS BLOCK METHOD OF BENCH GRAFTING GRAPEVINES


James W. Harris and J. A. Mortensen


In January 1989 a new method of bench grafting was implemented with the use of Oasis
blocks. In the past the conventional means of bench grafting have been the use of wax or
builders sand to protect the graft union from drying out. The Oasis block was tried for
the same purpose. It allowed excellent callusing around the graft union and also
inhibited scion rooting which can be a problem with the use of sand. The results were
outstanding.

Sixty-three bench grafts of Orlando Seedless scion on Tampa rootstock were made. Out
of 63 grafts, 60 successfully took. This is a 95.2% take. While this can be achieved
with the sand and carton method, there are definite advantages to using Oasis blocks:


Advantages
Scion Root Inhibition:

Simplicity of Use:

Labor Saving:


Light Weight:


Water Saver:


Economical:


Knits Well:




Healthy Plants:


Scion rooting can be a serious problem using sand & carton method.

Not cumbersome like sand or messy and bothersome like wax.

One step method, do not have to remove carton and sand or place
carton and sand around graft.

No worry of sand and carton causing plant to tip over from being
top heavy.

Does not require much water and therefore potted rootstock roots
and thrives better.

Cost no more than wax (4-5 cents per graft) and less expensive
than sand and carton (8 cents per graft).

Graft union calluses over very well making a smooth union,
allowing unobstructed flow of water and nutrients from roots to
scion.

Beautiful growth and highly successful take when compared to
waxing or sand and carton.


CFREC Leesburg Research Report LBG 89-6


COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION


COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE


SCHOOL OF FOREST RESOURCES AND CONSERVATION


CENTER FOR TROPICAL AGRICULTURE


The Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences Is an Equal Employment Opportunity Affirmative Action Employer authorized to provide research, educational
Information and other services only to individuals and institutions that function without regard to race, color, sex, age, handicap or national origin.


34748










Step by Step Instructions


1. Make cuttings the last week of December through the first two weeks of January.
a. Rootstock Cuttings: Cut two buds long (6" or more) leaving as much of the
cutting as possible between 2nd bud and 3rd bud without leaving third bud on
cutting. Make a smooth cut just under bottom bud.


-- > Room for grafting above top bud

cut here cut here
( Finished )
(rootstock cutting)
To bs Square off at bottom here just
Two buds left--* el
below bud
b. Scion Cuttings: Make two-bud cuttings. When making scion cuttings, cut between
buds leaving more space below bottom bud than above top bud on the scion.

--Shorter space left at top


there cut here(Finished scion cutting)
cut here cut here

> Longer space left at bottom


2. Place cuttings in callus pit immediately to keep from drying out. Callus pits are
made by digging a hole 2 to 2.5 ft. deep. Layer bottom of hole with white or
yellowish-brown builders sand. Place cuttings on sand and cover over with sand. Lay
next layer of cuttings on the top of sand then cover over with another layer of sand.
This continues until hole is full. The hole should be no deeper than 2 1/2 feet
below ground level. Dig separate holes for different cultivars to keep cuttings from
mixing up with one another.

3. Keep callus pit moist for the duration of cutting storage.

4. Take cuttings out of callus pits (Jan. or Feb.)
Note: Take out just enough to stay busy for a half day at a time.

5. Wash off cuttings to prevent any foreign particles from hampering the graft union
later.

6. Rootstocks
a. Cut a thin layer off the end of the upper part of the rootstock. Cut off just
enough to expose fresh green layer (about 1/4 inch). This can be done with
pruning shears.





Bottom Cut here at top of cutting


-2-










b. After this is done use pruning shears to make a split from the top of the
rootstock down through the center of the cutting (about 3/4" 1" long).



i -.---- Split here with pruning shears



7. Scions
a. Using grafting tool or pocket knife cut to form a wedge shaped bottom of the
scion just below bottom bud.





Cut both sides here (Finished wedge cut)



b. Place scions in bucket of water to keep from drying out.

8. Slip scion into split in rootstock aligning one side of scion with one side of
rootstock so that they are flush, and so the cambium layers match (cambium layer is
bright green tissue beneath bark).


I-- Scion


Join here

Rootstock


S(Finished Step 8)


9. Wrap plastic budding or tying tape tightly around graft union being careful not to
cover bottom bud of scion.





_----Wrap tape here






10. Graft is finished. Return to callus pit.

11. Remove grafts from callus pits (Mid-March to April 1).










12. Disbud rootstock at this point. Slice off smoothly all buds from rootstock only
using sharp knife. Cut just deep enough to expose outer layer of xylem (white tissue
inside the green cambium layer).


Save these two buds





Remove these two buds


13. Leave tape around graft union.

14. Slice Oasis blocks in two and place in water a few minutes ahead of planting,
allowing time to soak up water. Take two halves of the Oasis blocks and make a
sandwich by placing them on each side of the graft union just over the top of the
bottom bud on the scion and gently squeeze together to close the gaps between two
halves of Oasis block.




-Place Oasis block here






15. Tie plastic tape moderately tight around Oasis block halves.


16. Plant bench grafts singly into 1-gallon container with medium of your
sure Oasis block is entirely above soil level in pot.


choice, making


17. Oasis blocks should be watered daily but for very short time period. 2-5 minutes
should suffice for the entire day (overhead sprinklers). If watering by hand, water
just long enough to wet Oasis block. Don't over do it! You can't over water Oasis
blocks but you can overwater pots to the point of saturation and therefore not allow
roots to develop resulting in lower % of takes.

18. Remove Oasis blocks once plants reach a height of 2' (June 1). This is done by
snipping tape with pruning shears or knife. Oasis blocks fall readily to pot where
they can be left if desired.

19. Do not remove tape around graft union until plant is safely planted in vineyard.
Removal can be done with sharp knife (June 1 to December or after).









HISTORIC NOTE


The publications in this collection do
not reflect current scientific knowledge
or recommendations. These texts
represent the historic publishing
record of the Institute for Food and
Agricultural Sciences and should be
used only to trace the historic work of
the Institute and its staff. Current IFAS
research may be found on the
Electronic Data Information Source
(EDIS)

site maintained by the Florida
Cooperative Extension Service.






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