• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Copyright
 Title Page
 Table of Contents
 Main
 Appendix
 Index














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00625
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: August 1983
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00625
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Main
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
    Appendix
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
    Index
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
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OF


CONTENTS


CALENDAR


ADMINIST
U
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THE FACUI
V
E
GENERAL I
THEU


RATION AND
university Admi
college of Law /
legal lnformatia
egal Research


LTY
isitor
merit
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NIVE


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$,
4


FACULTY
inistratio
Administ
on Cente
and Writ


and Adjuncts


-Y
in


ration . .
r . . . . .
ing Program


4 4 4 . 4 * 4 4 4 4 4 4

* 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 . 4 4


* 4 4 4 4 *


. 4 4 4 4


RMATIO N . . . .
RSITY AND THE COLLEGE OF LAW


The University
The University


"-JM
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-J
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y ">-


Setti
Acti'
THE COL
ASh
ADM MISSIONS
ADMISSI
Prep
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-Past ..
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ng and Environmen
Sites .........
LEGE OF LAW
ort History . .


i

i


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ORIENTAL
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TION
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RENT
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REGISTRAT
FEES AND F
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Ameri


Studen
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Grad u
Gradin
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* 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
* 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
* 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
* 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4
4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4


DEGREE REQUIRE
URIS DOCTOR .
n for the Study of
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RpnuirPments


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TS
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of B
ofA
rrent
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4 4 4 4


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PROGRAM FOR BEGINNING STUDENTS
FOR DEGREE-J.D. . . . . . . ....
E EGREE PROGRA MS .. ............
regional Planning. .. ... .


business Administration
rts in Political Science-Public Administrati
Degree Admissions/General Information
SAND ACADEMIC POLICIES .444


ION 4
EXPENSE
: POLICE
:an Bar
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ate Cour


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28

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S* . *. .. 41
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42
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......... ...44
. .. . .. ... 44
. . .. .. 4. ...44
............44
* **.*. 45


1 *








4 TABLE OF CONTENTS


LEGAL INFORMATION CENTER .....
STUDENT PROGRAMS AND SERVICES
FINANCIAL AID-ENTERING J.D. S4
Po licy 4 4. . . . . . . . .


Loans . . . .
Scholarships. .
Basis of Award.


Financial
How to A
Minority
SCHO LARSHI
SCHOLARSHIP
LOANS FUND
SHORT-TERM


Assi
pply


I & 4 4
* 4 9 4


stance
4 4 4 4 4 4


Applicants
PS AND LOANS
PS FOR ADVANCE
'S FOR ADVANCE
LOAN FUNDS A[


COLLEGE OF LAW
I-O0 UJS IN G ......... ..4 4
SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND SE
CENTER FOR GOVERNM
CLINICAL P PROGRAMM .
D ISTiNGU SHED VISITING%


MiNOR ITY AFFAIR
PLACEMENT ....
INTER NATIONAL
international
International
international
Cambridge-W


ED
DI
DM


RVICES .
MENTAL RES

jG PROFES


LAW PROGRAMS
Law Society . .
Law Moot Court C
Summer Law Prog
arsaw Internation4


Mexican Summer Law Program
LAW CENTER ASSOCIATION . . .
Law Center Association Board o


ORGANIC


ZATIONS, ACTIVITIES, HONO
John Marshall Bar Association
The Council of Ten ........
Black Law Student Association
Environmental Law Society ..


R


S4 9 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 44 4 50


STUDENTS 54
. ... .. . . . . .* * . * 54
TUDENTS ~~.....................54


SLAW T 4 4 4 * * * * * . . . * .54
* * * * * * . * * . * * . 5 6 16
* 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 6


LAW STUDENTS .... ..........54
LAW STERUDENTS . . . . . .... .5
INISTERED BYTHE .. . . . . . .59


............ ..................59
...N......T..................60
iPONSIBILITY. . . . . . . .. . .60

SOR PROGRAM . .. .64
... 6 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 * 6 4
* . . . . . . . . . . . 65

. . . . ............ 65
competition . . . . . . . . 65
rarm s . . . . . . . . . . . .65
al Trade Law Program ........... 65
..............................67
... ..... .. ..... . . ........ .67
f Trustees . . . . . . . . 67
S AND AWARDS . .......... .69

..............................9
. .. . . . .. . 69
S . . . * . .7 0


Spanish,
Law Ass<
Law Wiv
Legal Fr<
Moot Co
U niversi
SCHOLASTIC


Order of


American Law Student Association .. . . . . . . .70
iciation for Women ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70
es ..70
iternities.. .. 70

t rt ...4 4 ...... 4 4 4 4 4 4 : 4 * 71
ty of Florida Law Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72
I HONORARIES 4 73
tthe Coif 473











TABLE OF CONTEND TS


COURSE OFFER NGS BY AREA ............
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ........... 4 .
FIRST YEAR COURSES . . .. ..
SECOND AND THIRD YEAR COURSES ........
SELECTED LEGAL PROBLEMS .......
SEM INA RS .......................
CURRENT LEGAL PROBLEMS SEMINARS .
DEVIATIONS, PREREQU SITES, AND ....
COURSE CANCELLATION
PREREQUISTE CH-ART .. . . ... . .. .. ..
NUMERICAL COURSE LISTING ...........
juris Doctor Curriculum . . . . . .... .. .
T- .E [TAX P ROG RA IM ................... ......* 4
MASTER OF LAWS IN TAXATION...............
Entering LL.M. in Taxation Financial Aid . .

REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREE-LL.M. IN TAXATION


* 4 4 4 4 4





* 4 A 4
* 4 4 4 *4
*. 4 .4 4 .4
* 4 4 4 4 4

4 4 4 4 4 .


* 4 4 4 4 A *
4 4 A A 4 4 *


* 4 1 4 4 4 4
4 4 4 4


Alphabetical Course Listing-Master of Laws in Taxation
LL. M in Taxation4
REGISTRATION BY COLLEGES ............. .............
STUL DE NT LISTING ....... ......... ...................
M A P . . . . 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .


* 4 4
* 4 4 4 *
4 4 I A A
* A 4 4 4
* 4 9 4 4
* 4 4 4
* . .4


* .78
* 4 4 81
.. .. .81

* . 83
4.....94


. .. .97
* . .97


S. .101
....102

* .4103
444103


. . .. .. .105
.. .. . .. .105


S44105
*..109


*4444444*112
124








6 / CALENDAR


FALL SEMESTER


February
4:00 pm.


1983


Tuesday


8, Friday


4:00 Noon


u!y 1


Last day to file application for admission.


Last day for those previously in attendance
at the University of Florida College of Law
to register during the registration period.


Friday


4:00 p.m.


Last day to file


completed application for


admission with advanced standing.


August 18, Thursday


12:00 p.m.


Last day for regular registration without be-
ing subject to late fee of $25.00. No one per-


mitted to start registration on
August 18 after 12:00 Noon.


August 18


Thursday


Thursday,


&19


& Friday


.College of Law orientation and registration
for fall entering class.


August 19, Friday


Drop/Add begins.


August


Monday


Classes begin. Late registration begins. All


registration fees increased $25.


August 26, Friday


12:00 Noon


time


registration


semester. Last time for Drop/Add. Last day


exercising


Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory


option.


time a


student


may withdraw


receive


full refund of fees.


September


Monday


Labor Day. All classes suspended.


September 9, Friday


Last time for filing degree applications for a
degree to be conferred at the end of fall
semester.


September 16, Friday


I ,Cf n (nr rk, nnnr nnt, nrrAr r^rrrr inn


AInn n m


i









C ALEN DAR


November


1 6, Wednesd ay


00 p mr


Last day for withdrawI ing


ing gra


dropping


na i


a course


s ithout


courses,
Detit on


Srecei


Last day, for


Novem


'A ednesda ,,


Mi Cl asses


oveRm


24-25


Thursday-Friday


Than


ksg iving


holida


ovem


ber 28, Monday


examinations


ecemrn


ber 9, Friday


Final


examinations


ecem


ber 1


,Thursday


10:00


am


Grades


for degree


candidates


in the Of-


of the


Reg star


December 16, Friday


report


of coil


on degree


cand dates


in the Office


of the


Registrar.


December


Saturday


College of


Law Commencement


Exercises.


ember


19, Monday


9:00 a.m


All grades


due in


the Office


of the Registrar.


SPRING


SEMESTER


1984


Friday


4:00 p m


Last da


to file application for admi


the spring semester as a beginning


October Saturday


November 11
12:00 Noon


ssion for
student


and for the Foreign Credentials Program.

Last day to file completed application for
admission with advanced standing for the
spring semester.


Friday


Last day for those previously in attendance
at the University of Florida College of Law
to register during the advanced registration
period.


I ^nLI^








8 CALENDAR

January 13, Friday


12.00 Noon


Drop/Add


ends.


exercising


Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory Option.


January 20, Friday


4:00 p.m


February
4:00 p.m.


Last day for filing degree application at the
Office of the Registrar for a degree to be
conferred at the end of the spring semester.


3, Friday


Last day for


changing


any grade in the


March 8-9,
12-13
Thursday-Friday
Monday-Tuesda


f not made up, grades of I


become E


Spring Break. All Classes suspended.


April 6, Friday


4:00 p. m


Last day for withdrawing without receiving


failing


April 13, Frida


rades in all courses.


All classes end.


April 16, Monday


Final examinations begin.


Friday


. Report of colleges on degree candidates due


:00 a.m


in the Office of the Registrar.


May 4, Friday


10:00 a.m ...

May 10, Thursday


Final Examinations end.


10:00 a.m


Grades for degree candidates due in the Of-


fice of the Registrar.


May 12, Saturday

May 14, Monday


Commencement Exercises.


10:00 a.m.


All grades due in the Office of the Registrar.


CI A &ACjl


l"i |i V


1 Ian AI


*sIIl *.. I a a sI


preceding term









CALENDAR 9


May 18, Friday


Last day for filing degree application


at the


Office of Registrar for a degree to be
red at the end of the summer term


May 21, Monday


confer


Classes begin. DropiAdd begins All registra-


tion fees increased
ing late.


$25 for students register-


23, Wednesday


2:00 Noon


Last time for


completing late registration for


summer


term.


time


Drop;


Students liable for


fees for all hours for


which re


stered. Last


time for exercising


Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory Option.


25, Friday


4:00 p.m


time


a student


may withdraw


receive full refund of fees. Last day for pay-


ing fees
of $25.


28, Monday


without being subject to a late


Memorial Day. Classes suspended


1. Friday


Last day for changing any grade assigned in
the preceding term. If not made up, grades
of I or X become E


June 29, Friday


Last da


for withdrawing


without receiving


failing grades in all courses


4, Wednesday


Independence Day. Classes suspended.


All cl


6, Friday

9, Monday


asses


Final examinations begin

Final examinations end.


16, Monda


18, Wednesday


4:00 p.m.


Grades for degree candidates due in the Of-


of the Registrar.


July 20, Friday


12:00 Noon


Report of colleges on candidates for degree


due in the Office of the Registrar.


July 21, Saturday


College Commencement Exercises.


une




*I *


v
1

. .
m


. :,




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ADMINISTRATION


AND


FACULTY


UNIVERSITY ADMINISTRATION
Robert Q. Marston, M.D., B.Sc


John


A. Nattress, Ph. D


.Executive


Vice


President


President


Robert


Bryan, Ph.D


. Vice President for
Academic Affairs


William Earl Elmore, B.


C.P.A.


Vice


President for


Administrative Affairs


Carl Arthur Sandeen. B.A.. M.A., Ph.D.


Vice


President for


Student Affairs


COLLEGE OF


LAW


ADMINISTRATION


Frank T. Read, B.


Dean


Associate Dean


Jeffrey E. Lewis, A.B.,
Martin H. Belsky, A.B.


Barry A. Currier, B.A.,


ames E. Dixon, A.B., M.A.,


ere H. Hudson, B.E., M.A..


.D.


. . Director of the Center
governmental Responsibility
. .. .Acting Director of
Graduate Tax Program
.. Assistant Dean for
Academic Affairs
Acting Assistant Dean for
student and Minority Affairs
S.. . Assistant Dean for


Administration


Robert R. Lingren, B.S.B.A., M.PHIL.,


Michael Patrick, B.S., M.S.E., spec. in Ed.


Dixie B. Miller, B.S.


W. T. Coram, Jr


B.A.. M.A.E.


Margaret M. Maxfield


Assistant Dean for


Development and Alumni Affairs
. ... .. .. Assistant Dean for
Admissions and Financial Aid
... ...... Director of Placement
. ... Coordinator of Continuing
Legal Education and
Alumni Affairs
...Administrative Assistant


to the Dean


Kathy Cowart


. Staff Assistant to


9 4-








12 / FACULTY

LEGAL INFORMATION CENTER


race


W. (Betty) T


aylor, A.B., M.A., J.D.


Director and


Affiliate Professor


Robert J Munro, B.A., M


Carole H. Groom


J.D., M.L.S.


s, B.A., M.L


Pamela D. Williams, B.A., M


,J.D.


Arthur R. Donnelly, B.S., M.L.S., Ed.D
Carol J. Feltz, B.A., M .S. . .


Susy


man, B.A., M.S.


Librarian


. Associate Librarian
.Associate Librarian
. Assistant Librarian
Assistant Librarian
Assistant Librarian


LEGAL RESEARCH AND WRITING PROGRAM


Iris A. Burke, B.A., J.D .. ...
Gertrude H. Block, A.B., M.A.T.


. . . . . . . . W ritin


Director
specialist


Lynn


Capehart, B.S., J.D.


istant Director


Sherry Hieber, B.A., J.D . .
Jean H. McCreary, B.A., J.D.


Bradford Lee Thomas, B.


J.D.


. Assistant Director
Assistant Director
. Assistant Director


CENTER FOR GOVERNMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY


.Assistant Director


William E. Adams, J.D .
C. David Coffey, J.D .
Richard Hamann, J.D.. .
Mary Anne Hilker, Ph.D..
Elizabeth McCulloch, J.D.


.Ass


instant Director


SAssistant Director
* Assistant Director
. Assistant Director













THE


.- ,, --- ,,.. . |^ "
-: .. .-
'., ... ..... .. "" " i +., S .,..'" .
I. [. .
".:: ..: .
S.? *. ..
.,'' 4. iV,^;.. .. '

-,, ,:: .
.,,,,- .' ."'.


FACULTY


FLETCHER N. BALDWIN JR., Professor of Law. A.B, 1958,


J.D., 1961


Georgia;


LL M 1962, Illinois; LL.M., 1968, Yale.


Professor Baldwin joined the Florida faculty in 1962. He was
a Fulbright Professor at Makerere University in Kampala,
Uganda, taught at Princeton and Brown Universities and in
the Mexican Summer Law Program, and has participated ex-
tensively in international legal affairs. Professor Baldwin was


Executive Editor of the Law Journal and i


Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa


Bar, his practice is primarily


a member of Phi


Phi and Coif Admitted to the Georgia


appellate. Professor Baldwin's


' ,a> .*"' ^
: *ii'^'" *'r.- N
-- 1: *' *,; .; *


principal
criminal


academic
procedure.


interests


Criminal Procedure; and


will
serve


are constitutional


teach


Constitutional


as faculty advisor to Moot


Court in 1983-84.

MARTIN H. BELSKY,


Associate


Professor of Law. A.B.


1965,


Temple; J.D


.. i^
.Cl',
.2 : ." .

"<: Te *-
* .
l ".
,:Vf-
*i.


1968


, Columbia; Diploma,


1969, Cambridge.


Professor Belsky joined the Florida faculty in 1982 as Director


of the Center for Governmental Responsibility.


Pennsylvania


Georgetown and Temple.


F lorida


Bars,


Professor Belsk


A member of


taught


was Editor-in-


Chief of the Columbia Transnational Law Journal


an In-


international Fellow. He has worked as Philadelphia's Assistant


District Attorney and Chief of Prosecutions, and later


private practice and served


was in


as Counsel to the U.S House. He


was Assistant Administrator of the National Oceanic and At-
mospheric administration before coming to Florida. His prin-


I. I ,


cipal


academic


interests


professional


responsibility,


criminal law, environmental law, and international law. He
will be teaching Professional Responsibility; Environmental


I ;7\- nrl thn I nw and Rncril Research seminar in 1983-84


*, ,


x" -.,- -
/ *" "'

\ '"*'I
Si *f
k '


I

















" 4


GERTRUDE BLOCK, Lecturer. A.B., 1941, Penn State; M.A.T.,
1967, Florida. Ms. Block has taught English, Humanities and
Transformational Grammar. She has been Writing Specialist
at the College of Law since 1974. Ms. Block's principal profes-
sional interest is legal semantics. She teaches the Writing
Clinic, in connection with the legal research and writing pro-
gram, and tutors J.D. and LL.M. candidates on an individual


basis.


IRIS A. BURKE, Director, Legal Research and Writing Pro-
gram. B.A., Brooklyn College, NYC 1967; J.D, Brooklyn Law
School, NYC 1977. She was a member of the editorial board
of the Brooklyn Law School Journal of International Law; and
of the Moot Court Honor Society. She has been published in
the Harvard Civil Rights-Civil Liberities Law Review. She


'I
--.. t:
9 i* :
v di


-'. '

I ,


worked for several
cluding a position
Legal Services. She


Florida


since


1980


legal services programs


in Florida, in-


as Managing Attorney for Three Rivers
has been a Legal Writing Instructor at


became


Director


the Legal


Research and Writing Program in 1982.


S";' "I .


MARY ELLEN CALDWELL, Professor of Law


N.S.C.L


; J.D ,


1955,


L.S.U


; LLM.,


1959


Yale


A.B., 1943,
. Professor


Caldwell joined the Florida faculty in 1974. She has taught at
Ohio State University, and is admitted to the Louisiana Bar


and the U.S.


Supreme Court.


Professor Ca dwell was a


member of the Board of Editors of the Louisiana State Law
Review and Coif. She clerked for Judge Wayne C. Borah on
the Fifth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals before attending Yale
as a Sterling Fellow. At Yale, she was appointed Research


Associate
academic


and Lecturer.
interests are


Professor
contracts,


Caldwell's
evidence,


principal
legislation,


jurisprudence, and food, drug and cosmetic law. She will


teach Legislation; Evidence;


and Food and Drug Law in


1983-84.


DENNIS A. CALFEE, Professor of Law. B.B.A.,


1968, J.D.,


6'U


4.









STUART R. COHN, Professor


of Lawv


A 1962, llinois


1964, Honors School


Yale.


Professor Cohn


of ur spruher n e,


joined


admitted to the Illinois


1966(-1 977


He was


Chicago Councii of


a found
Lawyers


Counsel of the Independent


the lrida
and pract
an mnem be
a]n( was a


Voters


Oxiord;
racu ty


iced
Ir an


LL Bi, 1966,


1 977


in (h icgo)
d D ector


Director


linois


[le is

o rui
if the


r and General
He has served


as a consultant to the Florida Division o
Cohn's princi pa profess onal interests


f Security 'es P
center on the


professor
regui a-


ion of business


porate
Organize


F finance:
actions in


enterprise


Secu r ties
Fac 1983i-43


ill t2dCh


ul at on


orporati
and


ons; Cor-


ness


BARRY


1 9)7


CARRIER, Pr
Southern Cal


ofessor


Professor


rw B .
urrier


1 968


lorida


facuil ty in


977. He has taught at the


and Duke University, and i


v0


2:2
1^ .... ': /. @
ifNls,
N ^ .x. .*y. M^
f.g :. *** ^ ^ .-I l^
lI:]
%*^.iK?
; x2
^^te-.-' *: '
N*::^*.* 3***'^


Professor
Fol lowi nc
peals Ds
Angeles
C graduate


r was
aton,


Currie
gradu


trict


Professor
Tax Pros


admitted


a member ll
he c erked


o Colu mbia


Circuit


Currior wI


rani in


52rv


1982-84


University of
d to the Ca ii f


ol L ax\ Rev iey>


for the


U 5 C


Kentucky
Irr w Bar,
and Coifl


court


of Ap-


and after pract ced in Los


e as Acting F
H is principal


directorr of the
academic in-


Ires.ts^ are regu action,


use and


He wil teach Income T


development of real property
Land Use Planning in 1983-84.


JEFFREY


DAV IS, Professor


of Law


1965. U.C


1972, Loyola Marymount: LL.M., 1973


Davis joined the Florida


Michigan. Professor


acuity in 1981. He has taught at


New York University, Rutgers-Camden and the University of
South Dakota, and is admitted to the California Bar. At


Loyola,


Professor Davis


was a member of the St.


Thomas


More Law Honor Society, Law Review, and was a Student
Teaching Fellow. He was a Cook Fellow at Michigan. His prin-


cipa acade mic interests are contracts,


SUmer


bankruptcy


Professor


commerical,


Davis


con-
teach


Debtor-Creditor Law; Contracts; and Banking Law in 19 83-84





GEORGE kL DAWSON, Associate Professsor of Law. A.B,


V** ^


\j .1.



@ :*
^ i '"








JAMES E. DIXON, Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs and
Acting Assistant Dean for Student and Minority Affairs. A.B.,
1972, Talladega; M.A., 1973, Notre Dame; M.A. (cert.), 1974,
University of Ghana; J.D., 1977, Notre Dame. Dean Dixon
joined the Florida administration in 1980. A native of Tampa,
he served as Chief Counsel and Assistant Director of the Loui-
-- siana Protection and Advocacy System in New Orleans. At
Notre Dame, he was a Danforth Fellow and International
-I Fellow. Dean Dixon's professional affiliations include the
.I .- o Louisiana Bar Association, the National Bar Association, the
." : A..,\ Florida Bar Committee on Disability Law, the Task Force on
.. v:: p Education, and the Governor's Commission on Disability
Law. He has served as a faculty member of the Southeastern
Region Council on Legal Education Opportunity Program at
Georgia, Mercer and Mississippi, and taught at Notre Dame
and Hillsborough Community College. His academic in-
terests are Law and the Behavioral Sciences and colonial
Caribbean history.



..-.. '- -.. JAMES J. FREELAND, Distinguished Service Professor. A.B.,
.' ". '.:. 1950, Duke; iD., 1954, Florida. Professor Freeland joined the
--., Florida faculty in 1957 and directed the Graduate Tax Pro-
gram from the 1977-82. He was on the N.Y.U. tax faculty and
" :- taught at Arizona. Professor Freeland is a Florida native and
is admitted to the Florida Bar. He has been recognized
- -: repeatedly as an outstanding professor and was named 1981
Outstanding Tax Lawyer in the State of Florida by the Tax
*Section of the Florida Bar. He was a member of the Law
i Review and Coif. He practiced in Miami after graduation.
*' Professor Freeland's principal academic interest is federal in-
.-, come taxation. He will teach corporate tax in 1983-84.



MANDELL GLICKSBERG, Professor of Law. B.A., 1949, J.D.,
1951, Florida; LL.M., 1958, N.Y.U. Professor Glicksberg joined
,T. t the Florida faculty in 1953 and has twice been recognized as
.'. dan outstanding professor, and has taught at N.Y.U. A native
"*- A%-?? of Miami Beach and a member of the Florida Bar, he was an
- .' ."-"j .. editor of Law Review. Following graduation, he practiced law
'SJ "-- . in Miami Beach and later served as a member of the U.S. Air
Force Judge Advocate General's Department. Professor
SGlicksberg directed the 1975 and 1981 revisions of the Florida
Uniform Title Standards and serves as supervisor to the Title









MICHAEL W. GORDON, Professor of Law. B S., 1957, J.D,
1963, Connecticut; M.A., 1968, Trinity; Dipl. de Droit Com-
pare, 1973, Strasbourg. Professor Gordon joined the Florida


faculty in 1968. He was


Associate


Editor of the Connecticut


Law Review and practiced three years before joining the Con-


necticut faculty. He
Guatemala and, has


was a Fulbright Professor in


taught in


Costa


Mexico


Rica, England and The


Netherlands


Professor


Cordon


lectured


extensively


throughout the U.S. and abroad. His principal academic in-


terests are corporation law,


comparative law


and interna-


tional legal affairs. He will teach Corporations,
on International Business Law in 1983-84.


and a


seminar


iV i
, ..if i
SI* u. i~ *IH
. ...c % '. *
^^."
<^ |,<*
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DAVID M. HUDSON, Assistant Pr


Forest; JD., 1974, Florida


LLM.,


ofessor of Law. B.S.,


State; LL.M.,


1968,


1975, Florida;


1980, London. Professor Hudson joined the Florida


faculty in 1980. He is admitted to the District of Columbia
and Florida Bars. Since graduation, he has served as Assistant
Attorney General with the Tax Section of the Florida Attorney
General's Office and as Deputy General Counsel of the
Florida Department of Business Regulation. Professor Hud-
son's principal academic interests are international taxation


and tax policy. He will teach Income Taxation;


ax; and Corporate Reorganiz


International


nations in 1983-84.


"rh" '4'\s


IERE H. HUDSON,
1961, Nebraska; M


Assistant Dean for Administration. B. Ed.,


, 1968,


George


Washington. Dean Hud-


son joined the College of Law in 1973. He completed


a career


with the U.S. Air Force in 1972 and won a Ford Fellowship to


the Institute for Court Management. He later


was employed


by the Florida Supreme Court to assist in establishing a
Florida court administration program. He has been a consul-
tant to the Florida State Courts Administrator and served on


the Governor's Committee on Upgrading Criminal


sonnel. Dean Hudson is a member of the
of the Institute for Court Management.


justice Per-


Academy of Fellows


E. L. ROY HUNT, Professor of Law


1955


, Vanderbilt;


.A


w *%


~i~r~I


j








THOMAS R. HURST, Professor of Law A.B., 1966, Wisconsin;
J.D., 1969, Harvard. Professor Hurst joined the Florida faculty
in 1974. He is a member of the Wisconsin Bar and has taught
at Texas. Following graduation, he worked in the Solicitor's


Office of


the U.S.


Labor


Department and practiced


Milwaukee from 1971-1974. He has served


as consultant to


the U.S. Energy Department, the Solar Energy Research In-
stitute and the Center for Governmental Responsibility. Pro-


fessor Hurst's principal
portions and energy


research interests are contracts, cor-


He wi


II teach Torts; and Energ


in 1983-84


I** f" :; '- wa --R. *
4 .
_. -


-


.. ...--


STANLEY N. INGBER, Professor of Law.


College;


, 1969, Brooklyn


, 1972, Yale. Professor Ingber joined the Florida


faculty in 1972. A native of Brooklyn and a member of the


New York Bar, he has


taught at Illinois, San Diego, Tennessee


and Boston. He was on the Yale Law Journal and is a


Woodrow
academic


Wilson
interests


jurisprudence, crimir
Constitutional Law; a


Fellow. Professor
are constitutional
ial procedure and


End Political


& Civil


Sngber's


p


former
principal


criminal


torts. H


will teach


Rights in 1983-84.


ERNEST M. JONES, Prof


essor


of Law.


B.B.A


, 1949; LL.B.,


1949, Mississippi; J.S.D., 1965,


Yale. Professor Jones


joined


the Florida faculty in 1954. A member of the Mississippi Bar,
he has taught at Mississippi, George Washington and Denver.


Professor


Jones'


principal


academic


interests


ministrative law and contracts. He will teach Administrative
Law; Contracts; and Florida Admin. Law in 1983-84.


JULIAN C. JUERGENSMEYER, Professor of Law. A.B., 1959,


1 ,


1963,


Duke;


Cert.


D'Eti


jdes Polit.,


1960,


Bordeaux,


Ys 'M wsi1


I sI
._ .


:.)
'-- sf
^ "r ^"j


are


.


r


. ."i ^Sfi'r









JOSEPH R. jULIN, Professor of Law and Dean Emeritus.
B S.L., 1950, J.D., 1952, Northwestern. Professor Julin joined


4f$


the Florida faculty in 1971 and served as D
A native of Chicago and a member of
Michigan Bars, he was Professor and A


r
I4
-JK: t


Michigan until 1970. He


ean from 1971-80.
the Illinois and


associate


was Associate Editor of the North-


western Law Review and is a member of Coif. After gradua-
tion, he practiced in Chicago and lectured at Northwestern.


Professor Julin
American Law


serves


Schools. His principal academic


property, future interests, oi


and gas


interests are


law, and legal educa-


tion. He will teach Property; and Future Interests in 1983-84.


JEFFREY E. LEWIS,


Associate Dean and Professor of Law.


A.B., 1966, J.D, 1969, Duke. Dean Lewis joined the Florida
faculty in 1972. A native of Ohio and a member of the Ohio
Bar, he taught at Akron, and was in private practice in Ohio.
He has served as a consultant to the Florida State Court's Ad-


ministrator and


as an arbitrator in the aluminum steel in-


dustries. He was named 1977 Outstanding Law Professor by
the John Marshall Bar Association. Dean Lewis' principal
academic interests are civil procedure, evidence and federal


jurisdiction. He will


teach Federal Practice and E


evidence


1983-84.


STEPHEN A. LIND, Professor of Law.


., 1962,


., 1965,


Cal., Berkeley;


LL.M., 1966, NY.U. Professor Lind joined the


Florida faculty in 1970. A native of California and


p~,
<* 'S:
tr

be, -


a member


of the California Bar, Professor Lind served as Acting Director
of the Graduate Tax Program in 1982-83. He will be on leave
at Hastings College in 1983-84.


ROBERT


R.


LINDGREN,


Assistant


Dean


and


Lecturer.


Dean at


as President-Elect of the Association of


1


r *IF ,i
- "1 ,
g .. .;
; ,r~t








JOSEPH W. LITTLE, Professor of Law. B.S., 1957, Duke; M.S.,


1961,


Worchester Polytechnic;


1963, Michigan.


fessor Little joined the Florida faculty in 1967. He is admitted
to practice in Florida, Georgia, the District of Columbia and


Michigan. He


was a member of the Gainesville City Commis-


sion from 1973-77, serving


as mayor from 1975-76, and has


been actively involved with environmental and public safety


issues


at the federal, state and local levels. Professor Little's


principal academic interests include administrative law, en-
vironmental law, state and local government, social legisla-
tion, taxation and torts. He will teach Torts I and II; Worker's
Compensation and Other Employment Rights; and Local
Government Law in 1983-84.


W. D.


^ ^.* .* .

''
%m^.-'..5, k


MACDONALD, Professor of Law. B.


1936, LL.B.,


1939, Toronto; Barr. at Law, 1939, Osgoode Hall; LL.M.


'I


1956, Michigan.


Professor Macdonald came


1947,
as a


visiting professor in 1948 and stayed on after his students


petitioned the State Board of Control to hire him.


A native of


Nova Scotia, he


was a member of


the Ontario Bar until


becoming an American Citizen in 1951. Professor Macdonald
has held a Ford Foundation Fellowship in Europe and Brazil,
has been a Harvard Research Scholar in Inter-American Af-
fairs and a Fulbright Scholar in Brazil. He has taught in


French (Cambodia


Luxumbourg) and


in Portuguese


(Brazil). On leave, Fall 1983; teaching Estates and Trusts; and


Fiducia


ry Administration Spring 1984.


ROBERT T. MANN, Professor of Law. B.S.B.A.,


1946, J.D,


1951, Florida; M.A., 1948,


George


Washington; LL.M., 1953,


Harvard; LL.M., 1968, Yale; LL.D. (Hon.), 1979, Stetson. Pro-


fessor Mann joined the Florida faculty in 1974.


the Florida and Massachusetts Bars, he


. .ir". t
?at,


Representative from


1956-1968,


A member of


was a Florida State


was Judge of the Second


District Court of Appeal from 1968-1974, serving


as Chief


Judge from 1973-1974, and served on the Public Service Com-


mission from 1978-1981. He


was


Editor-in-Chief of the Florida


Law Review, later taught at Northeastern and practiced in
Tampa. He will teach Florida Con. Law; Appellate Review;


and Law


& Public


Policy in 1983-84.


*:-, -.y B


FRANCIS T. McCOY, Professor of Law. B.A.,


1944; M


,1947;


S.J.D.,









C. DOUGLAS MILLER, Professor of Law


B .,
*
* - U.


B.S., 1962, J.D ,


1965, Kansas; LL.M., 1966, N.Y.U. Professor Miller joined the
Florida faculty in 1973. A member of the Kansas and Florida
Bars, he practiced in the Midwest from 1966-1973 and has
taught at Arizona State and has served on the Advisory Board
of the University of California, San Diego, Estate Planning
Conference. He was Associate Editor of the Kansas Law
Review and won the Harry J Rudnick Memorial Award at
N.Y.U. Professor Miller's principal academic interests are
estate planning and federal taxation. He will teach Tax Ac-


counting; Income Tax


Natural Resou


rces;


and Estate Plan-


ning in 1983-84,


DIXIE MILLER, Director of Placement. B


Florida. Ms.


Miller has worked as


onnel


technician for the Training


and Development and Central Employment sections of the


University of Florida P


ersonne


Division


she has been with the College of Law


. A
sine


native
e 1976


of Florida,
, handling


placement


both I.D and LL


graduate


s. Ms.


Miller


tive in


the National


Association for Law Placement at the


regional and national levels


was recent


elected


southeastern


egion


al Co


inator


National


Assoc


tion for


Law PL


acement.


ROBERT


19b66,


MOBERLY


sconsin. Profes


, Professor
sor Mober h


ined the


Florida f


acuity


in 1977


A member of the W, isconsin


and Tennessee


Bars,


served as


arbitrator,


mediator and administrative law judge


with the


Wisconsin


Employment


Relations Commission and


later practiced with


a Milwaukee firm. He has taught at Ten-


nessee,
Sciences
Review.


Louvain,


Professor


Belgium,


Moberi


After graduation,


Polish


was on the


Academy


Wisconsin


he clerked for the Wisconsin


Supreme Court, His principal academic


- I


interests are labor


law and


Negotiators;


conflict resolution.


Public


He will teach Lawyers


Sector Lab.


as a


and Labor Law in


1983-84.


ROBERT C. L. MOFFAT, Professor


of Law. B


, 1958, M


*s


LL. B.,
fessor


1962, Southern Methodist; LL.M., 1966,
Moffat joined the Florida faculty in 1966.


Sydney. Pro-
A member of


S... '


'3".^









MICHAEL L. MOORHEAD, Professor of Law. B.S.,


George


1966,


Washington, J D, 1969, Howard. Professor Moorhead


,...
I'S
--J -\ -
;, "*4t
2*
/4 .

I%.A
I
!5',
, '* *
^*^^y
^ ^ w *^/ ^ '*-*/
^^-.- ~ ~ h1r A '.< :.-.
/i"?!*"`:~ ^ ^ 'A -A


joined the Florida faculty in 1978. A member of the District of
Columbia Bar, he has taught at Howard and Richmond, and


has served


as Executive


Director and President of the Council


on Legal Education Opportunity. He is a member of the
Board of Trustees of the Law School Admission Council. Pro-
fessor Moorhead was Editor-in-Chief of the Howard Law Jour-


nal. After graduation,
Robinson III on the UA.
Columbia Circuit. His


rights. H
1983-84.


he clerked for Judge Spottswood W.
. Court of Appeals for the District of
principal academic interest is civil


will teach Labor Law; and Administrative Law


WINSTON P.


NAGAN, Professor


of Law


B.A. (Law), 1964,


South Africa; B.A., (Juris), 1966; MA., (Juris), 1971


Oxford;


M.C L., 1970; MM.L, 1970, Duke; J.S.D., 1977, Yale. Professor
Nagan joined the Florida faculty in 1975. A naturalized
American citizen, he was a James B. Warburg Fellow to the
University Consortium for World Order and has taught at


Virginia


Polytechnic,


Valparaiso and


De Paul.


Professor


-

,C~ I IL
- C fJ -ft^


Nagan's principal academic interests are private interna-
tional law, domestic relations, civil procedure, jurisprudence,
human rights and international law. He will teach Interna-


tional Law; Family Law; Human Rights; and


urisprudence in


1983-84.


MICHAEL A. OBERST, Associate Professor of Law. B.B.S.,
1963; JD., 1968, Florida. Professor Oberst joined the Florida
faculty in 1979. A member of the California and District of


Columbia Bars, he practiced in Los


Angeles and was a staff


member of the Joint Committee on Taxation. He was on the
editorial board of the Florida Law Review. Following gradua-


tion, he clerked for Judge Austin Hoyt of the U.S.


Tax Court.


Professor Oberst's principal academic interest is income
law. He will teach Partnership Tax in 1983-84.


j. MICHAEL PATRICK, Assistant Dean for


Financial


Aid. B.S.E., 1967; M.S.E.,


1970;


Admissions and
Specialist in Ed.,


1975, Drake. Mr. Patrick joined the Florida administration in


Eii


1

p











RICHARD N. PEARSON, Professor of Law. BB.A,
Michigan; LL.B., 1956, Boston University; LL M, 1964,


1950,
Yale


Professor Pearson


joined


the Florida


faculty


1982


member of the New Hampshire and Massachusetts Bars, he


I I


practiced for six years in Concord,


New


Hampshire,


taught at Connecticut and Boston University. H


e was Com-


ment Editor of the Boston Law


principal academic


interest is tort


review. Pr
s. He will


otessor Pearson


teach


Torts: and


Products Liability in 1983-84


. .. .. .1. .
* * .**


. .. ...
. .. .* ..
. *.* * .
m


.1.
I.,
. ": "/-y3


DON C. PETERS,


Professor


Northern I


owa;


ED., 1968, Iowa Professor Pe


ters joined the Florida


faculty in


A member


of the Florida,


Iowa


and Colorado Bars, he


was a Fu bnght Scholar


at the


University


of Malaya.


Kuala


Lumpar, Maiaysia,


was a Reginald


Law Fellow and has lectured at


Heber


Co orado


Smith Community
He was Comment


editor


of the Iowa


Review


and a member


of Coif


clerked for


He will teach Office


W. E Dov le of


& Pre- rial;


District Court,


Procedures;


never


and Civil


in 1983-84.


JAMES R.


Florida.
He esta


PIERCE
professor


Professor


1961


Pierce joined the Florida faculty


blished the College of Law clinics and has


in 1968


serve


Director of Clinics


since 1968


served


as the


First Assistant


Public Defender for the 8th Circuit,


cons


ultant to H.E.W. and


was appointed


Assistant State Atto


rnev in


the 8th,


12th, and


4th Circuits.


Professor


Pierce


was on the Florida


Law Review


cticed


in Cainesville after graduation. His principal


academic interests are criminal procedure and trial practice.


He will teach Evid


ence;;


Criminal P


roce


dure;


Criminal


Prac-


t ce; and Criminal Clinic in 1983-84


WALTER PROBERT, Prof


Sin r-n


essor


1OZ1 0 r- r o oco r- 1) -'r


of Law. I
P f j.


1949,


, 1951,


s I r


1 C-7


P b1 t ,


i i- I Bl /s -










4i/s^ ^
>" '1'flU
** *S $>4t1"^


JAMES C. QUARLES, Professor of Law. B.A., 1942, J.D., 1945,
Virginia. Professor Quarles joined the Florida faculty in 1969.
He began teaching at Mercer in 1947 and was Dean of the
Mercer Law School from 1956-69. He is a member of the
federal, Georgia and Virginia Bars and of the American Law


Institute, and served


as Executive Director of the Florida Law


Revision Commission. Professor Quarles was


the Virginia Law Review and


Senior Editor of


was elected to membership in


- ^3 **3


. .. .-
'"**^


Coif. After graduation, he clerked for Chief Judge John J.
Parker of the U.S. Court of Appeals. His principal academic


interests are criminal


and constitutional law. He will


teach


Constitutional Law; and Criminal Law in 1983-84.


.^"*, i -* "*^ 4 "! .' i
J4 ..
..." 1' ..f^^ ^ *




S.
4** -'- -^ %.

S-* I .?.-
It j**is'.<

M ~~~~* N li.lEei
1 1,.. 'I


--~


FRANK T.


Brigham Young;


Florida faculty in 1981.


, 1960,


1963, Duke. Dean Read joined the
He was Dean and Professor at both


Tulsa and Indiana University, and Assistant Dean, Associate


Dean and Professor at Duke.


nesota,


Missouri,


He is a member of the Min-


Oklahoma


Bars,


American Law Institute and a fellow of the American Bar
Foundation. Dean Read was on the Duke Law Journal and is a
member of Coif. He practiced in Minnesota and later was an
attorney with AT&T. He is President-Elect of the Law School
Admissions Council, one of the two major national law
school organizations. His principal academic interests are
evidence, civil procedure and civil and criminal trial practice.


CHRISTOPHER SLOBOGIN, Assistant Professor of Law. A.B.,


1973,


Princeton;


1977;


LL.M.,


1979,


University


.-4 .







.A -.

i


* i ^ '_


Virginia. Professor Slobogin joined the Florida faculty in
1982. A member of the Virginia Bar, he taught at Virginia and


directed the University's Forensic Evaluation


i- 1 ,


Research Center, training mental health professionals to per-


form


evaluations


for the


courts


drafting


Virginia's statute on psychological evaluations. His principal
academic interests are juvenile law, criminal procedure and


law and the behavioral


*11
-.. .~
...Jt. I
%. M'
**t ^ li


teach Crimina


sciences.


Professor


Procedure in 1983-84.


: v'.' -- ^ ^ :^
.It -*t/i*. S


DAVID T. SMITH, Professor of Law. B.A.,


19b0


Rnstnn Prnfegnor Smith


I


1957, Yale;


ninprl thp Finrida faniltv in


READ, Dean and Professor of Law. B.


Training and


most


Slobogin will


. .
.5 1










ANNE L. SPITZER, Assistant Professor of Law


Swartmore; MS,,


1966;


Ph.D,


1966,


Harvard;


1950,
1975,


Iowa Professor Spitzer joined the Florida faculty in 1979. She


is admitted to the Florida and Iowa Bars and


several


Bar circuits. She practiced in Iowa and later taught
University of Iowa. Professor Spitzer was a Founding


Federal
at the
Editor


and Articles Editor of the Journal of Corporation Law, a


.. ..r
,., -. ., ':"l


. .
I~ '* *g:9".:..:.*,._.
... ."". .

-r r- S :- i" 1


member of the


Iowa Law Review Board of Editors


member of Coif. After graduation,


Supreme Court justice


interest


and a


she clerked for iowa


Clay LeCrand Her principal academic


is medieval Engl ish legal history. She will teach Civil


Clinic; Professional Responsibility;
Legal History in 1983-84


and a seminar in English


? V
: ..


GRACE W. (BETTY) TAYLOR, Affiliate Professor o


Director, Legal Information Center. A.B.,
Florida State; I D., 1962, Florida. Professor


1949, M.


t Law,
S1950,


Taylor joined the


Florida faculty in 1950 and has held various positions in the


.. . i .. - t

.


University Library and the Law Library. She serves


on the Ex-


ecutive Board of the American Association of Law Libraries,


the American Bar


Association Law Library Committee and


the University of Florida Task Force on Use of Computer in


Education.


Professor


Taylor was Research Editor


of the


Florida Law Review She was elected as an alumnus to Coif,
Florida Blue Key and Phi Beta Kappa She will teach Sales in
1983-84.


...." "" ": " ."." "" "'." -
.- "... :" .... -. ..
.~;.. .. ..
.. ...


WINNIE F. TAYLOR,
Scrambling State; J D


Assoc
1975


iate Professor


Buffalo;


LL.M


Law. B


1979,


1972,


Wisconsin.


Professor Taylor joined the Florida faculty in 1979. A native
of Louisiana and a member of the New York Bar, she practic-


ed in Rochester for several years. She


serves


as consultant to


the Credit Union National Association and a number of state


credit


union


leagues on


federal credit


regulations com-


pliance. Professor Taylor began a three year appointment in
the Federal Reserve Board's Consumer Advisory Council. Her


principal academic


interests are


consumer,


contract and


commercial law. She will teach Comr
.,_ tracts; and Consumer Law in 1983-84.


& Cons.


Trans.


Con-


MARY POE TWITCHELL, Assistant Professor of Law B.A,


0 .dy*-;


'*i~ ./


, --

-'S


C.--


I.


-
.


. ,,- ...










W. SCOTT VAN ALSTYNE JR., Professor of Law. B.A, 1948,
Buffalo; MA., 1950, LLB., 1953, S.J.D., 1954, Wisconsin. Pro-
fessor Van Alstyne joined the Florida faculty in 1972. A
member of the Wisconsin Bar, he practiced in Milwaukee and
has taught at Nebraska, Wisconsin and Cornell. He is on the
Board of Directors of the Non-Resident Division of the


Wisconsin State Bar


and appointed Special Counsel on


various matters by the Wisconsin Governor. Professor Van


Alstyne


was Articles Editor of the Wisconsin Law Review and


is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and Coif


academic


tions;


- . -: : t ..
*. ,. :'.. t:,* ,**:.. .
. .. .. ., ... *. *
.* . .. ..
.. . . .
: ... .
:..'.. .
," "h', ? t'! :.: ...
S.4,'l;: .. .:. .
I;
*..* *.I . ,.... .
', ;:*, : i, '\
,, ,,, *, '
S" "A ^ ... :z. .,,. .


His principal


interest is commercial law. He will teach Corpora-


and Law Office Economics


in 1983-84.


KATHLEEN WAITS, Assistant Professor of Law.


Cornell;


1975,


Harvard.


Professor Waits


Florida faculty in 1979. A member of the


bia, Illinois and Florida Bars,


., 1972,


joined the


District of Colum-


practiced in Washington for


the Solicitor's Office of the US. Labor Department and has


taught at American University.


Professor Waits'


principal


academic interests are civil procedure, professional respon-


sibility and
sibility; and


sex discrimination. She will teach Prof. Respon-


C


Procedure in 1983-84.


WALTER O.


WEYRAUCH


Professor of Law


Dr. iru.


Frankfurt Main


, Germany; LL.B., 1955, Georgetown; LL.M.,


1956, Harvard; J.S.D., 1962, Yale. Professor Weyrauch joined


the Florida faculty in 1957


He is a native of Germany and


was admitted to the German Bar and the U.S. Court of Ap-


peals of the Allied High Commission,


Germany. He has


taught at Yale,


Rutgers


Newark), Berkeley and Frankfurt.


Professor Weyrauch is a Honorarprofessor


University of Frankfurt,


Germany, He was


of Law at the
a recipient of


Rockefeller and Fulbright grants. His principal academic in-


terests are family law and comparative law.
Business Organizations; Family Law; Legal C


Comparative


He will teach
counseling ; and


Law in 1983-84.


*I *. '- n


BAll ILITF'"b Al E


t F* -


ea neent o -
-
ss.,


SAIll I IA AAC


n t I


n r .


"h -
--z
\^i ,


...>* 1'








STEVEN J. WILLIS, Assistant professor of Law. B.S, 1974, J.D.,


1977, L.S.U.; LL.M.,


1980, N.Y.U. Professor Willis joined the


Florida faculty in 1981. He is admitted to the Louisiana Bar, is
a Certified Public Accountant in Louisiana and has taught at


N.Y.U. He


was Associate Editor of the Louisiana Law Revi


Managing Editor of the N.YU. Tax Law Review and a member


of Coif, Following graduation, he practiced in


New


means


and clerked for Judge Davis of the U.S. District Court for the


Louisiana Western District. His principal academic inte


are tax, corporate and comparative law. He


ax Proc; Federal Taxation; and Legal


rests


will teach Civil


counting in 1983-84.


VISITING


AND


ADJUNCT


PROFESSORS


BARBARA A. BURKETT, Adjunct


Associate Professor of Law


, 1963, iD., 1966,


Iowa; Graduate Studies, 1970-72, Illinois; LL.M., 1978, Harvard. Profes


the Florida faculty in 1977


sor Burkett joined


She has taught at the University of Arkansas, where she


developed their clinical programs, and was


a Bellow's Fellow


Burkett is admitted to the Florida, Iowa and Illinois Bars


as well


at Harvard. Professor


as several federal district


courts, courts of appeal, and the U.S. Supreme Court. She was a memberr of the Board of


Editors of the Iowa Law Review. Upon graduation, she


was a bank trust officer and later


joined the Vermilion County Legal


Services


Program. Her principal academic interests


are in the clinical and skills training areas.


KERMIT L. HALL, Associate Professor of History and Affiliate


Associate


Professor of


Law. Ph.D., 1972, Minnesota; Master of Study of Law


1980. Yale.


Professor Hall joined


the Florida faculty in 1981. He has taught at Wayne State and Vanderbilt, is a Director of


the American


Society for Legal History, and a recipient of numerous grants and


fellowships. His principal academic interests are judicial selection and behavior, and U.S.


constitutional history. He will teach a seminar


in American Constitutional and Legal


History in 1983-84.


JEFFREY L. HARRISON, Visiting Professor of Law. B.S., 1967, M.B.A.,, 1968, Ph.D.,


Florida; J.D., 1978, North Carolina.


A member of the T


exas


Bar, Professor Harrison


1970,
joined


pr










JOEL S. NEWMAN, Visting Professor of Law. A.B., 1968, Brown; JD., 1971, Chicago. Pro-
fessor Newman is a member of the Minnesota and New York Bars. He was in private


practice in New York City and Minneapolis, and has taught at Hawa


and Wake Forest.


He will teach Income Taxation in 1983-84.


JAMES D. O'DONNELL, Adjunct Lecturer.


1964,


1968


, Florida. Professor


O'Donnell joined the Florida faculty in 1980. He is admitted to the Florida Bar, Federal
District Court, U.S. Tax Court, US. Court of Claims and the U.S. Supreme Court. He prac-


ticed with and was a partner in


acksonville firm until starting his own firm in 1977. He


will teach Criminal Tax Fraud Procedures in 1983-84.


WALTER B. RAUSHENBUSH, Stephen C. O'Connell Visiting Professor of Law. A.B


1950


Harvard; J.D., 1953, Wisconsin, Professor Raushenbush has taught at Wisconsin, North-


western, New Mexico, Arizona State, Arizona and Texas. He has served as a Law


Admission Council Trustee since 1972, and served


as LSAC President 1980-82.


School
He will


teach Land Transactions and Finance; and Property in Sprin


1984.


JONATHAN W. SHIRLEY


ashington; J.D.,


Visiting
1982,


Assistant Professor. B
West Virginia; LL.M.,


A., 1977, West Virginia; M.F


1983. He


is a native


of West


Virginia, and is a member of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences and Phi Beta


Kappa. Professor Shirley will teach In
Taxation of Estates and Trusts.


come Taxation;


Corporate Taxation; and


income


CHRISTOPHER WEERAMANTRY


, Visiting P


professor


of Law.


A.B., LL.B., LL.D., University


of London. Professor Weeraman
in the area of human rights, and


a native


of Sri Lanka. He has published extensively


served as the Commissioner of


Assize and Puisne justice


of the Supreme Court of Sri Lanka. He


taught at Monash, Colombo, Tokyo, Stellen-


bosch, and Papua, New Guinea.





EMERITI


VERNON W. CLARK, Professor of Law Emeritus. A.B.E., 1932, J.D., 1942, Florida; M.A.,
1939, N.Y.U. Professor Clark joined the Florida faculty in 1946 and was a faculty member


for approximately 30 years. A native Floridian and


S .1


a member of the Florida Bar, he serv-


as a District Sinervisor for the Florida Probation and Parole Commission and as a











panels of the Federal Mediation and Consiliation Service, the American Arbitration


Association, and the U.S. Postal Service. Professor Delony


principal academic interests


are labor law and commercial law.


HENRY A. FENN, Distinguished Service Professor and Dean Emeritus.


1935, Yale. Dean Fenn joined the Florida faculty in 1948


1932; LL.B.,


as Dean and served until 1958 in


that capacity. He practiced in New York City and has taught at Yale, Vanderbilt, North


Carolina, and Southern California. His


principal academic interest is Estates and Trusts.


KENNETH B. HUGHES, Professor of Law Emeritus. B.A., 1933, LL.B., 1936, Southern Cal.;
LL.M., 1951, SJ.D., 1961, Harvard. Professor Hughes joined the Florida faculty in 1968
and has been named Outstanding Teacher of the Year on several occasions. He has
taught at Southern Cal., U.C.L.A., Puerto Rico, Boston University, Boston College and In-
diana at Bloomington. He is a member of the California, District of Columbia and Puerto
Rico Bars and practiced fifteen years in Los Angeles and Beverly Hills. Professor Hughes
was a Brandeis Fellow and member of Coif, and served as Admiralty Counsel to the U.S.


Maritime Commission. His principal academic interests are


evidence, federal practice


and criminal procedure. He will teach Criminal Procedure and Evidence in 1983-84.


RICHARD B. STEPHENS, Professor of Law Emeritus. A.B., 1939, Rochester; LL.B., 1942,


Michigan. Professor Stephens joined the Florida faculty in 1949, was selected


as the first


Outstanding Professor in 1965, and received the Florida Blue Key Distinguished Faculty
Award in 1964. A member of the Illinois and District of Columbia Bars, he practiced in
the District of Columbia. He is an honorary member of Coif, Omicron Delta Kappa and
Phi Kappa Phi. Professor Stephens' principal professional interest is federal taxation. He


was honored by the Florida Bar upon his retirement in 1977 by the creation of
tax scholarship that bears his name.


a graduate


PETER WARD, Professor of Law Emeritus. A.B.


1936, Harvard;


., 1939, Cornel


fessor Ward joined the Florida faculty in 1972 after a visiting
a member of the Florida, New York and various Federal


g appointment in 1970. He is
Bars, and has served on the


faculties of Cornell, Texas and the University of The South. Professor Ward retired in
1979.


DAVID WEISS, University Librarian Emeritus.
Harvard. Professor Weiss joined the Legal I


, 1937, Univ. of Pittsburgh;


.,1940,


Information Center in 1969, and was ap-


pointed Affiliate Professor of Law in 1976. After practicing law in Pennsylvania from
I OAC n I O C ...- r nr ^ IA r^ T -, I A Ar,, n^4 trfrr n fl nth m r 9\ 1n i n104Q I-I rz cnrnrt










GENERAL


INFORMATION


The University and the College of


The University


Law


- Past


The University of Florida is a combined state University and land-grant
college located in the northern center of the state. Its beginning is traced back
to privately-owned Kingsbury Academy, established in 1853, and merged with
state-owned East Florida Seminary following the Civil War. A few years later
the passage of the Morril Act provided lands for state institutions of higher


learning


which


would


promote


agriculture,


mechanical


military


science, resulting in the beginnings of the College of Agriculture, the College of
Engineering, and the Agricultural Experiment Station.


By 1905 there were a half-dozen state-supported


institutions


of higher


learning in Florida, located in various parts of the state and struggling for ex-
istence. At that time the Florida Legislature took a step unprecedented in the
history of education in any state by passing the Buckman Act, which abolished
the six State Colleges and provided for the establishment of two new institu-
tions, of which the University of Florida was one. It was established for men, at
Gainesville, and placed under the direction of the Board of Control, a body
created by the Buckman Act. The seven members of the board represented the
seven geographical sections of the state, and served without compensation, ex-
cept for travel and incidental expense incurred in the performance of duty. In


1947 the University was made coeducational.


The thirteen member Board of


Regents replaced the Board of
represented students since 1977.


control


n 1965. An additional regent has


The University


- Present


Florida's first, the University of Florida


also one of America's truly


distinctive universities. Along with Ohio State University and the University of


Minnesota,


the University of Florida offers more academic programs on a


single campus than any of the nation's other universities, private and public. It
is also among the nation's 25 largest universities; yet its division into 19 col-
leges and schools, with their 140 departments, gives students the opportunity
to know and work closely with most of their classmates and teachers. Its loca-
tion in Florida's University City Gainesville-dedicated from its founding to
serve as a home away from home for college students adds immeasurably to
the educational and social opportunities for students.


In short,


the University of Florida


is a residential


campus,


with rich







GENERAL INFORMATION


Leadership Training


One of the most important facets of a


complete education that the


University of Florida offers is leadership training.


Its results are prov


en. More


than half of Florida's Cabinet Members, including the Governor, are Univer


of Florida graduates, as are approximately one-third of the


state


senators,


members of the State House of Representatives, Floridians


in the U.S. Congress


and State Supreme Court justices. Half of the ten persons named in


Florida's most influential governmental, professional and business p


1978


ersons


attended the University


graduates


occupy


)f Florida.
positions


Thousands of other University of Florida


every


known


professional


endeav


throughout the state, in the nation and in many parts of the world


There are reasons behind the University of F orida leadership su


access.


contained campus in


a larger community


whose principal


focus


is on the


University


- provides


ou sands of leadership


opportunities. Student govern-


ment at the University of Florida is one of the nation's most independent and


infl uential. Every col lege has its own student council.


Almi ost every committee


for governance of the University


as a whole


have


student


members.


University turns many of its activities over to students to implement. Students


serve on advisory boards and


councils in city and county government. Hun-


dreds of students are employed in career-developing positions and serve intern-


ships in Gainesvi le area institutions.


Virtually every academic offering pro-


vides opportunities for membership in chapters of national student organiza-
tions. Churches and civic groups in the community provide special programs


and opportunities just for University of Florida students.


More than 500 par-


ticipate in a student volunteer action organization, providing companionship
and assistance to children, the elderly, the handicapped, the incarcerated, the
underprivileged and the lonely in 14 separate programs. It is the largest student


volunteer action group in the nation. A nationally recognized Student


Services


Office offers counseling programs for dozens of special student prob ems,


both academic and personal,

Setting and Environment


as well


as leadership training programs.


The University of Florida is located in Gainesville, a city of 86


situated


in north central Florida, midway between the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mex-


ico. The location enables residents to be within


easy


access


s of the beaches


while living in an area with gently rolling hills


Interstate 75 and good airline


service keep the University in the mainstream of commerce midway between
Atlanta and Miami.


In addition to a moderate climate, Gainesville


tages to students of the University. An 18-hole


offers many other advan-


olf course is on the campus,


and swimming and boating accommodations are available at nearby sorines







GENERAL INFORM TION


fare both on the campus and the community which gears itself to student in-
terests because of the preponderance of students in it. A full program of men's
and women's intercollegiate athletics insures one or more major spectator
games per week. More than seventy-five percent of the Student Body par-


ticipated last year on 1401


intramural teams. Gainesville is in the heart of


Florida's


rolling


woods,


lakes,


springs


river


country.


is equi-


distant- only a two hour drive- from the fishing and boating Gulf Coast and
the swimming, surfing and beaching Atlantic Coast. Big name music stars and
their bands are brought to campus for concerts almost weekly by Student


Government Productions. Students themselves


have numerous opportunities


to perform in local musical groups and stage plays, to exhibit their arts and


crafts, to write for several student-operated publications
interests of every description.


The College of

A Short History


and to pursue hobby


Law


THE COLLEGE OF LAW, founded in 1909,


began its work


in the Thomas


Hall Dormitory for men under the deanship of Albert J. Farrah, a graduate of
the University of Michigan, who served from 1909 until 1912.


Following the administration of Dean Farrah, Thomas W.


Hughes served


as Dean from 1912 until 1915. The Law Building, built in 1914, was one of the
first permanent units on the campus.


Harry R.


Trusler, also a graduate of the University of Michigan,


was ap-


pointed to the deanship in 1915 and served in the capacity until 1947. During
his administration the College of Law was accredited by the New York State


Board of Regents in


1917,


admitted to membership in the Association of


American Law Schools in 1920, and recognized as an approved school by the
American Bar Association in 1925, the same year in which it opened its doors to
women. In 1933 the requirements for admission were increased to require an
academic degree.
Henry A. Fenn, a former Professor of Law and Assistant Dean of Yale Law
School, became Dean in 1948 and served in that capacity until 1958. During his
deanship the curriculum was expanded and strengthened, and an individualiz-


ed program of research, writing and instruction was inaugurated, as wel


as a


seminar program in Legal Ethics which received national recognition. In 1955,


the College was granted a charter by the Order of the Coif


a national


scholarship society, in recognition of its high academic standards.
Dean Fenn elected to return to full-time teaching in the fall of 1958 and


Frank E. Maloney succeeded him as dean,


after serving as acting dean for a


year.
in iL I ,J I r^. f A^^ / J - ^ ^ i i - :j.. ^ - ^ i .. A .








CE\ERAL


INFOR,4A TION


During Dean Ju lin's tenure the College experienced


impress ive


qua ltat ve


growth as evidenced by creation of the
Responsibility and its highly successful N


Col ege's


master of


Center


Laws


Upon Dean u in's resignation from the deanship an


Government


in Taxat on program.
d return to teach ng ;


March, 1980, Associate Dean E. L. Hunt was named


interim


Dean.


Under Dean Hunt's direction,


the Co iege of Law changed from a quarter


a semester system and made major curriculum


revisions


improve


quality of legal education at the Holland Law
together with Dean Read, played a major ro e
pension of the Law Center facility es.


On July 1,1981 Frank T. Read assumed the de


Center,


n ad


in obtaining


anship. D


d ton, Dean Hunt,
funding for the ex-


ean Read former v


served as Associate Dean and


Professor of Law


Professor of Law at the Universitv of


s ity School of Law, Indianapolis. He is


Tulsa, and


helping


at Duke U
as Dean of


to guide the


n ivers tv, Dean


the Ind ana


Coflege


and
ver-


of Law


greater


national prominence


n the


1980's.


The Law Center is


nearing


complete on


with


construction


long-


awaited Bruton-CGeer HaI .


The 40,000-square-foot bu ld ing


was


inc uded


or ginal


plans for the Law C:enter.


College


Donat ons from a umni,


a $1.5


m lion


appropr at on


friends


and f


trom


acuty
State


Legislature have made possible the 53]7


mi lion


ciitv


two-story


Bruton-C


the south and will


include a


which


adjoin


courtroom comp lex,


a 7,00


present structure tr(
0-square-foot library


iegal


writing


area,


a suite


Center


for Go


vernmen


Responsibi ty,


p acement


areas.


Bruton,


center, legal aid
The bu hiding is
of Plant City, Fi (


cinic,


n a m ed


alum


for the


affa rs suite,


ning


and re


crea-


parents


rida.


-<.. . .
Stxsv
q #4
i qi:: "I'~,


% s,4
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.-..*A .-s i- "
i||^.. *fr . ":/^''.:. :*:::*'










ADMISSIONS


AND


DEGREE


REQUIREMENTS

Admission-Juris Doctor
Preparation For The Study of Law


A lawyer's education may be divided


nto pre-lega


training,


aw school


career,


post-legal education.


Pre-legal training involving a set under-


graduate program has deliberately not been prescribed by the College of Law.
The faculty feels that in view of the diverse nature of the lawyer's tasks, the
best program is similarly one of broad diversification in which the student
gains a knowledge of the formative processes of our civilization, the nature of
people and their institutions, and something of the technology of our age; the
capacity for understanding, independent and challenging thinking; and, finally,
the ability to express oneself clearly and forcefully in the English language.
Since concepts expressed in words are the primary tools of the legal pro-


fession


, it cannot be emphasized too strongly that the beginning law student


must bring into legal education the fundamental skills necessary for effective
oral and written communication. Students may also find that an understanding
of basic accounting principles will be helpful in some areas of the curriculum.
For additional information, see the current Pre-Law Handbook, published
annually, prepared by the Law School Admission Council and the Association
of American Law Schools. This books includes material on lawyers and the law,


pre-law preparation, application to law schools,


the study of law, and in-


dividualized information on most American law schools. It may be obtained at


college book stores or ordered from the Law
2000, Newtown, PA. 18940.

Admission Procedure
Before an application can be considered,


hool Admission Council, Box


the following documents must


be received in a timely manner by the College of Law: Law School application


forms,


Law School Application Matching Form (LSA Matching Form). and


LSAT/LSDAS report from Law School Admission Service (LSAS) and, if the ap-
plicant has attended another law school, a written statement concerning his or
her previous attendance at the other law school plus a complete transcript and


a certificate from the Dean, indicating the applicant


class rank and


certifyin


that he or she


is in good academic standing


at that


institution


- .1fI .
m.*'":t;1


~ -i :
~s; At


S~


m


i








ADMISSIONS AND DECREE REQUIREMENTS


applicants


(including


present


former


University


Florida


students) must register with the Law School Data Assembly Service (LSDAS).
Applications for admission of non-University of Florida students must be ac-
companied by an application fee of $15.00. This application fee is not refund-
able.
For Beginning Students: Beginning students are admitted only in August
and January. Applications may not be filed more than one year in advance of
the intended month of entry.
Applications and the LSA Matching Forms cannot be accepted for con-
sideration after February 1 and July 1 for the following fall and spring classes


respectively.


Early completion of applications within the periods specified is


strongly recommended inasmuch as al
ed deadline dates.
For Advanced Standing: Usually,


spaces may be filled prior to establish-


only those applicants who have com-


pleted the first year of law school are accepted. In no instance will a candidate
for admission with advanced standing be considered until academic evaluation
has been made for at least fourteen quarter hours or twelve semester hours by


the law school from which transfer is sought.


August, January or May.


Transfer may be effected in


The completed application must be on hand on or


before: July 1 for the fall term; October 1 for the spring term; and March 1 for
the summer term. Acceptance of a transfer applicant on the basis of the first
semester or quarter's academic evaluation is conditioned upon his or her main-
taining the Law School average or class rank prescribed above. No more than
28 semester or 42 quarter hours will be transferred. The completed application
consists of:
(1) University of Florida College of Law application forms, completed and
signed;
(2) a law school transcript with grades for at least 14 quarter or 12 semester
hours;
(3) a copy of the applicant's LSAT/LSDAS report from the law school from
which transfer is sought;
(4) a letter from the dean of the applicant's law school, indicating the ap-


plicant's class rank and certifying that he or she is


in good academic


standing and eligible to continue studies there; and,
(5) a statement to the Admissions Committee relating your reasons for now
wanting to attend the University of Florida College of Law.

All students must complete a total of 86 semester hours credit for the Juris
Doctor. A minimum of 58 must be completed in this College. Additionally,
students must satisfy the prescribed first-year curriculum, as well as the Profes-
sional Responsibility and Advanced Writing requirements.


All completed materials must


be received in room


164C Holland Law


/r. *I" I #tr.. 1 I 1I


I -








ADMISSIONS


AND DECREE REQUIREMENTS


system


respectively.


In the absence of documentation that a candidate was


, or that some other unusual condition occurred at one of the testing, mult


AT scores are averaged. Standards


y higher than those


for non-Florida residents are substan-


for residents.


Law Schoo


Admission Test: The


AT is given by Educationa


Testing


vice


in cooperation


with


leading


school


throughout


should be taken one year prior to the desired entry date. A fee


e country and
of $20 in addi-


tion to a Basic


Registration Fee of $20 is charged by ETS. L


AT/L


DAS


Registra-


tion Forms and LSA Matching Forms are found in the


Law Schoo


Admission


etin and


LSAT Preparation Materia


schools and undergraduate institutions.


which can be obtained from al
Tests are given four times a year


plicants applying for fa


admission should take the LSAT


n June,


October


December. Those applying for spring admission should register for the Decem-
ber, March or June LSAT.
It is recommended that students applying for the LSAT leave themselves
enough time for rescheduling in the event they are unable to take the exam on
the scheduled date or desire to take the exam a second time.
Educational Testing Service advises that older scores should be accepted


only


in special


circumstances and should be interpreted in light of the can-


didate's intervening experience.


s, an applicant may be required to take the


test again if his or her score is older than five years.


hool Data Asse


mbly Service: ALL applicants must submit the Law


choo


App


cation Matching Form


cessing year with the law school's


1 (LSA Matching Form) for the current pro-
copy of the application. No action will be


taken on any


application until


receipt


of this LSA Matching Form.


The LSA


Matching Forms are contained within the LSA/L


DAS registration materials in


the Law Schoo


Admissions


Bulletin.


DAS reports will be produced by LSAS


candidates


who


have


submitted


Matching


Form with


their law


school application to this or other 1k
plying to more than one law school.


schools, providing the applicant is ap-


Considerable lea
AS to prepare an L


d time (approximately 4 to 6 weeks


AT/L


must be allowed for


report ONCE THEY HAVE RECEIVED YOUR


AT/L


REG


TRATION FORM AND


TRANSCRI PTS.


Registration


for the


LSDA


is valid only for


a current processing year;


March 1


in the


,1983 through June 20,


1983-84


1984.


processing year


The deadline for registering with LSDA


1984


transcripts


must be


received by LSDA


spring


no later than July 15,


1984.


admission are reminded of the


they apply at the deadline,


they w


Those who make application for
deadline and are warned that if


need to reregister for the new processing


year


Evaluations:


Three


letters of


evaluation are reanested of


I 1 I


annli


cants







ADMISSIONS AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS /37

Courses completed with a grade of C or higher in other ABA/AALS approv-
ed law schools will be acceptable (subject to Faculty approval) for credit up to
but not exceeding a total of 28 semester hours. The Admissions Committee will
consider applications meeting the above criteria early in the term preceding
that in which matriculation is desired.
Acceptance of a transfer applicant is conditioned upon his or her main-
taining the law school average or class standing prescribed above for all work
undertaken subsequent to the application for transfer.

Applicants with Foreign Credentials: The Faculty of the University of
Florida College of Law has adopted the following policy in respect to admis-
sion of applicants with foreign legal credentials to our Juris Doctor (J.D.) pro-
gram:
(1) A "foreign lawyer" is defined as an individual who is a member of a
foreign bar or who holds a law degree issued by an institution not in the
United States.
(2) Foreign lawyer applicants shall ordinarily be required to take the LSAT,
unless specifically exempted from doing so by the Admissions and
Financial Aid Committee. In addition, applicants whose native
language is not English shall be required to take the Test of English as a
Foreign Language (TOEFL). Foreign lawyer applicants shall I submit all
information required of other applicants for admission and, in addition,
shall supply a detailed curriculum vitae indicating all professional ac-
tivities engaged in since law school.
(3) All foreign lawyer applications shall be initially considered by the Ad-
missions and Financial Aid Committee. The Committee shall forward
all applications which it affirmatively recommends to the full faculty,
which must approve or deny such applications. Admission of any such
applicants shall only be recommended based on a prior record that sug-
gests that the applicants is exceptional in terms of scholastic and career
potential and that such applicant's presence will substantially enrich
the educational experience of the j.D. program. Any applicant with
foreign credentials other than a "foreign lawyer" shall be considered in
accordance with the general J.D. admission policy, as revised in
August, 1980. When the Admissions and Financial Aid Committee
meets to consider foreign lawyer applications, it may request that
faculty members who are not members of the Committee, but who
possess expertise in evaluating foreign lawyer applications, participate
in its deliberations or submit written evaluations of such applicants to
assist it in its deliberations.
(4) The College of Law may consider for admissions applicants who have
foreign law study experience, or have been admitted to the practice of
Ir1A hrnr rl Riirh nnl irntc nr< t r\/iicd that ~Ithntioh a~dmikCinn will







38/ADMISSIONS AND DECREE REQUIREMENTS

and (b) American Association of Law Schools (AALS) sections 2.8 and
2.9 which read as follows:
(b) "2.8 Advanced standing. A member school may grant a student
academic credit ("academic standing") for work successfully com-
pleted at another member school or, much more cautiously, at a
non-member law school approved by the American Bar Associa-
tion (ABA). Similarly, advanced standing toward a first degree in
law may be allowed in respect to study outside the United States,
if related to courses substantially equivalent to those given in
member schools and if undertaken in an institution whose admis-
sions standards are comparably high.
2.9 Advanced standing for foreign study. Advanced standing for
foreign study shall not exceed one year unless the foreign study
related chiefly to a system of law basically followed in the jurisdic-
tion in which the member school is located; and in no event shall it
exceed two years."
The Admissions and Financial Aid Committee shall appoint a faculty
advisor for each foreign lawyer who accepts admission. The faculty ad-
visor shall assist the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs in determin-
ing whether the applicant shall be granted credit for any previous
course work taken at another institution which, in accordance with
ABA Standard 308, may not exceed one-third of the total number of
credits required for the J.D. degree. All foreign lawyer applicants,
without exception, shall be required to complete the courses in Legal
Writing, Professional Responsibility and the Senior Writing Require-
ment at this institution. Exemptions from other first year courses and
other upper division courses may be granted, at the discretion of the
Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs, depending on the background
and experience of the student. Any credit awarded pursuant to this
paragraph shall be conditioned on the student attaining a cumulative
grade point average of at least 2.50 on a 4.0 scale, in all courses taken
at the College of Law.
(5) A foreign lawyer may not receive credit retroactively for courses
audited or in which the student otherwise participated prior to admis-
sion to the College of Law or, if excluded for academic reasons, prior to
readmission to the College of Law, unless specifically approved by the
faculty.
(6) No action will be taken on a request for admission until receipt of a
completed application. A completed application must be received on
or before February 1st for the fall semester and July 1st for the spring
semester. A completed application consists of:
application forms, completed and signed;
ir t- .a .-& - ^








ADMISSIONS AND DECREE REQUIREMENTS/39

to and completion of a J.D. program with advanced standing may or
may not qualify one to take the Bar examination in a particular state.


Inquiries regarding precise


eligibility status should be directed to the


highest court in the state of the Bar Association of the state in which
the foreign lawyer plans to live and practice.

All of the above, with the exception of the LSAT/LSDAS Report, should be mail-
ed directly to Law School Admissions, 164 Holland Law Center, University of


Florida College of Law, Cainesville, Flo
tion write directly to the above address.


Orientation


rida, 32611, U.S.A. For more informa-


Program


For Beginning Students


In order to acquaint entering law student with the Coll


of Law and law


school teaching methods, an orientation program of one or more days is held
for each entering class. Applicants accepted for admission will be advised of
the exact date, prior to the commencement of regular classes, on which the
orientation for that class will begin.


As part of the orientation program,


Small Group Advisor.


entering students will be assigned a


These advisors are second and third year law students


who


II be available to help beginning


students adjust to their first year of law


school










MISSIONSS AND


D IC FF


R:2QUL


IRLM iN TS


*:v' .


"* A..


,..* : .. -. , *. ..' *,
- ;. -. --:. .' -''.: .- '
*. : *. ;:. .
1 1

* : ....: .. .
. ... .. .^ .,-. ...


... .. . ',
v'*> ^ ,,


..,, "
,,, , ,L 2 . d ~ 4 I


Requirements for Degree -J.D.


The faculty of the Coll


of Law will recommend for the degree of Juris


Doctor (J.D.) candidates who complied with the following requirements:


Completion


with


a passing


grade


courses


totaling


least


semester hours credit, of which at least 58 must have been completed
in this College.
Satisfactory completion of:
(a) Legal Research and Writing, LAW 5792, with a grade of S or better.
(b) Appellate Advocacy, LAW 5793, with a grade of S or better.
(c) The Advanced Writing Requirement.
(d) Professional Responsibility, LAW 6750
Maintenance of a 2.0 honor point average on all work attempted in this
College.
Fulfillment of course requirements as set forth hereafter under "Cur-
riculum."'
Completion of at least 90 weeks of full time study in residence in an ac-


credited law


srchnnl of which at lePat 60 must have been in residence in


S..
* N'


. \i








ADMISSIONS


AND


DECREE


REQuiREML\


Concur


rent


Degree


Progr


ams


Urban


A tour


Reg


Regional
year prog


onal


Planning


Planning


ram eadi ng tc
eis offered un


uris Doctor


joint


aster


ausp


ces


oi Arts


Urban


of the C


the G


graduate


hoo l


(College


Arch


itecture,


Department


Urban


ional


lems


stud ies
receives


separate


Planning).
urban and


The pr
region


with relevant
both degrees


ogram provi
al planning


course
at the


work
end


des students interested in


with


n the


an opportunity


planning


a four


matriculation would require


year


years.


legal


to blend


curriculum.


COiirse


study


Students must take


their r


student
whereas
the CGRE


and LSAT


gram.


prior to
College


admission and mrn
of Law faculty


VIsor


arateliy
for this


adm


program


mission to eac
is Professor


Currier.
Master of Business Administration
The College of Law and the Graduate


school


Business


ministration) offer a four year program cu minatin


n both


a Juries


Doctor


degree and a Master of Business Administration.


The program


is intended to
< ISl .r ] l.


provide broader career opportunities for students interested


in business ad-


ministration as well as in law. The student receives both degrees at the end of a
four year course of study whereas separate matriculation would require five
years. Students must satisfy admissions requirements of both colleges and may


enter the concurrent degree program only in the fall semester.


The student


enrolled in the joint degree program many spend the first year in either the Col-
lege of Law or the College of Business Administration. Students admitted to the
law college but electing to spend the first academic year in the College of
Business Administration under the joint degree program may enter the College
of Law thereafter without once again qualifying for admission so long as they
are in good academic standing in the College of Business Administration and
their law study begins no later than the third semester after commencement of
study at the College of Business Administration. Any student who participates
in the joint degree must commence courses in the second discipline no later
than the beginning of the third semester. The College of Law faculty advisor is
Associate Dean Jeffrey Lewis.
Master of Arts in Political Science-Public Administration
The College of Law and the Graduate School (Department of Political
Science-Public Administration) offer a four year program culminating in both a
Juris Doctor and a Master of Arts in Political Science-Public Administration.
This program allows the student to combine his or her interest in law with the
,rna nf r nhlir arnminictratirn Th0 catirlnt rrcivxoc hntfh loorpcar at the nnd nf







42 /ADMISSIONS AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

Architecture, and the Department of Political Science-Public Administration in
the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.


REGISTRATION,


FEES


AND


ACADEMIC


POLICIES


Registration
Registration dates for other than beginning students are set forth in the
College of Law Calendar. All students must adhere to the registration pro-
cedure announced by the Office of the Registrar. Students are responsible for
registering on those specified dates. Late registration fees will be charged for
students registering anytime after the specified registration period.
Change of Registration-A student is not permitted to drop a course, ex-
change one course for another, elect or revoke the satisfactory/unsatisfactory
option, or change sections in the same course without the approval of the
Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs. No student will receive credit for any


course which he or she is not properly registered. Dates within which cou


rses


may be dropped or added are set forth in the College of Law Calendar.

Fees and Expenses
Note: While the College of Law Calendar may deviate from the University
Calendar in some respects, law students must comply with all general Universi-
ty fee payment deadlines.


* I- I'


I C'







REGISTRATION, FEES AND ACADEMIC POLICIES/43

A Florida student will pay a fee of $38.00 per semester credit hour. and a
non-Florida student will pay a fee of $110.00 per semester credit hour.
Alien students will pay the same fee as a non-Florida student.
In addition, a $24.00 health fee per semester will be paid by both Florida
and non-Florida students.
All fees must be paid in accordance with University regulations. Late
registration increases the registration fee by $25.00; this increased fee will not
be waived for any reason. Prospective students should note that all fees are
subject to increase without notice after the date of publication of this catalog.
Applications for admission of non-University of Florida students to the
College of Law must be accompanied by an application fee of $15.00. This fee
is not refundable.
Law School Admission Test and Law School Data Assembly Service: A fee
of $20.00, in addition to a basic registration fee of $20.00 paid to the Law
School Admission Services, covers the cost of the LSAT. The fee for LSDAS is
$20.00.
Though expenses vary considerably with individual students, an unmar-
ried student attending the College of Law should anticipate expenses in addi-
tion to tuition of at least $3,645.00 per year, estimated as follows: books and
supplies, $450.00; personal and clothing, $545.00; room and board, $2,420.00;
transportation, $230.00.
Consult the University Catalog for the time and place of the payment of
fees and expenses, and for information concerning the classification of Florida
and non-Florida students.
The above-listed fees are subject to change and you will be informed
through the University of Florida when these occur.

Refund of Fees
1. Fees will be refunded in full for:
a. Credit hours dropped during the drop/add period.
b. Courses cancelled by the University.
2. With the exception of amounts required for collection under bond and
trust obligations, fees may be refunded in instances of:
a. Involuntary call to active duty.
b. Death of a student.
c. Illness of the student of such duration or severity, as confirmed by a
physician, the completion of the semester is precluded, or
d. Exceptional circumstances, upon approval of the University Presi-
dent.
Refunds may be obtained at Student Accounts, THE HUB, upon presentation
of proper documentation.







REGISTRATION, FEES AND ACADEMIC POLICIES


slon


, and three years of law study [or longer


if not a full-time school], which


have an adequate


library and a sufficient number of teachers giving their


entire time to the school to ensure actua


with the who


student body


and which


persona


acquaintance and influ


not be operated as


ence


a commercial


enterprise.

Student Employment


The College of Law of the


defined


by the


Association of


quires that its students be "fu


University of Florida is a fu


Amer
-time"


ican Law Schools.


-time


school


Association policy re-


students who devote substantially a


ir working


hours


to the study


schedules and minimum load


quire substantially the


Pursuant


to this


policy,


requirements are intentionally d


working time of students of this College


academic
;ned to re-
Deviations


from the required curriculum or the minimum load are never authorized solely


to enable students to engage in part-time


employment.


Therefore, no student


should plan to depend on part-time
current attendance at this College.

Maximum and Minimum Loads
No student may register in any


hours,


employm


semes


ent as


ter for


than 6 nor more than 8 hours


a means


than 1


of financing


con-


nor more than 16


during the summer term


minimum


is prescribed


faculty


to ensure equal


full-time com-


petitive


effort from all students, and to enable graduates of this College to


satisfy the study in residence requirements of the national accrediting a


tions


and of all federal


and state


jurisdictions. In exceptional cases, the


ssocla-


max-


imum and minimum loads may be varied by approval of


individual


petitions.


keeping with our accreditation


as a full-time law school


, no such petition will


granted for the sole purpose of enabling a student to hold part-time


ment. Any student who drops below the minimum


approval will be automatically


employ-


without administrative


suspended.


Graduate Level Course Option
With the advance approval


of the Ass


stant Dean for


Academ


Affairs,


students


may enroll in a maximum of two graduate courses


outside of the


school


for credit toward law school graduation.


Under this


may receive no more than a total of 6 semester credit units.


option a student
Two such courses


may be taken in one semester


Although the grade is not computed


in a stu-


went's


grade point average,


a B or higher must be earned to receive credit hours


for the course. Students on probation are not eligible for the option.


Grading Scale
n r, riinl.- n ,4-, D


- A stud


r- I A. .


went's work is graded according to the following scale: A


-.- .- -J r


TL.. - -1 --


- r- *i.*-I t I rlb tU| I II i 114 | i1 5 *ir i iurv/- i rluiu*ir narc I- 1 I i I rLa I nLJ r r-in-" r_


fr nr ryT


/- --^ J- J.J* C C* f^. JM 'J.kj








REGISTRATION, FEES AND ACADEMIC POLICIES/ 45


LAW 6951).


Trial


Advocacy (LAW 6361) and Crimina


Practice (LAW 6941) may


graded on a satisfactory-unsatisfactory or


raded basis


at the


option of the


instructor.


Satisfactory-Unsatisfactory
credit for 56 hours of work


Grading
in the Coll


System


Students


who


have


received


of Law are permitted to take one non-


seminar elective course on a satisfactory-unsatisfactory


standard for satisfactory work


shall be the grade of C.


radin


system.


or U grade will


become part of the student's record, but will not be counted in computing the


student's grade point average.


This option is available only to students in good


standing who are not on any type of probation.


The burden of assuring that the


class roll reflects a proper election of the option rests soley upon the in-


dividua


student.


The option of having the grade for a course determined on


the S-U basis must be exercised by the student in any course before the expira-


date of the


Drop/Add


period.


Therefore,


the option


must


be exercised


before the end of the first week of classes


and then becomes


final.


calen-


dar.) Students should carefully consider the risk
their final term.


Determination of Honor Point Average


exercising this option


- The honor point average is determin-


ed by computing the ratio of honor points of semester hours of work attempted


in courses


points a


in which


better


grades


according to the following


are assigne
scale:


student


receives


honor


GRADE


HONOR POINTS


GRADE


HONOR POINTS


S. 3. 4
* -/ *'^


. . ... .0


I (Incomplete)
X (absent from


exam)


Grades


of H (Deferred grad


tory) are not computed


satisfactory


in the stud


went's


rade


and U
point a


Unsatisfac-


average.


Attendance


Class attendance
continued enrollment


is a primary obligation of each student, whose


n the


right to


course and to take the examination is conditioned


upon


become


a record of


familiar with


attendance satisfactory


following


ABA


of the


professor


requirements


Students


dealing


with


should
atten-


dance.
A A P a RI t iO cfatoc in norintnfo n nrt


E .














46 / REGISTRA TION, FEES AND ACADEMIC POLICIES


iii) "full-time student"


means a student who devotes substantially all


working hours to the study of law.

b)

c) Regular and punctual class attendance is necessary to satisfy residence and

class hours requirement.


thS


...".. j. .,,. --' .

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I


semester, providing a student's course load does not fall below twelve hours in

the semester in which a course is dropped.

Exceptions to the above policy must be approved by the Assistant Dean
T", ^"t ,~; af V "" " ~4 r-i*-t*/' / "*-:**-.-* 14 -l^/^ I .,-J,,, L-t, i^ b- /*./ q - ^.J **^. jk .*, j**. w.^ Ii, ^- JLm *


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' w
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*" ri '..,,,,,,,,, _


'r'l IU1


Drop Policy

Between the end of the official drop/add period and the date designated


by the registrar's office


as the last day for withdrawing without receiving failing


grades in all courses, each student who has completed the first year of law


school


is allowed two automatic drops


as follows; no more than one per












REGISTRATION, FEES AND ACADEMIC POLICIES


5792 and


5793, Lega


Writing and Appellate Advocacy, both of which must be


completed with a grade of S or better


even if this


requirement necessitates


repeating these courses. Nor does this rule apply to LAW 6951, 6950, and 6930,


where no fa


Examination

end of each


ilure is


involved.


s-Examinations for each course are generally given only at the

semester. Students are given exam numbers before each examina-


tion period. Faculty members are given keys for these exam numbers upon re-


quest.


While most faculty members grade anonymously, they are not required


to do so. Each faculty member, during the semester, wil


advise students what


grading procedure


be followed in the course.


Examination papers are re-


trained by instructors for a period of not less than one year after administration


examination.


Usually,


within a reasonable time,


in whole


or in par


students


are given


any written work L

t. Re-examinations


an opportunity


jpon which a student'


are not


given.


review,

grade is


Academic


Policies for delay


n taking examinations.


.. ,.
-H -- .

.* ..

.--^"^ V..


ag
.." .


S-yS :.. ..Ei.

* ^*g2'-
-. ." 7"


-.. .S


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*.. .. *. *
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.. .. . .II. :. *. : : .... Mi.* .
. .. j~j v. ... ... ; ? -. .**.. . I


.. .. .. . . ,, :* ,." .1 .." -. p i
. * * *:X.G:.* .....- **
: *'.....S" + Jf .j E M 1E*j :-+ : .* .... l ..i...:.
..: .. .. . . .. .
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I.... -. *H*t :I .i"
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:.. .. .... ... ..... .. A ..



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: l.,:: .:4.:: '. :
: : .5?.. f.
:. .


:,


*. -
-- ,"i ii: r
IB^^


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-. .i. -.-.-. .
*

yrr -$;- .- .. *A* -
-L """ig p'g " *


, : .,,,, ,, ,"
-. .. .. ... .:*: .. :
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1 .*::.. ...
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'*' i?: : Ex.


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." . . .. ..... .. .."...". .. ..
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.. *.. .*' ..:. . ... ..- - .;
... . .: . . . . . .. "..
.. A . - .l . .. .... .. ..
.***"r =. **' .\. *' *.. **.* .F ":.* 1. *
..... : .. . . . ..
. ... : .. . N. - :..-. : . .
- i e *- "*i .*;. ^ ":. t-W- :
*..... . ....... .. h . .
.~l .. 4' .'. ...
H ....
.... .. . ,, . .H. .. *.. :f...
- *! ." -. a ** .. . . . * ..
", 4 ; ,", .-
d .. 4 ... . L 4 .


".



.4
*0
'*I




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;* 9.:*l' .



- *- x
A:h> IH W !


A.
:..' +.. .,


based


Hr*AI""*


~P~?~i~g~


- **9"* /.'I


_ ;' .. ..


--E4





*u







48 REGISTRA TION, FEES AND ACADEMIC POLICIES


advance


with the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs. Only after the


student is notified that the petition for taking an examination late has


been granted is the
rangements must be


student free to miss a schedu ed exam i nation. Ar-
made with the administration office for taking the


examination


An examination will, under no circumstances, be delayed because of


sever,
tons


al


bei ng scheduled consecutively un less there are at least three examina-


scheduled for consecutive examination periods. When the examination


schedule


requires a student to take three examinations in three consecutive ex-


am nation times, the student may elect to defer only the second examination in
that sequence, and then that examination must be taken on the first subse-
quent exami nation day on which the student has no other examinati on schedu l-
ed. (Under no circumstances will permission be given to take an examination
before the scheduled time.j


Departure and Reentry


Subject to the catalog rules governing probation and exclusion and


compliance with ABA and AALS standards where app icab


a student who


has been evaluated on at least one full semester of work may withdraw or
depart, retaining the right to reenter this College within five years from the end-
ing date of the last term in which such student earned law school credit. Upon
the expi ration of the period of five years, or un less special circumstances are
shown, a student who desires to return and otherwise entitled to continue to


Co allege


must apply for admission


as a beginni ng student, or with advanced


stand
made


ng


as appropriate. The determination of special circumstances shall be


by the Dean with reference to the particular circumstances of each stu-


dent.
comr
sion


A student who registers


p etion of a


as a beginning student but withdraws prior to


fuil semester's work, must submit a new app ication for admis-
-fl* W '^ *' ^ -'*"*- F >- V- '* itfl^^*, _ *_f '-/ 1I l ***f- lt.^/t^ *_-%^ E <'- B^ *-'* * *^r' I -


to a subsequent class, and will be


considered with regard to standards


prev

jury


ailing at the ti me of subsequent app location.

Duty


Each


student's obligation to function as a member of this law college


community


includes


the duty to


appear


when notified of selection for


service


as a juror on
Posted on the


Practice Court or Clinic trials. Periodic notices of selection are


official bulletin board of this


College.


Unexcused failure


to discharge this duty wili resu lt in permanent loss of


station


including


alized


priority


who


for alt courses upon which enrollment limitations


seminars,


wishes


practice


regain


are plac-


court, and clinical programs. A student thus
registration priority may request permission


from


the Assistant Dean for


Academic Affairs to perform jury


service


at such


time


as mav be designated


by the Assistant Dean.







REGISTRATION, FEES AND ACADEMIC POLICIES/49

determine whether the student has committed a prior offense. If it is not
a first offense, the situation will most likely call for all-University
disciplinary action (See #2). If, however, this is a first offense, and the
faculty member decides that no other factors in connection with the of-
fense would require all-University disciplinary action (conduct proba-
tion, suspension, or expulsion), he or she may hold a hearing with the stu-
dent.
The student should be:

a. given a notice of charges; and
b. given an opportunity in a hearing with the faculty member to present
his or her case.

This hearing will include an opportunity for the student to present any
witnesses he or she may have, the right to have an advisor present, the right to
confront any student who allegedly saw him or her cheating, and to understand
his or her rights prior to the beginning of the hearing. The maximum penalty
that the faculty member may assign is a grade of "E" in the course. If this issue
is not resolved as a result of this hearing, i.e., there has not been agreement on
the matter between faculty member and student, it is recommended that the
faculty member refer the case to the Director of Student Judicial Affairs who
will then transmit it to the University of Florida Student Honor Court for ad-
judication.
It the issue is resolved as a result ot the hearing held between the student
and the faculty member, the Director of Student Judicial Affairs should be con-
tacted and notified of the offense, its circumstances, and its resolution. In this
manner the University will be able to keep a central registry of all students who
have committed academic violations.

2. If the faculty member feels that a case of academic dishonesty may war-
rant possible all-University disciplinary action, the faculty member
should refer the case to the Director of Student Judicial Affairs, who will
then transmit it to the Student Honor Court. The case will then be ad-
judicated by the Student Honor Court. Penalties the Student Honor Court
can recommend are:
a. formal reprimand;
b. probation;
c. suspension; and
d. expulsion.
An "E" in a course involved may also be recommended to the faculty
member who, of course, retains the responsibility and authority to assign
all grades. If the student desires to appeal the decision recommended by
a I ., ., i-iw- i. C







REI ( S iRA


uslon


TION, FiES AND ACADEMIC


Academic


Reasons


Students


in the


are grad


uate


stude


nts in a program of professional


ucation


In place


of the University of F lorida Undergraduate Student Regu la-


the foil
A student


owing
t who


probation
withdraws


and excl


usion rules apply to all law students.


from the co I ege during two successive terms in


which the st


ment


in the


udent has


college


begun a


attend


unless,


ance shal l
d cause sh


excluded from further enroll- I


own,


the dean approves further


enrot lment.


For all


cumu active


terms
grade


other than


point


the f


average


first term


of the first year,


is less than 2.0 is not eligible


a student whose


to continue.


student whose


first year


grade point
f law study


average


will be


is less than 2.0 at the end of the first term of


on scho plastic probation and wi ll not be el igi-


ble to continue if the grade point average is
bationary term.
For purposes of these probation and ex(


than 2.0 at the end of the pro-


usion rules, the grades


and X are


treated


as the grade of E until they are changed to permanent grades, and at


that ti me the grade poi nt average will be recomputed and the student's stand-
ing will be determined on the basis of the permanent grades. The grades S and
U are not used in computing grade point averages. Only grades earned at this
College will be considered in computing a student's grade point average under
these rules.


A student ineligible


to continue under these rules will not be readmitted


except by action of the Academic Standards Committee of the College, and the
Academic Standards Committee will not entertain a petition from a student
who has received a grade of H in one-forth or more of the credit hours for
which the student was enrolled at the time of exclusion.
Reinstatement
Except as otherwise provided, a student who is ineligible to continue in the
College may petition the Academic Standards Committee for reinstatement.
Students petitioning for reinstatement must submit their written petitions to
the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs at least one week prior to the start of
classes in the term for which the student seeks reinstatement. The Committee's


decision is final, and may


incorporate appropriate terms and conditions.


LEGAL


INFORM A


TION


CENTER


POLICIfS








LEGAL INFORMATION CENTER/I5

more than doubling, so that by the end of the 1960-61 academic year the col-
lection reached 60,000 volumes.
In December, 1969, the 100,000th volume was added. With increasing ap-
propriations since 1970, the library collection again doubled in size by 1975.


The current count exceeds 350,000 volumes which ranks Florida 19th
school library holdings in the country.


in law


the last


decade


just under $3,000,000 was appropriated for legal


materials. For two years the budget was the largest among law school libraries


in the country and a third year it was second only to Harvard.


These funds


enabled the library to acquire in depth, rich resources for an expanding student
body and faculty.


The Legal Information Center


, formerly known


as the Law Library, pro-


vides comprehensive coverage of materials in all areas of American law, in-
c eluding complete holdings of state and federal laws and court reports, 800 law
review and legal periodicals indexed in the two standard legal periodical in-


dices, an extensive treatise


collection, broad coverage in


looseleaf


servi ces,


comprehensive tax material s for graduate research and a vast collection of
other supporting secondary author ty. While the federal documents collection


in the Legal Information Center expanding,


extensive regional


documents depository of the University LI braries as well
volumes are totally accessible to law students and faculty.


as its 2 i2


fede


mi llion


Other


segments


library's


book


holdings of English and other common law


collection


include


jurisdictions, as well


substantial
as those of


various other foreign countries.


with


University


Libraries,


A large
which


Latin American


specializes


co llect


is shared


Caribbean


Latin


American pub lications. Our Brazili an holdings rank among the best nat ionally.
The law coll section is housed in three spacious read wings rooms and four
stack levels, with individual study carrels on each floor. Elaborate facilities
and equipment are availab e for effective employment of the latest aud io-










LEGAL


INFORMATION CENTER


-- ^ -- _. H t


a


visual


over


techniques. I
00 pre-record


,. -"-.* ,. i. ;a ,*
.. .. .. ~i,... ';. "
. . ..
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.. I ..
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H 4;
,' iC -, ... .. 'yw '.,C f ""f'i -. . ,."
.. .. ... ^ : <- ^ ^ ... ; ..*.'"- *,"- .'
i ~ ,, .. ... .:.S &J .SH . ...i...;xlp '< .*".*^ 1 -* ,;:w. rb.b., =
1:-,~ ,.,fu ..^"EN'vV* .. XL ,W .& "T-s ... .. :'...
-,l ,!?- "/ *' .. : l '*,' .. .,:* *"' 'j"..r *.'. ". ""' *...."" ,,:.,-'! ...t '*'! "...,B .
%, i.,. ,i s i-i T iS. ajS. < ; .1 6 ., ': .. 1., ..; :. -*': l '|fft
.:*'--,:. '".... ..:,, :, .. : ,. *. '* _..**. ,':". *:^:.;^ '

: . . . :" ^ .
*:/.s^ :,^.i5 "l 1 ....A -. ,,.
^ ^ .. ^. ..^ ^' *
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and audio-cassettes


n addition to


16mm.


films


.' ..


.. .
... ~,.** A


ed book-sized video-cassettes, most of which are


, there are


in color


and may run up to sixty minutes.


These cassettes consists of programs prepared


national


institutes,


seminars


attorneys,


with


leading


torneys


professors


speakers.


One


series


advocacy


was


deve


loped by the American Bar Association.


The facilities rank among the best


in audio


-visua


materials available in any law


school


Half-inch black and white


color videotape


is used extensively


in recording


mock


trials


in the


center.


The opening of the professional audio-visual and courtroom facilities


Burton-Geer


addition


provide


more


extensive


usage


media


resources.


i












LEGAL INFORMATION CENTER / 53


Eighteen computer terminals are currently in operation; two for catalog-

ing, two for legal research, one for automated programmed instruction, and six

to initiate a campus-wide automated library system. Individualized library ser-

vices are provided to students and faculty members by a staff or professional

librarians who assist in learning how to use the automated systems for study

and research. The center has recently acquired seven IBM personal computers

for word processing, computer-assisted instruction, access to national law and

law-related data bases, and facu ty, staff, and student research projects. Three


terminals are available for public use.


These terminals use the LEXIS,


WESTLAW, and PLATO systems. The Legal Information Center was the first

law school subscriber to WESTLAW and an early subscriber to PLATO and

LEXIS. Through access to these systems, users may search extensive databases

of federal and state laws, cases, and administrative publications in addition to

other miscellaneous databases, including English law and cases, and the Euro-

pean Common Market. Many students learn the basics for some classes

through use of the programmed courses in PLATO, the computer assisted in-

struction system. The Center has recently acquired an extensive collection of

legal computer-assisted programs on floppy discs that can be used by faculty

and students on the IBM personal computers.


Ki'





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STUDENT


PROGRAMS


AND


SERVICE ES


Financial
Entering


Aid


J.D


Students


Policy


Holland Law


policy of the University of Florida Law Center Association and the
Center to meet the financial needs of qualified law students, in-


sofar as


funds are ava


able


with what


is in essence a revolving fund. Acc


bulk of availab


funds


directed toward


oans


rather than


scholar


ships.
Loans


Holland Law Center Association Merit Loan


ch year the


and Law


enter


Assoc


nation awards


approximately 10 Merit Loans


to entering freshmen


who are Florida residents. Merit Loans


provide a lump sum of $900 for the first


academic


year (2 semesters) of study. Addition


loans of $900


each for the


sec-


ond and third academic years will be reserved for the recipient, if the recipient


achi


eves


satisfactory grades.


University of Florida Law


co-e


nter Association Merit Loans do not require


ndorsers. No interest is charged until six months after the date of gradua-


tion or termination of law school attendance,


whichever comes first.


terest rate


is 4%


per annum. No payment of interest or principal is required un-


til five years after graduation or termination of law school attendance.


total


time for repayment is five years from the date on .which the payment of


interest and principal first becomes due.


Block


Memoria


Loan


Fund


This


fund,


established


by the


friends of Karl B. Block


, Jr., provides long-term loans in the amount of $900 per


academic year to beginning freshmen who are bona fide residents of Dade


County.


These loans are only available for fal


Robinson Reese Saunders Memoria


Loan


entering classes.
-This fund was estab


ished by


law firm of Saunders, Curtis,


be $900 per academic year


inestra


& Core.


The amount of the


The award will be made to beginning fres


oan wi
hmen i


recognition of the applicant's financial
College of Law and in the legal professic


need and promise for success in the
rn. This loan may not be available for


each beginning class


depending on the ava


ilabili


ty of fund








STUDENT PR)OGRCAMS


AND


SERViCES


Chester H. Ferguson


School warships -


Before


death


1983,


a umnus Chester H.


Ferguson established


a schola


rship


fund for


outs


tand


entering freshmen. These sch


academic year,


awarded on the


whtch


basis


have


of merit


a st ipend
and need


Basi s


of Award


Merit Loan


Non-resident Tuit


are aware


entering law students on


basis


scho


a nt


need


aracter,


titude,


undergradua


apparent
te grade po


the basis for first


resident Tuit on


promise


nt average


year awards.,


Scho arshi


p, an


success


and Law


Tobe


app ican


School


to apply


t must


have


Adm mission


a ,Vler


an over


roF essio)n.
Test scores
it Loan or N
undergo adu


grade point avera


ge ot at


least 3.20


on a


410 system, and


obtain


an L.SAT


score


36 (625 on old sc


or higher.


These


are minimum


criteria.


u c c es sf u i


p icants wI
quantitati ve


have


superior


requ iremen I


credenti


sta ted


Those applicants


above


oul d


wri te ci


who


irect v


o not meet


LU rivers


Financial


Aid Office


orson


concern


feder.


state


loans


avail a


Fi nanc I


Assistance


Federa


I and State


on a Univers ty -wide


insore


Oa ns


emp D


rmation


Oymnen
I cation


programs


are h


orms cancer


ning


tionai Di
and OPS


rect Loans, Federal
empl oyment may


Anderson


F orida


for a


residents
aranteed


Hai


mnav a


iv Insured Lo
be obtained


Un diversity
cciv to the


under


ars,
from


orida,


ated


Col ege


Work Stud


he Studenr


SEmp oy, menit,


t Fin ancia l


Ca inesyii e


agency


H higher


in their r


326 11


respe


ct ie


airs O1-


Non-
states


cat ion


How


to Apply


our credenti


of Florida
olarship, it


Law


Center


is suggested


Center part c pates


n a n (7
SnOCC


need


ation


that you
he Cracu


meet


Merit


requ


can


iremnents


or aNon-


request inanc i


ate and Profess onal


resident


assistance.


Scho


Tuition


The Ho llan
F nani alA


FAS), and uses the


CAPSF


AS report t


o sel ec


rec ipients for finan-


cia aid. To apply for finance al


assistance,


write to CAPSFAS fo


ran ap


cation


form and


, in completing the


form,


indicate


Holl and


aw


Center


as reca p-


ient. The address is:


Graduate and Professional Schoo


Financial


Service


Box 2614,


Educational Testing Service


Princeton, New Jersey 08540
The GAPSFAS report nmust be received on or before October 1 for spring
n~~~ nr Al *r Ir C- *r rE(14u~l rErr II r nwi)I n )\nD7t nr I7 rC4 r,- s> 4 < V1 r $ (' nc +








STUDENT PROGRAMS


annual stipend of $600


pleted at leas
vides that the


AND SERVICES


scholarship is awarded to a student who has com-


: two and not more than three semesters. Mrs. Crandall's will pro-
scholarships are to be awarded to good students in need of finan-


cial assistance.


recipients are


selected by the Board of Trustees of the Univer


sity of Florida Law Center Association on the basis of scholastic performance


and need.


The scholarship is awarded in the fall term.


Atwood


Dunwody


Scholarship.


- This


scholarship


was


establi


shed


friend to honor Atwood Dunwody,


a graduate of this College.


One


scholarship


is awarded


annually


to a


second year


student


on the


basis of


academic


standing and need for financial assistance.


This scholarship is award-


in the fall term.


Junia Engelhard-Max Bisk Scholarship.


-The


scholarship was establi


by Nathan M.


Class


of 1973, in memory of his wife's


mother,


unla


gelhard, and his father,


Max David Bisk.


A $200


cash


scholarship is awarded


annually on the basis of financial need to students who have completed their


first year


in law school.


This scholarship is awarded in the fall term.


Justice Richard W


Ervin Scholarship Fund.


- This fund was establ


ed by


aw firm of Ervin


Varn


, Jacobs, and Odom. One


scholarship is awarded an-


nually in the spring to a


graduating senior with high academic standing.


Joseph J.


Gersten Key.


-This award was established by


oseph J. Gersten


serving


as chairman of the Florida Board of Bar Examiners to honor the


outstanding law


school


senior judged on the basis of academic a


achievement


and leadership in activities relating to the law


school's


education


program,


extracurricular interests, character and promise of a distinguished career


scholarship is awarded annually to a


spring graduate.


Julius F


Parker


Scholarship.


- This


fund


was


established


Parker


family


in honor


Julius


Parker,


past president


Florida


State


sociation. One


scholarship of $500 is awarded annually to a senior with high


academic standing.


Only


summer and fal


graduates are eligible.


Alpha Delta Scholarship.


-Ph


Alpha D


elta Law Fraternity makes ten


hundred dollar


scholarships available nationally each year. Students


who have


completed two years of law school


fraternity may be eli


for such a scholarship.


and who are members of the


Applications and detailed


formation can be received from the Fa


culty


Advisor or the Chapter


justice.


Delta Phi Scholarship.


annually


grants


$100


- Ph


awards.


Delta Ph


awards


international
are made


Legal


to two


Fraternity
initiated


members of Cockre


Inn who have best


exhibited a high deg


ree of


scholastic


achievement,


as wel


as serve


to the


nn and the Colle


e of Law


Scholarships







STUDENT PROGRAMS AND SERVICES/57


Walter L.


"Bud" Robison, Ill, Memorial Scholarship.


- This scholarship in


memory of alumnus and past John Marshall Bar Association President Walter


L. "Bud" Robison


, was established by his family, members of the class of


1966, and other friends. An award of $750 is made annually on the basis of
need to an outstanding student in his or her second or third year of law school.
This scholarship is awarded in the fall.


Judge )ames B. Whitfield Constitutional Law Scholarship.


- Approximately


$1,000 with an appropriate certificate will be awarded annually to a senior law
student who has demonstrated high proficiency and interest in the field of Con-
stitutional Law. Consideration is to be given not only to grades but also to
those qualities that will lead to an outstanding career in the field of Constitu-


tional Law


Those eligible to apply are recipients of the highest


rade in Con-


stitutional Law


I, Florida Constitutional Law, Constitutional Law Seminar


or Political and Civil Rights; authors of articles or papers dealing with Constitu-
tional Law prepared for the University of Florida Law Review for seminars or
for an Independent Study Course; and those nominated by members of the


Holland Law Center Faculty who teach in the
scholarship is awarded each summer.


area of Constitutional Law


Loans funds for


Advanced


Law Students


From time to time, on an emergency basis, long-term loans


in the amount


of $300 per academic year may be granted if the student:
demonstrates financial need;
has completed at least one semester in the College of Law and has earn-
ed a law school average of 2.0 or higher;
is registered for at least 12 semester hours and possesses a validated fee
card before processing the loan; and
has loans and grants for the academic year (2 semesters) not exceeding
$2,500. (Tuition waivers for special students are not included in this
$2,500.)


Application forms for the following loan funds are in the law


school's Ad-


ministration Office and are


available at


the beginning and end of


each


semester. Applications are not available during the summer term.


Brevard


County


Association


Scholarship


Fund.


- Applicants


limited to Brevard County residents attending a Florida law school, and must
be at least second semester students in good academic standing. Funds are
limited to $1,000 per student per year, payable immediately prior to the beginn-
ing of the term and divided into equal payments based upon the school's
system. The financial need of the student is a paramount importance in making
the selection, and the Bar reserves the right to inquire into the financial status
,-* fc f^. l , > >, .,J _ tJb .. ^-- -- ., I-J ., I, mIJ, ---J.,. ,j, n" .. ,. C. ... 1L ,-: I .J J., .. ,-: ... ; kJ .. J- .- .








SUDENiT PROGRAMS AND


SERVICES


who
may
lion


have completed tw
be Joined to each


maV


be obtained


fu L semesters of study. A total not to exceed $3,000


applicant. Application forms and additional


informa-


from Jane Dallet, The Florida Bar, Tallahassee, Florida


32304.


dridge


worthy


Mark


Hart


Mrs. M
student
Hulsey,


Loan
arnon
ts to


Fund.


- This


loan fund was estab wished through the will


Houghtel in Hart. The loan fund is made available to


assist them


in completing their legal training.


Jr. Student Loan Fund..


-Established by


alumnus Mark


Hulsey


students need ng financial assistance in the form of loans.


Leroy


Franklin Lewis Memorial Loan Fund..


- This fund was established


through the will of


the late Mrs. Catherine L. Thomas of Pensaco a, Flor da, in


memory of her father, the late Leroy Franklin Lewis, formerly


a practicing at-


torneN
them


/


in New


York City. Loans are to be made avail ab e to students to assist


in completing their legal


medical and theol ogical training. First priority


loans


given


to law


students, with


preference


to second and third


r students.
1. David


Liewelyn


Loan


Fund.


- Friends and family of L. David L ewelyn


have


establish


loan fund in m


emory


of David Llewelyn,


i.D., 1


G iddings
William i. Da


E. Mabry


nn, Jr


Loan


Fund.


- This


oan fund


was


established by Mrs.


in honor of her father.


frien


Fran k
ds of


E, Ma money
he late Dean


Memor a l


Loan


Frank E. Malon


Fund.


- Students, alumni and other


establ ished as a memorial a fund to


assist-


law students.


Miarmi


Beach


Bar Association Scho warship Fund.


- App icants must be, or


ave


been, residents of Dade County attending a Florida Law School and must


at least second semester students in good academic standing. The student's


rades must meet the approval of the Bar's Scho


larship Loan Committee. Funds


are limited to $500 and are repayab le without interest one year after gradua-


thon.


The financial need of the student is of paramount importance and the Bar


require


an explanation of the circumstances of the students' financial


nee


Phi Apha Delta Loans. Phi A pha Delta Law Fraternity, International of
a program of Endowment Fund Loans to law student members of the


Fraternity who are in need of such loans to complete their


aw school educa-


tion. The maximum amount of such loans is $1,500.00 and repayment does not


begin until after graduation


In addition, the Fraternity offers a program of En-


dowment Fund Loans to members of minority groups who are attending law
school
Phi Delta Phi Loan Fund.- Phi Delta Phi International Legal Fraternity


1 e*t -^ r rn i q i i r r CDf t ^


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STUDENT PROGRAMS AND SERVICES : 59

Short-Term Loan Funds Administered
by the College of Law
The ten funds listed below are administered by the College of Law inter-
nally and can be made available within a day or two fo! owing application for
the loan. Terms vary slightly from fund to fund, but generally they are 90-day
loans, $250 maximum, and have no interest charges if paid back on time.
To be eligible, students must have completed at least two semesters at the
College of Law. Only one loan may be taken out each semester and a late
charge of ten percent of the loan amount will be assessed if the loan is not paid
back on time.
Ralph Blowers Memorial Loan Fund. Friends of the late Ralph Blowers
have established this fund to provide short-term loans up to $200 through the
Loan Committee of the John Marshall Bar Association, the student organiza-
tion of the College of Law, in conjunction with the Sun Bank of Gainesville.
Loans are made on the basis of individual student need.
Martha B. Culpepper Memorial Loan Fund. This fund was established in
memory of Martha B. Culpepper, the first administrative assistant of the
University of Florida Law Review, to provide short-term loans to students who
have completed two semesters of Law School.
Harriet-Horner Memorial Loan Fund.- This fund, established in memory
of George Harriett and Jack Horner, provides short-term loans to students in
the second and third years of law study.
Justice Story Book Exchange Loan Fund.- This short-term loan fund was
established by the student book exchange to provide emergency loans for
students who have completed two semesters of law school.
Young Lawyers Section John Marshall Bar Association Emergency Loan
Fund.- The Young Lawyers Section of The Florida Bar has made available to
the John Marshall Bar Association funds for emergency loans up to $200 to
students in their second semester or above.
Minority Law Student Emergency Loan Fund.- Loans in the amount of
$200 per academic year are awarded through the Assistant Dean for Minority
Affairs. Established to provide short-term relief for unexpected happenings.
Laura T. Plum Loan Fund.-This short-term loan fund was established
through the will of the late Laura T. Plum to assist worthy and needy law
students.
Randolph Ross Thomas, Jr. Memorial Loan Fund.- Short-term loans from
this fund are made available to students in the graduate tax program on the
basis of need in memory of Randolph Ross Thomas, Jr.


Li*f k -- a









60 STUDENT PROGRAMS AND SERVICES


Off-campus
Supervisor, Off-campus Housing
University of Florida


Gainesv


Florida 32611


On-campus
Director of Housing
University of Florida
Cainesville, Florida 32611


4 4


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Center for Governmental


Responsibility


The Center for Governmental Responsibility is an organization committed
to the goal of seeking out and implementing ways of making government more
accountable to its citizens. The Center provides students with a unique oppor-
tunity to conduct research on issues relating to executive, legislative, and
judicial functions at the local, state and national level. The research agenda in-


cludes energy law,


environmental and water law and policy, criminal and


juvenile justice, sunshine legislation and privacy, legal concerns of the elderly,
constitutional revision, bar reform and ethics, complaint handling and om-
budsman services.
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SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND SERVICES


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?. .L c" I


Clinica l


Program


The


translation of


eory


nto practice,


represe


nting a


ctual


ients


actual


cases


and studying the "non-traditional"


skills


awye


ring, is availab


to students enrolled in the clin


programs at the College of Law.


The total


spec


trum of I


practice,


trom


interviewing,


counseling,


case devel


opment,


research
experie


h, discovery and nego


nced


in the


context


tiation, through the full range


immediacy


of trial


representing


skills


indigent


can be
clients.


Legal


concepts such as divorce, evi


action, adoption, administrative


regulations,


consumers


rights,


arrest,


bail,


probation


habeas


corpus


take on


reality


when confronted in a cin


al program. Procedural and


evi


dentiary learning


enhan


ced by
students


expert encing


may


enro


and applying th


in one


ese


rules in concrete


programs:


Civil


cases.
Clinic


or the


rTmlrna


Civil


Clinic


operates


out of


the College of


represents


Clinic:









SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND


of evidence, interrogation


5! .+4S


of witnesses and re lationship with the trier of a


Participation in C clinic provides a unique opportunity t o ana lze and


ref ect


these skills, to enhance the development of


practical


corn petenicy


facilitate career choice


adjustment


to pract ce


after


graduation)


Enro -


ment in the Civil Clinic


requires a commitment to


through the semester break period up


the next semester. This


is required for


until the F:ri
all clinic stu


act ve client representat on
day before the beg inning of
dents whether gradu at ng or


The Civil Clinic


registration is done


awards 9 credits.


Enrollment


s limited to


10 st


in the middle of the semester registration. An


udents. Pre-
appli ation


form is avai able at the C i i ic Off ice (
Selections for the C inic will be


Room 323.


made on the basis of these a pp cations.


Although there are no form course prerequisites,


Ev ldence and Profess ional


Response ability


are strong y encouraged prior to begin ing the c ifi(


(b) The Criminal Law


(:inic commences with a course in Crim i na


program.
Practice


for 3 units of credit, following which students


are certifi ed a s interns and may


progress in the following termn to the Crimina l


Clinic c


course for 6 units of credit.


Enrollment in the Criminai Practice course is limirnted
these positions are reserved for students who w ish


to 24 students.


progress


Twelve


to the Cli nic


course. The remain ng 12 pos tions are av ailabl i e to students who wish to take
just the Criminal Practice course. Application is made in the middle of the


semester before enrollment, normally the two weeks befo


re regu lar preregistra-


tion. Application forms are available during this time at the Clinic Office,
Room 323.
The Criminal Practice course is organized largely upon a Practice Court
motif, with provision made for more conventional teaching methods such as


lecture and class discussion. During the course the class


as a group will


develop a single simulated criminal case through the entire formal criminal
process from arrest through trial. Other more abbreviated simulations will also
be conducted. The course is designed to provide the student with an overview
of the entire criminal pretrial and trial processes and to acquaint student with
the basic lawyering skills required to function in this context.


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*. .:. .







SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND SERVICES


In the following term students who elect to do so will be assigned as in-
terns to either the Office of Public Defender or State Attorney for the Eighth


Judicial Circuit in Gainesville. While assigned to these offices,


interns wil


form all attorney functions of the office under the supervision of selected staff
members of the offices. During the course of the semester, interns will be
assigned to misdemeanor, felony, and juvenile cases and may expect to be in-


volved in


interviewing clients and witnesses, investigating


cases,


doing all


pretrial pleading and discovery, negotiating and conducting actual jury and


nonjury trials. In all of these


activities, interns will be closely supervised by


staff members of the offices who, in turn, will be supervised by members of the
law faculty.


For further information,


6942.


Interested parties may


see course descriptions under LW 6940, 6941, and
contact Professor Don Peters (for the Civil Clinic)


and Professor James R. Pierce (for the Criminal Clinic) at the Office of the


Clinics


at the College of Law.


Distinguished Visiting
Professor Program
The University of Florida Law Center Association periodically assists the
College of Law in attracting eminent law teachers, jurists, and public figures to


participate in and teach seminar courses. Past visitors have


included the late


Tom C. Clark, Associate Justice of the United States Supreme Court; former
Secretary of Labor, Willard Wirtz; former Solicitor General of the United States


and former Dean of Harvard Law


school, Erwin Griswold, and Professors James


W. Moore, Delmar Karlen,


ames


Willard Hurst, and W


liam M.


Reisman.


Minority


Affairs


The College of Law is aware that minority groups are not represented


within the professions in any


significant number. Accordingly,


concerted ef-


forts are being made to make legal education available to minority students.


For further information on minority affairs,


see Admissions


Policy or con-


tact the Assistant Dean for Minority Affairs.

Placement
A full-time placement staff is available to provide assistance to prospec-
tive employers and students of the Holland Law Center. Representatives from
law firms, corporations, government agencies, and judicial offices throughout
the nation visit the Law Center during the year to interview prospective
-- ..in .. I *J.








SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND SERVICES/ 65

In addition to the placement of graduates for permanent employment, the


placement office assists second year students


in obtaining clerking positions.


These positions frequently lead to permanent employment upon the student's
graduation.


International


Law Programs


International Law Society
The International Law Society is a student association affiliated with the


American Association of Student


international Law Societies


n Washington,


D.C. Membership is open to all interested law students. The International Law
Society conducts a speakers program, with a series of luncheons throughout
the year with a guest speaker experienced in international law and foreign rela-


tions. The International Law Society also administers the participation


Phillip C. Jessup Internationa


in the


Law Moot Court competition.


International Law Moot Court Competition


The law school participates annually in the Philip C. Jessup


international


Law Moot Court competition. The program is administered by the International
Law Society, but is open to all law students who participate by means of in-
tramural competitions conducted each year. At the beginning of each Spring
semester a five member team is chosen to represent the law school in the an-


nual Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court competition.


The initial,


regional round is held each year at a law school in the South. The successful
team goes on to the national finals held each year in April in Washington, and
the winner of that competition argues against teams from law schools from


around the world. The subject each year dea


issue of international


with a hypothetical but timely


with memorials (briefs) prepared for argument


before the International Court of Justice.
International Summer Law Programs


Since


1970 the College of Law has sponsored


summer law programs


abroad,


which allow a student to study


international


and comparative


topics at associated legal institutions in other countries. In the past the two


programs have been offered in alternate years


Inquiries concerning plans for


the summer of 1984 should be referred to the Assistant Dean for Academic Af-
fairs.
There are international summer law programs offered by universities other
than the University of Florida. Before enrolling in such other programs, a stu-
dent must check with the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs to ascertain
l-~ x l- _I ,I. ~ I d: l l- -I L_ _ l _ i A - ^ - -





























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SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND SERVICES/ 67

with International and Comparative Law, particularly Civil Law, Socialist Law,
the Law of International Trade and the law of the European Economic Com-
munity and the Council on Mutual Economic Assistance. All courses are con-
ducted in accordance with the requirements of the Association of American
Law Schools and the American Bar Association.

Mexican Summer Law Program

The College of Law, in cooperation with the Escuela Libre de Derecho,


conducts a summer law program in Mex


ico City.


The program begins in


June and ends in mid-August,
Conducted entirely in English, the program is taught by faculty members
from law schools in both the United States and Mexico. United States law
students are offered an opportunity to study a variety of subject ranging from
the broad areas of International and Comparative Law to the more specific


area of Latin American and particularly Mexican Law. A


courses are con-


ducted in accordance with the requirements of the Association of American
Law Schools and the American Bar Association.


Law Center


Association


The University of F orida Law Center Association was formed in 1960 as a
support group for the College of Law. It is a 501 (c) (3) type organization under
the Internal Revenue Code, serving as a repository for nearly all of the private


support


given


the College.


Unrestricted


monies


provided


through


Association help fund a number of programs and purposes at the Law Center
including student scholarships and loans, placement, library support services,
the Graduate Tax Program, visiting professors and research.
The Law Center Trustees were organized n 1960 and act as an in formal
borad of advisors to the Dean and College. They are involved in managing the


assets of Law Center Association


Inc., legislative liaison work and securing


private funds. The Trustees have been instrumental in the successful campaign


to raise funds for the Commons Building.


The 1983-84 Trustees Chairman is


Doyle Rogers


a practicing attorney in Palm


Beach,


A second support group also plays a


role in assisting the


College


Law.


The College


reorganized in 1983


A umni


Its members ip


Council
includes


was


estab wished


representatives from


1972


each class


of the College who assist with the Annual Enrichment Fund and class


reunions.


The Alumni


Council also is


development, and special


involved


events


a Ft. Lauderdale Attorn


at the


is the


in continuing
College of La
83-84 Alumni


education,


w. Michael


uncil


career


McNe


rney


President.


Law Center


Association


TRnI .ciac


I II


R a; ar a








68 /SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND SERVICES


Charles B. Edwards, Fort Myers


George T. Eidson


r., Orlando


Robert M. Ervin, Tallahassee
Alan Greer, Miami


Michael L. Jamieson, Tampa
Rutledge R. Liles, Jacksonville
Norman H. Lipoff, Miami
Ben F. Overton, Tallahassee


W. S


Harrell


Pensacola


Frank T


amuel Holland, Miami


Sidney A.


Read, Gainesville


Stubbs


r.. Palm Beach


Dan H


Honeywell, Orlando


Law Center Association Council 1983


I 1W















ORGANIZE NATIONS,


ACTIVITIES,


HONORS


AND


AWARDS


. *,a .


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John Marshall Bar Association


The John Marshall Bar


Assoc


nation is the


student bar


assoc


iation affiliated


with the Law Student Division of the American Bar


Association and The Florida


Bar. Membership is open to all law students. JMBA arranges for prominent


members of the Bar to address law students.


The organization also appoints


student members to faculty committees in order to achieve student input into


matters of


common interest. In addition to


service function


MBA sponsors


many social events throughout the year.

The Council of Ten


l Ct r r n rn .4 i I +n 1 4 + 9


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Ti ... I / *: . b f k I :,. n 1 rr b-h /^i rr i- n n Y: I -* I







ORGANIZATIONS, ACTIVITIES HONORS AND AWARDS


This organization also aids in the recruitment of Black students to the law
school and provides academic assistance for entering Black students during
their period of transition from an undergraduate to a legal academic environ-
ment.
Environmental Law Society


association


open


to all


students


interested


in doing


legal


research on specific projects for environmental groups.
Spanish American Law Student Association


SALSA is an association open to all students


interested in a cultural


educational exchange with Latin American law students. The a


association aids


in the recruitment of Latin American students to the law


school


and provides


academic assistance to all members.

Law Association for Women


The Law Association for Women


L.A.W


is a student organization con-


cerned


specifically with the problems and


special


interest of female


students and with the legal rights of women


Membership is open to al


students, faculty, staff of the law school and spouses of these groups.
Law Wives
The purpose of this organization is to promote a spirit of friendliness
among law spouses; to provide more social activities for them; to assist them in
obtaining all the benefits to be derived from living in a University center; and


to assist the law school


and the community whenever possible.


Legal Fraternities
Phi Alpha Delta. Since 1924, the Duncan U. Fletcher Chapter of Phi Alpha


Delta Law Fraternity has provided a balance of


law students, faculty


service and social activities for


and alumni. Recent programs include tours of various


Florida prisons, a trip to the Florida Supreme Court, and numerous, well-known
state and local lecturers.


Phi Delta Phi. Cockrell


nn is the local chapter of the nation's oldest and


largest legal fraternity.


Inn activities provide a professional and


socla


mosphere in which members may associate informally with both faculty and
Phi Delta Phi alumni members of the Florida bench and bar. Inn members are
eligible for scholastic and merit awards, as well as national fraternity benefits


such as student loans and group insurance plans. Cockrell
twice a year and all students are invited to participate.


nn conducts rush














ORCANIZA fIONS,


AC TIVi
S -


TIES. HONORS AND A ,WARDS


C


B

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72/ ORGANIZATIONS, ACTIVITIES, HONORS AND AWARDS

Persons selected for Moot Court membership are eligible to participate in
a number of inter-collegiate competitions. The National Moot Court Competi-
tion is held each fall. Involving virtually all law schools in the United States,
the National competition has a regional round in Atlanta, sponsored by the
Georgia Bar, and a final competition in New York City sponsored by the Bar of
the City of New York.
In the spring, the Univerity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill sponsors a
competition in which approximately thirty law schools participate. Also in the
spring, The Florida Bar sponsors a statewide competition (won by the Universi-
ty of Florida 14 of the last 22 years) held in conjunction with the annual Bar
convention. The final round of argument is held before members of the
Supreme Court of Florida.
The Moot Court team at Holland Law Center is named in honor of the late
Justice Campbell Thornal of the Florida Supreme Court, a devoted alumnus.
Local competitions also receive support from the John Marshall Bar Associa-
tion.
Moot Court members may earn up to three hours credit toward graduation
for work satisfactory to the faculty advisor.

University of Florida Law Review
The University of Florida Law Review is a legal journal published quarterly
by the student Editorial Board assisted by the faculty advisor. The publication
consists of articles written by legal scholars expert in various areas of the law,
and works prepared by student members of the Law Review. All work is
selected, edited and prepared for publication by the student Editorial Board.
Law Review candidates are selected on the basis of high academic achieve-
ment. At the beginning of the second year, the top ten percent of the class
satisfactorily completing the first year curriculum is invited to participate on
the Review. All other students in good standing who have successfully com-
pleted Legal Research and Writing LW 5792 may write in the Open Writing
Competition during the first semester of their second year. In addition to the
open writing competition, any student may submit a work to compete for
publication in the Law Review, but this approach cannot lead to Law Review
membership nor can academic credit be given. For regular Law Review par-
ticipants, up to three hours of academic credit can be earned with approval of
the faculty advisor.


SI


m


I








ORGANIZE TIONS, ACTIVITIES, HONORS AND AWARDS / 73


Scholastic


Honoraries


Order of the Coif


The College of Law has a chapter of The Order of the Coif, a legal


scholar-


ship society with chapters at the leading law


schools of the


country. The


pur-


pose of Coif is to foster a spirit of careful study and to mark in a suitable man-
ner those who have attained a high level of scholarship. Election to the society
is based on scholarship and character. Eligibility for nomination is determined
once each year (normally in June). To be considered for membership, students
must be in the upper ten percent of three graduating classes and be eligible for
graduation with honors.
Phi Kappa Phi


Phi Kappa Phi is a national honor society, the
is the recognition and encouragement of superior


primary objective of which
scholarship in all fields of


study. Honor graduates within the top ten percent of each c


are eligible for


nomination.


Prizes and Awards
Students


American


Jurisprudence


Awards.


-The


publ


hers


American


Jurisprudence award a bound volume of an appropriate title from American
Jurisprudence to the student making the highest grade in each section of the


following courses: Constitutional Law 1 & 2, Contracts 1 &


Civil Procedure 1 & 2, Property 1


2, Criminal Law,


Torts 1 & 2, Commercial Paper, Business


Organizations,


Corporations,


Insurance,


Debtor-Creditor


, Evidence,


Federal Practice, Estates


& 2,
ning,


& Trusts, Future Interests, Fiduciary Administration 1


Administrative Law, Labor Law, Remedies, Conflict of Laws, Estate Plan-
and Family Law.


Gertrude Brick Law Review Prize.- To encourage participation on the
University of Florida Law Review and stimulate an interest in legal writing,


alumnus Albert Brick, in memory of his


mother, in 1951 established a trust


fund, added to through the years, that provides prizes totaling $250 annually to
the member of the Law Review submitting the best student note in each issue
of the Review.


The Bureau of National Affairs Award.


- A one-year subscription to U.S.


Law Week is given annually to the graduating student who has made the most
satisfactory progress in the senior year.


The Nathan Burkan Memorial Awards.


- Sponsored by the American Soci-









ORCANIZA

William C,


Gaith


ACTIVITIES, HONORS AND AWARDS

er Memorial Award. A gift, the income of which is used


encou


rage,


promote,


and support appellate advocacy within the College of


annual


recognizes


a student for outstanding leadership and


serve ce to


College's M


oot Court program.


William


M. Hicks


Award.


- The


author


Trial


Handbook


Florida


lawyers


awards


volume each term to the


student making the high


est grade


ractlce


Court.


Attorneys'


Title Insurance Fund.


- A business


trust of Florida, closely


affii


ated


with


The Florida Bar


, annual lly awards cash prizes to law students


w schools of Florida for papers in the field of real property law. A cash
of $150 is awarded for the best paper at each school .


Little,


Brown Award.


- Little,


Brown & Company


awards


an appropriate


ok annually


to the student making the highest grade in Law and Medicine,


LAW


6720.
Loca n


Over


nment Section of the Florida Bar Award.


- The Loc


al Govern-


ment
receive


Section


Ing t


Florida


Bar awards a


highest grade in Local


plaque


each year to


student


ernment Law.


Frank


Delta


E. Malone
Fraternity


Memoria
annual lv


Award.
resents


- The


Fletcher Chapter of Phi Alpha


award


to the


student


who


rendered the most outstanding
$25 and a certificate.


service


to the fraternity


The award


consists of


Frank


test sponsor
open to law


Ma money Environrmental Law Writing Contest.


by the Environmental


- This annual


Law Section of The Florida


students from each of the Florida law schools


con-


Bar will


The author o


winning


article


a guest,


at the


section s


expense,


annual


vIronmentai


Update Seminar.


The article w


appear in


Florida Ba


ournai.


. .. \
. ." .
..


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TONS,







ORGANIZATIONS, ACTIVITIES, HONORS AND AWARDS


George


Milam, Martin


W. Milam


Review Case Comment Award.


& Ade of Jacksonville has established an award


-The firm of
in memory of


the senior partner of that firm who passed away in 1967. Totaling $250 annual-
ly, awards will be given to the Law Review Junior Graduate who submits the
best Case Comment in each issue of the Review.


J. Hillis Miller Memorial Award.


- The Fletcher Chapter of Phi Alpha Delta


Fraternity


annually


recognizes


the senior law student


or recent law


graduate who has been outstanding in leadership and service to the law school.


The award consists of a cash prize
Claude Pepper Award..- This


and a certificate.


honor is accorded annually to the member


of the Fletcher Chapter of Ph


Alpha


Delta Law Fraternity who


evidences


distinction in scholarship and campus activities, thereby indicating a possible


interest in going into public life in the future. The award consists of
$100 and a citation.


a prize of


Phi Delta Phi Award.


- Cockrell


nn of Phi Delta Phi International Legal


Fraternity annually recognizes the student who makes the highest average in
the first semester at law school by inscribing the student's name on a scholar-
ship plaque.


Phi Delta Phi Graduate of the Year..


- Each spring, Cockrell Inn of Phi


Delta Phi selects a candidate for the International Fraternity's Graduate of the
Year Contest. Candidates are awarded appropriate certificates of recognition
and may win a cash prize for the local inn of up to $300.00.


Prentice-Hall Prize.


- Prentice-Hall, Inc. awards a bronze plaque annually


to each of the leading students in Corporate Taxation,
Estates and Trusts, and Parnership Taxation.


Income


Taxation of


Jonathan Norton


Roth Memorial Award in


Law and Medicine.


- This


award was established by Dr. and Mrs. Neal M.


the memory of their son,


Roth of Jacksonville to honor


Jonathan. The award is presented annually to the stu-


dent who evidences interest, ability, and distinguished achievement in the area
of Law and Medicine.
The Campbell Thornal Memorial. This fund was established in memory
of Mr. Justice Campbell Thornal by his friends. Income from the first $10,000
will be devoted to support of the Campbell Thornal Moot Court Competition,
and any additional income will be used to provide Campbell Thornal Scholar-
ships for deserving law students in this College.


Trial Lawyers Section of The Florida Bar Award.


- The Trial Lawyers Sec-


tion awards a ticket of admission to the Trial Advocacy Program sponsored by


the Trial Lawyers Section of The Florida Bar. A ticket wil


be awarded twice a


year to the outstanding student participating in Practice Court. Recipients of
this award must have graduated, taken the Bar and be admitted to practice
prior to the date of the program.


The University of Florida Society of International Law Essay Award.


- To


insure the continued contribution of The Florida Bar to the development of the












76, ORGANIZATIONS, ACTIVITIES, HONORS AND AWARDS



gram of salary supplementation is a factor of considerable significance in re-

taining people of eminence.

Attorneys' Title Insurance Fund Grant. The Lawyers' Title Guaranty Fund,

a business trust of Florida lawyers closely affiliated with The Florida Bar, has

established an annual grant of $1,000 to supplement the salary of a distinguish-

ed professor or professors in the field of real property. The grant is presently

held by Professor Mandell Glicksberg.

Stephen C. O'Connell Chair. The first endowed chair at the University of

Florida College of Law recongizes the contributions of Stephen C. O'Connell,


sixth president of the University of Florida, and former Chief


Florida Supreme Court.


justice of the


The O'Connell Chair was held by Visiting Professor


Roger A. Cunningham during the 1982 spring semester,


by visiting Professor


Rennard J. Strickland during the 1983 spring


semester, and wil


held by Pro-


fesso


r Walter Raushenbush in 1983-84.


-~ flu


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-, :" -











CURRICULUM


The program of study consists of six semesters or its equivalent of work
beginning in the fall or spring semesters of the academic year. As at most law
schools, the first year curriculum consists of prescribed courses. The broad pur-
pose of the law school's first year is to teach the student how to read and
analyze cases, and how to research points of law efficiently and express them
clearly in the context of subject matter basic to the student's future legal


education. This object


is to be achieved by offering a range of courses that


represent the fields of commerce, personal injury, property, procedure, and
public law.


The curriculum is the subject of continuing faculty stu


ferings listed below govern students commencin


their law


studies


course
during


1983-84 academic


year:


Fall Class


Fall Semester


Spring Semester


Summer


Term


(Optional)1


Contracts


Torts


Contracts II
Torts II


Civil Procedure I
Criminal Law
Jurisprudence
Research & Writing


Civil Procedure II
Property I
Constitutional Law I
Appellate Advocacy


Property II
Constitutional


Law 11


Electives


*Those students who enter in the fall semester and do not enroll for the sum-


mer term immediately following their second


semester must take Propert


and Constitutional Law II at the first possible opportunity thereafter


Spring Class
Spring Semester


Contracts


Torts


Civil Procedure I
Criminal Law
Jurisprudence


Summer Term
(Required)**
Contracts II


Torts II


Property I


Fall Semester


Electives
Civil Procedure II
Property II
Constitutional


Law I


I








78 / CURRICULUM


Addition l


Requirements


Legal Writing/Appellate Advocacy Requirement
These courses are graded on the basis of Honors (S +), Satisfactory (S),
Deferred Grade (H), or Unsatisfactory (U), and must be completed with a grade
of S or better to fulfill the requirement, even if this necessitates repeating both
courses.
Students who must repeat either or both of these courses must do so at the
first available opportunity after the first year, and failure to do so may result in
exclusion from the College of Law. Students must make arrangements for


repetition with


the Director


the Legal


Writing and


Research Program.


Repeated hours may not be counted toward the minimum load requirement
nor toward the 86 hour graduation requirement.


Second and Third Year


Professional


Requirements


Responsibility Requirement


All students are required to satisfactorily complete LAW 6750


Profes-


sional Responsibility and the Legal Profession, in their fourth or fifth semester.


For purposes of this latter requirement,
semester.
Seminar and Advanced Writing Requireme


the summer term is considered a


Each student is


required to accomplish a major fin


shed written work as a


result of individual research. Effective with the entering class of January


1981,


students must complete this requirement through the vehicle of a seminar. All
seminar offerings will afford students the opportunity to complete the ad-
vanced writing requirement. The intended purpose of the seminar requirement
is to give all students an intense, small group learning experience with close in-


terpersonal contact with faculty and other students.


The program should be


commenced no later than the fifth semester. Students are also encouraged to
enroll in seminars for purposes other than satisfying the advanced writing re-


qu irement.


Whether an alternative mode of evaluation will be available for


those students who do not require advanced writing certification is left to the
discretion of the individual faculty member conducting the seminar. No more


than 15 students will be


proval of the


permitted in any particular seminar except upon ap-


Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs and the professor teaching


sem inar.


Students who commenced their studies in the College of Law prior to 1981


may


satisfy the advance


ed writing requirement in any of the fo I owing ways: a)


through


a seminar


as set out ab


ove;


comp letion of the University of


Florida


Law Review


writing pro ect; c) parti citation on the Appe late Advocacy


I








CLR iCL ;LLM


which may ex st.


(See Prerequisite


Chart.)


assure expo sure to a broad course of study, t


i s recon 0rmen


stui


select adversity


courses


from


foliowi ng


areas,


Students


shou d


reter to


Prerequc isite


Chart


requ iremen ts


for d degree


second and third


year ( ourse


Each spri ng the proposed


se ect ion.
Academic


Year


Sche


d u Ie


may


obta


ned from


the Admi n istration


COUrses
riculum


will be


Office


offered.


counseling


book let


inform
dit on,


students


course


containing


of the


desc


trequen


ons


\it th


as we


reco rnme n at


as a cur-


i0ons


educators and practitioners in
reserve desk.


var ious


fie lds,


may


be obtained


at the


library


For all courses
21 3, consu lt the curie


or seminars


rent


a llocat ion for any given


Academy


course


which


Year


are designated


Schedu


or semir nar


with


variable


to determine


a pa


rt cu


credit,


actual


acade


cred it


term.


Commer al Law

LAW 6010- Sales
LAW 6020- Commercial Paper
LAW 6040 Consumer Law


LAW 6050
LAW 6051
LAW 6052
LAW 6062
LAW 6063


- Debtor-Creditor


- Secured Transactions
- Creditors' Remedies a


- Business Organizatoons
- Corporations


in Personal Property
id Bankruptcy


*LAW 6064 -Corporate Finance & Reorganization


LAW 6080


- Insurance


Perspective

LAW 6200 Legal Process
LAW 6210 Advanced Jurisprudence
LAW 6220 English Legal History.


LAW 6221


- Legal History Other than Common Law


LAW 6226 American Lega History
LAW 6250 Comparative Law


LAW 6260


- International Law


Procedure

LAW 6111 -Criminal Procedure-Police & Police Practices
LAW 611 2 -Criminal Procedure-Adversary System ..
*LAW 6302 Federal Practice
LAW 6304 Appellate Practice
LAW 6320 Remedies


ann







CURRICULUM


Public Law


LAW 6740
LAW 6480
LAW 6503
LAW 6520
LAW 6521


- Environmental Law
- Natural Resources.


- Florida Constitutional Law
- Administrative Law .
- Florida Administrative Law


6523


LAW 6531
LAW 6540
LAW 6544
LAW 6548
LAW 6550


- Legislation . . . . . . . . .
- Local Government Law, Taxation and Finance


- Labor Law


- Public Sector Labor Relations


- Workers' Compensation and Other Employment Rights
- Antitrust Law . . .


6552


LAW 6560
LAW 6570
LAW 6580


- Regulated Industries ..........
- Securities Regulation .
- Patent, Trademark, and Copyright Law
- Food, Drug and Cosmetic Law .. ..


Taxation


LAW 6531
LAW 6600
LAW 6610
LAW 6616
LAW 6620
LAW 6621


- Local Government Law, Taxation and Finance
- Income Taxation
- Corporate Taxation .
- Partnership Taxation
- Taxation of Gratuitous Transfers


- Income


Taxation of Estates


& Trusts


Legal Skills


LAW 6360
LAW 6361
LAW 6362
LAW 6380
LAW 6385
LAW 6940
LAW 6941
LAW 6942
LAW 6943


- Office and Pre-Trial Civil Practice
- Trial Advocacy .
- Practice Court .
- Legal Counseling
- Lawyers as Negotiators
- Civil Clinic .. .


summer)


-Criminal Practice
-Criminal Clinic .
-Civil Practice


Unclassified


LAW 6261
LAW 6474
LAW 6510
I AW 671n


- International Business


-Agricultural Law.
- Political and Civil Rights
- Family aw


LAW


.. 3/4


LAW


2/3


~~1








CURRICULUM, 81

Seminars (All seminars are variab e 213 credits unless designated otherwise.)
*LAW 6035-Commercial & Consumer Transactions Seminar
*LAW 6065-Corporate Problems Seminar


LAW 6066


- Franchise Enterprise Seminar


*LAW 6113 Criminal Procedure Seminar


LAW 6125


-Crime and Criminology Seminar


*LAW 6211 Iurisprudence Seminar


LAW 6225


- Legal HWistory Seminar


LAW 6235- Law and Society Seminar


LAW 6262


- Internal ona Bus iness Law Seminar


LAW 6285- Latin American Legal Institutions Seminar


LAW 6286


- Latin American Trade and Investment Seminar


* LAW 6335- Evidence Seminar


*LAW 6336
LAW 6405


- Civil Procedure Seminar
-Advanced Property Seminar


LAW 6455 Estates and Trusts Seminar


LAW 6465
LAW 6505
LAW 6512


- Historic Preservat on and the Law Seminar
- Constitutional Law Seminar


- Human Rights, Law and Poli


*LAW 6524- Legislative Drafting


LAW 6525


- Admi n istrative Law


*LAW 6545- Labor Law Seminar


LAW 6586
* LAW 6605
*LAW 6715
LAWV 6725
* LAW 6726
*LAW 6731
*LAW 6752
LAW 6936


*Prerequ


Seminar


Seminar
Seminar


-Law and Communication Seminar
- Fed era Taxati on Sem nar
- Family Law Sem nar


- Law and


Psychiatry


Seminar


- Hospital Law Seminar


- Admiralt


-Professional


- Current Legal


requh red see


y Law Seminar


Responsibi


Problem


P rerequisi


Semina
Chart.


Ou S


Descrpt


Public post-secondary


institutions


n F orl da


are requ


to imp ement a


common course number ng system


eloped at the


state


I. The


objective


s to provide a common


classI cat on


system


d isc ipinary


inter-


discip linary categories and sub-categor ies based on the profess ona


judgment


of the faculties in the


given


d isc pine areas


The course offer ings described


below


are identified


state de


course numbering system.


The statewide course number in


c udes a three- letter


prefix and a four-digit number,.


three


letters


identify


general


subject


? T '*


j


3h" ^- ni -- inr * -^ kn v- !r ^"i i ^ ~,3S hvf^ ^ *va^4' --f -'. f^ ^*S y /- i '.sr'i








82 /CURRICULUM

student by means of a hypothetical appellate record. The record is the basis for
the preparation of an appellate brief. Oral arguments follow the exchange of


briefs.


The course is graded on a scale of Satisfactory (S), Honors (S +), Un-


satisfactory (U),


or Deferred


Grade (H),; and


must


completed with


grade of


or better


even


if this requirement necessitates repeating the


course.


LAW 5300


-CIVIL PROCEDURE


credits.


eluding


Analysis of
consideration


a civil


lawsuit


from


jurisdiction,


commencement


venue,


pleading,


motion


discovery, and joinder of parties and of claims.


LAW 5301


-CIVIL PROCEDURE II


credits


Trial


a civil


lawsuit;


right to trial


, selection and


struction


jury,


respective


roles


udge,


jury,


awyer;


post-trial motions; judgments.


LAW 5501


-CONSTITUTIONAL LAW


credits.


establishment


operation


judicial


review


tergovernmental


relations


in the


federal


system


the powers of Cong


ress,


the President, and the states.

LAW 5502-CONSTITUTIONAL LAW II


credits.


Individual


procedure


rights;


mpediments


to legislative regula-


tions;
press,


impairment


assembly,


religion;


contract;


personal


Fourteenth


liberties general,


Amendment;


federal


speech,


powers


to civil right; citizenship.

LAW 5000 CONTRACTS


credits.


introduction


to the


theory


egally


enforceable


agreements and promises,
sideration.


including elements of contract formation and


con-


LAW 5001


-CONTRACTS II


credits.


obligations;


Effects


non-performance


legally


enforceable


conditions for relief from or discharge of obligations


contractual
theory and


application of third party beneficiary contracts


and assignments.


LAW


5100


-CRIMINAL LAW


credits. The substantive


law of crimes


covering, in addition to basic principles


and the elements of typical crimes, such
crime, responsibility, and defenses.


concepts


as relational and


inchoate


I A I I ? A' r- on I rrx i K i iE [ -I


, in-


r -- r CI r* rr r I~ *t


I _









CURRICULUM


LAW 5400- PROPERTY


2 credits. The acquisition and possession of property, real and personal; estates
in land; introduction to future interests; landlord and tenant.

LAW 5401 PROPERTY II
3 credits. The modern land transaction contract, deed, mortgage; recording
system; methods of title assurance; easements and licenses; covenants; rights
incident to land ownership


LAW 5700- TORTS


3 credits. Civil liability for damages legally
duties. Studied are plaintiff's interest in phys


caused by violation of imposed
ical and property integrity when


interfered with by intentional negligent or abnormal dangerous activities. Non-
physical harms such as harm to reputation, to economic interests, and invasion


of privacy are analyzed. Fault


stems are contrasted with alternative


social


procedures.

LAW 5701 -TORTS II
2 credits. Continued development of the material initiated in LAW 5700.

Second and Third Year Courses

LAW 6520-ADMINISTRATIVE LAW
3 credits. Analysis of the administrative process, with emphasis on the oppor-


tunity to be heard, compulsory process to obtain information, elements
procedure, and the process of decision.

LAW 6730- ADMIRALTY


of fair


2 credits. Jurisdiction; choice of law; right to navigate; sickness, personal in-
jury, and death of seamen, longshoremen, and others in maritime occupations;
collisions; government responsibilities related to navigation; maritime salvage;
pilotage; maritime liens.

LAW 6210-ADVANCED JURISPRUDENCE


or 3 credits. This is a


course in Advanced jurisprudence.


description


under LAW 5210


*r1 -
ii I i ^--


...' ," .


rA


f *


't' .








84 / CURRICULUM

LAW 6953- ADVANCED RESEARCH, WRITING AND


APPELLATE ADVOCACY


2 credits. Students serve as instructors in the first year Research Writing and
Appellate Advocacy course under the direction of the Director of the Program.
Letter grades awarded on the basis of writing assignments, instruction and
counseling prepared and performed by the student instructors. Enrollment with
permission of the Director only. LAW 6954 must be taken in addition to LAW
6953; otherwise, no credit towards graduation will be allowed for LAW 6953.
LAW 6954-ADVANCED RESEARCH, WRITING AND
APPELLATE ADVOCACY II
2 credits. Continuation of LAW 6953. LAW 6954 must be taken or no credit
towards graduation will be allowed for LAW 6953.
LAW 6474 AGRICULTURAL LAW
2 credits. A course devoted to the study of the legal aspects of agricultural


operations.


Topics pursued include protection and preservation of land for


agricultural use, federal regulatory agencies and legislation,
farming activities and agri-business and the law.
LAW 6226-AMERICAN LEGAL HISTORY


ability for


or 3


credits.


Historical


introduction to the origins and development or


American law, constitutional principles and legal institutions


and of their in-


fluence upon the distribution of social, economic and political power


LAW 6550


ANTITRUST LAW


3 credits. An analysis of the legal, economic and policy issues engendered by
efforts to prescribe standards of business conduct and preserve competitive


market structures under the Sherman Act, Clayton Act, Federa
sion Act, and related legislation.
LAW 6304- APPELLATE PRACTICE


Trade Commis-


2 credits. Methods of review of federal and Florida appellate courts, including
review of trial courts and administrative bodies.


LAW 6062- BUSINESS


or 3


ORGANIZATIONS


credits. A consideration of the various alternatives of doing business


such


as sole proprietorship, a partnership or a corporation. Emphasis


will be


placed on the partnership. Some consideration will additionally be given to the
unique forms of small businesses, including nonprofit corporations and profes-
sional associations.

LAW 6940-CIVIL CLINIC
9 credits fall and spring; 6 credits summer. Completion of 48 semester hours.
RPrnmmpnd d" I W T' Partirination in the conduct of civil leeal matters








CURRICULUM/ 85

cedures necessary for the conduct of civil litigation. Practice in these skills will
be provided by simulated exercise dealing with all phases of civil litigation.
This course is a prerequisite for students planning to take LAW 6940-CIVIL
CLINIC during the summer term, and students enrolling in the course are re-
quired to commit themselves to enrolling in that summer course. This course is
not available to students who have taken Criminal Clinic (LAW 6942), Lawyers


as Negotiators (LAW 6930), Office and Pretrial Civil Practice (LAW 6360
Advocacy (LAW 6361), or Practice Court (LAW 6942).

LAW 6020-COMMERCIAL PAPER
2 or 3 credits. A study of negotiable bills, notes and other commercial


banking


relating


to the


collection


checks,


and suretyship


Trial


paper,
in the


negotiable paper context.

LAW 6250- COMPARATIVE LAW


or 3 credits.


The first part of this c


ourse deals with a cross-cultural


com-


prison of law and the legal profession; the


specific applications,


second part deals with more


e.g., comparison of American and foreign case materials.


LAW 6340- CONFLICT OF LAWS
3 credits. Problems arising whenever at least one of the operative facts of the
case is connected with a state other than the forum, jurisdiction of courts; en-
forcement of foreign judgments; federal-state conflicts.

LAW 6040-CONSUMER LAW
2 or 3 credits. The principal subject areas are consumer sales and consumer
credit transactions and their judicial legislative, administrative and extra-legal


regulation. The postulation and evaluation of


egal correctives for perceived


problems will be the base from which the focal consideration of remedies and
their administration will be developed.

LAW 6064-CORPORATE FINANCE AND REORGANIZATION
2 or 3 credits. An inquiry into the legal problems involving the methods used in
financing the corporation payment of dividends, the reacquisition by a cor-
poration of its own shares and problems of mergers, consolidations and other
forms of corporate reorganization. Prerequisites: LAW 6063 and LAW 6760 (or
an undergraduate accounting course).

LAW 6610-CORPORATE TAXATION


credits. Prerequisites: LAW 6600, LAW 6063.


The tax considerations in cor-


porate formation, distributions, and liquidation.

LAW 6063 CORPORATIONS
3 credits. A consideration of problems in organizing a corporation, disregard of


the corporate fiction, control and management, federal regulations c
..* .- .J- I t A A . -I .. -. 4. . .


controlling
A - -







CURRICULUM


LAW 6942


-CRIMINAL CLINIC


6 credits. Prerequisite: LW 6941 and completion of 48 hours. Participation in


the conduct .of actual criminal legal matters as
member of the State Attorney's or Public Defen


an intern supervised by a
ider's Office. Credit will be


awarded


on a


satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.


6941


-CRIMINAL PRACTICE.


credits. Students


receive


instruction in the various skills, techniques and pro-


cedures necessary for the conduct of criminal law practice. Students will learn


practice skills while


participating in simulated


exercises dealing


g with all phases


of criminal litigation


Civil Clinic (LW 6940), Lawyer
Civil Practice (LW 6360), Tria


This course is not available to students who have taken


as Negotiators (LW 6930), Office and Pretrial
Advocacy (LW 6361), or Practice Court (LW


6362).


Students


who


commit


themselves


to enroll


following


term


Criminal Clinic


(LW 6942) wil


receive


registration priority. Students receiving


registration priority must
for LW 6941.


complete LW 6942 to


obtain


credit toward


radiation









CURRICULUM / 87

LAW 6112-CRIMINAL PROCEDURE -ADVERSARY SYSTEM


3 credits.


This course covers the commencement of formal criminal


ceedings; bail, the decision to prosecute, the grand jury, the preliminary hear-


ing, venue, joinder and severance, and speedy trial.


Trial concerns such as


guiltypleas, discovery, jury trial, prejudicial publicity, professional ethics and
double jeopardy are also considered.


LAW 6111 -CRIMINAL PROCEDURE


-POLICE AND POLICE PRACTICES


3 credits. Police as a social institution, including personnel, bureaucratic struc-
ture and incentives. Police practices such as arrest, search, seizure wiretap-
ping, eavesdropping, use of informers, entrapment, confessions and lineups are
also covered.


LAW 6050


-DEBTOR-CREDITOR LAW


4 credits. A survey of the individual


collection of monetary judgements,


bankruptcy, and the principles of secured transactions


the Uniform Commercial Code, the course


under Article Nine of


is intended for the student not desir-


ing the broader coverage provided by LAW 6051 and LAW 6052. Credit for this
course precludes credit for LAW 6051 and 6052.

LAW 6220- ENGLISH LEGAL HISTORY
2 credits. Emphasis on the history of English law from the Conquest: the feudal
society; the growth of constitutional concepts and the limits on public order;
the orgins of the central courts and the elaboration of the judicial system; the
history of the jury and of equity; the prerogative courts; a brief consideration,
time permitting, of the distribution of English Law.


LAW 6470


-ENVIRONMENTAL LAW


3 or 4 credits. A study of federal and Florida environmental law


Coverage includes public and private rights,


and policies.


litigation, and administrative


regulations relevant to air, water, noise, solid waste and radiation pollution, as
well as environmental protection and conservation.

LAW 6450- ESTATE PLANNING


credits. Prerequisites: LAW 6430


LAW 6440 and LAW 6620.


Objectives of


lifetime and testamentary planning of estates; procedures for ana


and large estates; the elimination, mitigations, and offsetting of adverse
tors; corrective procedures and their implementation.

LAW 6430- ESTATES AND TRUSTS


small


3 credits. Prerequisite: LAW 5400. Recommended: LAW 5401


ntestate su


cces-


sion, gifts, execution of wills, creation of trusts; charitable trusts; ademption
and lapse; powers of appointment.


I A\A/ CA3f


- F VIDFNCF


I


i / i i; f \1 I WI II i /t








CURRICULUM


LAW '


6302 FEDERAL PRACTICE


credit


ts. Prerequisites: LAW 5300 and LAW


5301. Recommended: LAW 5501 and


LAW
state


5502. Analysis of the federal judicial


systems,


including


system


consideration


and of its


relationship to the


of the applicable jurisdic-


oFna


LAW


cedural, and


6440


substantive law.


- FIDUCIARY ADMINISTRATION


credits.


Prerequisite:


LAW


6430.


Probi


ems


administration


ndents


estates


and of non-commercial trusts; probate


procedure; powers


Sfiduciary; compensation


of fiduciaries and their attor


neys.


LAW


6624-FIDUCIARY ADMINISTRATION II


credits. Prerequisite; LAW 6440.


Recommended: LAW


6620. Prob ems


of the


fiduciary in the allocation of receipts and disbursements b


between princ


income in the administration of trust and


estates;


the Uniform Princ


Income Act; the allocation of the burden of death


taxes.


LAW


6521


-FLORIDA


ADMINISTRATIVE LAW


or 3 credits. Cover


of Florida Administrative Procedure Act


FAPA)


making under the FAPA, decisions affecting substantial interests, enforcement


of agency action,


judicial review under the FAPA, non-FAPA judi


review


government in the sunshine and public records.

LAW 6503 FLORIDA CONSTITUTIONAL LAW


2 credits. Analysis of selected provisions of the Florida Constitution, with em-
phasis on recent decisions of the Florida Supreme Court; analysis of current
proposals for constitutional change.


LAW 6580


FOOD, DRUG AND COSMETIC LAW


credits. An applied administrative law course. Its focus is on the


quirements


egal re-


of the Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act and their impact on


con


summers, medical professionals, and producers and distributors of regulated pro-
ducts. The course does not deal with control of drugs of abuse or with issues of
products liability.


LAW 6433- FUTURE


INTERESTS


2 or 3 credits. Prerequisite: LAW 6430. Protection of the family; termination of
trusts; classification of possessory and future interests; gifts to classes; the Rule
Against Perpetuities.
LAW 6600-INCOME TAXATION
4 credits. Recommended: LAW 6760 to precede or be taken concurrently. Taxa-


tion of individuals


- Identification of taxpayer; concepts of gross income; ad-


ousted gross income, deductions, exemptions, and taxable income; recognition,
characterization, and other problems incident to the sale, exchange, or other


ece









C(i L.RRI Cb LLM


facul tv member,


then approved by the Curriculum C


committee.


Credit


awarded


will be determined


Curricu um


Corn mitt ee


( course


must


be c )mp eted


academic
3 ~ ~ n t* C^/l^^. ^ ^


minimum


course


comp eted four


terms


or ess.


Credit


awarded


may


load per semester (12


terms,


I nc dependent


courses


not be
only to


appliedc


to reduce


students who


are not


used c


have
cover


materials


covered in


courses offered


as pa


of the


regu a


CLi rricu lumly


LAW


6080 -


INSURANCE


credits


various


storms


Icles,


iHome


ownSers


Automobile, Health


dent;


oaters,


claims, processing, and insurance institutions,


; concepts
nc ip es of


market


ti ng,


inde nit,


transterence, reason


able expectancy ies,


uncons


cionable


advantages


LAW 6261 NTERNAT IONAL


BUSINESS LAW


2 or 3 credits, Legal
dividuals, business


problems ar
enterprises,


is ing i
other


transact ions


private


nst t


Wr o '
or rela
unions,


tions that inv


or go


olve


vernments


two or more nations.


LAW 6260


- INTERNATIO


NAL LAW


3 credits. An introduction


international


as apple ed between nations and


in American courts.

LAW 6540 LABOR LAW
4 credits. The law governing employer-union-employee relations in the private
sector. Subjects covered include employee organization, concerted activities,
collective bargaining, and administration of agreements, including arbitration.

LAW 6420- LAND TRANSACTIONS AND FINANCE
3 or 4 credits. A study of selected methods and problems related to conveyanc-
ing and development of real property; coverage may include land contracts,
liens, curative and limitation acts, homestead, condominiums, financing (in-
cluding both the traditional mortgage and alternative methods of financing
development) and an examination of the roles of lenders, developers, brokers,
attorneys and others in the development process.

LAW 6460-LAND USE PLANNING AND CONTROL
3 or 4 credits. A study of the legal aspects of the allocation and development
of land resources; private controls through covenants and easements; public
regulation and control through zoning and subdivision regulation; social,
economic and political implications of land regulations; eminent domain;
selected current problems such as growth management, historic preservation,
environmental regulation, urban development.








90/CURRICULUM

LAW 6950- LAW REVIEW
1 credit per semester. Maximum credits allowed are three. Research, writing,


and editoria


work


for the University


of Florida


Review.


Limited to


students whose scholastic average meets the requirements for law review
work. No letter grades are given for the course.


LAW 6385 -


LAWYER AS A NEGOTIATOR


credits. An examination of the negotiation skills which must be utilized by


lawyers.

LAW 6760 LEGAL ACCOUNTING


credits. Elements of accounting; interpretation of financial


statements and


audit reports; accounting problems likely to arise in a lawyer's practice. Design-
ed for students with little or no accounting background. Students with more
than 6 semester hours of accounting courses must seek special permission of
the instructor.


LAW 6380


- LEGAL COUNSELING


credits. Methods of interviewing and counseling


clients, discussion of the


attorney-client relationship based on actual case histories


involving


counsel-


LAW 6221


-LEGAL HISTORY OTHER THAN COMMON LAW


credits. Emphasis on the antecedents of the Western World's


aws


, legal in-


stitutions, legal thought,


etc. from customs of primitive societies societies


through


aw-related


developments


early


civilizations


from


ancient


Babylonia through Athens and Rome, into the Dark Ages of Western Europe,


and some


attention to selected other civ


izations.


A -- 1 -I I- I I a I., I








CURRICULUM


LAW 6523- LEGISLATION
2 credits. Role of the legislature


in the legal process; function of representa-


tion; codification and revision of the common law; judicial interpretation of
statutes; regulatory and sanctioning techniques; relationship of statutes to
other types of law.
LAW 6531 LOCAL GOVERNMENT LAW, TAXATION AND FINANCE


or 3


credits. Examination of the substantive and procedural


aw of


governments, including organization, powers, procedure, personnel


and of


financing sources, including state and local taxation, special assessments, user
fees and borrowing.
LAW 6951 -MOOT COURT


1 credit per semester. Maximum credits allowed are three. Advan


ced training


in appellate practice, including both the briefing and argument of cases


peal, as a result of participation in appellate moot court proceed
grades are given for the course.
LAW 6480- NATURAL RESOURCES


on ap-


No letter


2 or 3 credits. A study of the legal aspects of the conservation and develop-
ment of natural resources, particularly water, minerals, oil and gas. Special em-


phasis is placed on statutory enactments and administrative
federal and state governments.

LAW 6360-OFFICE AND PRE-TRIAL CIVIL PRACTICE


regulation by


3 credits. An introductory examination of the tasks and relationships invo


in law office and pre-trial lawyering. This course will survey


interviewing,


case


development, drafting, investigation, pleading, discovery, and pre-trial motion
practice. Students will perform aspects of each of these skill groups while par-


ticipating in


simulated exercises. Both short, one-class, and incremental, long-


term, simulations will be used. All performances will be critiques and many will


be videotaped for review by the student and


instructor.


Not available to


students who have taken civ


clinic, LAW 6940 or Criminal Practice, LAW


6941.

LAW 6616- PARTNERSHIP TAXATION


2 credits. Prerequisite: LAW 6600.


It is recommended that LAW 6062 precede


this course.


The tax meaning of "partnership"


; problems attending formation


transactions between partner and partnership; determination and treatment of
partnership income; sales or exchange of partnership interest; distributions;
retirement; death of a partner; drafting the partnership agreement.

LAW 6570- PATENT, TRADEMARK & COPYRIGHT LAW


2 credits.


Patentability; patent proceedings; construction of letters patent;


transfers, assignments, licenses, and contracts, infringements. Rights in literary







92/ CURRICULUM


criminal


case.


Includes the theory and dynamics of legal drafting, trial ad-


vocacy and the ethics of trial advocacy, pretrial proceedings and the trial pro-


cess


itself, with simulation of both criminal and civil trial and formal classroom


instruction


based


where


possible,


previously-conducted


simulation.


Because of the simulation and role-playing aspects of the course, student at-
tendance and participation in all class sections is required; students should be
aware that, for the same reasons, class sessions will generally extend beyond
the time periods indicated on the formal schedule. Registration preference


shall be


iven to students who have completed LW 6361, Trial Advocacy. Not


available to students who have taken Civil Clinic, LW 6940; Criminal Practice,
LW 6941; or Criminal Clinic, LW 6942.
LAW 6750- PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY AND
THE LEGAL PROFESSION


credits. This course examines the role of the individual


lawyer and the legal


profession


as an entity in contemporary


society. Topics covered include: the


role of the lawyer as advocate, counselor and community leader; the ethical
and moral obligations of the lawyer to his client, other lawyers and society as


derived from general ethical and moral principles and


as embodied in the Code


Professional


Responsibility;


problems


encountered


lawyer


representing particular categories of


clients


, including corporations,


criminal


defendants and indigents.

LAW 6544-PUBLIC SECTOR LABOR RELATIONS
2 or 3 credits. Prerequisite: LAW 6540. A study of labor relations in the public
(governmental) sector in the United States. The developing laws concerning the
right of public employees to form and join unions, collective bargaining, con-
certed activities and related subjects will be considered. Special attention is
given to the Florida Public Employees Relations Act, which represents one of


the model legislative


enactments.


When the course is taught for


credits,


federal sector labor relations, including the
will be covered extensively.


Serv


Reform Act of 1980,


LAW 6552


- REGULATED INDUSTRIES


2 or 3 credits. Prerequisite: LAW 6520. Recommended: LAW 6550. An examina-


tion of the legal and economic problems when selected


industries are sub-


jected to varying forms of administrative control; the public policy goals of


regulation; the effectiveness of the administrative process


in furthering and


balancing these goals; and the extent to which principles of antitrust remain
relevant and operative in this area.


LAW 6320


- REMEDIES


credits. Analysis and comparison of legal, equitable, statutory and extra-


judicial remedies.


Coverage includes injury to business


interests; remedies









CURRICULUM/ 93


forcement and priorities among competing interests.
precludes additional credit for this course.
LAW 6560- SECURITIES REGULATION


Credit for Law 6050


3 credits. Prerequisite: LAW 6063. Examination of the controls and exemptions
relating to the sale and distribution of securities by corporations, underwriters
and others, including such matters as the scope of the securities laws, registra-
tion provisions, distribution and resale of restricted securities, express and im-


plied civil liabilities,


secondary distributions and tender offers. Issues wil


analyzed in the context of the 1933 and 1934 federal statues,


state Blue Sky


as amended, and


aws.


LAW 6930- SELECTED LEGAL PROBLEMS


or 3


credits.


Courses involving exploration of legal problems of current


significance.

LAW 6620-TAXATION OF GRATUITOUS TRANSFERS


3 credits. Prerequisites: LAW 6430
estate and gift taxation.


LAW 6361


and LAW 6600. Fundamentals of federal


TRIAL ADVOCACY


credits. Prerequisites: LAW 6330.


A study of the tria


process, including the


law relating to trials, trial tactics and trial techniques. The course wil


consist


of two hours of classroom/lecture presentations and a three hour "laboratory"
period each week involving role-playing and critical evaluation of perfor-
mance. Letter grades may be given in lieu of satisfactory-unsatisfactory at the
option of the instructor. Registration preference shall be given to fifth and
fourth semester students in that order. Not available to students who have


taken Civil Clini


c, LAW 6940, Criminal Practi


LAW 6941


, or Criminal Clinic,


LAW 6942.


LAW


6548- WORKERS'


COMPENSATION


AND


OTHER


EMPLOYMENT


RIGHTS
credits. Rights of employees and duties of employers under modern social


programs


including worker's compensation,


wage and hour


regulations,


social


security, old


disability and medical programs and anti-discrimination laws.


M.tnmt*- -








94 CURRICULUM

SELECTED LEGAL
PROBLEMS COURSES
LAW 6930
The following is a list of Selected Legal Problems Courses that have been
previously offered or may be available during the 1983-84 Academic Year at
the College of Law. These courses are not permanent parts of the curriculum.
Students should consult the current Academic Year Schedule to determine the
availability of any of these courses.
Advanced Antitrust Law
Basic International Tax Problems
Compensation Systems
Economic Analysis Applied to Law
International Tax Law
Law and the Constitutional Order in American History
Products Liability
Sex-Based Discrimination
Women and the Law

Seminars
LAW 6525- ADMINISTRATIVE LAW SEMINAR
2 or 3 credits. This seminar will have variable content in dealing with the opera-
tions of a different regulatory agency at various times. It is recommended that
LAW 6520 be taken first.
LAW 6731 -ADMIRALTY SEMINAR
2 or 3 credits. Sovereign immunity; charter parties; carriage of goods by sea;
general average; maritime insurance; water pollution by vessels; searches and
seizures of vessels; coverage of other topics related to admiralty. Prerequisite:
LAW 6730.
LAW 6405 ADVANCED PROPERTY SEMINAR
2 or 3 credits. Exploration of current legal problems in the area of property law
leading to creative work on the part of the student in the form of a term paper.
LAW 6309-CIVIL PROCEDURE SEMINAR
2 or 3 credits. Detailed examination of civil litigation topics in both state and
federal courts and the relationship between state and federal courts. Prere-
quisites: LAW 5300 and LAW 5301.
LAW 6035-COMMERCIAL AND CONSUMER TRANSACTIONS SEMINAR








CURRICULUM / 95

blems in the law of corporations, e.g., corporate reorganizations, corporate
finance, and security regulations. Open only to fifth and sixth semester
students.

LAW 6125-CRIME AND CRIMINOLOGY SEMINAR
2 or 3 credits. Physical, psychological, and social aspects of criminology;
searches and seizures; police methods; extradition; the sentence; probation;
parole; pardon; civil rights; penology; recidivism; juvenile delinquency; Model
Penal Code; reforms and trends.

LAW 6113-CRIMINAL PROCEDURE SEMINAR
2 credits. Detailed examination of criminal procedure topics in both state and
federal courts. Prerequisites: LAW 5100.

LAW 6936-CURRENT LEGAL PROBLEMS SEMINAR
2 or 3 credits. Exploration of various legal problems of current significance
leading to creative work on the part of the student in the form of a term paper.


LAW 6455- ESTATES AND TRUSTS


EMINAR


2 or 3 credits. Prerequisite: LAW 6430. Recommended: LAW 6440. Examination
of current problems in estates and trusts.

LAW 6335- EVIDENCE SEMINAR
2 or 3 credits. Prerequisites: LAW 6330. Examination of selected problems of
proof in criminal and civil litigation. Content will vary to accommodate mat-
ters of contemporary interest.

LAW 6715 FAMILY LAW SEMINAR
2 or 3 credits. Prerequisites: LAW 6710. Examination of selected problems in
family law. Content will vary to accommodate matters of contemporary in-
terests.

LAW 6605 FEDERAL TAXATION SEMINAR
2 or 3 credits. Prerequisites: LAW 6600; others as announced from time to time.
Advanced problems in federal taxation with emphasis on techniques of federal
tax research.

LAW 6066- FRANCHISE ENTERPRISE SEMINAR
2 or 3 credits. Examination of the development of franchise relationships and


the principal legal issues inherent in and arising from this form


neSS


enterprise.


LAW 6465- HISTORIC PRESERVATION


AND THE


LAW


SEMINAR


2 or 3 credits. Recommended: LA


W 6460. Exploration of traditional


and emerg-


ing legal concepts for conserving the built environment.
I A AJ f [nr n r 1 i rItnI A I i A \CA r" lK i A [







96 CURRICULUM


through established legal processes, and stresses the relevance of human rights
perspectives in the practice of law.


LAW


26262- INTERNAL IONAL


BUSINESS LAW SEMINAR


credits.


A seminar concentrate ng on the regulation of international commer-


cia transactions,


considering several specific


contemporary problems deal ng


with


foreign


nations with


direct investment in developed and developing nations, incl udng
a market system and soc al ist nations. Contemporary issues will


explored,


such


as economic blockades and boycotts and the freezing of


assets.

LAW 6211 JURISPRUDENCE SEMINAR


credits.


depth


Detailed examination of jurisprudential topics, involving the in-


institutions and societies generally. Prerequisite: LAW 5210


LAW 6545- LABOR LAW SEMI NAR


3 credits.


Prerequisities: LAW 6540. Selected problems in the law of labor


and management relations,


vary ng among areas


SUC


h as special


labo


r legis a-


labor


LAW 6285


organizations, collective bargaining, and arbitration.
- LATIN AMERICAN LEGAL INSTITUTIONS SEMINAR


survey


credits,
of the


Open to graduate students in Latin American Studies. General


legal


systems


the American repub ics; interaction of


legal,


economic,


social


factors in current Latin American probe ems.


LAW


6286


- LATIN AMERICAN TRADE AND INVESTMENT SEMINAR


2 or 3 cred


Open to graduate students in Latin American Studies.


Legal


prob-


lems


involved


i n trad ing with and


formation and operation of business


enterprises


in Latin America.
ffin -tca y./ ~^\?\y ^


LAW
2orK


6585 LAW


3 credits.


AND COMMUNICATION SEMINAR


General semantics and other relevant techiques will be discussed


and applied to common
c uding advocacy, legal


ication
reason


situations in the areas of


awyering,


wr t ng, interviewing, counsel ing,


fact


find-


ing, and decision-making.


LAW


6725 -LAW


AND


ATRY


SEM


NAR


cred


course


intellectual


disciplines


stressing


psychoanalytic


theory and


application.


LAW


6235


-- LAW


AND


CITY


EMINAR


or 3


credits.


Advanced


work


in jurisprudence, international aw, or corn-


parative


6225 -LEGAL HISTORY


SEMINAR


credit ts.


A study


of the


develop


ment of our legal institutions, with in-


I* nln^ r? 5nw :


21 ii i i i ~(


CI-t II V -( i! 111 sl C1 1 MI -^ *^ i^ii ^ S if3










Current


Legal


Problems Seminars
Law 6936


The following is a list of Current Legal Problems seminars that have


been


previously offered or may be available during the 1983-84


Academic


Year at


the College of Law. These seminars are not permanent parts of the curriculum.
Students should consult the current Academic Year Schedule to determine the
availability of any of these seminars:
Admiralty Law Seminar
American Legal History Seminar
Appellate Review Seminar
Civil Procedure Seminar
Computers and the Law
Conflict of Laws Seminar
Criminal Procedure Seminar
Employment Discrimation Seminar
Energy Law Seminar
Environmental Law Seminar
Food and Drug Seminar


General Aspects of Internationa


Tax Law Seminar


Law and Constitutional Order in American Legal History Seminar
Law and Medicine Seminar
Law and Social Research Seminar
Legislation Seminar
Mexican Program Seminar
Professional Responsibility Seminar
Taxation Seminar
Women and the Law Seminar
Workers' Compensation and Other Employment Rights Seminar


Deviations,


Prerequisities, and


Course Cancellation
Prerequisites stated in the catalog may be waived by the instructor. A stu-
dent may riot take a course concurrently with its prerequisite except with per-


mission of the instructor. In exceptional


cases


the Dean may authorize devia-


tion from the prescribed program of study.
Prerequisites for particular courses may be prescribed and the


privilege is


CURRICULUM


M/97


.n/f **// ^1 I^ rn f /-^ r- i/h* l>^ ir^^ /-^ f^^ 1-- n^ *i- /- - -^ ^ -^*~ I4 * Iihnc^h*4" f^^^ -k* w L- -^w ^^ I >* ->







CURRICULUM


Civil Practice LAW 6943


course


a prerequisite


students


planning


take


LAW


6940-Civil Clinic during the summer
term, and students enrolling in the


course


required


commit


themselves to enrolling in that sum-


mer
who


course.


ave


Not open to students


taken


Criminal


Clinic


AW 6942), Lawyers


as Negotiators


(LAW 6930), Office and Pretrial Civil


Pract


(LAW 6360), Trial Adv


ocacy


Civil Clinic- LAW 6940


(LAW 6361), or Practice Court (LAW
6942).

Permission of instructor. Not open
to students on academic probation


or who


have


not completed


four


semesters of law study.
Required: Civil Practice LAW 6943


for those students who


will enroll in


Civil Clinic LAW 6940 during a sum-
mer term.


Recommended:


6330.


open


Evidence,
to students


LAW
who


have taken Criminal Practice, LAW


6941


Criminal Clinic, Law 6942, Of


fice and Pre-Trial Advocacy, LAW


6361


, Lawyers


as Negotiators,


LAW


Civil Procedure Seminar- LAW 6330


6930 or Practice Court, LAW

LAW 5300 and law 5301


6362.


Commercial
Transactions


& Consumer


Sem


mar


- LAW 6035


one


following:


Sales,


LAW 6010; Commercial Paper, LAW


6020


Debtor-Creditor LAW 1


, LAW


6050; or Consumer Law, LAW 6040.


Constitutional L
Commonwealth


Corporate Problem


aw in Britain and The


minar- LA

s Seminar


LAW 5501 and LAW 5502


W 6282


- LAW 6065 Corporations, LAW 6063.


orate


Finance


& Reorganization


Corporations, LAW 6063; Lega


LAW 6064


counting


LAW


6760


undergraduate


acco


hunting course).




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