• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Title Page
 Front Matter
 Table of Contents
 Administration
 General considerations
 Academic considerations
 Student information
 Course descriptions
 Academic personnel
 Students














Title: University record
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Full Citation
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00627
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: June 1981
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00627
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page i
        Page ii
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Front Matter
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Table of Contents
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Administration
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
    General considerations
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 16a
    Academic considerations
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
    Student information
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
    Course descriptions
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
    Academic personnel
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
    Students
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
Full Text
































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NIVEI9SITY


of TFLOFIDA


University Archives
George A. Smathers Libraries
University of Florida


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LIBqJS







1981-19S2



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD
J. HILLS MILLER HEALTH CENTER
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE


COLLEGE


OF


MEDICINE


CATALOG





















Ut3-i


The University of Florida College of Medicine is an equal opportunity employer within the meaning of Title VII of the
Civil Rights Act of 1964.


Volume LXXVI Series 1, No.


2, June 1981


Published quarterly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611. Office of Publications, Gainesville, Florida
32611. Second-class postage paid at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
This publication has been adopted as a rule of the University pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 120 of the Florida
Statute. Addenda to the University Record Series, if any, are available upon request to the Office of the Registrar.









STATE OF FLORIDA

Robert Graham
Governor


BOARD OF REGENTS


DuBose Ausley
Chairman/Tallahassee
Marshall M. Criser
Palm Beach


J. J. Daniel
Jacksonville


Murray H. Dubbin
Miami
James J. Gardner
Ft. Lauderdale
Gerald Sanchez
Student Regent


Dr. William L. Maloy
Pensacola
Jack McGriff
Gainesville
T. Terrell Sessums


Tampa


Betty Anne Staton
Vice Chairman/Orlando
Barbara W. Newell, Ph.D.


Chancell


State


University


UNIVERSITY

Robert Q. Marston, M.D.
President


OF FLORIDA

Kenneth F. Finger, Ph.D.


Acting


Vice


President for Health Affairs


Louis V. Voyles, B.A.
Registrar


William B. Deal, M.D.
Dean, College of Medicine


and Associate


Vice President


for Clinical Affairs


MEDICAL ADVISORY

Henry J. Babers, Jr. M.D. Eml
Gainesville Jack
Jean L. Bennett, M.D. Dav
Clearwater Ft.
James L. Borland, M.D. San
Jacksonville Tall


James W. Lower, Jr., M.D.
Daytona Beach
Charles K. Donegan, M.D.
St. Petersburg
Richard M. Fleming, M.D.
Miami Beach


COMMITTEE

met F. Ferguson, Jr., M.D.
;sonville
'id C. Lane, M.D.
Lauderdale
n H. Moorer, Jr., M.D.
ahassee


Louis C. Murray, M.D.
Chairman/Orlando
John H. Whitcomb, M.D.
Pensacola
Robert E. Windom, M.D.


Sarasota


System








ACADEMIC


CALENDAR


1981


1982


ALL CLASSES
Registration
Labor Day
Homecoming


Friday, August


September


1


26,
981


1981


Friday Noon, October 16, 1981
Saturday, October 17, 1981
Tuesday, November 11, 1981


Veterans Day
Thanksgiving


Wednesday,
to Monday,


6:30 p.m., November 26


November 30


1981


FIRST YEAR (Class of 1985)
Phase A
1st Semester


Orientation


Week of August 17, 1981


Monday,


Classes Begin
Semester Ends
2nd Semester
Classes Begin
Semester Ends


August 24,


1981


Friday, December 18, 1981


Monday, January 4,


Friday


1982


May 28, 1982


SECOND YEAR (Class of 1984)
Phase B
1st Semester


Monday, August 24,


Classes Begin
Semester Ends
2nd Semester
Classes Begin
Classes End


Friday,


Monday,


1981


December 18, 1981


January 4, 1982


Friday, March 1


1982


Clinical Rotations


Monday,


March


1982


THIRD YEAR (Class of 1983)
Phase B (continued)
Clinical Rotations End


Saturday,


March 13


1982


Phase C


Classes Begin


Monday, March


1982


FOURTH YEAR (Class of 1982)
Phase C (continued)
Classes End


Friday,


June 4, 1982


Commencement


Saturday, June


5, 1982








TABLE OF CONTENTS



a Dean's Staff
10 Departmental Chairmen

13 GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS
13 Educational Concerns
14 Students
14 Faculty
14 Research
15 Facilities

17 ACADEMIC CONSIDERATIONS
17 The Continuum of Medical Education
18 The Art and Science of Medicine
18 Flexibility of Programs
20 Junior Honors Medical Program
21 Program in Medical Sciences (PIMS)
21 Physician Assistant Program
22 Jacksonville Health Education Programs, Inc. (JHEP)
23 Pensacola Educational Program, Inc. (PEP)
23 Community Medicine
25 Preprofessional Education
25 The Applicant Pool
25 Admission to the College of Medicine
at an Advanced Standing Status
26 Basic Science Requirements
28 Medical College Admission Test
28 Application and Acceptance Procedures
29 Professional Education Leading to the M.D. Degree
29 Phase A
31 Phase B
32 Phase C
33 Evaluation
34 Student Conduct Code
35 Graduate and Postgraduate Programs
35 Graduate Education in the Medical Sciences
35 Programs Leading to the Ph.D. and M.S. Degrees








36 Medical Scientist Training Program (Combined M.D.-Ph.D. Degree)
37 Graduate Medical Education (Residencies and Fellowships)
38 Licensure
38 Continuing Education

41 STUDENT INFORMATION
41 Financial Considerations
41 Scholarships
43 Scholastic Awards
46 Loan Fund
47 Fellowships
48 Living Accommodations

51 COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
51 Phase A
52 Phase B
53 Phase C
54 Graduate Courses in the Medical Sciences
55 Anatomy
56 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
58 Immunology and Medical Microbiology
59 Neuroscience
62 Pathology
64 Pharmacology and Therapeutics
65 Physiology
66 Undergraduate Courses
68 Interdisciplinary Major in Biochemical and
Neural Sciences

71 ACADEMIC PERSONNEL
71 Faculty

103 STUDENTS
103 Medical Students
109 Graduate Students
11o Physician Assistant Students










DEAN'S


STAFF


WILLIAM B. DEAL, M.D.
Dean, College of Medicine and
Associate Vice President for
Clinical Affairs


J. LEE DOCKERY. M.D.


HUGH M. HILL, M.D.


Associate


Dean


Associate


Dean for Student and


Alumni Affairs

























LAMAR CREVASSE, M.D.
Assistant Dean for
Continuing Medical Education


JOSEPH E. LOFTON, M.D.
Assistant Dean for
Preprofessional Education


J. OCIE HARRIS, M.D.
Chairman Medical Selection
Committee


R. M. WHITTINGTON, M.D.
Assistant Dean for VA
Medical Center Relations


WILLIAM C. RUFFIN, M.D.
Assistant Dean for Clinical
Affairs


ROBERT H. REEVES, Ph.D.
Assistant Dean for
Tallahassee Program


MAX MICHAEL JR., M.D.
Assistant Vice President for
Jacksonville Programs


' ^-- ' '. '.










DEPARTMENT


CHAIRMEN


Second Row


ROSS, MICHAEL H., Ph.D.
Chairman, Department of Anatomy
MODEL, JEROME H.. M.D.
Chairman, Department of Anesthesiology
YOUNG. MICHAEL, M.D.
Chairman, Department of Biochemistry
and Molecular Biology
STEWART, WILLIAM L., M.D.
Chairman, Department of Community
Health and Family Medicine


Third Row


BERNS, KENNETH I., M.D., Ph.D.
Chairman, Department of Immunology
and Medical Microbiology
McGUlGAN, JAMES E., M.D.
Chairman, Department of Medicine
RHOTON, ALBERT L., JR.. M.D.
Chairman, Department of
Neurological Surgery
GREER, MELVIN, M.D.
Chairman. Department of Neurology


LUTTGE, WILLIAM G., Ph.D.
Acting Chairman. Department of Neuroscience
FRIEDRICH, EDUARD G.. M.D.
Chairman, Department of Obstetrics
and Gynecology
RUBIN, MELVIN L., M.D.
Chairman, Department of Ophthalmology
PETTY, R. WILLIAM, M.D.
Chairman. Department of Orthopaedic
Surgery


First Row





























K~r^
^t

^^pi!~ ^'te{fte


First Row


Second Row


SMITH, RICHARD T., M.D.
Chairman, Department of Pathology
SCHIEBLER, GEROLD L., M.D., Ph.D.
Chairman, Department of Pediatrics
NEIMS. ALLEN H., M.D., Ph.D.
Chairman, Department of Pharmacology
and Therapeutics
PHILLIPS. M. IAN. Ph.D.
Chairman, Department of Physiology


ADAMS, JOHN E.. M.D.
Chairman, Department of Psychiatry
WILLIAMS, CLYDE M., M.D., Ph.D.
Chairman, Department of Radiology
WOODWARD, EDWARD R., M.D.
Chairman, Department of Surgery


At








GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS
The College of Medicine, a component college of the J. Hillis Miller Health Center of the
University of Florida, opened its doors to medical students in September, 1956. The various
programs rapidly expanded to include a curriculum leading to the M.D. degree, a Ph.D
program in the basic medical sciences, and residency programs in the various specialties and
subspecialties of medicine, and numerous special fellowship programs of clinical or scientific
orientation.
The College of Medicine aspires to serve as an academic center of scientific and educational ex-
cellence and leadership in medicine and allied health fields, and highly specialized medical
care services to patients referred by practicing physicians. The faculty is dedicated to programs
of education, research, and patient care, while providing the student educational experiences
of the highest quality. Located in northcentral Florida, the College of Medicine is engaged in
intramural programs with the Gainesville Veterans Administration Medical Center and
extramural programs involving neighboring communities as well as a network of educational
services in Daytona Beach, Jacksonville, Tallahassee, Pensacola, Orlando, and other Florida
cities.
Situated at the southeast corner of the 2000-acre campus of the University of Florida, the
College of Medicine enjoys the benefit of strong ties with other programs within the university.
The relationships to engineering, biological sciences, social sciences, education, psychology,
and other disciplines are of particular importance.

EDUCATIONAL CONCERNS
The educational concerns of the College of Medicine begin with preprofessional counseling,
and include the program leading to the M.D. degree, residency, and continuing medical educa-
tion for the practicing physician. Each phase of this educational continuum has particular
emphasis and significance.
Educational offerings for the student of medicine must draw on the humanities, natural and
biological sciences, and on technology to provide a well-balanced educational experience. The
graduates of the program must have an appreciation both for the breadth of the arts and skills of
medicine and the highly specialized and fundamental nature of scientific medicine. The
graduates of the M.D. degree program must have sufficient experience to be able to choose
from the many career opportunities in medicine. Also, they must have acquired an attitude of
continuing self-education and must have learned to adhere to the highest scientific and ethical
standards of the medical profession.
The College of Medicine and its programs received full national accreditation first in 1960 and
again in 1976 by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education of the Association of American
Medical Colleges and the American Medical Association. The residency programs are
accredited individually by respective Specialty Boards.








STUDENTS
The college aspires to attract into the various programs students of the highest caliber. High
standards of scholastic achievement, moral character, and motivation are required of the
student. The highly personal relationship between patient and physician places the latter in a
position of trust, which demands maturity, integrity, intellectual honesty, and a sense of
responsibility. Because of the vast area of science which must be mastered by the physician, the
student of medicine must possess a high basic aptitude supplemented by academic preparation
of the highest order. Through an active recruitment program, a broader representation of the
ethnic mixture of the state is sought in the student body. The college adheres strictly to the prin-
ciple of ethnic, racial, religious, sex and social equality among its student body and faculty.
The University of Florida does not discriminate on the basis of handicap in the recruitment and
admission of students, the recruitment and employment of faculty and staff, and the operation
of any of its programs and activities, as specified by federal laws and regulations. The
designated coordinator for university compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of
1973 is the Associate Dean for Student Affairs.


FACULTY


The student is accepted into a fellowship of learning that
educational and personal relationship of long duration. To
medical education, the faculty must be representative of a wi
addition to the demand for highest competence in a chosen
must be interested in education and in students. It must atte
faculty-student relationships through personal, professional,
investigative and clinical training demands close interaction
problem at hand, be it the patient or the object of scientific


should mark the beginning of an
meet the requirements of modern
de area of academic experience. In
field of specialization, the faculty
mpt to develop and maintain close
and social contacts. The nature of
between faculty, students, and the
study.


RESEARCH


Individual and
faculty and stu
federal funds. I
Health Center
facilities at the


cooperative investigations constitute an important aspect of the activities of
dents. Facilities and equipment are made available through state, private, and
n addition to the research laboratories and animal facilities in the J. Hillis Miller
and the Veterans Administration Medical Center, there are animal research
Health Center Animal Research Farm.


Research projects of the faculty of the College of Medicine range from problems of molecular
and cellular biology to all phases of basic and applied clinical investigations including
behavioral sciences, epidemiology, and many other disciplines. Collaborative projects are in
process with veterinary science, engineering, biology, nuclear sciences, psychology, sociology,
education, and many other disciplines.
In view of the nature of modern biomedical investigation, it is natural that many interdepart-








mental efforts have evolved. Most of these involve faculties from the basic and clinical
sciences, and frequently from other colleges in the University. In general, these groups are
organized along categorical lines such as the Center for Neurobiological Sciences, the


Cardiovascul
Genetics, En
groups serve
units in the ni
focus for clii
developing bE


ar Group, the Tumor Biology Group, the
docrinology and Metabolism, and Gastroenti
a specific research need for the faculty and
ew curriculum. The Clinical Research Center ii
lical investigation. Very active collaboration
;tween faculties of the College of Medicine and


Divisions of Infectious Diseases,
erology, to mention a few. These
comprise very strong educational
n the Shands Teaching Hospital is a
in both research and education is
the College of Engineering. Educa-


tional opportunities in biomedical
graduate, and postgraduate.


engineering


are available


at all levels:


pre-bachelor,


FACILITIES


Most programs and faculty are housed in the J. Hillis Miller Health
facilities include the Chandler A. Stetson Medical Sciences Hall,
the Colleges of Dentistry, Health Related Professions, Med
Veterinary Medicine, the Shands Teaching Hospital and Clinics,
Medical Center.


I Center. The Health Center's
the Communicore Building,
icine, Nursing, Pharmacy,
Inc., and the Gainesville VA


The 476 bed Shands Teaching Hospital and Clinics, Inc. has some 18,000 inpatient admissions
recorded each year. The outpatient clinics and services record over 200,000 visits per year. The
VA Medical Center, located across the street from the Health Center, has a capacity of 480 beds
and provides additional clinical and research sources. Both institutions offer ample opportuni-
ty for hospital-based bedside and ambulatory teaching. Formal educational affiliations have
been established in Tallahassee, Pensacola, and Jacksonville as well, thus providing additional
basic science and clinical science resources.
The Communicore is a facility unique to the College of Medicine. This building houses lecture
and seminar rooms, multidisciplinary teaching laboratories designed to be flexible enough to
accommodate the wide variety of laboratory teaching programs of the different disciplines,
study areas, and a center for development and utilization of audiovisual and automated learn-
ing aids. In addition, the Health Center Library has a collection of 182,000 books and
periodicals. Computer-based bibliographic retrieval services, such as MEDLINE, are available
to support teaching and research activities. The library participates in a regional network of
medical libraries to supplement its information resources.



























































Architectural rendering of
Shands Hospital's new Patient
Services Building scheduled for
completion in 1983. The new
facility will house patient care
units, additional surgical suites
and intensive care facilities, a
new emergency room, and num-
erous patient services.








ACADEMIC


CONSIDERATIONS


Medicine, as a profession deeply rooted in the culture of the society it serves, must be respon-
sive to social needs and demands. Deficiencies in the medical system developed slowly in
recent decades and assumed critical proportions in the last few years. Both the consumer and
the provider of medical care now are expecting major changes in the practice of medicine and
its capacity to serve all elements of our population. Medical education, although somewhat
isolated from the day-to-day problem of medical care, has been drawn into the mainstream of
crisis and change. In response to this challenge, the faculty of the College of Medicine has been
deeply concerned with the adaptation of the educational programs to the needs of today and
tomorrow.


THE


CONTINUUM


OF


MEDICAL


EDUCATION


The curriculum of the College of Medicine has several basic objectives. First, it is designed to
instill in the medical student in the first year the attitude of a physician. By presenting the stu-
dent with a clinical problem and sufficient basic science data to understand the organic
malfunction, it is hoped the learning process will assume a meaningful significance. Second,
the curriculum is designed to acquaint students with the different facets of medicine in such a
fashion as to permit them to make an early choice from the many career offerings in medicine.
Third, the study plan permits the student to assume the responsibility for developing an educa-
tional program revelant to their particular needs-a program which will permit him to derive
maximum benefit from the learning process.
The present medical curriculum is the product of a trend over the last 50 years in which the


medical school a
had a great imp;
emergence of s(
preventive medi
education and m
organized medic
the development
twice is becoming
now are studying
their position as


nd its parent university have established close academic ties. This trend has
act on the quality and character of medical education. It has facilitated the
scientific medicine and increased sophistication of patient care (including
cine). The price paid for these advances has been a rising cost of medical
medical care, as well as an alienation of medical schools and their faculties from
;ine and the practitioner. As our society approaches an important juncture in
of health and medical care systems, the conflict between education and prac-
the cause of increasing concern for involved parties. Medical school faculties
g carefully the long-range aspects of their educational endeavors, as well as


proponents or intermediaries between opposite points of view.


As a result of


this review process, significant proposals for far-reaching change are being made, which will
have a long-lasting impact on medical education and medical schools.








THE ART AND SCIENCE OF MEDICINE

The scientific basis of medicine universally is accepted as a prerequisite for medical prac-
tice-at least on an intellectual level. Too often, however, we are confronted with the idea that
the practice of medicine is an art rather than a science; and furthermore, that too much science
in medical education renders the future physician insensitive to the human needs of his
patients. Frequently medical students complain that entrance into medical school really does
not bring about the expected change in fulfillment of their motivational desires. Often they feel
removed from the art of medicine to the point where they cannot experience satisfaction or
gratification of their emotional needs. As a result, a cynical attitude may emerge toward
medical and patient problems, with a subsequent loss of motivation toward learning. The
education experience must help the student to achieve a high quality blend of humanism and
science, which will enable optimal medical care to be provided to patients. The faculty hopes
some of the new programs will provide a blending of the art and the science of medicine.

Through careful planning an effort will be made to use the fundamental knowledge of the basic
sciences in a meaningful relation to career goals in medicine. While during Phase A (first year)
the emphasis will be on sciences, it will focus on clinical medicine during Phase B (second year
and first half of the third year). The opportunity to advance in both fields in a correlated fashion
then will be offered in Phase C. It is hoped this program will contribute toward a resolution of
the ambivalence between science and the practice of medicine.

The effect will be enhanced by an earlier beginning of clinical rotations by the student (second
semester of the second year), thus eliminating prolonged frustration.

These two features are of special significance for modern medicine, since there is widespread
recognition that delay between scientific discovery and its clinical application is too long and
must be shortened. It is expected that the graduates of the new program will have less difficulty
in retaining a true feeling for a close relationship between science and practice.


FLEXIBILITY OF PROGRAMS

For many years, medical faculties attempted to adhere to a principle of completeness in spite of
the increased volume of knowledge in the basic medical and clinical sciences. They added new
courses and condensed old ones until the deluge of factual material over-extended the student's
capacity for retention, as well as his or her facility for mental integration. In addition, the
assumption was made that a single standard program of instruction would be adequate for all
students accepted into the medical program. Experience at the University of Florida has since
prompted consideration of the varying backgrounds of medical students and a flexible
curriculum which will be relevant to the individual's needs and will permit incorporation for
further developments in medical education. Consequently, the new program at the University
of Florida differs from the previous curriculum in the following ways:








1. The basic or core program no longer is designated to transmit the total knowledge presumed
necessary for the practice of medicine. The emphasis has changed from presentation of
content to the transmission of an educational process, whereby the student is largely re-
quired to seek out the necessary content. Admittedly, the student will have wide gaps in the
knowledge of basic sciences and the practice of medicine, but should have sufficient infor-
mation to make a rational and well-informed decision regarding further education.

2. Although students in a medical school all share the desire to become physicians, their
backgrounds and specific goals vary greatly. By permitting greater individualization, the
new curriculum will enable the student to adapt their personal program to previous educa-
tional experience, individual learning speed, and to career plans for the future. In providing
for this flexibility, the medical curriculum will become an educational continuum beginning
with preprofessional education and culminating with continuing medical education for the
practicing physician.

3. The new medical program will endeavor to free the student from the classroom and provide
an opportunity to pursue studies in the library or laboratory. While the regular course load
for the first year of the medical student previously consisted of 34 to 36 hours per week, it
has been reduced. The student with more time to devote to individual studies will require
greater support also-through guidance, counseling, teaching aids such as computer
assisted instruction and others.

4. It is anticipated that the length of study in the medical program can be adapted naturally to
the needs of the individual student. In some instances first year courses may be used to fulfill
undergraduate degree requirements. In others, a student may embark on an early residency
program or pursue a combined M.D.-Ph.D. degree program. The prime emphasis of the cur-
riculum is on providing a program which has the elasticity to encompass individual needs
and interests. In addition to the change in structure of the curriculum, two new programs
for entrance into medical school besides the traditional route have been developed:









JUNIOR HONORS MEDICAL PROGRAM

The Junior Honors Medical Program allows the highly motivated and qualified student to
integrate the latter portion of premedical education with preclinical basic science medical
education. Application to the program takes place during a student's second year of college.
Students accepted into the program are simultaneously accepted into the College of Medicine.
Third year Junior Honors students take one seminar each semester. These seminars provide the
student with a solid background in biochemistry and other areas of preclinical basic science.


Year 1


Year 3


Year 2
University
LA&S College
Year 4


Year 5


Year 6


Year 7


Emphasis in these seminars is placed on student participation in a relatively non-structured
and informal format. In addition to the seminars, students continue to register for course-work
within the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Many students in the program also become in-
volved in research projects. The fourth year, the participants merge into the standard Phase A
medical program. Since the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences grants credit for the third year
seminars and most of the Phase A work, program participants are able to receive a B.S. degree
at the end of the first year of medical school.


Students are eligible to apply if they have (1) completed at least one year (three semesters) of
zoology; (2) completed two courses (quarters) in calculus; (3) completed freshman chemistry
and organic chemistry; (4) completed University of Florida's general education requirements,
English, institutions and humanities either via course or placement credit and (5) have a 3.5 or
higher grade point average. Students who have also completed their foreign language and/or
physics requirements during their first two years are in a favored position with respect to ap-
plication to this program. Although most applicants are second year students at the University


University
LA&S College








of Florida, applications are also accepted from students not enrolled at the University of
Florida who meet the above requirements and who are Florida residents.

Additional information about the Junior Honors Medical Program and the application pro-
cedures may be obtained by writing the Assistant Dean for Preprofessional Education, College
of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville Florida 32610.


PROGRAM IN MEDICAL SCIENCES (PIMS)

The program in Medical Sciences (PIMS), an inter-university approach to medical education,
began in the fall of 1971 at the Florida State and Florida A & M Universities in Tallahassee. In
this program, the two universities in the state capitol have combined efforts to provide instruc-
tion in the preclinical medical sciences parallel to the first year curriculum of the University of
Florida College of Medicine. Since this instruction is integrated with traditional undergraduate
degree programs in a college such as Liberal Arts and Sciences, the time permitted to achieve
competency in the preclinical sciences is flexible. While it is expected that most students will
spend five years in reaching this level, a number of accelerated students may do so in four
years, others in six.

Participation and enrollment in PIMS courses is limited to full-time undergraduate students at
Florida State and Florida A & M Universities. From among the participants in the program, an
evaluation committee determines which students are to be awarded secured status. This status
assures the student entrance into the second year at the University of Florida College of
Medicine, assuming acceptable academic performance and professional growth during
completion of the program requirements.

The curriculum is designed around a nucleus of existing courses in the social, biological and
physical sciences at Florida State and Florida A & M Universities, and contains all of the tradi-
tional basic science disciplines, short of physical diagnosis and systemic pathology. Clinical
seminars and other clinical experiences are furnished by the community of practicing physi-
cians in Tallahassee with the cooperation of Tallahassee Memorial Hospital, the Florida State
University Health Service, and Sunland Training Hospital.

Detailed information on the Program in Medical Sciences can be obtained by writing the Office
of the Director, Program in Medical Sciences, Florida State University, Tallahassee, 32306.


PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT PROGRAM

The Physician Assistant Program offered by the College of Medicine, University of Florida, is
designed to prepare health care professionals who will perform certain functions traditionally








performed by licensed physicians. The primary objective of the program is to prepare a physi-
cian assistant who provides comprehensive health care, under the supervision of a licensed
physician, to family members at various points along the age continuum. The curriculum of
this program offers the student in-depth content in the basic and medical sciences.

An admissions committee determines the students who are to be selected. Enrollment is based
on limitations imposed by laboratory and clinical facilities and materials. Admission to the
physician assistant major is open in the fall quarter only. Graduates of the program receive the
Bachelor of Science in Medicine degree. This program was awarded full accreditation by the
American Medical Association's Council on Medical Education in 1974.

To be eligible for admission to the College of Medicine Physician Assistant Program, an
undergraduate or postbaccalaureate student must:

1. Complete all lower division courses in the PRE-PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT CURRICULUM.
2. Pass all required pre-professional courses at a "C" or better level. NOTE: CLEP credit does
not substitute for any of the pre-professional requirements.
3. Show evidence of sound physical and mental health.
4. Have one year of direct patient care contact.


JACKSONVILLE HEALTH EDUCATION PROGRAMS, INC. (JHEP)

Eleven hospitals in nearby Jacksonville formed the Jacksonville Health Education Programs,
Inc. (JHEP) with the goal of improving medical education in the community. In 1969, by action
of the Board of Regents, JHEP became a division of the J. Hillis Miller Health Center. An assis-
tant vice president and a full-time faculty for the College of Medicine are in residence in
Jacksonville.

There are elective and required assignments in a variety of clinical areas available in Jackson-
ville. These afford the opportunity to observe patients in a community hospital setting and to
become acquainted with the many problems of health care delivery in the urban area. In addi-
tion to exposure to a large full-time faculty, the student works with practitioners and can learn
of the many nuances of practice removed from the academic center.

A number of residencies are conducted in Jacksonville. Residents participate in the teaching of
students. JHEP conducts a number of programs for continuing education of practicing physi-
cians to which students are welcome.

A nationally copied medical library system supports the teaching and research activities with
extensive periodical holdings, bibliographic services, and audiovisual collections.








PENSACOLA EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM, INC. (PEP)
A unique academic affiliation between the College of Medicine and the Pensacola Educational
Program (PEP) has been established. This affiliation provides the undergraduate medical stu-
dent from the University of Florida an opportunity to obtain a variety of clinical elective
experiences in Pensacola. In addition, numerous opportunities exist for graduate and
postgraduate educational programs between the two institutions.

COMMUNITY MEDICINE
The development of the University of Florida's Shands Teaching Hospital has played an impor-
tant part in accelerating the emergence of scientific medicine by providing ideal conditions for
certain aspects of clinical teaching. The student in the teaching hospital, however, is
confronted with highly selected types of patient problems, which in the outside world are ex-
ceptions rather than the rule. Less insight is gained into the day-to-day problems of minor and
major illnesses as they occur in the community.
The College of Medicine has developed educational programs in various community settings to
provide medical students and physicians-in-training with experiences in the common medical
problems of ambulatory health care. The rural health activities of the College of Medicine are
renowned for their contributions to patient care and medical education.
By extending the education of medical students into the community, students are also provided
the opportunity to view and understand the non-clinical factors of family and community
groups and institutions that affect medical care. Every medical student will participate in a
community health clerkship which also includes an opportunity for a brief preceptorship with
a practicing physician. Through these community experiences the faculty and students
together will become familiar with the common medical ills seldom seen in a hospital.
A basic premise in the community health programs of the College of Medicine is that they will
direct the talents of the faculty toward the problems of health care delivery and engage the
interest and enthusiasm of the medical students toward their future resolution.








PREPROFESSIONAL EDUCATION
The undergraduate college years are uniquely important to the education and training of a
physician. The role of the physician in the community, as well as the quality of the health care
delivered, will reflect the breadth of liberal education as much as it does the depth of profes-
sional education. It is difficult to overstate the importance to the future physician of a strong
background in the social-cultural area of study as increasing recognition is paid to the en-
vironmental and behavioral aspects of disease and the continuity of health care within the
community.
This does not imply that the student's knowledge of physical and biological sciences is of less
importance; on the contrary, the scientific basis of our understanding of disease processes is
rapidly expanding. Rather, it emphasizes the desirability of a carefully selected program in
liberal education with a strong core of understanding of the principles of physical and
biological science.
The preprofessional student's educational program, as well as the selection of activities, should
lead to the development of intellectual maturity and judgment, efficient study habits, and effec-
tive powers of reasoning. These goals of personal development, added to the importance of
basic knowledge obtained in the social, cultural, and natural science areas of study, emphasize
the significance of the liberal arts for the education of a physician.

THE APPLICANT POOL
Generally, students applying for admission should plan to complete the requirements for a
bachelor's degree. However, a limited number of well-qualified students may be accepted
without fulfilling the degree requirements, provided they show evidence of sufficient prepara-
tion for the study of medicine.
Personal qualities of a high order, a genuine concern for human welfare, and superior intellec-
tual achievement are the primary requirements for admission. Such intellectual achievement is
indicated in part by performance in undergraduate courses. Applicants with an overall "B"
average as a minimum will receive strongest consideration for admission to the College of
Medicine.
The College of Medicine admits both men and women to its entering classes. Members of
minority groups are also strongly encouraged to apply. A limited number of out-of-state
students, in proportion to the number of Florida residents as a whole, may be admitted.


ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE OF MEDICINE
AT AN ADVANCED STANDING STATUS
A person may seek transfer to the College of Medicine from a United States or Canadian
medical school. Individuals who already have received a degree from a college of medicine will








not be admitted to the M.D. curriculum at advanced standing status. A person may be admitted
to the College of Medicine at an advanced standing status within the context of the following
guidelines:
1. Previous professional or graduate education is adjudged adequate in quantity, quality, and
time frame to have been competitive for admission as a first-year student at this college and
to permit entry into the curriculum at a level beyond the first year. An applicant who is, for
any reason, on probation or not in good academic standing at the school from which transfer
is sought will not be recommended for transfer to this college.
2. A vacancy exists for the admission of a person to advanced standing status. A vacancy exists
only when, for any reason, an enrolled student physician, beyond the first year and prior to
the fourth year in the College of Medicine cannot continue his or her matriculation in the
College of Medicine.
3. An individual who is accepted for admission to advanced standing status will be awarded a
degree only if he or she is enrolled in the college a minimum of twenty-four months.
Initial consideration of an applicant for advanced standing will be undertaken only when the
applicant furnishes the following information upon request:
1. A signed narrative written by the applicant expressing the circumstances which prompted
the request to transfer at an advanced standing status.
2. Letter of recommendation from the dean of the professional or graduate school in which the
applicant either was enrolled or is presently enrolled.
3. Official transcripts of all post-high school academic course work.
4. Medical College Admissions Test.
5. Proof of successful completion of Part I of the National Medical Board Examination if the
applicant is or has been enrolled in a school of medicine.
6. A properly executed information form furnished by the Office of Admissions.
7. Proof of United States citizenship.
An applicant judged to be qualified on the basis of the furnished information may be extended
an interview. Applications for admission at advanced standing will not be processed unless a
vacancy exists in the respective class for which the application is made.
Special programs of study leading to graduate degrees in the basic medical sciences and admis-
sion requirements for these programs are outlined on page 35 of this Catalog.

BASIC SCIENCE REQUIREMENTS
The minimum science admission requirements include basic introductory courses and
laboratories in the following subjects:








Biology-8 semester hours (12 quarter hours)
General (Inorganic) Chemistry-8 semester hours (12 quarter hours)
Organic Chemistry-8 semester hours (12 quarter hours)
Physics-8 semester hours (12 quarter hours)
Many students desire an additional background in science. For this purpose, courses in
physiology, biochemistry, embryology, physical chemistry, microbiology and genetics should
be considered. It is not necessary to choose one of the sciences as a college major.
No specific requirement is set in the area of mathematics, since at most colleges some
mathematics is prerequisite to physics and chemistry. In general, some college level work in
calculus is strongly recommended. Familiarity with the principles of statistics and their ap-
plication to the analysis of data is an important asset for any medical student. A knowledge of
computers and computer programming would be valuable for the application of these tools in
medical education and in all forms of the delivery of health care.
Consideration should be given by the student to participation in honors courses, independent
study, and scientific research. These activities present opportunities for unstructured learning
experiences and explorations of certain areas in considerable depth.
Electives: The remainder of the college work should be distributed throughout the humanities
and social, biological, and behavioral sciences. The student should select subjects which are
stimulating intellectually, challenge a maximum performance, and contribute to the overall
development and maturation of the student. The courses may aim toward a thorough study of a
single area with a general background in many areas or may group in several related areas in
the sciences or humanities.
The discriminate selection by the student of elective courses will not only increase the store of
knowledge, but will help form attitudes basic to a professional career in medicine. Develop-
ment of certain skills will place the student at ease in a professional school.

Extracurricular Activities: Extracurricular activities and employment both during the
academic year and the summers can make important contributions to an individual's develop-
ment. Experience in medical and paramedical areas often contributes toward an understan-
ding of health care delivery problems and helps to solidify the basis of the student's motivation
toward a career in medicine.
Discipline in study is essential. Skill in accurate, rapid, interpretive reading should be
mastered. Methods of observation and collection of data, evaluation, deduction, and interpreta-
tion of findings are taught in psychology, physics, and other sciences. The analysis and
organization of a set of observations into its simple components and the synthesis of many
fragments of data into a working hypothesis on which a plan of action can be based are taught
in many courses. The student should keep these objectives in mind throughout their preprofes-
sional training.








A high degree of skill in the use of spoken and written language should be developed accurately
to extract a story, systematically record facts for the use of others, and precisely transmit to in-
structions. These techniques are taught in courses in English literature and composition. The
study of foreign languages also illustrates the exact meaning of words and the use of subtle
differences in shading.
Communication through symbols is taught in chemistry, physics, and mathematics. Proficiency
in typing increases the speed and accuracy of communication and will aid the student in their
professional work.
Medicine deals with individuals who react to their physical, social, and cultural environment.
Functional derangement induced by the interplay of emotional factors in the individual or by
external influences from the environment can be detected by subtle methods. The study of
emotional factors is taught in philosophy, religion, psychology, and the fine arts, while the
study of social forces is considered in history, literature, economics, sociology, and law. Since
all of these factors may induce reactions during physical illness which exceed that produced by
the disease itself, the study of principles in these areas is most important to the education of a
physician.

MEDICAL COLLEGE ADMISSION TEST (NEW)
Every applicant must take the New Medical College Admission test, preferably in the spring
preceding the submission of his or her application. As of 1977 this examination replaced the old
Medical College Admission Test and all candidates applying or reapplying for the class
beginning in September 1981 are required to have taken the New MCAT. The test is given twice
yearly in many colleges and universities. For further information about the test, write to The
American College Testing Program, P.O. Box 414, Iowa City, Iowa 52240.

APPLICATION AND ACCEPTANCE PROCEDURES
Admission to the College of Medicine is highly competitive and the applicant is appraised on
the basis of information gained from previous academic records, scores on the Medical College
Admission Test, recommendations by premedical advisors and teachers, and personal inter-
views. The College of Medicine endeavors to select those students who appear by present
standards the most qualified for a career in medicine. Similarly, the student is expected to make
a careful choice of that institution which offers an environment and program most suited to
their interests and personality. A personal visit to the school of their choice should be most
helpful.
1) The College of Medicine is a participating institution in the American Medical College Ap-
plication Service (AMCAS). The AMCAS application form may be obtained after June 1 from
any of the participating institutions or from the Office of the Registrar, University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida 32611.








2) After careful screening of the initial applications by the Medical Selection Committee,
promising applicants will be sent an additional formal application requesting information not
included on the AMCAS application. The completed form should be returned directly to the
University of Florida and arrangements made for submission of a preprofessional committee
evaluation or letters of recommendation. This second phase requires an application fee of $15
from all students not previously enrolled in the University of Florida. This fee is not refundable.
All materials should be submitted as early as possible, but no later than December 1 of each
year.
3) Following committee review of all the application materials, interviews with members of the
Medical Selection Committee will be arranged for competitive applicants. These interviews are
usually held on Fridays and Saturdays at the University of Florida College of Medicine campus
in Gainesville.
4) After receipt of an acceptance, a written reply to the College of Medicine is expected within
two weeks. There is a wide variety in acceptance dates of different medical schools and
therefore some students may wish to reconsider after filing a declaration of intent. This a
perfectly acceptable procedure, provided the student promptly sends written notification to
every school holding a place for him or her.
5) No deposit is required from accepted applicants, but if they accept the offer of a place, they
have an obligation to matriculate unless they are released by the school. Such release is granted
automatically upon request by the student.
The above procedures are approved by the Association of American Medical Colleges.


PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION
LEADING TO THE M.D. DEGREE
Once a decision has been reached by both the medical school and the applicant, the student
enters the professional portion of the educational continuum. From this point on, the student
will pursue his or her educational endeavors from the vantage point of a physician striving to
achieve well-rounded capacities as a physician-humanist and scientist in his or her profession
and community.

PHASE A
Phase A will occupy the entire first year, followed by vacation in the summer. Teaching will be
of an interdisciplinary, interdepartmental nature, with teaching teams drawn from both the
basic and clinical departments. The course schedule may be broken down in the following
manner:
Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics will consist of lectures and discussion sessions designed









to increase the student's basic biochemical knowledge of cellular functions in health and


disease


including


genetic


disorders.


The nutrition,


physical


chemistry,


metabolism,


molecular biology of mammalian cells are stressed including such subjects as homeostasis, in-
born errors of metabolism, cell genetics, and medical aspects of human genetics.

Gross Anatomy represents an introduction to the basic structure and mechanics of the human
body. The dynamics of learning occur primarily in the laboratory and are supplemented with
lectures, conferences, and demonstrations as needed.

Embryology covers early human development including gametogenesis. The major emphasis of
the course will be on normal human organ development and morphogenesis. A system
approach, correlated with the normal gross anatomy of those systems, will be used.

Medical Microbiology will study viruses and the processes by which they produce disease, im-
munology with an emphasis on the solving of clinical problems and finally bacteria, fungi and
parasites and the processes by which they produce infectious diseases.

Microscopic Anatomy is a course in which the microscopic structure of the cells, tissues, and
organs of the human body is taught. Correlation of structure and function is emphasized.

Principles of Physiology will cover the mechanisms of physiological processes with special
reference to the human body. Bioelectricity, homeostasis of body fluids, muscle, circulation of
blood, renal function, respiration, digestion and hormones are studied.

Medical Neuroscience is designed to provide students with the fundamental information con-
cerning the organization and function of the central nervous system.


Introduction


to Human


Behavior will


the human


life cycle


and the different


psychosocial factors affecting the physician and the patient. Individual students or groups of
students will interview patients under the supervision of the psychiatry and general medical-
surgical faculty.


Year I


GROSS ANATOMY
l(eMS 5IOcO
I


EMBRYOLOGY


(EMS 5121])


4.
**. :.... ..^ ^^^
"" ." ^ W ? W . .. " .. :.... :
.... .... .

... .:.... ....:.


..:." .:." ":.'. ::| :" B;:....|
...": .^"" ." .... :'li:" /:..4......
:I .Hfl tE
... u 'H"j
S:11 .









PHASE B

Phase B is designed to give a broad experience in clinical medicine. Diagrammatically, it may
be represented as follows:


YEAR II


SYSTEMIC PATHOLOGY
[BMS 5600)

SOCIAL AND ETHICAL
PHARMACOLOGY ISSUES IN MEDICAL
(BMS 5460) PRACTICE
(BMS 5822)

PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS
I (MS 5830)
with Radiology and
Ophthalmology
I
I ". PSYCHIATRY
(BCC 5151)
I -- .-------------------------


CLINICAL
ROTATIONS
I
Nj1 ~


Initial course work will consist of Systemic Pathology, Physical Diagnosis, Pharmacology, and
Community Medicine. Systemic Pathology will emphasize the effects of disease on the human
organism and the correlation of disease with symptoms, signs and the course of illness.
Physical Diagnosis will be taught emphasizing anatomic and radiologic characteristics of
children and adults. Experience in patient interview (psychiatry) will be provided. Laboratory
diagnosis and introduction to radiology will be taught concomitantly to familiarize the student
with diagnostic procedures. Community Medicine explores the patient's interactions
associated with disease, treatment, family and community.

The major portion of Phase B will be devoted to the clinical clerkships, in which groups of
students will rotate among the major clinical services receiving direct patient contact. During
the clerkships, the student will become an integral member of the medical team and will be
responsible for patient care during all hours of the day or night.

Each clinical service conducts a variety of seminars and conferences. These are considered to
be part of the clerkship and should be attended.
At the conclusion of Phase B, a review of particular basic sciences will be held for 11 weeks in-
cluding Clinical Pharmacology, Microbiology, and Pathophysiology.








PHASE C

Phase C occupies the last ten months of the curriculum and consists of elective experiences
combined with two months clerkship (one month of medicine and one month of surgery).
The students thus will be able to design a program which will permit extensive elective time in
a clinical or basic science area, an early experience related to their career choice, or an explora-
tion of their interests among several career choices. Considerable freedom will be permitted the
students in designing their program, but the choices must be made carefully in conjunction
with the student's faculty advisor. Remediation may take place in Phase C upon recommenda-
tion by the Academic Status Committee, appropriate department, and faculty advisor.
Any students academically below the middle of the class requesting to study away will be asked
to obtain their advisor's permission. Any student whose request exceeds a three month period
of study at other institutions, is to be reviewed by the Academic Status Committee and/or the
student's advisor. Each student is required to submit a written report of activities during this
period.


YEAR III


CLINICAL ROTATIONS


YEAR IV


CLERKSHIPS (a months)

ELECTIVES


Clinical assignments are available in all of the major disciplines of medicine. The student may
work as an advanced clerk, assuming greater responsibilities than in Phase B, or in special
cases may qualify for internship at an earlier time.
Estimated percentages of time and credit hours allotted for various Phase C offerings have been
calculated on the basis of credit hours per academic semester. Each student is expected to com-
plete a minimum of 50 semester credit hours in Phase C for graduation. Each student is re-
quired to take electives up to graduation regardless of the total hours accumulated.








The curriculum is constantly undergoing evaluation and refinement. Changes may occur from
year to year in order to improve the educational program of the undergraduate student of
medicine.
The provisions of this catalog are not to be construed as an irrevocable contract between the
student and the College of Medicine. The college reserves the right to effect policy and
regulatory changes at any time.

EVALUATION
Students entering the program of the College of Medicine are highly motivated and are con-
sidered graduate students in a program of professional education. They are preparing
themselves for a career requiring excellence of scholastic endeavor, moral integrity, sound
judgement, intellectual curiosity and above all, a drive to continue their education vigorously
after graduation. It is hoped that the system of evaluation will assist them in attaining their ob-
jectives.
Since the evaluation of the student must provide information on both the student and the educa-
tional program, new policies for evaluation were instituted at the same time the new cur-
riculum was implemented.
There are three major components of the evaluation system --project tests given by the
various teaching units throughout the program; National Board Examinations Part I be ad-
ministered in June of the third year and Part II in April of the third year, and progress reports
prepared by the members of the faculty.
Grades submitted by the faculty of the various curricular units, and the scores of the National
Board Examinations will be the information used by the Academic Status Committee in prepar-
ing recommendations regarding promotion, graduation, and general ranking of students.
National Board Examinations Parts I and II must be passed before the student is graduated.
Students may, at their request, receive grades as submitted to the Office of Student Affairs.
Grades submitted to the registrar will consist of "P" (pass) or "U" (unsatisfactory).
At the end of each quarter, the Academic Status Committee will review each student's perfor-
mance on the basis of his/her academic and non-academic performance and recommend to the
dean a suitable course of action. 1) A grade of "D" is passing but connotes borderline academic
performance. 2) PROBATION: Probationary status occurs when a student's performance is
marginally passing as determined by the Academic Status Committee. A student may be remov-
ed from probation after he or she demonstrates improvement in subsequent course work.
Failure to improve performance may result in dismissal. 3) Any student receiving failing grades
(F) in courses totalling 8 or more credit hours, or D grades in 50% or more of the credit hours,in
a Phase will be automatically dismissed. A student has the right to appeal academic dismissal to
the Academic Status Committee within 14 days after receiving written notification of dismissal.
4) If a student is permitted to repeat a year because of academic difficulties, he or she shall








automatically be dismissed if a grade below a C is received in any course work. 5) A student
may be dismissed for failure to maintain the requisite integrity, attitude, motivation, and per-
sonal and professional conduct deemed essential to the practice of medicine as determined by
the Academic Status Committee. 6) A student has the right to appeal non-academic dismissal to
the Executive Committee or subcommittee thereof appointed by the dean within 14 days after
receiving written notification of dismissal. The student may be accompanied by a student or
faculty advisor.
The Academic Status Committee will recommend to the dean those students who have satisfac-
torily met its requirements and are eligible for graduation. Superior students may be recom-
mended for graduation with honors. Nomination and selection of students will be made by the
faculty. Excellence of different types in varied fields will be considered, such as superior
academic work, outstanding student research and thesis, and other special achievements.

STUDENT CONDUCT CODE
Students enjoy the rights and privileges that accrue to membership in a university community
and are subject to the responsibilities which accompany that membership. In order to have a
system of effective campus governance, it is incumbent upon all members of the campus com-
munity to notify appropriate officials of any violations of regulations and to assist in their en-
forcement. All conduct regulations of the university are printed and made available to all
students and are applicable upon publication in the Independent Florida Alligator, the Universi-
ty Catalog, the Student Handbook, or other reasonable means of notification.
Violation of the Code of Conduct. A student may be expelled or receive any lesser penalty for
the following offenses:
1) Furnishing false information to the university with intent to deceive. This includes cheating
and plagiarism.
2) Forgery, alteration, or misuse of university documents, records, or identification cards.
3) Unauthorized use, taking or destruction of public or private property on campus, or acts
committed with disregard of possible harm to such property.
4) Actions or statements which by design or consequence amount to intimidation or hazing.
5) Participation in or continued attendance at, after warning to disperse by a university official,
a raid on a university living unit.
6) Disorderly conduct.
7) Disrupting the orderly operation of the university as defined in Florida Statutes, Board of
Regents' Policies, and the Demonstration Policy of the university.
8) Failure to comply with a university rule or regulation.
9) Violations of Housing, Interhall, and Area Council regulations.








10) Violation of conduct probation.
11) Possession, use, or delivery of illegal drugs as defined in Florida Statutes, and use of exploding
fireworks as defined in Florida Statutes.
12) Possession of a firearm on the university campus except as specifically authorized by Univer-
sity Policy on the Possession and Use of Firearms.
13) Actions or conduct which hinders, obstructs, or otherwise interferes with the implementation
or enforcement of the Student Conduct Code.
14) Failure to appear before the Committee on Student Conduct or the Director of Student Judicial
Affairs and to testify as a witness when reasonably notified to do so. Nothing in this subsec-
tion shall be construed to compel self-incrimination.
15) Violation of any municipal ordinance, law of the State of Florida, or law of the United States.



GRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE
PROGRAMS
GRADUATE EDUCATION IN THE MEDICAL SCIENCES
Programs Leading to the Ph.D. and M.S. Degrees
The educational continuum of the medical sciences is designed to provide flexibility in terms of
the type of degree which may be earned as well as the type of subject matter which may be
included in the individual curriculum.
Programs leading to the Ph.D. degree in medical sciences are offered by the College of
Medicine through the Graduate School of the university. The programs offered in anatomy,
biochemistry and molecular biology, immunology and medical microbiology, neuroscience,
pathology, pharmacology and therapeutics, and physiology are intended to give talented in-
dividuals an opportunity to engage in careers of research and teaching in the basic scientific
medical disciplines. The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology also offers a
program leading to the Ph.D in biochemistry.
The M.S. degree in the medical sciences is offered by the Departments of Anatomy.
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Immunology and Medical Microbiology, Neuroscience,
Pathology, Pharmacology and Therapeutics and Physiology. The Department of Biochemistry
and Molecular Biology offers the M.S. degree in biochemistry.
The prime requirements for admission to these programs are personal integrity, motivation,
and general scholastic achievement. Candidates must satisfy the general requirements for
admission to the Graduate School and produce a satisfactory score on the Graduate Record Ex-
amination. Candidates should have an undergraduate major in a biological or physical science,








but other undergraduate areas of concentration appropriate for study in the basic medical
sciences are engineering and mathematics. In order to remedy deficiencies in their
backgrounds, some candidates may find it necessary to take additional undergraduate courses
even though they hold the A.B. or B.S. degree required for Graduate School admission.
The completion of a satisfactory dissertation based on original research is the most important
single requirement of the Ph.D. program. Most of the work involved in the dissertation
ordinarily will be done in the last two years of residence, but candidates will be encouraged to
begin their research in a preliminary exploratory fashion toward the end of their first year.
Graduate education in the basic medical sciences is planned from an interdisciplinary point of
view, but with a major in the fields of anatomy, biochemistry and molecular biology, im-
munology and medical microbiology, neuroscience, pathology, pharmacology and therapeutics
or physiology. A minor is not required but may be elected in any relevant discipline approved
for graduate study in the university.

Graduate students have the opportunity of assisting in the teaching of medical and
undergraduate courses and most students are advised to do this as part of their training.
Teaching assistantships and nonresident tuition scholarships are available to a limited number
of students.

Individuals interested in graduate study should write directly to the Office of the Dean, College
of Medicine, or to the appropriate department chairman, who will give further details regar-
ding the programs, fellowships, assistantships, and scholarships.

Medical Scientist Training Program (Combined M.D.-Ph.D. Degree)
The Medical Scientist Training Program is designed for highly qualified students who are
strongly motivated toward a career in the medical sciences. This is a five to seven year pro-
gram, which attempts to provide, for a limited number of students, an in-depth education in a
basic science discipline as well as an in-breadth experience in human biology. Successful com-
pletion of this program will enable the student to enter a career of teaching and research in a
basic medical science department or pursue a residency program leading to a research and
teaching career in clinical medicine. It is hoped students in this program may bridge the gap
between basic science and clinically-oriented careers in the medical sciences.

Candidates for this program must satisfy admission requirements of both the College of
Medicine and the Graduate School. These include satisfactory scores on both the Graduate
Record Examination and the Medical College Admission Test, personal qualities of high order,
and superior intellectual achievement. A strong undergraduate background in the physical and
chemical sciences as well as mathematics is desirable. A genuine interest in human welfare is
essential.

The student will enroll in all courses for the M.D. degree. In addition, special graduate courses
and seminars will be required, as determined by the student's Graduate Advisory Committee.








The Graduate Advisory Committee also will assist the student in planning the curriculum,
determining progress, and guiding research activities.

In most cases the student will complete the first year of medical school while initiating a
research experience. During the summer quarter before beginning a 16-18 month clinical
clerkship program, the student will take graduate courses and commence a research project.
Graduate studies may be integrated into an extended Phase B (Basic Clinical Clerkships) and a
lengthened Phase C (Elective Studies). However, the program is designed to be flexible and in
all cases the curriculum will be determined by the needs and progress of the student.
Students will be evaluated by examinations similar to those in the separate M.D. and Ph.D.
programs. The Committee on Academic Status of the College of Medicine will evaluate the
student's performance and recommend promotion to the next class or awarding of the M.D.
degree. The Graduate Advisory Committee, in conjunction with the basic science department
from which the student will receive the Ph.D. degree, will assess the graduate performance.
Applications for this program are coordinated through the Office of the Director, Medical
Scientist (M.D./Ph.D.) Training Program of the College of Medicine. Candidates should specify
the basic science department to which admission is sought.


GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION (RESIDENCIES AND FELLOWSHIPS)
All programs of residency training offered in the Shands Teaching Hospital and the VA
Medical Center are fully accredited and approved by the American Medical Association Ac-
creditation Council on Medical Education and are listed in the Directory of Approved Residen-
cies. In addition, the Senate of the university formally recognized these programs as academic
non-degree programs of the College of Medicine at its meeting of June 26, 1969. The hospitals
hold certification from the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Hospitals. Each of the various
residency training programs has been approved by the Accreditation Council on Graduate
Medical Education.
The residency programs only accept individuals who are graduates of medical schools ac-
credited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education and graduates of foreign medical
schools who hold the ECFMG certificate and/or pass the Visa Qualifying Examination.
Residencies: Residencies vary in length with each of the services (between two and five years).
Formal residencies are offered in anesthesiology, family practice, medicine (internal medicine),
neurology, neruosurgery, obstetrics and gynecology, ophthalmology, orthopaedic surgery,
pathology, pediatrics, psychiatry, radiology and its subspecialties, and surgery (general, plastic,
thoracic, otolaryngology, and urology).
Stipends accompany each residency. Housing at moderate cost is adjacent to the Health Center
and is described on page 48.








Fellowships: A limited number of clinical fellowships are available in the various
subspecialties of anesthesiology, family practice, medicine, pathology, pediatrics, psychiatry,
radiology, and surgery to qualified applicants with some previous residency training and/or
research pursuit. There are some traineeships which are at a slightly more advanced level
pointing toward basic training for academic careers in clinical disciplines and the basic
medical sciences. A postgraduate training program in laboratory animal medicine is also
available.
Opportunities also exist for selected fellows to work toward the M.S. degree in the medical
sciences in one of the basic science departments offering such programs.
Applications: Detailed program information and applications for these programs may be
obtained by writing the appropriate departmental chairman, chief of service, or the Office of
the Dean, College of Medicine.

LICENSURE
Licensure to practice medicine and surgery in Florida can be obtained by endorsement if the


been certified by licensure


Boards of the United States,
Examiners as having complete
have been so certified within
for licensure. Such a license
for a minimum of one year. (
Canada are eligible for this en
otherwise are qualified and w
for Foreign Medical Gradu.


Inc. (FLEX)
ed its examine
the ten years
is good only i
graduatess of


examination of the Federation of State Medical
or is certified by the National Board of Medical
ation; provided that said examination required shall
immediately preceding the filing of the application
f the recipient engages actively in medical practice
aDDroved medical schools in the United States and


dorsement. In addition, graduates of foreign medical schools who


hose credentials
ates (ECFMG), a


qualification examination for foreign medical
The applicant must have completed at least o
private practice in the United States or legally


have been evaluated by the Educational Council
nd who have passed the American medical
graduates may be considered for endorsement.
ne year of approved internship or five years in
have declared intention to become a citizen and


have been a resident of the United States for a minimum of one year.
Since various state laws differ to licensure requirements, it is the responsibility of the medical
student to become familiar with the qualifications for licensure in the state or states which he
or she might consider as potential locations for the practice of medicine.

CONTINUING EDUCATION
The physician's proficiency in the practice of medicine depends on the commitment to con-
tinuing education. The College of Medicine recognizes its role in assisting with this aspect of
education and has designated to a member of the academic staff the responsibility for in-
augurating an effective means of strengthening the educational continuum through
postgraduate medical education. To facilitate such a program, a Division of Postgraduate
Education has been created.


applicant ha








The Division of Postgraduate Education has surveyed the needs of the practicing physician and
formed a Continuing Education Council to establish priorities in continuing education for the
practicing physician. These priorities have been defined and a series of two-day workshops
have been designed to meet the specific needs of the practicing physician at the community
hospital level. A physician from the university, along with a practicing physician, coordinate
these programs to bring both academic and practical benefits to the practicing physician. In ad-
dition, national seminars based on current relevant topics are conducted with national
speakers, university personnel, and practicing physicians. The interest of the practicing physi-
cian in this program has been encouraging, and is a tribute to the desire of the medical profes-
sion to keep abreast of the current trends in medicine.
Physicians are encouraged to participate in the Postgraduate In-Service Education Program
which is designed to meet the needs of the practicing physician. The practicing physician, in
conjunction with the university preceptor, designs a program to meet his or her individual
needs. Pre-programmed material is available to assist in the selection of an area for concentra-
tion. In this role, one acts as both teacher and student in the school's medical education pro-
gram. The practicing physician usually spends one to two weeks in this program for which a
small tuition is charged.
Postgraduate education personnel are available for consultation in the program design of
educational techniques, chart audit, and peer review as they relate to educational objectives of
an individual hospital. Other programs in continuing medical education are conducted in
cooperation with the Florida Board of Regents, the Florida Medical Association, the Florida
Academy of Family Physicians, and a variety of medical specialty groups.








STUDENT INFORMATION

FINANCIAL CONSIDERATIONS
The fee structure for Florida residents and nonresidents in the M.D. program of the College of
Medicine is under revision at the time of this printing. Fee information can be obtained after
July 1, 1981, by contacting the Student Financial Services, Room 100 THE HUB, Gainesville,
Florida 32611. Students are registered for two semesters during their first and fourth years and
for three semesters the second and third years. Fees and method of payment are subject to
change and are payable in accordance with university regulations. The Registration Fee
includes a Student Health Fee and a Student Activity Fee for each of the quarters. Most of the
service and facilities of the Student Health Services are available to students without charge. A
group insurance program sponsored by the Student Government is available at a very
reasonable cost. The Activity Fee covers the student's attendance at a wide variety of social,
athletic, and cultural events which are offered by the university.
Registration dates for each class in the College of Medicine are set by the Registrar's Office and
the students are notified when their group is expected to complete registration. These fees must
be paid in accordance with dates published in these instructions or they are increased by $25.
Students who are interested in doing work toward an advanced degree in the medical sciences
should consult the Bulletin of the Graduate School for information concerning tuition and fees.
Textbooks and instruments needed by a first-year student will require an expenditure of about
$600-$800. Purchase of a microscope will not be required as the College of Medicine, through a
special fund, has established a microscope bank and provides each entering student with a
microscope on a loan basis.
The minimal annual cost for a single Florida resident for the first year is $6,000 plus tuition.

SCHOLARSHIPS
AMA-ERF Scholarship: Awarded to an outstanding first year candidate for the Ph.D. degree.
AMA-ERF Scholarship: Awarded to an outstanding first year candidate for the joint
M.D.IPh.D. degree.
The Charles 0. Andrews, Jr. Scholarship Fund: A merit scholarship fund established in 1978
in memory of Judge Andrews and awarded annually to an M.D.-Ph.D. student.
W. Paul Bateman Scholarship: Established by the Bateman Foundation to assist worthy
medical students in need of financial assistance.
The Maurice H. Givins Scholarship Fund: An endowed fund established in 1975 to provide
financial assistance to students in the College of Medicine.








Molly and Mitchell Glick Scholarship Fund: Established in 1968 to assist worthy medical
students in need of financial aid.
The Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Gordon Scholarship Fund: This unrestricted endowed fund was
established in 1977 to assist worthy male students who demonstrate a need for financial
assistance.
Federal Scholarship for First Year Students of Exceptional Financial Need: The Health Pro-
fessions Educational Assistance Act of 1976 authorized "Scholarships for First-Year Students
of Exceptional Financial Need." This scholarship program provides for the payment of tuition
and fees, all other reasonable educational expenses and a stipend of $453 per month for a 12
month period. Students receiving "exceptional need" scholarships for their first year of study
are given priority consideration for National Health Service Corps Scholarships for their
second year of study.
Other students may participate in scholarship programs under the National Health Service
Corps and the Armed Forces where participants are required to perform obligated service on a
year-for-year basis with a minimum of two years.
Graham Hunter Scottish-American Exchange Scholarship, is awarded annually to a fourth
year student for the purpose of studying at the University of Dundee, Scotland, and for a
Scottish medical student to study at the University of Florida College of Medicine. This ex-
change program was made possible through funds provided by the late Mr. George Graham
Guthrie Hunter.
Medizinische Hochschule Hannover-American Exchange Scholarship, is awarded annually
to a fourth year student for the purpose of studying at the University of Hannover, West Ger-
many, and for German medical students to study at the University of Florida College of
Medicine. This exchange program was made possible through funds of the DAAD (German
Academic Exchange Service).
The George Graham Hunter Scholarship Fund, is awarded each year to an undergraduate
medical student in the field of orthopaedics. The recipient of this scholarship shall be
designated by the orthopaedic faculty and approved by the Dean of the College of Medicine.
C. J. Miller Scholarship is an endowed fund whose purpose is to support a junior or senior
medical student in good academic standing who is in need of financial assistance.
Avonelle C. Noah Scholarship Fund: An endowment fund was established in 1968 under the
terms of the will of Mrs. Avonelle C. Noah. The income from this fund is to be used to assist
worthy students in the College of Medicine.
Lettie Pate Whitehead Scholarship: This annual scholarship is awarded to worthy female
students in financial need from the states of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina,
Tennessee, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi or Louisiana.








Wheat Medical Scholarship Fund: An endowment fund was established in 1967 under the
terms of the will of Mrs. Eva H. Wheat. The income from this fund is to be used to assist worthy
male medical students (who are selected by the College of Medicine) to continue their
education.
Joseph and Lee Wolfe Medical Scholarship: Established in 1968, this annual scholarship
award is to be given at the discretion of the faculty to assist worthy students in the College of
Medicine.
County Scholarships: Various counties in Florida, such as Broward, Lee and Palm Beach, have
established scholarship awards to residents who attend the University of Florida College of
Medicine.

SCHOLASTIC AWARDS
Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society: The Beta Chapter of Florida was installed at the
University of Florida College of Medicine on May 9, 1960. A small number of students of the
junior and senior classes are eligible for membership. Selection is based upon high academic
standing, personal and professional character, and promise for future contributions to
medicine.
The John Gorrie Award, donated by Dr. Theodore F. Hahn, Jr., is presented each year to the
graduating medical student who, in the opinion of the faculty of the College of Medicine, is the
best all-around student showing promise of becoming a practitioner of the highest type.
Upjohn Achievement Award is offered through the Upjohn Company Achievement Award
program to the graduating medical student who achieves the highest academic standing during
the four years in medical school.
The William C. Thomas, Sr. Award is given each year to an outstanding student with an in-
terest in obstetrics and gynecology. The award is made by the Florida Obstetric and
Gynecologic Society.
The Faculty Award for Research is given to the graduating medical student who has made the
most outstanding contribution through research during the course of medical school.
Alumni Scholarship Award was established by the University of Florida Medical Alumni
Association from donations by its members and is awarded at the end of the junior year to a
student who is judged to be outstanding scholastically.
Bythewood & Baker Memorial Scholarship Award for Women Medical Students is an en-
dowed fund established in 1968 by'Miss Martha Isabel Mays and is awarded to a junior female
medical student who is judged to be academically outstanding.
The Luther W. Holloway Award was established by the Florida Pediatric Society in honor of
the late Dr. Luther W. Holloway to be awarded to the medical student showing the greatest
proficiency in child health.








The Hugh and Cornelia Carithers Award, an endowed award established by Drs. Hugh and
Cornelia Carithers of Jacksonville, is presented each year to a graduating student on the basis of
over-all accomplishments and aptitudes in child health and human development.
The University Medical Guild Scholarship Awards are presented each year by the University
Medical Guild to a medical student who, at the end of his third year, is judged to be outstanding
scholastically and to an entering student on the basis of need and scholastic merit.
The University Medical Guild Graduate Research Awards are presented each year to three
graduate students in the basic medical sciences who are judged to have performed the best
research during their graduate studies.
Genevra Todd and Henry E. Meleney Memorial Award, established originally by the late Dr.
Henry E. Meleney in memory of his wife, is to be given to a medical student for outstanding
achievement during the first year of medical study.
The Watson Clinic Award is to be presented each year by the Watson Clinic of Lakeland to the
medical student chosen for productive effort and scientific contribution. The research must
have been presented at a Medical Student Research Conference during the academic year.
The Dean Mitchell Baker Award, established by Dr. and Mrs. Roy M. Baker of Jacksonville in
memory of their son, is awarded each year to the graduating medical student for excellence in
the field of pediatric cardiology.

Joel Cohen, Patricia Ann Maddalone Memorial Award was established in memory of Joel
Cohen who demonstrated superior skill, imagination, and industry in the laboratory research of
drug hypersensitivity, and is to be presented each year to that student demonstrating out-
standing proficiency in clinical or laboratory investigation in the field of immunology.
Most Noble Order of the Flea Award is donated by this organization, composed of past and
present chairmen of the Department of Medicine, chiefs of the Medical Service at the Veterans
Administration Medical Center and chief residents in medicine, to the graduating medical stu-
dent who has demonstrated outstanding proficiency and excellence in the field of internal
medicine.
W. F. Enneking Award, established and funded by the Musculoskeletal Oncology Fellows of
the Department of Orthopaedics, is to be given annually to the graduating medical student who,
in the opinion of the faculty of the orthopaedic department, shows the most promise of making
a contribution to medicine through an academic career.
Guillermo J. Perez Memorial Scholarship Award was established by the Department of
Pediatrics in memory of the late Dr. Perez, a former member of the pediatric faculty, to support
each year the training of a graduating medical student who demonstrated an interest in adoles-
cent medicine.
Department of Community Health and Family Medicine Award is presented annually to a








senior medical student who shows promise of an outstanding career as a family practitioner
and in recognition of an outstanding performance in the area of family practice.
The Department of Radiology Award was established by the Department of Radiology in 1977
and is awarded annually to the graduating medical student who has demonstrated outstanding
proficiency and excellence in the field of radiology.
Walt Oppelt Memorial Award has been established in memory of the late Dr. W. Walter Oppelt
by friends, associates, and the Departments of Pharmacology and Therapeutics and Medicine.
This annual award will be presented to a graduating medical student who has excelled in the
field of pharmacology and therapeutics throughout the four years.
Paula Ellis Scholarship Award was established by the Gainesville Junior Women's Club as a
memorial to Paula Ellis and is given to a medical student chosen for academic excellence
and/or meritorious service who shows promise and interest in the prevention or cure of cancer.
F. Eugene Tubbs, M.D., J.D., Memorial Award was established in 1979 in memory of the late
Dr. Tubbs, a former resident physician in the College of Medicine and member of the Florida
House of Representatives. The award is to be awarded jointly each year to a University of
Florida medical student and a Florida State University law student who have demonstrated ex-
cellence in their field.
Charles Collins Obstetrical and Gynecological Award was established in 1975 by the Florida
Obstetrical and Gynecological Society to honor Dr. Charles Collins of Orlando. This award is
given each year on a rotating basis to a graduating medical student in one of the three medical
schools in the state who has shown academic excellence and outstanding performance in the
field of obstetrics and gynecology.
The Lemmon Company Student Award is established to recognize an outstanding senior
medical student who has excelled in the specialty of family medicine.
Netter Atlas Award, sponsored by Ciba Pharmaceutical Company, is given each year in
recognition of a medical student who has contributed the most to community service.
Sandoz Award established by Sandoz Pharmaceuticals, is presented annually to a medical stu-
dent in recognition of superior academic achievement and contribution to health care.
Book Awards consisting of presentations each year to outstanding members of the four classes
in the College of Medicine, are made by Lange Medical Publications and C. V. Mosby Com-
pany.
Roger G. Schnell Neurology Book Award, established by Dr. Roger G. Schnell of Ft.
Lauderdale, is to be given to a medical student who has shown excellence in the field of clinical
neurology.
Paul R. Elliott Award, established by the Program in Medical Sciences, is given annually to the
graduating physician whose performance and career aspirations best reflect the ideals and pro-
gram goals as set forth by Paul R. Elliott to provide excellence in primary care.








Lester-Bennett Award is to be given annually by Dr. Jean Bennett of Clearwater, in honor of
her parents, in recognition of an awareness of the need to be involved in community affairs and
service through medicine.

LOAN FUNDS
College of Medicine Loan Funds: Loans from these funds are available to students enrolled in
the College of Medicine who are in good academic standing and can show sufficient evidence
of financial need. Interest (at four percent) begins at graduation and continues until repayment
is completed. Repayment ordinarily begins two years after graduation, but deferment can be ar-
ranged if further medical training is planned. Short-term loans are available for emergencies,
but must be repaid within the quarter borrowed. Equipment loans can be made to spread over a
period of four years.
These funds have been made possible by grants from the W. K. Kellogg Foundation; the Selby
Foundation; the Patrick J. O'Shaughnessy Memorial Fund; the John J. Tigert Memorial Fund;
the Frederick F. Kumm, M.D., Memorial Loan Fund; the Helen Stargardt Memorial Loan Fund;
the George M. Green, M.D., Memorial Loan Fund; the Algia Collins, Jr., M.D., Memorial Fund;
the Publix Scholarship Loan Fund; Alachua County Medical Auxiliary; and by gifts from
several organizations and individuals within the State of Florida. Loans are administered by the
College of Medicine's faculty-comprised Loan Committee.

Health Professions Educational Assistance Act: The Health Professions Educational
Assistance Act of 1976 extends the act of 1963 through 1980 and provides student loans up to
the cost of tuition and $2,500 in one academic year. The loans are based on exceptional finan-
cial need and may be repaid in part by service in a shortage area. Interest rates are seven per-
cent per annum. A new program of federally insured loans will enable students to borrow up to
$10,000 a year, or a total of $50,000, with interest payable yearly for the life of the loan at a rate
not to exceed 10 percent. The loan principal would be repayable over a 10-15 year period
starting 9-12 months following completion of training or service in approved programs.
The Barbara S. Michael Loan Fund: A revolving loan fund established in 1977 for needy and
worthy students in the College of Medicine.
Bernard J. Wagner Loan Fund: Established in 1968, this trust fund is for the purpose of
assisting students of accredited medical schools to continue with their education. Preference
shall be given to those who have completed the most years in medical school. Loans are
repayable with interest at a rate never to exceed that prevailing rate at the time the loan is made
on student loans enacted by Congress.
United Student Aid Funds: Participation in this loan fund is made possible through the use of
the Ronald A. Julian Memorial Fund. USA Funds is a private, nonprofit corporation which en-
dorses low-cost loans made by hometown banks to needy college students. Graduate students
may borrow up to $2,000 per year-up to a combined total of $4,000-with repayments








beginning the fifth month after completion of graduate education. Interest starts when the loan
is made.
University of Florida College of Medicine Alumni Association Loan: This loan was establish-
ed by the members of the college's Alumni Association from donations by its members and
awarded to worthy students in financial need.
Hugh and Mable Wilford Loan Fund: This trust fund was established in 1970 for the purpose
of making loans available to assist worthy and needy students to attend the University of
Florida College of Medicine. This loan fund will be administered in accordance with pro-
cedures established for the Health Professions Student Loan Program.
Marie Rosa Valicenti Loan Fund: Established in memory of Mrs. Valicenti by the Carmen
Valicenti Trust to provide loans for students from the northern part of Brevard County and to
students from Orange County.
Dudley Beaumont Loan Fund: This fund was left to the College of Medicine early in the
school's history as a memorial loan fund to assist in meeting the financial needs of its students.
It is administered in accordance with the procedures established for the College of Medicine
Loan Fund.
The George Graham Hunter Loan Fund: This trust fund, established in 1968, is for the purpose
of making loans available to qualified medical students or residents in orthopaedics.
Other Sources: Many students have received financial support from local sources. These may
be discovered by inquiries addressed to voluntary health agencies, medical organizations, ser-
vice clubs, church organizations, or trust departments of banks.

FELLOWSHIPS
Student Research Fellowships: These fellowships are made possible by grants from voluntary
health agencies in Florida, pharmaceutical firms, the National Institutes of Health, and other
agencies. Medical student research holds a high priority in the College of Medicine with the
primary objective being that of involving the inquisitive student in a self-learning experience in
medical research. As an incentive to become involved in research, students are offered an op-
portunity to apply for fellowship support which is available on a part-time basis during the
academic year and on a full-time basis during summer vacations. Fellowships are awarded on a
competitive basis with a progress report and continuation application required for each
quarter. In addition to providing fellowships for research, this program also sponsors a con-
ference series for medical students to report the findings of their research and will contribute
funds (when available) to the travel expenses of medical students who are selected to present
the results of their research at national conferences. On the basis of the results of the research
projects and their presentation, medical students are eligible for the annual Faculty Research
and Watson Clinic awards, and graduating students may also be considered for Graduation
with Honors based on research.








LIVING


ACCOMMODATIONS


Housing on campus should be arranged through the Office of the Director of Housing, Univer-
sity of Florida, Museum Road at S.W. 13th Street, Gainesville, Florida (392-2181). Beaty Towers
have been reserved for upper division and graduate students with suites at $283 per quarter per
student. For married students, apartments in Corry, Diamond, University Villages, and
Tanglewood are available. These are modern two-story buildings of brick construction contain-
ing one, two, and a few three-bedroom apartments at $95-$250 per month (All prices subject to
change). The 104 units comprising Schucht Memorial Village ($95-$125 per month) are adjacent
to the Shands Teaching Hospital and priority is given, when possible, to single housestaff and
medical students who have clinical responsibilities requiring quick access to the Health Center.
To secure favorable consideration, application for on-campus housing should be made im-
mediately upon acceptance to the College of Medicine.


Private homes and privately
modations for students. The
through the Off-Campus Hou
are not compiled for mailing
tory rental arrangements can
of facilities and a conference
before school begins.


operated rooming houses and apartments provide many accom-
university's Division of Housing also offers a referral service
sing Section where current listings are available. These listings
since they are subject to constant change, and mutually satisfac-
be made normally only by the student after a personal inspection
with the landlord. Initial contacts should be made at least 30 days









COURSE

DESCRIPTIONS



PHASE A

The following courses comprise the basic medical science background (Phase A) of the cur-
riculum for the M.D. degree, and are offered to medical and dental students during the first
year. Many are available to graduate students in the university, although the number of
students who can be accepted is limited by laboratory facilities.
BMS 5100C GROSS ANATOMY
6 credits. The basic structure and mechanics of the human body are taught primarily in the laboratory but
supplemented with lectures, conferences and demonstrations.
BMS 5110 MICROSCOPIC ANATOMY
4 credits. The microscopic structure of the cells, tissues and organs of the human body is taught. Correlation of struc-
ture and function is emphasized in lecture and in the laboratory sessions.
BMS 5121 HUMAN EMBRYOLOGY
2 credits. Lectures will cover early human development with emphasis on normal organogenesis and tissue mor-
phogenesis. Some abnormal development will be presented.
BMS 5004 MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY
5 credits. The study of viruses and the processes by which they produce disease is presented concomitant to the study
of immunology with an emphasis on the solving of clinical problems. Both virologic and immunologic concepts will be
applied to the study of oncology. The final part of the course deals with the study of bacteria, fungi and parasites
including the processes by which they produce infectious disease.
BMS 5201C BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR GENETICS
6 credits. Lectures and discussion sessions are designed to increase the student's basic biochemical knowledge of
cellular functions in health and disease including genetic disorders. The nutrition, physical chemistry, metabolism,
and molecular biology of mammalian cells are stressed including such subjects as homeostatis, inborn errors of
metabolism, cell genetics, and medical aspects of human genetics.
BMS 5002 ASPECTS OF HUMAN BEHAVIOR
1 credit. This course offers a brief introduction to the complex biological, psychological and social interactions which
underline human behavior in both health and illness. Against a background of normal development, problems of pain
and chronic disease are used to demonstrate the psychosocial impact of illness.
BMS 5000 PRINCIPLES OF PHYSIOLOGY
6 credits. A study of the nervous, respiratory, cardiovascular, endocrine, renal and body fluid systems. Concepts of
physiology are presented with some clinical applications.
BMS 5005 MEDICAL NEUROSCIENCE
5 credits. Designed to provide students with the fundamental information concerning the organization and function of
the central nervous system, this neuroscience course is dedicated to an integrated and multidisciplinary approach to
central nervous system. It includes the study of neurohistology, neuroembryology, neurophysiology, neuroanatomy,
neurochemistry, sensory and motor system organization and function. The laboratory component of the course is in-
tensive providing students with an opportunity to develop a working knowledge of human brain structure and
organization. There is a heavy emphasis on applying basic science information to realistic clinical problems.









PHASE B

Most of the following courses involve detailed day-to-day care of patients in the Shands
Teaching Hospital and Clinics, Inc. They require highly specialized professional preparation as
well as large amounts of time which must, of necessity, be somewhat irregularly scheduled as
particular patients are available. These courses, therefore, are limited to candidates for the
M.D. degree. The individual clinical courses offered are integral parts of the teaching program
in the Phase B portion of the curriculum. With the exception of BMS 5822, 5460, 5600, 5465,
5830 and BCC 5151, these courses are offered to parts of the class in rotation for periods of ap-
proximately two months.

BMS 5822 SOCIAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES IN MEDICAL PRACTICE
3 credits. An introduction for second-year medical students to a number of medical problems with social implications,
and human problems with clinical consequences which will provide them with some ways of thinking them through
(anthropological, ethical, historical, philosophical, sociological). The course provides a forum for students to acquaint
themselves with the reasoned views of others and to sharpen their own views on issues raised in the readings and video
materials.
BMS 5460 PHARMACOLOGY
4 credits. Introductory course presents concepts of drug action (drug-receptor interactions, drug absorption, distribu-
tion, and elimination), introduces most of the major classes of drugs, and emphasizes the biochemical and
physiological basis for understanding drug action. Groups of drugs considered include anesthetic, autonomic, central
nervous system, renal, cardiovascular and antimicrobial compounds.
BMS 5600 SYSTEMIC PATHOLOGY
3 hours lecture and conference, and 8 hours laboratory. 8 credits. Prerequisites: Completion of first year of medical
school. Functional and anatomical pathologic changes are correlated with etiology, pathogenesis and clinical
manifestations of human disease.
BMS 5465 ADVANCED PHARMACOLOGY
One month, 4 credits. Lectures, conferences and laboratory. Fundamentals of drug action are studied with emphasis on
cardiovascular, neurological, and endocrine systems. Joint teaching in basic aspects of appropriate clinical areas (e.g.,
anesthesia, ophthalmology) will be conducted.
BCC 5151 DISORDERS OF THINKING, EMOTION AND BEHAVIOR
3 credits. This course enables the second year medical students to improve interviewing techniques, to learn symp-
tomatic psychopathology, to conduct comprehensive examinations and interrelate symptoms and to become familiar
with descriptive and dynamic aspects of common clinical syndromes and diagnostic categories. Small group teaching
is devoted to lecture-demonstrations and clinical work.
BCC 5120 NEUROLOGY CLERKSHIP
3 credits. Participation on the inpatient and outpatient services of the Neurology Department at Shands Teaching
Hospital, VA Medical Center and affiliated teaching services at regional centers. The student will learn how to evaluate
the patient by assuming ongoing responsibility while appreciating various physiologic, psychologic, chemical and
pathologic aspects of neural function.
BMS 5830 PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS AND INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL MEDICINE
Seven months. 5 credits. Conducted by the Department of Medicine with participation by the Departments of
Neurology, Orthopaedics, Ophthalmology, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Pediatrics, Otolaryngology and Urology. The
student is introduced to the common and basic components of physical and laboratory examinations, techniques of in-
terviewing and history taking, and care of the patient in all fields of medicine.









BCC 5170 COMMUNITY HEALTH CLERKSHIP
5 credits. This is a five week clinical rotation in which students participate in health care in various community set-
tings. Experiences in urban and rural areas, or preceptorships with practicing physicians will be individually arrang-
ed. Whenever possible the student will live in the community so that it can be seen first hand the medical and health
problems as they exist in different communities as well as the success and shortcomings of present day medical care.
The community health clerkship will be coordinated with the medicine and pediatric clerkship.
BCC 5100 ANESTHESIOLOGY CLERKSHIP
1 credit. One week. Intensive lecture and laboratory instruction in life support systems, including practice in the skills
necessary to approach and treat the patient suffering from acute cardiopulmonary collapse of varying etiology.
BCC 5150 PSYCHIATRIC CLERKSHIP
Two months. 8 credits. Observation and supervised treatment of psychiatric patients in the Shands Teaching Hospital
and VA Medical Center inpatient, outpatient, and consultation services. Weekly didactic seminars, experience, and in-
struction are given in the application of this material to the practice of medicine.
BCC 5130 OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL CLERKSHIP
Two months. 8 credits. Participation in obstetric and gynecologic management of women in the Shands Teaching
Hospital and Clinics, Inc. provides a learning experience with an appropriate degree of responsibility. The student
focuses attention on the subject of biology and reproduction.
BCC 5110 MEDICAL CLERKSHIP
Two months. 8 credits. Active participation in the care of ward and clinic patients is provided under supervision. Close
tutorial relationship with staff in lectures, conferences, and teaching rounds provides a rich learning experience. A
program in clinical therapeutics is conducted jointly with the Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics.
BCC 5140 PEDIATRIC CLERKSHIP
Two months. 8 credits. Students actively participate in inpatient and outpatient medical and surgical management of
infants and children. Teaching occurs in Pediatric Clinic, Emergency Room at Jacksonville's University Hospital and
the Shands Teaching Hospital, the latter serving as the major referral center for children in north and central Florida.
Focus is upon diagnosis, management and consequences of illness in children and among their families.
BCC 5160 SURGICAL CLERKSHIP
Two months. 8 credits. Provides experience in the care of surgical patients in the ward and in the operating room. In-
struction in surgical biology is provided by a series of daily seminars and lectures.


PHASE C

Within the general framework of Phase C, a student will register for 13 credit hours per
semester of which 3-13 hours are chosen from Elected Topics and the balance from other offer-
ings in the College of Medicine and the university. The total curricular program must be ap-
proved by the College of Medicine prior to registration.

GMS 5930 ELECTED TOPICS I
3-13 credits. Offered by all medical science and clinical departments of the college as an opportunity for concentrated
work in a field of particular interest to the student. Individual research, a preceptorship, or clinical clerkship in the
college or in another medical center in this country or abroad may be elected.
GMS 5931 ELECTED TOPICS II
3-13 credits. Same as GMS 5930.
GMS 5932 SELECTED TOPICS
8 credits. Same as GMS 5930.









GMS 5933 SELECTED TOPICS II


8 credits. Same


as GMS 5930.


GMS 5934 SELECTED TOPICS III


4 Credits. Same


as GMS 5930.


GMS 5935 ELECTED TOPICS III


3-13 credits. Same


as GMS 5930.


GMS 5936 ELECTED TOPICS IV


3-13 credits. Same


as GMS 5930.


GMS 5937 ELECTED TOPICS V


3-13 credits. Same


as GMS 5930.


GMS 5938 ELECTED TOPICS VI


3-13 credits. Same


as GMS 5930.


GRADUATE


COURSES ,


THE


MEDICAL


SCIENCES


Programs leading to the Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in the medical sciences (with a major in
anatomy, biochemistry and molecular biology, immunology and medical microbiology, neuro-
science, pathology, pharmacology and therapeutics, or physiology) are offered by the College of


Medicine. In addition, the M.S.


and Ph.D. degrees in biochemistry are offered by the Depart-


ment of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Training in these scientific disciplines is planned
to give experience in research and teaching, rather than in clinical practice for which the M.D.
degree program is designed.
Although no graduate major may be completed without adequate course work at the 6000 level
or higher, the 5000 level courses listed for each individual department also are available for
graduate credit as part of the candidate's major.
The following general courses are offered by each participating department. Most of these
courses, as well as others listed below, are also available to qualified graduate students from
other divisions of the university.

GMS 6905 RESEARCH IN MEDICAL SCIENCES
1 to 10 credits. May be repeated for credit. Supervised research other than that toward fulfillment of the thesis or
dissertation research in Departments of Anatomy. Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Immunology and Medical
Microbiology, Neuroscience, Pathology, Pharmacology & Therapeutics and Physiology.
GMS 6910 SUPERVISED RESEARCH
1 to 5 credits. Credit not applicable toward degrees. May be repeated.
GMS 6940 SUPERVISED TEACHING
1 to 5 credits. Credit not applicable toward degrees. May be repeated.


GMS 6971 MASTER'S RESEARCH: Anatomy, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology,
Microbiology, Neuroscience, Pathology, Pharmacology & Therapeutics, and Physiology.
I to 15 credits.


Immunology and Medical









GMS 7980 DOCTORAL RESEARCH: Anatomy, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Immunology and Medical
Microbiology, Neuroscience, Pathology, Pharmacology & Therapeutics, and Physiology.
1 to 15 credits.

ANATOMY

The department offers programs leading to the Ph.D. and, in special cases, the M.S. degree in
medical sciences. Areas of research and training include cellular, developmental and re-
productive biology, and mammalian morphology. Prospective students should have a strong
background in biology, and have taken undergraduate courses in inorganic chemistry, organic
chemistry, calculus, and physics. Deficiencies can be made up during the first year of graduate
study.

BMS 5100 GROSS ANATOMY
6 credits. The basic structure and mechanics of the human body are taught primarily in the laboratory but sup-
plemented with lectures, conferences, and demonstrations, as needed.
BMS 5168 APPLIED GROSS ANATOMY
4 credits. A continuation in depth of BMS 5100 with emphasis on applied and correlative aspects.
BMS 5110 MICROSCOPIC ANATOMY
4 credits. The microscopic structure of the cells, tissues and organs of the human body is taught. Correlation of the
structure and function is strongly emphasized. Fresh tissues are used when profitable and each student is issued a loan
collection of prepared slides. Recent advances in knowledge of cellular structure, acquired by the use of the phase and
electron microscopes, are included.
BMS 6173 SUBMICROSCOPIC ANATOMY
3 credits. Prerequisites: Histology or cytology; staff approval. Ultrastructure in cells and tissues of vertebrate forms.
Current research trends and functional connotations where pertinent.
BMS 6175 RESEARCH METHODS IN ANATOMY
1 to 4 credits. Research techniques of histochemistry, radiation biology, experimental embryology, teratology, en-
docrinology, or electron microscopy under supervision of a staff member. May be repeated with change of content up
to a maximum of 10 credits.
BMS 6176 SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANATOMY
1 to 4 credits. Readings in the recent literature of anatomy and allied disciplines. May be repeated with change of
content up to a maximum of 10 credits.
BMS 6150 ANATOMY SEMINAR
1 to 2 credits. Research reports and discussions of current research literature by departmental staff and graduate
students. May be repeated with change of content up to a maximum of 12 hours.
BMS 6905 INDIVIDUAL STUDY
1 to 3 credits; maximum 8. Supervised study in areas not covered by other graduate courses.
BMS 6185 FERTILIZATION AND GAMETOGENESIS
2 credits. Prerequisites: BCH 4313 and 4203 or equivalent. A general course in developmental biology. Supervised
study of publications in specific areas of reproductive biology, including oogenesis, spermatogenesis, fertilization, and
immunoreproduction. Weekly conferences, reports, lectures.
BMS 6120 EMBRYOLOGY AND ORGANOGENESIS
3 credits. Prerequisite: ZOO 3703 or BMS 5100. Human and higher mammalian development. Physiological and
clinical considerations stressed where pertinent.









BMS 6182 TECHNIQUES IN ELECTRON MICROSCOPY
2 to 4 credits. Prerequisites: courses and/or experience in histology and cytology. Theory and practice of electron
microscopic techniques including tissue preparation, sectioning, use of the electron microscope, and photography.
Offered in even-numbered years.
BMS 6166 ADVANCED MICROSCOPIC ANATOMY
2 to 3 credits. Prerequisites: BMS 5110 or ZOO 5755, consent of instructor. Histological approaches and techniques
relevant to selected research areas. Lectures, microscopic study and laboratory project relating structural and
functional aspects of a problem.
BMS 6105 ADVANCED GROSS ANATOMY
2 to 4 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Regional and specialized anatomy of the human body taught by
laboratory dissection, conferences and demonstrations. May be repeated with change of content up to a maximum of 9
credits.
BMS 7643 MEMBRANE BIOLOGY
2 credits. The structure, composition and turnover of plasma and intracellular membranes will be examined. Topics
relating to membrane function will also be considered including pinocytosis, regulation or intracellular exchange, cell
recognition, cell communication and virus formation.

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology offers the Master of Science and Doc-
tor of Philosophy degrees in biochemistry with specialization in physical biochemistry,
molecular biology, cell biology, and medical biochemistry. The department, as one of the basic
medical sciences, also offers these subjects as part of the program leading to the M.S. and Ph.D.
in medical sciences.
Specific areas of study include structure and function of cellular and nuclear membranes in
mammalian cells; transport of molecules into the cell; regulation of cell division and gene ex-
pression; biochemistry of differentiation; biochemical genetics; molecular biology of nucleic
acids; replication and repair in bacterial and eukaryotic cells; biosynthesis and structure of
nucleic acids, proteins, polysaccharides, lipids, lipoproteins; isoprenoid metabolism; physical
biochemistry of nucleic acids and proteins; mechanism of enzyme action; and marine
biochemistry.
New graduate students should have adequate training in general, organic, quantitative, and
physical chemistry as well as in physics, biology, and calculus. Minor deficiencies may be
made up immediately after entering Graduate School.
Doctoral candidates are required to take a core of biochemistry courses which include BCH
6065, 6156, 6206, 6415, 6876 and 6936. Depending upon interests and background of the stu-
dent, additional courses are recommended from the following list: BCH 6296, 6746, 7077 and
7257. The course of graduate study for doctoral candidates also includes advanced organic and
physical chemistry, physiology, microbiology and genetics.
BCH 6065 ADVANCED PHYSICAL BIOCHEMISTRY
4 credits. Prerequisites: General biochemistry and physical chemistry or consent of instructor. Physical chemistry of
biological molecules and the techniques for their study. Constitutes one of the three core biochemistry courses.










BCH 6156C RESEARCH METHODS IN BIOCHEMISTRY
1-4 credits. Prerequisites: BCH 6065, 6206, 6415. Only by special arrangement. Biochemical research in which the stu-
dent refines his research techniques in physical biochemistry, intermediary metabolism, molecular biology, and cell
biology under supervision of a staff member.
BCH 6206 ADVANCED METABOLISM
3 credits. Prerequisites: General biochemistry or consent of instructor. The reactions of intermediary metabolism with
emphasis upon their integration, mechanism, and control. Constitutes one of the three core biochemistry courses.
BCH 6296 ADVANCED TOPICS IN METABOLIC CONTROL
2 credits. Prerequisites: BCH 6065, 6206, 6415, or consent of instructor. Study of the thermodynamic, allosteric, en-
docrinologic, and genetic control of metabolic reactions.
BCH 6415 ADVANCED MOLECULAR AND CELL BIOLOGY
5 credits. Prerequisite: General biochemistry or consent of instructor. An advanced course combining the molecular
biology of pro- and eukaryotes with cell biology. Topics will include DNA replication, chromosome organization; RNA
and protein synthesis; as well as the biochemistry of cell organelles. Constitutes one of the three core biochemistry
courses.
BCH 6746 ADVANCED TOPICS IN PHYSICAL BIOCHEMISTRY
2 credits. Prerequisites: BCH 6065, 6206, 6415, or consent of instructor. Study of the physical chemistry of proteins,
nucleic acids, lipids, enzymes, as well as their modes of interaction.
BCH 6876 RECENT ADVANCES IN BIOCHEMISTRY
1 credit. Prerequisite: BCH 6065 or equivalent. Areas of biochemistry and molecular biology, selected by the faculty,
discussed critically and in depth. Emphasis on current controversy and theory, data interpretations, and scientific
writing. Classes held informally in small groups during each semester, involving all biochemistry faculty on a rotating
basis. S/U.
BCH 6910 SUPERVISED RESEARCH
1-5 credits. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Nonthesis, individually supervised research.
BCH 6936 BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR
1 credit. Required of graduate students in biochemistry; open to others by special arrangement. Research reports and
discussions of current research literature given by the departmental staff, invited speakers, and graduate students. S/U.
BCH 6940 SUPERVISED TEACHING
1-5 credits. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Teaching and conducting of discussions under direct supervision.
BCH 6971 RESEARCH FOR MASTER'S THESIS
1-15 credits.
BCH 7077 ADVANCED TOPICS IN MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
2 credits. Prerequisites: BCH 6065, 6206, 6415, or consent of instructor.The biochemical basis of molecular biology and
genetics with emphasis on the mode of control surrounding the replication and expression of the pro- and eukaryotic
genome.
BCH 7257 ADVANCED TOPICS IN CELL BIOLOGY
2 credits. Prerequisite: BCH 6415 or equivalent. Biochemistry of selected cell organelles with emphasis on compart-
mentation and integrated cellular function.
BCH 7627 BIOCHEMISTRY OF DISEASE
2 credits. Prerequisite: General courses in biochemistry. The molecular basis of human pathobiology. Biochemical
mechanisms underlying selected disease states.
BCH 7980 RESEARCH FOR DOCTORAL DISSERTATION
1-15 credits.









IMMUNOLOGY AND MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY
The department offers a program leading to the Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in medical sciences
with specialization in immunology and medical microbiology, including the fields of
parasitology and virology. Through individual planning of course work, research and teaching,
the graduate student is offered an educational atmosphere in which to develop skills and gain
intellectual independence and initiative. The program is closely related to that of the Depart-
ment of Microbiology in the College of Agriculture.

The undergraduate preparation for graduate study in immunology and medical microbiology
should be wide in scope and should include general biology, physics, chemistry (2 to 3 years in-
cluding organic and quantitative analysis), with statistics, calculus, physical chemistry,
genetics, and bacteriology recommended. A bachelor's degree in bacteriology or microbiology
is not required. In Graduate School, the student will at first obtain a general background in
microbiology as preparation for research and teaching. The remaining course work should be
arranged according to the student's interests and competence. Specialization in the following
areas is offered: virology, immunology, immunochemistry, cellular immunology, infectious
diseases, molecular genetics and parasitology.
BMS 5301 MEDICAL PARASITOLOGY
2 credits. Introduction to the major groups of animal parasites infecting man with special emphasis on life history,
epidemiology, and laboratory diagnosis.
BMS 6305 PARASITIC DISEASE OF THE TROPICS AND SUBTROPICS
3 credits. Animal parasitology covering the mechanisms of parasitic infections, the physiology of parasites and the im-
mune responses of the host; public health, veterinary and general aspects of various parasites affecting man and
animals. Laboratory work includes experiments showing the effects of nutrition of parasites; immune responses, fac-
tors and modes of transmission; life cycles; morphology.
BMS 6310 PRINCIPLES OF IMMUNOLOGY
3 to 5 credits. Biological and biochemical aspects of host resistance and immunity, with special emphasis on the
chemical and physiochemical properties of the proteins and immune reactions.
BMS 6321 SPECIAL TOPICS IN MICROBIOLOGY
1 to 6 credits. Contemporary research in a particular aspect of general microbiology. May be repeated with change of
content.
BMS 6330 VIROLOGY
3 credits. Natural history of viruses and mechanisms of viral replication.
BMS 6352 MOLECULAR GENETICS
3 to 5 credits. Microbial genetics, including mutation, selection, transformation, transduction, conjugation and
episomal factors, molecular structure and function of genes.
BMS 6360 EXPERIMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY
3 to 5 credits. Application of physical, chemical and biological techniques to experimental problems in microbiology.
Individual laboratory study under supervision. May be repeated with change of content up to maximum of 8 credits.
BMS 6930 SEMINAR
1 credit. Attendance is required of all graduate majors at one research presentation and one graduate report each week
as scheduled. May be repeated with change of content. S/U.









BMS 7931 RESEARCH CONFERENCE
1 credit. Critical discussion and appraisal of research programs of the faculty and students of the department. May be
repeated with change of content. S/U.
BMS 7932 JOURNAL COLLOQUY
1 credit. Critical presentations and discussion of recent original articles in the microbiological literature. May be
repeated with change of content.



NEUROSCIENCE

The department offers programs leading to the Ph.D. and M.S. degrees in medical sciences
with specialization in the basic neural and neurobehavioral sciences. While there are no fixed
entrance prerequisites, prospective students should obtain a reasonable undergraduate
background in biochemistry, physiology, statistics and behavioral science. Students admitted
with deficiencies in these areas will be required to obtain remedial training. All students will
receive core training in neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neurobehavioral science,
neurochemistry, neuroendocrinology, neurohistology, and neuropharmacology. The
remainder of the program will consist of laboratory research and advanced courses and
seminars from this and other departments.

BMS 5511 VISION
3 credits. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. The visual process and supporting systems approached from the
orientation of human vision.
BMS 6131C NEUROHISTOLOGY
2 credits. Histological approaches and techniques for the study of the neuronal, neuroglial and mesenchymal cellular
components of the central and peripheral nervous system. S/U.
BMS 6510 NEUROPHYSIOLOGY
3 credits. Physiology of nerve and muscle, central nervous system and the special senses.
BMS 6512 A SURVEY OF SENSORY SYSTEMS
3 credits. Prerequisite BMS 6510 or equivalent. A group of specialists provide a survey of theories and experimental
data on human and subhuman sensory reception and encoding. Auditory, visual, cutaneous and chemical senses are
included.
BMS 6514 SEMINAR IN SENSORY PROCESSES
1 credit. Topics of current interest in various areas of the sensory specialties are discussed within the seminar
framework. S/U.
BMS 6531 PHYSIOLOGY OF THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM
3 credits. Special and current problems in brain and spinal cord function covered in seminars.
BMS 6532 NERVE AS A TISSUE
2 credits. Seminar on current research problems in the area of cellular interactions in the nervous system. Readings
and discussion from articles in the fields contributing to the physiology, chemistry and anatomy of the nervous system.
BMS 7142C MEDICAL NEUROSCIENCE
4 credits. A comprehensive overview of human neuroanatomy from the subcellular to the gross tissue level. Lectures
will also cover neurochemistry, neuropharmacology, neurophysiology, neuroendocrinology and neurobehavioral
biology. Clinical correlations and applications will be given.










BMS 7143C STRUCTURE AND FUNCTION OF THE AUDITORY SYSTEM
3 to 5 credits. Prerequisite: BMS 7142C or consent of instructor. Laboratory seminar on the anatomy and physiology of
the auditory system. Stress on brainstem nuclei and their interconnections.
BMS 7165C RECENT ADVANCES IN NEUROSCIENCE
1 to 2 credits. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Seminar and group discussions of recent advances in one or more
areas of neuroscience. These areas include neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neurochemistry, neuropharmacology,
neuroendocrinology and neurobehavioral biology. May be repeated up to a maximum of 16 credits.
BMS 7467 PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY OF EXCITABLE MEMBRANES
2 credits. Membrane ionic permeability changes underlying action and synaptic potential generation. Application of
electrophysiological and radioactive tracer techniques to the analysis of drug action on excitable membranes. Offered
jointly by the Departments of Pharmacology and Therapeutics and Physiology.
BMS 7513 PHYSIOLOGICAL BASIS OF BRAIN RHYTHM
2 credits. An analysis of the structural, physiological and pharmacological substrates for electrical activity of the
central nervous system as manifested in the normal electroencephalogram including the development and relationship
to evoked potentials.
BMS 7533 COLLOQUIUM IN NEUROBIOLOGY
1 to 2 credits. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Current theoretical issues that relate to the neurophysiological,
physiological, chemical and behavioral approaches to the study of the nervous system. May be repeated with change of
content up to a maximum of 12 credits. S/U.

GMS 5702 NEUROHUMORS AND BEHAVIOR
3 credits. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Actions of putative neurotransmitters and neuromodulators and drugs
on animal behavior. The localization, metabolism, storage, release and physiological action of each group of
neurotransmitters will also be reviewed.
GMS 6700 HISTORY OF THE NEUROSCIENCE
2 credits. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. History of the discoveries, concepts and technical advances in the
nervous system disciplines from ancient to modern times. The emergence of the several neuroscience as experimental
disciplines that provide a foundation for rational medical applications.
GMS 6701 COMPARATIVE NEUROANATOMY AND NEUROPHYSIOLOGY
1 to 3 credits. Prerequisite: BMS 7142C or equivalent. The phylogenetic development of the central nervous system of
vertebrate animals considered from the behavioral, anatomical and electro-physiological points of view. S/U.
GMS 6703 PAIN AND SOMESTHESIS
3 credits. Current research on central nervous system coding and information transfer, using somethesis as a model
with particular emphasis on pain.
GMS 6710 NEUROBIOLOGY
3 credits. Prerequisite: Background in biological or behavioral sciences. Structure and physiology of the nervous
system as it pertains to control of behavior.
GMS 6732 NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY
2 to 4 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Neural regulations of endocrine systems in vertebrate animals.
Correlative study of neuroanatomical, neurophysiological and neurochemical aspects of endocrine control.
GMS 6735 NEUROPHARMACOLOGY
3 credits. Prerequisite: Background in biochemistry and basic neuroscience or consent of instructor. The
identification, synthesis, metabolism, and pharmacology of neurotransmitters and their receptors, to include biogenic
amines, neuropeptides, and other nervous system transmitters.
GMS 7711 NEURAL-BEHAVIORAL-ENDOCRINE INTERACTIONS
3 credits. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Interrelationships of endocrine hormones, nervous system activity, and









behavior. Sample topics include the role of hormones in sexual behavior, aggression, stress, parental behavior, learning
and memory, mood and target organ physiology.
GMS 7712 NEUROBEHAVIORAL RELATIONS
3 credits. Prerequisite: BMS 7142C or consent of instructor. Theories and data on the central nervous system basis of
higher order function. Emphasis will be on arousal, purposeful behavior and learning.
GMS 7713 INFORMATION STORAGE: A NEUROBIOLOGICAL APPROACH
3 credits. Prerequisite: BMS 7142C or consent of instructor. Consideration of data dealing with basic issues concerning
the nature and behavioral plasticity and information storage and their central nervous system foundations. Particular
emphasis will be paid to memory disruption and facilitation as an experimental tool in the study of memory processes.
GMS 7714 DEVELOPMENTAL NEURAL-BEHAVIORAL-ENDOCRINE INTERACTIONS
3 credits. Interrelationships and roles of endocrine hormones, behavior and nervous system activity during the
perinatal period on the development of adult patterns of neuroendocrine activity and behavior.
GMS 7715 INTEGRATIVE NEUROBIOLOGY IV: BEHAVIORAL NEUROBIOLOGY
4 credits. Lecture and laboratory course concerning the neurobiological substrates of behavior, and neurobehavioral
techniques.
GMS 7720 MOTOR SYSTEMS
3 credits. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. A study of the basic mechanisms involved in motor activity including a
detailed analysis of the muscle spindle and its central control by spinal cord and supraspinal mechanisms. Emphasis is
on normal rather than abnormal processes.
GMS 7721 NEURAL MECHANISMS OF INGESTION AND ENERGY REGULATION
2 to 3 credits. Identical with PSB 7719. Neuroanatomical, neurobehavioral and neuroendocrinological mechanisms
involved in the regulation of food and water consumption and regulation of body weight.
GMS 7730 FUNCTIONAL NEUROCHEMISTRY
1 to 3 credits. Prerequisite: biochemistry. A survey of molecules that play a special role in nervous system function or
respond to neural stimulation. Included will be studies of nucleic acids, proteins, glycoproteins, glycolipids,
phospholipids, cyclic nucleotides and neurotransmitters and the enzymes associated with their metabolism. Results
from simple systems will be related to those of higher brain function.
GMS 7731 MOLECULAR NEUROBIOLOGY
3 credits. Function of biochemicals in nervous tissue. Includes the function and metabolism of neurotransmitters and
other neurohumors, the structure and properties of membranes, metabolism and function of macromolecules,
axoplasmic transport and the development of nervous systems.
GMS 7733 INTEGRATIVE NEUROBIOLOGY I: CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR NEUROBIOLOGY
4 credits. Cellular and subcellular structure of nervous tissue. Development of the nervous system and factors involved
in its differentiation. Nervous system biochemistry including metabolism and function of neurotransmitters.
Axoplasmic transport. Degeneration and regeneration and trophic functions of nervous tissue.

GMS 7740 NEUROSCIENCE SEMINAR
1 credit. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Reading and discussion of current topics in neuroscience. May be
repeated with change of content up to a maximum of 12 credits. S/U.
GMS 7741 SPECIAL TOPICS IN NEUROSCIENCE
1 to 4 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Intensive reading and lectures in specialized fields of neuro-
science and allied disciplines. May be repeated with change of content up to a maximum of 12 credits.
GMS 7742 RESEARCH METHODS IN NEUROSCIENCE
1 to 7 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Research techniques in neurohistory, neurophysiology, neuroen-
docrinology, neurochemistry, neuropharmacology, neurobehavioral science, experimental neurology, neuroscience
instrumentation or electron microscopy under supervision of a staff member. May be repeated with change of content
up to a maximum of 12 credits.









GMS 7743 DEVELOPMENTAL NEUROBIOLOGY
3 credits. Seminar on the neuroanatomical and functional development of the nervous system. Includes discussion of
mechanisms of embryonic neurogenesis, behavioral embryology, and current research in neuroembryology.
GMS 7750 INTEGRATIVE NEUROBIOLOGY II: COMPARATIVE NEUROANATOMY
2 to 3 credits. Lecture and laboratory course concerning general principles of vertebrate neuroanatomy and brain and
spinal cord organization. Mammalian neuroanatomy stressed.
GMS 7760 INTEGRATIVE NEUROBIOLOGY III: SYSTEMS NEUROBIOLOGY


4 to 6 credits. Lecture course concerning neurobiological systems: sp


ecifically the motor


systems,


nonspecific systems,


sensory


systems, and neurotransmitter-neuroendocrine systems.


PATHOLOGY


The Department of Pathology offers


opportunities


to qualified


individuals


for study leading to


the Ph.D. in medical


sciences with expertise in experimental pathology including the following


specialized


areas:


tumor


biology


and virology,


immunology


of infectious


diseases,


munobiology, immunogenetics and immunopathology, comparative and nutritional pathology,
and clinical chemistry.

Experimental pathology at the University of Florida emphasizes the biological approach to the
understanding of disease. Careers in pathology offer a diversity of opportunities: research on


topics


as cancer,


immunity,


cardiac


and vascular


diseases,


service


in diagnostic


laboratories affiliated with hospitals, and teaching.


Graduate


students


entering


undergraduate training in


the experimental


general chemistry,


pathology


program


organic chemistry,


should
general


have


adequate


physics, general


biology, and two or more advanced courses in the areas of physiological, developmental, or
cellular biology, or in the case of students in clinical chemistry, courses in analytical, in-
organic, and physical chemistry. Some students may be required to remedy deficiencies in their
background by taking certain undergraduate courses after admission to the graduate program
in pathology.

General and Experimental Pathology

BMS 6601 SPECIAL SUBJECTS IN SYSTEMIC PATHOLOGY


credits:


max: 3. Prerequisite: Consent of staff. Pathological processes affecting


specific organs and organ systems.


BMS 6602 PRINCIPLES OF EXPERIMENTAL PATHOBIOLOGY


9 credits;


max: 18. Prerequisite: Consent of staff. General principles of pathology


, pathological processes affecting


specific organs and organ


systems,


and host mechanisms in response


to viral, b


acterial, and parasitic diseases. The


course content is sequential for two semesters and both semesters are required.
BMS 6606 COMPARATIVE PATHOLOGY


2 credits. Prerequisite: Consent of staff. Diseases of various


organ systems of domestic and laboratory animals com-


pared and contrasted with spontaneous diseases of man.
BMS 6620 SEMINAR IN PATHOLOGY
1 credit. Required of graduate students in pathology; open to others by permission of the department. Current research
literature and research reports by graduate students, pathology staff, and invited speakers.


1 to3










BMS 6621 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PATHOLOGY


1 to 4 credits;


max: 12. Prerequisite: Permission of department. Conferences and supervised laboratory work. Topics


selected to meet each student's needs.
BMS 6644 IMMUNOGENETICS AND TRANSPLANTATION
3 credits. Prerequisities: BMS 6642, BMS 6314 and consent of instructor. Role of the major histocompatibility


in control of cell differentiation, immune responsiveness, alloreactivity, and


disease


susceptibility. Clinical


complex
implica-


tions of contemporary


research


and future application of idiotype/anti-idiotype


systems.


Clinical Chemistry


BMS 6612


CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND TOXICOLOGY


3 credits. Chemical techniques employed in the diagnosis of di


sease;


methods in toxicology.


BMS 6613 CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND TOXICOLOGY: A ROTATION


2 to 20 credits;


max: 20. Prerequisite: BMS 6612. Participation in all


phases


of practical


clinical chemist


ry and


toxicology. Chemical methodology, clinical interpretation, and significance of laboratory measurements used in
diagnosing diseases. Individual investigative project in clinical chemistry and toxicology. Pathology graduate students


specializing in clinical chemistry must spend three terms on this


rotation.


BMS 7660 MEDICAL INFORMATION SYSTEMS


2 credits.


Systems


analysis


Communications within health


techniques,
care delivery


both theoretical


systems


and practical,


applied


to the medical


database.


studied.


Cellular Immunobiology

BMS 6630 TUMOR BIOLOGY
3 credits. Pathobiology, biochemistry,


and molecular biology of neoplasia; viral, and chemical


carcinogenesis;


immunology and therapy of


cancer


in man and animals.


BMS 6631 EXPERIMENTAL TUMOR BIOLOGY


2 credits. Prerequisite: BMS 6630 or consent of staff. Development of laboratory skills and techniques
various phenomena in tumor biology. Students will work in direct association with members of the BKv
faculty.
BMS 6641 IMMUNOPATHOLOGY


used in study of
IS 6630 teaching


2 credits. Abnormalities and


diseases


having immunological


bases


are studied.


BMS 6642 IMMUNOBIOLOGY


3 credits. Prerequisite: BMS 6314 or instructor consent. Biological aspects of the defense


systems;


specific and


nonspecific and cellular and humoral amplification systems involving immune interactions; pathologic aspects of


immunologic phenomena; phylogenetic and developmental


aspects


of immunity; current concepts in cellular


immunology emphasized.
BMS 6642L IMMUNOBIOLOGY LABORATORY
2 credits. Prerequisite: Consent of staff. Corequisite: BMS 6642. Project oriented. Laboratory skills and techniques in
immunobiology developed. Each student works in close association with a faculty member.









PHARMACOLOGY AND THERAPEUTICS

The Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics offers a program leading to the degree of
Doctor of Philosophy in the medical sciences with specialization in pharmacology.
The general research focus of the department is mechanistic, at the cellular and molecular


levels.


Specific


areas


of research


include


receptor


and membrane


pharmacology;


autos


mechanistic, at the cellular and molecular levels. Specific areas of research include receptor
and membrane pharmacology; autonomic, renal, developmental, endocrine, gastrointestinal
and neuropharmacology; teratology; fluid secretion and carbonic anhydrase inhibition; cancer
chemotherapy and carcinogenesis; physical chemistry and enzymes; opioid peptides; drug
metabolism; and environmental and marine toxicology.
Applicants should present undergraduate course credits in chemistry, including quantitative
analytical, organic, and physical chemistry; elementary physics and biology; and mathematics
through calculus. Otherwise, well-qualified students with certain deficiencies in preparation


will be allowed to


make these up during the first year of graduate study. In addition to


elementary


advanced


study


in pharmacology,


candidates


pursue


courses


biochemistry, physiology, and other medical sciences
advisory committees.

BMS 5465 ADVANCED MEDICAL PHARMACOLOGY
4 credits.
BMS 6400 INTRODUCTION TO PHARMACOLOGY


5 credits.


as determined by


Prerequisite: Elementary courses in biochemistry and physiology.


consultation with their


Overview of the entire field of


pharmacology


as the study of the interactions between living


systems


and foreign chemicals. Intended to prepare


majors for advanced courses or to familiarize nonmajors with the


BMS 6420 SEMINAR IN PHARMACOLOGY


1 credit. Prerequisite: BMS


6400. Research reports and discussions of current research literature by graduate students,


faculty, and invited lecturers.
BMS 6463 MOLECULAR PHARMACOLOGY
5 credits. Prerequisites: BMS 6400, CHM 3401.


A biochemical approach to the actions of drugs, stressing analysis


drug-receptor interactions, structure-activity relationships, kinetics of distribution of drugs, and metabolism of foreign
compounds.
BMS 6466 PHYSIOLOGICAL PHARMACOLOGY
5 credits. Prerequisite: BMS 6400. Influence of drugs upon physiological systems, including nervous, endocrine,
cardiovascular, renal, gastrointestinal, and musculoskeletal.
BMS 7421 RESEARCH METHODS IN PHARMACOLOGY
1 to 3 credits; max: 6. Readings, discussions, and practical experience with modern methods used in pharmacology.
Chemical and biological methods.
BMS 7423 TOPICS IN PHARMACOLOGY
1 to 3 credits; max: 12. Seminars, informal conferences, or laboratory work on selected topics in pharmacology.
BMS 7467 PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY OF EXCITABLE MEMBRANES
2 credits. Membrane ionic permeability changes underlying action and synaptic potential generation described ij
detail. Applications of electrophysiological and radioactive tracer techniques to analysis of drug action on excitable
membranes.


area.









PHYSIOLOGY

The Department of Physiology offers a program leading to the degrees of Master of Science and
Doctor of Philosophy in the medical sciences with specialization in physiology.


Areas of specialization
general endocrinology,
physiology of muscle,


within


the Department of Physiology include sensory physiology,


neuroendocrinology,


environmental


neurophysiology,


physiology,


cardiac


respiration,


electrophysiology,


circulation
epithelial


transport, and neonatal physiology.

Undergraduate majors appropriate as foundations for the study of physiology are biology,
chemistry, engineering mathematics or physics. The following courses are especially useful as


a background


chemistry,
calculus,


for the study


analytical
and statistic


chemistry,
s. Students


of physiology:


organ
may


C


general


chemistry,


biology,
physical


find it necessary


to rn


vertebrate


biology,


chemistry, general
emedy deficiencies


general
physics,
in their


background by taking undergraduate courses after admission to Graduate School.

BMS 5511 VISION
3 credits. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Introduction to methodology, anatomy, and the function of vision.
BMS 5520C PRINCIPLES OF PHYSIOLOGY
6 credits. Prerequisite: APB 3203 or equivalent. Physiology of mammalian organ systems, with special reference to the
human.
BMS 5520L LABORATORY IN PHYSIOLOGY
2 credits. Corequisite: BMS 5520C. Laboratory course designed to illustrate the principles of physiology. Students


perform exercises coordinated with course topics under discussion in BMS


5520C.


BMS 6512 SURVEY OF SENSORY SYSTEMS
3 credits. Prerequisite: BMS 6510. Theories and data on human sensory reception and encoding. Audition, vision, and
the chemical and cutaneous senses.
BMS 6535 SEMINAR IN PHYSIOLOGY
1 credit. S/U.
BMS 6536 RECENT ADVANCES IN PHYSIOLOGY


2 credits; max: 10. Content varies from year to year but


covers


recent advances in physiology.


BMS 6537 SEMINAR ON VISION
3 credits. Current research and theory in visual function. Literature survey and design of an experiment relevant to
recent theory.
BMS 6560C RESEARCH METHODS IN PHYSIOLOGY
2 to 4 credits; max: 6. Special needs of each student are met by conferences and laboratory work.
BMS 6573 PHYSIOLOGY OF RESPIRATION


2 credits. Gas exchange in lungs and tissues.


Ventilatory mechanics. Fluid mechanics of gas flow in


airways.


Comparative physiology of respiratory mechanisms.
BMS 6574 PHYSIOLOGY OF THE CIRCULATION OF BLOOD
2 credits. Physiology of the component parts of the circulation, relation of structure and function, emphasis on control
mechanisms.
BMS 6575 RENAL PHYSIOLOGY
2 credits. Seminars on the comparative physiology aspects of renal structure and function.









BMS 6576 BODY TEMPERATURE REGULATION
2 credits. Neural and endocrine aspects of temperature regulation, hypo- and hyperthermia, adaptation to cold and heat,
hibernation.
BMS 6577 NEONATAL P aspects of temperature regulation, hypo- and hyperthermia, adaptation to cold and heat,
hibernation.
BMS 6577 NEONATAL PHYSIOLOGY
2 credits. Physiological regulation in newborn mammals.
BMS 6578 PHYSIOLOGY OF THE MAMMALIAN THYROID GLAND
2 credits. Production, secretion, control, and function of thyroid hormones; interaction with other hormones.
BMS 6579 GASTROINTESTINAL PHYSIOLOGY
2 credits. Physiology of the vertebrate salivary glands, stomach, small and large intestine, pancreas, liver, and the
muscular movements of the gastrointestinal system.
BMS 6933 SENSORY SCIENCE SEMINAR
1 credit. Results of current investigations in sense organ function will be covered. S/U.
BMS 7467 PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY OF EXCITABLE MEMBRANES
2 credits. Membrane ionic permeability changes underlying action and synaptic potential generation described in
detail.
BMS 7570 BASIC CARDIAC ELECTROPHYSIOLOGY
2 credits. Study of the normal electrophysiology and ionic mechanisms involved in various regions of the heart.
BMS 7572 ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL BASIS OF CARDIAC DYSRHYTHMIAS
2 credits. Study of normal cardiac cellular electrophysiology and changes which result in cardiac dysrhythmias. New
techniques in diagnosis and management.


UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

These courses are offered by the College of Medicine for students majoring in other colleges.

EXP 3719L LABORATORY TOPICS IN PSYCHOPHYSICS
2 credits. Identical with EXP 3714L. Prerequisite: PSY 2013 or consent of instructor. A practicum in experimental
methodology. Students will collect, analyze and evaluate data on specific problems related to brain mechanisms of skin
sensation.
APB 3203 BASIC ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY
3 to 5 credits. Prerequisite: ZOO 2013C. Open to students in the Colleges of Nursing and Health Related Professions
and to others by permission of instructor. The structure and physiological function of selected human systems.
BMS 4022 BIOCHEMICAL AND NEURAL SCIENCES SEMINAR
1 credit. Discussion of topics of current interest in the biochemical and neural sciences.
BMS 4025 INTRODUCTION TO THE NEUROSCIENCE
4 credits. Prerequisite: ZOO 2014 or equivalent and consent of instructor. Structure and basic functions of the mam-
malian nervous system. Human neuroanatomy, including peripheral and central structures from spinal cord to
cerebral cortex. Fundamental concepts of neurophysiology, including initiation, propagation and synaptic transmis-
sion of the nerve impulse. Sensory, motor and integrative activities. Elements of neurochemistry and neurophar-
macology.
BMS 4021 INTRODUCTION TO NEUROCHEMISTRY
4 credits. Prerequisite: Biochemistry. Discussion of current topics in neurochemistry. To include the metabolism of




66










carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, proteins and nucleic acids, the metabolsim and function of neurotransmitters and
axoplasmic flow.
BMS 4023 CURRENT TOPICS IN BRAIN AND BEHAVIOR
4 credits. Identical with PSB 4003. PrerequiSite: BMS 4025. Corequisite: BMS 4024. Biological bases of behavior, and
structural and functional correlates of learning.
BMS 4024 EXPERIMENTAL METHODS IN BRAIN AND BEHAVIOR
1 to 4 credits. Identical with PSB 4104L. Prerequisite: BMS 4025 and PSB 3004. Corequisite: BMS 4023. An introduc-
tion to current techniques used in research on brain and behavior.
BCH 4313 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL BIOCHEMISTRY
5 credits. Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry. The first half of BCH 4313-BCH 4203. An introduction to physical
biochemistry. Topics will include a survey of the structure, chemistry and function of nucleic acids, amino acids and
proteins, enzyme kinetics and regulation.
BCH 4203 INTRODUCTION TO INTERMEDIARY METABOLISM
5 credits. Prerequisite: BCH 4313. The second half of BCH 4313-BCH 4203. An introduction to intermediary
metabolism. Topics will include a survey of the biosynthetic and degradative pathways of carbohydrates, lipids, and
amino acids, in addition to photosynthesis, energy conservation and metabolic control.
PCB 4535 BIOCHEMICAL GENETICS
4 credits. Prerequisite: BCH 4313-BCH 4203, BCH 5878, BCH 5879 or consent of instructor. Topics include classic and
contemporary experiments illustrative of the main aspects of DNA replication, function and chromosomal organiza-
tion; DNA synthesis, processing and regulation; specific protein synthesis as expressions of genetic information in:
bacteriophage, mammalian cells, virus, developing and differentiating tissues and genetically characterized plants.
BMS 4905 MEDICAL SCIENCES SENIOR RESEARCH
2 to 5 credits. Prerequisite: Senior standing and consent of instructor. Laboratory or literature investigations of
problems of current interest in the medical sciences.

Enrollment for the following courses restricted to students accepted in the Basic Biological and
Medical Sciences Program:

BMS 4012 CELL BIOLOGY SEMINAR
7 credits. Cellular functions in health and disease. The structure and molecular biology of the mammalian cell are
stressed including such things as virus-cell interactions, inborn errors of metabolism and bacterial growth. Identical to
PCB 4930.
BMS 4010 INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL SCIENCES SEMINAR
4 credits. Selected in-depth special topics in the preclinical basic sciences and their application to clinical problems.
BMS 4011 INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL SCIENCES SEMINAR
4 credits. Continuation of BMS 4010.






Page
Missing
or
Unavailable






Page
Missing
or
Unavailable









* BOYSEN, PHILIP


G., M.D., (Loyola-Stritch)


Assistant Professor and


Effective as of April 1, 1981


ANATOMY


Assistant Professor of Pulmonary Medicine
* CATON, DONALD W., M.D., (Columbia Univ.)
Associate Professor and
Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology


CAMERON, DON F
Assistant Professor


., Ph.D., (Med. Univ. of S.C.)


CHAPIN, JAMES C.,
Assistant Professor


M.D., (Univ. of Michigan)


* FELDHERR, CARL M., Ph.D., (Univ. of North Dakota)
Assistant Professor
HAY, DONALD A., Ph.D., (Univ. of North Dakota)
Assistant Professor
HOLLINGER, THOMAS G., Ph.D., (Purdue Univ.)
Assistant Professor
* KALLENBACH, ERNST A., Ph.D., (McGill University)
Associate Professor


COHEN, JERRY


A., M.D., (Univ. of Miami)


Assistant Professor


COTEV, SHAMAY, M.D., (Univ. of Chicago)
Visiting Professor
DE PADUA, CONSTANTE B., M.D., (Univ. of Philippines)
Associate Professor


GALLAGHER, THOMAS
Associate Professor and


M.D., (Univ. of Kentucky)


* LARKIN, LYNN H.,
Professor


Ph.D., (Univ. of Colorado)


LOFTON, JOSEPH E., M.D., (Univ. of Alabama)
Professor and
Assistant Dean for Preprofessional Education


* ROMRELL, LYNN ]
Associate Professor


Ph.D., (Utah State University)


Associate Professor of Surgery


GIBBS, CHARLES P., M.D., (Indiana University)
Associate Professor and
Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
* GRAVENSTEIN, JOACHIM S., M.D., (Harvard University)
Graduate Research Professor


GRAVES, SHIRLEY


A., M.D., (Univ. of Miami)


* ROSS, MICHAEL H., Ph.D. (New York University)
Professor and Chairman


SANDERS, WILLIE


B.S., (Univ. of Florida)


Associate Professor
* SELMAN, KELLY, Ph.D., (Harvard University)
Associate Professor
* WEST, CHRISTOPHER M., Ph.D. (Calif. Inst. of Tech.)
Assistant Professor


ANESTHESIOLOGY


Associate Professor and
Chief, Division of Pediatric Anesthesia
Associate Professor of Pediatrics
KAPLAN, RICHARD F., M.D., (SUNY-Upstate Med. Ctr.)
Assistant Professor
* KRISCHER, JEFFREY P., Ph.D., (Harvard University)
Associate Professor/VAMC
MELKER, RICHARD J., Ph.D., M.D.,
(Albert Einstein Medical College)
Assistant Professor and


Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and


Director of Emergency Medical


ANDERSEN, THORKILD W., M.D., (Univ. of Copenhagen)
Professor


Services


MODELL, JEROME H., M.D., (Univ. of Minnesota)
Professor and Chairman


BERMAN, LAWRENCE
Assistant Professor and


S., M.D. (Jefferson Medical Col.)


Assistant Professor of Pediatrics
* BLOCK, A. JAY, M.D. (Johns Hopkins)
Professor and
Professor and Chief of Pulmonary Medicine


MUNSON, EDWIN
Professor and


M.D., (Univ. of Tennessee)


Chief of Anesthesia/VAMC
PAUL, WILLIAM L., M.D., (Univ. of Kentucky)
Assistant Professor


PAULUS, DAVID


A., M.D., (Univ. of Vermont)


* Members of the Graduate Faculty


Assistant Professor
PERKINS, HAVEN M., M.D., (Univ. of Louisville)
Professor


FACULTY









SAGA-RUMLEY, SEGUNDINA A., M.D.,
(Univ. of Philippines)
Assistant Professor
SCHULTETUS, RAYMOND R., M.D., (Univ. of Kentucky
Assistant Professor
* SHAH, DINESH 0., Ph.D., (Columbia University)
Professor and
Professor of Chemical Engineering
SKORA, IRENA A., M.D. (Jagiellonski University)
Associate Professor and JHEP ChairmanlJHEP
SPOHR, ROBERT W., M.D., (Vanderbilt Med. School)
Assistant Professor
TABELING, BARBARA B., M.D., (Univ. of Kentucky)
Assistant Professor
* WYNNE, JAMES W., M.D., (Cornell University)
Associate Professor and
Associate Professor of Pulmonary Medicine

Volunteer Faculty
BALZER, RICHARD H., JR., M.D., (Univ. of Virginia)


Clinical A


assistant Professor/Jacksonville


CHAPMAN, ROY L., JR., M.D., (Univ. of Tennessee)
Clinical Assistant ProfessorlGainesville
CROSS, DAVID A., M.D., (Univ. of Oklahoma)
Clinical Instructor/Pensacola
DOUGLAS, MICHAL E., M.D., (Univ. of Arizona)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Boone, N.C.
DOWNS, JOHN B., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Associate ProfessorlUrbana, Ill.
HOPPER, STEVEN M., M.D., (Univ. of Kentucky)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
KRUSE, JOHN C., M.D., (George Washington Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professorl/HEP/Jacksonville
LEE, PETER K., M.D., Ch.B., (Moukden Med. Col.)
Research Professor Emeritus/Gainesville
NAGEL, EUGENE L., M.D., (Washington University)
Clinical Professor/Winter Haven
RACKSTEIN, ANDREW D., M.D., (Chicago Med. Sch.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Clearwater
RILEY, JOSEPH L., M.D., (Loma Linda University)
Clinical Instructor/Orlando


SEAGER, ORIN


A., M.D., (Univ. of Pennsylvania)


Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
STONE, DENNIS R., M.D., (Univ. of Miami)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEPljacksonville


TETLOW, ALAN G., M.D., (Univ. of Manchester)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
TUAZON, JAIME G., M.D., (Univ. of Santo Thomas)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
VOGELHUT, MARK, M., M.D., (Univ. of North Carolina)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Tallahassee


BIOCHEMISTRY AND
MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

* ALLEN, JR., CHARLES M., Ph.D., (Brandeis University)
Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
* BOYCE, RICHARD P., Ph.D., (Yale University)
Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
* CHUN, PAUL W., Ph.D., (University of Missouri)
Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology


* COHEN, ROBERT


Ph.D., (Yale University)


Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
* DUNN, BEN M., Ph.D., (University of California)
Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
* FRIED, MELVIN, Ph.D., (Yale University)
Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
KILBERG, MICHAEL S., Ph.D., (Univ. of South Dakota)
Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
KOROLY, MARY J., Ph.D., (Bryn Mawr College)
Visiting Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and
Molecular Biology


* LAIPIS, PHILIP


Ph.D., (Stanford University)


Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology


* MANS, RUSTY


Ph.D., (University of Florida)


Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
* McGUIRE, PETER, M., Ph.D., (Univ. of South Carolina)
Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
* O'BRIEN, THOMAS, W., Ph.D., (Marquette University)
Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
* REMSEN, JOYCE F., Ph.D., (Rutgers State University)
Assistant Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
* ROBERTS, R. MICHAEL, Ph.D. (Oxford University)
Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology


* STEIN, GARY


S., Ph.D., (University of Vermont


Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
* STEVENS, R. ANN, Ph.D., (University of Colorado)
Associate Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular
Biology/VAMC









* YOUNG, D. MICHAEL, M.D., (Duke University)
Professor and Chairman of Biochemistry and Molecular
Biology and Professor of Medicine


COMMUNITY HEALTH AND


FAMILY MEDICINE


GADOW, SALLY A., Ph.D., (University of Texas
Visiting Assistant Professor,
Division of Social Sciences and Humanities and
Visiting Assistant Professor of Philosophy in
Liberal Arts and Sciences
GRAUER, KENNETH A., M.D., (SUNY-Upstate)
Assistant Professor, Division of Family Practice


ALLENDE, NICHOLAS, M.D., (University of Chile)
Instructor/JHEP
* ARIET, MARIO, Ph.D., (University of Florida)
Professor and Chief, Division of Computer Sciences and
Professor of Medicine
BEACH, THOMAS B., M.D., (University of Wisconsin)
Assistant Professor and
Acting JHEP Department ChairmanlJHEP
BOYSEN, BETTE F., M.D., (Loyola University)
Assistant Professor and


Assistant Professor/Student Health


Services


CARSON, RONALD A., Ph.D., (University of Glasgow)
Associate Professor and Chief, Division of Social Sciences
and Humanities, and Associate Professor of Religion in
Liberal Arts and Sciences
CARANASOS, GEORGE J., M.D. (Johns Hopkins)
Professor and Professor of Medicine
COLLANTE, ERLINDA Y., M.D., (Far East University)
Instructor and Instructor/Student Health Service
CRANDALL, LEE A., Ph.D., (Purdue University)
Assistant Professor,
Division of Social Sciences and Humanities and
Assistant Professor of Sociology in
Liberal Arts and Sciences
CURRY, ROBERT W., JR., M.D., (Duke University)
Assistant Professor and Inpatient Service and
Unit Director, Division of Family Practice


DALLMAN, JOHN


M.D., (Medical College of Georgia)


Assistant Professor and Assistant Director,
Division of Family Practice


GREEN,


RUSSELL, JR., M.D., (University of Virginia)


Professor and Professor of Medicine
HARRIS, TOM V., M.B.A., (University of Florida)
Instructor and Assistant to the Dean,
College of Medicine
JERNIGAN, JAMES A., M.D., (Washington University)
Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Medicine
* KILPATRICK, KERRY E., Ph.D., (University of Michigan)
Professor, and
Professor of Industrial Systems Engineering,
and Professor and Director of Health Systems Research
Division, Health and Hospital Administration
KNIGHT, JOHN C., P.A.-C., (Florida International Univ.)
Physician Assistant in Division of Rural Health
KONOPA, JAMES E., B.S., P.A.-C., (Emory University)
Physician Assistant and Associate Director,
Physician Assistant Program
KOSCH, SHARON G., Ph.D., (University of Florida)
Assistant Professor and
Assistant Professor in Liberal Arts and Sciences
LASSITER, WILLIAM B., M.D., (University of Florida)
Instructor and Assistant Unit Director,
Division of Family Practice
LEWIS, DAVID E., Ed.D., (Duke University)
Associate Professor and Director,
Physician Assistant Program
MARCH, ALLAN W., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Assistant Professor and Acting Chief, Division of
Rural Health, and Assistant Professor of


Orthopaedics and Environmental Engineering


Sciences


P.A-C., (Duke University)


Physician Assistant in Division of Family Practice
DEAL, WILLIAM B., M.D., (University of North Carolina)
Dean College of Medicine and Associate
Vice President for Clinical Affairs;
Professor and Professor of Medicine


EASTON, IAN


MASE, DARREL J., Ph.D., (Columbia University)
Professor and
Professor and Dean Emeritus/Health Related Professions
MCKEE, JEAN M., P.A.-C., (University of Florida)
Physician Assistant in Student Health Services


S., Ph.D., (University of Florida)


Assistant Professor and
Director/Outpatient Physician's Group


DAVIS, JOHN









MOODY, LINDA E., Ph.D., (University of Florida)
Associate Professor and
Assistant Professor of Extension Home Economics in
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences
ORLANDO, JACQUELINE, Ph.D., (University of Florida)
Assistant Research Scientist, Division of Family Practice
OSTERBIND, CARTER C., Ph.D., (American University)
Professor and
Professor of Gerontology in Liberal Arts and Sciences
PETERSON, SANDRA, M., M.S.S.S., (Boston University)
Assistant Research Scientist, Div. of Family Practice
PROBERT, WALTER, J., S.D., (Yale University)
Professor and Professor of Law
REXROAT, GARY E., P.A.-C., (Duke University)
Physician Assistant in Division of Rural Health
ROBINSON, JAMES D., PHARM. D., (Univ. of Cincinnati)
Assistant Professor and
Assistant Professor of Pharmacy
ROSS, STEPHAN L., P.A.-C., (University of Florida)
Physician Assistant in Division of Rural Health
* SAVITT, TODD L., Ph.D., (University of Virginia)
Assistant Professor, Div. of Social Sciences and
Humanities, and Assistant Professor of History in
Liberal Arts and Sciences
SCHULKIND, MARTIN L., M.D., (Chicago Med. School)
Associate Professor, Division of Rural Health
Associate Professor of Pediatrics
SILVERSTEIN, JANET L., M.D., (Univ. of Pennsylvania)
Assistant Professor, Division of Family Practice
Assistant Professor of Pediatrics
* STEIN, GERALD H., M.D., (Univ. of Pennsylvania)
Assistant Professor and
Assistant Professor of Medicine/VAMC
STEWART, WILLIAM L., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Professor and Chairman
STREIB, GORDON F., Ph.D., (Columbia University)
Professor and


Professor of Sociology in Liberal Arts and


STROHMAN, BARRY R., P.A.-C.,


Sciences


(University of Florida)


Physician Assistant in Physician Assistant Program
WAGNER, PATRICIA A., Ph.D., (University of Wisconsin)
Assistant Professor and
Assistant Professor of Extension Home
Economics/Institute


of Food and Agricultural


Sciences


WICKENDEN, THOMAS C., M.D.,
(Columbia College of Physician and Surgeons)
Assistant Professor, Division of Rural Health
WILKES, RICHARD, M.D., (Northwestern University)
Physician Assistant in Physician Assistant Program and
Physician Assistant in Medicine
WILLIS JOHN, P.A.-C., (University of Florida)
Physician Assistant in Division of Rural Health


Volunteer Faculty
ALFORD, SAMUEL J., M.D., (Loma Linda University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
ASHLEY, ROBERT G., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
BARTLEY, ROGERS L., M.D., (University of Miami)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
BAZ, RICHARD, M.D., (American University of Beirut)
Clinical Assistant Professor/VAMC/Gainesville
BIGGERSTAFF, JAMES T., M.D., (Louisiana State Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
BODDICKER, RONALD FRANCIS, M.D., (Purdue Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
BURKE, CHARLES H., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
BUTLER, NEIL A., M.N., (University of Florida)
Clinical Associate inlVAMC/Psychiatry
COOPER, GARY R., M.D., (Tulane University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
DRAPER, ARTHUR D., JR., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
FRIEDLINE, PAUL N., M.D., (Temple University)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
GLENN, JOHNNY R., M.D., (Medical College of Georgia)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
HARDMAN, AL, M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
HAUPT, RONALD A., M.D.. (Loma Linda University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
HOGUE, ROBERT J., JR., M.D., (Univ. of Oklahoma)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
HOWARD, JOSEPH, M.D., (Kansas Univ. School of Med.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Pensacola
HUTCHINS, OSIE M., R.N.,
(St. Luke's Hospital School of Nursing)
Clinical Assistant Instructor/Advent Christian Village









KANE, ANDREW J., M.D., (SUNY-Buffalo)
Clinical Assistant ProfessorlJHEP/Jacksonville
LAWTON, H. ALFRED, M.D.,
(Northwestern University of Chicago)
Clinical Professor/VA-Bay Pines, Florida
LEVY, NORMAN S., M.D., (University of Chicago)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Lake City, Florida
MALONE, JOHN M., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant ProfessorlGainesville
MANSON, A. MACKENZIE, M.D., (Tulane University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MEDLEY, EVAN SCOTT, M.D., (University of Kentucky)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
MCCLOW, MARVIN V., M.D., (University of Iowa)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MCGIBONY, JAMES T., M.D. (Emory University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MCLAMB, JAMES N., M.D., (Univ. of North Carolina)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
PALMER, GEORGE SAXON, M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Tallahassee
PICHLER, FLOYD L., M.D., (Loma Linda University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
RAY, CRAIG, M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
SELANDER, GUY T., M.D., (New Jersey Medical School)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
SESSIONS, WILLIAM H., M.D., (Med. Col. of Georgia)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
TAYLOR, PAUL E., M.D., (Baylor College of Medicine)
Clinical Instructor/JHEPlJacksonville
WALKER, HARRY L., M.D., (Temple University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
WHITE, DAVID C., Ph.D., M.D., (Tufts University)
Clinical Professor/Tallahassee
YOUNG, THOMAS K., M.D.,
(Northwestern University Medical School)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville

Preceptors

ABEL, MARLING L., M.D., (Ohio State University)
Preceptor/Cocoa Beach
APPEN, RAYMOND C., M.D., (Duke University)
Preceptor/Cocoa Beach


ASHLEY, ROBERT G., M.D., (University of Florida)
Preceptor/Gainesville
AUCREMAN, CHARLES E., M.D., (Emory University)
Preceptor/St. Petersburg
BANKS, CULLEN W., M.D., (Howard University)
Preceptor/Gainesville
BEBER, CHARLES, M.D., (University of Nebraska)
Preceptor/Miami
BELK, WILLIAM W., M.D., (Medical College of Virginia)
Preceptor/Pensacola


BLACK, CURTIS


M.D., (University of Minnesota)


Preceptor/Dunedin
BRITT, EARL B., M.D., (SUNY-Downstate)
Preceptor/Tallahassee
BROOKS, HERBERT E., M.D., (University of Maryland)
Preceptor/Bonifay
CAMPBELL, RICHARD K., M.D., (Tulane University)
Preceptor/Miami
COHEN, MATTHEW M., M.D., (University of Miami)
Preceptor/Tallahassee
COLLETTE, JOHN, M.D., (Emory University)
Preceptor/Crescent City
COOKE, STANFORD B., M.D., (Hahnemann)
Preceptor/Miami
COVELLI, JOSEPH L., M.D., (SUNY-Downstate)
Preceptor/Maitland
DELLERSON, RICHARD, M.D., (University of Miami)
Preceptor/Hollywood
DERHAGOPIAN, R. P., M.D., (Tufts School of Medicine)
Preceptor/Miami


DESKY, MICHAEL,


S., M.D., (University of Miami)


Preceptor/Hollywood
EDMISTON, JAMES B., M.D., (University of Miami)
Preceptor/Miami
EDWARDS, HARRY, M.D., (Temple University)
Preceptor/Ocala
EISSMAN, ROBERT C., M.D., (Indiana University)
Preceptor/Lakeland
ERLICH, JEFF, M.D., (University of Miami)
Preceptor/Hollywood


ESCAMILLA, J. O., M.D., (Columbia Univ.,


So. America)


Preceptor/Brooksville
FLEISCHER, ANDY, M.D., (University of Miami)
Preceptor/Hollywood









GALL, JAMES, M.D., (McGill University, Canada)
Preceptor/Miami
GATIEN, LIONEL, D.O.,
(College of Osteopathic Medicine and Surgery)
Preceptor/Jacksonville
GREEN, JACOB, M.D., (University of Alabama)
Preceptor/Jacksonville
HANDWERKER, JOHN V., M.D., (Univ. of Tennessee)
Preceptor/Key Biscayne
HARDGRAVE, NEWT L., M.D., (Oklahoma University)
Preceptor/Clearwater


MCBATH, D. L., D.O., P.A.,
(Kansas City College of Osteopathy and Surgery)
Preceptor/Dade City
MCGANN, ALBERT, M.D., (Howard University)
Preceptor/Tampa
MCGREGOR, ALEXANDER, M.D.,
(University of St. Andrews, Scotland)
Preceptor/Gainesville
MILLER, ROBERT H., M.D., (University of Florida)
Preceptor/Jacksonville


MOLLOY, DAVID


M.D., (Yale University


HASLAM, ERNEST


, M.D., (University of Florida)


Preceptor/Virgin Islands


Preceptor/Panama City Beach


HOUSE, EDWIN K., M.D., (University of Miami)
Preceptor/Brooksville
HUX, ROBERT H., M.D., (Medical College of Georgia)
Preceptor/Leesburg
IKELER, GEORGE R., M.D., (University of Florida)
Preceptor/Clearwater
ISHLER, HAROLD LEROY, M.D., (Jefferson University)
Preceptor/Clearwater
JOHNSON, JAMES, M., M.D., (University of Miami)
Preceptor/West Palm Beach
JORDAN, BERTIS B., M.D., (University of Alabama)
Preceptor/Gulf Breeze
KATZ, NEIL, M.D., (Col. of Med. Montpellier, France)
Preceptor/Coral Springs
KIEHL, KENNETH C., M.D., (University of Miami)
Preceptor/Sarasota
KIMMELL, BERNARD, M.D., (University of Michigan)
Preceptor/West Palm Beach
LERNER, BARRY, M.D., (University of Rome, Italy)
Preceptor/West Palm Beach


LIPPMAN, NERVIN ROBERT, D.O.,
(Chicago College of Osteopathy)
Preceptor/Sarasota


MANDAL, SCOTT, M.D., (Georgetown University)
Preceptor/Melrose
MARTIN, ARTEMIO, M.D., (Manila Central University)
Preceptor/Williston


MATTERSON, BARRY
Preceptor/Miami


M.D., (University of Miami)


MOORE, LOUIS
Preceptor/Naples


S., M.D., (University of Zurich)


MORGAN, MICHAEL G., M.D., (University of Tennessee)
Preceptor/Lehigh Acres
MUMMERY, CHARLES RAY, M.D., (Temple University)
Preceptor/Miami
NEWMAN, BENJAMIN G., M.D., (Univ. of Cincinnati)
Preceptor/Altamonte Springs
NIKOLAUS, DONALD G., M.D., (Ohio State)
Preceptor/Dunedin
O'BRIEN, F. KEVIN, M.D., (Tulane University)
Preceptor/Riviera Beach
OLSEN, JULIAN O., JR., M.D., (Tulane University)
Preceptor/Gulf Breeze
ORR, LOUIS, M.D., (Emory University)
Preceptor/Gainesville
PADGETT, GLENN E., M.D., (George Washington Univ.)
Preceptor/West Palm Beach
PARR, PHILLIP L., M.D., (Vanderbilt University)
Preceptor/Gainesville
POLITO, JAMES I., M.D., (New York University)
Perceptor/Pompano Beach
POTTER, NELL W., M.D., (University of Florida)
Preceptor/Pensacola
PRATT, DANIEL W., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Preceptor/Tampa
REGALDO, MANUEL, M.D., (University of Havana)
Preceptor/Gainesville
ROBINSON, JERRY M., M.D., (Emory University)
Preceptor/Deltona


MAY, ROBERT D., M.D., (Temple University)
Preceptor/New Port Richey


SEIDEL, H. Y., M.D., (SUNY-Downstate)
Preceptor/Hollywood









SEWELL, JESSEE W., III, M.D., (Tulane University)
Preceptor/Marathon
SHEPPARD, JAMES C., M.D., (University of Alabama)
Preceptor/Ft. Walton Beach
SILBERMAN, HAROLD, M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Preceptor/Coral Gables
SMITH, LEONARD O., JR., M.D., (University of Florida)
Preceptor/Gainesville
SMOLEY, MELVIN, M.D., (University of Chicago)
Preceptor/Sunrise
SOURBEER, JOHN N., M.D., (Jefferson University)
Preceptor/Bellair Bluffs
SPRINGER, ROBERT, D.O.,
(Des Moines College of Osteopathic Medicine)
Preceptor/Jacksonville
SULLIVAN, JOHN E., M.D., (Creighton University)
Preceptor/Sarasota
SUSSMAN, HOWARD F., M.D., (University of Miami)
Preceptor/Miami
SYFRETT, T. FRANK, M.D., (University of Florida)
Preceptor/Panama City
TAWIL, ALBERT, M.D., (Jefferson University)
Preceptor/Tampa
TRUMP, RICHARD C., M.D., (Ohio State University)
Preceptor/Maderia Beach
VON THRON, JOSEPH C., M.D., (Ohio State University)
Preceptor/Cocoa Beach
WEBSTER, MARK, D.O.,
(Kirksville College of Osteopathic Surgery)
Preceptor/Orange City
WELLS, DONN A., M.D., (University of N.C.)
Preceptor/Ft. Lauderdale
WEST ORANGE FARMWORKERS HEALTH ASSOC.
Preceptor/Apopka
WHITE, ELGA B., M.D., (University of Miami)
Preceptor/Blountstown

MEDICINE

General Medicine and


Community Programs


ALLEN, DON L., D.D.S., (University of North Carolina)
Professor and Professor and Dean of Dentistry
BAST, ROBERT D., M.D., (University of Wisconsin)
Chief Resident and Instructor


CARANASOS, GEORGE
Professor and Chief


M.D., (Johns Hopkins)


CORMAN, LOURDES C., M.D.,
(Woman's Medical College of Pennsylvania)
Assistant Professor
CUNNINGHAM, RICHARD W., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor


FLETCHER, JUANITA, M.D.,


(Howard University)


Clinical Instructor/JHEP
GEFTER, MONICA L., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Instructor


GRISAITIS, WILLIAM
Clinical Instructor


M.D., (St. Louis University)


JERNIGAN, JAMES A., M.D., (Washington University)
Assistant Professor of Community Health and Family
Medicine and Assistant Professor of Medicine
MACMATH, TERRY, M.D., (SUNY-Upstate)
Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MARSTON, ROBERT Q., M.D., (Med. Col. of Virginia)
Professor and President of University
MCCARLEY, DEAN L., M.D., (Duke University)
Chief Resident and Instructor
* MCGUIGAN, JAMES E., M.D., (St. Louis University)
Professor and Chairman, Department of Medicine and
Professor of Immunology and Medical Microbiology
MORELAND, ALVIN F., D.V.M., (University of Georgia)
Professor and Professor of Comparative Medicine
PALMER, ROBERT C., M.D., (Tulane University)
Clinical Associate Professor/PEP/Pensacola
PETERS, WAYNE L., M.D., (University of Colorado)
Assistant Professor/JHEP/lacksonville
WEBB, CHARLES H., M.D., (Ohio State University)
Assistant Professor
YOUNG, MICHAEL D., M.D., (Duke University)
Professor and Chairman of Biochemistry and
Professor of Medicine


Volunteer Faculty
ANELLO, JOSEPH P., JR., M.D.,
(University of Padua, Italy)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
ANDERSON, RICHARD M., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
BRASHEAR, BILLY, M.D., (University of Louisville)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville









COLLINS, ROBERT D., M.D., (New York Medical College)
Clinical Associate Professor/PEP/Pensacola
CRAGO, JOHN A., M.D., (Cornell University)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
DAWKINS, WILBERT L., SR., M.D., (Meharry Med. Col.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
DOFF, SIMON D., M.D., (Long Island College of Medicine)
Clinical ProfessorlJHEP/Jacksonville
EBBINGHOUSE, JOE C., M.D., (Indiana University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
EMMEL, G. LEONARD, M.D., (Univ. of Pennsylvania)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
GILLESPIE, ROBERT R., JR., M.D., (Tulane University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
GROOVER, MARSHALL E., M.D., (University of Georgia)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
HALE, WILLIAM E., M.D., (Medical College of Virginia)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Dunedin
HARRISON, I. BARNETT, M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Tallahassee
LEE, HARRY G., M.D., (Cornell University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MENGEL, MARVIN C., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
MORROW, MATTHEW E., M.D., (Temple University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MONSOUR, FARIS S., JR., M.D., (Georgetown University)
Clinical Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
SLATON, ROBERT C., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
STRACHAN, JAMES B., M.D., (Washington University)
Clinical Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
WAINWRIGHT, W. RANDOLPH, M.D., (Med. Col. of Ga.)
I nstructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
WEBB, MICHAEL J., M.D., (University of Miami)
Clinical Instructor/Winter Park
WEIGEL WALTER W., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Instructor/Palatka
YOFFEE, HARRY F., M.D., (Tulane Medical School)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
YOUNG, MARTIN D., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Adjunct Research Professor/Gainesville


Cardiology
ARIET, MARIO, Ph.D., (University of Florida)
Professor and Chief, Computer Sciences and
Professor of Medicine and
Professor of Community Health and Family Medicine
BUSS, DARYL D., D.V.M., Ph.D., (Univ. of Wisconsin)
Associate Professor and
Associate Professor of Veterinary Medicine
CHRISTIE, LEONARD G., M.D., (Temple University)
Associate Professor
CONETTA, DONALD A., M.D., (Duke University)
Assistant Professor/JHEP
CONTI, C. RICHARD, M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Professor and Chief
CREVASSE, LAMAR E., JR., M.D., (Duke University)
Professor and Assistant Dean for Continuing Medical
Education
FELDMAN, ROBERT L., M.D., (Rutgers University)
Assistant Professor
GEISER, EDWARD A., M.D., (University of Cincinnati)
Assistant Professor
GREEN J. RUSSELL, M.D., (University of Virginia)
Professor and Professor of Community Health and
Family Medicine
LOMBARD, CHRISTOPHE, D.V.M., (Univ. of Zurich,)
Affiliate Assistant Professor
MEHTA, JAWAHAR, M.D., (Med. Col., Amristar, India)
Associate Professor
MILLER, ALAN B., M.D., (University of Florida)
Associate Professor/JHEP
* NICHOLS, WILMER W., Ph.D., (University of Alabama)
Associate Professor and Assistant Professor of Physiology


* PEPINE, CARL


M.D., (New Jersey College of Medicine)


Professor
SHORT, WILLIAM G. M.D., (West Virginia University)
Instructor/JHEP
TAYLOR, W. JAPE, M.D., (Harvard University)
Distinguished Service Professor and
Professor of Veterinary Medicine

Volunteer Faculty
ADAMS, LESLIE R., M.D., (University of Pennsylvania)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
ANDERSON, GEORGE A., M.D., (Bowman Gray)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville









ANDREWS, JOHN W., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
BAKER, ROY M., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
BANNON, PATRICK, M.D., (Georgetown University)
Clinical Instructor/JHEPl/Jacksonville
BARROW, MARK V., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
BIRCH, LARRY, M.D., (University of Michigan)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
BURNS, MARSHALL A., M.D., (Tulane University)
Clinical Associate Professorl/JHEP/Jacksonville
CHINOY, DAVID A., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
COOPER, GARY R., M.D., (Tulane University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
DACE, MELVIN C., M.D., (Washington University)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
DE LA TORRE, ANGEL, M.D., (University of Havana)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEPlJacksonville
DILLAHUNT, PAUL, M.D., (Ohio State University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
EL SHAHAWY, MAHROUZ, M.D.,
(Vienna Medical School)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Sarasota
FARIS, WILLIAM E., M.D., (Tulane University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
FLEMING, JACK W., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Associate ProfessorlPensacola
FULLER, EARL W., JR., M.D., (Medical College of Va.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
GILMOUR, KAY E., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
GUY, CLIFFORD R., M.D., (New Jersey Col. of Med.)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEPlJacksonville
HANSON, KARL B., M.D., (University of Chicago)
Clinical Professor/JHEPlJacksonville
HARTMANN, KAMILLO F., M.D., (Olomouc, Czech.)
Clinical Assistant Professorl/JHEPlJacksonville
IRA, GORDON H., JR., M.D., (Duke University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
JACOBS, DANIEL M., M.D., (Duke University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
KANTER, LAWRENCE J., M.D., (Case Western Reserve)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville


LOHRBAUER, LEIF A., M.D., (Duke University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MADISON, WILLIAM M., JR., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MCCALLISTER, ARCHIE, M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Associate Professor/Stuart
MCCULLAGH, JAMES M., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MCCULLAGH, WILLIAM H., JR., M.D., (Emory Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MCINTOSH, HENRY D., M.D., (University of Pa.)
Clinical Professor/Lakeland
MINER, JAMES A., M.D., (Indiana School of Medicine)
Clinical Assistant ProfessorlJHEP/Jacksonville
MONTGOMERY, JAMES A., M.D., (Tulane University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEPlJacksonville
MYERS, JAMES W., M.D., (Ohio State University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEPlJacksonville
OLLIFF, BENJAMIN C., M.D., (Med. Col. of Ga.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
PAGE, E. EUGENE, JR., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Clinical Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
PEELER, ROBERT G., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
PEKAAR, ROBERT L., M.D., (New Jersey Col. of Medicine)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEPlJacksonville
SAHAB, JOSEPH G., M.D., (French Faculty of Medicine)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Leesburg
SCHANG, STEVEN J., JR., M.D., (George Washington)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Pensacola
SCHNEIDER, IRVIN C., M.D., (Tulane University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEPlJacksonville
SCHONBERG, ALLAN, M.D., (George Washington Univ.)
Clinical Assistant ProfessorlJHEP/Jacksonville
SCHRANK, JOEL P., M.D., (Western Reserve)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
SILVERSTEIN, BURTON V., M.D., (Univ. of Pa.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
SNYDER, GARY J., M.D. (Rush Medical College)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
SOLER, RAUL D., M.D., (University of Havana)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEPlJacksonville
STORCH, HENRY D., M.D., (Tulane University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville










VAN CLEVE, ROBERT B., M.D., (Columbia University)
Clinical Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
WILLIAMS, J. CURTIS, JR., M.D., (Bowman Gray)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Pensacola


Clinical Immunology


BLUMBERG, SCOTT, M.D., (Boston University)
Assistant Professor/JHEP
CORMAN, LOURDES C., M.D.,
(Women's Medical College)
Assistant Professor
KATZ, PAUL, M.D., (Georgetown University)
Assistant Professor
LONGLEY, SELDEN, III, M.D., (Vanderbilt University)
Associate Professor
* PANUSH, RICHARD S., M.D., (University of Michigan)
Associate Professor and Chief and Associate Professor of
Immunology and Medical Microbiology
* STEIN, GERALD H., M.D., (University of Pennsylvania)
Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Community
Health and Family Medicine, Nursing and Psychology


Volunteer Faculty


CALDWELL, JACQUES R., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville
GARTEN, LEONARD, M.D., (Medical College of Georgia)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
KOHEN, MICHAEL D., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Daytona Beach
MASS, MYRON F., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
NEWMAN, MELVIN, M.D., (Boston University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
SALES, LOUIS M., M.D., (Boston University)
Clinical Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
STORCH, SIDNEY, M.D., (University of Brussels)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville


Dermatology


CHILDERS, RICHARD C., M.D., (University of Rochester)
Assistant Professor
CULLEN, STANLEY I., M.D., (University of Miami)
Associate Professor


Volunteer Faculty
SMITH, EDWARD W.P., M.D., (Ohio State University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
SOMPAYRAC, LAUREN M., M.D., (Univ. of Pa.)
Clinical Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
WILKERSON, RUTH C., M.D., (Med. Col. of Va.)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville


Endocrinology and Metabolism
* FISHER, WALDO R., M.D., Ph.D., (Univ. of Pennsylvania)
Professor
* FREUND, GERHARD, M.D., (Goethe University)
Professor and Professor of Neuroscience


MERIMEE, THOMAS
Professor and Chief


M.D., (University of Louisville)


MISBIN, ROBERT I., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Assistant Professor
MURRAY, FREDERICK T., M.D., (Hahnemann Med. Col.)
Assistant Professor
ROQUE, JUAN L., M.D., (University of Seville)
Associate Professor/JHEP
STACPOOLE, PETER W., M.D., Ph.D., (Vanderbilt)
Assistant Professor
THOMAS, WILLIAM C., JR., M.D., (Cornell University)
Professor, Associate Chief of Staff for ResearchlVAMC


Volunteer Faculty
BUCHER, ROBERT L., M.D., (University of Minnesota)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
COBLE, YANK D., JR., M.D., (Duke University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
KNIZLEY, HOMER, JR., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville
LONDONO, JAVIER H., M.D., (University of Antioquia)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville


LOWENTHAL, JOSEPH


M.D., (Univ. of Pennsylvania)


Clinical Professorl/JHEP/Jacksonville
MILLER, ROBERT, M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MONTGOMERY, CHARLES T., M.D., (Univ. of Miami)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
PUESTOW, ERIC CHARLES, M.D., (Univ. of Wisconsin)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville










OATES, THOMAS, W., M.D., (Ohio State University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Lakeland
SCHWALBE, FRANK C., JR., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville


MORRIS, WALTER E., JR., M.D., (Med. Col. of Alabama)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
TEK, HONG TAING, M.D., (University of Phnom-Penh)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
WIDNER, VICTOR R., M.D., (Kansas Univ. Sch. of Med.]
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville


Gastroenterology


BAIG, M. MANSOOR, Ph.D.,
Assistant Research Scientist


* CERDA, JAMES


(SUNY-Buffalo)


M.D., (University of Maryland)


Hematology
KEITT, ALAN


S., M.D., (Harvard University)


Professor and Associate Chairman
GOLDBERG, LAWRENCE S., M.D., (New York University)
Assistant Professor/JHEP
HARTY, RICHARD F., M.D., (Georgetown University)
Assistant Professor
KING, CHARLES E., JR., M.D., (Bowman Gray)
Assistant Professor
KOLTS, BYRON E., M.D., (University of Rochester)
Associate Professor
MATHIAS, JOHN R., M.D., (Temple University)
Associate Professor
* MCGUIGAN, JAMES E., M.D., (St. Louis University)
Professor and Chairman and Professor of Immunology
and Medical Microbiology
* TOSKES, PHILLIP P., M.D., (University of Maryland)
Professor and Chief


Volunteer Faculty


BORLAND, JAMES L., JR., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Clinical Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
BUELOW, ROBERT G., M.D., (Temple University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/lJHEP/Jacksonville
DEFORD, JAMES W., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
GROOVER, JACK R., M.D., (University of Maryland)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
HANCOCK, W. ROY, M.D., (Medical College of Georgia)
Clinical Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville


KANNER, ROBERT


S., M.D., (Creighton University)


Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
KRAMER, DEAN C., M.D., (University of Missouri)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
LEIBACH, JOHN R., M.D., (Ohio State University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville


Associate Professor and
Associate Professor of Pathology


KITCHENS, CRAIG


S., M.D., (University of Florida)


Associate Professor and Associate Professor of Pathology
NOYES, WARD D., M.D., (University of Rochester)
Professor and Chief
STREIFF, RICHARD R., M.D., (University of Basel)
Professor and Chief of Medical Services/VAMC


WHITTINGTON, RICHARD M., M.D.,
Professor and Chief of Staff/VAMC


(Jefferson)


Volunteer Faculty
ABRAMSON, NEIL, M.D., (Albert Einstein)
Clinical Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
KEENE, WILLIS R., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Clinical Professor/Folkston, Georgia
MARKS, ALAN R., M.D., (University of Brussels, Belgium)
I nstructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MOOMAW, DAVID R., M.D., (Northwestern University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEPljacksonville
PAWLIGER, DAVID F., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
SHER, HARVEY B., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville


TROTTER, GEORGE


S., M.D., (University of Maryland)


Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville


Infectious Diseases
DEAL, WILLIAM B., M.D., (Univ. of North Carolina)
Dean College of Medicine and Associate
Vice President for Clinical Affairs;
Professor and Professor of Medicine
FOSTER, MALCOLM T., M.D., (Bowman Gray)
Professor and Chairman of Medicine/JHEP










MANSHEIM, BERNARD


M.D., (Univ. of Wisconsin)


Assistant Professor


TISHER, C. CRAIG, M.D., (Washington University)
Professor and Chief


MARSTON, ROBERT Q., M.D., (Med. Col. of Va.)
Professor and President of University
MICHAEL, MAX, JR., M.D., (Harvard University)
Professor and Assistant Vice President for Health
Affairs/JHEP
RAMPHAL, REUBEN, M.D., (McGill University)
Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Immunology
and Medical Microbiology
* RAND, KENNETH H., M.D., (Stanford University)
Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Immunology
and Medical Microbiology
* SHANDS, JOSEPH W., JR., M.D., (Duke University]
Professor and Chief and Professor of Immunology and
Medical Microbiology


WINGO, CHARLES
Assistant Professor


S., M.D., (Louisiana State)


Volunteer Faculty
GREGORY, LOUIS F., JR., M.D., (Univ. of Mississippi)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
HAYES, CHARLES P., JR., M.D., (Duke University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MORFORD, DONALD W., M.D., (University of Kentucky)
Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
TARRANT, DARRELL G., M.D., (University of Kentucky)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville


VAZ,


ANTHONY


J., M.D., (Stanley Medical College, India)


Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville


Volunteer Faculty


JURGENSEN, PAUL F., M.D., (St. Louis University)
Clinical Associate Professor/Savannah, Georgia
MAUCERI, ARTHUR A., M.D., (Georgetown University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
SEIGER, BARRY E., M.D., (Boston University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
THOBURN, ROBERT, M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
VANDEVELDE, ALEXANDER G., M.D.,
(Univ. of Louvain)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville


Nephrology


Oncology


ELFENBEIN, GERALD
Associate Professor


KRAMER, BARNETT


M.D., (Johns Hopkins)


S., M.D., (University of Maryland)


Assistant Professor
OBLON, DAVID J., M.D., (University of Pennsylvania)
Assistant Professor
ROSS, WARREN E., M.D., (University of Florida)
Assistant Professor


* WEINER, ROY


S., M.D., (SUNY-Downstate)


Associate Professor and Chief, and Associate Professor of
Immunology and Medical Microbiology


Volunteer Faculty


* CADE, J.
Professor


ROBERT, M.D., (University of Texas)


MADSEN, KIRSTEN, M., M.D., (Aarhus, Denmark)
Assistant Professor


MAHONEY, JAMES
Assistant Professor


CUSUMANO, CHARLES L., M.D., (Georgetown Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville
STECHMILLER, BRUCE K., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville


JR., M.D., (University of Florida)


MARBURY, THOMAS C., M.D., (University of Texas)
Assistant Professor
MARS, DONALD R., M.D., (University of Miami)
Assistant Professor
PETERSON, JOHN C., M.D., (University of Florida)
Assistant Professor


Pulmonary Medicine
* BLOCK, A. JAY, M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Professor and Chief, and Professor of Anesthesiology
BLOCK, EDWARD R., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Associate Professor









* BOYSEN, PHILIP G., M.D., (Loyola-Stritch)
Assistant Professor and
Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology
HARMAN, ELOISE M., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Associate Professor
* HARRIS, J. OCIE, M.D., (University of Mississippi)
Associate Professor


RYERSON, EUGENE G., M.D., (New
Assistant Professor


Jersey


Col. of Med.)


SHARPE, ISABELLA K., M.D., (Med. Col. of Pa.)
Assistant Professor/JHEP
* WYNNE, JAMES W., M.D., (Cornell University)
Associate Professor and Assistant Professor of
Anesthesiology
* ZAUNER, CHRISTIAN W., Ph.D., (Southern Ill. Univ.)
Professor and Professor of Physical Education


Volunteer Faculty


ARMSTRONG, ALLAN L., M.D., (University of Virginia)
Clinical Instructor/Tampa


AUERBACH, DAVID, M.D.,


(University of Florida)


Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
COLEY, P. ANDREW, JR., M.D., (University of Miami)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
EYE, E. HOWARD, JR., M.D., (West Virginia University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
GREENBERG, ROBERT A., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
HENDERSON, FRANK W., M.D., (Jefferson Med. Col.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Lake City
JACKLER, IRA M., M.D., (University of Oklahoma)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MOOREHEAD, JOHN M., M.D., (Medical College of Ohio)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
NEDER, GEORGE A., JR., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Instructor/Orlando
REID, RICHARD A., M.D., (Indiana University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville



IMMUNOLOGY AND
MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY
* BERNS, KENNETH I., M.D., Ph.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Professor and Chairman


* BOYLE, MICHAEL D. P., M.D., (Chester Beatty Res. Inst.)
Associate Professor
* CRANDALL, RICHARD B., Ph.D., (Purdue University)
Professor
* DUCKWORTH, DONNA H., Ph.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Associate Professor


* FLANEGAN, JAMES B., Ph.D.,
Assistant Professor


(University of Michigan)


* GIFFORD, GEORGE E., Ph.D., (University of Minnesota)
Professor
* HAUSWIRTH, WILLIAM W., Ph.D., (Oregon State Univ.)
Associate Professor
* HOLLOMAN, WILLIAM K., Ph.D., (Univ. of California)
Assistant Professor
* MUZYCZKA, NICHOLAS, Ph.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Assistant Professor


* SIDEN, EDWARD
Assistant Professor


Ph.D., (University of California)


* SMALL, PARKER A., JR., M.D., (Univ. of Cincinnati)
Professor
* STEIN, JANET L., Ph.D., (Princeton University)
Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Biochemistry
and Molecular Biology


NEUROLOGY
ANDRIOLA, MARY R., M.D., (Duke University)
Associate Professor
BOWERS, DAWN, Ph.D., (University of Florida)
Assistant Professor


BUDA, FRANCIS J., M.D.,


(New Jersey College of Medicine)


Assistant Professor/JHEP
GONZALEZ-ROTHI, LESLIE, Ph.D., (University of Florida)
Assistant Research Scientist
GREER, MELVIN, M.D., (New York University)
Professor and Chairman
* HEILMAN, KENNETH M., M.D., (University of Virginia)
Professor
MUSELLA, LILLI, Ph.D., (McGill University)
Assistant Professor
RUSSO, LOUIS, M.D., (New York University)
Assistant Professor/JHEP Chairman
SPEEDIE, LYNN, Ph.D., (University of Texas)
Adjunct Postdoctoral Associate









VALENSTEIN, EDWARD, M.D., (Albert Einstein)
Associate Professor
WATSON, ROBERT T., M.D., (University of Florida)
Professor
* WILDER, BUNA JOE, M.D., (Duke University)
Professor
* WILLMORE, LUTHER JAMES, M.D., (St. Louis University)
Associate Professor


Volunteer Faculty


ANDRIOLA, MICHAEL J., M.D.,


(Duke University


Clinical Assistant Professor/Clearwater
BERCAW, BEAUREGARD L., M.D., (Univ. of Va.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Clearwater
CUNNINGHAM, RICHARD W., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
FEUSSNER, GEORGE G., M.D., (Univ. of Pittsburgh)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
FISCHER, NORMA P., (University of Florida)
Joint Associate Professor/Gainesville
GIPSON, AMOS C., M.D., (Vanderbilt University)
Clinical Instructor/Tampa
GREEN, JACOB, M.D., (University of Alabama)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
HARRISON, THOMAS H., M.D., (Duke University)
Clinical Instructor/Tampa
HAYCOOK, WILLIAM M., M.D., (University of Virginia)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
HUDGINS, ROBERT, M.D., (Med. Col. of Virginia)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
KILGORE, MANLEY W., M.D., (U.C.L.A.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
KOHLER, WILLIAM C., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Tallahassee
LOPEZ, RAUL I., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Lakeland
MALZONE, WILLIAM F., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Lakeland
MILLER, BAYARD D., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Pensacola
MOUAT, WILLIAM D., M.D., (University of Pittsburgh)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
NEALIS, JAMES, M.D., (University of Miami)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville


POHLMAN, GLENN L., M.D., (University of Minnesota)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
QUICK, DONALD T., M.D., (Case Western Reserve)
Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville
RAY, WALTER F., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Ocala
ROBINSON, BRYAN W., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Associate Professor/Tallahassee
SCHWARTZ, HARVEY D., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Boca Raton
SHAW, DAVID L., M.D., (University of Arkansas)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Pensacola
SLADE, GEORGE F., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Tallahassee


THORNTON, ROBERT


S., M.D., (Emory University)


Clinical Assistant Professor/Pensacola
VROOM, FREDERICK Q., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Associate Professor/Tallahassee
WROE, MARTHA C., (Stanford University)
Joint Associate Professor/Gainesville


NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY
BREMER, ALFONSO M., M.D., (Univ. Nat'l. Autonoma)
Professor/JHEP
DAY, ARTHUR L., M.D., (Louisiana State University)
Assistant Professor
GARCIA-BENGOCHEA, FRANCISCO, M.D., (Tulane)
Distinguished Service Professor
MICKLE, J. PARKER, M.D., (Vanderbilt)
Associate Professor
RHOTON, ALBERT L., JR., M.D., (Washington University]
Professor and Chairman
* SYPERT, GEORGE W., M.D., (Univ. of Washington)
Associate Professor, Surgery
Chief Neurological Surgery/VAMC
Associate Professor, Neuroscience


Volunteer Faculty
BIRD, C. ASHLEY, M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville


BOGGS, JOHN


S., M.D., (University of Michigan)


Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville









CAUTHEN, JOSEPH C., M.D., (Duke University)
Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville
FREEMAN, JAMES V., M.D., (University of Tennessee)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
HUDSON, CALVIN H., M.D., (University of Tennessee)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
MAULDIN, RONALD L., M.D., (University of N.C.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville


ZEAL, ARNOLD


A., M.D., (University of Manitoba]


Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville


* VAN HARTESVELDT, CAROL


Ph.D.,


(University of Rochester)
Associate Professor of Neuroscience and
Associate Professor of Psychology


* VIERCK, CHARLES


JR., Ph.D., (Univ. of Florida)


Professor
* WALKER, DON W., Ph.D., (Texas Christian University)
Associate Professor Neuroscience/VAMC
* WILLMORE, LUTHER J., M.D., (Saint Louis University)
Assistant Professor of Neuroscience and Neurology/VAMC
* ZORNETZER, STEVEN F., Ph.D., (Univ. of Calif., Irvine)
Associate Professor


NEUROSCIENCE


* BROWNELL, WILLIAM E., Ph.D., (University of Chicago)
Assistant Professor
CHILDERS, STEVEN R., Ph.D., (University of Wisconsin)
Assistant Professor of Neuroscience and Pharmacology
* DUNN ADRIAN J., Ph.D., (University of Cambridge)
Associate Professor
* FREUND, GERHARD, M.D., (J. W. Goethe University)
Professor of Neuroscience and Medicine
GFELLER, EDUARD, M.D., (University of Bern)
Professor of Neuroscience and Psychiatry
GOULD, WILLIAM R., Ph.D., (University of Florida)
Associate Professor of Neuroscience and Chairman,
Department of Physical Therapy
* HEATON, MARIETA B., Ph.D., (N.C. State University)
Associate Professor
* KING, ROBERT L., Ph.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Associate Professor
* LEONARD, CHRISTIANA M., Ph.D., (M.I.T.)
Associate Professor
* LUTTGE, WILLIAM G., Ph.D., (Univ. of Calif., Irvine)
Associate Professor and Acting Chairman
* MAHAN, PARKER E., D.D.S., Ph.D.,
(Emory, University; University of Rochester)
Professor of Neuroscience and Professor and Chairman,


OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY


ABRAMS, ROBERT M.,


Ph.D., D.D.S., (Univ. of Pa.)


Associate Professor
BARRON, DONALD H., Ph.D., (Yale University)
Professor
BRACKBILL, YVONNE, Ph.D., (Stanford)
Professor
BRENNOCK, WILLIAM E., M.D.,
(University of Nebraska; University of South Dakota)
Assistant Professor
CATON, DONALD, M.D., (Columbia University)
Associate Professor and
Associate Professor of Anesthesiology
CRUZ, AMELIA C., M.D., (Far Eastern University)
Associate Professor
DALY, JAMES W., M.D., (Loyola University)
Professor
DEVANE, GARY W., M.D., (Baylor College of Medicine)
Assistant Professor
DOCKERY, J. LEE, M.D., (University of Arkansas)
Professor and Associate Dean
FERRELL, ROGER ERNEST, M.D., (University of Florida)
Assistant Professor/JHEP


Department of Basic Dental


Sciences


FRIEDRICH, EDUARD


G., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)


* MUNSON, JOHN B., Ph.D., (University of Rochester)
Associate Profesor
* SYPERT, GEORGE W., M.D., (University of Washington)
Associate Professor of Neuroscience and Neurosurgery
* THOMPSON, FLOYD J., Ph.D., (Indiana University)
Assistant Professor of Neuroscience and


Professor and Chairman
GIBBS, CHARLES P., M.D., (Indiana University)
Associate Professor
HILL, HUGH M., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)


Prof. and


Assoc.


KALRA, PUSHPA


Dean for Student and Alumni Affairs
4 S., Ph.D., (University of Delhi, India)


Assistant Professor of Veterinary Medicine


Associate Professor








* KALRA, SATYA P., Ph.D., (University of Delhi, India)
Associate Professor
KELLNER, KENNETH R., M.D., Ph.D., (SUNY-Downstate)
Assistant Professor


MAHAN, CHARLES
Professor


S., M.D., (Northwestern University)


MONIF, GILLES R., G., M.D., (Boston University)
Associate Professor
NOTELOVITZ, MORRIS, M.D., Ph.D., (University of
Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa)
Associate Professor
NUSS, ROBERT C., M.D., (Thomas Jefferson)
Associate Professor/JHEP
QUINLAN, RAYMOND W., M.D., (Hahnemann Med. Col.)
Instructor
RIGGALL, FRANK C., M.D., (Univ. of West Virginia)
Assistant Professor
THOMPSON, ROBERT J., M.D., (Wayne State University)
Associate Professor and JHEP Chairman


VON MERING, OTTO, Ph.D., (Harvard
Professor


WILKINSON, EDWARD, M.D., (Med. Col. of Wis.)
Professor and Professor of Pathology



Volunteer Faculty
ALLGOOD, JACKSON L., JR., M.D., (University of Miami)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
BANCROFT, JOE W., JR., M.D., (University of Miami)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEPl/Jacksonville
BEADLING, LESLIE W., M.D., (Temple University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEPlJacksonville
CARSON, DORIS N., M.D., (Ohio State University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
CHISHOLM, GEORGE W., M.D., (Med. Univ. of S. C.)
Clinical Instructor/Orlando
FRIEDLAND, DAVID P., M.D., (Temple University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
GILLILAND, CHARLES H., M.D., (University of Iowa)
Clinical Professor/Gainesville
GLENN, J. EUGENE, M.D., (Univ. of North Carolina)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
HAGEL, DONALD R., M.D., (University of Nebraska)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEPlJacksonville


HALL, DOUGLAS C., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Instructor/Ocala
HARDMAN, ALVIN A., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
HARRELL, JAMES E., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Associate Professor/Stuart
HAYES, JAMES FRANKLIN, JR., M.D., (Univ. of Tenn.)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
JONES, JAMES R., JR., M.D., (University of Georgia)
Clinical Associate Professor/Orlando
KIRBY, TAYLOR H., JR., M.D., (George Washington Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville
MAYER, GEORGE L., M.D., (University of Arkansas)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MCDOWELL, RICHARD W., M.D., (Univ. of Pennsylvania)
Clinical Professor/JHEPlJacksonville
MCNEILL, H. WYATT, M.D., (University of Miami)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MEIN, ROBERT M., M.D., (University of Louisville)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MESSER, H. HUTSON, M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Associate Professor/Tallahassee
MOFFETT, ALFRED A., M.D., (University of Miami)
Clinical Associate Professor/Leesburg
MOJADIDI, QUDRATULLAH, M.D., (Kabul University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MULLEE, ROBERT G., M.D., (SUNY-Downstate)
Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville
OBERDORFER, PAUL W., M.D., (Tulane University)
Clinical Assistant Professorl/JHEP/Jacksonville
PHELAN, WILLIAM J., M.D., (Georgetown University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
PHILLIPS, CURTIS M., M.D., (Medical College of Georgia)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville


PLATOCK,


GERALD


M., M.D.,


(Medical


College


Georgia)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
ROSIN, ALEXANDER P., M.D., (Tulane University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
RUST, WILBUR C., M.D., (Albany Medical College)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
SCHOENFELD, ORENE, M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville
SIMPSON, WILBUR CANNON, M.D., (Med. Univ. of S. C.)
Clincial Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville









STEIN, DANIEL S., M.D., (Wayne State)
Clinical Associate Professor/St. Petersburg
SUMMERLIN, WINSTON, L., M.D., (Univ. of Maryland)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
SUTER, MAX, M.D., (Tulane University)
Clinical Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
YOUNG, THOMAS K., M.D., (Northwestern University)
Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville



OPHTHALMOLOGY


CASSIN, BARBARA C., B.S.,


(Simmons College)


Assistant Ophthalmologist
CYRLIN, MARSHALL N., M.D., (Washington Univ.)
Assistant Professor
* DAWSON, WILLIAM W., Ph.D., (Florida State Univ.)
Professor


ROMANO, PAUL E., M.D.,
Professor


(Cornell University)


RUBIN, MELVIN L., M.D., (Univ. of California)
Professor and Chairman
STEPHENSON, GARY, M.D., (Washington University)
Assistant Professor and JHEP Chairman/JHEP
STERN, GEORGE A., M.D., (Univ. of California, L.A.)
Assistant Professor
STRATTON, ROBERT D., M.D., (Univ. of N.C.)
Assistant Professor
TROBE, JONATHAN D., M.D., (Harvard University)
Associate Professor


Volunteer Faculty


AINSWORTH, WILLIAM N., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
BELYEU, JESSE H., M.D., (Tulane University)
Clinical Assistant ProfessorlJHEP/Jacksonville
BLOOM, JEFFREY N., M.D., (NYU School of Medicine)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
CLOWER, JAMES W., M.D., (University of Georgia)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Daytona Beach
COBB, WILLIAM T., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/St. Petersburg
DRYFUSS, JOHN A., M.D., (NY Med. College)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville


DUKES, EARLE T., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Lakeland
GILBERT, WALTER R., M.D., (Duke University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
GLOTFELTY, JOHN, M.D., (University of Louisville)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Lakeland
HALE, N. PATRICK, M.D., (Univ. of Arkansas)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
HAZOURI GERALD C., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
HERRON, WARREN, M.D., (University of Tennessee)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Pensacola
HOUSTON, WILLIAM H., M.D., (University of Georgia)
Clinical ProfessorlJHEP/Jacksonville
LESTER, ROBERT H., M.D., (Medical College of Georgia)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MAGRUDER, GEORGE B., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
MARSHALL, WALTER H., JR., M.D., (Univ. of Fla.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
NICOLITZ, ERNST, M.D., (University of New Mexico)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville/Gainesville
PINKOSON, CHARLES, M.D., (Tulane University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
ROBBINS, JAMES E., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
ROSE, HOWARD N., M.D., (Chicago Medical School)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
SCHNAUSS, ROY H., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
SIMMONS, RICHARD L., M.D., (Indiana University)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
SMITH, DONALD L., M.D., (Jefferson Medical College)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Ocala
STAMAN, JAMES A., M.D., (Temple University)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
TRICK, GARY L., M.D., (Indiana University)
Adjunct Assistant Professor/Big Rapids, Mich.
WOLCHOK, EUGENE B., (SUNY-Buffalo)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville


ORTHOPAEDICS


BRIGHT, ROBERT W., M.D., (Medical College of Virginia)
Associate Professor









* BURCHARDT, HANS, Ph.D., (University of Florida)
Assistant Professor
CAMBLIN, JOHN G., M.D., (Queen's University of Belfast)
Assistant ProfessorlVAMC
DELL, PAUL C., M.D., (University of Florida)
Assistant Professor/VAMC
* ENNEKING, WILLIAM F., (University of Wisconsin)
Distinguished Service Professor
GLOWCZEWSKIE, FRANK P., AS/AA, (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant in Orthopaedics
HOROWITZ, MARSHALL, M.D., (University of Basel)
Assistant Professor and JHEP Chairman/JHEP
INDELICATO, PETER A., M.D., (N. Y. Medical College)
Assistant Professor/VAMC
MILLER, GARY J., Ph.D., (University of Florida)
Assistant Professor/Bioengineering
PETTY, R. WILLIAM, M.D., (University of Arkansas)
Associate Professor and Chairman


SPANIER, SUZANNE
Assistant Professor


SPRINGFIELD, DEMPSEY
Assistant Professor/VAMC


S., M.D., (University of Florida)


S., M.D.. (Univ. of Fla.)


GREEN, C. STANTON, M.D., (University of Miami)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
HOCKER, JOHN T., M.D., (University of Kansas)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
HOGSHEAD, HOWARD P., M.D., (University of Iowa)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
HUDSON, TERRY M., M.D., (Duke University)
Affiliate Assistant Professor/Gainesville


LACEY, JAMES


A., M.D., (Medical College of Georgia)


Clinical Instructor/Winter Park


LOVEJOY, JOHN F., JR., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical InstructorljHEPlJacksonville
MARCH, ALLAN W., M.D., (Johns Hopkins University
Joint Assistant Professor/Gainesville
MARSH, BURTON W., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Instructor/Ocala


MEAD, CHARLES


A., M.D., (George Washington Univ.)


Assistant Professor Emeritus/JHEP/Jacksonville
MOORE. THOMAS H., JR., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
MORSE, SEYMOUR, M.D., (Long Island Col. of Medicine)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville


TYLKOWSKI, CHESTER M., M.D., (University of Illinois]
Assistant Professor


Volunteer Faculty


BINSKI, JAMES C., M.D., (Stritch School of Medicine)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
BRADY, LOUIS P.. M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Winter Park
CLARKE, RUSSELL P., JR., M.D., (St. Louis University)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
CROFT, CARL L., M.D., (Duke University)
Clinical Instructor/Winter Park
DEDO, RICHARD G., M.D., (Northwestern University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
DYER, JAMES W., M.D., (Oklahoma University)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville


FIPP, GEORGE


M.D., (Indiana University)


Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
FRY, RICHARD M., M.D., (Temple University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
GILLESPY, THURMAN, JR., M.D., (Jefferson Medical Col.)
Clinical Instructor/Daytona Beach


NIXON, JOSEPH


M.D., (Medical College of Georgia)


Clinical Instructor/Winter Park


PARR, PHILLIP L., M.D., (Vanderbilt Medical School)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
PIOTROWSKI, GEORGE, Ph.D., (Case Western Reserve)
Affiliate Associate Professor/Gainesville
PUJADAS, GUILLERMO M., M.D., (Havana University)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
RIDDICK, MAX F., M.D., (University of Tennessee)
Clinical Instructor/Winter Park
SHAW, CHARLES H., M.D., (Wayne State University)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
SPIVEY, JAMES N., M.D., (Med. Col. of South Carolina)
Clinical Instructor/Winter Park
STANFORD, THOMAS A., M.D., (Loma Linda University)
Clinical Instructor/Winter Park
SWITZER, HUGH E., M.D., [University of Miami)
Clinical Instructor/JHEPlJacksonville
THOMPSON, JOHN Q., M.D., (Harvard Medical School)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEPlJacksonville
TODD, ETHAN O., JR., M.D., (Med. Col. of South Carolina)
Clinical Assistant ProfessorlJHEP/Jacksonville









VAUGHEN, JUSTINE L., M.D., (Temple University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
WALLACE, PAUL F., M.D., (University of Chicago)
Clinical Assistant Professor/St. Petersburg
WILLIAMS, JOHN W., JR., M.D., (University of Miami)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville


* PECK, AMMON B., Ph.D., (University of Wisconsin)
Assistant Professor
PIERSON, K KENDALL, M.D., (New York University)
Professor
RHATIGAN, RONALD M., M.D., (University of Iowa)
Clinical Professor and JHEP Chairman/Jacksonville


* SCORNIK, JUAN


C., M.D., (Univ. of La Plata, Argentina)


Associate Professor


PATHOLOGY


ALEXANDER, RONALD W., M.D., (Tulane University)
Professor
BALLINGER, WILLIAM E., M.D., (University of Florida)
Assistant Professor
* BAER, HERMAN, M.D., (University of Basel, Switzerland)
Associate Professor
* BRAYLAN, RAUL C., M.D., (Buenos Aires Medical School)
Professor
* CRANDALL, CATHERINE A., Ph.D., (Purdue University)
Associate Professor
* DONNELLY, WILLIAM H., M.D., (University of Ottawa)
Associate Professor and
Associate Professor of Pediatrics
* GRAMS, RALPH R., M.D., (University of Minnesota)
Professor
* HACKETT, RAYMOND L., M.D., (University of Vermont)
Professor
HOOD, C. IAN, Ch.B., (University of Liverpool)
Professor


KEITT, ALAN


S., M.D., (Harvard Medical School)


Associate Professor
KIMURA, ARTHUR K., Ph.D., (Univ. of Calif. L.A.)
Assistant Professor
* KLEIN, PAUL A., Ph.D., (University of Florida)
Associate Professor
KITCHENS, CRAIG, M.D., (University of Florida)
Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Medicine


* MAINO, VERNON


C., Ph.D., (University of Rochester


Assistant Professor
* MACLAREN, NOEL K., M.B., Ch.B., (University of Otago)
Professor
* MOSCOVICI, CAROL, Ph.D., (University of Rome)
Professor
* NORMAN, SIGURD J., M.D., Ph.D., (Univ. of Washington)
Professor


SMITH, ALBERT C., M.D., (Univ. of Hawaii)
Assistant Professor
* SMITH, RICHARD T., M.D., (Tulane University)
Professor and Chairman and
Professor in Pediatrics
* TEAGUE, PERRY O., Ph.D., (University of Oklahoma)
Associate Professor
WAKELAND, EDWARD K., Ph.D., (University of Hawaii)
Assistant Professor
WEBER, W. ROBERT, M.D., (University of Cincinnati)
Assistant Professor
WILKINSON, EDWARD J., M.D., (Marquette University)
Professor


* WOODARD, JAMES


C., D.V.M., Ph.D., (M.I.T.)


Associate Professor and
Associate Professor in College of Veterinary Medicine


Volunteer Faculty
BERNHARDT, HARVEY E., M.D., (Univ. of Louisville)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
BYERS, GEORGE E., M.D., (Temple University)
Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville
ECHEVARRIA, RENE, M.D., (University of Havana)
Clinical Associate Professor/St. Petersburg
HARDY, NED M., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
LIPKOVIC, PETER, M.D., (Univ. of Beograd, Yugoslavia)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MULLEN, SANFORD A., M.D., (Columbia University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
RYDEN, SALLY E., M.D., (Univ. of Michigan)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
SAFFOS, ROSILIE 0., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville









Endocrinology


General Pediatrics
CHEDID, PHILIPPE, M.D., (French Faculty of Med.)
Assistant ProfessorljHEP
DEBUSK, FRANKLIN L., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Professor and Chief
FAKHREDDINE, FUAD A., M.D., (Univ. of Bagdad)
Instructor/JHEP
GOUDARZI, TAJVAR, M.D., (Tehran Medical School)
Instructor/JHEP
HOYOS-ALONSO, SANTIAGO, M., M.D.,
(Univ. of Salamanco, Spain)
Assistant Professorl/JHEP
PARKHURST, ROBERT, M.D., (Univ. of Michigan)
Assistant Professor
PESEK, JOSEPH A., M.D., (University of Miami)
Assistant Professor/JHEP


SOLER, GLADYS P., M.D.,
Assistant ProfessorljHEP


(University of Havana)


SOUD, GARY G., M.D., (University of Barcelona)
Assistant Professor/JHEP
WEBER, F. THOMAS, M.D., (University of Cincinnati)
Associate Professor


Cardiology


BLANCHARD, WILLIAM B., M.D.,
Assistant Professor


KAPPY, MICHAEL, M.D., (Univ. of Wisconsin)
Associate Professor
ROSENBLOOM, ARLAN L., M.D., (Univ. of Wisconsin)
Professor and Chief
SILVERSTEIN, JANET, M.D., (University of Pennsylvania)
Assistant Professor
TOLAYMAT, ASAD, M.D., (Damascas School of Medicine)
Assistant Professor/JHEP


Gastroenterology
ANDRES, JOEL M., M.D., (SUNY-Buffalo)
Assistant Professor and Chief


Genetics
FRIAS, JAMIE L., M.D., (Univ. of Concepcion)
Professor and Chief
GARNICA, ADOLFO D., M.D., (University of California)
Associate Professor
KOHN, PETER, Ph.D., (Boston University)
Assistant Professor
MCREYNOLDS, JOHN, M.D., (University of Oklahoma)
Assistant Professor
WILLIAMS, CHARLES A., M.D., (University of Florida)
Instructor and Medical Director, Sunland Training Center


(Univ. of Virginia)


Hematology
GROSS, SAMUEL, M.D., (University of Rochester)
Professor and Chief


BAYNE, EDWARD J., M.D., (Medical College of Virginia)
Assistant ProfessorlJHEP
GESSNER, IRA H., M.D., (University of Vermont)
Professor and Chief
MELKER, RICHARD, M.D., (Albert Einstein Col. of Med.)
Assistant Professor
MILLER, ROBERT, M.D., (University of Florida)
Associate Professor/JHEP
SCHIEBLER, GEROLD L., M.D., Ph.D., (Harvard Univ.)
Professor and Chairman
VICTORICA, BENJAMIN E., M.D., (Univ. of Argentina)
Professor


MEHTA, PAULETTE


M.D., (University of Louvain)


Assistant Professor
STRANDJORD, SARAH E., M.D., (University of Illinois)
Assistant Professor


Immunology and Infectious Diseases
AYOUB, ELIA M., M.D., (American Univ. of Beirut)
Professor and Chief
BARRETT, DOUGLAS, M.D., (University of South Florida)
Assistant Professor
SCHULKIND, MARTIN L., M.D., (Chicago Med. Sch.)
Associate Professor


PEDIATRICS









Neonatology


Pulmonary


CHIU, THOMAS T. W., M.D., (Univ. of Hong Kong)
Assistant Professor/JHEP
DRUMMOND, WILLA H., M.D., (Univ. of Pennsylvania)
Assistant Professor
EITZMAN, DONALD V., M.D., (University of Iowa)
Professor and Chief
GARRISON, R. DONALD, M.D., (Univ. of North Carolina)
Assistant Professor/JHEP
HABERKERN, CHARLES M., M.D., (Columbia University)
Assistant Professor
KANTOR, NEIL M., D.O.,
(Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine)
Assistant Professor/JHEP
AMLESIC, IRENE E., M.D., (Hahnemann Medical College)
Assistant Professor
RESNICK, MICHAEL B., Ed.D., (University of Florida)
Assistant Professor
SETZER, EMMALEE, M.D., (University of Alabama)
Assistant Professor

Nephrology


FENNELL, ROBERT


S., III, M.D., (Univ. of Florida)


Associate Professor/Director of Pediatric Dialysis Unit
GARIN, EDUARDO H., M.D., (University of Chile)
Associate Professor
IRAVANI, ABDOLLAH, M.D., (Tehran University)
Assistant Professor
LEVIN, SIDNEY, M.D., (Baylor University)
Professor and Pediatric Chairman/JHEP
RICHARD, GEORGE A., M.D., (University of Pittsburgh)
Professor and Chief
WHITWORTH, JAY M. M.D., (Indiana University)
Associate Professor/JHEP

Neurology
ALEXANDER, ANN W., M.D., (Duke Medical School)
Visiting Assistant Professor


ROSS, JOHN J.,


M.D., (Harvard University)


Professor and Chief


Pediatric Research


VAN MIEROP, L.H.S., M.D., (St. Univ. of Leiden)
Graduate Research Professor and Chief


CHESROWN, SARAH, M.D., (Med. College of Virginia)
Assistant Professor
LOUGHLIN, GERALD M., M.D., (University of Rochester)
Assistant Professor
MANGOS, JOHN A., M.D., (Aristotelean Univ. Med. Sch.)
Professor and Chief


Volunteer Faculty
ANDERSON, TORSTEN, M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
AXLEY, JOHN, M.D., (University of Maryland)
Clinical Assistant Professor/PEP/Pensacola
BAKER, ROY M., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical ProfessorljHEP/Jacksonville
BARTLETT, JOHN, M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Fort Myers
BEAM, LEWIS R., JR., M.D., (Vanderbilt University)
Clinical Associate Professor/Winter Park
BELL, WILLIAM R., M.D., (Duke University)
Clinical Professor/PEP/Pensacola


BENSON, ROBERT


S., M.D., (Emory University)


Clinical Assistant Professor/PEP/Pensacola
BENTON, CHARLES R., M.D., (Columbia Unviersity)
Clinical Assistant Professor/PEP/Pensacola
BLOOM, FREDERICK L., M.D., (Med. Col. of Wisconsin)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Sarasota
BOOTHBY, RICHARD J., M.D., (SUNY-Downstate)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
BOWERS, JOHN A., M.D., (Med. Col. of Georgia)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
BRILL, THOMAS M., M.D., (University of Michigan)
Clinical Professor/Gainesville
BULLARD, JOHN F., JR., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/PEP/Pensacola
BUTSCHER, WILLIAM C., M.D., (Jefferson Med. Col.)
Clinical Professor/Ocala
CARITHERS, CORNELIA M., M.D., (Cornell University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
CARITHERS, HUGH A., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
CIMINO, LOUIS E., M.D., (St. Louis University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Tampa









CLEMENT, STEHPEN P., M.D., (Harvard University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Sarasota
CLUBBS, ROGER C., M.D., (University of Arkansas)
Clinical Assistant Professor/PEP/Pensacola
COHAN, ROBERT H., M.D., (Univ. of North Carolina)
Clinical Assistant Professor/PEP/Pensacola
COHEN, JERROLD H., M.D., (University of Tennessee)
Clinical Assistant Professor/PEP/Pensacola
COLYER, ROBERT F., JR., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville


CONDRON, COLIN


M.D., (University of Dublin)


Clinical Associate Professor/Orlando
CRANE, JAMES, D., M.D., (Duke University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
DAVID, JOSEPH K., M.D., (Duke University)
Clinical Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
DELL, GEORGE A., M.D., (St. Louis University)
Clinical Professor/Gainesville
DELLINGER, CHARLES T., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEPIJacksonville
ESCHENBURG, CHARLES, M.D., (University of Colorado)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Delray Beach
FLEET, JOEL, M.D., (Tulane University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
FRAME, EUGENE M., M.D., (Temple University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEPlJacksonville
FRASER, DONALD J., M.D., (Hahnemann Med. College)
Clinical Associate Professor/Orlando
GABERTAN, BONIFACIO, M.D., (Univ. of Santo Tomas)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
GILLIS, HARRY G., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Daytona Beach
GINTER, MYRNA B., M.D., (University of Havana)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
GIUSTI, VINCENT F., M.D., (University of Pennsylvania)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
GRANAT, LLOYD E., M.D., (SUNY-Downstate)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
GUEDES, BENJAMIN L., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
GUTTERY, EDWIN III, M.D., (University of Louisville)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Fort Myers
GYLAND, STEPHEN P., M.D., (Vanderbilt University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville


HABIB, AMID, M.D., (Damascus University)
Clinical Instructor/Orlando
HADLEY, WILLIAM P., M.D., (Duke University)
Clinical Professor/Gainesville
HANSBERRY, WILLIAM E., M.D., (University of Miami)
Clinical Associate ProfessorlJHEP/Jacksonville
HOFFMAN, LLOYD E., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Salt Lake City, Utah
HORN, KENNETH A., M.D., (N.Y. Univ. School of Med.)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
INGLE, ERON B., M.D., (Tulane Medical School)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Louisiana
IVEY, JOHN F., M.D., (Baylor University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
JENKINS, THOMAS G., M.D., (University of Nebraska)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Pensacola
JONES, JIMMY E., M.D., (University of Tennessee)
Clinical Assistant Professor/PEP/Pensacola
JONGCO, ETHELINDA R., M.D., (Univ. of Philippines)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Kissimmee
JONGKO, GERMELINA, R., M.D., (Univ. of Santo Tomas)
Clinical Assistant Professor/PEP/Pensacola
KANAREK, KEITH S., M.D., (Univ. of Witwatersrand)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
KELLY, WALTER C., M.D., (Temple University)
Clinical Associate Professorl/JHEPl/Jacksonville
KING, ALTON E., M.D., (University of Miami)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
KOHLER, WILLIAM C., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Tallahassee
KOKOMOOR, MARVIN L., M.D., (University of Michigan)
Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville
LANE, JOHN G., JR., M.D., (George Washington Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
LANIER, JAMES C., M.D., (Vanderbilt University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
LASPADA, ANTHONY, M.D., (University of Bologna)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
LAZOFF, STEPHEN, M.D., (Boston Univ. Sch. of Med.)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MANTILLA, GONZALO, M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Quito, Equador


MARRIOT, HENRY


M.D., (Oxford University)


Clinical Professor/St. Petersburg









MCGUIRE, CHARLOTTE, M.D., (University of Arkansas)
Clinical Professor/Tallahassee
MCINTOSH, CHARLES B., M.D., (Meharry Medical Col.)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MCWILLIAMS, NEIL E., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/PEP/Pensacola
MIGNEREY, THOMAS G., M.D., (Ohio State University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/PEP/Pensacola
MOORE, MARCUS M., M.D., (Duke University)
Clinical Associate Professor/Fort Myers
MORGAN, WILLIAM C., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Sarasota
MORONEY, JOHN D., M.D., (St. Louis University)
Clinical Asssistant Professor/Tampa
MOSS, JAMES K., M.D., (Med. Col. of Georgia)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
O'DANIEL, JOSEPH R., M.D., (University of Kentucky)
Clinical Instructor/PEP/Pensacola
PATTANI, JAYKUMAR, M.D., (Bombay University)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
PERLMAN, M. ALLAN, M.D., (University of Miami)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
PICARDI, MERCEDES E., (University of Puerto Rico)
Clinical Assistant Professor/PEP/Pensacola
PICKENS, JAMES C., (University of Alabama)
Clinical Assistant Professor/PEP/Pensacola
POTTER, NELL W., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/PEP/Pensacola
POWERS, DAVID W., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Inverness
PRICE, MORRIS A., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
RAGLAND, ROBERT B., M.D., (Duke University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
REDD, HENRY J., M.D., (Johns Hopkins University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Lakeland
RITROSKY, JOHN JR., M.D., (SUNY-Syracuse)
Clinical Associate Professor/Fort Myers
ROSENBLATT, CHERYL C., M.D., (SUNY-Buffalo)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
ROWLEY, SAMUEL D., M.D., (Jefferson Med. Col.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
SABATER, ALBERTO, M.D., (Univ. of Philippines)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville


SANDERS, SANDY K., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville
SCHAFER, WALTER L., M.D., (Ohio State University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/St. Petersburg
SHASHY, ROBERT A., M.D., (Med. Col. of South Carolina)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
SKINNER, RICHARD G., JR., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
SMALLWOOD, DON, M.D., (Indiana Medical School)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Delray -Beach
THRELKEL, ROBERT, M.D., (Duke University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
TOWNSEND, JAMES W., M.D., (Duke University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
VINSON, ROBERT H., M.D., (Univ. of North Carolina)
Clinical Professor/Vero Beach
WALKER, JAMES W., M.D., (University of Tennessee)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
WEISE, EDMUND R., M.D., (University of Virginia)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
WELTY, PAUL B., M.D., (Tulane Medical School)
Clinical Assistant Professor/St. Petersburg
WESTMARK, EDWARD, M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Professor/PEP/Pensacola
WHITCOMB, JOHN H., M.D., (Harvard Medical School)
Clinical Professor/PEP/Pensacola
WHITNEY, RICHARD H., JR., (University of Alabama)
Clinical Assistant Professor/PEP/Pensacola
WILSON, ROBERT K., M.D., (University of Alabama)
Clinical Assistant Professor/PEP/Pensacola
WOLFSON, SORRELL L., M.D., (Vanderbilt University)
Clinical Professor/Tampa
WOODWARD, PAT, M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Quincy
WORRELL, CYNTHIA, M.D., (University of Arkansas)
Clinical Assistant Professor/PEP/Pensacola
WUBBENA, PAUL F., JR., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
ZAVELSON, THOMAS M., M.D., (Duke University)
Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville
ZIMMERMAN, DALE, M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville









PHARMACOLOGY AND THERAPEUTICS
* BAKER, STEPHEN P., Ph.D., (University of Aston)
Assistant Professor
* CARLSON, GERALD M., Ph.D., (University of Michigan)
Associate Professor
* CHILDERS, STEVEN R., Ph.D., (University of Wisconsin)
Assistant Professor
* CREWS, FULTON T., Ph.D., (University of Wisconsin)
Assistant Professor
* GARG, LAL C., Ph.D., (University of Florida)
Associate Professor
* KADZIELAWA, CHRIS, M.D., Ph.D., (Krakow Academy of
Medicine; Warsaw Academy of Medicine)
Associate Professor
* KEM, WILLIAM R., Ph.D., (University of Illinois)
Associate Professor
* LEIBMAN, KENNETH C., Ph.D., (New York University)
Professor
* MAREN, THOMAS H., M.D., (Johns Hopkins University)
Graduate Research Professor
* MUTHER, THOMAS F., Ph.D. (Leeds University)
Associate Professor
* NEIMS, ALLEN H., M.D., Ph.D., (Johns Hopkins Univ.)
Professor and Chairman and Professor of Pediatrics
* SHIVERICK, KATHLEEN T., Ph.D., (Univ. of Vermont)
Assistant Professor
* SILVERMAN, DAVID N., Ph.D., (Columbia University)
Professor and Professor of Biochemistry and
Molecular Biology
* VOGH, BETTY P., Ph.D., (University of Florida)
Associate Research Scientist


PHYSIOLOGY


* CASSIN, SIDNEY, Ph.D., (University of Texas]
Professor


* FREGLY, MELVIN


Ph.D., (University of Rochester)


Graduate Research Professor


* GERENCSER, GEORGE A., Ph.D., (Indiana University)
Associate Professor


* JAEGER, MARC


M.D., (Univ. of Berne, Switzerland)


Professor
* OTIS, ARTHUR B., Ph.D., (Brown University)
Professor


* PHILLIPS, M. IAN, Ph.D., (Univ. of Birmingham, England)
Professor and Chairman
* POSNER, PHILIP, Ph.D., (SUNY-Downstate)
Associate Professor
* STAINSBY, WENDELL N., Sc.D., (Johns Hopkins Univ.)
Professor


PSYCHIATRY
ADAMS, JOHN E.,


M.D., (Cornell)


Professor and Chairman and
Professor of Clinical Psychology


AHSANUDDIN, KHAJA M., M.D., (Osmania University)
Associate Professor and Chief, Pediatric Consultation-
Liaison Service
AREY, SANDRA S., Ph.D., (University of Florida)
Assistant Professor of Sociology in Psychiatry
AUTH, JOANNE M., M.H.Ed., (University of Florida)
Associate in Psychiatry
BARNARD, GEORGE W., M.D., (Univ. of North Carolina)
Professor and
Chief, Consultation-Liaison Service
BELAR, CYNTHIA D., Ph.D., (Ohio University)
Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology in
Psychiatry and Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology
* BLASHFIELD, ROGER K., Ph.D., (Indiana University)
Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology in
Psychiatry and Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology
CARRERA, III, FRANK, M.D., (Emory University)
Associate Professor and Chief, Division of Child and


Adolescent


Psychiarty


Associate


Professor


Pediatrics
COLLINS, DOROTHY E., M.A., (University of Chicago)
Associate Professor of Social Work in Psychiatry
DIRECTOR, KENNETH L., M.D., (Albany Med. College)
Assistant Professor/VAMC
GFELLER, EDUARD, M.D.,
(Universitaet Bern, Switzerland)
Professor/VAMC and Chief, Psychiatry Service, VAMC
GOBLE, LARRY K., M.S.W., (Ohio State University)
Assistant Professor of Social Work in Psychiatry
GORDON, RICHARD E., M.D., Ph.D., (Univ. of Michigan]
Associate Professor
GREENBERG, SAMUEL I., M.D., (University of Chicago)
Visiting Associate Professor









HARRIS, FAYE G., Ed.D., (University of Florida)
Associate Professor of Psychiatric Nursing in
Psychiatry and Associate Professor of Nursing
HODGIN, JON D., M.D., (University of North Carolina)
Assistant Professor
* JOHNSON, SUZANNE B., Ph.D., (SUNY-Stony Brook)
Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology in Psychiatry
and Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology
* KULDAU, JOHN M., M.D., (Western Reserve University)
Associate Professor and Director, Residency Training
Program and Program in Social and Community Psychiatry


LLINAS, JOSE


M.D., (Havana Univ. Med. Sch.)


* PLUTZKY, MAX, M.D., (Havana Univ. Medical Sch.)
Professor and Chief, Adult Psychiatry Outpatient Clinic,
Director of Undergraduate Training, and Professor of
Clinical Psychology
RADELET, MICHAEL L., Ph.D., (Purdue University)
Assistant Professor of Sociology in Psychiatry and
Assistant Professor of Sociology


RAND, COLLEEN


S. W., Ph.D., (Stanford University)


Assistant Profesor of Psychology in Psychiatry
RESNICK, MICHAEL B., Ed.D., (University of Florida)
Assistant Professor of Educational Psychology in
Psychiatry and Assistant Professor of Pediatrics


Professor and Chief, Student Mental Health


Service,


ROBBINS, MARILYN


B.S., (Iowa State University)


Professor of Community Health and Family Medicine
LYONS, HENRY R., M.D., (Georgetown University)
Associate Professor/VAMC and Associate Chief of Staff for
Education, VA Medical Center
MASKIN, MEYER H., M.D., (Wayne State University)
Professor Emeritus
MAURER, RALPH G., M.D., (Yale University)
Associate Professor and Chief, Child Inpatient Service
MCDONALD, NANCY F., M.S.W., (University of N. C.)
Associate Professor of Social Work in Psychiatry


MELAMED, BARBARA


G., Ph.D., (Univ. of Wisconsin)


Professor of Clinical Psychology in Psychiatry and
Professor of Clinical Psychology
MILNER, III, GILBERT C., M.D., (University of Texas)
Associate Professor and Chief, Child Outpatient Service
MOFFATT, SHEILA, M.S.W., (Tulane University)
Instructor of Social Work in Psychiatry


MOSKOVITZ, RICHARD


A., M.D., (Harvard)


Assistant Professor


Associate in Psychiatry
ROBERTSON, MARY F., Ph.D., (University of Toronto)
Associate in Psychiatry and Associate in Pediatrics
RUFFIN, WILLIAM C., JR., M.D., (Univ. of N. C.)
Professor and Chief of Staff
* SPRINGER, PHILIP K., M.D., (University of Mississippi)
Assistant Professor and Chief, Adult and Adolescent
Inpatient Services
STEWART, RONALD B., M.S., (University of Florida)
Professor of Pharmacy in Psychiatry and Professor and
Chairman of Pharmacy Practice
SULLWOLD, ARTHUR F., M.D., (Louisiana State Univ.)
Assistant Professor/VAMC
SUTTER, ANN B., M.S.W., (University of Oklahoma)
Instructor of Social Work in Psychiatry
TUCKER, JALIE A., Ph.D., (Vanderbilt University)
Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology in Psychiatry
VERA, MARIA I., M.S.W., (University of Kansas)
Instructor of Social Work in Psychiatry


MUNIZ, CARLOS E., M.D., (Havana Univ. Med. School)


Associate
Associate


Professor/VAMC and
Professor of Pharmacy


* NEWMAN, E. GUSTAVE, M.D., (Duke Univ. Med. Ctr.)
Associate Professor
NEWMAN, ROBERT E., M.D., (George Washington Univ.)
Assistant Professor and Chief, Adolescent Inpatient Unit


OLDFIELD-HALL, ELIZABETH


A., M.Ed:, (Univ. of Fla.)


Assistant in Psychiatry
OLDS, ROBERT W., JR., M.D., (Ohio State University)
Assistant Professor/VAMC
PERRY, NATHAN W., Ph.D. (Florida State University)
Professor of Clinical Psychology in Psychiatry and
Professor and Chairman of Clinical Psychology


* WARHEIT, GEORGE


Ph.D., (Ohio State University)


Professor of Sociology in Psychiatry and
Professor of Sociology


Volunteer Faculty
ANO, NELITA R., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Instructor/South Daytona
ARANETA, ENRIQUE, M.D., (University of Philippines)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
BUCHHOLZ, ROBERT A., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
CASSISI, ELAYNE E., M.D., (University of Miami)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville









CATANZARO, RONALD J., M.D., (Washington University)
Clinical Associate Professor/West Palm Beach
DEAN, STANLEY R., M.D., (University of Michigan)
Clinical Professor/Miami
EMERSON, RICHARD P., M.D., (Harvard University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Miami
FORIZS, LORANT, M.D., (University of Szeged)
Clinical Professor/Tarpon Springs
GELFAND, FRANCINE L., M.D., (New Jersey Col. of Med.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Leesburg
GOSSINGER, GARY T., M.D., (University of Michigan)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
HAMPTON, ARCHIBALD, M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Palatka
HANKINS, GARY C., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
KESKINER, ALI, M.D., (McGill University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Tarpon Springs
KING, E. HENRY, M.D.,
(Columbia College of Physicians/Surgeons)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
KING, TAYLOR R., M.D., (Vanderbilt University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville


KOLIN, IRVING


S., M.D., (SUNY-Upstate)


Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
LANGEE, HARVEY R., M.D., (Stanford University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
LAZORITZ, MARTIN, M.D., (Medical College of Virginia)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
MEADOWS, RICHARD L., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Dunedin
MILLER, ERNEST C., M.D., (Tulane University)
Clinical Instructor/Jacksonville
MOST, BERTHA M., M.D., (University of Pittsburgh)
Adjunct Assistant Professor/Gainesville
NELSON, JOHN F., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
POLLACK, ROBERT W., M.D., (SUNY-Downstate)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando


REINHARDT,
(Medical Col]


ROGER


F., M.D.,


lege of Georgia)


Clinical Associate Professor/Pensacola
SALL, DAVID L., M.D., (Thomas Jefferson University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville


SCOTT, GWENDOLYN L., M.D., (University of Cincinnati)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Tarpon Springs
STEIN, JOEL M., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
STIEFEL, JOHN R., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville


TABOADO,
Technology)


VIOLA


Y., M.D.,


(Cebu


Institute


Clinical Instructor/Crystal River
VERGARA, ALEJANDRO, M.D., (University of Havana)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
WARSON, SAMUEL, M.D., (McGill University)
Clinical Professor/Sarasota
WELLBORN, WALTER H., JR., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Professor/Tarpon Springs
WILDER J. LLOYD, M.D., (Loma Linda University)
Clinical Instructor/Orlando
ZEITLER, ROBERT G., M.D., (Washington University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Tarpon Springs


RADIOLOGY
AGEE, 0. FRANK, M.D., (LA State Univ.)
Professor


ASTACIO, JULIO E., M.D., (University of El Salvador)
Instructor
BALSYS, RAYMOND, M.D., (University of Arkansas)
Professor/JHEP
BROOKEMAN, VALERIE A., Ph.D., (Univ. of St. Andrews)
Professor
CARROLL, ROBERT G., M.D., (University of Pittsburgh)
Associate Professor, VAMC


CLORE, FORREST


C., M.D., (University of Michigan)


Associate Professor, VAMC
COUCH, MARGARET W., Ph.D., (University of Florida)
Assistant Research Professor, VAMC


DICKHAUS, ALFRED J.,


M.D., (University of Florida)


Clinical Assistant Professor
FELMAN, ALVIN H., M.D., (University of Cincinnati)
Professor
FITZGERALD, LAWRENCE T., Ph.D., (Univ. of Fla.)
Associate Professor
FITZSIMMONS, JEFFREY R., Ph.D., (Univ. of Fla.)
Instructor









FOTOPOULOS, JOHN P., M.D., (Tufts Medical School)
Professor/JHEP
GANO, OVID R., B.E.E., (University of Florida)
Assistant Professor


HAMLIN, DEREK


M.D., (University of Cape Town)


Assistant Professor, VAMC


HAWKINS, IRVIN F., M.D., (University of Maryland)
Professor
HAWKINS, W. THOMAS, M.D., (Univ. of Texas S.W.)
Clinical Assistant Professor
HUDSON, TERRY M., M.D., (Duke University)
Assistant Professor


JOHNSON, JAMES


A., M.D., (Emory School of Medicine)


Clinical Assistant Professor


KAUDE, JURI V., M.D., (University of Kiel)
Professor
KOVACS, JOSEPH, M.D., (Medical College of Alabama)
Clinical Assistant Professor
LOTZ, PRESTON R., M.D., (Hahnemann Medical College)
Assistant Professor, VAMC
MAUDERLI, WALTER, D.Sc., (Fed. Inst. of Technology)
Professor
MCNEELY, GWYN F., M.D., (Univ. of North Carolina)
Clinical Assistant Professor
POSTMA, TOM W., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor
QUISLING, RONALD G., M.D., (University of Wisconsin)
Assistant Professor
SCOTT, KATHERINE N., Ph.D., (University of Florida)
Associate Research Professor, VAMC
SOONG, JOHN, M.D., (University of West Indies)
Assistant Professor, VAMC
WEAVER, JAMES W., M.D., (Tulane University)
Assistant Professor
WEINSHELBAUM, ARLENE M., M.D., (Univ. of Chicago)
Assistant Professor, VAMC
WILLIAMS, CLYDE M., M.D., Ph.D.,
(Baylor University; Oxford)
Professor and Chairman


Radiation Therapy


* BOVA, FRANCIS J.
Assistant Professor


Ph.D., (Univ. of Fla.)


CLELAND, MICHAEL


M.S., (University of Florida)


Assistant in Radiology
GEFTER, JEFFREY W., M.D., (University of Florida)
Assistant Professor
MARCUS, ROBERT B., JR., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant Professor
* MILLION, RODNEY R., M.D., (Indiana University)
Professor and Chief
MITCHELL, THOMAS P., M.S., (Louisiana Poly. Univ.)
Assistant In Radiology
PARSONS, JAMES T., M.D., (Duke University)
Assistant Professor
THAR, TIMOTHY L., M.D., (Johns Hopkins University)
Assistant Professor


SURGERY


General Surgery


ALEXANDER, RAYMOND H., M.D.,
Associate Professor and Chief/VAMC


(Duke University)


BRIENT, BRUCE W., M.D., (University of Kansas)
Associate Professor/VAMC


CLUTTERBUCK, WILLIAM, B., M.D.,


(Ohio State Univ.)


Instructor/VAMC


HOWARD, RICHARD


Associate


M.D., (Yale University)


Professor


PFAFF, WILLIAM W., M.D., (Buffalo University)
Professor and Chief
Director, Transplantation Program
RUMLEY, THOMAS O., JR., M.D.,
(University of South Carolina)
Assistant Professor
THIGPEN, JACK B., JR., M.D., (University of Miami)
Assistant Professor/JHEP
THOMAS, JAMES M., M.D., (University of Florida)
Assistant Professor and Chairman/JHEP
VOGEL, STEVEN B., M.D., (University of Florida)
Associate Professor
WOODWARD EDWARD R., M.D., (University of Chicago)
Professor and Chairman


Volunteer Faculty
BEGGS, JOHN H., M.D., (University of Minnesota)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Lake City




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