• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Cover
 Commitment to diversity
 Academic calendar
 Graduate school
 Graduate degrees and programs
 Admission to the graduate...
 General regulations
 Financial information and...
 Financial assistance
 Research and teaching services
 Interdisciplinary research...
 Student services
 Administration
 Fields of instruction














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00630
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city, Fla
Publication Date: 2008
Copyright Date: 2008
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00630
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Cover
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Commitment to diversity
        Page 3
    Academic calendar
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
    Graduate school
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
    Graduate degrees and programs
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
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    Admission to the graduate school
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
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        Page 81
        Page 82
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        Page 88
    General regulations
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
    Financial information and requirements
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
    Financial assistance
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
    Research and teaching services
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
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        Page 133
        Page 134
        Page 135
    Interdisciplinary research centers
        Page 136
        Page 137
    Student services
        Page 138
        Page 139
        Page 140
        Page 141
        Page 142
        Page 143
        Page 144
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    Administration
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
        Page 158
        Page 159
        Page 160
        Page 161
    Fields of instruction
        Page 162
        Page 163
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Full Text
file:///N I/Administration/current-catalog/catalog-text/catalog-coverpage.html


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Publication Policy


Accreditation

The University of Florida is accredited by the Commission on Colleges of the
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award the degrees of bachelor, master,


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specialist, and engineer, as well as doctoral and professional degrees. It has 16 colleges and
more than 150 interdisciplinary research and education centers, bureaus, and institutes. One
hundred undergraduate degree programs are offered and the Graduate School coordinates
more than 200 graduate programs throughout the University's colleges and schools.
Professional postbaccalaureate degrees are offered in dentistry, law, medicine, pharmacy,
public health, and veterinary medicine.

(1866 Southern Lane, Decatur,
Georgia 30033-4097; telephone
(404) 679-4501)


Equal Opportunity

The University encourages applications from qualified applicants of both sexes from all
cultural, racial, religious, and ethnic groups. UF is committed to nondiscrimination with respect
to race, creed, religion, age, disability, color, sex, sexual orientation, marital status, national
origin, political opinions or affiliations, or veteran status in the administration of educational
policies, financial aid, employment, or in any program or activity. Refer to the Office of Equal
Opportunity Programs within UF's Human Resources Services for additional information; 352-
392-1075.

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COMMITMENT TO DIVERSITY

The University of Florida is committed to creating a community that reflects the rich racial,
cultural and ethnic diversity of the state and nation. No challenge that exists in higher
education has greater importance than the challenge of enrolling students and hiring faculty
and staff who are members of diverse racial, cultural or ethnic minority groups. This pluralism
enriches the university community, offers opportunity for robust academic dialogue and
contributes to better teaching and research. The university and its components benefit from
the richness of a multicultural student body, faculty and staff who can learn from one another.
Such diversity will empower and inspire respect and understanding among us. The university
does not tolerate the actions of anyone who violates the rights of another person.

Through policy and practice, the university strives to embody a diverse community. Our
collective efforts will lead to a university that is truly diverse and reflects the state and nation.

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ACADEMIC CALENDAR

The information in this catalog is current as of May 2008. Please contact individual
programs for any additional information or changes.

Fall 2008

Fall 2008 degree application (ISIS online): opens July 7, closes September 19.

Fall 2008 late degree application (paper) will be accepted September 22 October 16
(106 Grinter).

August 8, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Deadline if requesting transfer of credit (for Fall degree candidates)

August 21-22, Thursday-Friday, 11:59 p.m. of last day
Registration

August 25, Monday
Classes start.
Drop/add starts.
Late registration starts (late fee assessed).

August 29, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Drop/add ends.
Late Registration ends (late fee assessed).
Deadline to withdraw with no fee liability.

September 1, Monday, Labor Day
No classes.

September 5, Friday, 3:30 p.m.
Fee payment deadline.
Tuition waiver established
Residency reclassification deadline for receiving the request and all documents.

September 12, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Deadline for S/U Option Forms

September 19, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Deadline to withdraw with 25% refund (W symbol assigned).
Degree ISIS online application deadline for Fall 2008 degree award this term.

October 13 Monday, 5:00 p.m.
Dissertation first submission to Graduate School Editorial Office (160 Grinter) for
review
http://gradschool.ufl.edu/pdf-files/checklist-dissertation.pdf
Spring 2009 degree application (ISIS online) opens.

October 16, Thursday
Midpoint of term for completing doctoral qualifying examination.
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Deadline to change from thesis to non-thesis
Deadline to submit request for transfer of credit for Fall 2008 degree
Deadline to add/change supervisory committee
Late degree paper application deadline (106 Grinter) for Fall 2008 degree award

October 24-25, Friday Saturday, Homecoming*
No classes. *Tentative date.

November 3, Monday, 5:00 p.m.
Thesis first submission (defended, signed, formatted, on paper) to Editorial (160
Grinter) for review.
http://gradschool.ufl.edu/pdf-files/checklist-thesis.pdf
Abstracts deadline for Fine Arts' performance and project option (Editorial, 160
Grinter)

November 11, Tuesday, Veterans Day
No classes.

November 27-28, Thursday-Friday, Thanksgiving
No classes.

December 2, Tuesday, 5:00 p.m.
Final exam form deadline (Editorial, 160 Grinter) for dissertation or thesis degree
award.
Final exam form deadline (Records, 106 Grinter) for nonthesis degree award.
Final submission of thesis or dissertation.
Deadline for "Final Clearance" status in the Editorial Document Management (EDM)
system, to qualify for degree award this term.

December 10, Wednesday
Classes end.

Deadline if requesting transfer of credit for Spring 2009 degree candidates

December 11-12, Thursday-Friday
Examination reading days (no classes).

December 13, Saturday, 15-19, Monday-Thursday
Final examinations.

December 19, Friday
Last day to drop a course and receive W on transcript.

December 19-20, Friday-Saturday
Commencement.+

December 22, Monday, 12:00 noon
All grades for Fall 2008 must be in the Registrar's office.

December 23, Tuesday
Grades posted on ISIS in evening
Degree certification.

Spring 2009


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Spring 2009 degree application (ISIS online): opens October 13, 2008, closes January
30, 2009.

Spring 2009 late degree application (paper) will be accepted February 2 March 5,
2009 (106 Grinter).

December 10, Wednesday
Deadline if requesting transfer of credit for Spring 2009 degree candidates

January 5, Monday, 5:00 p.m.
Registration

January 6, Tuesday
Classes start.
Drop/add starts.
Late registration starts (late fee assessed).

January 12, Monday, 5:00 p.m.
Drop/add ends.
Late Registration ends (late fee assessed).
Deadline to withdraw with no fee liability.

January 16, Friday, 3:30 p.m.
Fee payment deadline.
Tuition waiver established
Residency reclassification deadline for receiving requests and all documents.

January 19, Monday, Martin Luther King Jr. Day
No classes.

January 23, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Deadline for S/U Option Forms

January 30, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Degree ISIS online application deadline for Spring 2009 degree award this term.
Deadline to withdraw with 25% refund (W symbol assigned).

March 2, Monday, 5:00 p.m.
Dissertation first submission to Graduate School Editorial Office (160 Grinter) for
review. For checklist:
http://gradschool.ufl.edu/pdf-files/checklist-dissertation.pdf

March 5, Thursday
Midpoint of term for completing doctoral qualifying examinations.
Deadline to change from thesis to non-thesis
Deadline to submit request for transfer of credit for Spring 2009 degree
Deadline to add/change supervisory committee
Late degree application (paper) deadline (106 Grinter) for Spring 2009 degree award

March 7-15, Saturday-Sunday, Spring Break
No classes.

March 16, Monday
Summer 2009 (all sessions) degree application (ISIS online) opens.


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March 30, Monday, 5:00 p.m.
Abstracts deadline for Fine Arts' performance and project option (Editorial, 160
Grinter).
Thesis first submission (defended, signed, formatted, on paper) to Editorial (160
Grinter) for review:
http://gradschool.ufl.edu/pdf-files/checklist-thesis.pdf

April 20, Monday, 5:00 p.m.
Final exam form deadline (Editorial, 160 Grinter) for dissertation or thesis degree
award.
Final exam form deadline (Records, 106 Grinter) for nonthesis degree award.
Final submission of thesis or dissertation.
Deadline for "Final Clearance" status in the Editorial Document Management (EDM)
system, to qualify for degree award this term.

April 22, Wednesday
Classes end.

April 23-24, Thursday-Friday
Examination reading days (no classes).

April 25, 27-30-May 1, Saturday-Friday
Final examinations.

April 30 and May 1-3, Thursday-Sunday
Commencement+

May 1, Friday
Last day to drop a course and receive W on transcript.

May 4, Monday, 12:00 noon
All grades for Spring 2009 must be in the Registrar's office.

May 5, Tuesday
Grades posted on ISIS in evening
Degree certification.

Summer 2009

All Summer 2009 degrees will be awarded at the end of Summer C.
All applicants should select B/C file on the ISIS screen.
Summer 2009 degree application (ISIS online) for Summer A, Summer C, Summer A/
C, or Summer B/C enrollment: opens March 16, closes May 13.
Summer 2009 degree application (ISIS online) for only Summer B enrollment: opens
March 16, closes July 1.

Late degree application (ISIS online) deadline for Summer 2009 degree award if
enrolled Summer A, Summer C, Summer A/C, or Summer B/C will be accepted May
14 June 29.

Late degree application (ISIS online) deadline for Summer 2009 degree award if
enrolled Summer B only (no registration Summer A or Summer C) will be accepted
June 26 July 1.


April 22, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.


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Deadline if requesting transfer of credit for Summer 2009 degree candidates

May 8, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Summer A & C registration

May 11, Monday, 5:00 p.m.
Summer A & C classes start.
Summer A & C drop/add starts.
Summer A & C late registration starts (late fee assessed).

May 12, Tuesday, 5:00 p.m.
Summer A & C late registration ends (late fee assessed).
Summer A & C drop/add ends.
Summer A & C deadline to withdraw with no fee liability.

May 13, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.
Summer A, Summer C, Summer A/C, or Summer B/C (no registration only Summer
B): Summer 2009 degree application (ISIS online) deadline Degree award end of
Summer C

May 20, Wednesday
Deadline for S/U Option for Summer A
Summer A deadline to withdraw with 25% refund (W symbol assigned).

May 22, Friday, 3:30 p.m.
Summer A & C fee payment deadline.
Summer A & C tuition waivers established.
Summer A & C residency reclassification deadline for receiving the request and all
documents.

May 25, Monday, Memorial Day observed
No classes.

May 29,Friday 5.00 pm
Deadline for S/U Option for Summer C

June 19, Friday
Summer A classes end.
Summer A final examinations during regular class periods.
Last day to drop a course for Summer A and receive W on transcript.

June 22, Monday, 9:00 a.m.
All grades for Summer A must be in the Registrar's office.

June 22-26, Monday-Friday, Summer Break
No classes

June 26, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Summer B registration.
Summer B only (no registration Summer A of Summer C): Summer 2009 degree ISIS
online application open until July 1

June 29, Monday, 5:00 p.m.
Summer B classes start.
Summer B drop/add starts.
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Summer B late registration starts (late fee assessed).
Midpoint of Summer term.
Late degree application (ISIS online) deadline for Summer 2009 degree award if
enrolled Summer A, Summer C, Summer A/C, or Summer B/C.
Last day to add/change supervisory committee
Last day to change from thesis to non-thesis
Last day to submit request for transfer of credit for Summer 2009 degree
Dissertation first submission to Graduate School Editorial Office (160 Grinter) for
review:
http://gradschool.ufl.edu/pdf-files/checklist-dissertation.pdf
Summer C deadline to withdraw with 25% refund (W symbol assigned)

June 30, Tuesday, 11:59 p.m.
Summer B drop/add ends.
Summer B late registration ends (late fee assessed).
Summer B deadline to withdraw with no fee liability.

July 1, Wednesday
Late degree application (ISIS online) deadline for Summer 2009 degree award if
enrolled Summer B only (no registration Summer A or Summer C).

July 3, Friday,Independence Day observed
No classes.

July 8, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.
Deadline for S/U Option for Summer B
Summer B deadline to withdraw with 25% refund (W symbol assigned).

July 10, Friday, 3:30 p.m.
Summer B fee payment deadline.
Summer B tuition waivers established.
Summer B residency reclassification deadline for receiving the request and all
documents.

July 15, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.
Abstracts deadline for Fine Arts' performance and project option (Editorial, 160
Grinter).
Thesis first submission (defended, signed, formatted, on paper) to Editorial (160
Grinter) for review:
http://gradschool.ufl.edu/pdf-files/checklist-thesis.pdf

July 29, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.
Final exam form deadline (Editorial, 160 Grinter) for dissertation or thesis degree
award.
Final exam form deadline (Records, 106 Grinter) for nonthesis degree award.
Final submission of thesis or dissertation.
Deadline for "Final Clearance" status in the Editorial Document Management (EDM)
system, to qualify for Summer degree award.

August 7, Friday
Classes end.
Final examinations during regular class periods.
Last day to drop a course for Summer B and C terms and receive W on transcript.

August 8, Saturday
Commencement+
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August 10, Monday, 12:00 noon
All grades for Summer B and C terms must be in the Registrar's office.

August 11, Tuesday
Grades posted on ISIS in evening
Degree certification.

Fall 2009

Fall 2009 degree application (ISIS online): opens July 13, closes September 18.

NOTE: Prospective students should contact the appropriate academic unit for
admission application deadlines.

+ Projected dates. Notification of dates and times of ceremonies for colleges and
schools will be sent to degree candidates as soon as plans are finalized. Please do not
anticipate exact dates and times until notification is received.

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GRADUATE SCHOOL

The information in this catalog is current as of May 2008. Please contact individual
programs for any additional information or changes.

Organization
Graduate School Deans
Graduate Council
History

Organization

The Graduate School consists of the Dean, Associate Deans, Graduate Council, and
the Graduate Faculty. General policies and standards of the Graduate School are
established by the Graduate Faculty. Any policy change must be approved by the
graduate dean(s) and the Graduate Council. The Graduate School is responsible for
enforcing minimum general standards of graduate work in the University and for
coordinating the graduate programs of the various colleges and divisions of the
University. Responsibility for detailed operation of graduate programs is vested in
individual colleges, schools, divisions, and academic units. In most colleges an
associate dean or other administrator is directly responsible for graduate study in that
college. The Graduate Council helps the Dean in being the agent of the Graduate
Faculty for executing policy related to graduate study and associated research. The
Council (chaired by the graduate dean) considers petitions and policy changes. A
graduate program's academic unit appoints members of the Graduate Faculty, with
approval of the graduate dean. All faculty members who serve on supervisory
committees or who direct master's theses and doctoral dissertations must first be
appointed to the Graduate Faculty. The academic unit determines the level of duties
for each Graduate Faculty member.

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GRADUATE DEANS

HENRY T. FRIERSON,
Ph.D. (Michigan State University), Dean of the Graduate School and Associate Vice
President and Professor of Educational Psychology

KENNETH J. GERHARDT,
Ph.D. (Ohio State University), Associate Dean of the Graduate School and Professor of
Communication Sciences and Disorders

LAURENCE B. ALEXANDER,
Ph.D. (Florida State University), Interim Associate Dean of the Graduate School and
Professor of Journalism and Communications

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GRADUATE COUNCIL (2007-2008)


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HENRY T. FRIERSON,
Ph.D. (Michigan State University), Dean of the Graduate School and Associate Vice
President

H. JANE BROCKMAN,
Ph.D. (University of Wisconsin), Professor of Zoology

RICHARD DICKINSON,
Ph.D. (University of Minnesota), Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering

EILEEN B. FENNELL,
Ph.D. (University of Florida), Professor of Clinical and Health Psychology

BRIDGET FRANKS,
Ph.D. (University of Nebraska-Lincoln), Associate Professor of Educational Psychology

ABRAHAM G. HARTZEMA,
Ph.D. (University of Minnesota), Eminent Scholar, Pharmacy Health Care
Administration

JEFFREY NEEDELL,
Ph.D. (Stanford University), Associate Professor of History

PANAGOTE M. PARDALOS,
Ph.D. (University of Minnesota), Distinguished Professor, Industrial and Systems
Engineering

SHARLEEN SIMPSON,
Ph.D. (University of Florida), Associate Professor of Nursing

V. BETTY SMOCOVITIS,
Ph.D. (Cornell University), Associate Professor of History and Zoology

CHRISTOPHER STANTON,
Ph.D. (Cornell University), Professor of Physics

MARGARET WALLACE,
Ph.D. (Indiana University), Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

KIM WALSH-CHILDERS,
Ph.D. (University of North Carolina at Charlotte),
Professor of Journalism and Communications

REBECCA HAYES,
Doctoral Student of Criminology and Law, Graduate Student Council Representative

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History

Graduate study at UF existed while the University was still on its Lake City campus.
However, the first graduate degrees, two Master of Arts with a major in English, were
awarded on the Gainesville campus in 1906. The first Master of Science was awarded
in 1908, with a major in entomology. The first programs leading to the Ph.D. were
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approved in 1930, and the first degrees were awarded in 1934, one with a major in
chemistry and the other with a major in pharmacy. The first Ed.D. was awarded in
1948. Graduate study has grown phenomenally at UF. In 1930, 33 degrees were
awarded in 12 fields. In 1940, 66 degrees were awarded in 16 fields. In 2006-07, UF
awarded 4380 graduate degrees in more than 100 fields, including 784 Ph.D. degrees.

Graduate Deans and Years of Service

May 2007 to Present: Henry T. Frierson, Dean
2004-2007: Kenneth J. Gerhardt, Interim Dean
1999-2004: Winfred M. Phillips, Dean
1998-1999: M. Jack Ohanian, Interim Dean
1993-1998: Karen A. Holbrook, Dean
July-September 1993: Gene W. Hemp, Acting Dean
1985-1993: Madelyn M. Lockhart, Dean
1983-1985: Donald R. Price, Acting Dean
September 1982-January 1983: Gene W. Hemp, Acting Dean
1980-1982: Francis G. Stehli, Dean
1979-1980: F. Michael Wahl, Acting Dean
1973-1979: Harry H. Sisler, Dean
1971-1973: Alex G. Smith, Acting Dean
1969-1971: Harold P. Hanson, Dean
1952-1969: L. E. Grinter, Dean
1951-1952: C. F. Byers, Acting Dean
1938-1951: T. M. Simpson, Dean
1930-1938: James N. Anderson, Dean


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GRADUATE DEGREES AND PROGRAMS

The information in this catalog is current as of May 2008. Please contact individual
programs for any additional information or changes.

Definitions
Listing of Degrees and Programs
Master's Degrees
General Regulations
Master of Arts and Master of Science
Other Master's Degrees
Doctoral Degrees
Doctor of Philosophy
Doctor of Audiology
Doctor of Education
Doctor of Nursing Practice
Doctor of Plant Medicine
Specialized Graduate Degrees
Engineer
Specialist in Education
Nontraditional Programs
Concurrent Graduate Programs
Joint Degree Programs
State University System Programs
Interdisciplinary Graduate Concentrations and Certificates

Definitions

Degree is the title conferred by the University on completing the academic program,
for example, Doctor of Philosophy. Some degrees include the name of the field of
study (Master of Architecture, Master of Education). Others (Master of Arts, Master of
Science) do not.

Program is the student's primary field of study. This is the student's major. Programs
offered at UF are approved by the Graduate Council, Faculty Senate, Board of
Trustees, and Florida Board of Governors (specialist and doctoral degrees). The
degree and program name appear on the student's transcript. Available programs are
identified under the degree name in the list of graduate degrees and programs.

Co-major is a course of study allowing two majors for one Ph.D. degree. Each co-
major must be approved by the Graduate Council.

Concentration is a subprogram in a major. Concentrations offered at UF are
approved by the Graduate Council. The concentration, degree, and program may
appear on the student transcript.

Minor is a block of course work completed in any academic unit outside the major, if
approved for master's or doctoral programs listed in this catalog. If a student earns
more than one course from an academic unit contributing to the major of
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another, the student is not eligible to earn a minor from the contributing
academic unit. If a minor is chosen, the supervisory committee must include a
representative from the minor field. A minor requires at least 6 to 15 credits
depending on the program. The minor appears on the student's transcript along with
the program name and the degree awarded.

Specialization is an informal designation used by academic units to indicate areas of
research or scholarly strength, and has no formal significance. Track and emphasis
are similar unofficial terms. No tracks, emphases, or specializations appear in official
lists in this catalog or on the student transcript.

Graduate certificate may be offered by an academic unit along with a graduate
degree. The certificate indicates that the student took a required number of courses in
a special area. It requires Graduate Council approval but is not listed on the student
transcript.

Multi-college program is a degree program offered through more than one college.

Combined degree program is a combined bachelor's and master's degree program
allowing an academically advanced undergraduate student to take graduate courses
before completing the bachelor's degree and to count 12 graduate credits toward both
degrees. Students admitted into a combined program will normally have above
average GPAs and superior scores on the verbal, quantitative, and analytical writing
portions of the GRE. Individual academic units determine whether a combined degree
program is appropriate. Combined degree programs established before January 1,
2003, may have other requirements.

Cooperative degree program leads to a graduate degree awarded by UF with more
than one institution authorized to provide course work.

Jointly conferred degree program leads to a graduate degree awarded jointly by
UF and another institution.

Joint degree program is a course of study that leads simultaneously to a graduate
degree and a professional degree (i.e., D.M.D., D.V.M., J.D., M.D., Pharm.D.).
Normally 12 credits of professional courses are counted toward the graduate degree
and 12 credits of graduate courses are counted toward the professional degree.
Individual academic units determine whether a joint degree program is appropriate.
Joint programs established before January 1, 2003, may have other requirements.

Concurrent degree program is simultaneous study on an individualized basis that
leads to two master's degrees in two different graduate programs or two master's
degrees in the same major. Such a program is initiated by the student and requires
prior approval of each academic unit and the Graduate School. If the student is
approved to pursue two master's degrees, no more than 9 credits of course work from
one degree program may be applied toward the second master's degree.

Catalog year refers to the rules in effect during the first year a degree-seeking
student enrolls in a program; the set of requirements a student must fulfill. If the
student takes time off, then the catalog year is the academic year of readmission.

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Listing of Degrees and Programs

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See Fields of Instruction for specializations in the approved programs.

T=thesis or dissertation N=nonthesis or no dissertation. Degree names and correct
abbreviations are listed in bold. Possible majors (if different than the degree name)
are listed in normal type.

Possible concentrations that are not interdisciplinary are listed under the major in
italics. Interdisciplinary concentrations can be found in the Interdisciplinary
Concentrations section of this catalog.

Master of Accounting (M.Acc.)N
Master of Advertising (M.Adv.) T
Master of Agribusiness (M.AB.) N
Food and Resource Economics
Master of Agriculture (M.Ag.) N
Agricultural Education and Communication
Farming Systems
Animal Sciences
Botany
Master of Architecture (M.Arch.) T
Historic Preservation
Sustainable Architecture
Sustainable Design
Master of Arts (M.A.)
Anthropology T/N
Art Education T
Art History T
Business Administration
InsuranceT
Marketing T/N
Classical Studies T
Communication Sciences and Disorders T/N
Criminology, Law and Society T/N
Digital Arts and Sciences T
Economics T/N
English T/N
French T/N
Geography T
Applications of Geographic Technologies
German T/N
History T/N
Jewish Studies
International Business T
Latin T
Latin American Studies T
Linguistics T/N
Mathematics T/N
Museology [Museum Studies] T
Philosophy T/N
Political Science T/N
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Political Campaigning
Political Science International Relations T/N
Psychology T/N
Religion T/N
Jewish Studies
Sociology T/N
Spanish T/N
Women's Studies T/N
Master of Arts in Education (M.A.E.) T
Majors are those listed for the Master of Education degree.
Master of Arts in Mass Communication (M.AMC.) T/N
Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) N
Anthropology
French
Latin
Latin American Studies
Mathematics
Political Science-International Relations
Spanish
Master of Arts in Urban and Regional Planning (M.A.U.R.P.) T
Master of Building Construction (M.B.C.) N
Building Construction
Sustainable Construction
Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) N
Business Administration
Competitive Strategy
Decision and Information Sciences
Entrepreneurship
Finance
General Business
Global Management
Graham-Buffett Security Analysis
Human Resource Management
International Studies
Latin American Business
Management
Marketing
Real Estate and Urban Analysis
Sports Administration
Master of Education (M.Ed.) N
Curriculum and Instruction
Early Childhood Education
Educational Leadership
Educational Psychology
Elementary Education
English Education
Foreign Language Education
Foundations of Education
Marriage and Family Counseling
Mathematics Education
Mental Health Counseling
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Reading Education
Research and Evaluation Methodology
School Counseling and Guidance
School Psychology
Science Education
Social Studies Education
Special Education
Master of Engineering (M.E.) T/N
Aerospace Engineering
Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Biomedical Engineering
Chemical Engineering
Civil Engineering
Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering
Computer Engineering
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Environmental Engineering Sciences
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Materials Science and Engineering
Mechanical Engineering
Nuclear Engineering Sciences
Master of Family, Youth and Community Sciences (M.F.Y.C.S.) N
Community Studies
Family and Youth Development
Nonprofit Organizations Development
Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) T
Art
Creative Writing
Theatre
Master of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences (M.F.A.S.) N
Master of Forest Resources and Conservation (M.F.R.C.) N
Geomatics
Master of Health Administration (M.H.A.) N
Master of Health Science (M.H.S.) T/N
Occupational Therapy
Rehabilitation Counseling
Master of Interior Design (M.I.D.) T
Master of International Construction Management (M.I.C.M.) N
Master of Landscape Architecture (M.L.A.) T
Master of Latin (M.L.) N
Master of Laws in Comparative Law (LL.M.Comp.Law) N
Master of Laws in International Taxation (LL.M.I.T.) N
Master of Laws in Taxation (LL.M.T.) N
Master of Music (M.M.) T
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Music
Choral Conducting
Composition
Instrumental Conducting
Music History and Literature
Music Theory
Performance
Sacred Music
Music Education
Master of Occupational Therapy (M.O.T.) N
Master of Public Health (M.P.H.) N
Biostatistics
Environmental Health
Epidemiology
Health Management and Policy
Public Health Practice
Social and Behavioral Sciences
Master of Science (M.S.)
Aerospace Engineering T/N
Agricultural and Biological Engineering T/N
Agricultural Education and Communication T/N
Farming Systems
Agronomy T/N
Animal Molecular and Cellular Biology T
Animal Sciences T
Applied Physiology and Kinesiology T/N
Athletic Training/Sport Medicine
Biomechanics
Clinical Exercise Physiology
Exercise Physiology
Human Performance
Motor Learning/Control
Sport and Exercise Psychology
Astronomy T/N
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology T
Biomedical Engineering T/N
Botany T
Business Administration T/N
Insurance
Marketing
Retailing
Chemical Engineering T/N
Chemistry T/N
Civil Engineering T/N
Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering T/N
Computer Engineering T/N
Computer and Information Sciences T/N
Dental Sciences T
Endodontics
Orthodontics
Periodontics
Prosthodontics
Digital Arts and Sciences T
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Electrical and Computer Engineering T/N
Entrepreneurship T/N
Entomology and Nematology T/N
Environmental Engineering Sciences T/N
Epidemiology T
Biostatistics
Health Management Policy
Family, Youth, and Community Sciences T
Community Studies
Family and Youth Development
Nonprofit Organizations Development
Finance T/N
Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences T
Food and Resource Economics T/N
Food Science and Human Nutrition T/N
Nutritional Sciences
Forest Resources and Conservation T
Geomatics
Geography T
Applications of Geographic technologies
Geographic Information Systems
Geology T
Health Education and Behavior T/N
Horticultural Science T/N
Environmental Horticulture
Horticultural Sciences
Industrial and Systems Engineering T/N
Information Systems and Operations Management T/N
Supply Chain Management
Interdisciplinary Ecology T/N
Management T/N
Materials Science and Engineering T/N
Mathematics T/N
Mechanical Engineering T/N
Medical Sciences T
Clinical Investigation
Microbiology and Cell Science T/N
Nuclear Engineering Sciences T/N
Physics T/N
Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology T
Plant Pathology T/N
Political Science
International Development Policy and Administration
Psychology T/N
Real Estate T/N
Recreation, Parks, and Tourism T/N
Natural Resource Recreation
Therapeutic Recreation
Tourism
Soil and Water Science T/N
Sport Management T/N
Veterinary Medical Sciences T/N
Forensic Toxicology
Wildlife Ecology and Conservation T/N
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Zoology T/N
Master of Science in Architectural Studies (M.S.A.S.) T
Historic Preservation
Sustainable Architecture
Sustainable Design


Master of Science in
Building Construction
Sustainable Construction
Master of Science in
Nursing
Midwifery
Master of Science in
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Forensic Drug Chemistry
Forensic Science


Building Construction (M.S.B.C.) T


Nursing (M.S.Nsg.) T/N


Pharmacy (M.S.P.) T/N


Forensic Serology and DNA
Medicinal Chemistry
Pharmacodynamics
Pharmacy
Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy
Master of Science in Statistics (M.S.Stat.) T


Master of
Astronomy
Botany
Chemistry
Geography
Geology
Mathematics
Physics
Zoology


Science in Teaching (M.S.T.) N


Master of Statistics (M.Stat.) N
Engineer (Engr.)T/N
A special degree requiring 1 year of graduate work beyond the master's degree. For a
list of the approved majors, see those listed for the Master of Engineering degree,
except Biomedical Engineering, Civil Engineering, and Coastal and Oceanographic
Engineering.

Specialist in Education (Ed.S.) N
A special degree requiring 1 year of graduate work beyond the master's degree. For a
list of the approved programs, see those listed for the Doctor of Education degree.

Doctor of Audiology (Au.D.) N
Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) T
Curriculum and Instruction
Educational Leadership
Educational Policy
Educational Psychology
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Foundations of Education
Higher Education Administration
Educational Policy
Marriage and Family Counseling
Mental Health Counseling
Research and Evaluation Methodology
School Counseling and Guidance
School Psychology
Special Education
Doctor of Nursing Practice (D.N.P.) N
Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) T
Aerospace Engineering
Agricultural and Biological Engineering
Agricultural Education and Communication
Agronomy
Animal Molecular and Cellular Biology
Animal Sciences
Anthropology
Art History
Astronomy
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Imaging Science and Technology
Mammalian Genetics
Biomedical Engineering
Biostatistics
Botany
Business Administration
Accounting
Decision and Information Sciences
Finance
Insurance
Management
Marketing
Real Estate and Urban Analysis
Chemical Engineering
Chemistry
Imaging Science and Technology
Civil Engineering
Classical Studies
Coastal and Oceanographic Engineering
Communication Sciences and Disorders
Computer Engineering
Counseling Psychology
Criminology, Law and Society
Curriculum and Instruction
Design, Construction, and Planning
Economics
Educational Leadership
Educational Policy
Educational Psychology
Electrical and Computer Engineering
English
Entomology and Nematology
Environmental Engineering Sciences
Epidemiology
Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences
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Food and Resource Economics
Food Science and Human Nutrition
Food Science
Nutritional Sciences
Forest Resources and Conservation
Geomatics
Foundations of Education
Genetics
Geography
Geology
German
Health and Human Performance
Athletic Training/Sport Medicine
Biomechanics
Exercise Physiology
Health Behavior
Motor Learning/Control
Natural Resource Recreation
Sport and Exercise Psychology
Sport Management
Therapeutic Recreation
Tourism
Health Services Research
Higher Education Administration
Educational Policy
History
Horticultural Science
Environmental Horticulture
Horticulture Sciences
Industrial and Systems Engineering
Interdisciplinary Ecology
Linguistics
Marriage and Family Counseling
Mass Communication
Materials Science and Engineering
Mathematics
Mechanical Engineering
Medical Sciences
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Genetics
Immunology and Microbiology
Molecular Cell Biology
Neuroscience
Physiology and Pharmacology
Toxicology
Mental Health Counseling
Microbiology and Cell Science
Molecular Genetics and Microbiology
Mammalian Genetics
Music
Composition
Music History and Literature
Music Education
Nuclear Engineering Sciences
Nursing Sciences
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Medicinal Chemistry
Medicinal Chemistry and Toxicology
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Pharmacodynamics
Pharmacy
Pharmaceutical Outcomes and Policy
Public Affairs
Toxicology
Philosophy
Physics
Plant Molecular and Cellular Biology
Plant Pathology
Political Science
Educational Policy
Psychology
Clinical and Health Psychology
Psychology
Rehabilitation Science
Religious Studies
Research and Evaluation Methodology
Romance Languages
French
Spanish
School Counseling and Guidance
School Psychology
Sociology
Soil and Water Science
Special Education
Statistics
Veterinary Medical Sciences
Wildlife Ecology and Conservation
Zoology
Doctor of Plant Medicine (D.P.M.) N
Back to Top

Master's Degrees

The master's degree is conferred only on completing a coherent and focused program
of advanced study. Each academic unit sets its own minimum degree requirements
beyond the minimum required by the Graduate Council.

Back to Top

General Regulations

Graduate School regulations are as follows. Colleges and academic units may have
additional regulations beyond those stated below. Unless otherwise indicated in
the next sections on master's degrees, these general regulations apply to all
master's degree programs at the University.

Course requirements: Graduate credit is awarded for courses numbered 5000 and
above. The program of course work for a master's degree must be approved by the
student's adviser, supervisory committee, or faculty representative of the academic
unit. No more than 9 credits from a previous master's degree program may apply
toward a second master's degree. These credits are applied only with the written
approval of the Dean of the Graduate School.

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Major: Work in the major must be in courses numbered 5000 or above. For work
outside the major 6 credits of courses numbered 3000 or above may be taken if part
of an approved plan of study.

Minor: Minor work must be in an academic unit other than the major. If a student
earns more than one course from an academic unit contributing to the major of
another, the student is not eligible to earn a minor from the contributing academic
unit. If a minor is chosen, at least 6 credits of work are required in the minor field.
Two 6-credit minors may be taken with the major academic unit's permission. A 3.00
(truncated) GPA is required for minor credit.

Degree requirements: Unless otherwise specified, for any master's degree, the
student must earn at least 30 credits as a graduate student at UF. No more than 9 of
the 30 credits (earned with a grade of A, B+, or B) may be transferred from
institutions approved for this purpose by the Dean of the Graduate School. At least
half of the required credits (not counting 6971) must be in the major.

Transfer of credit: Only graduate-level (5000-7999) work with a grade of B or
better, is eligible for transfer of credit. A maximum of 15 transfer credits are allowed.
These can include no more than 9 credits from institutions approved by UF, with the
balance obtained from postbaccalaureate work at the University of Florida. Credits
transferred from other universities are applied toward the degree requirements, but
grades earned are not computed in the student's grade point average. Acceptance of
transfer of credit requires approval of the student's supervisory committee and the
Dean of the Graduate School.

Petitions for transfer of credit for a master's degree must be made during the
student's first term of enrollment in the Graduate School.

The supervisory committee is responsible for using established criteria to ensure the
academic integrity of course work before accepting graduate transfer credits.

Supervisory committee: The student's supervisory committee should be appointed
as soon as possible after the student is admitted to the Graduate School and no later
than the second term of graduate study. Supervisory committees for graduate degree
programs are initiated by the student, nominated by the respective academic unit
chair, approved by the college dean, and appointed by the Dean of the Graduate
School. The Dean of the Graduate School is an ex-officio member of all supervisory
committees. Only Graduate Faculty may serve on a supervisory committee. If a
student takes fewer than 12 credits in the first term, the deadline is the end of the
term during which the student has accumulated 12 or more credits or the end of the
second term. If a minor is designated for any degree, a representative from that
minor is needed on the supervisory committee. If two minors are designated, two
representatives are needed.

The supervisory committee for a master's degree with a thesis must consist of at least
two members selected from the Graduate Faculty. The supervisory committee for a
master's degree without a thesis may consist of one member of the Graduate Faculty
who advises the student and oversees the program. If a minor is designated, the
committee for both thesis and nonthesis programs must include one Graduate Faculty
member from the minor academic unit.

Language requirements: (1) Each academic unit determines whether a reading
knowledge of a foreign language is required. The requirement varies from one
academic unit to another, and the student should check with the appropriate academic
unit for specific information. (2) All candidates must be able to use the English
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language correctly and effectively, as judged by the supervisory committee.

Examination: Each candidate must pass a final comprehensive examination. This
examination must cover at least the candidate's field of concentration. It must occur
no earlier than the term before the degree is awarded. The comprehensive
examination for the nonthesis master's degree may be taken at a remote site. All
other examinations must be held on campus.

Time limitation: All work (including transferred credit) counted toward the master's
degree must be completed within 7 years before the degree is awarded.

Leave of absence: Any student who will not register at UF for a period of
more than 1 term needs prior written approval from the supervisory
committee chair for a leave of absence for a designated period of time. The
student must reapply for admission on return. See Readmission and Catalog Year.

Back to Top

Master of Arts and Master of Science

The general requirements for the Master of Arts and the Master of Science degrees
also apply to the following degrees, Master of Arts in Education, Master of Arts in Mass
Communication, Master of Science in Building Construction, Master of Science in
Pharmacy, and Master of Science in Statistics. However, for the specialized degrees,
there are some additional requirements that must be followed.

Course requirements: A master's degree with thesis requires at least 30 credits
including up to 6 credits of Research for Master's Thesis (6971). All thesis students
must register for an appropriate number of credits in 6971.

A nonthesis Master of Arts or Master of Science degree requires at least 30 credits. No
more than 6 of those credits can be from S/U courses. Nonthesis students cannot use
Research for Master's Thesis (6971).

For all master's programs, at least half the required credits (not counting 6971) must
be in the major. One or two minors of at least 6 credits each may be taken, but a
minor is not required by the Graduate School. Minor work must be in an academic unit
other than the major.

Nonthesis M.S. students in engineering, if working at off-campus centers, must take
half the course work from full-time UF faculty members and must pass a
comprehensive written examination by a committee recommended by the Dean of the
College of Engineering and appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School. This
written comprehensive examination may be taken at an off-campus site. The College
of Engineering may use the Fundamentals of Engineering examination in lieu of the
GRE for admitting students into the nonthesis master's degree programs.

Thesis first submission: Each master's thesis candidate must prepare and present a
thesis that shows independent investigation and that is acceptable in form and
content to the supervisory committee and to the Graduate School. The work must be
of publishable quality and must be in a form suitable for publication, using the
Graduate School's format requirements. The academic unit is responsible for quality
and scholarship. Graduate Council requires the Graduate School Editorial Office, as
agents of the Dean of the Graduate School, to briefly review theses and dissertations
for acceptable format, and to make recommendations as needed.
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When first presented to the Graduate School Editorial Office, the thesis should already
be successfully defended (with the ETD signature page signed by the committee) and
should be near-final (not a draft), completely formatted, and printed on plain paper
(do not print 2-sided). Students should be completely familiar with the format
requirements and should work with the Applications Support Center/ETD Lab to
troubleshoot their files before printing out their first submission for the Graduate
School Editorial Office (see Deadlines section of this catalog).

Format requirements:
http://gradschool.ufl.edu/pdf-files/editoria -format.pdf

Format examples:
http://gradschool.ufl.edu/editoria I/format.html#sam pies

Checklist:
http://gradschool.ufl.edu/pdf-files/checklist-thesis.pdf

Graduate School Editorial Office:
http://gradschool.ufl.edu/editorial/introduction.html#contacts

CIRCA's ETD Lab (technical support):
http://etd.circa.ufl.edu/download.html

By UF requirement, students must maintain access to their Gatorlink e-mail: the
Editorial Office e-mails the student when the thesis has been reviewed. The student is
responsible for retrieving the marked thesis from the Editorial Office, review
comments, and resolving any deficits related to the format requirements. Students
should promptly make all needed changes.

Uploading and submitting the final pdf: After changes have been made to the
satisfaction of the supervisory committee, the Final Exam form is given to the
Graduate School Editorial Office, and the student may then upload and submit the
final pdf of the electronic thesis, through the Editorial Document Management (EDM)
system. The Editorial Office checks to make sure the format is acceptable and that the
links work, and e-mails the student regarding the status of the ETD (electronic thesis
or dissertation). If accepted, no further changes are allowed.

Editorial final clearance: Among other requirements (see Checklist above), the final
thesis must be accepted (not just submitted) by 5:00 p.m. of this deadline. Most
students complete all requirements well in advance.

Copyright: The student is automatically the copyright holder, by virtue of having
written the thesis. A copyright page should be included immediately after the title
page to indicate this.

Thesis language: Theses must be written in English, except for students pursuing
degrees in Romance or Germanic languages and literatures. Students in these
disciplines, with the approval of their supervisory committees, may write in the topic
language. A foreign language thesis should have the Acknowledgements, Abstract,
and Biographical Sketch written in English. All page titles before Chapter 1 should also
be in English.

Journal articles: A thesis may include journal articles as chapters, if all copyright
considerations are addressed appropriately. In such cases, Chapter 1 should be a
general introduction, tying everything together as a unified whole. The last chapter
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should be general conclusions, again tying everything together into a unified whole.
Any chapter representing a journal article needs a footnote at the bottom of the first
page of the chapter: "Reprinted with permission from . giving the source, just as
it appears in the list of references. The thesis should have only 1 abstract and 1
reference list.

Change from thesis to nonthesis option: Permission of the supervisory committee
is needed to change from thesis to nonthesis option. This permission must be
forwarded to the Graduate School by midpoint of the final term. The candidate must
meet all the requirements of the nonthesis option as specified above. A maximum of 3
credits earned with a grade of S in 6971 (Research for Master's Thesis) can be
counted toward the degree requirements only if converted to credit as A, B+, or B in
Individual Work. The supervisory committee must indicate that the work was
productive in and by itself and that the work warrants credit as a special problem or
special topic course.

Supervisory committee: Appointment should be as soon as possible after the
student has been admitted to Graduate School and no later than the end of the
second term. Supervisory committee duties are to advise the student, to check on the
student's qualifications and progress, to supervise preparation of the thesis, and to
conduct the final examination.

Final examination: When most of the student's course work is completed, and the
thesis is in final form, the supervisory committee must examine the student orally or
in writing on (1) the thesis, (2) the major subjects, (3) the minor or minors, and (4)
matters of a general nature pertaining to the field of study.

The candidate and the entire supervisory committee must be present at the defense.
The defense date must be fewer than 6 months before degree award. All forms should
be signed at the defense: the candidate and the supervisory committee chair sign the
ETD Publishing Agreement form; and the entire supervisory committee should sign
the ETD Signature Page and the Final Examination Report. If thesis changes are
requested, the supervisory committee chair may hold the Final Examination Report
until satisfied with the thesis.

Final comprehensive examination: Nonthesis students must pass a comprehensive
written or oral examination on the major and on the minor if a minor is designated.
This comprehensive examination must be taken no more than 6 months before the
degree is awarded.

Back to Top

Other Master's Degrees

Although the general requirements for the Master of Arts and the Master of Science
degrees also apply to the following discipline-specific degrees, there are some
important differences. For detailed requirements, see Fields of Instruction. In addition,
the Graduate School monitors the following requirements for these specialized
degrees.

Master of Accounting

The Master of Accounting (M.Acc.) is the graduate degree for students seeking
professional careers in public accounting, business organizations, and government.
The M.Acc. program offers specializations in auditing/financial accounting, accounting
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systems, and taxation.

The recommended curriculum to prepare for a professional career in accounting is the
3/2 five-year program with a joint awarding of the Bachelor of Science in Accounting
and the Master of Accounting degrees on satisfactory completion of the 150-credit
program. The entry point into the 3/2 is the start of the senior year.

Students who have already completed an undergraduate degree in accounting may
enter the 1-year M.Acc. program, which requires 34 credits of course work. At least
18 credits must be in graduate-level accounting, excluding preparatory courses. All
students must take a final comprehensive examination. For details about
requirements, see General Regulations for master's degrees.

M.Acc./J.D. program: This joint program culminates in both the Juris Doctor (J.D.)
degree awarded by the College of Law and the Master of Accounting (M.Acc.) degree
awarded by the Graduate School. The program is for students with an undergraduate
degree in accounting, who are interested in advanced studies in both accounting and
law. About 20 credits fewer are needed for the joint program than if the two degrees
were earned separately. The two degrees are awarded after completing curriculum
requirements for both degrees. Students must take the GMAT (or the GRE), and also
the LSAT before admission, and must meet the admission requirements for the
College of Law (J.D.) and the Fisher School of Accounting (M.Acc.).

Master of Advertising

The Master of Advertising (M.Adv.) program develops leaders in the profession by
giving students theoretical, research, and decision-making skills essential for strategic
advertising and integrated communications planning; and the opportunity to develop
expertise in an area such as account management, research, creative strategy, media
planning, international and cross cultural advertising, new technology, special market
advertising, and advertising sales management.

Students without a basic course or substantial professional experience in marketing or
advertising must complete articulation courses before entering the program. All
students must complete a basic statistics course before entering. The M.Adv. requires
at least 33 credits and a thesis. Some areas allow a terminal project in lieu of thesis
(with permission from the academic unit's Graduate Faculty).

Students select a supervisory committee to guide selection of courses, selection of
thesis topic (or project in lieu of thesis), and completion of the thesis or project. At
least one committee member must be from the Department of Advertising's Graduate
Faculty.

Students complete and orally defend their theses or projects. The student's
supervisory committee is responsible for evaluating the thesis or project and the final
defense.

Master of Agribusiness

The Master of Agribusiness (M.AB.) degree program offers advanced study for
students seeking careers in sales, marketing, and management with organizations
that operate mainly in the food industry and agribusiness sector. Through rigorous
practical course work, students can capitalize on the program's broad-based
resources, as students look forward to careers as food marketers, commodity
merchandisers, and agribusiness managers. Students may focus on areas such as
strategic sales, international marketing, human resource management, and the
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futures market. This program is not recommended for students seeking careers in
research and university teaching.

The program requires at least 30 credits (core and elective courses in finance,
marketing, management, decision-making, and quantitative methods relevant to
agribusiness). These courses prepare students to analyze current situations,
anticipate opportunities, and develop effective action plans. Before starting the
program, students must have taken and successfully passed prerequisite courses in
marketing, management, statistics, and finance. Contact the academic unit for
information on additional prerequisite courses and program requirements.

Master of Agriculture

The degree of Master of Agriculture (M.Ag) is for students with primary interests other
than research. General requirements are the same as for the Master of Science
degree without thesis except that, for the Master of Agriculture, a major comprises 12
credits of graduate courses in an academic unit. At least one member of the Graduate
Faculty must be included on the student's supervisory committee. A comprehensive
written or oral examination is required in the term the degree is awarded.

Master of Architecture

The Master of Architecture (M.Arch) is an accredited graduate degree meeting the
professional requirements of the National Architectural Accrediting Board for students
who wish to qualify for registration and practice as architects. Candidates are
admitted from architectural, related, and unrelated undergraduate backgrounds;
professional experience is encouraged but not required.

The M.Arch. requires at least 52 credits, including no more than 6 credits in ARC 6971
or 6979. Course sequences in design history and theory, structures, technology, and
practice must be completed. Students are encouraged to propose individual programs
of study (outside of required courses), and interdisciplinary work is encouraged.

Master of Arts in Teaching and Master of Science in Teaching

These degrees (M.A.T., M.S.T.) combine graduate study in a discipline with selected
education courses and a teaching internship, providing flexible curricula that prepare
students for a variety of options including teaching and further graduate work.

Requirements for the degrees are as follows:

(1) A reading knowledge of one foreign language if required by the student's major.

(2) Satisfactory completion of at least 36 credits while registered as a graduate
student, with work distributed as follows:

- At least 18 credits in the major and 6 credits in the minor.

- Six credits in an academic unit internship in teaching (6943 Internship in College
Teaching). Three years of successful teaching experience in a state-certified school
may be substituted for the internship requirement, and credits thus made available
may be used for further work in the major, the minor, or in education.

- At least one course selected from three or more of the following: social and/or
psychological foundations of education; education technology; counselor education;
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special education, and community college curriculum. Other areas may be added or
substituted at the discretion of the supervisory committee. These courses may be
used to comprise a minor.

(3) Off-campus work: At least 8 to 16 credits (at the academic unit's discretion),
including at least 6 credits in one term, must be earned on the Gainesville campus.
Beyond that, credits earned in off-campus UF courses approved by the Graduate
School are accepted if they are appropriate to the student's degree program as
determined by the supervisory committee.

(4) At degree completion, the student needs at least 36 credits in the major for
certification purposes.

(5) The student must pass a final comprehensive examination (written, oral, or both).
This examination covers the field of concentration and the minor.

Master of Arts in Urban and Regional Planning

The degree of Master of Arts in Urban and Regional Planning (M.A.U.R.P.) is a
graduate degree for professional urban and regional planners and meets the
educational requirements for the American Institute of Certified Planners. The
program is accredited by the Planning Accreditation Board. General requirements are
the same as for other Master of Arts degrees with thesis, except that the minimum
registration required is 52 credits including no more than 6 credits in URP 6971 or
6979. All areas allow a project (requiring 6 credits) in lieu of thesis (with permission
from the academic unit's Graduate Faculty).

M.A.U.R.P./J.D. joint program: A 4-year program leading to the Juris Doctor and
Master of Arts in Urban and Regional Planning degrees is offered under the joint
auspices of the College of Law and the College of Design, Construction, and Planning,
Department of Urban and Regional Planning. For students interested in the legal
problems of urban and regional planning, this program blends law studies with
relevant course work in the planning curriculum. Students receive both degrees at the
end of a 4-year course of study whereas separate programs would require 5 years.
Students must take the GRE and the LSAT before admission, must be admitted to
both programs, and must complete the first year of law school course work before
commingling law and planning courses. A thesis is required on completing the course
work.

Interested students should apply to both the Holland Law Center and the Graduate
School, noting on the application the joint nature of their admission requests. For
more information on the program, contact the Holland Law Center and the
Department of Urban and Regional Planning.

Master of Building Construction

The Master of Building Construction (M.B.C.) degree is for students pursuing advanced
work in construction management, construction techniques, and research problems in
the construction field.

General requirements are the same as for the Master of Science in Building
Construction degree except that the M.B.C. requires at least 36 graduate credits. A
thesis is not required. All candidates are required to pass a comprehensive
examination at the completion of course work.

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Joint Program: The M.B.C./J.D. program is offered in conjunction with the Levin
College of Law.

Master of Business Administration

The Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) degree gives students (1) conceptual
knowledge for understanding the functions and behaviors common to business
organizations and (2) analytical, problem-solving, and decision-making skills essential
for effective management. Emphasis is on developing the student's capacities and
skills for business decision making.

The traditional M.B.A. curriculum is structured so that students may extend their
knowledge in a specialized field. The program offers certificate programs in auditing
and informational technology, financial services, hospitality management, supply
chain management, decision and information sciences, entrepreneurship and
technology management, and global management, and concentrations in finance,
security analysis, real estate, competitive strategy, marketing, entrepreneurship,
decision and information sciences, management, global management, human
resource management, Latin American business, international studies, and sports
administration.

Admission: Applicants for admission must submit recent official scores from the
Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) and official transcripts for all previous
academic work. All program options require at least 2 years of full-time professional
work experience performed after receiving an acceptable bachelor's degree, along
with written essays and personal recommendations from employers. All qualified
applicants are asked to interview as part of the admissions process. Applicants whose
native, first language is not English must submit acceptable scores from one of the
following: TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language), IELTS (International English
Language Testing System), MELAB (Michigan English Language Assessment Battery)
or successful completion of the University of Florida English Language Institute
program. Admission is competitive and class size is limited.

A heterogeneous student body is seen as an important asset of the program.
Accordingly, the backgrounds of students include a wide range of disciplines and
cultures. Although the curriculum assumes no previous academic work in business
administration, enrolling students find introductory course work in statistics, calculus,
and financial accounting beneficial.

For more specific information on other aspects of the program, contact the Office of
Admissions, Florida M.B.A. Program, 134 Bryan Hall, P.O. Box 117152, Gainesville FL
32611-7152, or visit the website, http://www.floridamba.ufl.edu.

Course work: At least 48 qualified credits of course work are required for the 2-year
option, and 1-year Option A. The 1-year Option B requires 32 credits. Credits cannot
be transferred from another institution or program.

Options

Traditional M.B.A. 2-year option: The traditional M.B.A. program requires 4 terms
of continuous full-time study. The program starts only in the fall; many students
spend the summer working at internships. This option requires at least 2 years of full-
time, post-undergraduate work experience.

Traditional M.B.A. 1-year, Option A: Students with an acceptable bachelor's
degree, which need not be in business, may complete this option in 12 months. The
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program starts in the summer and requires 48 acceptable credits and 2 years of post-
undergraduate work experience.

Traditional M.B.A. 1-year, Option B: For students with recent, acceptable
undergraduate degrees in business (completed within 7 years before starting the
program), this option starts in July. Students take mostly electives during summer B,
fall, and spring terms and graduate in May. This option requires 2 years of post-
undergraduate work experience.

Executive M.B.A. option: A 20-month program for working professionals, students
attend classes 1 extended weekend per month (Friday-Sunday). The program is
divided into 5 terms, starts in August, and includes a 1-week international experience.
The international study tour is a program requirement; students travel abroad in May
for a week of experiential learning through lectures or discussions with local business
and government leaders. The tour will include a combination of lectures, group
projects and/or site visits. This option requires 8 years of post-undergraduate work
experience, and students are expected to have people or project management
responsibilities in their current positions.

M.B.A. for professionals 2-year option: This 27-month program starts in August
and January and is for professionals who work full time while pursuing their degrees
part time. Students attend classes 1 weekend per month (Saturday-Sunday) and
must attend a 1-week in-residence elective class. This option requires 2 years of post-
undergraduate work experience.

M.B.A. for professionals 1-year option: For students with acceptable
undergraduate degrees in business (completed within 7 years before starting the
program), this 16-month option starts in August. Students attend classes 1 weekend
per month (Saturday-Sunday) and must attend a 1-week in-residence elective class.
The first meeting includes a 1-week, on-campus foundations review of basic course
work. This option requires 2 years of post-undergraduate work experience.

Internet M.B.A. 2-year option: This 27-month program starts in January and allows
students with computers, through Internet access, to "attend" classes and interact
with faculty and classmates via such technology as e-mail, DVD, streaming video,
synchronous group discussion software, asynchronous class presentation software,
and multimedia courseware. Students visit campus 1 weekend (Saturday-Sunday)
every 4 months. This option requires 2 years of post-undergraduate work experience.

Internet M.B.A. 1-year option: For students with acceptable undergraduate
degrees in business (completed within 7 years before starting this program), this 16-
month option starts in January and gives students and faculty the same interactive
technology as the Internet M.B.A. 2-year option. Students visit campus 1 weekend
(Saturday-Sunday) every 4 months. The first meeting includes a 1-week, on-campus
foundations review of basic course work. This option requires 2 years of post-
undergraduate work experience.

M.B.A. for professionals in South Florida option: This 24 month program starts
during the summer. For professionals who wish to continue working full time while
pursuing their degrees part time. Students attend classes once every 3 weeks
(Saturday-Sunday) in Fort Lauderdale. This option requires 2 years of post-
undergraduate work experience.

M.B.A./M.S. in medical sciences (biotechnology) program: Concurrent studies
leading to the Master of Business Administration and Master of Science degrees,
offered in cooperation with the College of Medicine, are in response to the needs of
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businesses engaged in biotechnological sciences. Both degrees can be obtained in 3
years. The program requires 1 year of science courses, 1 year of business courses,
and a year devoted to research and electives in business and science. Research is
done in one of the Interdisciplinary Center for Biotechnology Research core
laboratories. Students must meet the admission and curriculum requirements of both
degrees. Requirements of the M.B.A. program are those in effect when an applicant is
admitted to the program. A student must at all times remain in good standing in both
degree programs to remain in the M.B.A. program. This program requires 2 years of
post-undergraduate work experience.

M.B.A./Ph.D. in medical sciences program: Concurrent studies leading to the
Master of Business Administration and Doctor of Philosophy degrees are offered in
cooperation with the College of Medicine. This 120-credit program trains research
scientists to assume responsibilities as managers of biotechnical industries. Estimated
time to complete both degrees is 5 to 7 years. Students must meet the admission and
curriculum requirements of both programs. Requirements of the M.B.A. program are
those in effect when an applicant is admitted to the program. This program requires 2
years of post-undergraduate work experience.

M.B.A./J.D. program: A program of joint studies leading to the Master of Business
Administration and Juris Doctor degrees is offered under the joint auspices of the
Warrington College of Business Administration and the Levin College of Law. Current
M.B.A. or J.D. students must declare their intent to apply for the second degree
during their first year. Applications are then due according to admission schedules for
that year. Both degrees are awarded after a 4-year course of study. Students must
take both the LSAT and the GMAT before admission and meet the admission and
curriculum requirements of both degrees. Requirements of the M.B.A. program are
those in effect when an applicant is admitted to the program. This program requires 2
years of post-undergraduate work experience.

M.B.A./Pharm.D. program in management and pharmacy administration: A
program of concurrent studies culminating in both the Master of Business
Administration and Doctor of Pharmacy degrees allows students interested in both
management and pharmacy administration to obtain the appropriate education in both
areas. Candidates must meet the entrance requirements and follow the entrance
procedures of both the Warrington College of Business Administration and the College
of Pharmacy, and admission to the two programs must be simultaneous. The degrees
may be granted after 5 years of study. Requirements of the M.B.A. program are those
in effect when an applicant is admitted to the program. This program requires 2 years
of post-undergraduate work experience.

M.B.A./M.I.M. program in international management: A dual degree program
between the University of Florida (UF) and the American Graduate School of
International Management (Thunderbird) makes it possible to earn both degrees after
3 years of study. Students start the program at UF and apply to Thunderbird in their
first year. Requirements of the M.B.A. program are those in effect when an applicant
is admitted to the program. This program requires 2 years of post-undergraduate
work experience.

World Leadership M.B.A. option: A 16-month program for executives. The program
is divided into 5 modules and starts in January. This consortium program will bring
together top executives from all over the world to participate in a truly global M.B.A.
experience. During the course of the program, students attend classes in three 2-
week residencies and two 1-week residencies. These residencies will take place in 5
different countries (U.S., Belgium, U.K., India, and China). World Leadership M.B.A.
graduates will earn a consortium Master of Business Administration degree from the
University of Florida and Vlerick Leuven Gent Management School, plus a Master of
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Business Administration degree from Aston Business School. This program requires 10
years of post undergraduate work experience, and students are expected to have
significant people or project management responsibilities in their current positions.

Exchange programs: The M.B.A. program offers second-year students exchange
opportunities at numerous international universities. Currently, exchange programs
exist with schools in Australia, Belgium, Brazil, Chile, China, Canada, Denmark,
England, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Korea, Liechtenstein, the
Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Spain, Sweden, Taiwan, Thailand, and Turkey. For a
complete list of exchange partners, see http://www.cba.ufl.edu/sb/intlprograms/uf/
exchange.asp.

Master of Education

The Master of Education (M.Ed.) degree program meets the need for professional
personnel to serve a variety of functions required in established and emerging
educational activities of modern society. A thesis is not required.

All M.Ed. programs require at least 36 credits, with at least half of these credits
earned in courses in the College of Education. Up to 6 credit earned from 3000- and
4000-level courses taken outside the academic unit may be counted toward the
minimum requires for the degree provided they are part of an approved plan of study.
(See also General Requirements for Master's Degrees.)

At least 16 credits must be earned while the student is enrolled as a graduate student
in courses offered on the Gainesville campus of the University of Florida including
registration for at least 6 credits in a single term. This requirement may deviate where
distance education programs are considered.

Master of Engineering

Students may choose a thesis or nonthesis option for the Master of Engineering (M.E.)
degree. To be eligible for admission to the M.E. program, students must have earned
a bachelor's degree from an ABET-accredited college or they must complete
articulation work for equivalence. Admission requirements of the Graduate School
must be met. The College of Engineering may use the Fundamentals of Engineering
examination in lieu of the GRE for admitting students into the nonthesis master's
degree programs. Students who do not meet the ABET requirement may be admitted
to the Master of Science program (see section on Master of Arts and Master of
Science).

The nonthesis M.E. degree is a 30-credit course-work-only degree (practice-oriented
project or capstone course may be included in the 30 credits). At least 15 credits must
be in the student's major at the 5000 level or higher. For work outside the major,
courses numbered 3000 or above (not to exceed 6 credits) may be taken if they are
part of an approved plan of study. If a minor is chosen, at least 6 credits are required.
Two 6-credit minors may be taken. At the discretion of individual engineering
academic units, an oral or written examination may be required.

The thesis option requires 30 credits of course work, including up to 6 credits of 6971
(Research for Master's Thesis). At least 12 credits (not counting 6971) must be in the
student's major. Courses in the major must be at the 5000 level or higher. For work
outside the major, up to 6 credits of courses numbered 3000 or above may be taken if
part of an approved plan of study. If a minor is chosen, at least 6 credits are required.
Two 6-credit minors may be taken at the discretion of the academic unit. A
comprehensive oral and/or written final examination is required.
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An off-campus (distance learning) student who is a candidate for the nonthesis M.E.
degree must take half the course work from full-time UF faculty members and must
pass a comprehensive written examination administered by a committee from the
academic unit. If the student has a minor, the committee must include a member
representing that minor.

Master of Family, Youth, and Community Sciences

The Master of Family, Youth, and Community Sciences (M.F.Y.C.S.) degree prepares
students for mid-level leadership positions in public and private organizations,
agencies, and businesses that address the needs of families, youths, and
communities. The program of study provides the student with a broad base of
knowledge in the discipline. It includes required courses in the theoretical foundations
of the discipline, public policy analysis, program planning and evaluation, nonprofit
management and ethics for practitioners. This program requires at least 32 credit
hours (half of which are electives the student selects with the supervisory committee).
Completing the degree requires comprehensive written and oral examinations.

Master of Fine Arts

The Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.) degree is offered with majors in art, creative writing,
and theatre. Requirements are the same as for the Master of Arts with thesis, except
the M.F.A. requires at least 60 credits (54 for creative writing), including 6 to 9 credits
in 6971 (Research for Master's Thesis). Students in art and theatre substitute 6973
(Individual Project) creative work in lieu of the written thesis.

Admission: Applicants requesting admission to any of the programs should have an
earned baccalaureate degree in the same or a closely related field from an accredited
institution. Students must fulfill the admission requirements of their disciplines and
the Graduate School's admission criteria. In cases where the undergraduate degree is
not in the area chosen for graduate study, the student must demonstrate a level of
achievement fully equivalent to the bachelor's degree in the chosen graduate field. A
candidate deficient in certain areas must remove the deficiencies by successfully
completing appropriate courses.

Art or theatre candidates also must submit a portfolio of the creative work, or must
audition, before being accepted into the program. Creative writing candidates must
submit 2 short stories, 2 chapters of a novel, or 6 to 10 poems. Three years of work in
residence are usually needed to complete degree requirements. If deficiencies must
be removed, the residency could be longer. See Fields of Instruction for Art, English,
and Theatre.

Art: The M.F.A. degree with a major in art involves advanced visual research for those
who wish to attain a professional level of proficiency in studio work. Specialization is
offered in the studio areas of ceramics, creative photography, drawing, painting,
printmaking, sculpture, graphic design, and digital media. For studio work, the M.F.A.
is generally the terminal degree and is often the required credential for teachers of art
in colleges and universities.

In addition to the general requirements above, students must take at least 60 credits.
Requirements include 42 credits in studio courses (24 in specialization, 12 in electives,
and 6 in ART 6973C); 6 credits in art history; 3 credits in teaching art in higher
education (required if the student is to accept a teaching assistantship); 3 credits in
aesthetics, criticism, or theory; and 6 credits of electives. The College requires the
student to leave documentation of thesis project work for purposes of record,
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exhibition, or instruction.

Creative writing: The M.F.A. in creative writing develops writers of poetry and fiction
by a series of workshops and literature seminars. Candidates are expected to produce
a thesis (a manuscript of publishable poetry or fiction) at the end of the 3-year
program. The degree requires 9 courses (4 workshops, 3 literature courses, and 2
electives), 3 reading tutorials, and a thesis: 48 credits in all. Students take at least 1
workshop each term. All of the literature courses cannot be in the same century. The
electives may be literature seminars or workshops; 1 elective may be an approved
graduate course outside the Department of English.

Theatre: The M.F.A. degree with a major in theatre is for those interested in
production-oriented theatrical careers and teaching. Two specializations are offered:
acting and design. The craft skills encompassed in the program are later applied in
public and studio productions. The program requires 60 credits, including 18 credits of
core classes, 17 credits of specialty training, an internship, and a project in lieu of
thesis.

Master of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences

The nonthesis Master of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences (M.F.A.S.) program trains
students in the technical aspects of fisheries and aquatic sciences emphasizing written
and oral communication of scientific information. Requirements are the same as for
the Master of Science degree with the nonthesis option, except that the M.F.A.S. also
requires a technical paper. The program requires at least 26 graduate credits of
graded course work (at least 16 in the major). The final draft of the technical paper
must be submitted to all supervisory committee members for approval at least 3
weeks before the scheduled date of the oral and written final examination.

Master of Forest Resources and Conservation

The Master of Forest Resources and Conservation (M.F.R.C.) degree is for additional
professional preparation rather than primary research. Requirements are the same as
those listed under General Regulations for master's degrees, except that the M.F.R.C.
requires GRE scores of at least 500 verbal and 500 quantitative.

Work required: At least 32 credits of letter-graded course work with at least 12
credits of graduate course work in the major are required. A thesis is not required, but
the student must complete a technical project in an appropriate field. This project may
take various forms, such as a literature review, extension publication, video, training
manual, or curriculum. The M.F.R.C. requires a final examination covering the
candidate's entire field of study. The student must present the work to the
supervisory committee in an on-campus public forum before the final examination.

Master of Health Administration

The Master of Health Administration (M.H.A.), offered by the College of Public Health
and Health Professions, trains qualified individuals to become managers and leaders of
health care organizations. The degree provides a core of business and analytical skills,
concepts and knowledge specific to health administration, opportunities for application
and synthesis, and exposure to the field of practice. The M.H.A. program admits
students only in the fall term and requires full-time study for 2 years, plus a summer
internship between the first and second years. The program requires a total of 63
credits.

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Master of Health Science

The Master of Health Science (M.H.S.) degree, offered by the College of Public Health
and Health Professions, provides exposure to health research and meets the need for
leadership personnel in established and emerging health care programs. The College
currently offers programs in occupational therapy and rehabilitation counseling.

There are three paths to enter occupational therapy and attain the Master of Health
Science degree. The 4-term thesis option emphasizes research and is the appropriate
route for (but not limited to) students seeking admission to the College of Public
Health and Health Profession's Ph.D. program in rehabilitation science. The 3-term
nonthesis option emphasizes research and advanced theories related to the practice of
occupational therapy. Both options prepare leaders in the profession and require 36
credits. The third option, the distance learning program, is for working professionals
to increase knowledge in emerging practice areas and leadership.

The rehabilitation counseling program meets the need for professional personnel to
serve in various areas of rehabilitation counseling. The Department requires at least
52 academic credits for most students, including at least 49 credits in the major.
Some exceptionally well-qualified students may need fewer credits with approval of
the program chair. Work in the major includes both practicum experiences and a full-
time internship. Elective courses may complement the major and relate to the
student's career plans. All candidates must pass a comprehensive examination. See
General Regulations for requirements for all master's degrees.

Master of Interior Design

The Master of Interior Design (M.I.D.) allows students to direct their attention to a
variety of topics including design pedagogy and processes; sustainable, safe, and
secure environments; creative performance and innovation; and built heritage
conservation.

Work required includes at least 36 credits (no more than 6 thesis credits). Required
preparatory courses are in addition to the minimum credits for graduate work.

Master of International Construction Management

The Master of International Construction Management (M.I.C.M.) is a nonthesis,
distance education, advanced degree program with a research report/project
requirement offered by the Rinker School of Building Construction. The M.I.C.M.
allows students with computer and Internet access to attend classes at any time, any
place and to interact with faculty and classmates via the Internet.

Admissions: Applicants for admission must have:

- An undergraduate degree,

- At least 5 years of meaningful, supervisory-level construction management
experience,

- Acceptable GRE scores

- A grade point average of 3.00 on a 4.0 scale,

- If an international student, an acceptable score on one of the following: TOEFL
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(Test of English as a Foreign Language: computer=213, paper=550, web=80), IELTS
(International English Language Testing System: 6), MELAB (Michigan English
Language Assessment Battery: 77), or successful completion of the UF English
Language Institute program, and

- Sponsorship by the employer.

Work required: The M.I.C.M. prepares students to assume upper-level construction
management responsibilities in a multinational construction company. Specializations
include sustainable construction, information systems, construction safety, and human
resource management. In addition to 6 research-oriented graduate credits, the
student selects 1 or 2 specializations and then takes the rest of the required 33
credits from the remaining courses and special electives. Students must pass a
comprehensive oral and/or written examination on completing course work and the
master's research report/project.

Master of Landscape Architecture

The degree of Master of Landscape Architecture (M.L.A.) is the advanced professional
degree for graduates with baccalaureate credentials in landscape architecture and is a
first professional degree for the graduate from a nonlandscape architectural
background. Candidates are admitted from related and unrelated fields and
backgrounds. An advanced professional life experience track is available for eligible
candidates.

Work required: Candidates must complete at least 52 credits, including no more
than 6 credits of thesis or project. For students without baccalaureate credentials in
landscape architecture, required preparatory courses are in addition to the minimum
credits for graduate work. For advanced professional life experience candidates, the
minimum requirement is 30 credits, including thesis. At least 50% of all course work
must be graduate courses in landscape architecture. Some areas allow a project
(requiring 6 credits) in lieu of thesis, with permission of the academic unit's Graduate
Faculty.

Master of Latin

The Classics Department offers the nonthesis Master of Latin (M.L.) degree, a 30-
credit program mainly for currently employed and/or certified teaching professionals
who wish to widen their knowledge of Latin, broaden their education in the field of
Classics, and enhance their professional qualifications. This degree can be attained by
students in residence for fall/spring terms or by a program of summer course work at
UF and by directed independent study and/or distance learning courses during the
regular academic year.

Students registering during summer terms can complete the degree in 4 years by
earning 6 graduate credits each summer (total = 24), plus two 3-credit independent
study or distance learning courses during the intervening academic years. Those who
already have some graduate credit in Latin, or who can take more credits during the
year, can complete the degree more quickly.

Unlike the M.A. degree in Latin, the Master of Latin degree has no thesis requirement,
does not prepare students for Ph.D. level studies, and is aimed specifically at currently
employed and certified Latin teachers.

Admission: Contact the Department's Graduate Coordinator or Distance Learning
Coordinator before applying. Requirements for the admissions process are:
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- Apply to UF's Graduate School,

- Acceptable GRE scores,

- Three letters of recommendation, and

- Transcripts recording undergraduate courses (and graduate courses, if any;
students must demonstrate the ability to take Latin courses at the graduate level).

Degree requirements include at least 30 credits as a UF graduate student. Of
these, no more than 8 credits (grade of A, B+, or B) may be transferred from
institutions approved for this purpose by the Dean of the Graduate School. At least
half of the 30 credits required should be from Latin language and literature courses
(LAT or LNW courses at the 5000 level or above). UF graduate-level courses taken
before admission to Graduate School (e.g., in the Latin Summer Institutes) may be
applied to the 30 credits if approved by the Graduate School. The Department will
work closely with individual students to determine how many previous graduate
credits at UF or other institutions may be applied to this program.

The student may elect minor work in other academic units (e.g., history, philosophy,
art history, religion) although there is no requirement to do so. If a minor is chosen,
at least 6 credits are required in the minor field. Two 6-credit minors may be taken
with departmental permission. A GPA of 3.0 is required for minor credit and for all
work counted toward the degree. All work in a minor must be approved by the
supervisory committee.

Examination: The supervisory committee administers a final oral and written
comprehensive examination at completion of the course work. This examination
includes (1) an oral component on Roman literary tradition and (2) a written
component covering (a) Latin sight translation and grammar, (b) Roman history and
civilization, and if applicable (c) the minor, or minors. As preparation for this
examination, the student should read the required reading list of secondary works in
English.

Language requirement: The Department for this degree plan does not require, but
strongly recommends, at least a reading knowledge of one (or more) of the following:
German, French, Italian, or Spanish. Such study will facilitate reading important
secondary works not translated into English, enhance travel, and perhaps lead to
teaching opportunities in the chosen language at the secondary school level.

Master of Laws in Comparative Law

The Master of Laws in Comparative Law (LL.M.Comp.Law) degree is for graduates of
foreign law schools who want to enhance their understanding of the American legal
system and the English common law system. The program starts with Introduction to
American Law, a 4-credit summer course that gives students a foundation in the
American legal process. It also helps students acclimate to the College of Law and the
University community before starting the academic year. During fall and spring terms,
and with the director's approval, students choose their remaining 22 credits from
more than 100 Juris Doctor and LL.M. in Taxation courses and seminars. For
admission information consult the College of Law Catalog or write to the Comparative
Law Office, P.O. Box 117643, University of Florida, Gainesville FL 32611-7643.

Master of Laws in International Taxation
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The Master of Laws in International Taxation (LL.M.I.T.) degree program offers
advanced instruction for law graduates who plan to specialize in international taxation,
in the practice of law. Degree candidates must complete 26 credits. Of these 26
credits, 22 must be graduate-level tax courses, and 13 must be graduate-level
international tax courses, including a research and writing course.

Master of Laws in Taxation

The Master of Laws in Taxation (LL.M.T.) degree program offers advanced instruction
for law graduates who plan to specialize in federal taxation and particularly federal
income taxation, in the practice of law. Degree candidates must complete 26 credits.
Of these 26 credits, 22 must be graduate-level tax courses, including a research and
writing course.

Master of Music

The Master of Music (M.M.) degree is offered in music or music education. The music
program offers the following concentrations: choral conducting, composition,
instrumental conducting, music history and literature, ethnomusicology, music theory,
performance, and sacred music. The M.M. degree prepares students for careers as
teachers in studios, schools, and universities; performers; music historians; music
critics; church musicians; composers; conductors; and accompanists.

Admission: Applicants should have a baccalaureate degree in music or a closely
related area from an accredited institution and must meet the admission requirements
of the Graduate School and the College of Fine Arts. Students whose undergraduate
degree is in another discipline must demonstrate a level of achievement fully
acceptable for master's level work in this discipline. Applicants normally complete at
least 16 credits in music theory, 6 credits in music history, and 12 credits in
performance. A candidate deficient in certain undergraduate areas must remove the
deficiencies by successfully completing appropriate courses. If remedial work is
needed, the residency (usually 4 terms of full-time study) may be longer. An audition
is required for all students.

Work required includes at least 32 credits of course work (not counting prerequisite
or deficiency courses) incorporating a core of 9 credits. The core in all emphases
includes MUS 6716 (MUE 6785 in the music education program), MUT 6629, and one
MUH or MUL graduate course. A thesis or creative project in lieu of thesis is required.

The College of Fine Arts reserves the right to retain student work for purposes of
record, exhibition, or instruction. For more information, see Fields of Instruction.

Master of Occupational Therapy

The nonthesis Master of Occupational Therapy (M.O.T.) degree program is for
students who do not have a degree in occupational therapy, and who want to enter
the field of occupational therapy. The program gives students a holistic perspective
including an understanding of the philosophical and theoretical bases for practice in
the current health care environment. The M.O.T. program provides a strong
background in theory, assessment, and therapeutic intervention.

This 5-term program of graduate study consists of 3 terms of classroom course work
and 2 terms (24 weeks) of internship. Students enter the program after completing a
bachelor's degree. The M.O.T. degree is awarded after completing 58 credits.
Students must receive at least a B on all course work and satisfactory evaluations on
all clinical fieldwork.
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Master of Public Health

The Master of Public Health (M.P.H.) is a nonthesis degree program that prepares
students to become effective public health practitioners, scientists, and educators.
Graduates can contribute to the health of the local, national, and international
communities through advancing public health knowledge and by designing,
implementing, and evaluating programs and policies that prevent disease and
promote health. Students have the opportunity to develop skills in 1 of 6 public health
concentration areas:

- Biostatistics: Applying quantitative and analytical methods in public health research
and evaluation

- Environmental health: Assessing risk levels and protecting the public from
environmental threats to health

- Epidemiology: Studying the distribution and determinants of health In populations
and communities

- Public health management and policy: Providing leadership in public health
administration and developing policies to promote the public's health

- Public health practice: Developing breadth in the field of public health by studying 2
or more of the other concentration areas

- Social and behavioral sciences: Exploring the unique issues faced by diverse groups
and populations and acquiring skills to achieve social and behavioral change.

The M.P.H. degree program is a 48-credit program for individuals with bachelor's
degrees. Those with prior terminal degrees in health-related fields may take the M.P.
H. in an accelerated 42-credit format. Several collaborative programs with
professional and graduate degrees are available, including D.V.M./M.P.H., J.D./M.P.H.,
and Pharm.D./M.P.H. A combined degree program for seniors and a 15-credit
certificate program also are offered. For additional information, visit http://www.mph.
ufl.edu.

Admission: Applicants with any undergraduate major are considered for the program
as long as they meet the Graduate School admission requirements and their interests
match the program's philosophy and curriculum.

Work required: In the 48-credit program, students take 16 credits of core public
health course work and 5-8 credits of internship. Internships are designed to promote
competency in the concentration area and contribute to the student's career goals.
The remaining 24-27 credits include required and elective course work in the
concentration area chosen by the student. Specific course requirements vary by
concentration area.

Students who have a relevant terminal degree in a health-related field may be eligible
for the 42-credit accelerated program, pending M.P.H. admissions committee
approval. This program requires completion of 16 credits of core public health course
work, 21 credits of concentration course work, and a 5-credit internship.

Master of Science in Architectural Studies

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Admission: The Master of Science in Architectural Studies (M.S.A.S.) is a
nonprofessional, research degree for students with undergraduate degrees in any field
of study who wish to undertake advanced studies and research in architectural
specialties. Specialization is offered in environmental technology, architectural
preservation, urban design, history, and theory.

Work required includes at least 35 credits of course work incorporating up to 6
credits of ARC 6971 (Research for Master's Thesis). Most course work should be in the
School of Architecture, but multidisciplinary electives in planning, history, law,
engineering, art history, and real estate are encouraged. Students also may enroll in
one of the School's off-campus programs in Nantucket, in the Caribbean, in Hong
Kong, or in Vicenza. A thesis is required.

Requirements for level and distribution of credits, supervisory committee, and final
examination are the same as for the Master of Arts and Master of Science with thesis.

Master of Science in Nursing

The College of Nursing offers the Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.Nsg.) degree
(thesis or nonthesis) with advanced practice preparation for the roles of the nurse
practitioner in acute care, adult, family, neonatal, pediatric, psychiatric/mental health,
and midwifery nursing. In addition to the advanced practice clinical tracks, the College
also offers tracks in public health, adult health clinical nurse specialist, and the clinical
nurse leader (CNL). The CNL is a generalist clinician who brings a high level of clinical
competence and knowledge to the point of care and serves as a resource for the
health care team.

Program requirements include at least 46 credits for advanced practice clinical
tracks, and at least 36 credits for the generalist CNL track. Thesis M.S.Nsg. candidates
must prepare and present theses acceptable to their supervisory committees and the
Graduate School. An oral presentation of the thesis and a comprehensive exam in the
major are also required. M.S.N. candidates must pass a comprehensive written
examination in the major.

Cooperative M.S.Nsg. degree with Florida State University (FSU) and the
University of Florida (UF): For students in the nurse-midwifery clinical track, the
cooperative degree program is an approved mechanism allowing students to transfer
more than the usual number of semester credit hours (9 vs. 24) from FSU to UF. On
completing the curriculum, students are awarded an M.S.Nsg. from UF. Students meet
admissions requirements for both universities and take most of the core graduate and
primary care courses at FSU; on completing these courses, credits are transferred to
UF and students enroll in the UF midwifery clinical track courses. The guidebook for
midwifery students explains admissions, advisement, and progression for traditional
and cooperative degree students (http://www.nursing.ufl.edu/prospective/
curriculum_plans/
midwifery%20guidelines.pdf ).

Admission: Applicants for all M.S.Nsg. clinical tracks are encouraged to apply by
March 15. After March 15, applications are accepted through May 31, and students
are accepted on a space-available basis. For admission criteria and information on the
application process, see the Master of Science in Nursing page (http://www.nursing.
ufl.edu/prospective/prospective_msn.shtml). For general M.S.N. program inquiries,
contact Academic Support Services. For specific information on clinical midwifery,
contact Dr. Alice Poe, Clinical Coordinator, Nurse Midwifery Track, (904) 244-5174.

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Master of Statistics

The Master of Statistics (M.Stat.) degree requires at least 36 credits including at least
30 graduate credits in the major. Courses are selected in consultation with the
supervisory committee chair and approved by the supervisory committee. Students
must pass two examinations: (1) a first-year examination, given by a committee
designated for the purpose, on material covered in statistics courses for first-year
graduate students and (2) a final oral examination consisting of a presentation by the
student on a statistical topic not covered in depth in the regular course work. The
student should consult with his/her adviser to choose a topic, and present a written
report on that topic to the supervisory committee at least 1 week before the
examination date. A typical report is 8 to 10 pages. During and after the presentation,
the student's committee may ask questions related to the topic of the presentation
and related to other material covered in the student's program of study.

Back to Top

Doctoral Degrees

Doctor of Philosophy

The Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) is a research degree and is granted on evidence of
general proficiency, distinctive attainment in a special field, and particularly on ability
for independent investigation as demonstrated in a dissertation presenting original
research with a high degree of literary skill. Consequently, doctoral programs are
more flexible and varied than those leading to other graduate degrees. The Graduate
Council does not specify what courses are required for the Doctor of Philosophy
degree. General requirements: The program should be unified in relation to a clear
objective, the program should have the considered approval of the student's entire
supervisory committee, and the program should include an appropriate number of
credits of doctoral research.

Course Requirements

Course requirements for doctoral degrees vary from field to field and from student to
student. In all fields, the Ph.D. degree requires at least 90 credits beyond the
bachelor's degree. All master's degrees counted in the minimum must be earned in
the last 7 years.

Transfer of credit: No more than 30 credits of a master's degree from another
institution will be transferred to a doctoral program. If a student holds a master's
degree in a discipline different from the doctoral program, the master's work will not
be counted in the program unless the academic unit petitions the Dean of the
Graduate School. All courses beyond the master's degree taken at another university
to be applied to the Ph.D. degree must be taken at an institution offering the doctoral
degree and must be approved for graduate credit by the Graduate School of the
University of Florida. All courses to be transferred must be graduate-level, letter-
graded with a grade of B or better and must be demonstrated to relate directly to the
degree being sought. All such transfer requests must be made by petition of the
supervisory committee no later than the third term of Ph.D. study. The total number
of credits (including 30 for a prior master's degree) that may be transferred cannot
exceed 45, and in all cases the student must complete the qualifying examination at
the University of Florida. In addition, any prior graduate credits earned at UF (e.g., a
master's degree in the same or a different discipline) may be transferred into the
doctoral program at the discretion of the supervisory committee and by petition to the
Graduate School. The petition must show how the prior course work is relevant to the
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current degree.

Major: A Ph.D. student does the major work in an academic unit specifically approved
for offering doctoral courses and supervising dissertations. See Graduate Programs. At
least a B (3.00) is needed for courses included in the major.

Minor: With the supervisory committee's approval, the student may choose one or
more minor fields. Minor work may be completed in any academic unit outside the
major if approved for master's or doctoral programs listed in this catalog. The
collective grade for courses included in a minor must be B (3.00) or higher.

If one minor is chosen, the supervisory committee member representing the minor
suggests 12 to 24 credits of courses numbered 5000 or higher as preparation for a
qualifying examination. Part of this credit may have been earned in the master's
program. If two minors are chosen, each must include at least 8 credits. Competence
in the minor is demonstrated by written examination by the minor academic unit, or
by the oral qualifying examination.

Minor course work at the doctoral level may include courses in more than one
academic unit if the objective of the minor is clearly stated and the combination of
courses is approved by the Graduate School (this approval is not required for a minor
in one academic unit).

Leave of Absence

A doctoral student who ceases to be registered at UF for more than 1 term needs prior
written approval from the supervisory committee chair for a leave of absence for a
stated period of time. The student must reapply for admission on returning. See
Readmission and Catalog Year.

Supervisory Committee

Supervisory committees are nominated by the academic unit chair, approved by the
dean of the college concerned, and appointed by the Dean of the Graduate School.
The committee should be appointed as soon as possible after the student starts
doctoral work and no later than the end of the second term of equivalent full-time
study. The Dean of the Graduate School is an ex-officio member of all supervisory
committees.

Duties and responsibilities of the supervisory committee:

- Inform the student of all regulations governing the degree sought. This does not
absolve the student from responsibility for being informed about these regulations.
See General Regulations.

- Meet immediately after appointment to review the student's qualifications and
discuss and approve a program of study.

- Meet to discuss and approve the proposed dissertation project and the plans for
carrying it out.

- Give the student a yearly evaluation letter in addition to S/U grades earned for
research courses 7979 and 7980. The chair writes this letter after consulting with the
supervisory committee.

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- Conduct the qualifying examination (or participate in it, if administered by the
academic unit). In either event, the student and the entire supervisory committee
must be present for the oral part of the examination. This examination must be given
on campus. For exceptions, see Examinations in General Regulations.

- Meet when at least half the work on the dissertation is complete, to review
procedure, progress, and expected results; and to make suggestions for completion.

- Meet on campus when the dissertation is completed and conduct the final oral
examination to assure that the dissertation is a piece of original research and a
contribution to knowledge. At least four faculty members, including the entire
supervisory committee, must be present with the candidate for this examination. Only
the actual supervisory committee may sign the ETD Signature Page, and they must
approve the dissertation unanimously. See Examinations in General Regulations.

Membership: The supervisory committee for a doctoral candidate comprises at least
four members selected from the Graduate Faculty. At least two members, including
the chair, must be from the academic unit recommending the degree. At least one
member serves as external member and should be from a different educational
discipline, with no ties to the home academic unit. One regular member may be from
the home academic unit or another unit.

If a minor is chosen, the supervisory committee includes at least one Graduate
Faculty member representing the student's minor. If the student elects more than one
minor, each minor area must be represented on the supervisory committee.

Special appointments: People without Graduate Faculty status may be made official
members of a student's supervisory committee through the special appointment
process. Appropriate candidates for special appointments include

- Individuals from outside UF with specific expertise who contribute to a graduate
student's program of study

- Tenure-track faculty not yet qualified for Graduate Faculty status

- Nontenure-track faculty or staff at UF who do not qualify for Graduate Faculty
status

Limitations for special appointments:

- They do not hold Graduate Faculty appointments

- They have a special appointment that is specific only to an individual student's
committee

- They may not serve as a supervisory committee chair, cochair, external
member, or minor representative.

The student's supervisory committee chair requests the special appointment, briefly
explaining what the special appointment contributes to the supervisory committee. A
special appointment is made for a specific supervisory committee. If a student
changes to a new degree or major and the committee chair wishes to include the
special member on the new supervisory committee, another request must be
submitted to the Graduate School for the new committee.

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External member:

- Represents the interests of the Graduate School and UF

- Knows Graduate Council policies

- Serves as an advocate for the student at doctoral committee activities.

If the academic unit's committee activity conflicts with broader University policies or
practices, the external member is responsible for bringing such conflicts to the
attention of the appropriate governing body. Therefore, the external member is
prohibited from holding any official interest in the doctoral candidate's major academic
unit. Faculty holding joint, affiliate, courtesy, or adjunct appointments in the degree-
granting academic unit cannot be external members on a student's committee.

Minor member: The Graduate Faculty member who represents a minor on a
student's committee may be appointed as the external member if he/she does not
have a courtesy graduate appointment in the student's major academic unit.

Cochair: To substitute for the chair of the committee at any examinations, the
cochair must be in the same academic unit as the candidate.

Retired faculty: Graduate Faculty members who retire may continue their service on
supervisory committees for 1 year. With approval of the academic unit, retired faculty
may continue serving on existing or new committees beyond this period.

Substituting members at qualifying and final examination: If a supervisory
committee member cannot be present at the student's final defense, a Graduate
Faculty member in the same academic area may substitute for the absent committee
member. The substitute should sign the Final Examination form on the left side, in the
space provided for committee members, noting the name of the absent member.

The chair of the student's major academic unit also must indicate the reason for the
absence and state that the absent member agreed to this substitution at the final
examination.

The substitute should not sign the ETD signature page. The original committee
member must sign.

With approval of all members of the supervisory committee, one committee member
(not the chair or external member) may be off-site at a qualifying oral examination or
at the final oral defense of the thesis or dissertation, using modern communication
technology to be present rather than being physically present.

No substitutes are allowed for the chair or external member of the
committee. Changes to the supervisory committee may be entered online before the
qualifying examination.

The Graduate Council wants each supervisory committee to function as a University
committee (not a departmental committee), applying University-wide standards to the
various doctoral degrees. For complete information on the appointment process,
consult the Graduate Council Policy Manual, http://gradschool.ufl.edu/
archived-files/policy-manual-archived-copy.html (Chapter VIII).

Language Requirement
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Any foreign language requirement for the Ph.D. is established by the major academic
unit with approval of the college. The student should check with the graduate
coordinator of the appropriate academic unit for specific information. The foreign
language departments offer classes for graduate students starting to study a
language. See the current Schedule of Courses for available languages. All candidates
must be able to use the English language correctly and effectively, as judged by the
supervisory committee.

Campus Residence Requirement

Beyond the first 30 credits counted toward the doctoral degree, students must
complete 30 credits enrolled at the University of Florida campus or at an approved
branch station of the University of Florida Agricultural Experiment Stations or the
Graduate Engineering and Research Center. An academic unit or college may establish
and monitor its own more-stringent requirement as desired.

Qualifying Examination

All Ph.D. candidates must take the qualifying examination. It may be taken during the
third term of graduate study beyond the bachelor's degree.

The student must be registered in the term the qualifying examination is given.

The examination, prepared and evaluated by the full supervisory committee or the
major and minor academic units, is both written and oral and covers the major and
minor subjects. Except for allowed substitutions, all members of the supervisory
committee must be present with the student at the oral part. At this time the
supervisory committee is responsible for deciding whether the student is qualified to
continue work toward a Ph.D. degree.

If a student fails the qualifying examination, the Graduate School must be notified. A
re-examination may be requested, but it must be recommended by the supervisory
committee and approved by the Graduate School. At least 1 term of additional
preparation is needed before re-examination.

Time lapse: Between the oral part of the qualifying examination and the date of the
degree there must be at least 2 terms. The term the qualifying examination is passed
is counted, if the examination occurs before the midpoint of the term.

Registration in Research Courses

Advanced Research (7979) is open to doctoral students not yet admitted to candidacy
(classified as 7 and 8). Students enrolled in 7979 during the term they qualify for
candidacy will stay in this registration unless the academic unit elects to change their
enrollment to Research for Doctoral Dissertation (7980), which is reserved for doctoral
students admitted to candidacy (classified as 9).

Admission to Candidacy

A graduate student becomes a candidate for the Ph.D. degree when the student is
granted formal admission to candidacy. Such admission requires the approval of the
student's supervisory committee, the academic unit chair, the college dean, and the
Dean of the Graduate School. The approval must be based on

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- The academic record of the student

- The supervisory committee's opinion on overall fitness for candidacy

- An approved dissertation topic

- A qualifying examination as described above

The student should apply for admission to candidacy as soon as the qualifying
examination is passed and a dissertation topic is approved by the student's
supervisory committee.

Dissertation

Each doctoral candidate must prepare and present a dissertation that shows
independent investigation and that is acceptable in form and content to the
supervisory committee and to the Graduate School. The work must be of publishable
quality and must be in a form suitable for publication, using the Graduate School's
format requirements. The student and supervisory committee are responsible
for level of quality and scholarship. Graduate Council requires the Graduate
School Editorial Office, as agents of the Dean of the Graduate School, to review theses
and dissertations for acceptable format, and to make recommendations as needed.

Dissertation first submission: When first presented to the Graduate School
Editorial Office, the dissertation should be near-final (not a draft), completely
formatted, and printed on plain paper (do not print 2-sided). Students should be
completely familiar with the format requirements and should work with the ETD Lab to
troubleshoot their files before printing out their first submission for the Editorial Office
(see Deadlines section in this catalog).

- Format requirements:
http://gradschool.ufl.edu/pdf-files/editoria -format.pdf

- Format examples:
http://gradschool.ufl.edu/editorial/format.html#sam ples

- Checklist:
http://gradschool.ufl.edu/pdf-files/checklist-dissertation.pdf

- Graduate School Editorial Office:
http://gradschool.ufl.edu/editorial/introduction.html#contacts

- CIRCA's ETD Lab (technical support):
http://etd.circa.ufl.edu/download.html

By UF requirement, students must maintain access to their Gatorlink e-mail: the
Editorial Office e-mails the student when the dissertation has been reviewed. The
student is responsible for retrieving the marked dissertation and review comments
from the Editorial Office and for resolving any deficits related to the format
requirements, whether noted or not. As soon as they have defended, students satisfy
their committee's requirements, making any and all needed changes.

Uploading and submitting the final pdf: After changes have been made to the
satisfaction of the supervisory committee, the Final Exam form is given to the
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Graduate School Editorial Office, and the student may then upload and submit the
final pdf of the electronic dissertation, through the Editorial Document Management
(EDM) system. The Editorial Office checks to make sure the format is acceptable and
that the links work, and e-mails the student regarding the status of the ETD
(electronic thesis or dissertation). If accepted, no further changes are allowed.

Editorial final clearance: Among other requirements (see Checklist above), the final
dissertation must be accepted (not just submitted) by 5:00 p.m. of this deadline. Most
students complete all requirements well in advance.

Publication of dissertation: All dissertation students must pay a $65 microfilm fee
to University Financial Services, S113 Criser Hall. All dissertation students also must
sign a microfilm agreement form. This is due at dissertation first submission. Students
who began their graduate program in Fall 2001 or later must submit their final
dissertations electronically (not on paper).

Copyright: The student is automatically the copyright holder, by virtue of having
written the dissertation. A copyright page should be included immediately after the
title page to indicate this. The Editorial Office no longer accepts copyright registration
requests. Registering copyright is not required and does not benefit most students.
Any students who wish to register a copyright can do so themselves (http://www.
copyright.gov).

Dissertation language: Dissertations must be written in English, except for students
pursuing degrees in Romance or Germanic languages and literatures. Students in
these disciplines, with the approval of their supervisory committees, may write in the
topic language. A foreign language dissertation should have the Acknowledgments,
Abstract, and Biographical Sketch written in English. All page titles before Chapter 1
should also be in English

Journal articles: Dissertations may include journal articles as chapters, if all
copyright considerations are addressed appropriately. In such cases, Chapter 1 should
be a general introduction, tying everything together as a unified whole. The last
chapter should be general conclusions, again tying everything together into a unified
whole. Any chapter representing a journal article needs a footnote at the bottom of
the first page of the chapter: "Reprinted with permission from . giving the source,
just as it appears in the list of references. The dissertation should have only 1 abstract
and 1 reference list.

Guidelines for Restriction on Release of Dissertations

Research performed at the University can effectively contribute to the education of
our students and to the body of knowledge that is our heritage only if the results of
the research are published freely and openly. Conflicts can develop when it is in the
interests of sponsors of university research to restrict such publication. When such
conflicts arise, the University must decide what compromises it is willing to accept,
taking into account the relevant circumstances. The AAU guidelines contained herein
were adopted by the University of Florida Graduate Council on January 19, 1989.

- Sponsors' recommendations should be considered advisory and not mandatory.

- Maximum delay in publication should not exceed 3 months.

- No additional delays in publication beyond the pre-review. Timely submission of any
patent or copyright applications requires effective communication among investigators
and sponsors throughout the project.
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Participation in nonclassified sponsored research programs cannot be restricted on
the basis of citizenship.

Agreements involving publication delays must not delay students from final defense
of their dissertations.

Final Examination

After submitting the dissertation and completing all other work prescribed for the
degree, the candidate is given a final examination, oral or written or both, by the
supervisory committee, on campus. The candidate and the entire supervisory
committee must be present at the defense. The defense should be no more than 6
months before degree award. All forms should be signed at the defense: the candidate
and the supervisory committee chair sign the ETD Rights and Permission form; and
the entire supervisory committee should sign the ETD Signature Page and the Final
Examination Report. If dissertation changes are requested, the supervisory committee
chair may hold the Final Examination Report until satisfied with the dissertation.

Satisfactory performance on this examination and adherence to all Graduate School
regulations outlined above complete the requirements for the degree.

Time limitation: All work for the doctorate must be completed within 5 calendar
years after the qualifying examination, or this examination must be repeated.

Back to Top

Doctor of Audiology

The Colleges of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Public Health and Health Professions
offer a program leading to the degree of Doctor of Audiology. The Au.D. degree is
awarded after a 4-year program of graduate study. Foreign languages are not
required. The program leading to the Au.D. degree is administered by the
Departments of Communicative Disorders and Communication Sciences and
Disorders, their respective colleges, and the Graduate School.

Admission: To be considered for the Au.D. program, students must meet the
following minimum requirements:

A 3.00 junior-senior undergraduate grade point average and a program specific
acceptable score on the GRE General Test,

Evidence of good potential for academic success in at least three letters of
recommendation, and

Evidence of acceptable skills in written expression through a personal statement
describing the motivation and skills applicable to graduate study and the profession of
audiology.

Course requirements includes 125 credits for students entering the program with a
bachelor's degree awarded by an accredited institution consisting of at least 70
credits of didactic instruction, 45 credits of applied practicum, and 3 credits of
audiology research.

A 70-credit program leading to the Au.D. is offered for applicants holding an earned
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master's degree in audiology from an accredited institution.

A 45-credit program leading to the Au.D. is offered for applicants holding an earned
master's from an accredited institution, certification and/or licensure in audiology, and
at least 3 years of full-time experience in audiology.

Supervisory committee: Supervisory committees are nominated by the chairs of the
Departments of Communication Sciences and Disorders and Communicative
Disorders, approved by the deans of their respective colleges, and appointed by the
Dean of the Graduate School.

The committee should be appointed as soon as possible after the student starts the
program and, in general, no later than the end of the second term of equivalent full-
time study. The supervisory committee shall consist of no fewer than two members of
the audiology Graduate Faculty.

Duties of the supervisory committee include curriculum planning for the student,
annual evaluation of the student's progress in the program including administration of
the oral and written comprehensive examination in the third year of study, and
determining successful completion of the audiology research project.

Comprehensive examination, required for all Au.D. candidates, may be taken
during the eighth term of study beyond the bachelor's degree. Both written and oral,
this examination is prepared and evaluated by the supervisory committee, which is
responsible for determining whether the student is qualified to continue work toward
the degree by completing the clinical residency.

Back to Top

Doctor of Education

The Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) degree offers advanced professional training and
academic preparation for the highest levels of educational practice. Programs are
available in the School of Teaching and Learning and the Departments of Counselor
Education; Educational Administration and Policy; Educational Psychology; and Special
Education.

A minimum of 90 credits beyond the bachelor's degree (master's degrees included
must be in the last 7 years) is required. Course requirements vary with the academic
unit and with the student's plan for research and/or professional pursuit. With the
approval of the supervisory committee, the student may choose one or more minor
fields of study. The Ed.D. requires a qualifying examination and a dissertation.

See Requirements for the Ph.D. for information on transfer of credit, minors, leave of
absence, supervisory committee, language requirement, campus residence
requirement, qualifying and final examinations, admission to candidacy, dissertation,
and certification. These statements apply to both the Ph.D. and Ed.D. degrees.

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Doctor of Nursing Practice

The College of Nursing offers a program leading to the degree of Doctor of Nursing
Practice (D.N.P.). The program prepares advanced practice nurses with the
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knowledge, skills, and abilities needed in today's complex health care environment
and produces advanced practice nurses with educational background comparable to
health care practitioners in other fields.

Admission: To be considered for the D.N.P. program, students must meet the
following minimum requirements:

A master's degree in nursing and a GPA of at least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale.

A score of 500 or higher on each of the verbal and quantitative sections of the
Graduate Record Examination (GRE).

Completion of the GRE analytical section.

Current licensure (or eligibility) in the state of Florida

Program of study: The D.N.P. program consists of 93 credits that can be completed
in 8 semesters of full-time study or 14 semesters of part-time study. Students who
already have an M.S.N. degree are able to satisfy the requirements of the D.N.P.
curriculum upon completion of 48 credits.

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Doctor of Plant Medicine

The College of Agricultural and Life Sciences offers an interdisciplinary program
leading to the degree of Doctor of Plant Medicine (D.P.M.). The D.P.M. degree is
awarded after a 3- to 4-year program of graduate study. Foreign languages are not
required. The program leading to the D.P. M. degree is administered by the College of
Agricultural and Life Sciences and the Graduate School.

Admission: Students must meet the following minimum requirements:

B.S. or B.A. degree, preferably in biological, agricultural, or health science.

A 3.00 grade point average in upper-division courses.

A program specific acceptable score on the GRE General Test.

Applicants from countries where English is not the native language must also
achieve a satisfactory score on one of the following: TOEFL (Test of English as a
Foreign Language: computer=213, paper=550, web= 80), IELTS (International
English Language Testing System: 6), MELAB (Michigan English Language Assessment
Battery: 77) or successful completion of the University of Florida English Language
Institute program.

Evidence of good potential for academic success in at least three letters of
recommendation.

Evidence of acceptable skills in written expression through personal statements
briefly describing their backgrounds, reasons, and career goals for studying plant
medicine.

Course requirements: Students entering the program with a bachelor's degree must
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earn 120 credits. This includes at least 90 credits of course work and 30 credits of
internship. Students entering the program with a master's degree in a related area
may be allowed to transfer up to 30 credits in graduate courses corresponding to
those required by the plant medicine program.

Supervisory committee: The supervisory committee is selected by the student,
nominated by the Director of the Plant Medicine Program, approved by the Dean of
the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences, and appointed by the Dean of the
Graduate School. The committee should be appointed as soon as possible after
starting the program and before midpoint of the student's third term. Each
supervisory committee must consist of three UF Graduate Faculty members: one each
from entomology/nematology, plant pathology, and plant/soil science. The duties of
the supervisory committee include planning elective courses and internships, helping
to complete the program of study form (Form 2), evaluating elective internships,
periodically evaluating the student's progress in the program (a minimum of two
supervisory committee meetings are required and the student should meet with the
committee chair regularly and at the start of each semester), and administering the
final oral comprehensive examination.

Comprehensive examination: Both written and oral comprehensive examinations
are required of all D.P.M. students. The written examination has three sections:
entomology/nematology, plant pathology, and plant/soil science. Faculty from the
appropriate disciplines are appointed by the Program Director to develop and grade
the final written examination, working in concert with faculty who teach courses
required for the D.P.M. degree. The three sections of the written exam may be taken
independently during the student's last three semesters in the program at the
discretion of the supervisory committee and after completion of all course work and
internships. After a student passes all three sections of the final written examination
(80% or higher is considered a passing grade), the supervisory committee administers
an oral examination that tests the student's ability to diagnose and manage plant
health problems. A student who fails to pass a comprehensive examination may
retake it within 3 months.

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Specialized Degrees

Engineer

For those engineers who need additional technical depth and diversification in their
education beyond the master's degree, the College of Engineering offers the degree of
Engineer(Eng.). This degree requires at least 30 credits of graduate work beyond the
master's degree. It is not to be considered as a partial requirement toward the Ph.D.
degree. The student's objective after the master's degree should be the Ph.D. or the
Engineer degree.

Admission to the program: Students must have completed a master's degree in
engineering and apply for admission to the Graduate School of the University of
Florida. The master's degree is regarded as the foundation for the degree of Engineer.
The master's degree must be based on the candidate having a bachelor's degree in
engineering from an ABET-accredited curriculum or having taken sufficient articulation
course work to meet the minimum requirements specified by ABET.

Course and residence requirements: Total registration in an approved program
must include at least 30 graduate credits beyond the master's degree. This minimum
requirement must be earned through the University of Florida. The last 30 credits
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must be completed within 5 calendar years.

Supervisory committee: Each student admitted to the program needs a supervisory
committee with at least 3 members of the Graduate Faculty (2 from the major
academic unit, and at least 1 from a supporting academic unit). In addition, every
effort should be made to have a representative from industry as an external adviser
for the student's program.

This committee should be appointed as soon as possible after the student is admitted
to Graduate School and no later than the end of the second term of study.

This committee informs the student of all regulations pertaining to the degree
program. The committee is nominated by the academic unit chair, approved by the
Dean of the College of Engineering, and appointed by the Dean of the Graduate
School. The Dean of the Graduate School is an ex-officio member of all supervisory
committees. If a thesis or report is required, the committee will approve the proposed
thesis or report and the plans for carrying it out. The thesis must be submitted to the
Graduate School. The committee will also conduct the final examination on campus
when the plan of study is completed.

Plan of study: Each plan of study is developed on an individual basis for each
student. Thus, there are no specific requirements for the major or minor; each
student is considered individually. If the plan of study includes a thesis, the student
may register for 6 to 12 credits of 6972 (Research for Engineer's Thesis).

Thesis: The thesis should represent performance at a level above that ordinarily
associated with the master's degree. It should clearly be an original contribution; this
may take the form of scientific research, a design project, or an industrial project
approved by the supervisory committee. Work on the thesis may be conducted in an
industrial or governmental laboratory under conditions stipulated by the supervisory
committee.

Final examination: After the student completes all work on the plan of study, the
supervisory committee conducts a final comprehensive oral and/or written
examination (for thesis students, this also involves defending the thesis). This
examination must be taken on campus with all participants present.

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Specialist in Education

An Ed.S. program develops competencies needed for a professional specialization.
Specializations are offered in the School of Teaching and Learning and the
Departments of Counselor Education, Educational Administration and Policy,
Educational Psychology, and Special Education. Ed.S. applicants must apply and be
admitted to UF's Graduate School. All work for the degree, including transferred
credit, must be completed within 7 years before the degree is awarded.

The Ed.S. degree is awarded on completing a planned program with at least 72 credits
beyond the bachelor's degree or at least 36 credits beyond the master's degree. All
credits accepted for the program must contribute to the unity and the stated objective
of the total program.

Students are tested (no more than 6 months before graduation) by written and oral
examination. A thesis is not required; however, each program includes a research
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component relevant to the intended profession. With the academic unit's approval,
course work taken as part of the specialist program may count toward a doctoral
degree.

Students who enter the program with an appropriate master's degree from another
accredited institution must complete at least 36 credits of post-master's study to meet
the following requirements:

At least 36 credits in graduate-level courses

At least 12 credits in graduate-level professional education courses

Students who enter the program with a bachelor's degree only must (during the 72-
credit program) meet these requirements in addition to the requirements of the
Master of Education degree or its equivalent.

Only graduate-level (5000-7999) work, earned with a grade of B or better, is eligible
for transfer of credit. A maximum of 15 transfer credits are allowed. These can include
no more than 9 credits from institutions approved by UF, with the balance obtained
from postbaccalaureate work at UF. Credits transferred from other universities are
applied toward meeting the degree requirements, but the grades earned are not
computed in the student's grade point average. Acceptance of transfer of credit
requires approval of the student's supervisory committee and the Dean of the
Graduate School.

Petitions for transfer of credit for the Ed.S. degree must be made during the student's
first term of enrollment in the Graduate School. The supervisory committee is
responsible for basing acceptance of graduate transfer credits on established criteria
for ensuring the academic integrity of course work.

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Nontraditional Programs

Concurrent Graduate Programs

Any student interested in pursuing two master's degrees in two different programs or
two master's degrees in the same program concurrently should discuss the proposed
study with Graduate Student Records (392-4643, 106 Grinter) before applying.
Written approval is needed from each academic unit and the Graduate School Dean.
The student must be officially admitted to both programs through regular procedures.
No more than 9 credits from the first program may be applied toward the second.
Contact the academic unit(s) for details.

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Joint Degree Programs

A joint degree program leads to a graduate degree and a professional degree.
Normally 12 credits of professional courses count toward the graduate degree and 12
credits of graduate courses count toward the professional degree. Individual academic
units determine whether a joint degree program is appropriate. Joint programs
established before January 1, 2003, may have other requirements.

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To participate in a joint program, a student must be admitted to both programs.
Enrollment in one program may precede enrollment in the other according to timelines
set by the program. During the term the student is graduating, registration is required
(at least 3 credits fall or spring, or 2 credits summer). This course work must be credit
that applies toward the graduate degree requirements. See graduate coordinator for
details.

Combined Bachelor's/Master's Degree Programs

UF offers a number of bachelor's/master's programs for superior students. In these
programs, 12 credits of graduate-level courses are counted for both degrees. See
Transfer of Credit for requirements. For admission requirements and available
programs, contact the academic unit.

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State University System Programs

Traveling Scholar program: By mutual agreement of the appropriate academic
authorities in both the home and host institutions, traveling scholars' admission
requirements are waived and their earned credits are guaranteed acceptance.
Traveling scholars are normally limited to 1 term on the host campus, and it cannot
be their final term. The program offers special resources on another campus that are
not available on the student's home campus. To participate, graduate students need
prior approval from their graduate coordinator, their supervisory committee chair, and
the Dean of the Graduate School. Interested students should contact Graduate
Student Records, 106 Grinter Hall.

Cooperative degree programs: In certain degree programs, faculty from other
universities in the State University System hold Graduate Faculty status at UF. In
those approved areas, the intellectual resources of these Graduate Faculty members
are available to students at UF.

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Interdisciplinary Graduate Certificates and Concentrations

A number of graduate programs offer interdisciplinary enhancements in the form of
concentrations, field research, or graduate certificates. Those approved by the
Graduate Council are summarized on the next pages.

African Studies

The Center for African Studies, a National Resource Center on Africa (funded partly
by Title VI of the Higher Education Act), directs and coordinates interdisciplinary
instruction, research, and outreach related to Africa. In cooperation with participating
academic units throughout the University, the Center offers a Certificate in African
Studies for master's and doctoral students. The curriculum provides a broad
foundation for students preparing for teaching or other professional careers requiring
knowledge of Africa.

Graduate fellowships and assistantships: Students pursuing degrees in
participating academic units can compete for graduate assistantships and Title VI
Foreign Language and Area Studies fellowships. Extracurricular activities: The Center
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for African Studies sponsors the annual Carter Lectures on Africa on a given theme, a
weekly colloquium series (BARAZA) with invited speakers, an African film series, and
periodic brown bag discussions. Other conferences and lectures, and performances
and art exhibits in conjunction with other campus units, are held throughout the
academic year. The Center also directs an extensive outreach program addressed to
public schools, community colleges, and universities nationwide.

Library resources: The Center for African Studies gives direct support for African
library acquisitions to meet the instructional and research needs of its faculty and
students. The Africana Collection exceeds 120,000 volumes and 500 periodicals. The
Map Library has 360,000 maps and 165,000 serial photographs and satellite images
and is among the top five academic African map libraries in the U.S.

Graduate certificate program: The Center for African Studies, cooperating with
participating academic units, offers a Certificate in African Studies in conjunction with
the master's and doctoral degrees.

For more information about the various programs and activities of the Center, contact
the Director, Center for African Studies, 427 Grinter Hall, website http://www.africa.
ufl.edu.

Agroforestry

The agroforestry interdisciplinary concentration is administered through the School of
Forest Resources and Conservation. It offers facilities for interdisciplinary graduate
education (M.S., Ph.D.) by combining course work and research around a thematic
field focusing on agroforestry, especially in the context of tropical land use. Students
seeking admission to the concentration need a degree in a relevant field such as
agronomy, forestry, horticulture, soil science, or social sciences. They should apply to
the School of Forest Resources and Conservation or another academic unit that closely
represents their background and interest. Course work may be chosen from several
related disciplines. Thesis research can be undertaken in Florida or overseas. Degrees
are awarded through the academic units the candidates are enrolled in.

In conjunction with the graduate degree, a student can earn a concentration or minor
in agroforestry by fulfilling certain requirements. Students who have a primary
interest in agroforestry and undertake graduate research on an agroforestry topic can
seek the concentration. Those who have an active interest and some training in
agroforestry, but do not conduct graduate research on an agroforestry topic, can earn
a minor. Candidates meeting the requirements can have Concentration in Agroforestry
or Minor in Agroforestry appear on their transcripts.

Each option requires completing FNR 5335 (Agroforestry) and an appropriate number
of approved supporting courses. These courses should be distributed over at least two
academic units outside the major to prepare the student to function in
multidisciplinary teams and to associate with professionals from other disciplines.
Students whose background is in biology are encouraged to take social science
courses, and vice versa.

For a student with a concentration or minor in agroforestry, at least one member of
the supervisory committee should represent agroforestry. The Agroforestry Program
Advisory Committee requires this member to counsel the student on selecting courses
and the research topic.

For more information, contact the Agroforestry Program Leader, 330 Newins-Ziegler
Hall, Phone (352) 846-0880, Fax (352) 846-1277, E-mail pknair@ufl.edu.
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Animal Molecular and Cell Biology

The interdisciplinary concentration in animal molecular and cell biology (AMCB) gives
graduate students in the animal and veterinary sciences an understanding of
principles of molecular and cell biology as applied to animal health and production. It
emphasizes participation in molecular and cell biology research and provides an
intellectual environment for cross-fertilization among disciplines. Graduate Faculty
from the Departments of Animal Sciences, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology,
Chemistry, and the College of Veterinary Medicine participate in the program. The
AMCB gives graduate students access to the diverse research facilities needed to
study cellular and molecular biology, reproductive biology, virology, immunology, and
endocrinology. Facilities exist for recombinant DNA research, experimental surgery, in
vitro culture of cells, tissue and organ explants, embryo manipulation, vaccine
production, and recombinant protein engineering.

Ph.D. degrees are awarded by participating academic units, with an interdisciplinary
concentration in animal molecular and cell biology. Applicants need a strong
background in animal or veterinary sciences. Graduate degree programs are designed
by each student's supervisory committee, headed by the member who represents
AMCB. All students must complete a core curriculum, may obtain cross-disciplinary
training through rotations in laboratories of participating faculty, and may participate
in the AMCB seminar series.

Requirements for admission to AMCB are the same as for the faculty adviser's
academic unit and college. Graduate assistantships and fellowships are available from
sources in individual academic units and the AMCB. For more information, contact Dr.
Peter J. Hansen, Department of Animal Sciences, pjhansen@ufl.edu.

Biological Sciences

The Archie Carr Center for Sea Turtle Research conducts research on all aspects
of the biology of sea turtles. Researchers at the Center for Sea Turtle Research,
collaborating with students and faculty of various academic units, take a
multidisciplinary approach to address the complex problems of sea turtle biology and
conservation. Scientists from the Center have investigated questions of sea turtle
biology around the world, from the molecular level to the ecosystem level, from
studies of population structure based on mitochondrial DNA to the effects of ocean
circulation patterns on the movements and distribution of sea turtles. Long-term field
studies of the Center are conducted mainly at two research stations in the Bahamas
and the Azores. For more information, contact the Director, Archie Carr Center for Sea
Turtle Research, 223 Bartram Hall, Phone (352) 392-5194, Website http://accstr.ufl.
edu.

The Whitney Laboratory for Marine Bioscience is a UF research center for
biomedical research and biotechnology. Founded in 1974, the Whitney Lab is
dedicated to using marine model animals for studying fundamental problems in
biology and applying that knowledge to issues of human health, natural resources,
and the environment.

The academic staff of the Whitney Laboratory consists of 10 tenure-track and 2
nontenure-track faculty members, together with 50 associates, students, and visiting
scientists. Dr. Peter A. V. Anderson is the director.

Fields of research conducted at the Whitney Laboratory include chemosensory and
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visual physiology and biochemistry, neural pattern generators, ion channel structure
and function, neurogenomics, synaptogenesis and synaptic physiology, protein-lipid
interactions, physiology and evolution of neurotransmitter pathways, membrane
pumps and transporters, and regulation of ciliary mechanisms. This research uses the
techniques of modern cell and molecular biology, for which the Laboratory is
particularly well equipped and recognized.

Research at Whitney Laboratory attracts graduate students and scientists from all
over the United States and abroad. Students enroll in the graduate programs of
academic units on campus and complete their course work before moving to the
Whitney Laboratory, where they conduct their dissertation research under the
supervision of resident faculty. An NSF undergraduate research training program at
the Whitney Laboratory is also available for 10-week periods.

The Laboratory is situated on a narrow barrier island with both the Atlantic Ocean and
the Intracoastal Waterway within a few hundred feet of the facility. It is located in
Marineland, about 18 miles south of St. Augustine and 80 miles from Gainesville.

For more information, contact the Director, Whitney Laboratory for Marine Bioscience,
9505 Ocean Shore Blvd, St. Augustine FL 32080-8610, Phone (904) 461-4000; Fax
(904) 461-4008; Website http://www.whitney.ufl.edu.

The UF Marine Laboratory at Seahorse Key is a field station providing (a) support
for research by students, faculty, and visiting scientists; (b) an outstanding teaching
program in marine related subjects; and (c) support from public education related to
marine, estuarine, and coastal resources of Florida. Seahorse Key is 57 miles west of
Gainesville on the Gulf Coast, 3 miles offshore and opposite Cedar Key. Facilities
include a research vessel, several smaller outboard-powered boats for shallow water
and inshore work, a 20 x 40 foot research and teaching building, and a 10-room
residence, with 2 kitchens, a dining lounge, and dormitory accommodations for 24
persons.

Chemical Physics

The Center for Chemical Physics, with participating faculty from the Departments of
Chemistry, Physics, and Chemical Engineering, is concerned with graduate education
and research in the theoretical, experimental, and computational aspects of problems
in the borderline between chemistry and physics. Graduate students join one of the
above academic units and follow a special curriculum. The student receives a Ph.D.
degree and a Certificate in Chemical Physics. For information, contact the Director, Dr.
Valeria Kleiman, 311A Chemistry Laboratory Building, P.O. Box 117200, Gainesville FL
32611, E-mail kleiman@chem.ufl.edu.

Ecological Engineering

The Graduate Certificate in Ecological Engineering is for graduate engineering
students wishing to develop expertise in ecological solutions to engineering problems.
Students interested in the certificate must apply for admission through the
Department of Environmental Engineering Sciences. The certificate program is open to
individuals in any graduate program who hold an undergraduate engineering degree,
or who complete the additional undergraduate engineering articulation courses
needed to bring the student's background to the minimum level required for engineers
by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology.

The certificate program consists of 15 course credits, and a research project with
content materially related to some aspect of ecological engineering. If appropriate, the
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15 credits of graduate course work may count toward the minimum requirements for
the graduate degree. The student's terminal project, master's thesis, or individual
studies project may satisfy the ecological engineering project requirement. For more
information, contact the Graduate Coordinator, Department of Environmental
Engineering Sciences, P.O. Box 116450, University of Florida, Gainesville FL 32611,
Phone (352) 392-8450.

Geographic Information Systems

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) revolutionized the way land features are
located, measured, inventoried, managed, planned, and studied. GIS provides
theories and methods for measuring location and topography, physical and biological
attributes, and distribution of cultural components through data storage, analysis,
modeling, mapping, and data display.

GIS applications are diverse. They include determining the suitability of land for
different uses, planning future land uses, setting cadastral boundaries for the purpose
of property recognition and taxation and regulation, analyzing land and land-cover for
both resource inventories and scientific studies, and siting commercial enterprises.

Users and producers of GIS include engineers, geographers, planners, biologists and
ecologists, land resource managers, archaeologists, sociologists, public health
professionals, medical researchers, property tax assessors, law enforcement officers,
land-development companies, utility companies, and retail stores. Undergraduate and
graduate students who learn to use GIS technology are in high demand and so start
at higher salaries than their non-GIS peers. As a result the GIS community at the
University of Florida developed the Interdisciplinary Concentration for
Geographic Information Systems (ICGIS).

The ICGIS integrates existing GIS resources on campus, for graduate students, in
response to changing regulatory environments in institutions and governments at all
levels. This concentration established a standard set of courses and activities that
allow graduate students to become experts in creating, studying, and using
geographic information. Such graduates are in strong positions to meet future
regulatory requirements for certification as professionals. Structurally, the ICGIS
established a five-category curriculum within the standard M.S., M.A., M.E., or Ph.D.
requirements. Completing the GIS concentration is officially recognized by statements
on transcripts and a certificate.

For more information, contact Dr. Scot E. Smith, University of Florida, P.O. Box
110565, Gainesville FL 32611, Phone (352) 392-4990 E-mail sesmith@ifas.ufl.edu

Gerontological Studies

The University of Florida Network for Biobehavioral and Social Research and Training
in Aging (The Age Network), in cooperation with the Psychology Department, offers a
Graduate Certificate in Gerontology.

The Certificate constitutes the required curriculum for all aging training program
trainees. The Certificate program is intended for students who have a strong
gerontology/geriatric focus in their graduate program and will be completing a
master's thesis or doctoral dissertation on aging.

For details on the Geriatric Care Management Certificate, contact The Age Network, c/
o Psychology Advising Office, Psychology Building, Room 135; Phone (352) 392-0601
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ext. 206; E-mail psyadv@grove.ufl.edu.

Historic Preservation

Historic preservation is the safeguarding of all cultural heritage: tangible and
intangible. The College of Design, Construction, and Planning offers an
interdisciplinary opportunity to study for the profession through multiple fields
including archeology, architecture, landscape architecture, urban and regional
planning, interior design, building construction, museum studies, law, and cultural
tourism. The master's degree course work is practical and technical in scope and
includes the study of history, research techniques, traditional crafts, materials
conservation, documentation, interpretation, cultural research management, housing,
urban rejuvenation and adaptive use of historic structures, restoration methodologies,
economics, green design and sustainable/livable communities.

The 21st century offers significant expansion of the field of heritage conservation to
address smart growth, sustainability, and economic development initiatives. Many
related jobs exist, including preservation consultant, preservation contractor,
preservation researcher, Main Street program director, site manager, lawyer,
archeologist, cultural resource manager, historian, real estate professional, and policy
administrator.

The College offers several nationally recognized field schools or practice: Preservation
Institute: Nantucket, Traditional Crafts Field School, and the National Historic
Landmarks District in Saint Augustine, America's oldest city.

The Interdisciplinary Concentration and Certificate in Historic Preservation
(ICCHP) integrates resources throughout UF to address the diverse topics relevant to
the field. Thus, the ICCHP establishes a set of courses that allow graduate students to
gain expertise in researching and applying historic preservation in the United States
and abroad. Depending on the student's career goals and background, this can include
recognizing, documenting, and protecting historic structures and sites; rehabilitation
and restoration technologies; and exploring emerging and related specializations such
as community development and sustainable development.

The interdisciplinary curriculum structure draws on course work providing 12 credits
for master's students and 15 credits for Ph.D. students specializing in historic
preservation. The concentration is officially recognized by statements on the transcript
and by a certificate.

For more information, contact Roy Eugene Graham, FAIA, Bienecke-Reeves
Distinguished Professor, Director of Historic Preservation Programs, University of
Florida, P.O. Box 115701, Gainesville FL 32611, Phone (352)392-0205, ext. 233, E-
mail regraham@ufl.edu.

Hydrologic Sciences

Interdisciplinary graduate studies in hydrologic sciences are for science and
engineering students seeking advanced training in diverse aspects of water quantity
and quality, and water-use issues. This concentration emphasizes (1) understanding
the physical, chemical, and biological processes occurring over broad spatial and
temporal scales; and (2) skills in hydrologic policy and management based on a
strong background in natural and social sciences and engineering.

Graduate Faculty from nine departments in three colleges contribute to this
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interdisciplinary concentration. Depending on academic background and research
interests, students may earn a degree in any one of the following departments:
Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Civil and Coastal Engineering, Environmental
Engineering Sciences, Food and Resource Economics, Forest Resources and
Conservation, Geography, Geological Sciences, Horticultural Sciences, and Soil and
Water Science.

M.S. (thesis and nonthesis option) and Ph.D. studies are available. Interdisciplinary
graduate requirements recognize diversity in the academic backgrounds and
professional goals of the students. A core curriculum (12 credits for M.S.; 18 credits
for Ph.D.) provides broad training in five topics: hydrologic systems, hydrologic
chemistry, hydrologic biology, hydrologic techniques and analysis, and hydrologic
policy and management. Additional elective courses (11 to 14 credits for M.S.; 30
credits for Ph.D.) allow specialization in one or more of these topics. Research projects
involving faculty from several academic units can provide the basis for thesis and
dissertation research topics.

Assistantships supported by extramural grants are available. Tuition waivers may be
available to students who qualify. Students with B.S. or M.S. degrees in any of the
following disciplines are encouraged to consider this specialization in their graduate
program: engineering (agricultural, chemical, civil, environmental); natural sciences
(physics, biology, chemistry); social sciences (agricultural and resource economics);
forestry; and earth sciences (geography, geology, soil and water science).

For more information, contact Dr. Mark Newman, UF Water Institute, P.O. Box
116601, Gainesville FL 32611, Phone (352) 392-5893, E-mail markn@ufl.edu; or visit
the Hydrologic Sciences Academic Cluster website (http://www.hydrology.ufl.edu).

Latin American Studies

Founded in 1930, the UF Center for Latin American Studies is the oldest in the U.S.
and remains a premier institution. It offers interdisciplinary teaching and research
programs focused on Latin America and the Caribbean. The M.A. program draws on
20 center-based Graduate Faculty and more than 160 faculty affiliates who teach
courses or carry out research related to Latin America.

Master of Arts degree in Latin American Studies: This M.A. degree requires a
thesis and 30 credits, including a 15 credit specialization in either a discipline or a
topic.

Discipline specializations emphasize training and research in area and language
studies in a specific academic unit, such as Anthropology, Geography, History, Political
Science, Romance Languages and Literatures (Spanish, Portuguese, or Haitian
Creole), or Sociology. This option is especially suited to students interested in
pursuing a Ph.D. in a related discipline.

Topical specializations cluster course work and research around a thematic field
focusing on contemporary Latin American problems, such as Andean studies, Brazilian
studies, Caribbean studies, development, gender studies, international
communications, Latin American business environment, Latino studies, religion and
society, and tropical conservation and development. This option prepares students for
technical and professional work related to Latin America and the Caribbean.

Additional requirements for both options are as follows:

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- 2 required gateway seminars: LAS 6220, Issues and Perspectives in Latin American
Studies and LAS 6293, Design and Methods of Research in Latin American Studies;
ideally, both seminars are taken in the first semester;

- 9 credits of Latin American area or language courses outside the specialization; and

- Intermediate proficiency in Spanish, Portuguese, or Haitian Creole; and

- An interdisciplinary thesis on a Latin American topic.

Although the M.A. degree in Latin American studies is a terminal degree, many past
recipients have entered the Ph.D. programs in related disciplines preparing for
university teaching and research careers. Other graduates are employed in the
Foreign Service, educational and research institutions, international organizations,
government or nonprofit agencies, and private companies in the United States and
Latin America.

Requirements for admission to the program are:

- A baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university;

- Grade point average of at least 3.2 for all upper-division undergraduate work;

- Acceptable scores on the Graduate Record Examination;

- For international students, a satisfactory score on one of the following: TOEFL (Test
of English as a Foreign Language: computer=213, paper=550, web=80), IELTS
(International English Language Testing System: 6), MELAB (Michigan English
Language Assessment Battery: 77), or successful completion of the UF English
Language Institute Program;

- Basic knowledge of either Spanish or Portuguese; some Latin American course work.

Juris Doctor/Master of Arts program: This joint degree culminates in the Juris
Doctor degree awarded by the College of Law and the Master of Arts degree in Latin
American studies awarded by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. The joint
degrees can be completed in four years rather than the five years required if earning
each degree separately.

Candidates for the joint program must be admitted to both academic units. See
Requirements for Master's Degrees for admission criteria for the M.A. program.
Contact the College of Law for J.D. requirements. For more information, contact Dr.
Richmond Brown, Center for Latin American Studies (rfbrown@latam.ufl.edu).

Graduate Certificates in Latin American Studies: Graduate students may earn a
Certificate in Latin American Studies along with a degree from the College of
Agricultural and Life Sciences; Business Administration; Design, Construction, and
Planning; Education; Fine Arts; Journalism and Communications; Law; or Liberal Arts
and Sciences.

M.A. thesis or Ph.D. students need at least 12 credits of Latin American course work
distributed as follows:

- 3 credits of LAS 6938;
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- At least 3 credits of Latin American course work in one academic unit outside the
major;

- 6 credits of courses with Latin American content within the major (to the extent
possible);

- Intermediate proficiency in a Latin American language (language courses at the
3000 level or higher count toward the certificate); and

- a thesis or dissertation on a Latin American topic.

Nonthesis master's degree candidates must have at least 15 credits of Latin American
course work distributed as follows:

- 3 credits of LAS 6938;

- At least 6 credits of Latin American courses in an academic unit or units outside the
major;

- 6 credits of courses with Latin American content within the major (to the extent
possible); and

- intermediate proficiency in a Latin American language. For more information, see
www.latam.ufl.edu/academic programs.

Financial support: The Center for Latin American Studies provides several graduate
assistantships and academic year and summer FLAS fellowships for Portuguese,
Haitian Creole, and/or Garifuna. The Center also provides substantial financial support
for UF graduate students pursuing research in Latin America, the Caribbean, and
Latino Studies.

Research: Several research and training programs provide opportunities and financial
support for graduate students, especially in the Amazon, the Andes, and the
Caribbean.

Library resources: The Latin American Collection of the UF libraries holds more than
400,000 volumes of printed works and manuscripts, maps, and microforms and more
than 1,000 serial titles dealing with Latin America and the Caribbean. All areas are
well-represented but particular strengths are on Brazil and the Caribbean. UF's
Caribbean Collection is the largest in the world.

Other activities: The Center for Latin American Studies sponsors conferences,
colloquia, and cultural events; supports publication of scholarly works; provides
educational outreach service; and cooperates with other campus units in overseas
research and training activities. The Center also administers summer programs in
Brazil and Mexico.

For more information on the Center's programs and activities, contact the Center's
Associate Director for Academic Programs and Student Affairs, Dr. Richmond Brown,
319F Grinter Hall, E-mail rfbrown@latam.ufl.edu, Phone (352) 392-0375, ext 807.

Medical Physics

Medical Physics applies advanced physical energy concepts and methods to the
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diagnosis and treatment of human disease. Students enroll in the Department of
Nuclear and Radiological Engineering and take courses taught by the medical physics
faculty from Nuclear and Radiological Engineering, Radiology, and Radiation Oncology.
Students interested in the radiation protection aspects of applications of radioactivity
or radiation in the healing arts may enroll in the medical health physics option. Formal
courses include academic unit core requirements, a radiation biology course, and a
block of clinical medical physics courses taught by Nuclear and Radiological
Engineering, Radiology, and Radiation Oncology faculty. The program also includes
clinical internships in the Departments of Radiology and Radiation Oncology. Research
opportunities and financial support exist in the form of faculty research and projects
related to patient care.

Modern European Studies

The Center for European Studies, a National Resource Center on Europe (funded
partly by Title VI of the Higher Education Act), directs and coordinates interdisciplinary
instruction, research, and outreach related to Europe. In cooperation with
participating academic units throughout the University, the Center offers a Certificate
in Modern European Studies for master's and doctoral students. The curriculum
provides a broad foundation for students preparing for teaching or other professional
careers requiring knowledge of Europe.

Graduate fellowships and assistantships: Students pursuing degrees in
participating academic units can compete for graduate assistantships and Title VI
Foreign Language and Area Studies fellowships.

Extracurricular activities: The Center for European Studies sponsors various
conferences, lectures, film series, performances, and art exhibits in conjunction with
other campus units. The Center also directs an extensive outreach program addressed
to public schools, local community, as well as business groups.

Library resources: The Center for European Studies gives direct support for
European library acquisitions to meet the instructional and research needs of its
faculty and students.

Graduate certificate program: The Center for European Studies, cooperating with
participating academic units, offers a Certificate in Modern European Studies in
conjunction with the master's and doctoral degrees. To obtain the Certificate, students
at the master's level need to complete 13 credit hours and students at the doctoral
level need to complete 16 credit hours of courses with European content. Both
master's and doctoral students are required to complete a 1-unit EUS 6005:
Introduction to European Studies course. Given the critical role of languages to the
comprehensive study of Europe all certificate recipients are required to complete at
least one year of training at the 2000 level or above in at least one European
language. However, in accordance with Graduate School regulations no language
courses below the 3000 level will be included within the certificate program itself.
Those students with a high level of language training, however, may count up to a
maximum of two language courses at the 3000 level or higher towards the completion
of the Certificate in Modern European Studies. In all cases students must complete at
least 9 credit hours of course work outside their home department or unit.

For more information about the various programs and activities of the Center, contact
the Director, Center for European Studies, 3324 Turlington Hall, Website http://www.
ces.ufl.edu.

Quantitative Finance
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The interdisciplinary concentration in quantitative finance trains students for academic
and research positions in quantitative finance, and risk management. It gives
graduates an edge in the job market by providing substantial expertise in key related
disciplines: finance, operations research, statistics, mathematics, and software
development. It is focused in teaching and research on design, development, and
implementing new financial and risk management products, processes, strategies, and
systems to meet demands of various institutions, corporations, governments, and
households. Emphasis is on an interdisciplinary approach requiring knowledge in
finance, economics, mathematics, probability/statistics, operations research,
engineering, and computer science.

Four academic units participate in this interdisciplinary concentration: Industrial and
Systems Engineering (College of Engineering), Mathematics (College of Liberal Arts
and Sciences), Statistics (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences), and Finance,
Insurance, and Real Estate (College of Business Administration). To be eligible, a
student must be admitted to a Ph.D. program in one of these participating academic
units. Students seeking admission to the concentration need strong quantitative skills
and a degree in one of the relevant fields such as finance, engineering, statistics, or
mathematics. Students with a background in several disciplines are welcome.
Application should be submitted to one of the participating academic units.

Each student takes basic courses and meets the home academic unit's Ph.D.
requirements. The student also takes approved courses in the other participating
academic units to meet the requirements of the concentration.

Dissertation research is conducted in quantitative finance, risk management, and
relevant areas involving quantitative finance approaches. The student receives a Ph.D.
degree and a Certificate in Quantitative Finance.

Activities of the Ph.D. concentration in quantitative finance are supported by the Risk
Management and Financial Engineering Laboratory (RMFE Lab), http://www.ise.ufl.
edu/rmfe. The RMFE Lab facilitates research and applications in the area of risk
management and financial mathematics/engineering, including organizing research
meetings, seminars, and conferences. It provides a basis for the collaborative efforts
of multidisciplinary teams of UF researchers, governmental institutions, and industrial
partners. For details, visit http://www.ise.ufl.edu/rmfe/qf.

Quantum Theory Project (QTP)

QTP is an interdisciplinary group of 12 faculty plus graduate students, postdoctoral
associates, and staff in the Departments of Physics and Chemistry. The
computationally oriented theoretical research investigates electronic structure,
conformation, properties, and dynamics of molecules and materials. The work covers
large areas of modern chemistry, condensed matter and materials physics, and
molecular biology. Essentially all the effort is supported by substantial extramural
funding, both individual and collaborative. QTP operates the J. C. Slater Computer
Laboratory to support large-scale computing for precise numerical solutions and
simulations, plus graphics and visualization. Since 1960, the Institute has organized a
major international meeting, the annual Sanibel Symposium.

Graduate students in chemistry and in physics are eligible for this specialization and
follow a special curriculum. For more information, contact the Director, Quantum
Theory Project, E-mail director@gtp.ufl.edu, P.O. Box 118435 (New Physics Building);
or visit the QTP website http://www.qtp.ufl.edu.

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Sustainable Architecture

The Concentration and Certificate in Sustainable Architecture is for architecture
graduate students (in the M.Arch. or M.S.A.S. program) seeking advanced courses on
a wide range of topics related to sustainable architecture. The concentration in
sustainable architecture supports detailed rigorous study in specific areas of expertise.
Furthermore, the program requirements recognize the inherent diversity of academic
backgrounds and professional goals of the students. Thus, there is flexibility in the
selection of a suite of courses, while maintaining exposure to the multidisciplinary
subject matter of sustainable architecture. This essential feature of the program
allows students to develop individualized yet focused plans of study. Students select
from a variety of approved courses offered in the College of Design, Construction, and
Planning (the School of Architecture, the School of Building Construction, the
Department of Interior Design, the Department of Landscape Architecture, and the
Department of Urban and Regional Planning); and in other colleges in the University.
Course work may include the following sustainability issues.

- Architectural design and preventing environmental degradation: protecting
ecosystems, fauna and flora, energy consumption, energy conservation, architectural
commissioning, maintenance, water consumption, land use, and materials selection
(resource depletion, environmental degradation, and healthy environments)

- Providing healthy architectural environments: indoor air environmental
quality, nontoxic environments, and sustainable ecosystems and landscapes

- Responsive and responsible building design and construction:
environmentally responsive architecture, and environmentally responsible architecture

- Sustainable architectural and environment theory: the philosophy of
sustainable design, ecological theory, sustainability and ethics, deep ecology, and
systems theory

- Enhancing the community environment: historic preservation, sustainable
developments, community and neighborhood design, regional design, and systems
theory

- Mitigating the environmental effects of construction operations: life cycle
operations, design longevity, reusing materials, recycling materials, deconstruction,
and reconstruction.

Students enrolled in the Concentration and Certificate Program in Sustainable
Architecture must complete at least 12 credits of approved sustainable architecture
electives. Students must complete at least 6 credits within the School of Architecture;
and at least one approved 3 credit course from outside the School of Architecture.
Students also must complete a research project or thesis on a subject pre-approved
by the concentration's Governing Board, related to sustainable architecture. For more
information, contact the Graduate Program Assistant, School of Architecture,
University of Florida, Box 115702, Gainesville FL 32611-5702, Phone (352) 392-0205
ext. 202, E-mail bhuds@ufl.edu

Sustainable Design

The Interdisciplinary Concentration and Certificate in Sustainable Design
(ICSD) is for master's-level students in the College of Design, Construction, and
Planning. This concentration allows students to become proficient in one or more of
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the following areas: sustainable architecture, sustainable construction, sustainable
interior design, sustainable landscape architecture, or sustainable urban planning.
Course work deals with the following issues.

- Preventing environmental degradation: protecting ecosystems, fauna and
flora, energy conservation, energy consumption, architectural commissioning,
maintenance, water consumption, land use, site selection, and materials selection
(resource depletion, environmental degradation, and healthy environments)

- Providing healthy environments: indoor air environmental quality, outdoor
environmental quality, nontoxic environments, and sustainable ecosystems and
landscapes

- Responsive and responsible building construction: construction impacts on
sites, environmentally responsive architecture, environmentally responsible
architecture (preventing environmental degradation), and designing sustainable
building components

- Mitigating the environmental effects of construction operations: life cycle
operations, design longevity, reusing materials, recycling materials, deconstruction,
reconstruction, and historic preservation

- Enhancing the community environment: sustainable developments, community
and neighborhood design, regional design, and city planning design

- Environmental theory: the philosophy of sustainable design, ecological theory,
sustainability and ethics, deep ecology, and systems theory.

Students wishing to participate in the ICSD should notify their department or school
as early in the graduate program as possible. To participate in the ICSD, a student
must be admitted and enrolled in one of the departments participating in the ICSD.
Students will complete the concentration for either the master's degree or Master of
Science degree, but not for both degrees if awarded from the University of Florida.
Students cannot enroll in two concentration programs at the same time.

To successfully complete the ICSD, the student must earn 12 credit hours in
sustainable design research and course work from a list of recommended courses. To
satisfy the interdisciplinary intent of the ICSD, the student must take one of the
approved 3 credit courses outside their home department or school, but within the
College of Design, Construction, and Planning; and at least one approved 3 credit
course from another college of the University. For more information, contact the
Dean's Office in the College of Design, Construction, and Planning, University of
Florida, Box 115701, Gainesville FL 32611, Telephone (352) 392-4836.

Toxicology

The Center for Environmental and Human Toxicology serves as the focal point
for activities concerning the effects of chemicals on human and animal health. The
Center's affiliated faculty includes 20 to 30 scientists and clinicians interested in
elucidating the mechanisms of chemical-induced toxicity, and is drawn from the
Colleges of Medicine, Veterinary Medicine, Pharmacy, Public Health and Health
Professions, Engineering, and the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. The
broadly based, interdisciplinary expertise provided by this faculty is also used to
address complex issues related to protecting public health and the environment.

Students who wish to receive graduate training in interdisciplinary toxicology leading
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to a Ph.D. enroll through one of the participating graduate programs. The number of
graduate programs involved in interdisciplinary toxicology, and the variety of
perspectives provided by their disciplines, allows a great deal of flexibility in providing
a plan of graduate study to meet an individual student's interests and goals in
toxicology. Student course work and dissertation research are guided by the Center's
researchers and affiliated faculty who are also Graduate Faculty members in the
student's major academic unit. Dissertation research may be conducted either in the
student's academic unit, or at the Toxicology Laboratory facilities, at the Center. For
more information, please write to the Director, Center for Environmental and Human
Toxicology, P.O. Box 110885, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611; or visit their
website (http://toxicology.ufl.edu).

Transnational and Global Studies

The Transnational and Global Studies Center (TGSC) is one of several federally funded
centers on campus. The TGSC is a National Resource Center created in 2003 through
funding from the U.S. Department of Education. It is part of a Florida-wide consortium
of universities, the Florida Network for Global Studies. The TGSC is housed in the
International Center but has affiliated faculty from the entire campus. The TGSC
promotes interdisciplinary research, supports faculty and students by developing
curricula and academic programs, sponsors cultural activities and guest speakers on
transnational and global issues, and conducts outreach. The TGSC offers the
Transnational and Global Studies Graduate Certificate. This certificate will enable
graduate students to identify one of four tracks that will help strengthen their
interdisciplinary studies. The graduate tracks articulate with the undergraduate
international studies major. The certificate curriculum is reviewed by the
Transnational and Global Studies (TNGS) Certificate Committee for approval but does
not supersede the supervisory committee's role. The graduate certificate recognizes
successful completion of course work (13 credits for master's, 15 credits for Ph.D.)
related to transnational and global issues. Courses meeting certificate requirements
come from more than 50 graduate courses with specific transnational and global
content, organized into four areas of specialization: science and technology, business
and economics, global governance and security, and development and area studies.

Students earning the certificate must participate in the Transnational and Global
Studies Seminar. The seminar addresses the most pressing transnational and global
issues and is led by faculty with expertise in these fields. This course is taken for
either 1 credit or 3 credits: a research paper is needed to earn 3 credits. For more
information on the Transnational and Global Studies Certificate, contact Ms. Heather
A. Barrett, UF International Center, 170 Hub, P.O. Box 113225, Gainesville FL 32611;
Phone (352) 273-1531; E-mail hbarrett@ufic.uf.edu; or visit the website (http://www.
tgsc.ufl.edu/).

Tropical Agriculture

The Center for Tropical Agriculture, in the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences,
seeks to stimulate interest in research and curriculum related to the tropical
environment and its development. Website: http://cta.ufl.edu.

Research: International agricultural development assistance contracts frequently
have research components. The Center helps coordinate this research.

Minor in tropical agriculture: An interdisciplinary minor in tropical agriculture is
available for both master's and doctoral students majoring in agriculture, forestry, and
other fields where knowledge of the tropics is relevant. The minor may include
courses treating specific aspects of the tropics such as natural resource management
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(e.g., soils, water, biodiversity), climate, agricultural production, and the languages
and cultures of those who live in tropical countries.

Requirements for the minor at the master's level include a minimum of 7 letter-
graded credit hours. Six letter-graded credit hours chosen from the list of approved
courses with the guidance of the supervisory committee. Selected courses must be
from outside the student's major and may not include courses from other academic
units which qualify for graduate credit within the home department. One letter-graded
credit hour must be a "hands-on" experience in the student's tropical agriculture
selected focus. This experience may take the form of a study abroad, internship, field
trip, or special project and must have a time equivalent at least equivalent to a 1-
credit graded course.

Requirements for the minor at the Ph.D. level include a minimum of 12 letter-graded
credits. Selected courses must be from outside the student's major and may not
include courses from academic units which qualify for graduate credit within the home
department. One letter-graded credit hour must be a "hands-on" experience in the
student's tropical agriculture selected focus. This experience may take the form of a
study abroad, internship, field trip or special project that must have a time equivalent
to a 1 credit letter-graded course. See the list of suggested courses that can be used
to meet this requirement. An intent of the minor at the Ph.D. level is to insure each
student has an appreciation of the social context within which tropical agriculture is
often practiced. To that end, at the discretion of the CTA faculty member, if the
student does not have a background that addresses the social context, 3 letter-graded
credits may be selected from the social science section of the approved list.

Certificate in Tropical Agriculture (CTA): The certificate emphasizes breadth in
topics relevant to tropical agriculture for graduate students (available through the
College of Agricultural and Life Sciences). The CTA prepares students for work
requiring knowledge of biological and social aspects of tropical agriculture. Students
entering the program receive guidance from members of the CTA Steering Committee
regarding course work appropriate for careers in international agricultural
development.

The CTA requires at least 12 credits. The "typical" certificate program has 12 to 24
credits. These credits may, with approval from supervisory committees, also count
toward the M.S. or Ph.D. While foreign language abilities and work experience in a
foreign country are strongly encouraged, they are not requisites for the CTA.

For information or application brochure, contact Dr. Richard E. Litz, Director, Center
for Tropical Agriculture, University of Florida, c/o Tropical Research and Education
Center, 18905 SW 280th Street, Homestead FL 33031, e-mail relitz@ufl.edu or Dr.
Nicholas B. Comerford, Soil and Water Science Department, P.O. Box 110290,
University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, E-mail nbc@ufl.edu.

Other activities: The Center seeks broad dissemination of knowledge about tropical
agriculture by sponsoring conferences, short courses, and seminars featuring leading
authorities on the tropics; publishing books, monographs, and proceedings; and by
acquiring materials for the library and the data bank.

Tropical Conservation and Development

The Tropical Conservation and Development Program (TCD), in the Center for Latin
American Studies, offers an interdisciplinary graduate certificate and graduate
concentration focused on integrative approaches to conservation and development in
Latin America and other tropical regions. Both the certificate and concentration are
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open to students who are interested in acquiring interdisciplinary knowledge and
technical skills to pursue a career in conservation and development research and
practice. These students must be enrolled in master's or Ph.D. programs in TCD's
affiliate academic units at the University of Florida

Course work for the certificate and the concentration includes social science theory,
principles of tropical ecology, patterns and trends of tropical resource use and
conservation, and research methods. TCD core courses also allow students to gain
essential practical skills. Emphasis is on communication and presentation techniques,
grant writing, proposal writing, and fundraising; facilitation and conflict management;
participatory methods for research and project implementation; and project design,
analysis, and evaluation. Summer research, practitioner experiences, and field-based
training programs provide learning opportunities outside the classroom.

On completing the certificate or concentration, students should have an in-depth
understanding of the relationships among biological conservation, resource
management, and the livelihood needs of rural communities; and the appropriate
professional skills for a career in research, field practice, or both.

TCD's affiliate academic units are Agricultural Education and Communication,
Agronomy, Anthropology, Comparative Law, Botany, Food and Resource Economics,
Forest Resources and Conservation, Geography, Geological Sciences, Latin American
Studies, Natural Resources and Environment, Political Science, Religion, Sociology,
Soil and Water Science, Urban and Regional Planning, Wildlife Ecology and
Conservation, Women's Studies, and Zoology.

Master's students can earn a certificate in TCD by completing 12 credits of approved
course work: 2 interdisciplinary core courses and 1 course each in tropical ecology and
social science. Ph.D. students can earn a certificate by completing 15 credits of
approved course work (3 interdisciplinary core courses and 1 course each in tropical
ecology and social science). Students from natural science academic units must take
the social science credits outside their major. Otherwise, courses from the student's
major can count toward program requirements. Substitutions need prior approval
from the TCD faculty adviser.

To earn a concentration in TCD, students must complete the course requirements for
the certificate (as explained above) and they must focus on tropical conservation and
development in their thesis, dissertation, or final project. One member of the
student's supervisory committee must be a TCD affiliate faculty member. This person
is responsible for judging whether the student's thesis focuses on tropical
conservation and/or development. For the faculty member to make this judgment, the
student must articulate in writing how the research fits in the broader context of
biodiversity conservation and/or rural development in the tropics. This person cannot
count as the external member of the committee.

For more information on the TCD certificate and concentration program, and for a list
of approved courses, visit the TCD website (http://www.latam.ufl.edu/tcd), or
contact Marianne Schmink, TCD Director, 301 Grinter Hall, (352) 392-6548 ext. 827,
E-mail Schmink@latam.ufl.edu.

Tropical Studies

The Organization for Tropical Studies (OTS) is a consortium of 50 major educational
and research institutions in the United States and abroad, created to promote
understanding of tropical environments and their intelligent use by people. The
University of Florida is a charter member. Graduate field courses in tropical biology
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and ecology, agricultural ecology, population biology, and forestry are offered in Costa
Rica and Brazil during spring and summer terms. Students are selected on a
competitive basis from all OTS member institutions.

A University of Florida graduate student may register for 8 credits in an appropriate
course cross-listed with OTS (e.g., PCB 6357C or AGG 6933). The University of Florida
does not require tuition for OTS courses. Registration is on the host campus.
However, students on Graduate Assistantships must also be registered at UF.
Research grants are available through OTS. For more information, contact University
of Florida representatives to the OTS board of directors, Dr. Robert Holt (111 Bartram
Hall) and Dr. Hugh Popenoe (2169 McCarty Hall).

Vision Sciences

An interdisciplinary specialization in vision sciences is available through the College of
Medicine. The Department of Ophthalmology serves as the administrative and
logistical center. However, most of the faculty are from the IDP advanced
concentrations. Current interests include retinal gene therapy, gene expression in the
mammalian retina and lens, especially during fetal development, biochemistry of
vision in vertebrates and invertebrates, biochemistry and neurobiology of wound
healing and neural tissue degeneration, and molecular and cell biology of animal
model retinal degeneration. For more information, contact the Program Director, Dr.
W. Clay Smith, P.O. Box 100284, College of Medicine, Gainesville FL 32610-0284,
Phone (352) 392-0476.

Wetland Sciences

The Interdisciplinary Concentration in Wetland Sciences (ICWS) is a unified
interdisciplinary program in wetland science and policy for master's and doctoral
students.

Graduate faculty from the following academic units contribute to the wetlands
sciences concentration: Agricultural and Biological Engineering, Botany, Civil
Engineering, Environmental Engineering Sciences, Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences,
Forest Resources and Conservation, Geography, Geological Sciences, Landscape
Architecture, Law, Soil and Water Sciences, Urban and Regional Planning, Wildlife
Ecology and Conservation, and Zoology. Students in any of these programs may elect
to participate in the ICWS. A major strength of the ICWS is the breadth of wetlands-
related courses and research opportunities in many academic programs across
campus. The ICWS exposes students to perspectives outside their disciplines and
provides a rigorous, substantive education in wetlands sciences in addition to their
disciplinary focus.

Students may complete the ICWS for either the M.S. or Ph.D. degree. A core
curriculum (15 credits for M.S. and 18 credits for Ph.D.) provides the opportunity for
interdisciplinary training in four broad subject areas:

- wetlands science (1 course each in wetlands ecology, wetland hydrology, and
wetlands biogeochemistry),

- wetlands systems,

- wetlands organisms, and

- wetlands policy/law.
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Additional course work in a student's disciplinary focus may strengthen the student's
knowledge base or allow for specialization in one or more of the areas.

For more information, contact Dr. Mark T. Brown, Director, Howard T. Odum Center
for Wetlands, Phelps Lab, P.O. Box 116350, Gainesville FL 32611, Phone (352) 392-
2424; or visit the website (http://www.cfw.ufl.edu).

Women's and Gender Studies

Two certificates, one master's degree (thesis or nonthesis option), and a doctoral
concentration are offered in women's and gender studies. Participating graduate
faculty are from several academic units, campus-wide, including Agricultural and Life
Sciences, Anthropology, Counselor Education, English, German and Slavic Studies,
History, Journalism and Communications, Latin American Studies, Linguistics,
Medicine, Nursing, Philosophy, Psychology, Religion, Romance Languages and
Literatures, Sociology, and Teaching and Learning.

The two graduate certificates in women's studies for master's and doctoral students
are offered in conjunction with degree programs in other academic units. The
Graduate Certificate in Women's Studies and the Graduate Certificate in Gender and
Development require specific sets of course work to thoroughly ground students in the
discipline. The Graduate Certificate in Women's Studies is a general introduction to
the field, and the Graduate Certificate in Gender and Development allows students to
focus on issues related to gender, economic development, and globalization.

The doctoral interdisciplinary concentrations in women's and gender studies give
graduate students a thorough grounding in the new scholarship produced by the
intersection of women's studies and other academic fields. The concentration
facilitates analysis and assessment of theories about the role of gender in cultural
systems and its intersections with other categories of differences, such as race,
ethnicity, religion, class, sexuality, physical and mental ability, age, and economic and
civil status. Emphasis is on participating in women's and gender studies research and
on providing an intellectual environment for cross-fertilization among disciplines.
Women's and gender studies critically explores the role and status of women and
men, past and present.

Participating academic units award Ph.D. degrees with an interdisciplinary
concentration in women's and gender studies. Study plans are designed by each
student's supervisory committee, whose chair is affiliated with women's and gender
studies.

Admission requirements are those of the student's home academic unit and college.
After admission to the degree-granting academic unit, the application is sent to the
Graduate Coordinator of Women's and Gender Studies who chairs an admissions
committee.

For more information on the master's degree, see Fields of Instruction; or contact the
Director, Center for Women's Studies and Gender Research, 3324 Turlington Hall.

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ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

The information in this
catalog is current as of
May 2008. Please contact
individual programs for any
additional information or
changes.

How to Apply
Admissions Examinations
Medical Immunization
Computer Requirement
Conditional Admission
International Students
Students with Disabilities
Postbaccalaureate Students
Nondegree Registration
Readmission
Faculty Members as Graduate Students
Residency for Tuition

How to Apply

To apply for admission: contact the academic unit of interest for information about admissions
procedures. To find websites for academic units, visit http://qradschool.ufl.edu/students/
college-department-links.html. Applications that meet minimum standards are referred by
Graduate Admissions in the Office of the University Registrar to the graduate selection
committees of the various academic units for approval or disapproval. To be admitted to
graduate study in a given academic unit, the prospective student must meet the requirements
of the unit and the Graduate School. Admission to some programs is limited by the resources
available.

Minimum requirements include an earned bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited U.S.
institution or a comparable degree from an international institution. Applicants must have a
minimum grade average of B for all upper-division undergraduate work and scores that are
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acceptable for the program to which the student is applying on the General Test of the
Graduate Record Examination (GRE) or on the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT).
These scores must be used in the context of a holistic credential review process. Some
academic units require a reading knowledge of at least one foreign language. Exceptions to
the above requirements are made only when these and other criteria, including letters of
recommendation, are reviewed by the academic unit, recommended by the college, and
approved by the Dean of the Graduate School.

Direct admission to the Graduate School requires a baccalaureate degree from an accredited
college or university. Two copies of the official transcripts from all previously attended colleges
or universities should accompany all applications: one for the academic unit and one for the
Registrar. These transcripts must be received directly from the registrar of the institution
where the work was done. Official supplementary transcripts are required as soon as they are
available for any work completed after applying for admission.

Admission requirements of an academic unit are often more rigorous than the minimum
requirements set by the Graduate School. Because of resource limitations, most academic
units do not accept all qualified applicants.

UF is committed to creating a community that reflects the rich racial, cultural, and ethnic
diversity of the State of Florida and the United States of America. The greatest challenge in
higher education is to enroll students and hire faculty and staff who are members of diverse
racial, cultural, or ethnic minority groups. This pluralism enriches the University community,
offers opportunity for robust academic dialogue, and contributes to better teaching and
research. The University and its components benefit from the richness of a multicultural
student body, faculty, and staff who can learn from one another. Such diversity empowers and
inspires respect and understanding among us. The University does not tolerate the actions of
anyone who violates the rights of another. By policy and practice, the University embodies a
diverse community. Our collective efforts lead to a University that is truly diverse and a
University that reflects the U.S. population.

The University encourages qualified applicants of both sexes from all cultural, racial, religious,
and ethnic groups. The University does not discriminate on the basis of marital status, sexual
orientation, disability, or age in admission or access to its programs and activities. The Title IX
Coordinator's office is in 145 Tigert Hall (352) 392-6004.

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Admissions Examinations

Graduate Record Examination (GRE): In addition to the General Test of the GRE, some
academic units encourage the applicant to submit scores on one or more advanced subject
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tests. Scores on all tests taken are considered for admission. Applicants with a previous
graduate or professional degree or equivalent from a regionally accredited U.S. institution may
be exempt from the GRE and undergraduate GPA requirements. Contact the academic unit for
specific requirements.

Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT): Warrington College of Business
Administration applicants may substitute satisfactory Graduate Management Admission Test
(GMAT) scores for GRE scores. Master of Business Administration (M.B.A.) applicants must
submit satisfactory GMAT scores (at least 465). Students applying to the executive Master of
Health Administration program in the College of Public Health and Health Professions may
substitute the GMAT for the GRE. For more information, contact Educational Testing Service,
Princeton NJ 08540.

Graduate study in Engineering: Some programs may use the Fundamentals of Engineering
(FE) examination in lieu of the GRE for admitting students into the nonthesis master's degree
programs.

Graduate study in Law: Applicants must hold the Juris Doctor or equivalent degree. Consult
the Levin College of Law catalog (http://www.law.ufl.edu/proqrams/) for the specific programs
of interest.

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Medical Immunization

When the admission application is approved, the student is sent a Proof of Immunization form
to complete and return. Students cannot register until the Health Care Center receives and
approves the form. For details visit http://shcc.ufl.edu/medical/immune.shtml.

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Computer Requirement

All students need ongoing access to a computer to complete their degree programs
successfully. The University expects each student to acquire computer hardware and software
appropriate to the degree program. Basic competency in using a computer is required for
graduation; class assignments may require using a computer, academic advising and
registration can be done by computer, and University correspondence is often sent by e-mail.
All students are required to maintain access to Gatorlink email in order to receive
official university communications.
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The University offers limited access to computers through its computer labs, but most students
are expected to purchase or lease a computer that is capable of dial-up or network connection
to the Internet, graphic access to the World Wide Web, and productivity functions such as
word processing and spreadsheet calculations http://www.circa.ufl.edu/computer.htm. Most
colleges have additional software requirements or recommendations. See their web pages for
that information.

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Conditional Admission

Students admitted as exceptions under the 10% waiver rule must present both an upper-
division grade point average and their GRE test scores (verbal, quantitative, and analytical
writing) with their applications and meet all other criteria including excellent letters of
recommendation from colleagues, satisfactory performance in a specified number of graduate
courses taken as postbaccalaureate students, and/or practical experience in the discipline for a
specified period of time.

For students granted conditional admission to the Graduate School, final admission decisions
are deferred for 1 term until requisite examination scores or final records are available.

Students granted conditional admission need to have these conditions communicated to them
by the academic unit admitting them. When these conditions are met, the academic unit must
notify the student in writing, sending a copy to Graduate Student Records (106 Grinter 392-
4643). Eligible course work taken while a student is in conditional status may apply toward the
graduate degree.

Students failing to meet any condition of admission are barred from further
registration.

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International Students

All international students seeking admission to the Graduate School must submit satisfactory
scores on the GRE General Test or GMAT for selected programs.

International students must submit a satisfactory score on one of the following: TOEFL (Test
of English as a Foreign Language: computer=213, paper=550, web=80), IELTS (International
English Language Testing System: 6), MELAB (Michigan English Language Assessment
Battery: 77) or successful completion of the University of Florida English Language Institute
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program.

Students who meet the following conditions may be exempt from the English language test
requirements:

- International students whose native language is English

- International students who have spent at least 1 academic year in a baccalaureate or post-
baccalaureate degree program at a college or university in a country where English is the
official language

International students with unsatisfactory scores on the TOEFL, IELTS, MELAB, unsuccessful
completion of the University of Florida English Language Institute program, or unsatisfactory
scores on the verbal parts of the GRE must achieve an acceptable score on an essay
administered by the Academic Written English program at UF. If English skills are not
acceptable, then performance on the essay will be used to place students in appropriate
courses that will not count towards a graduate degree. To be eligible for teaching
assignments, graduate students whose native language is not English must submit satisfactory
scores on the Test of Spoken English (TSE) or the SPEAK Test. Students who score 55 or
above are allowed to teach in the classroom, laboratory, or other appropriate instructional
activity. Those who score 45 to 50 are allowed to teach on the condition that they enroll
concurrently in EAP 5836, to help their interpersonal and public speaking communication skills.
Students who fail to score 45 points may not be appointed to teach. To raise their scores on
the TSE, they are advised to take EAP 5835, a course to improve general oral language skills.
They must then submit a TSE or SPEAK score of 45 or higher to be appointed to teach, and
they come under the guidelines described above. Applicants should write to the Educational
Testing Service, Princeton, NJ 08540, for registration forms and other information on TOEFL,
TSE, GMAT, and GRE, or the website at www.ets.org Information about IELTS can be found
at http://www.ielts.org. Information about MELAB can be found at http://www.lsa.umich.edu/
eli/testinq/melab/general/. Information about the University of Florida English Language
Institute is available at www.eli.ufl.edu. Students may register for the locally administered
SPEAK test with the Academic Spoken English Office, 3340 Turlington Hall.

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Students with Disabilities

The Disability Resource Center (DRC) at the University of Florida provides services to students
with disabilities in compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and Title II of
the Americans with Disabilities Act. The DRC works to provide equal access to University
programs and services in order to meet the individual needs of students with disabilities.
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Students are not required to disclose their disability. However, if accommodations are
requested, students must register with the Disability Resource Center and provide
documentation to verify their disability. Current documentation from a qualified physician or
other licensed professional in a field related to the disability is required. At a minimum, the
documentation must address:

- Verification of disability,

- Substantial functional limitations noted as a result of the disability on a major life activity,

- Recommendations of possible accommodations. Possible accommodations include note-
taking services, accommodated testing, alternative formatted materials, interpreting services,
or educational assistants.

For information about services or to set-up an appointment, please call the office at (352) 392-
8565 or visit the office in 001 Building 0020 (Reid Hall). Please view the website at http://www.
dso.ufl.edu/drc/ for additional information.

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Postbaccalaureate Students

Postbaccalaureate students have a bachelor's degree and have not been admitted to the
Graduate School. Admission for postbaccalaureate enrollment requires a 2.0 GPA and an
acceptable score of TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language: computer=213,
paper=550, web=80), IELTS (International English Language Testing System: 6), MELAB
(Michigan English Language Assessment Battery: 77) or successful completion of the
University of Florida English Language Institute program if the applicant is from a non-English
speaking country. Postbaccalaureate enrollment is offered for:

- Students not seeking a graduate degree (including students who change their professional
goals or students wishing to expand their academic backgrounds); and

- Students who intend to enter a graduate program at some future date, but need a
substantial number of prerequisite undergraduate courses.

Postbaccalaureate students may enroll in graduate courses, but that work normally is not
applied to the graduate degree if the student is admitted to the Graduate School. By petition
in clearly justified cases and in conformance with regulations on courses and credit, it is
possible to transfer up to 15 credits of graduate course work earned with a grade of A, B+, or
B. For the College of Education, only students who have completed a baccalaureate program
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in the College may be admitted to postbaccalaureate status for the purpose of completing a
teacher certification program. Other applicants may be admitted to postbaccalaureate status
only for a limited time to fulfill prerequisites for admission to a master's program. Applicants
seeking teacher certification, with degrees in other fields, should apply for admission to a
master's program in the College of Education. For more information, visit the Registrar's
website, http://www.admissions.ufl.edu/qrad/postbacc.html.

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Nondegree Registration

Nondegree enrollment is restricted to participants in special programs, off-campus programs,
University-affiliated exchange programs, and those participants with nondegree educational
objectives at UF. Students denied admission to UF for any term are not eligible for nondegree
registration. Students need prior approval from the academic unit(s) to take courses in a
nondegree status. That course work normally is not applied toward the graduate degree if the
student is admitted to the Graduate School. By petition in clearly justified cases and in
conformance with regulations on courses and credit, it is possible to transfer up to 15 credits
of graduate course work earned with the grade of A, B+, or B. A student should not remain in
this classification for more than 1 term before being admitted as a postbaccalaureate or
graduate student.

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Readmission

This information applies only to students admitted to a graduate program who have attended
the University. Former graduate students who do not enroll at the University for 2 consecutive
terms, including any summer term, must reapply for admission whether to the same or a
different program. Readmission, however, is not guaranteed and is subject to the availability
of space at the appropriate level, college or major. Therefore, students may need prior written
approval (from their academic unit) to take a leave of absence for 2 or more consecutive
terms. Students who skip a single term will be scheduled automatically for a registration
appointment for 1 term (the next term). To apply for readmission, contact the Office of
Admissions, P.O. Box 114000, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-4000, http://www.
req.ufl.edu/regadmi.htm

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Faculty Members as Graduate Students
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UF faculty in tenured or tenure-accruing lines, as designated by the Florida Administrative
Code, normally may not pursue graduate degrees from this institution. Exceptions are made
for the Florida Cooperative Extension Service (IFAS) county personnel, the faculty of the P. K.
Yonge Laboratory School, and University Libraries faculty. Under certain restrictions
established by the Graduate Council, persons holding nontenure- or nonpermanent-status-
accruing titles may pursue graduate degrees at UF. Any other exceptions to this policy must
be approved by the Graduate Council. Such exceptions, if given, are rare and will only be
approved when it is determined to be in the best interest of the University.

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Residency for Tuition

How to apply for residency

All U.S. citizens, permanent residents and others included in Section 4 of the Board of
Education Rule 6a-10.044 above are eligible to apply for Florida residency. Residency for
tuition purposes is controlled exclusively by laws enacted by the Florida Legislature. For the
purpose of assessing tuition, residency and nonresidency status shall be determined as
provided in Classification of Students, Florida or Non-Florida (Section 6A-10.044, Florida
Administrative Code), Section 240.1201, Florida Statutes, and the Florida State University
System Residency Policy and Procedure Manual [revised effective October 17, 2000]. For the
entire law, see http://www.leq.state.fl.us/statutes. Staff members in the Office of the
University Registrar review applications for Florida resident status, together with supportive
documentation, and render a decision based on the documentation and the requirements of
Florida law.

This law, the rules, and the implementation manual presume that students initially classified as
nonresident will not be reclassified as residents merely by being enrolled for 1 year. The
applicant is responsible for providing all of the documents needed to merit a reclassification for
tuition purposes.

A student wishing to establish residency should pick up the Request for Change in Residency
Status form from the Office of the University Registrar, 222 Criser Hall, to review the
information and items that may be requested when the student files for Florida residency for
tuition purposes.

Residency for graduate students on appointment

Graduate research and teaching assistants and fellows who are United States citizens or
permanent residents are eligible for in-state residency for tuition purposes after completing 3
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consecutive terms over 12 consecutive months.

By University of Florida policy, all eligible students must take appropriate actions to become in-
state residents for tuition purposes at the start of their first term of enrollment and no later
than the end of drop/add. Among other criteria listed in the Florida Administrative Code, these
actions may include:

(1) Registering as a voter in Florida

(2) Obtaining a Florida driver's license or Florida ID

(3) Obtaining a Florida vehicle registration and insurance if appropriate and

(4) Completing a declaration of domicile. Information to accomplish these tasks is available
from the academic unit's graduate coordinator.

Final determination of residency status is made by the Office of the University Registrar.

Before the start of their second year of enrollment, students must file the appropriate
documentation with the Office of the University Registrar before the end of drop/add. Students
who are eligible but do not file the appropriate documents must speak with the graduate
coordinator before the end of drop/add.

Florida Administrative Code

Classification of Students: Florida or Non-Florida (6A-10.044, Florida Administrative Code)
Residency for Tuition Purposes.

The purpose of this rule is to establish consistent policies for the classification of students as
residents for tuition purposes. The determinations of classification or reclassification shall be
consistent to assure that students are classified the same regardless of the institution
determining the classification.

(1) The classification of a student as a Florida resident for tuition purposes by an institution or
entity governed by Section 1009.40, Florida Statutes, shall be recognized by other public
postsecondary institutions to which the student may later seek admission, provided that
student has attended the institution or entity making the classification within the last twelve
(12) months and the residency is noted on the student's transcript. Once a student has been
classified by an institution or entity as a resident for tuition purposes, institutions to which the
student may transfer are not required to re-evaluate the classification unless inconsistent
information suggests that an erroneous classification was made or the student's situation has
changed.
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(2) Non-U.S. citizens such as permanent residents, parolees, asylees, refugees, or other
permanent status persons (e.g., conditional permanent residents and temporary residents),
who have applied to and have been approved by the U.S. Bureau of Citizenship and
Immigration Services with no date certain for departure shall be considered eligible to
establish Florida residency for tuition purposes.

(3) Nonimmigrants holding one of the following visas shall be considered eligible to establish
Florida residency for tuition purposes. Persons in visa categories not listed herein shall be
considered ineligible to establish Florida residency for tuition purposes.

(a) Visa category A Government official.

(b) Visa category E Treaty trader or investor.

(c) Visa category G Representative of international organization.

(d) Visa category H-1 Temporary worker performing professional nursing services or in a
specialty occupation.

(e) Visa category H-4 Only if spouse or child of alien classified H-1.

(f) Visa category I Foreign information media representative.

(g) Visa category K Fiance, fiancee, or a child of United States citizenss.

(h) Visa category L Intracompany transferee (including spouse or child).

(i) Visa category N Parent or child of alien accorded special immigrant status.

(j) Visa category O-1 Workers of "extraordinary" ability in the sciences, arts, education,
business, or athletics.

(k) Visa category 0-3 Only if spouse or child of 0-1 alien.

(I) Visa category R Religious workers.

(m) Visa category NATO 1-7 Representatives and employees of NATO and their families.

(n) Visa category T Victims of trafficking, who cooperate with federal authorities in
prosecutions of traffickers, and their spouses and children.
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(o) Visa category V Spouses and children of lawful permanent residents.

(4) Non-U.S. citizens who fall within the following categories shall also be considered eligible
to establish Florida residency for tuition purposes:

(a) Citizens of Micronesia.

(b) Citizens of the Marshall Islands.

(c) Beneficiaries of the Family Unity Program.

(d) Individuals granted temporary protected status.

(e) Individuals granted withholding of deportation status.

(f) Individuals granted suspension of deportation status or cancellation of removal.

(g) Individuals granted a stay of deportation status.

(h) Individuals granted deferred action status.

(i) Individuals granted deferred enforced departure status.

(j) Applicants for adjustment of status.

(k) Asylum applicants with INS receipt or Immigration Court stamp.

(5) If a declaration of domicile, pursuant to Section 222.17, Florida Statutes, is being used as
one of the documents to establish residency for tuition purposes, the date that an applicant
shall be deemed as establishing residency for tuition purposes shall be twelve (12) months
hence from the date that the Clerk of Circuit Court notes the declaration was sworn and
subscribed to them. Nothing in this subsection shall prevent the use of additional
documentation as evidence that legal residency was established by other means pursuant to
Section 1009.21(1)(c), Florida Statutes, as of a date earlier than that established by the
Declaration of Domicile.

(6) An applicant shall be classified at the time of initial classification as an "All Florida"
resident for tuition purposes, and the institution to which the applicant is applying shall grant
the applicant residency for tuition purposes, if all of the following criteria are met. If the
applicant does not meet all of the criteria, he or she must be evaluated to determine residency
status.
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(a) Students requesting All Florida resident status as an independent person must meet all of
the following criteria :

- The student's nation of citizenship is the United States

- The student is twenty-four (24) years of age or over

- The student's permanent address is a Florida address

- The high school from which the student graduated is a Florida high school

- Every institution the student attended is located in the State of Florida and

- The student provides written or electronic verification that he or she has been issued two
(2) of the following three (3) Florida documents that are dated more than twelve (12) months
old: a voter's registration, a driver's license or a vehicle registration.

(b) Students requesting All Florida resident status as a dependent person must meet all of the
following criteria :

- The student is eligible to be claimed by his or her parent or legal guardian as a dependent
under the federal income tax code;

- The student's nation of citizenship is the United States;

- The student is under twenty-four (24) years of age;

- The student's mother, father or legal guardian is the person claiming Florida residence;

- The student's mother, father or legal guardian claiming Florida residence has a Florida
permanent legal address; and

- The student's mother, father or legal guardian claiming Florida residence provides written
or electronic verification that he or she has been issued two of the following three Florida
documents that are dated more than twelve (12) months old: a voter's registration, a driver's
license or a vehicle registration.

(7) An applicant, who at the time of initial classification is not classified as an All Florida
resident for tuition purposes, shall be further assessed by the institution to which the applicant
is applying. The student shall provide clear and convincing evidence that establishes that he or
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she, or if a dependent, the student's mother, father, or guardian, has been a Florida resident
for the preceding twelve (12) months. No single piece of documentation shall be conclusive.

(a) The documentation may include, but is not limited to, the following: driver's license, voter
registration card, vehicle registration, declaration of domicile, proof of purchase of a
permanent home, transcripts from a Florida school for multiple years, proof of permanent full-
time employment, a Professional or Occupational License, Florida incorporation, documents
evidencing family ties, proof of membership in organizations, and any other documentation
that supports the student's request for resident status.

(b) Dependent or independent status will be based on a copy of a student's or his or her
parents' most recent tax return or other documentation. A dependent person will be one for
whom fifty (50) percent or more of his or her support has been provided by another as
defined by the Internal Revenue Service. An independent person will be one who provides
more than fifty (50) percent of his or her own support.

(c) An independent or dependent student who is enrolled full-time in an institution and is
seeking to be re-classified as a resident for tuition purposes, must provide such documentation
which substantiates that he or she, or if a dependent, the student's mother, father, or
guardian, is establishing Florida as his or her permanent domicile and not as a mere
temporary residence incident to the enrollment in higher education.

(8) A student, or if a dependent, his or her father, mother or guardian, must maintain legal
residence in the state of Florida for at least twelve (12) months immediately prior to the first
day of classes of the term for which residency status is sought at a Florida institution.
Institutions may establish submission deadlines for all documentation that will be used to
determine residency for tuition purposes. The burden of providing the documentation, which
justifies the classification of a student as a resident for tuition purposes, rests with the
applicant.

(9) Notwithstanding the foregoing, institutions shall classify persons as residents for tuition
purposes in accordance with the criteria set forth in Section 1009.21, Florida Statutes.

(10) For purposes of determining residency for tuition purposes, any reference to federal or
state government shall be construed as meaning U.S. federal or Florida state government.

(11) In determining the domicile of a married person, the determination of a legally married
person shall be consistent with Chapter 741, Florida Statutes.

(12) Definitions.

(a) The term "institution," as used in this rule when adopted by the Board of Governors shall
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mean state universities, and when adopted by the State Board of Education shall mean
community colleges, with the understanding that both Boards shall coordinate and cooperate
as a K-20 system.

(b) Community colleges shall mean those set forth in Section 1000.21(3), Florida Statutes.

(c) State universities shall mean those set forth in Section 1000.21(6), Florida Statutes.

(d) The term "full-time" shall mean enrollment in twelve (12) or more credits per term for
undergraduate students and nine (9) or more credits per term for graduate students.
Institutions may provide exceptions for students such as dissertation students, co-op students,
or students with disabilities.

Specific Authority 1009.21(11)
FS. Law Implemented 1009.21(11)
FS. History New 10-6-92,
Amended 10-17-00, 3-22-05.

Tuition payments

Florida resident tuition payments are available to graduate assistants and fellows who
meet the eligibility requirements. Any change in the student's academic or employment status
after processing a tuition payment will result in the original payment being updated, reduced,
or voided as appropriate.

Non-Florida resident tuition payments are available to out-of-state students who hold
graduate assistantships or fellowships and who meet the eligibility requirements. Any change
in the student's academic or employment status after processing a tuition payment will result
in the original payment being updated, reduced, or voided as appropriate.

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GENERAL REGULATIONS

The information in this
catalog is current as of
May 2008. Please contact
individual programs for any
additional information or
changes.

The student is responsible for becoming informed and observing all program regulations and
procedures. The student must be familiar with Graduate Catalog general regulations and
requirements, specific degree program requirements, and offerings and requirements of the
major academic unit. Rules are not waived for ignorance. Any exceptions to the policies stated
in the Graduate Catalog must be approved by the Dean of the Graduate School. After
admission to the Graduate School, but before the first registration, the student should consult
the college and/or the graduate coordinator in the major academic unit about courses and
degree requirements, deficiencies if any, and special regulations of the academic unit. The
dean (or representative) of the college where the degree program is located must oversee all
registrations. Once a supervisory committee is appointed, registration approval is the
responsibility of the committee chair.

Catalog Year
Classification of Students
Confidentiality of Student Records
Academic Honesty
Student Conduct Code
Registration Requirements
Attendance Policies
Change of Graduate Degree Program
Courses and Credits
Grades
Unsatisfactory Progress or Unsatisfactory Scholarship
Foreign Language Examination
Examinations
Preparation for Final Term
Awarding of Degrees
Attendance at Commencement
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Catalog Year

Catalog year determines the set of academic requirements that must be fulfilled for
graduation. Students graduate under the catalog in effect when they first enroll as degree-
seeking students at UF provided they maintain continuous enrollment. Students who are
unregistered for 2 or more consecutive terms must reapply for admission and will be assigned
the catalog in effect when enrollment is resumed. With the approval of their college dean's
office, students may opt to graduate under the requirements of a later catalog, but they must
fulfill all graduation requirements from that alternative year. The University will make every
reasonable effort to honor the curriculum requirements appropriate to each student's catalog
year. However, courses and programs are sometimes discontinued and requirements may
change as a result of curricular review or actions by accrediting associations and other
agencies.

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Classification of Students

6 Postbaccalaureate students: degree-holding students admitted to postbaccalaureate credits.

7 Graduate students seeking a first master's degree.

8 Graduate students who have earned a master's degree, or who have earned 36 or more
credits while seeking a graduate degree, but who have not been admitted to doctoral
candidacy.

9 Graduate students admitted to doctoral candidacy.

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Confidentiality of Student Records

The University ensures the confidentiality of student educational records in accordance with
State University System rules, state statutes, and FERPA, the Family Educational Rights and
Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, also known as the Buckley Amendment.

Student directory information that can be released to the public is limited to:

- Student name
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- Local/permanent addresses and e-mail address

- Listed telephone numbers)

- Class and college

- Major

- Enrollment status (e.g., undergraduate or graduate level; full time or part time)

- Dates of attendance at UF

- Degree(s) and awards received at UF

- Most recent previous educational institution attended

- Weight and height of university athletes

Currently enrolled students must contact the appropriate agency/agencies to restrict release
of directory information. The Office of the University Registrar, the Department of Housing
and Residence Education, and Human Resource Services routinely release directory
information to the public. Directory information may also be released by other university
departments and/or employees.

- Students who want to restrict directory information must do so at the Office of the
University Registrar in 222 Criser Hall.

- Students who live on campus also must request this restriction from the Department of
Housing and Residence Education (next to Beaty Towers).

- Students who are also University employees must request this restriction from Human
Resource Services.

- Students who do not want their addresses, phone numbers or personal information
published on the Web should update their directory profile accordingly.

Student educational records may be released without a student's consent to school
officials who have a legitimate educational interest in accessing the records. "School officials"
shall include:

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- An employee, agent or officer of the university or State University System of Florida in an
administrative, supervisory, academic, research, or support staff position;

- Persons serving on university committees, boards and/or councils; and

- Persons employed by or under contract to the university to perform a special task, such as
an attorney or an auditor.

"Legitimate educational interest" shall mean any authorized interest or activity undertaken in
the name of the university for which access to an educational record is necessary or
appropriate to the operation of the university or to the proper performance of the educational
mission of the university.

The university also may disclose information from a student's educational record without a
student's consent to either individuals or entities permitted such access under applicable
federal and state law.

Students have the right to review their own educational records for information and to
determine accuracy. A photo I.D., other equivalent documentation or personal recognition by
the custodian of the record will be required before access is granted. Parents of dependent
students, as defined by the Internal Revenue Service, have these same rights upon
presentation of proof of a student's dependent status. Each spring when the catalog is
published, students are notified of their FERPA rights.

If a student believes the educational record contains information that is inaccurate, misleading
or in violation of his or her rights, the student can ask the institution to amend the record. The
UF Student Guide outlines the procedures for challenging the content of a student record, as
well as the policies governing access to and maintenance of student records.

Students who believe the university has not maintained the confidentiality of their educational
record as required by law may file a complaint by contacting the Family Policy Compliance
Office, U.S. Department of Education, 400 Maryland Avenue SW, Washington, DC 20202-5901.

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Academic Honesty

In the fall of 1995 the UF student body enacted a new honor code and voluntarily committed
itself to the highest standards of honesty and integrity. When students enroll at the University,
they commit themselves to the standard drafted and enacted by the students.

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Preamble: In adopting this honor code, UF students recognize that academic honesty and
integrity are fundamental values of the university community. Students who enroll at the
University commit to holding themselves and their peers to the high standard of honor
required by the honor code. Any individual who becomes aware of a violation of the honor
code is bound by honor to take corrective action. The quality of a University of Florida
education depends on community acceptance and enforcement of the honor code.

The Honor Code: We, the members of the University of Florida community, pledge
to hold ourselves and our peers to the highest standards of honesty and integrity.

On all work submitted for credit by students at the University, the following pledge is either
required or implied: "On my honor, I have neither given nor received unauthorized aid in
doing this assignment."

The University requires all members of its community to be honest in all endeavors. A
fundamental principle is that the whole process of learning and pursuit of knowledge is
diminished by cheating, plagiarism and other acts of academic dishonesty. In addition, every
dishonest act in the academic environment affects other students adversely, from the skewing
of the grading curve to giving unfair advantage for honors or for professional or graduate
school admission. Therefore, the University will take severe action against dishonest students.
Similarly, measures will be taken against faculty, staff and administrators who practice
dishonest or demeaning behavior.

Student responsibility: Students should report any condition that facilitates dishonesty to
the instructor, department chair, college dean, or Student Honor Court.

Faculty responsibility: Faculty members have a duty to promote honest behavior and to
avoid practices and environments that foster cheating in their classes. Teachers should
encourage students to bring negative conditions or incidents of dishonesty to their attention.
In their own work, teachers should practice the same high standards they expect from their
students.

Administration responsibility: As highly visible members of our academic community,
administrators should be ever vigilant to promote academic honesty and conduct their lives in
an ethically exemplary manner.

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Student Conduct Code

Students enjoy the rights and privileges that accrue to membership in a university community
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and are subject to the responsibilities that accompany that membership. For a system of
effective campus governance, it is incumbent upon all members of the campus community to
notify appropriate officials of any violations of regulations and to assist in their enforcement.
The University's conduct regulations, available to all students in the Student Guide, are set
forth in Florida Administrative Code. Questions can be directed to the Dean of Students Office.

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Registration Requirements

The University of Florida operates on a semester system consisting of two 16-week terms and
two 6-week summer terms. One semester credit equals 1.5 quarter credits. "Term" is used
hereafter, instead of "semester".

Required Full-Time Registration

Summer
Fall and Sprng B

Full-time graduate students not on
9-12 4 4 8
appointments
Fellows receiving $4,000 or more per term, 12 4 4 8
and trainees
Assistants on .25 to .74 FTE 9 3 3 6
Assistants on .75 to .99 FTE 6 2 2 4
Full-time assistants:
1.00 Fall & Spring 3
1.00 Summer A 2 or 2
1.00 Summer B 2 or 2
1.00 Summer C land 1 or 2

Graduate students on appointment: Required registration for fellows and trainees with
stipends of $4,000 or greater per term is 12 credits. Fellows whose stipends are less than
$4,000 must register for at least 3 credits during fall and spring terms, and 2 credits for
summer. Any additional credits are at the expense of the student. The full-time registration
requirement is reduced for students who are graduate assistants. For students on appointment
for the full summer, registration must total that specified for C term. Registration may be in
any combination of A, B, or C terms. However, courses must be distributed so that the student
is registered during each term on appointment. Students on appointment are financially liable
for excess credits beyond the required registration. If a student on appointment drops below
the required registration at any time in the semester, the student becomes financially liable for
the entire registration. Students who do not register properly are not permitted to remain on
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appointment.

Full-time registration is 9 to 12 credits. However, most fellows must be registered for 12
credits in fall or spring and 8 credits in summer. Students not on an appointment may want to
enroll full time to finish their degrees in the minimum time frame or may be required to enroll
full time by external funding agencies or their academic units.

Full-time equivalent is required or prescribed registration; fewer than 9 to 12 credits but
considered appropriate in specific circumstances. This includes students on a .25 to 1.00 FTE
assistantship and other limited circumstances. See the Graduate Council Policy Manual.
Lockstep programs such as M.B.A. are defined as cohorts who move together in the same
enrollment sequence with courses taught in a particular order, on a particular schedule.
Students have no flexibility in their program or sequence, and may not drop in and out of
courses independently. On academic unit request, the Graduate School will certify specified
students as full-time equivalent under the circumstances stated in the Graduate Council Policy
Manual.

Part-time registration: Students not on an appointment and without a specific registration
requirement by the government, external funding agency, or academic unit may register as a
part-time student. Minimum registration is 3 credits in fall or spring and 2 credits in summer.

Employee registration: UF staff employed on a permanent, full-time basis may be
permitted to waive fees up to a maximum of 6 credits per term on a space-available basis.
Enrollment is limited to courses that do not increase direct costs to the University. Courses
that increase direct costs can include TBA (to be arranged), computer courses, individualized
courses, distance learning, internships, and dissertation and master's thesis courses.
Laboratory courses are permitted on a space available basis. For additional information visit
the Human Resource Services website: http://www.hr.ufl.edu/

Undergraduate registration in graduate courses: Upper-division undergraduate students
may enroll in 5000-level courses with consent of the instructor. Normally, a student must have
a GPA of at least 3.00. To enroll in 6000-level courses, a student must have senior standing,
consent of the instructor, and an upper-division GPA of at least 3.00.

After a student is accepted to graduate school, up to 15 credits of graduate-level courses
earned with a letter grade of B or better taken under this provision may be applied toward a
graduate degree at UF, if credit for the course has not been used for an undergraduate
degree, and if the transfer is approved by the academic unit and made as soon as the student
is admitted to a graduate program.

Final term registration: During the term the final examination is given and during the term
the degree is awarded, a student must be registered for at least 3 credits in fall or spring and
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2 credits in summer. Thesis students must enroll in 6971 and doctoral students must enroll in
7980. Nonthesis students must enroll in course work that counts toward the graduate degree.
Students on a fellowship, traineeship, or assistantship must be registered appropriately for
their appointments.

Cleared prior: The extension known as "cleared prior" is for that rare student who (because
of some unforeseeable event) narrowly misses one of the deadlines for graduating this term.
It may be possible for such a student to graduate next term without registering for next term,
if all degree requirements are completed by the last business day before classes begin for the
next term. All students should do the following:

- Register correctly during the term before graduation (minimum of 3 credits if fall or spring,
2 credits if summer)

- Complete all degree requirements

- Clear all incomplete or other unresolved grades

- Apply online for a degree (Registrar's office) for the upcoming term

- Submit the final exam form to the Graduate Student Records Office for nonthesis degree
programs requiring a final comprehensive examination

- Thesis and dissertation students, their supervisory committees, and their academic units'
graduate administrative staff should read the Editorial Office's most recent Checklist for
Doctoral Dissertations or Checklist for Master's Theses (whichever is appropriate), to
understand everything that needs to happen for the student to achieve Editorial First
Submission and Editorial Final Clearance. Scheduling the defense is a major concern, because
students who are clearing prior must defend before they can achieve Editorial First Submission.

a. Schedule the defense and successfully defend the thesis or dissertation

b. Submit the Final Examination form to Graduate Editorial at least 2 weeks before the last
business day before classes start next term

c. Achieve Editorial First Submission at least 2 weeks before the last business day before
classes start next term

d. Achieve Editorial Final Clearance before 5:00 p.m. of the last business day before classes
begin for the next term

Drop/add: Courses may be dropped or added during drop/add without penalty. This period
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usually lasts 5 UF calendar days or 3 days for summer, starting with the first day of the term.
Classes that meet for the first time after drop/add may be dropped without academic penalty
or fee liability by the end of the next business day after the first meeting. This does not apply
to laboratory sections. After this period, a course may be dropped and a W appears on the
transcript. Students become financially liable for any course added or dropped after
the deadline, including students with fee waivers.

Retaking courses: Graduate students may repeat courses in which they earn failing grades.
Grade points from both the initial failed attempt and the first attempt earning a grade of C or
better are included in computing the grade point average. The student receives credit for the
satisfactory attempt only.

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Attendance Policies

Students are responsible for meeting all academic objectives as defined by the instructor.
Absences count from the first class meeting. In general, acceptable reasons for absences from
class include illness, serious family emergencies, special curricular requirements, military
obligation, severe weather conditions, religious holidays, and participation in official University
activities. Absences from class for court-imposed legal obligations (e.g., jury duty or
subpoena) must be excused. Other reasons also may be approved.

Students may not attend classes unless they are registered officially or approved to audit with
evidence of having paid audit fees. After the end of drop/add, the Office of the University
Registrar provides official class rolls/addenda to instructors. Students who do not attend at
least one of the first 2 class meetings of a course or laboratory in which they are registered
and who have not contacted the academic unit to indicate their intent may be dropped from
the course. Students must not assume that they will be dropped if they fail to attend the first
few days of class. The academic unit will notify students dropped from courses or laboratories
by posting a notice in the academic unit office. Students may request reinstatement on a
space-available basis if documented evidence is presented. The University recognizes the right
of the individual professor to make attendance mandatory. After due warning, professors may
prohibit further attendance and then assign a failing grade for excessive absences.

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Change of Graduate Degree Program

To change majors or degree level (same or different college), the academic unit must submit a
completed Change of Graduate Degree Program for Graduate Students form to the Graduate
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School. The form must be signed by an authorized representative of the new academic unit
and college, and then submitted to the Graduate School for processing. Any changes to
degree programs MUST occur before the published midpoint deadline of the
student's final term.

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Courses and Credits

Undergraduate courses (1000-2999) may not be used as any part of the graduate degree
requirements. All 1000- and 2000-level courses may be taken on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory
(S/U) basis.

Six credits of undergraduate courses (3000-4999) outside the major may count when taken as
part of an approved graduate program.

Courses numbered 5000 and above are limited to graduate students, with the exception
described under Undergraduate
Registration in Graduate
Courses Courses numbered 7000 and above are normally for advanced
graduate students.

No more than 5 credits each of 6910 (Supervised Research) and 6940 (Supervised Teaching)
may be taken by a graduate student at UF. Students who have taken 5 credits of 6910 cannot
take 7910; the rule also applies to 6940 and 7940.

For a complete list of approved graduate courses, see Fields of
Instruction Academic units decide which of these graduate
courses to offer in a given term. Contact the academic unit for information on available
courses.

Generally, graduate courses may not be repeated for credit. However, there is no limit on
courses numbered 6971, 6972, 6979, 7979, and 7980. Other courses repeated for credit
indicate "max" after the single term credit.

Professional work: Graduate students may receive credit toward their degrees for courses in
professional programs (e.g., J.D., D.V.M., or M.D.) when their advisers and graduate
coordinators certify that the course work is appropriate for their programs and when the
students receive permission from the academic units and colleges offering the courses. A list
of such courses for each student must be filed with Graduate Student Records (106 Grinter)
and is limited to a maximum of 9 credits toward the master's degree and 30 credits toward the
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doctorate.

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Grades

The only passing grades for graduate students are A, B+, B, C+, C, and S. Grades of C+ and
C count toward a graduate degree if an equal number of credits in courses numbered 5000 or
higher have been earned with grades of B+ and A, respectively. Grade points are not given for
S and U grades; S and U grades are not used to calculate grade point averages. All letter-
graded courses eligible to count toward the graduate degree, except 1000- and 2000-level
courses, are used to calculate the cumulative grade-point average.

Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory: Grades of S and U are the only grades awarded in courses
numbered 6910 (Supervised Research), 6940 (Supervised Teaching), 6971 (Research for
Master's Thesis), 6972 (Engineer's Research), 7979 (Advanced Research), and 7980 (Research
for Doctoral Dissertation). Additional courses for which S and U grades apply are noted in the
academic unit offerings in the Fields of
Instruction section of the catalog.

All language courses regardless of level may be taken S/U if the student's major is not a
language and the courses are not used to satisfy a minor, with approval from the student's
supervisory committee chair and the instructor of the course. S/U approval should be made by
the published deadline date. All 1000 and 2000 level courses may be taken S/U. No other
courses (graduate, undergraduate, or professional) may be taken for an S/U grade.

Deferred grade H: The grade of H is not a substitute for a grade of S, U, or I. Courses for
which H grades are appropriate must be so noted in their catalog descriptions, and must be
approved by the Graduate Curriculum Committee and the Graduate School. This grade may be
used only in special situations where the expected unit of work may be developed over a
period of time greater than a single term. All grades of H must be removed before a graduate
degree can be awarded.

Incomplete grades: Grades of I (incomplete) received during the preceding term should be
removed as soon as possible. Grades of I carry no quality points and become punitive after 1
term. All grades of I must be removed before a graduate degree can be awarded.

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Unsatisfactory Progress or Unsatisfactory Scholarship

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Any graduate student may be denied further registration if progress toward completing the
program becomes unsatisfactory to the academic unit, college, or Dean of the Graduate
School. Unsatisfactory scholarship is defined as failure to maintain a B average (3.00) in all
work attempted. Students need an overall GPA of 3.00, and graduate students also need a
3.00 GPA in their major (and in the minor, if a minor is declared) at graduation. Students with
less than a 3.00 GPA may not hold an assistantship or fellowship.

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Foreign Language Examination

A foreign language examination is not required for all degree programs. For specific
information on foreign language requirements, contact the graduate coordinator of your
academic unit.

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Examinations

The student must register for sufficient graduate credits during the term any examination is
taken. The student's supervisory committee is responsible for administering the written and
oral qualifying examinations and the final oral examination for the defense of the thesis,
project, or dissertation. All members of the supervisory committee must sign the appropriate
forms, including the ETD signature page, for the student to meet the requirements of the
examination.

The written comprehensive examination for the nonthesis master's degree may be taken at a
remote site. All other qualifying and final examinations for graduate students must be held on
the University of Florida campus. Exceptions to this policy are made only for certain graduate
students whose examinations are administered at the Agricultural Research and Educational
Centers or on the campuses of the universities in the State University System.

With the approval of all members of the supervisory committee, one committee member (not
the chair and not the external member) may be off-site at a qualifying oral examination or at
the final oral defense of the thesis or dissertation, using modern communication technology to
participate rather than being physically present.

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Preparation for Final Term
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