• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
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 Appendix














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00616
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: August 1982
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00616
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Main
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
    Appendix
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
        Page 116
        Page 117
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
        Page 123
        Page 124
        Page 125
        Page 126
        Page 127
        Page 128
        Page 129
        Page 130
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This


public


document


was


promulgated


a total


cost


$5376.00


or 1.344


copy


provide


official


information


describing


Law


program


University


Florida


cost


, regulation


for adm


ssion


University


of Florida


George A. Smathers Libraries


This publication has


been adopted as a rule of the University pursuant to the pro-


vision
orisac


of Chapter 120 of the Florida Statutes.


Addenda to the University Record


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THE UNIVERSITY RECORD
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA













ABLE


OF


CONTENTS


CALENDAR
ADMINISTRATION ANC
University Adm
College of Law
Legal Informati


THE FAC


GENERA
THE




THE

ADMISSI


FACL
linistra
Admin
on Cer


Legal Research and W
ULTY .. ... ... ..
Visitors and Adjuncts
Emeriti . . . .
L INFORMATION...
UNIVERSITY AND TH
The University Past
The University Presei


Sett
Acti
COL
ASh
ON5


ing and Environm<
ivities .......
LLEGE OF LAW .
lort History ...
iAND DEGREE RE


ADMISSIONS-JURIS DOC1
Preparation for the Sti


Adm
Adm
Adm
ORIENTAL
REQUIRE
CONCUR
Urba


is
is


sions Policy ..
;sions Procedure


mission Requireme
1TION PROGRAM
MENTS FOR BEG
RENT DEGREE PI
n and Regional PI


Master of Business Ad
Master of Arts in Politi
Concurrent Degree Ad
REGISTRATION, FEES AND ACI


REGI
FEES
ACA


ISTRATION
AND EXPENSES...
DEMIC POLICIES. ...
American Bar Associal
Student Employment.
Maximum and Minimu
Graduate Course Optic
Grading Scale ....
Satisfactory-U nsatisfai


Determination


of Hon


JLTY


S. . .6
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 1


itio n . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
listration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11
enter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12
writingg Program . . . . . . . . . . . . .12
13
. . . . . a . . . . . . . . . . . . a 2 8
........ .......................... 30
. . . . .. . . . 31
E COLLEGE OF LAW 31
S .. . . . . . . . . . .*a . . ..31
nt .31

dnt of3Law......aa aaa *a*.32
n t . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1
*nt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

I ..... . . .. ....... .... . . .33

REQUIREMENTS .35
rO R .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
udy of Law . . . . . . .. . . . . 35
S. . . . . . . . . .36
. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . 37
nts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38
I FOR BEGINNING STUDENTS ...........39
;REE-j.D .... . ... . .. . ..... ... . . .40
IOGRAMS . . . . . . . . . .. . . .41
planning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
ministration . . . . . . . . . . . . . .41
cal Science-Public Administration ....... .42
Imissions/General Information ... ..... 42
ADEMIC POLICIES . . . . . . . . . .42
. . . . . . . . .......42
. .... ... ................. . a....... .43
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
tion Standards. . . . . . . . . . . .44
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
im Loads . . . . . . . . . . . . . .44
on . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .46
ctory Grading System... . . . . . . .46
or Point Averase . . . . . 46


I






4 / TABLE OF CONTENTS


LEGAL INFORMATION CENTER


STUDENT PROGRAMS AND SI
FINANCIAL AID-ENTERIN
Policy . . . . . .


Loans .. ..... .
Scholarships. . ..
Basis of Award ..


SCH
SCH
LOA
SHO


Financial
How to A
Minority
OLARSHI
OLARSHI
,NS FUND
IRT-TERM


Assistance


pply . . .
Applicants
PS AND LO0
PS FOR ADI
'S FOR ADV
LOAN FUN


Sf f f f f f . 52


ERVICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55
1CG .D. STUDENTS . . . . . . . . . . 55
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .55

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..55
* . f f f f f f . f . 4 4 4 f . f f f f f f f * 5 6



A N S . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..57
/ANCED LAW STUDENTS ft.t.t............... .57
ANCED LAW STUDENTS ....*.............58
DS ADMINISTERED BY THE ................59
............................. 5 5







DS A DMI N ISTE RE D BY TH E 59


COLLEGE OF L
HOUSING ....
SPECIAL PROGRAMS Al
CENTER FOR GOVE
CLINICAL PROGRAM
DISTINGUISHED VI
MINORITY AFFAIR!
PLACEMENT ...f
INTERNATIONAL L
International L<
International Li
International Si
Cambridge-Wai
Mexican Summ
LAW CENTER ASSO
Law Center Ass(
ORGANIZATIONS, ACTI
John Marshall E
The Council of
Black Americar
Environmental
Spanish Americ
Law Associatioi
Law Wives .
Legal Fraterniti
Moot Court ..
University of Fl
SCHOLASTIC HON(
Order of the Co


Dk;: Vnn


DLk


.AW

I D SERVICES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .63
RNMENTAL RESPONSIBILITY. ........ ... ....63
M . ... ... ... ... ... f . . . . 63
VISITING PROFESSOR PROGRAM ...............66
4... ... ... f..ft ff t ff t f t 4 4 4 ff tt ttt 66

AW PROG RAMS t t . . . . . . . . . .66
aw Society. .. 66
aw Moot Court Competition ....67
summer Law Programs .. . . . . . . . . . . .67
rsaw International Trade Law Program ........... 67
er Law Program . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
CIATIO N ..... ... . . .... ...... 68
ociation Board of Trustees .. . . . . . . . . .68
IVITIES, HONORS AND AWARDS.... .......... .69
lar Association ..... . . . . . . . . . .69
Ten ......... .. ...........................69
n Law Student Association.. . ..........69
Law Society . .. . . . . . . . . . . .70
:an Law Student Association .. . .... .......70
n for W om en . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70
S. .. ... .. ............................... 70
es. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .70
.... ........ ........................... .71
orida Law Review . . . . . . . . . . . .72
3RA RIES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .72
)if . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2
71









TABLE OF CONTENTS / 5


Seminar and Advanced Writing Requirement


COURSE OFFERINGS BY AREA
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS .. ..


FIRST YEAR COURSES
SECOND AND THIRD
SELECTED LEGAL PRO
SEMINARS. ......
CURRENT LEGAL PRO


YEAR COURSES.
BLEMS .... . .

BLEMS SEMINAR


. . . .. .. . . 78


. . . . . . . . . . . . .78
. . . . ....... ........ . 81
..........................81

. . . . . . . . . * . . . 83
...........................93

tS . . . . . . . . .. . . .96
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .96


DEVIATIONS, PREREQUISITES, AND
COURSE CANCELLATION
PREREQUISTE CHART ..........


NUMERICAL COURSE LISTING
Juris Doctor Curriculum .


THE TAX PROGRAM .....
MASTER OF LAWS IN
Entering LL.M. in
REQUIREMENTS FOR
Alphabetical Cou
LL.M. in Taxation
REGISTRATION BY COLLE
STUDENT LISTING ...
Second Year Class ...
Third Year Class....


.. . .. . .. . .. . . . . .....97


. . . . . . . . . . . . . .. .1


TAXATIO N. . . . . . . . . . .
Taxation Financial Aid
DEGREE-LL.M. IN TAXATION ......
rse Listing-Master of Laws in Taxation


GES


MAP


. .1
. .1
. .1


. . . . .1
. . . . .1
. . . . . 1


S. 9 . S 9 9 . . . 9 9 1
. . ......... .. . .......... .. .1

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S S . 9 S .1
. . a . . . . .1
. .................................... 1







CALENDAR


FALL


SEMESTER


1982


February 1


4:00 p m

March 1
4:00 p.m


Monday


Last day to file application for admission.


, Monday


Last day to f


completed appli


cation for


admission with advanced standing for fall.


, Friday


2:00 Noon


Last day for those previously in attendance


at the University of Flo


rida Coll


of Law


to register during the preregistration period.


August 19 & 20


Thursday


& Friday


College of Law Or


entation and registration.


August 20, Friday


Last day for regular registration without be-


subject to


late fee


of $25.00. No one per-


mitted to start registration on Friday


20, after 12:00 Noon.


August 23, Monday


Classes


begin


. Drop/Add


begins.


Late


registration begins.


creased $2


August 27
I2:UO Noon


, Friday


ast time


for completing late registration for


semester


Last time for Drop/Add and


for changing sections.


Last day for


exercls-


ng Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory option.


August


, Friday


.Last


a student


withdraw


receive full refund of fees.


August 30, Monday


Last day for paying fees


in full


without being


subject to a

Labor Day.


late fee


asses


Last time for fil


of $2


suspended.


location at the


of the Registrar for a degree to be


conferred at the end of fa


September 1


semester


4:00 p.m.


Last day for


the pre


changing any grade a


signed


grades


August


registration fees


September 6, Monday

September 10, Friday


Office


, Friday


ing degree app


ceding term


If not made up,








CALENDAR


November


25-26


Thursday-Friday


Thanksgiving holidays.


asses


suspended.


November


29, Monday


.Final


examinations


begin.


December 10, Friday


.Final


examinations


December 16


, Thursday


10:00 a.m.


Grades


for degree


candidates due


in the


fice of the Registrar.


December 16


, Thursday


3:00 p.m.


. Report of


colleges on candidates for degree


due in the O


office of the


Registrar.


December


December
9:00 a.m.


.Coll


18, Saturday

20, Monday


ege Comm


ence


All grades for fa
of the Registrar


SPRING


SEMESTER


ment Exercises.


semester due in the Office


1983


1982


September 1


Thursday


4:00 p.m.


. Last day to f


e app


cation for adm


mission for


the spring


October 1
4:00 p.m.


semester as a beginning student.


Saturday


Last day to file completed appli


cation for


admission with advanced standing for


spring


November
12:00 Noon


semester.


11, Friday


. Last day for those


previously


in attendance


at the University of Florida College of Law


to register during the prereg


istration period.


1983


january


, Friday


12:00 Noon


. Last day for regular registration without be-


subject to late fee of $25


.00. No one per


m itfft


hoain


I I I I LLk J tJ L a I I


registration


>n Friday.


Y*







CALENDAR


anuary 14,
2:00 Noon


Friday


Last day for completing


late registration for


spring semester.


Last day for DroplAdd and


for changing


sections.


Students


liable


fees for all hours for which registered.


January 14, Friday


exercising


Satisfa


ctory/Un-


satisfactory option.


January 21
3:00 p.m.


Wednesday


Last time for filing degree appl


cations


the Off


of the Registrar for a degree to be


conferred at the


end of the


spring


semester


February 4,


Thursday


4:00 p.m.


. Last day for changing any grade


the prceding term
I or X become E.


If not made


U


assigned in
p, grades of


March 3-4


Thursd


ay-Friday


Spring holidays,


Classes


suspended.


March 28-29


Monday-Tuesday


Classes


suspended.


, Friday


4:00 p.m.


Last time


for withdrawing without receiving


failing grades


in all


courses.


, Friday


. .All cl


asses


Final


18, Monday .

28, Thursday


examinations


begin.


10:00a.m.


.Report


of Coil


on degree


candidates


due Office of the


.Final


29, Friday

5, Thursday


istrar


examinations


9:00 a.m.


Grades


for degree candidates due


in the Of-


of the Registrar.


, Saturday


Coll


Commence


ment Exercises.


May 16,
9:00 a.m.


Monday


All grades for spring semester


in the Of-


of the


registrar








CALENDAR


May 20, Friday


2:00 Noon


. . Last day for registration without b


ect to a late fee of $


25.00.


No one


permit-


ted to start registration on Friday


after 12:00 Noon.


May 20, Friday


.Last time


for filling degree appli


cation at


the Off


of the


Registrar for


a degree to be


conferred at the end of the


summer term.


,Monday


Classes


begin.


Drop/Add


begins.


registration begins.


creased $2


5.00 for


All registration fees in
students registering late


, Friday


12:00 Noon


Last time for completing


summer term.


Last time


late registration for
for Drop/Add and


for changing sections.


Students


liable


for all hours for which registered.


time for


exercising


Satisfactory/Unsati


sfac-


tory option.


, Friday


4:00 p.m...


..Last


a student


may


withdraw


recieve full refund of fees.


, Friday


.Last day for paying fees


ject to a


late fee


without being


25.00.


May 30, Monday


.Memorial


asses


suspended.


June


, Friday


4:00 p.m..


.Last day for


changing any grade a


signed


the preceding term.


If not made


up, grades


of I or


become


July 4, Monday


Independen
suspended.


iday


Classes


uly 8, Friday


asses


uly11


Monday


SFinal
SFinal


July 18, Monday ..

July 20, Wednesday


4:00 p.m..


Examinations
Examinations


begin.


... Grades for degree candidates due


in the Of-


fice of the


Registrar.


uly 20, Wednesday


4:00 p.m


Report of colleges on


candidates for degree


















I- r













!II

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illll II
immi






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". .
:1 iicy~ 1
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ADMINISTRATION


AND


UNIVERSITY


FACULTY


ADMINISTRATION


Robert Q.


Marston


M.D


B.Sc


. . . . .President


John A.


Nattress


Robert A Bryan,


. . .. . . . . E


executive V


Ph.D


Presid


Presid


ent for


Academic Affairs


illiam Earl


Elmore


C.P.A.


Vice


President for


Administrative Affairs


Arthur Sandeen


M.A


Ph.D.


Vice


President for


student Affairs


COLLEGE


OF


LAW


ADMINISTRATION


Frank T


Read


*, J.D.


Jeffrey E.
Martin H.


Lewis, A.B.,
Belsky, A.B


J.D.


*, J.D.


Assoc


ate Dean


. Director of the Center


for Governmental Respon


Steph


en A.


Lind


., J.D.,


LL.M.


. . . . . . .A c


ting Director of


Graduate


Tax Program


James E.


Dixon, A.B.,


M.A


., J.D.


.. Ass


istant Dean for


Student and Minority Affairs


Jere H


Robert R.
Arthur R.


Hudson


Lingren,
Shelley,


M.A. .


M.PH IL


r., B.A.


...... . A s


., J.D.


,J.D.


sistant Dean for
Administration


............... Assistant Dean


... Assistant Dean for
Academic Affairs and
Director of
Legal Writing Program


Michael
ixie B. M


W.T


Coram


Patrick


r.. B.A


.,spec.


M.A.E


in Ed


... .Assistant Reg


istrar


.... Director of Placement
. Coordinator of Continuing
Legal Education and


Ab Im


A f' r. '


tn**a****lI 1'I *naa


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . V


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . D e a n







12 / FACULTY

LEGAL INFORMATION CENTER


Grace


W. (Betty) Taylor


M.A


.. Director and
Affiliate Professor


Robert J.
Carole H


Pam


Munro, B.A.,


Groom


M.A


Librarian


. . . . .Associate Librarian
. . . . Associate Librarian


Williams


Arthur R. Donn


Carol


Feltz


M.S..


Ed.D


* Assistant Librarian
. Assistant Librarian


usy CGilman,


tant Librarian


LEGAL RESEARCH AND WRITING PROGRAM


Arthur R.


Shelley


r., B.A


. ....D.............. D director


., JD.


and Assistant Dean


Gertrude


H. Block


M.A.T


. . . . . .. W writing


special ist


Burke


Lynn Capehart,
Sherry Hieber,


.,J.D.


. . ........ .. ... Associate Director


B.S., J.D.


*, J.D.


. . .Ass


istant Director


.Assistant Director


Jean H


McCreary


Bradford Lee Thomas, B.A.,


I .D. . . . ... ....... .. .. ... .Assistant Director
I.D . . . . . . . . . . . . .Assistant D director







THE


FACULTY


AL STRFay
rTZfa mtis P
*^%-^ "-^- u, '"^n*^ ^*^























FLETCHER N.


BALDWIN JR.,


Professor of Law.


A.B., 1958,


, Georgia;


Yale.


LL.M


., 1962,


nois;


LL.M


Professor Baldwin joined the Florida faculty


., 1968,
in 1962.


He was a Fulbright
Kampala, Uganda, t


Professor


at Makerere


University


aught at Princeton and Brown Univer-


sities


in the Mexican


participated extensive


fessor


Baldwin was E


executive


Summer Law
international


Editor


Program,


legal


of the Law


and has


affairs.
lourna


is a member of Phi Beta Kappa,


mitted
pellate.


to the


Georgia


Professor


are constitutional


teac


Constitution


his


Baldwin's


and
Law


Phi Kappa F
s practice


prince


cremina


and Coif.


is primarily


academic
procedure.


Criminal


interests
He will


Procedure


1982-83.


MARTIN H.


Temple;


Professor Be


of the


BELSKY


1968


ssoc


iate Professor of Law.


Columbia


sky joined the


; Diploma,


Florida fa


Center for Governmenta


1969,


culty in 1982


Responsibility.


A.B., 1965,
Cambridge.
as Director
member of


the Pennsylvania Bar, he has


taught at Georgetown and Tem-


essor


Belsky was


Editor-in-Chief


of the Columbia


Transnational Law Journal and an


International Fellow.


has worked


as Philadelphia's


Assistant District Attorney and


Chief of Prosecutions


later


served


as Counsel to the U


House.
Oceanic
Florida.


was


and Atm
His princil


Assistant


Administrator


of the


National


ospheric Administration before coming to


academic interests are


criminal


aw. en-


vironmental


and energy laws and international


GERALD T


BENNETT


, Professor of Law. B.A


1958


St. Ber-


*. -


II







GERTRUDE BLOCK, Lecturer.
1967. Florida. Ms. Block has 1


A.B., 1941, Penn. State; M.A.T
taught English, Humanities an


Transformational Grammar. She has


at the
sional


Law College since


interest


is lega


1974.


semantics.


been Writing


Block


Specialist
pal profes-


will tutor and teach


egal English composition


in 1982-83 in connection with the


egal research and writing program.


MARY


Caldwe


ELLEN
.; J.D.,


CALDWELL,


1955,


L.S.U.;


joined the Florida fac


Professor
LL.M..


of Law.


1959


ulty in 1974.


Yale.
She has


1943,


Professor


taugh


Ohio State Un


versity


and the U.S. Supreme


and is admitted to the


Court.


Professor


Cal


Louisiana Bar
Idwell was a


member of the Be
Review and Coif. ;
the Fifth Circuit U


as a Sterling Fellow


)ard of Editors of the Louisiana State Law


clerked for Judge Wayne G.


Borah


Court of Appeals before attending Yale
At Yale, she was appointed Research


Associate
academic


and
interest


jurisprudence,


teach


Lecture
sts are


r.


and food


Legislation;


essor


contracts,
, drug and


viden


Caldwi
evidence


cosmetic law.


Food


and Drug


princ


legislation,


She w
Law


1982-83.


DENNIS A. CALFEE


1972


zaga;


Professor of Law.


LL.M


1975


B.B.A


Florida.


.,1968,
Profess


onzaga


or Calfee


joined the Florida f


Teacher of the


acuity


in 1975 and has twice


at the Law College.


been named
taught at the


University of Leiden


in the


Netherlands


is admitted to the


Washington State Bar and


is a Certified Public


Accountant.


Following


graduation,


Washington State


Professor


C


Court of Appeals.


:alfee
His r


clerked


for the


academy


interest i
Transfers


s taxation.


in Fall


will teach


Taxation


of Gratuitous


1982.


STUART R. COHN


essor


of Law. B.A.


1962


-A a a


.- I


a a


* -I


a S


- a r-


- I A LJ ^ n -- L. I nk a a .n n. a nf I LI' lL, S-


L.K-


A.B.,


)rlnc


U L 1 1i







BARRY A.


acuity


CURRIER
Southern


in 1977


Professor of Law.


essor


B.A., 1968, U.C.L.A


Currier joined the Florida


has taught at the Unive


rsity of Kentucky


and Duke


University and is admitted to the California Bar.


Professor Currier
Following graduate
peals District of C


a me


mber of Law Review and Coif


clerked for the U


olumbia Circuit and


Court of Ap-


later practiced


in Los


Ange


essor


regulation,


teac


Currier's


princ


academic


int<


use and development of real property


h Property


Income T


axation


crests are
. He will


Real Estate Transactions and Finan


1982-83.


JEFFREY DAVIS, Prof


1972
Davi


essor


, Loyola Marymount;


S


oined the Florida f


of Lai
LLM.
aculty


NW


., 1965, U.C.L.A


, 1973, Michigan. Professor


r


in 1981


has taught at


New York Univers


Rutgers-Camden and the University of


South
Loyola,


Dakota


and is admitted


Professor Davis was


to the


California


a member of the St


More Law Honor Society and Law Review and was


teaching Fe


cipal academic i
and bankruptcy


Ilow. He was a Cook Fellow at M


chigan


interests are contract, commerical,


essor


Davis


. Thomas
a Student
i. His prin-
consumer


will teach Contracts


and Debtor-Creditor Law


in 1982-83.


GEORGE


L. DAWSON


Associate


esssor


of Law.


1966


Princeton


1969,


Chicago


. Professor


Dawson


joined


Florida


Faculty


was


1982


Teacher of the


taught at the Universities of


Oregon


and Michigan,


is admitted to


the Colorado


Professor


Dawson was


an editor


of the Ch


icago Law


Review.


and
Joint


is active


in the


is an adviser to the


t


Psycholog
academic


Technica


Test


interests


National


Standards
ing. Profe


school Admission Coun
I Committee to Devel


ssor


are commercial


Educational and
Dawson's principal
law and decedents'


estates and trusts.


h Estates and Trusts I; Corn-


mercia


Paper; and Contracts


in 1982-83.


JAMES E.
A -.:-- A


DIXON


Assistant Dean for


Student and Minority


1 fl rr- > T u liI _J. *l l*. A A I A


CL 1~--


*


_I_







JAMES J.
1950, Duk


FREELAND


J.D., 1954, Flo


, Distinguished Service Professor. A.B.,


Professor Freeland joined the


Florida faculty in


1957


and directed the Graduate


Tax Pro-


gram from the 1977-82. He was on the N.Y.U. tax faculty and


taught at Arizona. Professor Freeland


a Florida native


is admitted
repeatedly as
Outstanding


to the


Florida


Bar. He has


been


recognized


an outstanding professor and was named 1981


Tax Lawyer in the State of Fl


orida by the


Section of the Florida


Review and Coif. 1-
Professor Freeland's


Bar. He was a member of the Law
practiced in Miami after graduation.


princ


academic


interest


federal


come taxation.
Holland Spring


He will


be on


eave


1982 and will teach


1983.


MANDELL


1951


GLICKSBERG, Pro
. Florida; LL.M.


essor
1958


. B.A., 1949,


N.Y.U


. Prof


essor


Clicksber


been re
Miami
editor


joined the Florida faculty


ognized


in 1953 and has twice


as an outstanding professor. A native


Beach and a member of the Florida Bar


of


Review.


Following graduation,


he was


taught at


N.Y.U., prac
member of
Department.


1981 r<
serves
Florida


ticed law


in Miami


the U.S. Air
Professor (


visions of the


Force


Beach and later


udge


Ilicksberg


Florida


as supervisor to the


Law Review.


He will


Advocate


directed


Uniform


served as


nera


1975


Title Standards and


Title Standards Program of the


teach


Land Transactions and


Finance and an Advanced Property


eminar


in fall 1982.


MICHAEL W


GORDON


Professor of Law


1957


1963, Connecticut; M.A.,


1968,


Trinity;


Dipl.


de Droit Com-


pare, 1973, Strasbourg. Professor Gordon joined the Florida
faculty in 1968. He was Associate Editor of the Connecticut


Law Review and practiced three years before


oining the Con-


necticut faculty


Guatemala


He was a Fulbright Professor in M


and taught


in Costa


directs the Mexican Summer


Rica.


Professor


Law Program and has


exico and
Gordon
lectured


extensive
academy


ely throughout the U


ic


affairs.


Finan


interests


are corporate


He will teach


ce, Comparative


and abrc
ion law


Corporation


>ad.


His principal


and international
Is and Corporate


Law and a seminar


national


Business


in 1982-83.


DAVID M.


Wake


Fnrept-


HUDSON


I I .


Assistant Professor


1974 Florida State- II


of Law. B.
M 1q97


1968


Flnrida


J.D.,


?c







JERE H.
1961, N
son join


HUDSON
ebraska: 1%


Assistant Dean for Administration.


1968


led the College of La


, George W
w in 1973.


ashington.


B. Ed.,


Dean Hud-


-He completed a


career


with the U
the Institu
by the Fl


.S. Air Force in 1972
te for Court Manage


orida


supreme


Court


and won a Ford Fellowship to
ment. He later was employed


to assist


establishing


Florida court administration program.


He has been a consul-


tant to the Florida State Courts Administrator and served on


the Governor'


sonne
of the


Committee on Upgrading Crimina


Dean Hudson


justice Per


a member of the Academy of Fellows


institute for Court Management.


KENNETH B.


HUGHES


Professor of Law.


B.A., 1933, LL.B.,


1936,
fessor


Southern Cal


LL.M


Hughes joined the Florida fa


Harvard.


culty


in 1968 and has


Pro-
been


named Outstanding


Teache


r of the


Year on several occa-


sons.


Boston


has taught at


University,


Southern Cal.


Boston College and


U.C.L.A.


, Puerto Rico,


Indiana at


Bloom-


ington. He is a member of the Ca


ifornia


District of Colum-


bia and Puerto Rico B.
Angeles and Beverly H


Fellow and member of Coif


ars and practiced fifteen years in Los


Professor Hughes was a Brandeis
, and served as Admiralty Counsel


to the U


Maritime


Commiss


terests are evidence, federal pr


ion. His principal academic in-
actice and criminal procedure.


He wil


teach Criminal Procedure and Evidence


in 1982-83.


E.L. ROY HUNT,


Professor of


B.A., 1955,


Vanderbilt;


1960, M


ssissippi; LL.M,


1962


Yale.


Professor Hunt join-


ed the Florida faculty


Dean


Associate


Dean


1962, and has si
cting Dean and


served
Inter


as Assistant


Dean.


native of Tennessee and a member of the Missis


Professor Hunt taught at M


ssissippi and was a Fulbright Lec-


turer


at South Korea's


Associate
Hunt's pr
conflict o


Editor
incipal


Seoul


of the


academic


National


ssippi


interests


University.


ourna


He was a
Professor


are international


)f laws and historic preservation


will teach


International
in Fall 1982


Law and a seminar


and will


teac


h at St.


in Historic


Mary's


Preservation Law
Spring 1983.


THOMAS R. HURST
I.D.. 1969. Harvard.


Profes


rroressor


sor of Law


Hurst


A.B., 1966, Wiscon


joined the Florida faculty


r I


, A








STANLEY N.


NGBER, Professor of Law. B.A., 1969, Brooklyn


lege;
ulty


1972


, Yale. Professor Ingber


oined the Florida


1972. A native of. Brooklyn and a member of the


New York Bar
and Boston. H


, he has taught at Illinois,


le was on the Yale


San Di


ourna


Tennessee


and is a member


of Phi Beta Kappa, the Amer


Woodrow W
academic int
jurisprudence,
Constitutional


ilson
erests


criminal


Fellow.


ican Law insi
Professor


are constitutional


procedure and torts.


urisprudence


tute and is a former


s principal


criminal


He w


teac


and Criminal


1982-83.


ERNEST
1949, M


M. JONES
ississippi; J


, Prof
.S.D.,


essor of


1965,


B.B.A


Yale.


Professor


1949
ones


joined


the Florida f


acuity in 1954. A member of the Mi


ssippi Bar


he has taught at M


ssissippi, George Washington and Denver.


Professor J
ministrative
Florida Adi


es' principal


law and


contracts.


ministrative


academic


interests


He will teach Contracts;
] Administrative Law in


1982-83.


JULIAN C. JUERGENSMEYER, Professor of Law. A.B.,


1959,


1963,


Cert.


Diplomas


D'Etudes


Polit.,


Comparative


1960,
Law,


Bordeaux,
1968-69,


Strasbourg,
Florida fac
taught at


France.


ulty in
Indiana


Professor


Juergensmeyer


1972. He has practiced in Clev


University,


Tulane


joined


eland and


and Ethiopia's


Haile


ellassie I University. He was on the Duke Law


ournal-and is


a member


of Coif


Cambridge-Warsaw


directs th
interests


Professor


International


Agricultural Law Cen


are land


use control


J uergensmeyer


directs


Trade Law Program and
ter. His principal acade


law, agriculture


the
co-
mic
en-


vironmental law and comparative


law. He


will teach Land


Use Control


, Agricultural


and a seminar on


vironmental Law


in 1982-83.


JOSEPH


JULIN,


Professor


of Law


and Dean


.r, rJ 4rr a S ta. I-. r


Emeritus.
S. i


.








JEFFREY E.
A.B., 1966,


LEWIS,
IJD,


Associate


1969


Dean


Duke.


and Professor


Dean


Lewis


joined


Law.
the


Florida faculty in 1972. A native of


Ohio and a member of


the Ohio Bar
tice in Ohio.


, he taught a


Akron


and was


He has served as a consultant


in private prac-
t to the Florida


State


Court's


aluminum


stee


Administrator
I industries.


ding Law Professor by the


and i
He was


s an arbitrator


name


ohn Marsha


in the


1 1977 Outstan-
Bar Association.


Dean
cedure


Federal


Lewis'


princ


evidence


academic


federal


Practice and Evidence


interests


jurisdiction.
in 1982-83.


are civil
He will


teac


STEPHEN


LIND


Professor


196;


1965,
joined


., Berkeley;


the Florida


LL.M


faculty


1966


in 1970.


and a member of the California Bar


Francisco and teaches


in the fall


N.Y.U


Professc


A native of Ca


he has


at Hastin


taugh
CollE


2, J.D.,
)r Lind
lifornia
at San


essor


Lind will serve


Tax Program


as Acting Director


1982-83 and wil


Taxation in the


LL.M.


of the Graduate


er courses
programs


in Partner-
in Fall 1982


and Taxation


of Corporate


Reorgan


izations


the LL


program


Spring 1983.


ROBERT
B.S.B.A.,


R. LINDGREN
1976, J.D., 198


Assistant
Florida;


Dean


M.Phil.


1978


Lecturer.
Oxford.


Dean Lindgren was named Ass


and Alumni


Affairs


in 1982 and I


stant Dean for Development
1as served as Campaign Coor-


dinator for the College'


law Center Building Campaign.


He is


admitted to the Florida Bar and coordinates al


of the Co


lege's


serve<


external


activities


education and alum
d as an Assistant


including ft
ni activities. \
to University


undra
While


ising,
in law


President


continuing


school
Robert


Marston.


JOSEPH


LITTLE


, Prof


essor


of Law.


1957, Duke;


M.S.,


Worcester


Professor Little


Polytechnic;


joined the Florida faculty


, 1963,
in 1967


Michigan.
He is ad-


*








W. D.


MACDONALD,


Professor of


Law.


1936,


LL.B.,


1939, Toronto; Barr


S.J.D.,


1956,


at Law, 1939, Osgoode Hall; LL.M.,


Michigan.


Professor


Macdonald


oinec


1947,
I the


Florida faculty as


a visiting professor


in 1948 and stayed on


r'


after his stud


petitioned the State Board of Contro


hire him.


A native of Nova


Scotia


was a member of the


Ontario Bar until b


becoming an American citizen in 1951. Pro-


fessor Macdonald has held a Ford Foundation F


fellowship


Europe and Brazil, has been a Harvard Research Scholar


Inter-American Affairs


a Fulbri


cholar


in Brazil


and has


taught in Cambodia and Luxumbourg. He


h Conf


of Law


s; Estates and Trusts; Fiduciary Administration


seminar on Conflict


of Laws


and a


in 1982-83.


ROBERT T


MANN


Professor of Law


B.S.B.A., 1946,


1951


Florida


Harvard; LL.M.,


M.A.


1968


1948
. Yal


, George Was


LL.D.


Hon.),


hington;


LL.M.


1979, Stetso


, 1953,
n. Pro-


fessor Mann joined the


Florida fa


the Florida and Massachusetts B


culty in 1974. A member of
ars, he was a Florida State


Representative f
District Court of


rom 19!
Appea


56-1968


from


was J


udge of


1968-1974,


serving


udge from 1973-1974, and served on the Public Ser


mission from 1978-1981. He was


Second


as Chief
vice Com-


Editor-in-Chief of the Florida


Law Review


, later taugh


at Northeastern and practiced in


Tampa.


He wil


teach Civ


Procedure; Appellate Practice;


Florida Constitutional Law; a seminar on Theory of Appellate
Review and a business course in 1982-83.


FRANCIS T


McCOY


Prof essor of Law. B.A


.,1944; M.A


1947


1955


, Florida. Professor McCoy


oined th


in 1955. A member of the Florida Bar


Army Reserve from 1942-1972, served in the U.S.


e Florida facul-
was in the U.S.


Foreign


vice and later was a Sterling Graduate Fellow at Ya


fessor McCoy's


princ


academic


interests are admiralty,


aw, legal history and comparative


He will


teach


ily Law and Admi


ralty Courses


and seminars


in Famil


, Admiralty and Lega


History


in 1982-83.


C. DOUGLAS MILLER


Professor of


Law


. B.S.,


1962


I








DIXIE MILLER
Miller has wo


and D


, Director of Placement. B.S., 1973, Florida, Ms.


rked


as personnel


development and Central


technician for the T
Employment sections


raining
of the


University of Florida Personn


Division.


A native of Florida


she has been with the College of Law


placement of both J.D. and LL.M


since


graduates.


1976. hand


Ms. Miller is ac-


tive in the National


region


Association for Law Placement at


and national leve


ROBERT B. MC
1966, Wisconsin.
in 1977. A memk
served as arbitra


)BERLY,


Professor of


Professor Moberly


ber of the Wiscons


itor


., 1963,


oined the Florida faculty


in and Tennessee Bars


mediator and administrative


udge


with the Wisconsin Employmen


Relations Commission and


later pra


cticed with a M


ilwaukee firm. He


has taught a


nessee


Louvain


, Belgium,


Polish


Academy


Sciences.
Review.
Supreme


Professor


After
Court.


Moberly


graduation,


was on the Wisconsin


he clerked


His principal academic


law and conflict resolution. He wil
Sector Labor Relations; a labor law


as a Negotiator


teac


Wisconsin


interests are
h Labor Law;


labor
Public


seminar; and The Lawyer


in 1982-83.


ROBERT C.L. MOFFAT


Professor of


1958


M.A.,


1962


Southern


Methodist;


Moffat joined the Flo


rida fa


LL.M
culty


., 1966,


1966.


Sydney


Professor


A member of the


Texas Bar


he was Russel


Sage Resident at Ca


., Berkeley,


and has taught at


eorgia,


lege, Oxford. He was Editor


Swarthmore and Brasenose Col-
-in-Chief of the Southwestern Law


journal


was a Fulbright


Scholar


in Australia


was a


Graduate Scholar at Harvard. He clerked for Chief Judge


E, Estes of the Northern Federal District of Texas.


Professor


Moffat's
criminal
tional la
vanced I


principal


academic


interests


are j


urisprudence,


law and procedure, sociology of law and consitu-


He will tea


urisprud


ence


ch Jurisprudence,


and Criminal


Law and Society


Procedure


in 1982-83


MICHAEL


L. MOORHEAD


Georee Washineton.


I.D.. 196'


Professor
9. Howard.


(


of Law. B.S., 1966,
Professor Moorhead


*









WINSTON


South Africa;
M.C.L., 1970;
Nagan joined


M


j


NAGAN, Professor of Law.


uris),


B.A., (Juris), 1966;
4M.L., 1970, Duke;


F


American citizen, he


:lorida
was a


faculty


ames


Law),


1971


1977. Yale.


1975.


1964,


Oxford


Professor


A naturalized


B. Warburg Fellow to the


University Consortium for World Order and


has taught


Virginia
Nagan's
tional la
human
Law: lur


tl V/ v.


Polytechnic,


principa


rw, domestic
rights and


risprud


ence;


Valparaiso


academic


relations


and De Paul.


interests


international


are private


procedure,


He will


and Conflict of Laws


essor


interna-


urisprudence,


teach


Family


in 1982-83.


MICHAEL A.


1963; J.D.,


OB


1968


IERST, A
Florida.


ssoc


iate Profe


ssor of Law.


B.B.S


Professor Oberst joined the Flo


faculty


1979. A member of the California and District of


Columbia Bars, he practiced


member of the


editorial
tion, he


in Los Angeles and was a staff


oint Committee on Taxation. He was on the


board of the Florida Law Review. Following gradua-


clerked for


Professor Oberst's


udge Austin Hoyt of the U.S.


principal academic interest is


Tax Court.
income tax


law. He will


teac


Income Tax


, Deferred Compensation;


and Ad


vanced Corporate Tax


1982-83.


p


. MICHAEL
4.S.E., 1970
joined the Fl


PATRICK,
; Specialist


stant


in Ed.,


orida administration


registrar


1975,


. B.S.


1967


Drake.


1980 and


princ


invol


ved with


admission


financial


records.


was a classroom teacher and Guidance Director in the


public


school


sions and Stud
munity College


system and spent seven years on the Admis-
lent Services staff at Des Moines Area Com-


e. F


later served


as a state officer in


Iowa Personnel and Guidance A


ssoc


iation and


as President


of the Iowa


Personnel


Guidance


Association


President


of the


owa


Association


of Coll


Admi


ssions


Counselors.


Dir LI AD r


LU


DC A DCO "l


Df


ncrnr


rf I a.,


1 oQn


aI*u Ia sl .ji a 1 rl i II r I I IrIlll I S I V *I I S I '.j.


I


M.A.,


RA









JAMES R
Florida


PIERCE


Professor of Law.


Professor Pierce joined the


1965


Florida fa


culty


in 1968


He established the College of Law


clinics and has served as


Director of Clinics since
Public Defender for the
was appointed Assistan


;1968 He


served as the First


Assi


8th Circuit. consultant to H.E.W


State Attorney


in the 8th


12th


stant
. and
w and


4th Circuits.


Professor Pierce was on the Florida Law Review


and practiced in Gain


esville after


graduation.


His principal


academic


interests are criminal procedure and tria


He will teach


Criminal


Practice and


Criminal


pract
Clinic


1982-83.


WALTER PROBERT


Professor of Law


1949


Oregon;


.S.D., 1957,


essor


Probert


joined


Florida


faculty


in 1959. Am


ember of the Oregon Bar, he prac-


ticed in Portland


, taught at Western Reserve, Northwestern,


Denver
Nation.
gram. I


, Washington and Texas,
al Science Foundation I


-le has


and served as Director of the


and Social


received the Blue Key Distingu


Science Pro-
ished Teacher


Award and also teaches in the
Probert was on the Oregon La


College of Medicine. Professor


eview Board of Editor


was elected to the Orders of Coif and St.


His prin


academic interests are torts,


professional


urisprudence,


responsib


law and medicine


teach


urisprudence;


and Profes


sional


Respon


sibility


in 1982-83.


JAMES
1945, I
Florida
1947 i


1956-69.


C. QUA
University


acuity
d was


R


ELES, Professor
of Virginia. Pr


1969.


B.A., 1942;


ofessor Quarles


He began


Dean


a member


teaching


Mercer Law
the federal


oined


at Mercer


, Georgia


from
and


Virginia Bars and of the American Law


Institute, and serv-


ed as Executive Director of the Florida Law Rev


sion Com-


mission.
Virginia


Coif.
Parker


Professor


Review


After
r of


Quarl
'and


graduation,


was


Senior


was elected


he clerked for Chief


Court


Appeals.


Editor


to membership


udge


rincipa


academic


will teach Con


interests are criminal


stituational


and constitutional


and Criminal


in 1982-83


FRANK


DCAn


U'


lf oan and


Profounr of


I aw


19An


Ir. R. *rn i | I fl.5 |it1 TV 2I| t..'I Ot . J i nfl,.


*


[.









ARTHUR


SHELLEY


Assistant


Dean


for Academic


Affairs and Director, Lega


I Research and Writing Program.


1975,


Amherst


1978,


University


Virginia.


Dean


his professional
New York. After


Shelley,
career v


a native


vith a pr


>r next serving


Bostonian,


ivate law firm in


as Associate


commenced


racuse,


Director of the


Writing


Program


at Virginia


he came


to Florida


assume his Assistant Deanship duties in


1980. He has been


responsible
academic p


academic


policies, and schedu


counseling,


exceptions


In 1982 he was named


Director of the Legal Research and Writing Program and is


currently


serving


academic interests are


both
sports


capacities.


law and


princ


legal education.


CHRISTOPHER


1973,


SLOBOGIN


Princeton;


Assistant


1977;


LL.M


Professor
., 1979,


University


of Virginia. Professor Slobogin joined the Florida faculty


1982. A member of the Virginia


Bar, he


taught at Virginia


and directed


University's


Forensic


Evaluation


Training


and Research Center,


training mental


health professionals


to perform evaluations for the courts and drafting mos


Virginia's


statute


on psychological


evaluations.


prin-


academic


interests


are juvenile


crim na


cedure
Slobogin


and law and the


teach


ehaviora


Procedur


sciences.
e and


Professor


chiatry in 1982-83.


DAVID T. SMITH


1960
1968


Boston.


A member


Professor


essor c
Smith


of Law.


1957, Yale;


oined the Florida fa


of the Massachusetts


Bar and


faculty in
the U.S.


Supreme Court, he


taught at


Indiana University, Duqu


and Case Western Reserve. He received the


Florida Blue


Distinguished


Faculty


Award


in 1974.


essor


Smith is a


member of the Amercian Bar Association, the Massachusetts


Bar Association, the A
Blue Key. He was Art


merican


udicature Society and Florida


cles Editor of the Boston Law Review


and is a me


mber of Coif


princ


ipal academic interests are


in the area of estates and trusts. He will teach Estates and


Trusts
serve


; Future Interests; and Fiduciary Administration


as


Law Review Faculty Advisor


in 1982-83.


AkjlIS I C


PIT71D


Acc icfant Prnfoccnr nf


I 'nm


* .-4 n M *1 *


A.B.,









GRACE


Legal
State


BETTY)


Information


1962


TAYLOR


Center.


Florida.


Professor


essor


of Law,


1949


1950


Taylor


Director,
. Florida


oined the Florida


ulty in 1950


and has


held various positions


in the Un


iversl-


ty Library and the Law Library


Board


of the


American


Associ


She s
ation


;erves


on the


of Law


executive


Libraries


American Ba
University of
Education. P
Florida Law F
Florida Blue


r Assoc
Floridc


nation Law Library Committee and the


a


essor


review
Key


Force on Use


ylor was R
was elected


'h


esea


of Computers


Editor


as an alumnus


Kappa.


of the
to Coif.


teac


Ta


. She
and P


seminar on Computers and the Law


n Spring 1983.


WINNIE F
Grambling


TAYLOR


i State; J.D.,


Professor Taylor


Associate Professor of Law. B.A


1975


oined the


Buffa
Florida


lo; LL.M.,
faculty


1972


1979, Wisconsin.
in 1979. A native


of Louisiana and a member of the New


York Bar


practic-


ed in Rochester for


several


years.


serves


as consultant to


the Credit Union National Association and a number of state


credit union
pliance. Prof


consumer,


leagues


essor


contract


Tayl,
t and


on federal


credit


regulations


com-


principal academic interests are


come


h Con-


tracts


and Consum


er Law


in 1982-83.


MARY POE TWITCHELL, A


stant


Professor of Law


1966
Yale.


Hollins; I
Professor


., 1970, UN


Twitch


1977, Fla


LL.M


1982


ell joined the Florida faculty in 1982. A


member of the


Florida Bar


, she practiced in


aenesvi


three


years.


She was A


member of


principal


torts


articless Ed
and Omi<
academic


teac


I


itor of the Florida Law Review


:ron Delta K


interests
Procedure


appa.


are civil


essor


Twit-


procedure and


in 1982-83.


N CCrtTT VAM AICTVMI ID


Pmefaccnr rof I .i


R A 1QAA









KATHLEEN WAITS, Assistant Professor of Law. A.B.,


Corn


1975,


Harvard.


Professor


Waits


oinec


1972,
i the


Florida faculty


1979. A memb


er of the District of Colum-


bia, Illinois and Florida Bars, she practiced in Washington for


citor's


Office of the U.S. Labor Department and has


taught at
academic
sibility and
and Profes:


American


University.


interests are civil


Professor


Wait'


procedure, profession


sex discrimination. She will teach Ci


sional R


esponsib


principal
al respon-
Procedure


in 1982-83.


WALTER O. Wl
Frankfurt Main,
1956, Harvard; J


EYRAUCH


Professor of Law


Germany; LL.B.,


1962


Yale.


1955


Dr. iru


, Georgetown;


Professor Weyrauch


LL.M.,
joined


the Florida faculty


in 1957


He is a native of Germany and is


admitted to the German Bar, the
Germany, and the U.S. Court of


Allied High Comm


Appeals.


mission


He has taught at


Yale,


Rutgers,


Frankfurt


Berke


Professor


Weyrauch


was a recipient


of Rockefeller


and Fulbrigh


grants. After graduation,


His prin


i Wa


he clerked for the German courts.


cipal academic interests are law of associations and


comparative


Family
1982-83.


law.
; Lega


He will teach


Coun


Business


Organ


ation


ng; and Comparative


WINTON


Tulane; I
Williams


WILLIAMS,


LL.B


Professor


O


., 1962, Mississippi; LL.M.,


f Law.
1973,


B.B.A


Y


joined the Florida faculty in 1969. He


1957


ale. Professor
is a native of


Mississippi and a member of the Mississippi Bar. He


ed 1974-75 Teacher of the year. Professor W


illiam


was nam-
s was on


the Miss
Court B'
state. Hi


ppi Law Journal and was Chairman of the Moot


oard.


After


s principal


graduation,


practiced


home


academic interest is commercial transac-


tions and debtor-creditor law


and S


will teach Debtor-Creditor


1982-83.


STEVEN I. WILLIS. A


assistant professor of


.. 1974:


/ ,


I .. .


L, II.I .


. J









DON C. PETERS, Professor of Law, B


1965, Northern Iowa;


1968


1973
was


owa


member


a Fulbright


esso


r Peters joined the


of the Florida


Scholar at the Un


owa and


Florida faculty


orado Bars


diversity of Malaya,


Kuala


Lumpar, Malaysia,


Fellow and ha:


was a Reginald Heber
s lectured at Colorado


Community


He was Comment


Editor of the Iowa Law Review


a member of Coi


later
He wi


clerked for W.E. Doyle


ll


teach Civ


of U


Clinic; Office


.S. District Court


and Pre-Trial


Denver


Civil Practic


and Civil Procedure in 1982-83.


VISITING


AND


ADJUNCT


PROFESSORS


BARBARA A.


BURKETT


, Adjunct


ociate Professor of


aw.


., 1963, J.D.,


1966,


owa;


Graduate Studie


1970-72


LL.M.


,1978, Harva


rd. Prof


essor Burkett joined


the Florida fa


culty


1977. She has


taught at the Univ


ersity of


Arkansas,


where


eloped their


programs,


was a Bellow's F


ellow at Harvard.


Professor


Burkett is admitted to the


courts


courts


of appea


Florida


and the U.S.


owa and


supreme


Ilinois Bars as


Court.


She was


I as several federal district
a member of the Board of


Editors of the Iowa Law Review. Upon graduation,


she was


a bank trust officer and


joined the Vermilion


County L


services


Program.


er prmc


academy


interests


are in the


and skills training areas.


PHILLIP E.


LL.M.


EGGER


Florida.


Visiti


esso


stant


r Egger


Professor


joined the Florida fa


1978


culty for a


; J.D.,


1980, Con


one-ye


zaga;


ar professorship


beginning


in May 1982. He


is a native


of W


ashington and is admitted to the Washington


Bar. While att


ending the


University of Florida Col


ege of Law, he


was research


assistant


.








FACULTY


MICHAEL


SCOTT


1980; LL.M.,


HAWLEY,


1981


Florida.


A member of the Florida Bar


of Florida,


esea


served as


Cain


Adjunct


Assistant


Professor Hawley


Professor


Law.


oined the Florida fa


B.S.B.A.,


culty


, he was Vice President of the Tampa First Nationa


clerk and researcher to both a Gainesville firm and Am


esville,


and has


lectured


at the Universities of


Florida,


1971;
1981.
Bank
erican
South


Florida


Tampa.


essor


Hawley


was on the Florida


eview


member of
of taxation.


Florida Blue


Key and Om


icron Delta Kappa.


teac


in the


area


ROLAND


L. HJORTH,


Visiting


Professor of


Law. A. B


1957


Nebraska


LL.B.


, 1961,


N.Y.U.


Professor Hjorth has


been a member of the


University of Washington faculty


since 1964. A member of the New York


Bar and the


Washington State Bar


socla-


practiced


in New


and has taught


at N.Y.U.,


Texas and Michigan


a Fulbright


Fellow


at the


Univ


ersity


of Heidelberg,


was Note


and Comment


Editor of the N.Y.U.


Review


is a member


of Coif.


Professor


Hjorth's


academic


interests are federal ta


nation and European Common Market law


will teach Fed
in Fall 1982.


BRUCE


LL.M.,


1975


income


KRAMER
, Illinois. I


Tax Accounting and


, Visiti


income


Professor


essor Kramer of Texas


Taxation of Natural


1968


ech join


ed the


sources


U.C.L.A


Florida fa


culty on a


visiting professorship for


1982-83. A member of the California


practice in Los Angeles and has taught at


Indiana and Lewis


Bar, he
S& Clark.


was in private
He has worked


as consultant and


investigator on many proje


cts dealing with land use


planning


environmental


issues.


teac


h Property


and En


vironmental


in 1982-83.


STEPHAN


MICKLE


, Adjunct


Assistant


essor


1965


M.Ed.


, 1966;


1970


Florida.


Professor


Mickle has been an Alac


hua County


Judge


since


1979.


Prior to graduation from law
Instruction. After graduation,


school, he taught for the Brevard County Board of Public
he was staff attorney in the Federal Office of Economic


Opportunity


, practiced law


in Gain


esville and joined the Florida faculty


as an Assis-


Professor


, teaching


practice.


essor


Mickle's


princ


academic


terests are lega


ethics


constitutional law and t


practice.


JAMES


O'Donnel


Federal
Court.


O'DONNELL,


joined


Adjunct


the Florida


District Court,


Lecturer.


faculty
x Court,


He practiced with and was a partner


., 1964;


1980.


., 1968,


is admitted


U.S. Court of Claims and


in a


ckson


Florida.


to the


essor


Florida


the U.S.


ville firm until


Supreme


starting h


.- si|l ,


. . .


* ,II I I I I


-i ^ .. ft -. I- ft -^ I I - ft --J i J- ^ ft .-i. *Y i i i I


r i-


I


In -I .-


was


1


. 111 /








FACULTY


EMERITI


VERNON


, 1939,


. CLARK,


N.Y.U


essor


Professor


of Law


Clark


y member for approximately


Emeritus.


oined
years.


ABE,


the Florida


A native


1932;


faculty


IJD.,


1942


1946


, Florida;


was a


Floridian and a member of the


Florida
Commi


he served as a


District


ssion and as a State Auditor


was Supervising


Princi


honorary member of Coif


supervisor


for the Florida Probation and Parole


Prior to entering the College of Law as


of Tallah


Florida Blue


assee


Schools.


Key and the Amer


ican


Professor


a student


Clark


Trial Lawyers As


is an
socia-


tion.
mun


He taught


in the


areas


crimina


mana


procedure,


taxation


corporations.


DEXTER DELONY


Professor


of Law Emeritus.


1937


1939


Alabama;


LL.M


, Harvard. Professor Delony joined the Florida facu


tice, an attorney with the federal


1948 He was in private


government and taught at the Pennsylvania Whar


ton School of Finance


and the University of Denver Co


llege of Law


has served as


consultant to committees of the U


. Congress and is a m


ember of the labor arbitration


pane


of the Federal Mediation and Consiliation


rvice


, the


American Arbitration


Association and the U


Postal


service


Profes


sor Delony's


princlpa


academic


interests


are labor law and commercial law.


HAYFORD O.


ENWALL,


Professor of


Emeritus.


1938, Miami


L, 1929,


Florida


Professor Enwall


oined the Florida faculty in 1956 and served as Prof


essor for 20


years. He


was in practice 20 years,


served as Assistant U.S.


Attorney and taught


at Miami


and V


irginia


He is a member of the Bars of the Florida Supreme Court, U.S


Courts


for Southern and Northern Florida Dis


rict of


11th U.S.


Columbia Supreme Court, Court of Appea


Circuit Court of Appea
U.S. Court of Claims a'


the U.S. Supreme Court. Professor Enwall is a member of Coif and Flo


rida Blue Key


has taugh


Torts


Evidence


Procedure and Prac


tice Court.


RICHARD B.


STEPHENS, Profes


sor of Law Eme


ritus.


1939


, Rochester; LL.B.,


1942,


Michigan.


Professor Stephens joined the Florida faculty


in 1949. was


selected as the first


Outstanding Professor in 1965 and received the Florida Blue Key Distinguished Faculty


Award


in 1964. a member


of the


Illinois and District of Columbia Bars


, he practiced


the Distric


t of Columbia. He is an honorary member of Coif


Omicron Delta Kappa and


Phi Kappa Phi. Professor Stephens'


principa


professional interest is federal


taxation.


was honored by the Flo


rida Bar


upon h


retirement


in 1977


by the


creation of a graduate


tax scholarship that bears his name.


Dist










GENERAL


INFORMATION


The


University


and


the


College


Law


The University


- Past


The University of Florida is a combined state University


and land-grant


ocated


in the northern center of the state.


ck to the days previous to Florida's


admission to the


While


Union


its beginnings go


in 1845


ege-


the college of


Arts and


Sciences-did


not open until


A few


years later the passage of the Morril Act provided


ands


for state institutions of


higher learning which would promote agriculture, mechanical arts and military


science


, resulting in the beginnings of the College of Agriculture, the College of


Engineering,


and the Agricultural Experiment Station.


By 1905


earning
stence.


there were


in Florida,


a half-dozen state-supported


institutions


ocated in various parts of the state and strugg


At that time the Florida Legi


of higher
ng for ex-


slature took a step unprecedented in the


history of education in any state by passing the Buckman act, which abolished
the six State Colleges and provided for the establishment of two new institu-


tions


, of which the University of Florida was one.


t was established for men


Gainesv


, and placed under the direction of the Board of Control, a body


created by th


Buckman Act.


The seven members of the board represented the


seven geographical sections of the state, and


served without compensation,


cept for travel and incidental expense incurred in the performance of duty


1947 the University was made coedu


national.


The thirteen member Board of


Regents


replaced


Board


control


1965.


addition


rege


represented students since


The University


1977.


- Present


Florida'


, the


University


Florida


also one of


Amer


ca's truly


distinctive universities.


Along with Ohio State University and the University of


Minnesota


, the


University


Florida


offers


more


academic


programs


on a


ngle campus than any of the nation's


other universities, private and public. It


is also among the nation's


5 largest universities;


yet its division


19 co


leges and


schools, with their 140 departments, gives students the opportunity


to know and work closely with most of their classmates and teachers.


ts loca-


tion in Florida's University City


-Gainesville


-ded


icated from


its founding to


serve as a home away from home for college students adds immeasurably to
the educational and social opportunities for students.


short


University


Florida


is a


residential


campus,


with


' *







GENERAL


INFORM TION


Students attending the University of Florida come from every county in


state, every state in the nation,


and last year from 90 foreign countries. The


University of


Florida ranks


7th among state universities


and 18th among a


universities
ment Schola


in the nation in the number of National Merit and Merit A


who


hieve-


hoose to attend.


One


most


important


facets


complete


education


versity of Florida offers is


leadership training. Its


results are proven. More


than half of Florida's


Cabinet Members,


including the Governor


are University


Florida


graduates,


as are approximately


one-third


state


senators,


members of the State House


of Representatives,


tate Supreme Court justices.


Floridians


nthe U


Half of the ten persons named


. Congress
in 1978 as


Florida's


most


influential


governmental


professional


and business persons


attended the Univ


ersity of Florida.


Thousands of other University of Florida


graduates


occupy


positions


every


known


professional


endeavor


throughout the state, in the nation and in many parts of the world


There are reasons


behind the


University of Florida


leadership suc


cess.


contained


campus-in a


larger


community whose principal


focus


is on the


Univ


ersity


- provides thousands of


leadership opportunities.


student govern-


ment at the University of Florida is one of the nation's


most independent and


influential. Ev


ery co


ege has its own student council


Almost every committee


governance


University


as a whole


have


student


members.


University turns many of its activities over to students to implement.


Students


serve on advisory boards and councils in city and county government. Hun-
dreds of students are employed in career-developing positions and serve intern-


ships


n Gainesvelle area institutions.


Virtually every academic offering pro-


vides opportunity for membership


in chapters of national


student organiza-


tions.


Churches and civic groups in the community provide special program


and opportunities


just for University of Florida students.


More than 500 par-


ticipate in a student volunteer action organization,


providing companionship


and assistance to children


, the elderly


the handicapped, the incarcerated, the


underprivileged and the lonely


volunteer action group in the nation


n 14 separate programs. It is the largest student


A nationally recognized Student Services


Office


offers


counseling


programs


dozens of


special


student problem


both academic and persona


as we


as leadership training program


Setting and Environment


University


Florida


ocated


Gainesv


a city


86.929


situated i


n north central Florida


, midway between the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf


Mexico


. The


location


enables residents


to be within easy


access of the


beaches while


* -


giving in an area with gently rol


ng hills.
a


Interstate
I


75 keeps the
I I


Un I~ ar Sn t -r SL S t Sv -lu Sr -v fl a s* a a a a aI S r S A ** I


* S


ir


I







GENERAL INFORMATION


union on campus.


Outdoor recreation


courts, pools and fields abound,


only on campus but throughout the community.


More than


1,000 persons are


able to engage simultaneously in eight different athletic and recreational ac-


tivities


n the new Stephen C.


O'Connel


Student Activities Center


Entertain-


ment of every description is available nightly and every weekend. This


includes


, both on the campus and the community, which gears itself to student in-


terests because of the preponderance of students


Afu


program of men'


women's


games


ticipated
Florida's


per week.


intercollegiate


More


last year on


rolling


woods


than


1401


athletics


insures


seventy-five


intramura


lakes


, springs


one or more major


percent of the


teams.


Student


Gainesv


river


country.


spectator
Body par-
e heart of


Is equl-


distant


-only a two hour drive-from the fishing and boating Gulf Coast and


the swimming,


surfing and beaching Atlantic Coast.


Big name music stars and


their


bands


are brought to campus


concerts


almost weekly


Student


Government Productions.


Students themselves have numerous opportunities


to perform in loca


musical groups and stage plays,


to exhibit their arts and


crafts


, to write for several student-operated publications and to pursue hobby


interests of every description.


The


College


Law


A Short History


THE COLLEGE OF LAW


founded


in 1909


, began its work in the


Thomas


Dormitory for men under the deanship of Albert J


the University of Michigan,


who served from 1909 unt


Farrah
1912.


, a graduate of







GENERAL INFORM TION


Following the administration of Dean Farrah,


Thomas W


Hughes served


as Dean from 191


The Law Building,


built in 1914, was one of the


first permanent units on the campus.


Harry R


Trusler


also


pointed to the deanship


a graduate of the University of Michigan,
1915 and served in the capacity until 1947


was ap-
During


his administration the


College of Law was accredited by the New York State


Board


Regents


admitted


to membership


Association


American Law


in 1920, and recognized as an approved school by the


American Bar Association


n 1925, the same year


in wh


ch it opened its doors to


women.
academy


In 1933 the requirements for admission were increased to require an
c degree.


Henry A. Fenn,


hool


became


Dean


a former Professor of Law and Assistant Dean of Yale Law


in 1948 and served


in that capacity until 1958.


deanship the curriculum was expanded and strengthened,


and an


During his


individualiz-


ed program of research,
seminar program in Lega


writing and


instruction was inaugurated,


as wel


Ethics which received national recognition.


College was granted a charter by the Order of the Coif


as a


n19


a national


scholarship


society


in re


cognition of


ts high academic standards.


Dean Fenn elected to return to fu


-time teaching


in the


of 1958 and


Frank E


Maloney succeeded him as dean,


year.
Under Dean Maloney's


guidance,


after


serving as acting dean for a


the University of Florida Law


ocia-


was


formed


1960.


Assoc


iation


established


substantial


oan


funds


to attract highly qualified students to the Col


Largely


as a result of


Dean Maloney's resc
present academic bu


Spessard


Holland


,urcefulness and untiring effort,


ding


n February 1969.


Law Center


Present facilities


the College occupied its


Iding is
include


the first unit of the


classroom,


court-


room


, and


administrative


space,


as well


as a


library collection in


excess


330,000 volumes.
Dean Maloney elected to return to full-time


teaching in the fa


of 1970.


Former Assistant Dean E. L.


Roy Hunt


served as Acting Dean until the appoint-


ment in winter,


1971


of Dean


Joseph R.


, formerly


Associate Dean and


Profe


ssor of Law at the University of Michigan Law


hool.


During Dean Julin's tenure the college experienced impressive qua


itative


growth


as evidenced


creation


the college's


Center for Governmental


Responsibility and its


highly successful


Master of Laws in


Taxation program.


Upon Dean


n's resignation from the deanship and return to teaching


March


1980


Associate Dean E


Hunt was named


interim Dean.


Under Dean Hunt'
to a semester system


direction


made


the Co


major


ege of Law


curriculum


changed from a quarter


revisions to improve the


quality of lega
together with


education at the Holland Law Center.


Dean


Read


In addition


Dean Hunt


, played a major role in obtaining funding for the


Commons


ding expansion of the Law Center facilities.


/-iCA&


* a ar a -- n -


-AL/~ A g-Y


- As L


- 1- S -


a a s... a muses n On O .


I -






ADMISSIONS AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS /


-~ ~ ~


The two-story Commons,


which will adioin the


present structure from


south


include


a courtroom


complex,


a 7,000-square-foot


library, a legal
Responsibility,


writing are


a, a suite for the Center for Governmental


placement center


legal aid clinic, alumni affairs


suite


and dining and recreation areas.


ADMISSIONS


AND


DEGREE


REQUIREMENTS


Admission-juris


Doctor


Preparation For The Study of Law


awyer's education may be divided


nto pre-lega


training, law school


career


,and


post-legal


education.


Pre-lega


training


involving


graduate program has deliberately not been prescribed by the Co


The faculty feels that in view of the diverse nature of the lawyer's


set under-
ege of Law.


tasks


best program


is similarly


one of


broad diversification


in which


student


gains a knowledge of the formative processes of our civ


ization


the nature of


oeooDle and their


institutions, and


something of the technology of our aee


S-. *.







ADMISSIONS


AND DECREE REQUIREMENTS


vidualized information on most Am


erican law schools


It may be


obtained at


ege book stores or ordered from the


school Adm


ssion Council


2000


Newtown


18940.


Admissions Policy


Admission to the University of Florida College of Law


determined by the


cant's


in other


potential for


aw-related


success
careers.


in the College of Law,


Each applicant's


the lega


profession,


credentials are measured


against others applying for the same class.


Approximately fifty


percent of


each


entering


class


is chosen


solely


reference to a combination of L


score and the cumulat


undergraduate


grade


point


average


(UGPA)


leading


to the


baccalaureate


degree.


absence


plinary


problems,


appli


cants


with


quantitatively


superior


records will be automatically admitted.


Approximately forty


percent of


each


class


is sel


ected from


"hold"


category


In considering applicants


in the


"hold"


category


in addition to the


quantitative credentials mentioned above,
to consideration the following factors:


Adm


ssions Committee takes


An analysis of the flow of effort, ascending or d


the undergraduate or oth


ece


nding, reflected


er academic performance.


colleges or universities where, and the disciplines


icant's


in which


degrees were earned.


Academic accomplishment subsequent to the


calaureate


Lead


earning of the first bac-


degree.


ership and other relevant activities.


Evaluations by persons in a position to form an obj


to the


potential


applicant


employers where the type of work is
study and practice of law).
Maturing experience (employment,


(e.g., u
ikely to


ective


ergraduate


judgment as
professors,


indicate potential


for the


military service, etc.).


The applicant's


racial


ethnic


cultural


and economic background,


geographic origin (both


inside and outside of Florida).


In accordance with


native action program,


Board of Regent


s' policy and the University's


approximately ten percent of each entering class


be admitted as exceptions to the above criteria through the


Minority


affir-
may


Admis-


sions program


This program is


mited to black app


icants and to applicants







ADMISSIONS


AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS


qualifying under the pre-law study program of the


Council on Legal Edu


cation


Opportunity (CLEO


information regarding the


CLEO program is available at


undergraduate


eges


and universities.


The Board of Regents has also ruled that the State University System of


Florida wil


accept non-Florida residents in numbers not to exceed ten percent


of the total systemwide enrollment.


Accordingly


admission standards for


non-


residents are substantially higher than those


for residents.


Minimum


admissions


standards


are filed


with


Graduate


Schoo


University of Florida,


Gainesvi


e, Florida 33611


Admission Procedure


Before an application


be received


forms


, Law


n a tim
School


can be con


sidered


ely manner by the Co


App


cation


Matching


ege of Law:


Form


owing documents must
Law School application


Matching


Form).


LSAT/LS


DAS report from Law Schoo


Admission Service


(LSAS) and, if the ap-


plicant has attended another law school, a written statement concerning his


her previous attendance at the other law school


plus a complete transcript and


a certificate from the Dean


, indicating the


apple


cant's


class


rank and certifying


that he or she is in good academic standing at that institution.


applicants


(including


present


former


students) must register with the Law School Data


Asse


University
mbly Serv


Florida
LSDAS).


Applications


for admi


ssion of non-University of Florida students must be


companies by an application fee of $15.00.
dable.


For Beginning Stud


This app


ication fee is not refun-


ents: Beginning students are admitted only


n August


and January. Applications may not be filed more than one year in advance of
the intended month of entry.
Applications and the LSA Matching Forms cannot be accepted for con-


sideration after February


classes,


respectively.


Early


nd September 1
completion of


or the fo


applications


owing fa


within


I spring
periods


specified is strongly recommended inasmuch as al


spaces


may be filled prior


to established deadline


dates.


Advanced Standing:


Usually


only those applicants who have com-


pleted the first year of law


school


are accepted. In no instance wil


a candidate


for admission with advanced standing be considered until academic evaluation


has been made for at least fourteen quarter hours or twelve


semester hours by


law school


from wh


transfer


is sought.


Transfer may be effected


August,
before:


January or May.
June 1 for the fall


The completed application must be on hand on or


term


October 1 for the spring term; and March 1 for


the summer term.


The completed app


ation consists of:


I I-:I....- - -- rl-- :J- II - .. a .. ..I:--.-I:---- ... --- l ^. l a. A


ff-I


11







ADMISSIONS


AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS


Admission Requirements
Beginning Students: All
must hold (prior to beginning


cants


class


for admission to the College of Law


a baccalaureate degree from a qualify


institution and a satisfactory score on the Law School Admission


The minimum acceptable


Test (LSAT


score on the LSAT required for admission varies


with the total


grade point average achieved by the applicant on a


work attempted by the applicant prior to the receipt of the bachelor's


The mean LSAT


college
degree.


score and overall undergraduate average of classes currently


being selected are 650 and 3.5 (4.00 system), respectively


n the absence of


documentation that a candidate was ill, or that some other unusual condition


oCC


urred at one of the testing,


multiple LSAT


scores are averaged. Standards


non-Florida residents are substantially higher than those for residents.


Law Schoo


Admission Test: The L


AT is given by Educational Testing


in cooperation


with


leading


schools


throughout


should be taken one year prior to the desired entry date. A fee


? country and
of $20 in addi-


tion to a Basic


Registration Fee of $18 is charged by ET


AT/L


DAS


Registra-


tion Forms and LSA Matching Forms are found in the Law Schoo


Bulletin and LSAT Preparation Materia
schools and undergraduate institutions.


Admission


which can be obtained from all
Tests are given four times a year


plicants applying for fa


admission should take the LSAT


n June, October


December.


Those applying for spring admission should register for the Decem-


, February or June LSAT.
It is recommended that students applying for the LSAT leave them


enough time for rescheduling in the event they are


selves


unable to take the exam on


scheduled date or desire to take the exam a second time.
Educational Testing Service advises that older scores should be accepted


only in special circumstances and


should


be interpreted


ght of the can-


didate's


intervening


experience.


Thus


, an applicant may be required to take the


test again if his or her score is older than five years.


Law Schoo


Data Assembly Service:


ALL applicants must submit the Law


Application Matching Form (LSA Matching Form (with the law school


copy


application.


action


taken


on any


application


until


receipt
within t
Bulletin


of this


A Matching Form.


LSA/LSDAS


LSDA


registration


reports will


The LSA Matching Forms are contained


materials


in the


be produced by LSAS


School


Adm


missions


for candidates who have


submitted the L


A Matching Form with their


school application to this or







ADMISSIONS


AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS


schools, providing the applicant is applying to more than one


Considerable


AS to prepare an L


ead time (approximately 4 to 6 weeks) must be allowed


AT/L


d for


report ONCE THEY HAVE RECEIVED YOUR


AT/LSDA


REG


TRATION FORM AND TRAN


CRIPTS.


Registration


for the


DAS


is valid


only for


current processing year


March 1


,1982 through June 20,


1983.


The deadline for reg


istering with L


1982-83


processing year


is July


1983 and all


transcripts


must be


received by L


ater than June 30,


1983.


Those who make application


spring admission are reminded of the September 1 deadline and are warned


that if they


apply after the


15th processing deadline they wil


need to


reregister for the new processing year.


Evaluations:


Three letters


of evaluation are requested of al


applicants


within 30 days of the receipt by the College of Law of the completed applica-
tion for admission.


Advanced Standing: An applicant w


shing to transfer with advanced stand-


ing on the basis of work completed at another law school may be considered


for admission provided he or she meets the


the other law


owing criteria:


member


SSOCI


ation


American


choo


(2) the applicant has earned a


higher, or is
(3) the applicant is


cumulative law


upper


school


one-half


average of 2
r her class;


.65 or


study at the other law


school.


Courses completed with a grade of C or higher in other ABA/AAL


schools will be acceptable (subject to Faculty approval) for


approv-


credit up to


but not exceeding a total of 45 quarter or 30 semester hours.


The Adm


Committee will consider applications meeting the above criteria early


term preceding that


ssions
in the


in which matriculation is desired.


Acceptance of a transfer applicant is conditioned upon his or her main-


training the


school


average or


class


standing prescribed above


for a


work


undertaken subsequent to the application for transfer.

Applicants with Foreign Credentials: The College of Law may consider for
admission applicants who have foreign law study experience, or have been ad-


mitted to the practice of law abroad.


Those who wish to have more information


should write directly to the Law


school Admissions Office


164 Holland Law


Center


Gainesville


FL 32611


Orientation


Program


a -L .


other law


school.


school is approved by the American Bar Association and


in good standing and e


gible to continue his or her


-- A A


I







ADMISSIONS


AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS


Small


Group Advisors Help Ease the


Transition.


Requirements


for


Degree


J.D.


faculty
Doctor


(J.D.)


e College
candidates


recomme


who


have


complied


with


ie degree
following


requirements:
1. Compl


etion


with


a passing


grade


courses


totaling


at least


semester hours credit


of which at


east 60 must have


been completed


in this College.
Satisfactory completion of:
(a) Legal Research and Writing, LAW 5792,


Appellate Advocacy,


with a grade of


LAW 5793, with a grade of


or bet-


or better


The Advanced Writing requirement.


essiona


Responsibility


LAW 6750


Maintenance of a


.0 honor point average on all work attempted in this


Fulfillment of course requirements as set forth hereafter under
riculum."


"Cur


Completion of at least 90 weeks of fu


time


tudy in residence in an ac-


credited law school of which at least 60 must have been in residence in








ADMISSIONS AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS / 41


Concurrent


Degree


Programs


Urban and Regional Planning


A four year program


leading to a Juris Do


tor and Master of Arts


in Urban


and Regiona


Planning is offered under the joint auspices


of the College of Law


and the Graduate Schoo


ege of Architecture, Department of of Urban and


Regional Planning).


The program provides students interested


in the


egal prob-


lems of urban and regional planning with an opportunity to blend their law


studies


with


relevant course work


in the


planning


curriculum.


student


receives


both


degrees


at the


a four year


course


study whereas


separate matriculation would require five years. Students must take the GRE


and LSAT


prior to admission and must separately gain adm


ssion to each pro-


gram.


The College of Law faculty advisor for this program is Professor Barry


Currier.
Master of Business Administration







REGISTRAR TION


FEES AND ACADEMIC POLICIES


of Law thereafter without once again qualifying for admission so long as they


are in good a


cadem


standing


n the Co


ege of Business Administration and


their


aw study begin


ater than the third semester after commencement of


study at the College of Business Admin


station.


Any student who participates


in the


oint degree must commence courses in the second discipline no


than the beginning of the


third


semester


The College of Law fa


ulty advisor is


Associate Dean Jeffrey Lewis.


Master of Arts in Politica


Science-Public Administration


College of Law and the Graduate


school (Departme


nt of Po


ience-Public


Administration)


offer


four


year


program


culminating


both


Doctor


ministration.


a Master


This program allows th


clence-


student to combine his or her


interest


in law


rees


with


area


public


administration.


at the end of four years of study.


student


receives


Students must satisfy


adm


both
mission


requirements


both


eges.


College


faculty


fessor Winston Nagan.
Concurrent Degree AdmissionslGeneral Information
Interested students should apply to both the Ho


and Law Center and the


Graduate School


, noting on the application the


joint nature of their admission


request. Alternatively, students may apply to the Graduate


school during their


first year of law school. Candidates must meet the entrance requirements and


follow the entrance procedures for each col


by each college and satisfy the curric
information is available from the Co


Students must be accepted


ulum requirement of each degree.


ege of Law


Further


the College of Business


ministration,
Architecture


Department of Urban and Regiona


Planning


in the College of


, and the Department of Political Science-Public Administration in


the Co


ege of Libera


Arts and


fences.


REG


ISTRA


TION


FEES


AN


ACADEMIC


POLICIES


Registration








REGISTRATION, FEES AND ACADEMIC POLICIES


Fees


and


Expenses


Note:


the College of


Law Calendar may


deviate


from


Unive


rsity


endar


in some respects, law students must comply with al


neral Univers


ty fee payment deadlines.


A Florida student will pay a fee


of $38.00 per


semester credit hour.


and a


non-Florida stud


ent will pay a fee of $110.00 per semester credit hour


Alien students will pay the


same


as a non-Florida student.


In addition, a $24.00 health fee per semester will be paid by both Florida
and non-Florida students.


fees


must


paid


in accordance


with


University


regulations.


Late


registration increases


the registration fee by $


.00; this increased'fee w


be waived for any reason.


Propective students should note that all fees are sub-


ect to increase without notice after the date of publ


Applications for admission of


cation of this catalo


non-University of Florida students to the


College of Law must be accompanied by an application fee
is not refundable.


of $1


5.00.


This fee


Admission


Test and


school


Data A


assembly


rvice:


fee of $20.00. in addition to a basic registration fee


of $18.00 paid to the


. .







REGISTRATION, FEES AND ACADEMIC POLICIES


Refund


Fees


will be refunded


in fu


Credit hours dropped during the drop/add period.
Courses cancelled by the University.


With the exception of


amounts required for collection under


bond and trust obli
a. Involuntary cal


gations,


fees may be refunded


n instances


to active duty.


Death of a student.


Illness of the


student of such duration or severity,


as c


confirmed


by a physician,


completion of the semester is precluded,


Exception


circumstances,


upon


approval


University


Pre


ident.


Refunds may be obtained at
of proper documentation.


student Accounts


THE HUB


, upon presentation


Academic


Policies


American Bar Association Standards


Council


Lega


Education


Adm


ssions


to the


American Bar Asso


nation requests that attention be called to the Standard


Amer


ican


Association


adopted


1921


and by


it recommended for


enactment by all


every


states.


These standards as amended provide


candidate for admission to


the bar


in effect that


, in addition to taking a public


amination


, shall give


evidence


of graduation from a


aw school which shall re-


quire at least three years of acceptable


college work as a condition of admis-


on, and three years of law study [or longer if not a full-time school],


have an adequate


which


brary and a sufficient number of teachers giving their


entire time to the


school to ensure actua


persona


acquaintance and


influence


with the whole student body


and which


not be operated as a commercial


enterprise.

Student Employment


The College of Law of the University of Florida is a fu


defined by the Association of
quires that its students be "ful


their working hours to the


schedules and minimum


American Law Schools.


-time"


study


students who devote


-time law


school


Association policy re-


substantially a


Pursuant to this policy


academic


oad requirements are intentionally designed to re-


quire substantially the full working time of students of this Co


Deviations


from the required curriculum or the minimum load are never authorized solely


A I S


* - S 1


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_ _I I


















1





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r r
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1


i


M


N r


VA>"


F


' ? \ v


lt- si-tis
" * ,-







REGISTRATION,


tion wil


FEES AND ACADEMIC


be granted for the


POLICIES


sole purpose of enabling a student to hold part-time


employment.
ministrative


student


approval


who


drops


below


automatically


2 quarter
suspended.


hours


without


Graduate Level Course Option
With the advance approval


of the Dean


, students may


enro


na max-


mum of two graduate courses outside of the law school for


credit toward


school


graduation.


Under this option a student may receive no more than a


total


semester
average,


6 semester
Although


credit


units.


grade


Two


such


courses


is not computed


may


taken


in a student'


grade


in one


point


a B or higher must be earned to receive credit hours for the course.


Students on probation are not eligible fo


r the


option.


Grading Scale


stud


went's


work is graded according to the


owing


scale:


excel


ent; B


- good


- satisfactory; D


- poor; and E


- failure.


grades of B +


and D + are awarded to those students whose work is evaluated at a


between the five primary grades.


may


be given when a


student has


n addition


been


, the grade of H (deferred grade)


excused from


completing a


course


within the grading period.


Grades of


(Incomplete


(absent from examination


are automatical-


changed


to E's at the deadline set


in the


University Calender


However


under no circumstances may a grade


or X be changed after one year. An H


grade may not be changed after two years.


Grades
& Writing (


of Satisfactory (S) or Unsatisfactory (U) are given


LAW


Appellate


Advocacy (LAW


793),


in Legal


esea


(LAW


6940),


Crimina


inic (LAW


6942),


Review (LAW 6950) and Moot Court


(LAW 6951).


Trial Advocacy


LAW 6361) and Crimina


Practice


(LAW 6941) may


be graded on a satisfactory-unsatisfactory or graded basis,


at the option of the


instructor.


Satisfactory-Unsatisfactory
credit for 56 hours of work


Grading


System


- Students


who


have


received


in the College of Law are permitted to take one non-


seminar elective course on a satisfactory-unsatisfactory grading system


standard for satisfactory work shall be the grade of C.


or U grade


become part of the student's record,


student's grade point average.


but wil


option


standing who are not on any type of probate


class


dividua


stud


not be counted in computing the


is available only to students in good
tion. The burden of assuring that the


reflects a proper election of the option rests soley upon the in-
at. The option of having the grade for a course determined on


the S-U basis must be exercised by the student in any course before the expira-


tion date of the


Drop/Add


period.


Therefore,


the option


must be exercised


* a j a F i . I r | / I


eve


1


- _


I







REGISTRATION, FEES AND ACADEMIC POLICIES


GRADE


HONOR POINTS


GRADE


HONOR POINTS


I (Incomplete) .....
X (absent from exam)


. . .


Grades


of H (Deferred grad


are not computed


in the


factory


student's


and U (Unsatisfac-


grade point average.


Attendance


Students


should become familiar with the fo


owing ABA requirements


ng with attendance.
ABA Rule 305 states


n pertinent part:


Attendance:


Subject to the qualifications and exceptions


contained


in this


Chapter,


law school sha


require as a condition for graduation,


the completion of a


course of study in


residence of not


than


1200 class hours,


extending


over a period of not less than ninety weeks


for full-time students


"in residence"
"class hours"


means attendance at cla


sses


n the law


school.


means time spent in regularly scheduled class sessions


in the


school including time allowed for fina


examinations, not


ceeding ten percent of the total number of class session hours.


"full-time


student"


means


a student who devotes


substantially


working hours to the study of law.


Regular and punctual class attendance is necessary to satisfy residence
and class hours requirement.








REGIS


TRATION, FEES AND ACADEMIC POLICIES


Drop Policy


Between the end of the official


by the registrar's


drop/add period and the date designated


as the last day for withdrawing without receiving fa


grades in a


courses, each


student who has completed the first year of


school is allowed two free drops


providing


a student's


course


load


as follows; no more than one per semester,


does


not f


below twe


hours


semester in which a course is dropped.
Exceptions to the above policy must be approved by the Assistant Dean


Academic


Affairs.


should be recognized that as to any exception the


burden is upon the student to demonstrate that a


ness


serious


for which documentation is provided and over whi


no control


necessitated


his or her request.


Approval


problem (such


as il-


h the student has
of other than the


two free drops cannot be expected if the course is to be dropped because:
a. More hours are registered for than should have been.


The drop is simply to avoid a


c. It has


ow grade which would lower the average.


been belatedly decided that the course is no


longer n


needed.


Repeating Courses


A student who has passed a course cannot repeat it.


A stud


ent who has


failed a course cannot repeat it except that ir
Dean may permit repetition of a failed course.


1 exception


This rule does


circumstances,


not apply to LAW


5792 and


,Lega


Writing and Appe


ate Advocacy, both of which must be


completed with a grade of


or better


, even if this requirement necessitates


repeating these courses. Nor does this rule apply to LAW 6951
where no failure is involved.


6950


,and 6930,


Examinations


Examinations for each course are genera


y given only at the


end of each semester


Students are given exam numbers before each examina-


tion period. Faculty members are given keys for these exam numbers upon re-


quest.
to do


While most faculty members grade anonymously,


Each faculty member,


during the semester


they are not required
advise students what


grading procedure will be followed in the course. Examination papers are re-


trained by instructors for a period of not


than one year after admini


station


examination.


Usually,


within a reasonable tim


based


whole


students


are given


an opportunity


e, any written work upon which a student's


or in part.


Re-examination


are not


given.


review,
grade is


Academic


Policies


Delay


for delay in taking examinations.

Taking Examinations


Permission will not be given for a stud
amination except in extreme emergencies.


vary depending on whether


t .I t


.


ent to d


elay taking a


eduled


The procedure to be followed will


Iness or some other emergency is involved:


*t


I


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L !-L L.-


1 ___ A


& __' ,, A^-,* r^ X -


I








REGISTRATION, FEES AND ACADEMIC POLICIES


An examination


, under


no circumstances,


delayed


because of


several


being


aminations
amination


scheduled


scheduled


schedule


consecutively
consecutive


requires


consecutive examination


times,


a student


unless


there


examination


to take


are at least


periods.


three


When


three examinations


in three


the student may elect to defer only the


cond


examination


in that


sequence,


then


examination


must


taken on the first subsequent examination day on which the student has no


other


examination


scheduled


Under


no circumstances


permission


given to take an examination before the scheduled time.)


Departure and Reentry


Subject to


compliance


catalog


rules


governing


probation


with ABA and AALS standards where applicab


been evaluated on


east one


exclusion and in
e. a student who


semester of work may withdraw or


depart,


retaining the right to reenter this College within five years from the end-


ing date of the last term in which such student earned law


school credit. Upon


the expiration of the period of five years, or unless


specla


circumstances


shown


, a student who desires to return to this College must apply for admission


as a beginning student, or with advanced standing as appropriate.


The deter


mination of special circumstances shall be made by the Dean with reference to


particular


circumstances


each student.


A student who registers


as a


I. I a I I I I ,' *


II & I


ft


I







REGISTRATION, FEES AND ACADEMIC POLICIES


, incl


uding


seminars


practice court,


and clinical programs. A student


thus penalized who wishes to regain registration priority may request permis-


sion from the


instant Dean for


Academic Affairs to perform jury service at


such time as may be designated by the As


sistant Dean.


Students who for compelling reasons are unable to appear for jury duty


when


notified may obtain


permission


from


distant Dean to substitute


another person without


penalty.


Post facto requests w


be treated on the


same basis as


unexcused absences.


Academic Dishonesty Procedures
The Academic Dishonesty Procedures


of the University of Florida,


are applicable to the College of Law,


are as fo


ows:


A faculty committee com-


posed of members from the colleges wil


review on a regular ba


sis the


work of


the Student Court and propose procedural changes as appropriate.
1. When a student is accused of academic dishonesty, the faculty member
involved will meet with the student. Prior to this meeting, the professor


should contact the Director of Student Judicia


Affairs


Tigert Ha


determine whether the student has committed a prior offense.


is not


a first


offense,


situation


most


likely


-University


sciplinary action (See #2


If, however, this is a first offense, and the


acuity member decides that no other factors in connection with the of


fense would


require


all-University


disciplinary


action (conduct proba-


, suspension,


or expulsion),


he or


she may hold a hearing with the


dent,
The student should be:


a. given a notice of charges; and
b. given an opportunity in a hearing with the faculty member to present
his or her case.


This


hearing wil


include an opportunity for the student to present any


witnesses he or she may have, the right to have an advisor present, the right to


confront any student who allegedly


saw him or her cheating, and to understand


his or her right prior to the beginning of the hearing.


the faculty member may assign is a gra
not resolved as a result of this hearing,


the matter between faculty member and


The maximum penalty that


ide of "E" in the course. If this issue is
i.e., there has not been agreement on


student, it is recommended that the


faculty member refer the case to the


Director of Student Judicia


Affairs who


will then transmit it to the University of Florida Student Court for adjudication.


If the


issue is resolved as a result of the hearing held between the student


and the faculty member


the Director of Student Judi


Affairs should be con-


tacted and notified of the offense, its circumstances,


and its resolution.


n this


manner the University will be able to keep a central registry of all students


who


have committed academir vinlatinn;







REGISTRATION, FEES AND A


ACADEMIC POLICIES


grades. If the student desires to appeal the decision recommended by the Stu-


dent Court he/she may do so through the
the Vice President for Student Affairs.


Dire


ctor of


student Judicia


Affairs


Official


Notices


The privilege


insofar as permitted by


aw and


in acc


ordan


ce with


quirements is reserved to modify


amend


, or revoke any rules,


regulations,


quirements for degree, or to make changes


in the


curriculum set forth in this


catalog.
(All students are required to acquaint themselves with matters posted on
the Official Bulletin Board.)
Exclusion for Academic Reasons


Students in the college are graduate


students


in a program of prof


essiona


education


n place of the University of Florida Undergraduate Student Regula-


tions


the fo


owing probation and exclusion rules apply to al


law students.


A student who withdraws from the college during two successive terms in


which the student has begun attendance shal


excluded from further enroll-


ment


in the college unless,


for good cause shown


the dean approves further


enrollment.


For all terms other than the first term of the first year


cumulative grade point av


erage is less


than


not eligib


a student whose
e to continue. A


student whose grade point average is less than 2.0 at the end of the first term of


the first year of law


study wil


be on scholastic probation and will not be eligi-


ble to continue if the grade point average is less than
bationary term.


.0 at the end of the pro-


For purposes of these probation and exclusion rules,


treated as the grade of E unti


the grades


ar


they are changed to permanent grades,


d X are
and at


that time the grade point average will be recomputed and the student's


ding will be determined on the basis of the permanent grades.


stan-


The grades


U are not u


n computing grade point averages.


Only grades earned at this






LEGAL


INFORMATION CENTER


college will be considered i


n computing a student's


grade point average under


these


rules.


student


eligible to continue under these rules


will not be readmitted


exce


pt by action of the Readmissions Committee of the college, and the Read-


missions Committee wil


ed a grade of H


not entertain a petition from a student who has


in one-forth or more of the


redit hours for wh


h the


receiv-
tudent


was


enrolled at the


time of exclusion.


Reinstatement


Except


as oth


provided,


a stud


ent who


to continue


n the


ege may petition the Readm


ions Committee for reinstatement.


Students


petitioning for reinstatement must submit their written petitions to the Chair-
man of the Readmissions Committee at least one week prior to the start of


lasses


in the term for which the student seeks reinstatement.


final


, and may


The Committee's


incorporate appropriate terms and condition


LEGAL


NFORMA


TION


CENTER


The Co


books


ege of


n fact, ten years


opened in
ater, at the


1909 with


a very


meager


end of the academic year


collection


1918


election numbered only 4,


548 volumes.


Growth was not dramatic during the next two decades; neverthe


collection reached the


10,000 figure


in 1933, and by the end of the academy


year,


1940


there were


almost 14,000 volumes


Library


, nearly


threefold increase since its earliest years.
In the postwar period the enrichment of the curriculum and opportunity
for broader and deeper training and research had its impact on the library. In
the decade between 1940 and 1950, the collection nearly doubled in number of


volumes.


The fo


owing d


ecade showed corresponding growth,


the collection


more than doubling, so that by the end of the 1960-61 academic year the co
election reached 60,000 volumes.


n Dec


propriations


ember


since


1969
1970


100.000th volume was added.


library


With


increasing ap-


collection again doubled in size by


The current count exceeds 330,000 volumes


which ranks


Florida


19th


school


library holdings in the country.


decade


under


$3,000,000


was


appropriated


legal


materials. For two years the budget was the


largest among law


school libraries


in the country and a third year it was second only to Harvard.


These funds


enabled the


brary to acquire in depth,


rich resources for an expanding student


body and factilty


L. 'A tA V w r* i* t t t W .


|








LEGAL INFORMATION CENTER


Other segments of the library's book collection include substantial


holding


various


gs of English and other


other foreign countries.


common


jurisdictions


A large Latin Ameri


can


, as wel


aw co


as those of


section is


shared


with


University


Libraries,


which


specializes


Caribbean


Latin


American publications. Our Brazilian holdings rank among the best nationally


The law collection is housed in three spacious readings rooms


and four


stack leve


Is, with individual


study carrels on each floor


Elaborate facilities


and equipment are available


effective employment of the


latest audio-


visual


techniques.


n addition to


16mm.


films and audio-cassettes, there are


over


700 pre-recorded book-sized video-cassettes, most of which are in color


and may run up to sixty minutes. These cassettes consists of programs prepared


national


institutes,


and seminars


attorneys,


with


leading


torneys


professors


speakers.


One


developed by the American Bar Association.
in audio-visual materials available in any law


series


advocacy


The facilities rank among the


school


was
best


Half-inch black and white


color videotape


is used extensively


in recording the mock


trials


in the


center courtroom and recording lectures


urist or public figures who visit.


E..I!~IPYP~2.Y~ ~







LEGAL


INFORMA


TION


Seven


computer terminals are currently in operation; two for cataloging,


two for legal research,


one for automated programmed instruction, and two to


initiate


campus-wide


automated


library system.


individualized library ser-


vices are provided to students and faculty members by a staff or professional
librarians who assist in learning how to use the automated systems for study


and research.


Three terminals are available for pub


WESTLAW


, and PLATO systems.


use.


The Legal


These terminals use


information Center was


the first


aw school


subscriber to WE


TLAW and an early subscriber to PLATO


LEXIS.


Through


access


to these


systems,


users


may


search


extensive


databases of federal and state laws,


cases


and administrative


publications


addition


to other


miscellaneous database


and the European Common Market.


classes
assisted


through


use of


instruction system.


s, including


Many students


programmed


The College of


courses


English law


learn the basic


in PLATO


, the


na cases,
for some
computer


Law is recognized as a national


leader in computerized law systems and offers


excellent fac


students


and faculty to become profic


n the new technologies.


As the most comprehensive legal


library in the state,


Legal


nforma-


tion Center provides services not only to the


school


community but also to


the University, the Bar,


prisoners, and the public throughout the state.










STUDENT


PROGRAMS


AND


SERVICES


Financial


Aid


Entering


J.D.


Students


Policy


It is the policy of the University of Florida Law Center Association and the
Holland Law Center to meet the financial needs of qualified law students, in-


sofar as funds


ingly


are ava


able


the bulk of availab


with what


funds


in essence a revolving fund.


is directed toward loans


ccord-


rather than scholar-


ships.
Loans


Holland Law Center Association Merit Loan


enter


Assoc


ch year the


iation awards approximately 10 Merit Loans


to entering


land Law
freshmen


who are Florida residents. M


erit Loans provide a lump


sum of $900 for the first


academic year (2 semesters) of study


Addition


loans


of $900 each for the


second and third academic years will be reserved for the recipient,
pient achieves satisfactory grades.


f the


recl-


University of Florida Law Ce


co-endors


nter Association Merit Loans do not require


ers. No interest'is charged until six months after the date of gradua-


tion or termination of law school attendance,


chever comes first.


The in-


terest rate is 4% p


er annum. No payment of interest or principal is required un-


til five years after graduation or termination of law school attendance.


total time for repayment is five years from the
interest and principal first becomes due.


date on which the payment of


Block


Memoria


Loan


Fund- This


fund


established


by the


friends of Kar


Block, Jr


., provides long-term loans in the amount of $900 per


academic year to beginning freshmen who are bona
County.


fide residents of


Dade


Robinson Reese Saunders Memoria


Loan-This fund was established by


the law firm of Saunders, Curtis,


Ginestra & Gore.


The amount of the


oan wi


be $900 per academic year.


The award w


be made to beginning freshmen


recognition of the apple


icant's financial


need and promise for success


in the


of Law and


n the


profession.


This loan may not be availab


h beginning class


depending on the availability of funds.


Scholarships


I S a *ZtZ --I-----------------. ..*. ....J- *L .r I


eac


rl I


& I *I I J ^ *J


.-I .


_ I


|


I







STUDENT PROGRAMS


AND SERVICES


achievement


in extra


curricular


service


activity


while


in undergraduate


graduate school.
Chester H.


estab


ished


scholarships,


Ferguson


a scholarship


Scholarships- Alumnus


fund


outstanding


which have a stipend of $1,000 for a


Chester
entering
:ademic


H. Ferguson


freshmen.


year


These


are awarded


on the


basis of m


erit and need.


Basis of Award


ente


Merit Loans
ring law stud


titude,


and Non-resident
ents on the basis


apparent


promise


Tuition


holarships


scholastic reco


success


are awarded only to


j, character
profession.


, ap-


undergraduate grade point average and Law


hool Admission


Test scores are


the basis for first year awards.


To be eligible to apply for a Merit Loan or Non-


resident


Tuition


holarship, an applicant must have an overall


undergraduate


grade point average of at least 3.20 on a 4.0 system,


of 625 or higher


These are minimum criteria. Successful


and obtain an L


applicants wil


score
have


superior


credentials.


Those applicants who do not meet th


quantitative


quirements stated above should write directly to the University's


Financial


ce (111


Anderson Ha


) for deta


conce


rning th


ral and


state


oans


available.
Financial Assistance
Federal and State


sponsored


oans and employ


ent programs


are handled


on a University-wide basis.


information and application forms concerning Na-


tional Direct Loans, Federally


nsured Loans


ege Work Study Employment,


and OPS employment may be obtained from the Student Financial Affairs Of


111 Anderson Ha


, University of Florida,


Gainesv


Florida 32611


Florida residents may apply to the designated agency in their respective


. Non-
states


for a guaranteed bank loan under the Higher Education Act.
How to Apply
If your credentials and financial need meet the requirements for a Univer-


sity of


Florida Law Center


scholarship,


Association Merit Loan or a Non-resident


it is suggested that you request financial


assistance.


Tuition


The Holland


Law Center participates in the Graduate and Prof


essiona


hool Financial Aid


rvice


(CAP


FAS), and uses


GAP


FAS report to select recipients for finan-


To apply for finan


form and


lent.


, in completing
address is:


assistance, write to GAPSFAS for an appli


the form


indicate the Ho


and Law Center as


actionn
recip-


graduate and Professional


Box 2614


Princeton


Financia


cationa
, New J


Aid Service


testing Service


ersey 08







STUDENT PROGRAMS AND SERVICES


directly


Univ


with


assistant


Dean


Minority


Affairs


ty of Florida for detailed information.


Holland


Center


I-I


al~iQ


Scholarships
Scholarships


and


for


Loans


Advanced


Law


Students


The
students.


following
Application


scholarship


forms


funds


for these


available


scholarships


advance
obtained


Administration Offi


ce of the Co


ege of Law.


Cranda


through


Memorial


the will of the


Scholarships.
dte Kathleen


-The


scholarships


Cranda


were


in honor of


establ


her husband,


ate Dr


ship


afford W


ege of Law of the
s, each with an a


Cranda


, formerly


University of Florida.


annual


stipend of


a member of the fa


culty of the


Presently there are two scholar-


approximately $600.


One scholarship


is awarded to a student who has completed at least two and not more than


three


semesters


other


a student


who


completed


four


semesters
awarded


Mrs.


to good


Cranda


students


provides


in need


that


financial


scholarships


assistance.


are to be


Recipients


selected


by the


Board


Trustees


Univ


ersity of


Florida


Law Center


Association on the basis


A i


of scholastic performance and need.


- I a3 *_


in *s1"n r .j' *elflit, r * i n *u c_ l i nlE r nn 2 rC nir rI j j LL L r3 r i iLJt r 1 rf I/ 4


Kl^^^^ +** *....
iWU";


_ _L- IL-:_ ...... -A.-


E _


I







STUDENT PROGRAMS


AND SERVICES


Joseph J.


Gersten Key.--


This award was established by


oseph J


Gersten


serving as chairman of the Florida Board of Bar Examiners to honor the


outstanding law school


senior judged on the basis of academic achievement


and leadership


in activities relating to the law school'


education


program,


extracurricular interests


, character and promise of a distinguished


career.


Julius F


. Parker Scholarship.


--This


fund was


established


by the


Parker


family


honor


ulius


Parker


, past president of the


Florida


State


Association.


One


scholarship of $500 is awarded annually to a senior with high


academic standing.
Phi Alpha Delta Scholarship. -


Alpha Delta Law Fraternity makes ten


five hundred dollar ($500)


scholarships available nationally ea


ch year


Students


who have completed two years of law school and who are members of the


fraternity may be eligible


for such a scholarship.


Applications and detailed


formation can be received from the Faculty


Advisor or the Chapter


justice.


Delta Phi Scholarship.


annually


grants


$100


-Ph


awards.


ta Phi I
awards


international
are made


Lega


to two


Fraternity
initiated


members of Cockre


achievement,
Walter L.


Inn who have best exhibited a high degree of scholastic


as well as service to the Inn and the College of Law.


"Bud" Robison


Memorial


Scholarship.


This


scholarship in


memory of alumnus and past John Marsha


Bar Association President Walter


"Bud"


Robison


, was established by his family


members of the


class of


1966, and other friend


An award of $


50 is made annually on the basis of


need to an outstanding student in his or her second or third year of law


school


Judge James B.


Whitfield Constitutional Law Scholarship.


- Approximately


$1,000 with an appropriate certificate will be awarded annually to a senior law
student who has demonstrated high proficiency and interest in the field of Con-


stitutional


Law.


Consideration


is to be given


not only to grades


but also to


those qualities that will lead to an outstanding career in th


field of Constitu-


tional


Those


igible to apply are recipients of the highest grade


in Con-


stitutional Law


Florida Constiitutiona


Constitutional Law Seminar


or Po


itica


and Civ


Rights; authors of articles or papers dealing with Constitu-


tional Law prepared for the University of Florida Law Review for seminars or


an I


independent Study Course; and those nominated by members of the


Holland Law Center Faculty who teach


in the area of Con


stitutional Law


Loans


funds


for


Advanced


Law


Students


From time to time, on an emergency basis,


ong-term


oans in the amount


of $300 per academic year may be granted


*
*
0
O


if the student:


demonstrates financial need;
has completed at least one semester in the College of Law and has earn-


ed a law school average of


is registered for at least 1


.0 or higher;


semester hours and possesses a validated fee


r.2rrI knmonro nrnroccnn fho Inrrn 2nfrl








STUDENT PROGRAMS AND SERVICES


selection, and the


Bar reserves the right to inquire into the financial


of the parents of a student under


ing fund,


25 years of age.


grant is paid back over five


years


status


In order to provide a continu-
commencing one year after


graduation.
Clearwater Bar Association Memoria


Loan Fund.


- A loan fund establish-


ed as a memorial


to deceased


members of the Clearwater


Loans from this fund are available to students residing


Association.


n the Clearwater-Largo


area.


James W


Day Memoria


Loan Fund.--


Admirers of Mr.


Day have provided


a fund for loans to needy students with good academic records


given to third year
The Florida


Preference


aw students.


Foundation,


Glenn


Terrell


Scholarship


Fund.


- This


scholarship
who have


p


oan is limited to only those students attending Florida


completed two full semesters of study. A total not to


may be loaned to each applicant.


tion may be obtained from
32304.


Jane


excee


Application forms and additional


Florida Bar


Tallaha


ssee


school


d $3,000
informa-
. Florida


Eldridge Hart Loan Fund. -


loan fund was established through the will


of the


ate Mrs.


Marion Houghtelin Hart.


The loan fund is made


available to


worthy law students to assist them


in completing their legal training.


Mark


Hulsey,


Student


Loan


Fund..


- Established


alumnus


Mark


Hulsey


r. for law students needing financial assistance in the form of loans.


Leroy Franklin Lewis Memorial


Loan Fund..-This fund was established


through the


of the late Mrs.


Catherine L.


Thomas of Pensacola, Florida,


memory of her father


the late


Leroy Franklin Lewis, formerly a practicing at-


torney


in New York City


Loans are to be made available to students to assist


them in


completing th


, medical and theologi


training. First priority


oans


be given to law students,


with preference to second and third


year students.


L. David Llewelyn Loan Fund.-


Friends


and family of L.


David Llewelyn


have established this loan fund in memory of David Llewelyn,


Giddings E.


Mabry Loan Fund.


--Th


loan fund was establish


hed by Mrs.


Dann


r.. in honor of her father.


Frank


Maloney


Memoria


Loan


Fund.


students


alumn


other


ends


of the


ate Dean Frank E


Maloney estab


ished as a memorial


a fund to


assist


aw students.


Miami Beach Bar Association Scholarship Fund.


have been


residents of Dade


Applicants must be, or


County attending a Florida Law School and must


be at least second semester students in good academic standing.


grades


must


Funds are I
*


meet the


approval


Bar's


Scholarship


Loan


The student'


Committee.


limited to $500 and are repayable without interest one year after


_. _ - a


iam


-1 1. - .


I







STUDENT PROGRAMS


AND SERVICES


may repay these loans without interest within two years subsequent to gradua-
tion from law school.


Dean Slagle Memorial Loan Fund.


An anonymous donor has provided a


fund for loans to needy


aw students with good academic records.


Preference


is given to third year


aw students.


C.J.
loans


TeSelle Memoria


to needy


given to third year
The University


Fund.


law students
aw students.


Catalog or the


- An anonymous donor has provided a fund


with good


University


academic


Student


records.


Financial


Preference is


Bulletin


should be


consulted for information as


to other scholarship and loan funds that


may be available


to law students.


Short-


Term


Loan


Funds


Administered


the


College


Law


The ten funds listed below are administered by the Co


ege of Law


nter-


nally and can be made available within a day or two following app


oan.


cation for


Terms vary slightly from fund to fund, but generally they are 90-day


loans


$250 maximum


, and have no interest charges if paid back on time.


To be eligible,


students must have completed at least two semesters at the


ege of


Law.


Only one


oan may be taken out each semester and a late


charge of ten percent of the loan amount wi
back on time.


be assessed if the


oan is not paid


Ralph Blowers Memoria


Loan Fund.-Friends of the late Ralph Blowers


have established this


fund to provide short-term


oans


up to $200 through the


Loan Committee ofthe John Marshal


Bar Association, the student organization


of the


ege of Law, in conjunction with the Sun Bank of Gainesville.


Loans


are made on the basis of


individual student need.


Martha B.


memory


Culpepper Memoria


Martha


Loan Fund. -


Culpepper,


This fund wa


administrative


established


assistant


University of Florida Law Review, to provide short-term loans to students who


have completed two semesters of Law


hool.


Harriett-Horner Memoria


Loan Fund.


- This fund


, established in memory


of George Harriett and


Jack Horner, provides short-term loans to students


the second and third years of law study.
Justice Story Book Exchange Loan Fund.-- This short-term loan fund was


estab


shed


the student


book


exchange


to provide emergency


loans for


students who have completed two semesters of law school.
Young Lawyers Section -John Marshall Bar Association Emergency Loan


Fund.


- The


Young Lawyers Section of The Florida Bar has made available to


John Marshall


Association funds for emergency loans up to $200 to


students


in their


second semester or above.


Minority


Law Student Emergency Loan Fund.


- Loans


n the amount of


a - a a *







STUDENT PROGRAMS AND SERVICES


have completed two semesters of law


school.


University Club of Orlando Loan Fund.


--The


University Club of Orlando


has provided a fund,


loans


ava


are available to students


semesters in law


able for short-term loans


in good


standing who


to needy students.


have


complete(


These
d two


school


Housing


On-campus.


Single


students


eight housekeeping apartments,


may


acc


ommodations


and married students


in on-campus,


in on-campus married


sing.


These are owned and operated by the


University of Florida.


In addi-


, married students may apply for low-income apartments if th


come is not greater than $10,850 to $1


eir family


ending upon family size,


cording to a scale fixed by the F.H.A.).
Off-campus. There are numerous off-campus modern apartments near the
University.


For further


information on housing for


single and married students con-


tact:


supervisor,


Off-campus
Off-campus Housing


Dire


On-campus
ctor of Housing


University of Florida


University of Florida


Gainesville


Florida 32611


Gain


esville, Florida 32611


In addition,


"Hove


a law
Sweet


school
Hove


usually sent to beginning students


student


a survey


organization,


available


Counc


housing.


Copies


Ten,
are


one month before the start of classes.


owing Apartment Rental Rate Chart was compiled by the staff of


student


newspaper


Alligator.


is reprinted with


Please note that these prices were in effect at the time of the April,
and are subject to change.


their permission


1982 survey










STUDENT PROGRAMS


AND SERVICES


Apartment


Rental


Rates


A/ th the po::rment hunrtng
cornpied the chort belown o


some steps, gas and phone cohls


a /eaor ong


tease and


a maonrhi


season


upon


te phone survey


The AlIgaoor has
fo help save you


foH rates


and indicated by


change,


Those


survey,


"'ur. Please


note, these prices


did not


have


readriy ovadoabie


Apartment 1/ 2/1 2/1 /2/2 3/2 Other
r Ar or _
-2-



Brandywine ,U V U P OU
4I S A Ak P F 422F

Bridgelight Townhouse U

Brookwood Terrace 4/2' y
210U Jf(U -UY5U
,i >i .* 435U
Butler Garden 220U 27?UI
y:. ^** A :OF Jl
Camelot

College Terrace 2 .2TF

Colonial Manor
2 t A e AI I AF
Country Gardens 2U 30U

Country Manor
2> NA 272U 364U d41U

Country Village 24U 339U
??(>0 3 At .49U 3J1U J
Covered Bridge cur. 291U 362U 395U
* Hn^ 'A 23< B d
-
Deerwood
O.A2. 2 180U J10U 292U

East Side Garden8U

Eighth Ave.
K; 2^. A
Forest Glen 2

Fox Hollow
-'3< /i r < A U2115U 275U 285U

Frederick Garden
^6S i A4. 265F 325F
French Quarter
*xAit bW2 160 A F
The Garden 4/2%'
4 Ai l as. % A e 48U 348U 440U
Gotor Town
J.-^ 6'A 255U 310jU 40U
Gotor Village 2-U
2' NWA t e i <9
Gatorwood
37 SW Ae 28U 3U 6U
Georgetown 326F 40! 4i7F
1U4 NA Y ^ Ae
Glen Springs Manor 3/1%
2 30 NW 3 A. A.. 268U 0U
Granada cur.
ibOON u4rS< 30U 350U
Hawaiian Village 32 385
346 SW 2 dA~ 265U 50U UT 375U
Horizon House 3/'1
SiiNW iOt y AH 33U


Apartment, 1/n 2/1 /1 2/2 3/2 Other

Margate Villa cur.
tNlA 45 A0e i U ,US4fU
McKibbinBoanks J2e
SSA 4 hU J, YU" U '5 OU
Milthopper Village cur. 3'U 355 ,3/2'
i! A' IA 3 / *' 3'" P-P 0U 430 SOU

Mount Vernon 23. 34 U
;i S A3/> Ae er R An 5BU UT
Oak Forest 9UtU4 3/2 U4/3

Oak Glade U2U
$rU SU 2 235U

Oaks
qSU 3U 425U

Old Archer Court
JOyi SW AAtrnet P
Piccadilly 230 350- 375
1220 SW j4" 310 430 455
Pine Rush 210 285
4 7S5W20' A"e 220 305

Pinetree Gardens 4/2%
4 iSW 20t Ae Ave 433U
Pinewood 230U 295U
4400 NW 39' Ave 240F 310F
The Place 4/2
123 SW3 dA e e55pp
Point West
S00SW34mS, 275U 345U 375U 450U

Prairie View cur. 200
6315 SW 13hS 30U
Regency Oaks
7SU 3R 5U 44U
3230 SW Aher od 75 3
Robinson Villa
4107SW Ith PPace U
Santa Fe Trace
33i0 NW 9 s' S 245U 295U
Starlite
829 SW Sth Ave
Stone Ridge 285U 378U 3/2
3800 SW 34 St 337F 45F 538F
Sugarfoot Village 249
640( SW 20"m Ave 59U
Summer Place
3316 SW 4is' Place
Summit House 249 298
O00SW l6tCout 59U 309U
Sunrise
310 SW 23rd Terrce U
Sunset 3/1 y
515 NW 1O St 2 326U
Thomas Coy 255
14055W 10" Terrace UF
Treetops
501 St i Br S'
University Gardens 2,5U 350U
70RAW IAth Asa 3ilSI "tOe


The prices quoted are based on
y ro e f prices were not set for


or the time of the


apartments


the current prc


nor included


es were hsied
aore subject to


new routes








SPECIAL PROGRAMS


AND SERVICES


Center


for


Governmental


Responsibility


The Center for Governmenta


to the goal of seeking out and


espons


implementing w


ity is an organization committed
ays of making government more


accountable to its citizens.


The Center provides students with a unique oppor-


tunity


to conduct


research


on issues


relating


to executive


, leg


active


judicial functions at the


ocal, state and national


level .


The research agenda


has included such topics as energy policy


coastal zone management, constitu-


tional revision,


bar reform


, sunshine


lation,


complaint-handling and om-


budsman systems,


alternatives to the judicial process, and campaign financing.


Students at the Center are


involved in activities


such as testimony


hearings
drafting.


publication,


Publications


testimony,


court


administrative


include
briefs,


educational


technical


hearings,


pamphlets,


project


legislative


academic


reports.


Funding


analysis


articles,


sources


Center projects include federal and state agency


dations


, private corporations, foun-


, and the Florida Legislature.


Applications


are accepted


from


students


in the


third


semester


beyond;


personal


interviews


are conducted


upon


project position openings.


Students are selected for participation on the basis of undergraduate,


and law school record and experience.
cial compensation.


graduate


student participants are provided finan-


A







_-- --
= --t




-





-2~ ~


Wilbert Ha


. Home of the Center for Governmental Resoonsibilitv.


S1







SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND SERVICES


when confronted in a c
enhanced by experience


program. Procedural and evidentiary learning is


ing and applying these


rules


in concrete cases.


Students


may


enro


in one


programs:


Clinic


or the


Crimina


Clinic:
The Civ


Clinic operates out


of the College of


nts whose financial posture and civil lega


problem


and represents


meet guide


set by


the Florida Supreme Court. Students are given primary responsibility for hand


ing each case. C
members of The


:lose supervision by faculty


supervisors who are experienced


Florida Bar ensures professional responsibility and a climate


encouraging feedback and reflection.


The Civ


Clinic provides a one-semester experience in al


practice and an exposure to a variety of


practice


areas


substantive areas of law.


In addition there is a classroom component in which the student performs in
controlled simulated situations which are videotaped and critiqued by peers


and supervisors.


n the course of the semester the student will confront prob-


lems of interviewing, counseling,


die a


areas of trial practice,


investigation, discovery, negotiation and han-
uding preparation of trial tactics, presentation


of evidence, interrogation of witnesses


and relation


hip with the trier of fact.


Partic
these


ipation in Clinic provides a unique opportunity to analyze and reflect on


skills,


to enhance


the development


practical


competency


facilitate career choice and adjustment to practice after graduation.


ment
through


nmg


in the Civ
;h the se
>f the ne:


and to


Enrol


Clinic requires a commitment to active client representation


rmester


break


semester


period


. This


graduating or not.
The Civil Clinic awards 9


until


Friday


is required


redits.


Enrollment


before t
students


e begin-
whether


limited to 10 students.


registration is done in the middle of the semester registration


An application


form


is available at the C


inic Office


Room 323.


applicants wil


be interview-


, k1 rlr ar r r ;4 S- i- ,, *,- ,,r,-


i


xt








SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND SERVICES


progress in the following term to the Crimina


Clinic course for 6 units of credit.


Enro


ment in the Criminal Practice course is limited to


24 students.


Twelve of


these positions are reserved for students who wish to progress to the Clinic


course.


The remaining


positions are availab


to students who wish to take


ust the Criminal


semes


Practice course.


ter before enrollment


Application is made in the middle of the


, normally the two weeks before regular preregistra-


tion.


Application


forms


are available during this


time


at the Clinic


Office


Room 323.


The Criminal


Practice course is organized


largely upon a Practice Court


motif


, with provision made for more convention


teaching methods


such as


lecture


class


discussion.


During


course


class


as a


group


develop a


single


simulated criminal


case through the entire forma


criminal


process from arrest through trial.


Other more abbreviated simulations


also


be conducted.


The course is designed to provide the student with an overview


of the entire criminal pretria


and tria


processes and to acquaint student with


the ba


sic lawyering skills required to function in this context.


n the fo


owing term students who elect to do so will be assigned as


terns


to either the Office of Pub


c Defender or State Attorney for the Eighth


Judicia
form al


Circuit


n Gain


esvi


While


assi


gned to these


offices


interns wil


attorney functions of the office under the supervision of selected staff


members


of the offices.


During the course of the semester


interns


will be


assigned to misdemeanor


felony, and juvenile cases and may expect to be in-


volved
pretria


interviewing


clients


witnesses


, investigating


cases


pleading and discovery, negotiating and conducting actual


nonjury trials.


In all of these activities, interns wi


staff members of the offices who,
law faculty.


in turn


, doing


jury and


closely supervised by


, will be supervised by members of the


For further information


, see course descriptions under LW 6940, 6941


6942.


Interested


parties


may


contact


Professor


Anne


Spitzer (for the


Clini


c) and Professor James R.


Pierce (for the Criminal Clinic) at the Office of


the C


nics at the College of Law


II-I .:I II







SPECIAL PROGRAMS


Distinguished


Professor


Visiting


Program


The University of Florida Alumn


Association periodically


assists the Co


lege of Law in attracting eminent law teachers, jurists, and public


participate in and teach


figures to


seminar courses. Past visitors have included the


Tom C.


Clark


, Ass


ociate


Justice of the United States


Supreme Court; former


Secretary of Labor


ard Wirtz


former


citor General of the United States


and former Dean of Harvard Law


hool


Erwin Griswold


, and Professors James


Moore


Delmar Kar


, James W


lard Hurst


and W


am M.


isman.


Minority


Affairs


The College of L
within the professions


in any


aware


that minority groups are not


For further information on minority affairs,
tact the Assistant Dean for Minority Affairs.


Placement


significant number.


Accordingly


represented


concerted ef-


forts are being made to make legal education available to minority students.


see Admissions


cy or con-


A full-time pla


cemen


staff


ava


ilable


to provide


assistance to prospec-


employers and students of the Ho


and Law Center


Representatives


from


law firm


s, corporations, government agencies,


and judic


offices throughout


nation


visit


Center


during


year


to interview


prospective


graduates. Private interview facilities are available at the Holland Law Center
to those employers who interview on a nondiscriminatory basis.


In addition to coordinating activities between


staff


of the placement office


is available at al


students and employers, the
times to provide individual


counseling to students. Assisting in resume preparation,


ing techniques,


advising on interview-


and providing information concerning the variety of positions


and opportunities available are just a few of the activities of the


placement of-


fice. A placement bulletin is also available for graduates of the Holland Law
Center.


It is estimated that approximately


70%


of those


law graduates seeking


employment have


obs at graduation.


The av


rage starting salary for the May


1982 graduating


class


was $24.900.


n addition to the placement of graduates for permanent employment, the


placement office assists


second year students in obtaining clerking positions.


AND SERVICES






SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND SERVICES


Membership is open to all interested law students.


Society conducts a speakers program,


international


with a series of luncheons throughout


the year with a guest speaker experienced in


international


law and foreign rela-


tions.


The Internationa


Phillip C.


Jessup


international


society also administers the partic
Law Moot Court competition.


pation


in the


International Law Moot Court Competition


The law school participates


annual


n the Ph


ip C.


essup


Law Moot Court competition. The program is administered by the


society, but is open to al


international
international


law students who participate by mean


tramural competitions conducted each year


At the beginning of each


pring


semester a five member team is chosen to represent the


aw school in the an-


nua


Philip C.


Jessup Internationa


Law Moot Court competition.


The initial


regional round is held each year at a law school in the South.


The successful


team goes on to the national finals
the winner of that competition arg


held each year in April
;ues against teams froi


in Washington, and
m law schools from


around the world.


issue


international


The subject each year dea


with


memorials


with a hypothet
)riefs) prepared


cal but timely


argume


before the


ntermational Court of


justice.


International


Summer Law Programs


Since


abroad


1970


which


the
allow


College o
a student


topics at associated lega


programs


to study


sponsored
international


summer
l and cc


institutions in other countries.


law programs
)mparative law


In the past the two


have been offered in alternate years. No program will be held


summer of 1983.


inquiries concerning plans for the summer of 1984


in the


should be


referred to the office of the Dean.


ere are international summer law programs offered by universities other


than the University of Florida.


Before


enrolling


in such other programs,


a stu-


dent must check


with the


sistant


Dean


Academ


Affairs to


ascertain


whether or not residence credit and academic credit may be transferred to the


Unive


rsity of Florida.


ist of A.B.A. approved summer law programs


located


both in the United States and abroad is available


n the Administration Off


for student use.


Cambridge-Warsaw
The College of
University and the


international Trade Law Program


, in cooperation with


institute


Lega


Trinity Co


sciences


ege of


Polish


Cambridge


Academy


Sciences,


conducts a summer program


in England and Poland.


The program is


conducted entirely


n English,


taught by faculty members from this College of


, Cambridge University


and the Po


academy of S


sciences.


United States


aw students are offered an opportunity to study a variety of subject dealing


.


I







SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND SERVICES


Condu


ted entirely


n Eng


sh, the program is taught by faculty members


from


schools


in both the


United


States and Mexico.


United


States


students are offered an opportunity to study a variety of sub


ect ranging from


the broad areas of


nternationa


and Comparative Law to the more specif


area of
ducted


Latin


in ace


American


ordance


hools and the


particularly


Mexican


courses


with the requirements of the Association of
Lmerican Bar Association.


are con-


American


Law


Center


Association


The University of Florida Law Center


Assoc


nation was


formed


in 1960


as a


support group for the College


of Law


a 501 (c) (3) type organization under


the Internal Revenue Code,


serving as a repository for nearly all of the private


support


given


to the


Unrestricted


monies


provided


through


Assoc


nation help fund a number of programs and purposes at the


including student


the Graduate


scholarships and loans,


Tax Program,


Law Center


cement, library support services,


visiting professors and research.


The Law Center


Trustees were organized


1960 and act


as an informal


board of advisors to the Dean and Col


They are involved in managing the


assets


Law Center


ssoc


nation


legislative


son work


and securing


private funds.


The Trustees have been instrumental


n the successful campaign


to raise


funds


for the Commons


ding.


1981-82 Trustees Chairman is


Doyle Rogers


, a pract


icing attorney in Palm Beach.


Two support groups


play key roles


in the Law Ce


nter Association. The Law


Center Counci


establ


shed in 19


is made up of mostly younger alumni who


assist the college in a variety of areas including placement,


outstanding


dent recruitment and resource deve


opment. Roger L.


Blackburn '71


a Miam


attorney is th


1982-83 Coun


Chairman.


Law Center Association
Board of Trustees


Doyle Rogers,
Mark Hulsey,


Chairman


Palm Bea


Chairman, Jack
Vice Chairman


:sonville
, Tampa


usan Bla


Vice


Chairman


, Jacksonvil


Roy Hunt, Secretary
cott Van Alstyne Jr.,


,G


aine


Treasurer


Gain


esville


Sam


AlII


John C. Bie
William O.


ohn J


good
?rley,


Crews


Charles B.


George


Jr., New Port Richey
Tampa
field, Jacksonville


Gainesvi


Edwards


son Jr


, Fort Myers


Orlando


~1 I





!


--







ORGANIZATIONS,


ACTIVITIES, HONOR


AND AWARDS


ORGANIZATIONS,

ACTIVITIES,


HONORS


AND


AW


ARDS


Enjoying


John Marsha


"Brown Baggers"


Bar Association


The John Marsha


Bar Association


student bar association aff


iated


with the Law Student Division of the American Bar Association and The Florida


Membership


is open to all


students.


members of the Bar to address law students.


JMBA arranges for prominent
The organization also appoints


student members to faculty committees


matters of common interest.


n addition to


in order to achieve student


service functions


, JMBA


nput into
sponsors


many socia
The Counci


events throughout the year.
of Ten


l a *i -- = *1 I . R I








ORGANIZE TIONS,


This organization also aids


in the recruitment of Black students to the


school


and provides academic as


distance for entering Black students during


eir period of transition from an undergraduate to a lega


academy


env


ron-


ment.
Environmental Law Society


is an association


open


stud


interested


doing


legal


research on specific projects for environmental groups.
Spanish American Law Student Association


SALSA is an association open to a
educational exchange with Latin Ameri
in the recruitment of Latin American st


students interested


aw students.


udents to the


The a
schoc


cultural


association aids


and provides


academic assistance to al


members.


Law Association for Women


The Law


Association for Women (L.A.W.)


a student organization con-


cerned


pecifica


with


students and with the


e problems and
rights of women


special


interest


fema


Membership is open to a


students


, faculty


staff of the law


school and spouses


of these groups.


Law Wives


purpose of


organization


is to promote a


spirit


of friend


ness


among law spouses;


to provide more socia


activities


for them


to assi


st th


em in


obtaining all the benefit


to be derived from


ving


n a University center; and


to assist the law


school


and the community whenever


r possible.


Lega


Fraternities


Alpha


Delta.


1924


Fletche


r Chapter


Alpha Delta Law Fraternity has provided a balance


of service and socia


tivities for


aw students, faculty, and alumni. Recent programs


ude tours of


various


Florida prison


, a trip to the Florida Supreme


Court


, and numerous,


well-known state and local lecturers.


Delta Phi.- Cockrel


the loca


chapter of the nation's


oldest and


largest


egal


fraternity.


activities


provide


a professional


social


mosphere in which members may associate informally with both faculty and


Delta Ph


alumni members of the Florida bench and bar


nn members are


gible for


scholastic and merit awards


as wel


as national fraternity benefits


such as student loans and group insurance plan


Cockrell


nn conducts rush


twice a year and all students are invited to participate.


ACTIVITIES, HONORS AND AWARDS


)








ORGANIZE TIONS,


ACTIVITIES, HONORS AND AWARDS


S~L~ii~F" ~,















I;"
~ "~
rI, :~C
CI
I: "G~
;r- 5
r'-'~*;"~,~i~~-'"*1, -~


Top:


The Annua


Race


udicata; Bottom Left:


The Winner:


Jeff Kramer; Bottom


Right:


Dean


Tom Read.


Moot Court


The Moot Court program currently encompasses participation


state and


national appe


ate competitions.


Members are selected by means of intramural


competitions conducted every semester.


These competitions are open to a


students in the two semesters subsequent to their successful completion of Ap-
pellate Advocacy.


Each spring


semester, the Moot Court team


sponsors the Annua


Cup Com-


petition


This competition


is open to al


students who have completed


i


.


*







ORGANIZATIONS,


ACTIVITIES, HONOR


AND AWARDS


spring,


The Florida Bar sponsors a statewide competition (won by the Universi-


ty of Florida
convention.


14 of th


final


round


years) held in conjunction with the annual Bar


argument


is held


before


members


supreme Court of Florida.
The Moot Court team at Holland Law Center is named i


n honor of the


justice


Campbell Thornal of the


Florida Suprem


Court, a d


Local competitions also receive support from the John Marsha


voted alumnus.


Bar A


ssocla-


tion.


Moot Court members may earn up to three hours credit toward graduation


for work


satisfactory to the faculty advisor.


University of Florida Law Review


University of Florida Law Review


a lega


ourna


published quarterly


by the student Editoria


Board assisted by the faculty advisor.


consists of articles written by lega


The publication


scholars expert in various areas of law


works prepared by student members of the Law R


eview


work is


, and
cted.


edited


prepared


publication


student


Editoria


Board.


Review candidates


are sel


ected on the basis of high academic achieve


ment. At


the beginning of the second year, the 1
completing the first year curriculum is


top ten percent of the


class satisfactorily


invited to participate on the


Review


other


students


in good


standing


who


have


successfully


completed


Lega


search and Writing


"LW


5792"


may write in the Open Writing Competition


during the first semester of their second year


In addition to the open writing


competition,


Law R


any st,'dent may submit a work to compete for publication


eview, but this approach cannot lead to Law Review membership n


in the
or can


academic


credit


be given.


For regular


Review


participants,


to three


hours of academic credit can be


earned with approval


of the


ulty adv


Scholastic


Honoraries


Order of the Coif


of Law has a chapter of The Order of th


ship society with chapters at the leading
pose of Coif is to foster a spirit of careful
ner those who have attained a high level <
is based on scholarship and character. Eli


Coif


schools ofthe country.


scholar-
The pur-


study and to mark in a suitable man-


scholarship.


Election to the


society


gibility for nomination is determined


I i II


The Coil







ORGANIZATIONS,


ACTIVITIES, HONORS AND AWARD


once each year (normally in J
must be in the upper ten perc
graduation with honors.
Phi Kappa Phi


une).


To be considered for membership,


ent of three graduating


asses


students


and be


Kappa Phi is a national


honor


SOCI


the primary objective


of wh


is the
study


recognition and en
Honor graduates w


couragement of sup


erior


within the top ten perce


nt of


scholarship in a


eac


class


ds of


are el


nomination.


Prizes


and


Awards


Students


American


Jurisprudence


Awards.


Jurisprudence award a bound volume of an appropriate


Jurisprudence to the student making the hi
following courses: Constitutional Law 1 &


shers


title from Am


can


erican


hest grade in each section of the


Contracts


Crimina


Civil Procedure 1
Organizations, (


& 2, Property
Corporations,


eral Practice, Estates


& Tru


Torts 1 &


insurance,
sts, Future


Commercial Paper


Business


Debtor-Creditor


interests, Fiduciary Administration 1


, Administrative Law, Labor Law


Rem


edies


Conflict of Law


Estate Plan-


ning,


and Family Law.


Gertrude


Brick


Review Prize.--To encourage


participation on


University of


Florida


Review


stimulate an


interest in


writing,


alumnus


Albert


Brick,


in memory of his mother,


in 1951


established a


trust


fund


, added to through the years, that provides prizes totaling $250 annually to


the member of the Law Review submitting the best student note in each issue


of the


Review.


The Bureau of National Affairs Award.


-A one-year


subscription to U


Law Week is given annually to the


graduating student who has made the most


satisfactory progress in the senior year.


The Nathan Burkan Memoria


ety of Composers, Authors and Publishers,


Awards. Sponsored by the American


these awards are presented each


year to the students at this law
of copyright law.


school


submitting the best


essays


on the subject


Tom


vocacy


estab


Cole


Memoria


the Public Defender'


Award.
Office


encourage


of the


shed an award in memory of alumnus


ixth Judicia


Tom A.


excellence


in trial


Circuit of Florida has
e. An award of $50 is


presented each term to the student making the
cedure Adversary System.


Corpus Juris Secundum Awards. -
Secundum award a bound volume of


highest grade


Each year the pub


in Criminal Pro-


shers of Corpus


an appropriate title from Corpus







ORGANIZATIONS,


ACTIVITIES, HONORS AND AWARDS


law s
of $1


ichoo


of Florida for papers in the field of real property law. A cash prize


0 is awarded for the


Little


Brown Award.-- Little


best paper at each school.


, Brown & Company


award


an appropriate


book annually to the student making the


highest grad


in Law and Medicine


LAW 6720.
Local Government Section of the Florida Bar Award.-The
ment Section of The Florida Bar awards a plaque each year


Local Govern-
to the student


rece


iving the highest grade in Loca


Government Law.


Frank E.


Delta


Maloney Memoria


Fraternity


annually


I Award.
presents


- Th
this


Fletcher Chapter of Ph


award


to the


student


Alpha


who


rendered the most outstanding service to the fraternity


and a


The award consists of


certificate.


Frank E. Maloney Environmenta
test sponsored by the Environmenta


Law Writing Contest.-


annual


con-


Law Section of The Florida Bar wil


open to law students from each of the Florida law


schools


author of the


winning


article will


a guest,


at the section's expense,


at the


annual


vironmental Law Update Seminar
Journal.


article will appear in


The Florida


George


Milam


Martin


Milam


& Ade


Review


of Jacksonv


Case


Comment


Award.


-The


firm


has established an award in memory of


the senior partner of that firm who passed away in 196


Totaling $


50 annual-


awards will be given to the Law Rev


ew Junior Graduate who submits


best Case Comment in each issue of the Review.


. Hillis Mi
Fraternity


er Memorial Award.


annually


recognizes


The F
the s'


letche
senior


r Chapter of Ph


student


Alpha Delta


or recent


graduate who has been outstanding in leadership and service to the law school
The award consists of a cash prize and a certificate.


Claude Pepper Award..


- This honor is accorded annually to the member


Fletcher


stinction in


interest in going


Chapter


Alpha


Delta


scholarship and campus activities,


nto public


n the


future.


.w Fraternity who evidences
thereby indicating a possible
e award consists of a prize of


$100 and a citation.


Delta Phi Award.


- Cockrel


nn of Phi Delta Ph


international Lega


Fraternity annually recognizes the
the first semester at law school by
ship plaque.


student who makes the highest average


nscribing the student's


name on a scholar-


Delta Phi Graduate of the


Year.. -


Each spring,


Cockrell


nn of


Delta Ph


selects a


candidate for the


International Fraternity'


Graduate of the


.r >







ORGANIZE TIONS,


Year Contest.


ACTIVITIES, HONORS AND AWARDS


Candidates are awarded appropriate certificates of. recognition


and may win a cash prize for the loca


Prentice-Hall Prize.


- Prentice-Hall


inn of up to $300.00.
, Inc. awards a bronze plaque annual


each


of the leading students


in Corporate


Taxation


Income


Taxation of


Estates and Trusts, and Parnership


Taxation.


Jonathan


Norton


Roth


award was established by Dr


Memoria
and Mrs


Award


Medicine. This


Roth of Jacksonv


e to honor


the memory of their son,


onathan.


The award is presented annually to the stu-


dent who evidences interest, ability
of Law and Medicine.


and di


stinguished achievement in the area


The Campbel


Thorna


Memorial.- This fund was established in memory


of Mr


Justice Campbell Thorna


by his friends. Inco


me from the first $10.000


be devoted to support of the Campbe


Thornal Moot Court Competition


and any additional income will be used to provide Campbell Thornal
ships for deserving law students in this College.


holar-


Lawyers Section of The Florida Bar Award.


--The


Lawyers


tion awards a ticket of admission to the Trial Advocacy Program sponsored by


Trial


Lawyers Section of The Florida Bar


cket wil


be awarded twice


year to the outstanding student participating in Practice Court. Recipients of


this award must have


graduated,


taken the


Bar and be admitted to practice


prior to the date of the program.
The University of Florida Society of


international Law Essay Award.- To


insure the continued contribution of The Florida Bar to the development of the


practice of
Society of I


private


international


in this


State,


University of


international Law occasionally awards a cash prize


Florida


to the student of


this law school submitting the best
tional law.


West Publishing Company


essay


Award. -A


on a chosen topic


of private interna-


ected title from the


Hornbook


series


is awarded


highest scholastic av


annually


erage


to the
n the c


member


each


class


who achieves the


ass.


m1 E! LQ.







ORGANIZATIONS,


ACTIVITIES, HONORS AND AWARDS


Faculty


Nothing is more impo
faculty composed of capab


rtant for the maintenance


, experienced and industrious


a law


school


scholars


than a


, and a pro-


gram of salary supplementation is a factor of considerable significance
training people of eminence.


in re-


Lawyers'


Title Guaranty Fund Grant.


a business trust of Florida


The Lawyers' Title Guaranty Fund,


lawyers closely affiliated with


Florida Bar


established an annual grant of $1,000 to


supplement the salary of a distingu


ed professor or professors in the field of real property.


held by Professor Mande


grant is presently


Clicksberg.


Stephen C.


O'Connel


Chair.


The first


endowed chair at the University of


Florida College of Law recognizes the contribution


tephen C.


O'Conne


sixth president of the University of


Florida,


and former Chief


Justice of the


Florida
Roger


Supreme Court.


The O'Conn


Cunningham during the


Chair was held
spring semester,


by Visiting


and w


Professor


be held by


visiting Professor Rennard J. Strickland during the


1983 spring semester.









CURRICULUM


The program of study consists of
fall or spring semesters of the academic


six semesters of work beginning in the


year


year curriculum consists of prescribed cou


school's


rses


at most law school


e


The broad purpose of the


first year is to teach the student how to read and analyze


case


how to research points of law efficiently and express them clearly


is
in


first
law
and
i the


context of subject matter basic


to the student's


future


egal education. This


ective is to be achieved by offering a range of courses that represent the fields


of commerce, personal


injury


curriculum is the


property


procedure,


and public


subject of continuing faculty study


law.
The course of-


erings


listed below gov


ern students comm


enc


aw stud


during


1982-83 session.


Fall


Class


mester


Spring


mester


umme


r Term


(Optiona


Contracts I


Torts


Contracts II
Torts II


Civil Procedure


Crimina


Jurisprudence
Research & Writing


Civil Pro


cedure II


Property I
Constitution


Appe


Advo


cacy


Property II
Constitution


Electives


Spring


Class


spring


semester


Summer Term
(Required)


Sem


ester


Contracts I


Electives


Torts


Contracts II


Civil Procedure


Crimina


Torts II
Property


Jurisprudence
Research & Writing


Civil Procedure


Property II
Constitutional


Sprin


Appe
Advo


emester


cacy


Constitution
Law II
Electives


*Those


students whoenter in the fa


cpmepter and dn not


Pnrn l


fnr thp


C *rm r


ll II | I | II1


I







CURRICULUM

Students who must repeat either or both of these courses must do so at the


first available opportunity after the first year


and failure to do so may result


exclusion
repetition


from
with


the College of
the Director c


Law.


Students


egal


must


make


Writing


arrangements


Research


program


Repeated hours may not be counted toward the 12-hour minimum


ment


oad require-


, nor toward the 86 hour graduation requirement.


Second
Professional


and


Third


Year


Requirements


Responsibility Requirement


students


are required


to complete


satisfactorily


LAW


6750


, Profes-


sional Responsib


ty and the Lega


Profession, in their fourth or fifth


semester


purposes


latter


requirement,


summer


term


is considered


semester.
Seminar and Advanced Writing Requirement
Each student is required to accomplish a major fin


shed written work as a


result of individual research. Effective with the entering class of January


1981


students must complete this requirement through the vehicle of a seminar. A


seminar offerings wil


afford students the opportunity to complete the advanc-


ed writing requirement.


intended purpose of the


seminar requirement is to


give


students an


intense


, small


group


learning experience with


ose in-


terpersonal contact with faculty and other students.


The program


should be


commenced no later than the fifth semester


Students are also encouraged to


enroll in seminars for purposes other than satisfying the advanced writing re-


quirement.


Whether an alternative mode of


evaluation will


be available for


those students who do not require advanced writing certification is
discretion of the individual faculty member conducting the seminar


than 15


eft to the
No more


students will be permitted in any particular seminar except upon ap-


proval of the Dean and the professor teaching the seminar.


Students who


commenced their studies


n the College of Law prior to 1981


may satisfy the advanced writing requirement in any of the following ways: a)


through a


seminar


as set out above;


completion


of the


University of


Florida Law Review writing project; c


Board


participation on the Appellate Advocacy


through satisfactory completion of an Independent Study Course,


approved by the Curriculum Committee.
Satisfaction of the advanced writing requirement must be evidenced by


the execution of a certificate to that effect by the member of the fa
whose supervision the writing was done.


culty under


Course


Offerings


Area







CURRICULUM


educators and practitioners in various fields, may be obtained at the library
reserve desk.
For all courses or seminars which are designated with variable credit, e.g.


consult the current Academic Year Schedule to determine the actua


credit


allocation for any given course or seminar in a particular academic term.

Commercial Law


LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW
*LAW
LAW


LAW


*LAW
LAW


6010


--Sa


6020-


6040
6050
6051
6062
6063
6064
6080


Comm


Paper


--Consumer Law.
- Debtor-C red itor
- Debtor-Creditor
- Business Organi
- Corporations.


zations


--Corporate Finance
- Insurance......


& Reorgan


ization


. 2/


Perspective


LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW


6200
6210
6220
6221


6250


- Lega


Process


Advanced Jur


-En


ish L


isprud


ence


egal History


-Legal History Other than Common Law
-American Legal History .. ........
-Comparative Law .. . .. .....
- International Law . . . . .


Procedure


LAW
LAW
*LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW


6111


-Crimina
-Crimina


cedure-Po


Procedure-Ad


& Police


Pract


ices


versary System


-Federal Practice..


6304-
6320-


6330
6340


Appe


ate Practice


Remedies.


... . ..2 /


--Evidence


--Conflict of Law


Property


LAW
LAW
*LAW
*LAW
*LAW
LAW


6420


6430-


6433


6440-


6450


6460-


-Land Transactions


Estates


& Finance


& Trusts


- Future Interests.


... 21


Fiduciary Administration I


state


Planning


Land Use Planning and Contro


a D r A . S S


.2


2/


. . 3


..2


2


.3


Bm i A i


1.


II A f /* /


/*







CURRICULUM


LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW


6544
6548
6550


--Public Sector Labor Relations


Workers'


Compensation and Other Employm


Antitrust Law


- Regulated


6560-


6570


curities


Patent


ent Rights .. 3
...........3


Industries
Regulation


Trad


emark


, and Copyright Law


Taxation


LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW


6531


6600-
6610-


6616
6620
6621


--Loca


Governm


ent Law


Taxation and Finance


. . 2/


Income Taxation
Corporate Taxation


- Partnership Taxation
--Taxation of Gratuitous


income


Transfers


Taxation of Estates


& Trusts


Legal Skills


LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW


6360
6361
6362
6380
6930
6940
6941


-Offi
- Tria


ce and Pre-Tria


Practice


Advocacy


- Practice Court


- Lega


Coun


Lawyers


-Civ


selling


as Negotiators


Clinic


summer


-Criminal Practice


--Crimina


6943


--Civ


Clinic


Practice


Uncla


LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW


6510


6710-


20-


6730
6750
6751
6760
6905


6930-


6950
6951


6954


-International E
- Political and C


siness


Rights


Family Law
Law and Medicine
Admiralty ..


essiona


Respon


ity and the


egal Profess


- Law Office Economics
- Legal Accounting


Independent


tudy Course


1 to3


elected Legal Problems


- Law Review
--Moot Court
-Advanced R


Advan


ced R


research
research


, Writing,


Writin


and Appe
and Appe


ate Ad


vocacy
vocacy


a - a. a S S 3 S a S -


. 2/


2


.. 3


.9


. . . . . . . . . . . 3


2


S 2/


r I A Rll






CURRICULUM


LAW
*LAW
*LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW
LAW
*LAW
LAW
*LAW
LAW
*LAW
*LAW
LAW
*LAW
*LAW
*LAW
LAW


6286-


6335
6336
6405
6455
6465
6505
6512


6525
6545


6586-


6605
6715


6726
6731


6936


Latin American


Trade and


investment Seminar


--Evidence Seminar


- Civ


Procedure Seminar


--Advanced Property Seminar
-Estates and Trusts Seminar
--Historic Preservation and the Law


- Constitutional
-Human Rights,


minar


Law Seminar


Law and Policy Seminar


- Legislative Drafting Seminar .
- Administrative Law Seminar
--Labor Law Seminar


Law and Communication


. . . . . . 2


minar


--Federal Taxation Seminar
- Family Law Seminar
- Law and Psychiatry Seminar


Hospita


Law Seminar


- Admiralty Law Seminar
- Professional Responsibi


--Current Lega


*Prerequisite required

Course Descri


eminar


Problems Seminar


- see Prerequisite Chart.


options


Public post-secondary


institutions


n Florida are required to implement a


common course numbering system developed at the state level.


The objective


is to provide a common


classification


system


sciplinary


inter-


disciplinary categories and sub-categories based on the professional judgment


of the faculties


n the given discipline areas.


course


offerings


described


below


are identified


statewide


course numbering system. The
prefix and a four-digit number


statewide course number includes


a three-letter


The three letters identify the general subject


matter


first digit


indicates the course level.


The next three digits were


assi


gned by the faculty in the appropriate discipline according to the common


course


numbering


procedures.


blank


space


indicates


statewide


course number had not been determined at the time of catalog printing.


The University of Florida will accept for fu


credit a


transfer courses that


have a common prefix and number as
available.


soon as the common numbers become


First


Year


Courses


LAW 5793- APPELLATE ADVOCACY


1 credit.


A continuation of LAW 5792.


A factua


tuation


presented to the


student by means of a hypothetical


appe


ate record. The


record is the basis for


no rt4l r, -, n l I n n, I ., .fl1 n/fillt. (a' 4un., k, ark n nnl ^\y


t-haa n~nr~rl r n a rn i +!n nnlln C^"F r-r/li r rBI+







CURRICULUM


jury,


respective


roles of judge, jury


and lawyer; trial and post-trial motions;


judgments.


LAW


-CON


TITUTIONAL LAW I


credits.


establishment and operation of j


relations in the federal system;


review


the powers of Congress,


, intergovernmen-


the President


the states.


LAW


5502


credits.


the
asse


-CON


TITUTIONAL LAW


individual procedural rights;


impairment


mbly


religion


contract;


personal


impediments to


liberties-- genera


the Fourteenth Amendment; federal


ative regulations;


peech,


powers as


press,
right;


citizenship.


LAW 500--


CONTRACT


credits.


introduction


to the


theory


enforceab


agreements and promises,
sideration.


uding elements


contract formation and


con-


LAW 5001


credits.


nations;


-CONTRACT


Effects


conditions


non-performance


for relief from or disc


legally


enforceable


charge of obligations;


contractual
theory and


ication of third party benefit


LAW 5100


ciary contracts and assignments.


-CRIMINAL LAW


credits.


The substantive


aw of crimes


covering,


in addition to basic prin


and the elements of typical crimes, such concepts as relational and inchoate


, responsibility


10-JUR


crime

LAW


credits.


dimensions


and defenses.


ISPRUDENCE


A study of the relationships


proc


between the practical and theoretical
of the complexity composed of legal,


ethical


mora


experience


ight of history


contemporary socio-


problems.


LAW 5792


-LEGAL RESEARCH AND WRITING


redit.


The first half of a two-part course,


both parts required for graduation.


includes emphasis on basic legal research and writing lega


memoranda.


course is graded on ascaleof Satisfactory(S
Deferred Grade (H), and must be completed


Honors (


Unsat


d with a grade of


S


factory (U), or


or better even


requirement necessitates repeating the course.


LAW


PROPERTY


credits.


in land


The acquisition and possession of property, rea


introduction to future interests


and personal; estates


landlord and tenant.


. A L p I A ll'* n '-h r r f r- r | i


I


_ _ _1|


I


I


I







CURRICULUM / 83


LAW 5701
2 credits.


TORT


Continued development of the material initiated in LAW 5700.


Faculty Advisement Session


Second


and


Third


Year


Courses


LAW 6520-


ADMIN


TRATIVE LAW


3 credits.


Analysis of the administrative process, with


emphasis on the


oppor-


tunity to be heard,


compulsory process to obtain information,


elements of fair


procedure,


LAW 6


and the process of decision.
-ADMIRALTY


credits.


Jurisdiction


choice of law


right to navigate


sickness


, persona


and death of seamen


, longshoremen,


and others in maritime occupations;


collisions; government responsibilities
pilotage; maritime liens.


related to navigation


maritime salvage


LAW 6210


ADVANCED JURISPRUDENCE


or 3


credits.


IS a


course


in Advan


Jurisprudence.


See description


under LAW 5210.


LAW


6953


ADVANCED


RESEARCH


, WRITING


AND


APPELLATE


VOCACY


credits. Students serve


as instructors


in the first year Research, Writing and


Appel
Letter


ate Advocacy course under the direction of the Director of the Program.


grades


awarded


on the


basis


of writing a


assignments,


instruction


counseling prepared and performed by the student instructors. Enrollment with


-







CURRICULUM


LAW 6550--ANT ITRU


T LAW


3 credits.


An analy


of the


legal


economic and policy issues engendered by


efforts to prescribe standards of business conduct and preserve competitive


market structures under the Sherman Act


, Clayton Act,


Federal Trade


Commis-


sion Act


and related


legislation.


LAW 6304-


APPELLATE PRACTICE


credits. Methods of review of federal


and Florida appellate courts,


including


review of trial courts and administrative bodies.


LAW 6062


NESS ORGAN


ZATIONS


or 3


such


redits.


A consideration of the various alternatives


as sole proprietorship, a partnership or a corporation.


of doing bu
Emphasis v


ness


placed on the partnership. Some consideration will additionally be given to the


unique forms


of small bu


sinesses


, including nonprofit


corporations


and profes-


siona


associations.


LAW 6940


credits fa


sion


-CIVIL CLINIC


and spring; 6 credits summer


n the conduct of civil legal
combined with substantial


Recommended: LW 6330.


P


matters under a scheme of systematic


related


credits taken may be awarded on a


forma


better grade


instruction


articipa-
supervi-


One-third of the


basis at the option of the


structor. The remaining


c red it


will be awarded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory


a letter grade is not awarded for one-third of the credits taken,


credits wil


be graded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.


students who have taken Crimina


Practice


LW 6941


Crimina


nor to students who have taken Office and Pre-Tria


Advocacy LW 6361


Lawyers as Negotiators LW 6930,


Not available to
Clinic LW 6942,


Practice LW 6360,
and Practice Court


LW 6362.


LAW 6943


-CIVIL PRACTICE


credits.


Students receive


instruction


cedures necessary for the conduct of civ


be provided by
This course is


V


n the various


, technique


litigation. Practice


simulated exercise dealing with all


phases


in thes
of civi


a prerequisite for students planning to take LAW


e


s and pro-
skills will


I litigation.
6940-CIVIL


CLINIC during the summer term, and students enrolling in the course are re-


quired to


commit them


selves


to enrolling


in that summer course.


This course is


not available to students who have taken Crimina


as Negotiators (LAW 6930), Office


Clinic (LAW 6942), Lawyers


and Pretrial Civil Practice (LAW 6360),


Advocacy (LAW 6361), or Practice Court (LAW 6942).


LAW 6020


or 3 credits.


-COMMERCIAL PAPER


study of negotiable


notes and other


- a -


commercial
*


paper,


* II P I I I B__ -_ --1 L- _


1







CURRICULUM


LAW 6040--CONSUMER LAW


or 3 credits.


princ


redit transactions and their


ipal subject areas are consumer sales and


udicia


legislative,


consumer


administrative and extra-lega


regulation.


postulation and evaluation of


correctives


for perceived


problems will be the base from which the foca


their administration will be deve


consideration of remed


oped.


LAW 6064


-CORPORATE FINANCE AND REORGAN


ZATION


credits.


An inquiry into the


problems involving the methods


used


financing the corporation payment of dividends, the reacquisition by a cor-
poration of its own shares and problems of mergers, consolidations and other


forms of corporate reorganization.


an undergraduate accounting


LAW 6610-


Prerequisites: LAW 6063 and LAW 6760 (or


course).


CORPORATE TAXATION


credits.


Prerequisites:


porate formation,


LAW 6600


distributions


LAW 6063.
liquidation.


The tax


considerations in


cor-


LAW 6063


-CORPORATION


3 credits.


A consideration of problems


the corporate fiction,
insider trading, proxy


contr
solic


ol


in organizing a corporation,


and management, federal regulations


itation and short-swing profits, derivativ


lisregard of
controlling
e suits and


special problems of the


LAW 6942


close corporation


-CRIMINAL CLINIC


red its.


Prerequisite:


LW 6941


Participation


n the


condu


ct of actua


criminal


egal matters


as an intern supervised by a m


mber of the


tate Attorney's


Public Defender's


Office.


Credit w


be awarded on a satisfactory/unsatisfac-


tory basis.


LAW 6941


-CRIMINAL PRACTICE.


credits.


Students receive instruction


n the various


, techniques and pro-


cedures necessary for the conduct of criminal


practice


skills whi


participating


law pract


Students w


mulated exercises dealing with a


earn
lases


criminal


litigation.


This course is not available to students who have taken


nic (LW 6940),


Lawyers as Negotiators (LW 6930), Office


and Pretria


Practice (LW


6360),


Advocacy (LW


6361),


or Practice Court (LW


6362).


Students


who


commit


themselves


to enrol


owing


term


Criminal C


(LW 6942) wil


receive registration priority


registration priority must complete LW 6942 to obtain
for LW 6941.


LAW 611


-


Students receiving


redit toward graduation


-CRIMINAL PROCEDURE-ADVERSARY SYSTEM


1








86 / CURRICULUM


LAW 6050-DEBTOR-CREDITOR LAW


redit


An introduction to the relationship of debtor and creditor, the course


examines the law relative to the process of obtaining


judicial


remedies


creditors


without


consensual


credit


liens


bankruptcy law, and the creation and use of security interests


udicia


and extra-


including
n persona


basic
prop-


erty under Article Nine of the Uniform Commercia


Code.


LAW 6051


credits.


- DEBTOR


Prerequisite


-CREDITOR LAW II


6050.


This


course


is a continuation


Debtor


Creditor Law


and provides further analysis of the principles covered in the


basic course in the context of new factual settings and financial
including business workouts under the Bankruptry Reform Act.


transactions


LAW 6220--


credits.


society


ENGLISH LEGAL H


TORY


Emphasis on the history of English


the growth of constitution


aw from the Conquest:


concepts and the limits on pub


the orgins of the central courts and the elaboration of the judi


history of the jury and of equity


the feuda


order


cial system; the


the prerogative courts; a brief consideration,


timn normittino nf th rlictrihaltinn nf Fnalikh I aw







CURRICULUM


LAW 6430-


ESTATES AND TRUST


3 credits.


Prerequisite:


LAW 5400.


Recommended:


LAW 5401


ntestate


succes-


, gifts,


execution of will


s, creation of trusts; charitable tru


sts; ademption


and lapse; powers of appointment.


LAW 6330


EVIDENCE


4 credits.


Prerequ


isite: LAW 5300 and 5301


A study of the law governing the


proof of issues of fact before a judicial tribunal.


Topics covered may


judicial notice


, presumptions, burden of proof


hearsay, relevancy


testimonial


proof,


demonstrative and scientific proof, documentary proof, and privileged


communications.


Emphasis


placed


common


modern


developments such as the Federal Rules of Evidence.


LAW 6710-


FAMILY LAW


3 credits.


Nature of contract to marry and of marriage; requ


sites for vali


annulment
lems of the


doctrines; divorce;


causes


, grounds,


child; economic and tort relations


defenses


between spouses


sdiction


prob-


and parent and


LAW 6302


- FEDERAL PRACTICE


3 credits. Prerequisites:


LAW


300 and LAW


5301


ecomme


nded: LAW


5501


and LAW 5502.


Analys


of the federal


udicia


system and of its relationship to


the state's


judicial systems, including consideration of the


applicab


urisdic-


tiona


, procedure


LAW 6440 -


substantive law.


FIDUCIARY


ADMINISTRATION


credits.


Prerequ


site:


LAW


6430.


Problems


administration


decendents'


estates and of non-commercial trusts


probate procedure; powers


of the fiduciary; compensation of fiduciaries


and their attorneys.


LAW 6624


- FIDUCIARY


ADMINISTRATION II


2 credits.
fiduciary


Prerequisite; LAW 6440.


n the


allocation of


Recommended: LAW 6620.


Problems


receipts and disbursements between


of the


princ


and income in the administration of trust and estates; the Uniform Principa


income Act:


the allocation of the burden of death taxes.


LAW 6521


-FLORIDA ADMIN


TRATIVE LAW


or 3 credits.


Coverage of Florida Administrative Procedure Act (FAPA) rule


making under the FAPA,


decisions affecting substantial


interest


enforcement


of agency action,


udicia


review under the FAPA


non-FAPA


udicia


review


government
LAW 6503-


in the sunshine and public records.
- FLORIDA CONSTITUTIONAL LAW


credits.


Analys


of selected provisions


of the Florida Constitution


with em-


phasis on recent decisions of the Florida


supreme Court; analysis of current


nrsfnjlr~e ^r I LFa. rn4- in -a i I ri ^ i








88 / CURRICULUM

LAW 6600-INCOME TAXATION
4 credits. Recommended: LAW 6760 to precede or be taken concurrently. Taxa-
tion of individuals-Identification of taxpayer; concepts of gross income; ad-
justed gross income, deductions, exemptions, and taxable income; recognition,
characterization, and other problems incident to the sale, exchange, or other
disposition of property. Analysis includes the various provisions of the Internal
Revenue Code, interpretative material issued by the Treasury and major court
decisions.


LAW 6621
2 credits. P
6440 prece
phasis on i
of income
lems, inclu


-INCOME TAXATION (
rerequisites: LAW 6600.
de this course. The taxat
income required to be d
or corpus, and accumuh
ding the treatment of in


3F ESTATES AND
It is recommended
ion of income of tr
distributed currently
nation distributions;
come in respect o


TRUSTS
that LAW 6430 and LAW
usts and estates with em-
r, equivocal distributions
other fiduciary tax prob-
f decedents.


LAW 6905-INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE


1 to
facu
will
two
mini
corn


3 credits.
Ity member
be determ
academic
mum court
pleted foL


Content of course
hr, then approved by
ined by Curriculum
terms or less. Cred
se load per semeste


ir


terms.


ndependc


to b
the C
Comr
it aw
r (12
?nt s


e determined initially by
:urriculum Committee. Cr
imittee. Course must be (
carded may not be appli
hrs.) Open only to studei
tudy courses are not uw


materials covered in courses offered as part of the regular cur


LAW 6080-INSURANCE
2 or 3 credits. The various forms
Automobile, Health and Accident; Fl
claims, processing, and insurance inst
transference, reasonable expectancies,


ri


student and
*ed it awarded
completed in
ed to reduce
nts who have
sed to cover
culum.


of policies, i.e., Fire; Homeowners,
oaters, etc.; concepts of marketing,
itutions, principles of indemnity, risk
and unconscionable advantages.


LAW 6261- INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS LAW
2 or 3 credits. Legal problems arising in transactions or relations that involve in-
dividuals, business enterprises, other private institutions, or governments of
two or more nations.

LAW 6260-INTERNATIONAL LAW
3 credits. An introduction to international law as applied between nations and
in American courts.

LAW 6540- LABOR LAW
4 credits. The law governing employer-union-employee relations in the private
sector. Subjects covered include employee organization, concerted activities,
collective bargaining, and administration of agreements, including arbitration.







CURRICULUM


economic


selected


political


current prob


ems


implications


regulations;


such as growth manager


eminent


ent. historic


domain


preservation,


environmental regulation,


urban d


development.


LAW 6720-


LAW


AND MEDICINE


or 3


credits.


The relationship betw


een law and the


medicia


sciences


with


particular emphasis


on med


ical proof i


litigation.


LAW 6


-LAW OFFICE ECONOMICS


credit.


An examination of


career


r alternatives


within the


profess


on nar


rowing to the
management


cision to open a


cove


ring library


solo


aw offi


accounting,


over


an examination of law office


ead and the lik


e; lawyers


comes


genera


ients


, developing a


iente


and a


survey of the


blems of


expansion,


partnerships,


associates


incorporated


aw firm


related matters.


estricted to fifth and si


requires a written examination


Regular


semester


better grades


aw students.
are awarded.


course


LAW 6950-
1 credit per
and editoria


LAW REVIEW


semester.


work


Maximum credits a


Univ


ersity


owed are three.


Florida


Research


Review.


, writing,


Limited


students


whose


scholastic


average


meets


requirements


review


work.


No letter grades


are given for the


course.


LAW 6760


LEGAL ACCOUNTING


credits.


Eleme


nts of a


accounting


interpretation of financial statements and


audit


reports


Designed for stui
more than 6 sem


accounting


problems


dents with little or no a


ester hours of a


to arise


accounting ba


accounting courses


in a


awyer


ckground


must


seek


Stud


practice.
ents with


special perm


sion of the


instructor.


LAW 6380-


LEGAL COUN


ELING


2 credits.
attorney-c


Methods


lent relation


interviewing and coi
ship based on actua


unseling


case


clients


histories


alscusslI
involving


on of the
counsel-


LAW 6221


credits.


stitutions


-LEGAL H


Emphasis


, lega


TORY OTHER THAN COMMON LAW


on the antecedents of the We


thought,


from


customs


stern World'


primitive


societies


, legal in-
societies







CURRICULUM


through


aw-related


developments


early


civilizations


from


ancient


Babylonia through Athens and Rome,


into the Dark Ages of W


western Europe,


and some attention to selected other civilizations.


LAW 6220


LEGAL PROCESS


credits.


An examination of the operation of selected type


institu-


tions


ng social science studies in order to test and develop theories con-


cerning the functioning of the


LAW 6


egal process.


LATION


credits.


Role of the


legislature


in the


process;


function of representa-


codification and revision of the


statutes


regulatory


sanctioning


common law
techniques; r


judicial interpretation of


ationship of


statutes


other types of law.


LAW 6531


-LOCAL GOVERNMENT LAW


TAXATION AND FINANCE


or 3


credits.


Examination


of the


substantive


procedural


loca


governments,


financing


including


sources


organization,


uding state and


powers,


oca


procedure,


taxation, special


personnel


assessments, user


fees and borrowing.


LAW 6951


-MOOT COURT


1 credit per semester
in appellate practice,


Maximum


credits a


owed are three.


Advan


including both the briefing and argument of


ced training


cases


on ap-


peal, as a result of participation
grades are given for the course.


n appellate moot court proceedings.


better


LAW 6480-


NATURAL RESOURCES


or 3 credits.


A study of the


egal aspects of the


ment of natural resources, particularly water


conse


minerals


rvation and develop-
I and gas. Special em-


phasis
federal


placed


on statutory


enactments


administrative


regulation


and state governments.


LAW 6360-


OFFICE AND PRE-TRIAL CIVIL PRACTICE


credits.


introductory examination of the


tasks and relation


ships


involved


aw office and pre-trial lawyering.


This course will survey


interviewing,


case


development,


drafting,


estigation,


pleading,


discovery, and pre-tria


motion


practice.


students will perform aspects of each of these skil


cipating in simulated exercises.


term


simulation


used. A


Both short, one-class,
performances will be


Groups whi
incremental


,long-


ritiques and many will


be videotaped for
students who have


review
taken


student


clinic


LAW


instructor


6940 or Criminal


available


Practice


6941.


, LAW


LAW 6616-
2 rPriftc Pri


PARTNER


HIP TAXATION


arPnllicita. I AWA/ AA(J


t ic rnrnmmanrtlar that I AWA AAfl nrorcrla


I







CURRICULUM


and the state


as demonstrated by developments


in the areas of free speech,


press,


association, religion,


and privacy


While focus wil


be on first amend-


ment doctrine, study will also include consideration of


various po


cal and


philosophical theories of


LAW 6362


individual/state.


-PRACTICE COURT


3 credits.
criminal
criminal


A study of the


process,


case.


theory, dynamics,


based


on the


Includes the theory


strategy and tactics


simulated


trials


dynamics


both


of the c
a civil


ivil and


egal drafting,


vocacy and the ethics of tria


cess


itself


ocacy,


with simulation of both criminal and


pretrial proceedings and the trial pro-


and forma


ssroom


instruction


based


where


possible,


previously-conducted


simulation.


Because of the simulation and role-playing aspects of the course, student at-


tendance and participation in all class sections is required; students


should be


aware that, for the same reasons,


time


periods


indicated


on the


sessions will gen


formal


schedule.


erally extend beyond


Registration


preference


II be given to students who have complete
ilable to students who have taken Civil Cli


d LW 6361


Trial


Advocacy


, LW 6940; Crimina


Practice


LW 6941


or Criminal Clinic


LW 6942.


LAW 6750


PROFESSIONAL RE


PON


AND


THE LEGAL PROFES


credits.


course examines the role


profession as an entity in contemporary


of the


society


individual


Topics


cove


er and the


red include: the


role of the lawyer as
and moral obligations
derived from general e


Professiona


advocate, counselor and community leader; the ethical
of the lawyer to his client, other lawyers and society as


?thic


Respon


al and moral principles and


sibility


representing particular categories
defendants and indigents.


problems
of clients


as embodied in the Code


encountered


udin


g corporations,


awyer


cnrlmina


LAW 6


PUBLIC SECTOR LABOR RELATION


or 3 credits. Prerequisite: LAW 6


study of labor relations


in the


governmental) sector in the United States.


The developing laws concerning the


right of pub


employees to form and join unions, collective bargaining,


con-


certed activities and related subjects will be considered. Special attention is


given to the
the model I


Florida Public Employees Re


islative


enactments.


nations


When


Act, which represents


course


is taught


one of


3 credits


federal
will be


sector labor


relations


uding the Ci


ce Reform Act of 1980


covered extensively.


LAW 6552


-REGULATED


INDUSTRIES


credits.


Prerequisite: LAW 6520.


recommended: LAW 6550.


An examina-


tion of the


legal


and economic


problems when


selec


ted


industries are


ava


U


_ __


I







CURRICULUM


LAW 6010--
2 or 3 credits.


The law applicable to the sale of goods,


uding bulk transfers,


with emphasis on the


devices


utilized


in the distribution of such property.


LAW 6560--


ECURITIE


REGULATION


3 credits. Prerequisite: LAW 6063.


Examination of the control


and exemptions


relating to
and others


the


ale and distribution of securities by corporations, underwriters


, including such matters as the scope of the


securities laws, registra-


tion provisions,


distribution and resale of restricted securities, express and i


ilities, secondary distributions and tender offers.


issues wil


analyzed in the context of the 1933 and 1934 federal


statues


as amended


state Blue


LAW 6930-


aws.


SELECTED LEGAL PROBLEMS


or 3


credits.


Courses


involving


exploration


legal


problems


current


significance.
LAW 6620-


TAXATION OF GRATUITOU


TRAN


3 credits.


Prerequisites:


LAW


6430 and LAW


6600.


Fundamentals of federal


estate and gift taxation.


LAW 6361


credits.


-TRIAL ADVOCACY
Prerequisites: LAW 6330.


law relating to trials,


tactics


A study of the tria


and trial techniques.


process,


The course wil


uding the


consist


of two hours of classroom/lecture presentations and a three hour


period
mance.


each


week


involving


role-playing


critical


evaluation


laboratory"
of perfor-


Letter grades may be given in lieu of satisfactory-unsatisfactory at th


option of the instructor.
fourth semester students


Registration p
in that order.


'reference shal


be given to fifth and


Not available to students who have


taken Civil C
LAW 6942.


LAW 6940


Crimina


Practice, LAW 6941


or Criminal C


LAW


6548-


WORKER


COMPEN


ATION


AND


OTHER


EMPLOYMENT


RIGHT


3 credits.
programs
security,


Rights of employees and duties of employers under modern socia


including worker


old age, disability and medi


compensation, wage and hour regulations, social


al programs and anti-discrimination laws.






CURRICULUM / 93


Selecte

Problems

Law


Legal


SCourses

6930


The following is a list of


ected Legal Prob


ems


Courses


that have been


previously offered or may be available


during the


1982-83 Academic


ear at


the College of Law.
Students should con


availability of any of these


These courses are not permanent parts of the curriculum.
suit the current Academic Year Schedule to determine the


courses.


Advanced Antitrust Law


cultural


International Tax Problems


Compensation Systems


Economic Analys


Applied to Law


International Tax Law
Law and the Constitutional Order in American History


Lawyers


as Negotiators


Products Liability


Sex-Based Disc
Women and th


rimination
e Law


Seminars


LAW 65


-ADMIN


credits.


TRATIVE LAW SEMINAR


seminar will have variable content


in dealing with the opera-


tions of a different regulatory agency at various times.
LAW 6520 be taken first.


It is re


commended that


LAW 6731


-ADMIRALTY SEMINAR


or 3 credits.


Sovereign


immunity


charter parties;


carriage of goods


genera


average; maritime insurance;


seizures of vessel


s; coverage of other


water pollution by vessels;
topics related to admiralty


searches


Prerequisite:


LAW 6730.


LAW 6405-


ADVANCED PROPERTY SEMINAR


or 3 credits.


Exploration of current


egal problems


leading to creative work on the part of the student


LAW 6336-


in the area of property


in the form of a term paper.


CIVIL PROCEDURE SEMINAR


or 3 credits.


Detailed examination of civil


tigation topics in both state and


rnh ,rf cr ^ Mn l +kn sall ,4a 1 nr k ..


3-


,, 4.4. a nA^ ,, A al rtI a*A a i r


>/<* IJ- I.u


dT/"rf~f I


M


I j> l h *-







CURRICULUM


tiona


cases


testing


these


theories.


student


is required


to write


simulated


judicial opinion and a major research paper.


LAW 6065


-CORPORATE PROBLEMS


EMINAR


credits.


Prerequisite: LAW 6063


Consideration of the more diff


cult pro-


blems


in the law of


corporations,


e.g., corporate


reorgani


zations


, corporate


finance,
students.


security


regulations.


Open


only


to fifth


sixth


semester


LAW 61


-CRIME AND CRIMINOLOGY


EMINAR


or 3


credits.


Physical,


psychological


, and


social


aspects of


criminology


searches


seizures;


police methods;


extradition; the sentence;


probation


paroi
Pena


e; pardon


civil rights;


penology


recidivism


nile de


inquency;


Mod


reforms and trends.


LAW 6113


-CRIMINAL PROCEDURE SEMINAR


credits.


Detailed examination of criminal procedure topics


in both state and


dera


courts.


Prerequ


sites:


LAW 5100


LAW 6936


-CURRENT LEGAL PROBLEM


or 3 credits.


Exploration of various lega


SEMINAR
problems of


current


significance


leading to creative work on the part of the student in the form of a term paper


LAW 64


ESTATE


AND


or 3 credits. Prerequisite:


TRU


LAW 6430.


EMINAR
Recomm


ended: LAW 6440.


Examination


of current probl


LAW 633


ems


EVIDENCE


in estates and trusts.


SEMINAR


credits.


Prerequisites:


LAW 6330. Examination of


ected problems of


proof i


n criminal and civ


litigation.


Content w


vary to accommodate mat-


ters of contemporary


interest.


LAW 671


-FAMILY LAW


SEMINAR


or 3


credits.


Prerequisites:


LAW 6710.


Examination of selected problems


family law


Content will vary to accommodate matters of


contemporary


terests.


LAW 6605


or 3 credits.


-FEDERAL


TAXATION SEMINAR


Prerequisites: LAW 6600; others as announced from tim


to time.


Advanced problems
tax research.


in federal


taxation with emphasis on techniques


of federal


LAW 6066


FRANCHISE ENTERPRISE SEMINAR


or 3 credits. Examination of the development of franchise relationships and


the principal
enterprise.


egal


issues


inherent in


arising from this form of business


uve


I







CURRICULUM


tionship of
phasizes the


ndividua


to the


international


influence of human rights perspective


lega


environment,


em-


on law-making in national


regional and transnational context.


The seminar seeks to determine a real


human


through estab


rights


shed lega


in securing
I processes,


enhanced


and st


resses


protection


the relevance


individual


of human rights


perspectives
LAW 6262-


in the practice of law.
INTERNATIONAL BUSI


NESS


LAW SEMINAR


credits. A seminar concentrating on the regulation of international


commer-


cial transactions, considering


several


specific


contemporary problems


dealing


with foreign direct investment in developed and developing nations,


nations with a market system and socialist nations.


including


Contemporary issues will


be explored, such as economic blockades and boycotts and the


freezing of


assets.


LAW 6211


ISPRUDENCE SEMINAR


2 or 3 credits. Detailed examination of jur
depth institutions and societies generally.


sprudential 1
Prerequisite:


LAW


, involving the
5210.


LAW 6545


LABOR LAW


EMINAR


credits.


Prerequisities:


LAW 6540.


ected problems in the


law of


abor


and management relations, varying among areas such


as special


abor legisla-


, labor organ


LAW 6285


survey


izations


, collective bargaining,


-LATIN AMERICAN LEGAL


credits.
of the


and arbitration.


INSTITUTIONS


EMINAR


Open to graduate students in Latin American Studies.


egal


systems of the


American


republics;


interaction of


Genera


legal,


economic


, and social factors in current Latin American problems.


LAW 6286


- LATIN AMERICAN TRADE AND


NVE


TMENT SEMINAR


Sor3
ems


credits.
involved


Open to graduate students in Latin American Studies.


I


in trading with and


Lega


the formation and operation of


prob-


business


enterprises
LAW 6585-


in Latin America.


LAW


or 3 credits.


AND COMMUNICATION SEMINAR
eral semantics and other relevant techiques w


be discu


ssed


and applied to communication situations in the areas of


uding advocacy


, legal reasoning,


writing,


interviewing,


aw and
counsel


awyering, in-
ine. fact fin-


ding, and decision-making.


LAW 6725


-LAW
credits.


AND P


YCHIATRY SEMINAR


Discourse


intellectual


discip


stressing


psychoanalytic theory and application.


LAW 6235


-LAW


AND SOCIETY


SEMINAR


or 3 credits.


Advanced work


sprudence,


international


, or com-


parative law.






CURRICULUM


Curren

Problems

Law


Legal


Seminars

6936


The fo


owing


st of Current Legal Problems


seminars that have been


previously offered or may be available during the 1982-83 Academic Year at


the College of Law


These seminars are not permanent parts of the curriculum.


Students should consult the current Academic Year


hedule to determine the


availability of any of these seminars.

Conflict of Law Seminar


Employment Di


scrimination Seminar


Energy Law Seminar


Environmental


Law Seminar


Food and Drug Seminar


Genera


Aspects of


nternationa


Tax Law Seminar


Law and Constitutional Order in Ameri


can History Seminar


Law and Medicine Seminar
Mexican Program Seminar
Women and the Law Seminar
Workers' Compensation and Other Employment Rights Seminar


n~


lint'


D.A. .' .. C::







CURRICULUM


Prerequisite


Chart


Course


Prerequisite


Administrative


Law Seminar


- LAW 6525


Recommended: LAW 6520


Admiralty Seminar-6731
Civil Practice-LAW 6943


LAW 6


course


a prerequisite


students


planning


take


LAW


6940-C
term,
course


ems


vil Clinic during the summer
nd students enrolling in the


required


elves


commit


to enrolling in that sum-


mer
who


course.
have


Not
taken


open


to students


Criminal


(LAW 6942),


Lawyers as Negotiators


LAW 6930), Office and Pretria


Practice (LAW 6360), Tria


Advo


cacy


(LAW 6361


or Pract


Court (LAW


6942).


Civil Clinic-LAW 6940


Permission


instructor


open


to students on academic probation


or who


have


not completed


four


semesters of law study.


Required:


Civil


Practice


LAW


6943


for those students


who wil


enro


nic LAW 6940 during a


sum-


mer term.


Recommended:


6330.


open


have taken Criminal


6941


Crimina


Clinic


Evidence,
to students


Practice,
Law 694


LAW
who
LAW


Pre-Tria


6361


Advocacy,


, Lawyers as Negotiators,


LAW
LAW


6930 or Practice


Court, LAW 6362.


Civil Procedure Seminar-LAW 6330


LAW


5300 and law


5301


Commercial
Transactions


& Consumer


one


eminar LAW 6035


LAW 6010


6020
6050


)f the following:
Commercial Paper


Debtor-Creditor LAW 1


LAW
LAW


or Consumer Law, LAW 6040.


Constitutional L
Crnmmnnwpalth


in Britain and The


mlnar


LAW


5501


and LAW


5502


-I AW 7RtR


\r







CURRICULUM


Criminal Practice


- LAW 6941


NOt open
taken Ci


students


who


LAW


have
6940:


Lawyers as Negotiators,


LAW 6930;


Office


Pre-Trial


Practi


LAW
6361


6360;


Trial


or Pract


Adovocacy


, LAW


Court LAW 6362.


Crimina


Procedure Seminar


LAW 5100.


LAW 6113


Crimina


Clinic


-LAW 6942


Crimmal Practice


LAW 6941


Debtor-Creditor Law


-LAW 6051


Debtor-Creditor Law


LAW 6050.


Estate Planning-


LAW 6450


Estates
Fiduciary
Taxation


Trusts


Admin.


LAW


LAW


Gratuitou


6430;


6440 and
Transfers.


LAW 6620.


Estates &


Trusts


LAW 6430


Property I, LAW 5400
Recommended: Property


LAW


5401.


Estates &


sts Seminar


- LAW 6455


Estates &


Trusts


Recommended


ministration


LAW 6430


Fidu


LAW 6440


Evidence


-LAW 6330


Evidence Seminar-LAW 6335


Procedure
Procedure II


Evidence
Evidence


LAW


5300


LAW 5301


, LAW 6330 (Pre Fa


1981


LAW 6330 and Evidence


, LAW 6331).


Fam


y Law


seminar


- LAW 6715


Fam


y Law,


LAW 6710.


Federa


Practice


- LAW 6302


cedure


Procedure


LAW 5300 and LAW


Recommended:


Constitution


LAW 5501 and LAW 5502.


Federa


Taxation Seminar


-LAW 6605


Income
Fall 1981
6600, In


Taxation,
- Income


come


LAW


6600


Taxation


Taxation


LAW
LAW


6601) and others as announced from
time to time.


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