<%BANNER%>

University record

University of Florida Institutional Repository
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00633

Material Information

Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city, Fla
Publication Date: 1906-
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: quarterly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026
System ID: UF00075594:00633

Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00633

Material Information

Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city, Fla
Publication Date: 1906-
Copyright Date: 2009
Frequency: quarterly
regular

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: serial   ( sobekcm )
government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.

Record Information

Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026
System ID: UF00075594:00633

Full Text
In____~ ~ _~il___


University Record

Vol. II AUGUST, 1907 No. 3
Published quarterly by the University of the State of Florida
Gainesville, Florida


General Information


Farmers' Institutes



GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA
Entered, September 6, 1906, at the Pos;:office at Gainesville, Florida, as second-class
matter, under Act of Congress, July 16, 1906


C .


Thomas Hall











General Information

This issue of the Record is designed to furnish detailed information
concerning the University and its work which cannot readily be found
elsewhere. Especial attention is called to the Comparative Statistics set
forth in Section II, showing the rank of the institution among similar institu-
tions in our section, and the comparative cost of attending the several in-
stitutions compared. Attention is also directed to Section V, which sets
forth plans for the work of the Farmers' Institutes.
It is hardly possible that so minute and detailed a statement will be
entirely free from errors; but it is believed that errors, if there be any, are
few and slight, and in no case sufficient to impeach any general statement,
or invalidate any general conclusion.


1. General Plan of Grounds and Buildings

On the following page is a general plan of the campus, with the
number and arrangement of buildings already erected and to be erected ir:
the course of the development of the institution. It will be observed that'
the Board of Control, enjoying the rather unusual privilege of ample i
grounds, free from previous buildings, has laid out a large and systematic\
plan for all possible needs and growth for many years to come. It is not
expected that this plan will be fully realized at any definite or early date.
But faith in the development of the State and of the State University looks
forward to coming generations, and builds not merely for today and today's
needs, but for the future with its larger needs and numbers. It may take
a hundred years for the completion of these plans; but as the State grows
and new educational needs arise, a place is ready in these plans, and the
University will finally grow into a splendid and harmonious whole, worthy
of the greatness of the State which sustains it.
Two buildings, Nos. 35 and 44 on the plan, have already been erect-
ed. No. 35 has been named Buckman Hall, after Senator HI. H. Buck-
man, the author of the Bill by which the institution was created; and No.
44 has been named Thomas Hall. after Mavor W. R. Thomas. of the city
of Giainesville. A photograph of Thomas Hall on the cover of this Record
and Buckman H~-all on page 4, show the external appearance of these twvo
buildings. Both buildings are intended ultimately for dormitories; but
Thomas H~all is being used at present for lecture rooms and laboratories
and other similar purposes. Buckman Fjall is arranged in modern and ex-
cellent fashion for dormitory purposes. It is built in five blocks, separated
by fire walls. It is three stories high, heated by steam and lighted by

























































UNIVERSITY OF THE STATE OF FLORIDA NOW IN COURSE OF
CONSTRUCTION~ AT CAI\NESIVILLE.
EXPLANATION OF DIAGRAM--Curved lines mark boundaries of walks and
driveways, Nos. 1 to 9 inclusive are residences for Faculty, 10 Medicine and Phar-
macy, 11 Chapel, 12 Law, 13 Philosophy, 14 Museum, 15 History and Economics, 16
School of Mines, 17 Engineering and Architecture, 18 NTormal School, 19 Library,
20 Languages, 21 Administration, 22 Mechanic Arts, 23 Electrical Engineering,
24 Agricultitre, 26 Chemistry and Physics, 27 Science, 28 Infirmary, 29 Power
House, 30 Horticulture, 31 Biology, 32 Y. M. C. A., 33 Experimental Station, 34, 35
Dormitories, 36 Fraternal Home, 37 Literary Society, 38 Dining Hall, 39 Dormitory,
40 Fraternal Home, 41 Literary Society, 42 Dormitory, 43 Tennis Court, 44 Dormi-
tory, 45 Gymnasium, 46 Dormitory, 47 Athletic Field.







electricity. Each inner block affords accommodations for 24 students,
while the end sections each accommodate 12 students. Each suite con-
sists of one or two bedrooms, and a study hall, so that the sleeping and
studying apartments of the students are separate. Each section of the
building has its bathroom and closet.
In addition to these two buildings, a one-story machine shop has
been built on the site of the electrical engineering building (No. 23).
This building is equipped for forge and wood and metal work, but the
drawing and recitation rooms for this department are in Thomas Hall.
The liberality of the last Legislature provided for three additional
buildings, a Science Hall (No. 27), an Engineering Hall (No. 23), an
Agricultural Hall (No. 24 or 33). It has not yet been possible to begin
work on these buildings, though it is expected that Science Hall will be




















Buckman Hall

completed in time for the beginning of next year's work; and Agricultural
Hall and Engineering Hall will be completed by the opening of the fol-
lowing year.
Tentative plans for Science Hall have been submitted, and an outline
of them is given on another page. This building, completed and
equipped, will cost about $50,000.00, and will compare favorably with any

of the University except Agriculture, Botany and Horticulture, which will
be located in A~;- irk uhril Hall, and Civil, Mechanical and Electrical Engi-
neering, which will be located in Engineering Hall.
As fast as these buildings are completed and made habitable, recita-
tion rooms, laboratories, etc., will be moved from Thomas H~all, and it will
be completed as a dormitory.








































A Corner in the Machine Sho0p



















r .1)s to '
. t












earr






The Blacksmith Shop








Tentative Plan for Science Hall














Second Floor
On the right are offices, lecture rooms, laboratories, for Geology and Mineral-
agy; and the Museum. On the left are a number of general recitation rooms for
various departments; all of which later will be equipped for the Department of
Biology.














First Floor
On the right are offices, stock rooms, lecture rooms and laboratories for the
Department of P'hysics. On the left, the same for Chemistry.














Ground Floor
On the right rear are stock rooms and testing laboratories for Physics; right
front, for Geology and Mineralogy. On the left front are stock rooms and labora-
tories for Pathogenic Bacteriology, with additional stock rooms for other depr-t-
ments; left rear, for other Zoological work, with additional stock rooms.


































The Gymnasium--Third Floor in Buckman Hall


Laboratory for Advanced Chemistry






II. Standing of the University, Comparative

Statistics

The University of the State of Florida offers the students of the State
an education that will compare favorably, both in extent and thoroughness,
with that offered by other state and private institutions in our section of the
country. These facts will be made plain by the comparative tables which
follow, and which set forth conditions in Stetson University, Washington
and Lee University, Emory College, and the State Universities of Georgia,
Alabama, Mississippi, and Louisiana, in comparison with conditions in the
University of our own State.
The First Table deals with the Requirements for Entrance and Gradu-
ation in the several institutions compared. Both of these requirements en-
ter into the determination of the grade and value of the work of an insti-
tution. The student's starting point (the Entrance Requirements) plus
the amount of work he is required to do during the four years of his col-
lege course (the Graduation Requirements) gives the total rough value of
his college training. In the matter of the Entrance Requirements it will
be seen that Plorida stands third on the list, with Stetson first, Georgia
second (one point ahead of Florida), and Alabama, Emory, Louisiana,
Mississippi, and Washington and Lee following in the order named. In
the Graduation Requirements Florida stands first of all the institutions
named, and in all courses, except the Scientific B. S., in which she stands
third, Emory (76), Louisiana (74), Florida (72).
The Second Table shows the number and variety of college courses
offered each year by the several institutions. This table indicates, first,
that the University of the State of Florida offers a greater variety of col-
lege courses than any of the institutions with which it is here compared;
second, that it holds first place in more courses than any other institution
in the group (in fact, it holds first place, ties with first, and second place,
in twenty-two courses out of the total of thirty-two enumerated in the table);
and, third, that it offers by far the largest number of hours of college work
of any of the institutions considered. (The figures in this table in the
case of Stetson University are not given for Electrical Engineering or for
Shop Work, and are subject to question and possible correction in Civil
and Mechanical Engineering, because of lack of definite information in the
latest catalogue of that institution). -- 1~-
The UIvezrrsity o, thle State of Roai da provides fthese excellent educational
opportunities at unusually low rates to the students. A study of Table III will
demonstrate this fact.
Should a Florida student live at home or board outside of the dor~mi-
tories while attending the State University his University expense would
amount to $b5.00 for the year, while, if he attended the other institutions






his University expenses would be in Mississippi, $s17.50; in Alabama,
$67.00; in Georgia, $7?0.50; at Stetson, $b85.10; in L~ouisiana, $85.50; at
Washington and Lee, $87.50; and at Emory, $91.00. This is the stand-
ard for Florida, and the minimum for the other schools.
Should this Florida student board in the dormitory his expenses for
board and tuition at the University of the State of Florida would be
$b125.00; while they would vary in other institutions from $b132.50 in Mis-
sissippi to $b208.10 in Stetson and $6221.00 in Washington and Lee.
Hence, combining the facts and fires of Tables I, II and III, it will
be seen that a Florida student can get as good an education, perhaps bet-
ter, at lower rates in his own State University than in any of the other in-
stitutions under consideration.


III. Attendance

Tables IV and V present statistics of attendance; and need only a
word of remark. In Table IV it will be observed, first, that the proportion
of men college students to the population of the State is less in Florida
than in the other and older institutions in other States (which is natural;
and the disparity is not so great as would be expected), but is considerably
greater than in the case of Stetson University; and second, that Florida is
the only State in which the State University has a larger number of men
college students than two other leading institutions of the State combined.
In Table V it is to be observed that while the present University
seems to have fewer men college students than some of the institutions
abolished by the Buckman Bill, the difference in the grades of the institu-
tions will more than account for the apparent difference in attendance.
Thus the present University has sixty men college students, while the old
University is credited with 87, the old East Florida Seminary with 77, and
the old Florida State College wcith some part, probably about one-half or a
little less, of 120. The best information available indicates that less than
60 from the former University and from the former Florida State College,
and about 30 from the former East Florida Seminary, would now be classi-
fied as "college students." In other words, the new University, after only
two most strenuous years, has nearly as many men college students in
actual numbers as any of the abolished schools; and has more than any of
them, if the change in grade be taken into account.
~-- ,...- These figures are highly encouraging; and promise wipell for the growth
and enlargement of the University. Indeed, the beginnings of the new`~
institution, despite many difficulties and drawbacks, offer the people of the
State just ground for encouragement and hope; and justify the authorities
at once in commending the institution to favorable attention and in ex-
pecting the cordial support of all patrons of education in their efforts to-
bring this great enterprise to a worthy issue.





TABLE 1.--REQUIREIVENTS FOR ENTRANCE AND GRADUATION

A. Entrance Requirements--Number of hours* required in different subjects for entrance into the Freshman Class.

Washington
SUBJECTS Florida Stetson E'mory Georgia Alabama Mississippi Louisiana
and Lee

English _.~.~ ~ ~.~~ 15 15 15 14 15 15 15 15
Mathematics _._. ~ ~~ 15 20 8 11 13 11 18 15
H-istory ~.. ~ ~ 10 5 5 10 10 5 10 or 5
Latin __ ~ ___ ~ 15 20 16 or 13 13 15 15 15
Science _...~. __. -... 5 Or 10 5 O
Greek __. _~.._ _---~~-/.~- --./ 10 (A.B.) I.____ 6 (A. B.) 5 (A. B.) 7 (A. B.)
TOTALS ___~____~~ 45-55 80 28-39 48-54 56 53 40-43 50


B. Graduation Requirements--Number of hours* required for graduation in the different courses.


70 62
72 62
79 - - -
84 62
78 62

* "Hour" means an hour's


55 68 66 64
64 76 66 68

60 i____ l 74 72


class work per week throughout the year.


Literary--A. B. ..~_~
Scientific--B. S.
Agriculture--B. S
Engineering--B. Sj. ~~
Pedagogy--A. B.













9
24
224
71-
9
7%
12
12
3
6
12
6
3
0
16
13-!
27
9
12
2
9
79
9
7Q
15


Hours
0
2
0
2
18
20
3
6
0
15
6
10
6
8
11
0
0
13
14
34!
191
51
0
6
10
6
0
9


Hours
0
3
0
6
22
6
2
12
11
15
10
9
10
16
19
0
0
14
14
18
9
0
0
5
9
2
0
12

Rhetoric
230


2812r


tonie Phil. 6 /Mining 11 t
278$ 226


Alabama Mississippi Louisiana


H-ours
17#
0
3


ITe


Ith the NumDer or nours xnnually In ~acnLo


Georgia

Hours
13
3
0
4;
33 I
231
3
12
10
26*
9
li
11
12
18
6
3
12
21
6
5
SO
2
9
17
6
0
11
*Includes Teu-


Florida

Hours
19
3
4
15%
24#
23
3
20
10
18
14
10
19
10
18
9
3
13
26
20
12
16
1
12
14
8
0
11


356


Washington
and Lee
Hours
0
3
0
6

20
8
0
0
17
6
6
6
11
20
0
0
11
11
0
0
0
0
9
13
3
0
3


174}


Emory

Hours
0
3

11
9
3
3


12
6
0
6
15




15

6


6
6
3
0
6
Bible 4
ChurchGov.3
134%


Agriculture _-. ~~~~-- -
Astronomy__~. ~~~~..
Bacteriology_ ~ ~~~-~-
Botany__~_~..~ ~~~. -
Chemistry ~~.. ~ ~---
Civil Engineering_ ~~~ ~~
Economics 1.~-----
Education ___.~~ ~- ~
Electrical Engineering _~.~.
English ____~~~~~. ~
French ~~~.~~~~-- -
Geology ~~.~~~~.-
German __.~~
Greek _~_~___ _~~~~
History and Political Science_ ~~~
Horticulture.~_~ ~~~~~-
Italian ___.~. ~~~.~
Latin __~_~ ~~ .~.~~
Mathematics _._~~~~.~
Mechanical Engineering_ ___

b. Shop work___ _~__
Military Science_ ~
Philosophy__~__ .~~~.
Physics .. ___. __-~~~ ~ ~
Spanish ___ __~~. ~~
Veterinary Science_ ~ ~
Zoology .~ ~~~~~~~~


Totals_ S ~~~~~~~~


Stetson

Hours
0
1
11
20
181
61
15
15
5
15
10
15
0
0
10
15



0
10
10
0
0
6j


201)





TAE3LE III.- EXPENSES F"OR TI--E YEAR


Emory

$ .00
60.00
5.00
5.00
5.00

2.00
2.00


2.00
10.00
$91.00



$690.00}


Washington
and Lee

$5.00
50.00
2.50-10
5.00
5.00




25.00
Cost
$8 ...


A. University Expenses


Florida

$5.00
Free*
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
F'ree
Free
Cost
Free
$5.00



$F120.00


Stetson


Georgia

$10.00
Free*
2.50-15
3.00
2.50-3.50

5.00



Cost






$b95.50f


Alabama

$9.00
Free*
9.00-15
9.00
6.00
3.00
3.00
3.00
6.00

3.00
5.00





$s126.00


Mississippi Louisiana


Registration _~~~._~ ~ ~~
Tuition. __... ~. ~ ~~
Chemistry ____
,,,,, ( Physics ~____~
SMineralogy _,_.

Gymnasium _ .~~~.~ __~
Medical__ .. ~~~~~_~_
Incidental ____ ______
Damage .. ~.. ~ ______
Diploma.__.~~____ .. ~
Total: With Chemristry and Physics .~

B. Living Expenses
Board, includinT fuel, light and
furnishedroom.____ ___~


1. Grand Total brithin the State .
2. " ~outside the State _


$ 10.00
Free
"Small"





5.00

2.50


$17.50


Free*
10.00-15
2.50-5.00
2.50-10



8.00

5.00

3235.0500-


72.60
7.50-15


7.50




Cost
5.00


$115.50-


$b126.00


Other living expenses, such as cl?:.thnc, laur-iry, t..:l:k, jndl prs.r:nl .1 exensulrer, j; they i ary b.:.th w th
the individual and locality, cannot be dethnitely determined, and will be treated as a constant quantity.


$125.00 $20.60 $213.50-221 $181.00 $116-128.50 $317 $120 1325.
$145.00 20.0Do Do 166 -178.50 193-199 Do 150

* $20 00 to *$50 to stu- *2 osu900
Students thlinimum. t Minimum. dents from *20osu-$6tos-
from other Room partial- Room pata-other States dents from I dents from
States Ily furnished I ly furnished t Minimum other Statesr Iter States


$115.00 $ 102.00


I


I










TABLE IV. -ATTENDANCE


Florida
(1907)
104
60
60
57
15
3


.000178



.53

.25
Rollins 12
Stetson 41
Florida 60
Total 113


Stetson
(1907)
484
92
41
31
18
10


.000122



.36

.44


Emory
(1905-6)
292
247
247
217
25
30


.000193



.30


Georgia
(1906)
408
348
348
334
47
14


.000271



.42

.13


Alabama
(1906)
491
279
224
21'8
54
6


.000206



.26

.24
Southern 144
Polyt'h'c. 501
Alabama 224
Total, 869


Mississippi
(1906)
361
303
238
227
34
11


.000343


Louisiana
(1907)
549
413
393
355
39
38


.000492


1. Total attendanc3e-_ __..
2. College studem:;to*____ _
3. Men college students_. _
a. From horne state _
b. From hjome county __
c. From o her states_ .
4. Poporion a en college
dents to ite population
of ta e _. ~ ._ .
5. Proportion of men college stu
dents to tot 31 number of me
college stu jents in three lead
ing institute ns in the state _
6. Proportion oit men college stu-(
dents from ome county .

*Does not include Normal or Profes- i


Washington
and90Lee

371
296
296
138
37
158


.000236



.22



Iirginia 45 1
1olyt'h'c. 61 1
." & L. 29 /
STotal, 13 4


.24 .51

.14 .10
Millsaps 132iTulane 289
A. & M. 620 Jefferson 92
Miss.~ 238 Louisiana393
-Total, 9901 Total, 774


.10
Georgia
Mercer
Emory
Total,


sional students
**Estimated for 15
ucation.


05 by Bureau of Ed-




















17 6
J 120 110 ?
S(not separated) 1
12 12*
18** 36**"
35***" 28***
15 36
16 17

From catalogue 1903-1904, with
announcements 1904-1905.
*All included elsewhere.
**All but six included elsewhere.
***All but one included else-
where.


T~AEBLE V.--ATTEN DANCE. Corrparison vvith the Old Order.


Present
Womean s

Women Only
204
200
68
132

60


97**


133

From catalogue
1906-1907
*Included in
Normal.
**All but thir-
teen elsewhere
***All but two
elsewhere.


Present
University

Men Only
104
100
35
65

60
35








From catalogue
1906-1907


Former
University

Men Only
225
213
72
141
12
87
80
58







From catalogue
1904-1905


Former
Florida State College


Former
East Florida Seminary

Men Women
153 103
136 97
62 72
74 25
17 6
77 44
36 15
33 15


6 28
1 1



From catalogue 1903-1904, with
announcements 1904-1905.


Total attendance \
Florida students
1. Home couny
2. Othercones
Students from ot ler states
Total College st dents*
Preparatory Itudents
(( Commeril "
"Music and a ts
LL Oratory "
SNormal "
Unclassified "



*Does not include N rmal or
Professional students.


Men


Women


166
160
89
71







IV. Farmers' Institutes

During the ensuing two years it is expected to hold Farmers' Insti-
tutes under the auspices of the University. This has been made possible
by the last Legislature which made available $610,000.00 for the next two
years for this purpose. The United States government provides the money
for carrying on the work of the Experiment Station, but none of the Fed-
eral money is available for Farmers' Institutes. It is therefore necessary
for the State to make provision for this work if it is to be carried on.
Every state and territory in the United States, with two or three excep-
tions, Florida among them, carried on Farmers' Institutes last year.
No educational movement in recent years has had more rapid prog-
ress, and has attracted more general attention than the Farmers' Institutes
in the United States. A number of the Southern States have gone so far
as to charter special trains to carry the speakers and exhibits from place to
place. On account of the sparsity of our population and the distance be-
tween farming communities, such trains would probably not be a paying
investment for us.
The Florida farmers and fruit growers should, however, hold local meet-
ings at convenient places to discuss their successes and failures. To com-
pare notes as to how local crops should be managed, and what varieties of
certain crops are best adapted to their particular vicinity and their particular
soil. How certain crops should be cultivated, and what quantities and
kinds of fertilizers have given best results. The successful farmer or
fruit grower is a busy man and feels that he has not the time to prepare a
paper or to talk at Farmers' Institutes. He owes it, however, to his com-
munity and section to sacrifice his own interests to this extent and to come
out and be of service to his neighbors. A talk at a Farmers' Institute is no
more difficult than a talk to a neighbor.
In addition to the valuable facts that are acquired by tilling the soil
there are those that are of more fundamental nature and can be worked
out only by such persons as have the opportunity to give their whole time
to a limited and narrow subject. For instance, no farmer has the time to
apply all the different kinds of fertilizers to see which will give the best re-
turns for the money invested. The busy fruit grower has not the time,
nor can he afford the expense of trying a score or more of insecticides to
see which one is the most profiatabe to use for a certain insect pest. This
and similar work must be delegated to some one who can give all his timet~_
and attention to such problems. The University and Experiment Station
have'more than a dozen men who are specialists in the true sense of the
word. Any one of these men will gladly address farmers' meetings. Ar-
rangements for these speeches can be made through P. H. Rolfs, Superin-
Stendent of Farmers' Institutes.











IThe following diagram will indicate the proposed lines of development
!for the College Farm. The Board of Control has set aside sufficient money
;to begin this work immediately, and to carry it on throughout the year.
In all this work of development the preference will be given to students
who desire to work their way through the University, and especially to
Agricultural students who would thus gain valuable practical information
in the actual work of making a farm and at the same time earn a part of
their expenses in the University.


3Srrz
aia


Diagram of College Farm


EXPLANATION OF DIAGRAM--1 Farm Residence, 2 Green House,
3 Corn Crib and Seed H-ouse, 4 Dairy Barn, 5 Machinery first floor, Hay second
floor, 6 Tool Room, 7 Manure Shed, 8 Watering Trough, 9 Horse Barn, 10 Fer-
tilizer House, 11 Pig House, 12 Pig Lots, 13 Dairy, 14 Fruit and Vegetable Pack-
ing House, 15 Dressing Room for Bathers and Bathing Suits, 16 Pump House.
17 Pump House, 18 Chicken H-ouse, 19 Chicken Yards.


The College Farm








V. The College Farm

The authorities of the University have set aside forty acres of the finest
pine and hammock land for the development of a college farm which is to
be used exclusively for the instruction of students, and supplemented as
need may require by the farm and experiment work of the Experiment
Station. To quote from the Record of last February:
"We plan to develop this farm from the woods into a splendidly
equipped, model, PAYING farm. The students during the next four
years will have the opportunity of making the problems involved in bring-
ing this about their own problems, and they will have the entire time of
expert instructors to assist them in the solution. While students of after
years may find a beautiful farm equipped with everything that helps to
make farming a pleasurable as well as a profitable business, the students
who enter now and identify themselves with the work of building up this
farm as it progresses will be the ones who will reap the greatest benefit
from it.
"The farm is admirably adapted to vegetable growing, and we hope to
have a plant fully equipped for growing lettuce under cover and with irri-
gation in operation next winter. Cucumbers, cantaloupes, egg plant and
other vegetables will be grown on a commercial scale as soon as we can
get the ground prepared for them.
"A model farm-residence is planned, to be surrounded by a model
farmyard. This will furnish a rare opportunity for teachers interested in
the movement to teach agriculture in the public schools as well as the
general amelioration of conditions surrounding rural home life, to study the
problem of inexpensive home improvement according to the best principles
of landscape gardening, while at the same time it will give valuable sug-
gestions to the young farmer who is contemplating beginning a home for
himself. Near the residence will be a plot devoted to orchard purposes.
It is intended that this orchard be demonstrative in character, rather than
commercial, and we hope, therefore, to place in it all the varieties of Flor-
ida fruits possible to be grown in this latitude.
"The larger part of the farm will be devoted to the problem of devel-
oping a system of general farming profitable in this part of Florida. The
building of sanitary dairy barns, horse barns, silos, machinery sheds, fertil-
izer houses, dairy buildings, pig styes, chicken houses and yards, etc.,

out of roads and of fields to facilitate rotation of crops, as well kds the un-
derdraining of a considerable portion of the farm, will furnish an equal
opportunity to study farm engineering."
We expect to have all fields cleared and fenced, and the more impor-
tant of the buildings erected and in use during the next two years. Plans
are all made, and the work will be pushed as rapidly as possible.








VI. Agricultural Experiment Station.

The Florida Agricultural Experiment Station was founded in 1888.
Since then Congress has appropriated $b15,000.00 annually for its support.
This amount was increased to $20,000.00 in 1905. From that time the
fund will be increased by $b2,000.00 a year until the amount shall be
$b30,000.00. Broadly speaking, this money is given to the State of Flor-
ida for the increasing and disseminating of valuable information in Agri-
culture. While Congress has made us a present of this handsome sum,
it has, however, limited its expenditure. None of it can be used for the
purchase of land. The amount that may be spent for building purposes is
only sufficient to keep the buildings and fences in repair. Expenses for
extension work, such as Farmers' Institutes and reading courses, cannot be
charged to it. From this it will be seen that the United States expects
Florida to provide suitable laboratories, farms and farm buildings, and also
to provide the funds necessary for the popularizing of the investigations
carried on by the Experiment Station.
The work of the Station has been somewhat varied during the nine-
teen years of its existence. Eighty-nine bulletins, eighteen annual reports,
and sixty-five press bulletins have been published; all distributed free on
application. Naturally, some bulletins have proven more popular than oth-
ers. The bulletin on tomato diseases has gone through two editions, and
is now exhausted. The bulletin on pecan culture had a demand largely in
excess of its supply. Other bulletins have been in equally strong demand.
In addition to the bulletins prepared and published by the Staff, numerous
lectures have been delivered to Farmers' Institutes and to horticultural so-
cieties in the State.
In carrying out the work of the Station much help of the most valu-
able kind has been received from farmers and fruit growers of the State.
The most helpful has been along the line of co-operative experiments.
Fields of this kind have been located in twelve different counties. In this
work the expenses are borne jointly by the farmer and the Stationl. The
Station gets the full benefits of having the experiment tested by a
thorough, up-to-date farmer or fruit grower, and the co-operator has the
advantage of being the first man to be benefited by the facts obtained.
The results of experiments are published in bulletin form, and are
distributed free: to all farmers and fruit growers of the; Stare wrho _may applyv
tr- _.for thern Those who desire to receive regularly all the publicati~ons of the
Station will be put upon the general mailing list, and those who desire only
bulletins on some particular subject will receive the same upon request.
The Officers of the Station will be glad also to have special problems and
difficulties brought to their attention, and will endeavor to help in their
solution. Applications should be sent to the Director of the Experiment
Station.









Teachers and others interested are again reminded that the Univer-
sity maintains extension work under which courses of free lectures will be
delivered to any High School in the State desiring them, and reading circles
will be organized and conducted without charge in any school or community
requesting them. This system tenders the services of the University to all
the people of the State, and it is earnestly desired that many schools and
communities will take advantage of it.
The Lecture Bureau will arrange to have the President and various
members of the Faculty of the University visit the various public schools of
the State and give them either general or special lectures on general edu-
cational themes and on the more technical subjects connected with the
work in which the several professors are actively engaged. Take, for exam-
ple, the subject of Education, or of English. The Professor of Pedagogy or
the Professor of English will visit one of our public schools once or more
during the year, as the case may demand or circumstances may justify, and
will give lectures to the teachers and students and the general public on
certain phases of their respective subjects. By this means it is believed
that local school life would be quickened; the interest in that school would
be stirred, and hence in all schools; and the University would again come
into intimate and immediate touch with the life of the school and of the
people, and would thus more fully serve the people as a public institution.
The Literary Bureau will arrange and direct courses of reading for the
teachers of the State especially, and for others who may want to take advan-
tage of its services. It will outline courses of reading on special subjects,
such as History, Economics, English, etc.; will indicate the best books to
be read; will direct the reading, and help the reader in any problem or dif-
ficulty. This Bureau will also, so far as possible and consistent with the
best interests involved, send out from the University Libraries, to ~school
reading circles only, such books and magazines as can be obtained on the
subject in hand. The University Committee on University Extension will
consist of Professors W. F. Yocum, J. N. Anderson, J. M. Farr, E. R.
Flint, Karl Schmidt, D. Y. Thomas. County Superintendents, Principals
of Schools, and others interested in the work of this Committee, are re--
quested to communicate with the Chairman of the Committee during the
school term, or with the President of the University during the vacation,
stating in what feature of the work they are most interested. They will
then? receive mogje detailed and explicit information concerning that partic-
ular phase of the Committee's activity. -
There will be no charge for the services of this Committee, z-epti us
necessary expenses for postage and transportation.
For information concerning this and all other general work of the
University communications should be addressed to the President.


VII. University Extension

































































































































































An --* --


P


i