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Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00614
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: August 1984
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00614
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Copyright
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Table of Contents
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Main
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
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        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
    Index
        Page 116
        Page 117
    Back Matter
        Page 118
        Page 119
        Page 120
        Page 121
        Page 122
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TABLE


OF


CONTENTS


Administration ..
. . .


Law Administ

Law Administ
m.... . *


Foreign Exchange Facult
Center for Governmenta
Legal Information Cente
Legal Research and Writ


GENERAL INFORMATION ......
THE UNIVERSITY .........
The University-Past ...
The University-Present
THE COLLEGE OF LAW ...
A Short History ......
ADMISSIONS AND DEGREE REQ


ADMISSION


I


S-JURIS DOCTO


Preparation
Admissions I
Admissions I
ORIENTATION PROGR
REQUIREMENTS FOR
JOINT DEGREE PROG


for the Stud
Procedure
Requirement
IAM FOR BE
DEGREE-J.D
RAMS ....


CALENDAR .......
ADMINISTRATION
University
College of
THE FACULTY ....
College of
Emeriti ..


I.
me.


* C C St C S
* ataaat


mm....


Joint Degree Admissions/General Information


S.. .. . . . 44
S.. .. .. .. 46
. . .... .... .... e.. 46


Master
Master
Master
Master
Master
Doctor


REGI


Accounting


e.e.tt t C


Business Administration ................
Arts in Political Science-Public Administration
Arts in Sociology ........... ... ....
Arts in Urban and Regional Planning.. ..


Philosophy in History


a.....


STATION, FEES AND ACADEMIC POLICIES ..
REGISTRATION ..........................
FEES AND EXPEINSES ..................
ACADEMIC POLICIES ................. .
American Bar Association Standards .....
Student Employment ...................
Maximum and Minimum Loads........


S. . . 46
.. . ...... 46
a. .. ... .. 47


S. . . 47


47
S. .. . .. . .. .. 48
e m . .. .e.. a c. .m. .48
S. . .. ... .. .. ... 48
. .. .... 50
. . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
S. ...... ....... ... . 50

. ..... ... ..... . 50


ration . . . . . . .. . . . .... 11
S. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13
ration and Faculty ........................ 13
S. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . 30
y . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . 31
SResponsibility. ......... . . . . . . .. 31
r . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32
ting Program .. ..... .... .... . .. . .... 33
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. m .a 34
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . 34
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34
. . . . . . . . e . . . . . . . 34
. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . 35
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35
JIREMENTS ............... .... ... ..... 38
R a........ .. . .... ... ...... . 38
y of Law .. .. . . . . . . . . .. . .. 38
S........... .. 39
ts ............ .. ... .. ... ... 40
EGINNING STUDENTS ................... .... 44






4 /TABLE OF CONTENTS


Examinations ..
Delay in Taking E
Departure and Re
Jury Duty .....
Academic Honest
Official Notices


Exclusion for Aca
Reinstatement ..
LEGAL INFORMATION CEN
STUDENT PROGRAMS ANI
FINANCIAL AID-ENTE


Policy


Loans .........
Scholarships ...
Basis of Award .
Financial Assistan
How to Apply ..
Minority Applicar


* .. *.*.*. . ......... ...... * * * * * * * * 5
examinations .. ................. ................ 53
entry ... . . . . . . .... .. . . ..... . . .... . 54
en ry ... . . .. ................ .. ......... 54

y Guidelines .. ............... ................... 55
* .a a. * * *..*... * C S S C . a a..* . 5 6 a c * a a a c 56
demic Reasons .................................. 56
........ . .......... ................ ......... 57
JTER .......... ......... .................. ...... 58
D SERVICES .............. ... ................... 60
;RING J.D. STUDENTS ...a..... ..... ............ 60
. . ......... ... .. ..... .. . .. ... 60

. . ... .. .. . . . . ...... .... .... ..... 60
... ... .. ... ... .. ... ... .. ... ... .. ... .. 60


ice

its


SCHOLARSHIPS AND LO
SCHOLARSHIPS FOR AD
LOAN FUNDS FOR ADVA
SHORT-TERM LOAN FUN
HOUSING ............
SPECIAL PROGRAMS AND SEI
CENTER FOR GOVERNMI
CLINICAL PROGRAM ..
DISTINGUISHED VISITING


ENDOWED CHAIRS .
MINORITY AFFAIRS ..
PLACEMENT ........
INTERNATIONAL LAW
International Law
International Law


LAW


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . ... 61
S. . .. ag. .. . a a *. c... ... ... .. 61

. .. .. .. . .. ........e.... . . ....... 62
ANS ..... ... .....g c ..... . ... .... ..... .. .. 62
VANCED LAW STUDENTS ....................... 62
NCED LAW STUDENTS ......................... 64
DS ADMINISTERED BY THE COLLEGE OF LAW ... 65
. . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . ..... 66
VICES ........ aa.......... ........ ........... 66

ENTAL RESPONSIBILITY ................... .... 66
........................... ..... ... . ... .. ... 67
S6


G PROFESS


........
as eeee.. a


PROGRAMS
Society ....
Moot Court C


International Summer Law Progl
Cambridge-Warsaw Internationa
Mexican Summer Law Program
CENTER ASSOCIATION ......
Law Center Association Board o


;OR PROGRAM ...................... 68
S............. . .... .... ... ... ...... 68
. . . .. ...... . a *.e ..ta a a ..e..a . a.. 69
................. ... .. .. ... g .. .... 69
................ .. ..... . ..... ... .. 71

competitionn .......................... 71
rams ............ ................. 71
Il Trade Law Program ................. 71


f


ORGANIZATIONS, ACTIVITIES, HONORS A
John Marshall Bar Association ...
The Council of Ten .. .......
Black Law Student Association ..
Environmental Law Society .....
Spanish American Law Student As
A a *c t C..


S.,


................................... 71
................................... 72
trustees .................. ........ 73
ND AWARDS ..................... 74
.... ......... .............. ... 74
. . . ....... a c a a c c . . . c 74
............. ............. .. 74
. ....... . .a...... . ..... . .... 74
sociation .......................... 74







TABLE OF CONTENTS/5


CURRICULUM


. . ft . . . ... . . f 82


FALL CLASS ..... ..................
SPRING CLASS ......................
ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS ........
Legal Writing/Appellate Advocacy Re
SECOND- AND THIRD-YEAR REQUIRE
Professional Responsibility Requirem'
Seminar and Advanced Writing Requ


COURSE OFFERINGS BY AREA
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS ....
FIRST-YEAR COURSES .......
SECOND- AND THIRD-YEAR (
SELECTED LEGAL PROBLEMS
SEMINARS .................
CURRENT LEGAL PROBLEMS S


COURSESS



SEMINARS


DEVIATIONS, PREREQUISITES, AND COL


PREREQUISITE CHART ........
NUMERICAL COURSE LISTING
Juris Doctor Curriculum ...
THE TAX PROGRAM ...............
MASTER OF LAWS IN TAXATION


. . . . .. . . . . . .. . . 82
S. . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
S... .. .. ... .. .. ... 83
*quirements ............... 83
ENTS ................. ....... ... 83

ent ...itt ... ... . . . . . .. 83
lirement ..... .. . .... ... .... 83
S. . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
S. . . . . .. . . . .. . . 85
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
. . . . . . .. . .. . . .. .. . . 100
. . . . . . . . . . .. . ... .. 100

. . . . . .. ... . . . . . . . . 103
JRSE CANCELLATION ......... 103
........ .......... .. .... . .... 103


. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ... 1

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1
nancial Aid ................... ........ 1


Entering LL.M. in Taxation Fii


REQUIREMENTS FOR DEGREE-LL.M. IN TAXATION .......
Alphabetical Course Listing-Master of Laws in Taxation
LL.M. in Taxation ..... ................... ......


. . . . . . . 112


INDEX






CALENDAR


FALL SEMESTER


Februa


4:00 p.m


March 30,
1:00 p.m.


1984


, Wednesday


Last day to file application for admission.


Friday


Last day for those previously in attendance at
the University of Florida College of Law to reg-


sister during


he advanced registration period.


, Monday


. Last day


to file


completed


application


admission with advanced standing.


August 16,


Thursday


Last day for regular registration without being


subject to late fee of $25
ted to start registration (


16th after


.00. No one permit-
on Thursday, August


:00 p.m.


August 1(
Thursday


- Friday


College of Law orientation and registration for
fall entering class.


August 1


, Friday


Drop/Add begins.


August


, Monday


Classes begin.


Late registration begins.


All regis-


tration fees increased $25.00


August


, Friday


12:00 noon


Last time for


late registration for fall semester.


Last time for Drop/Add. Last day for
Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory option.


August


exerci


, Monday


2:30 p.m.


Last day for withdrawal with full refund.

All undeterred fee payments are due in full.
Anyone who has not paid fees or arranged to
pay fees with Student Financial Services by this


date will be subject to a $25


.00 late


charge.


September 3


Monday


Labor Day. Al


classes suspended.


September
4:00 p.m.


14, Friday


Last time for filing degree applications for a






CALENDAR


October 1
4:00 p.m.


, Monday


Last day to exercise automatic drop.


October 19 20
Friday, Saturday.


All classes suspended on Friday, Homecoming.


November


5-9


Advanced registration for Sprin


1985 Semester.


November


12, Monday


All classes


suspended,


Veterans


November
4:00 p.m.


14, Wednesday


Last day for withdrawing without rec


ving fail-


ing grades in all


courses. Last day for dropping


a course by petition


November


, Wednesday


All classes end.


November


Thursday


- Friday


Thanksgiving holidays.


November 26, Monday


Final examinations


begin.


December


December
10:00 a.m.


December
3:00 p.m.


, Friday . . . . . . . . . . Final examinations


13, Thursday


Grades for degree candidates due in the Office
of the Registrar.


14, Friday


Report of colleges on degree candidates due
in the Office of the Registrar.


December 15


, Saturday .. . .......... College o


Law Commencement Exercises.


December
9:00 a.m.


17, Monday


All grades due


in the Office of


Registrar.


SPRING


SEMESTER


1985


I


It v 9


Klnnr


I 3ct rI,\/ trn fib nnrlitln fEr


irlm iccd n frCr






CALENDAR


November 9
12:00 noon


, Friday


.. Last day for those previously in attendance at
the University of Florida College of Law to reg-
ister during the advanced registration period.


anuary 4


Friday


- Monday


Orientation and registration for entering


students.


january


, Monday


Last day for regular


registration without being


subject to late fee of $25.00.


January 8,


Tuesday


...................... Classes begin.


Drop/Add begins


January 11,
12:00 noon


January


Friday


Drop/Add ends. Last day for exerc
factory/Unsatisfactory Option.


, Monday


ng Satis-


Last day a student may withdraw and receive
full refund of fees.


January 1i
2:30 p.m.


January


, Tuesday


All undeferred fee payments are due in full.
Anyone who has not paid fees or arranged to
pay fees with Student Financial Services by this
date will be subject to a $25.00 late charge.


, Friday


2:30 p.m.


February
4:00 p.m.


Last day for filing degree application at the Office
of the Registrar for a degree to be conferred
at the end of the spring semester.


, Friday


........... Last day for changing any grade in the preced-


ing term.


If not made up,


grades of I or


become E.

Last day a student may withdraw and receive
a 25% refund of course fees.


February 1
4:00 p.m.


15,


Friday


. ............................ Last day to exercise automatic drop.






CALENDAR


, Monday


4:00 p.m.


Last day for withdrawing without receiving fail-


ing grades in all courses.


April 1


, Friday


classes end.


April 15,


Monday


Final examinations begin.


!6, Friday.

, Thursday


examinations end.


... .. . . . . . Repor


of colleges on degree candidates due


in the Office of the


Registrar.


, Friday


10:00 a.m.


. . . . . .............. Grades for degree candidates due in the Office
of the Registrar.


May 4,


Saturday


Commencement Exercises.


May 6,


Monday


0:00 a.m.


. All grades due


in the Office of


Registrar.


SUMMER


TERM


1985


March


, Friday


2:00 p.m.


Last day for


those previously in attendance


the University of Florida College of Law to reg-
ister during the advanced registration period.


17, Friday


2:00 p.m.


Last time for registration without being subject
to a late fee of $25.00. No one permitted to


start registration on Friday, May


7th after


12:00


noon.


May 20,


Monday


Classes begin.


Drop/Add begins. All registra-


tion fees increased $25.00 for students regis-
tering late.


, Wednesday


12:00 noon ...


Last time for completing registration for


Sum-


mer 1985 Term.


May 24,


Friday


2:30 p.m.


Last day for filing degree application at the Office
of Registrar for a degree to be conferred at the






CALENDAR


May 3


, Monday

, Friday .


Memorial Day. Classes suspended.

Last day for changing any grade assigned in


he preceding term.


not made up, grades of


become E.


Last day a student may withdraw from the Uni-


versity and receive a


refund of course


june 28


Friday


Last day for withdrawing without receiving fail-


ing grades in all courses.


July 4,


Thursday


Independence Day. Classes suspended.


uly 5


, Friday


asses


uly 8,


Monday


.. Final examinations begin.


Final examinations end.


17, Wednesday


4:00 p.m.


July 19


Grades for degree candidates due in the Office
of the Registrar.


.. Report of colleges on candidates for degree
due in the Office of the Registrar.


Friday


uly 22, Monday


10:00 a.m.


All grades for summer term due in the Office


of the Registrar.


, Saturday


........................ College Commencement Exercises.


15, Monday












ADMINISTRATION


UNIVERSITY


ADMINISTRATION


Marshal
John A.


Criser, J.D.


Nattress, Ph.D.


. . . . . . President
Executive Vice President


Rober


A. Bryan, Ph.D.


William D.


Elmore, B.S.


Vice President for
Academic Affairs
Vice President for


C.P.A.


Administrative


Affairs


David R.


Challon


er, M.D.


Vice President for


Health Affairs


C. Arthur Sandeen, Ph.D.


Vice President for


Student Affairs


Kenneth R.


Tefertiller, Ph.D.


... Vice President for
Agricultural Affairs
... Vice President for


Ardene Wiggins,


Alumni


& Development


COLLEGE OF


LAW


ADMI N ISTRATION


Frank T. Read, B.S.,


Dean


Jeffrey E.
Martin H.


Lewis


A.B., J.


Associate Dean


Belsky, A.B., J.D.


........ Director of the Center
for Governmental Responsibility


David M.


Richardson


LL.B.


LL.M . .......


Director


Mandie M.


James E.


Barnes


Dixon


B.A.. M.S.


A.B., M.A.


Graduate Tax Program
... Assistant Dean for


J.D.


Student and Minority Affairs
........ Assistant Dean for


J.D.


Jere H


Hudson


Academic Affairs
Assistant Dean for


B.E.. M.A.


Administration


Robert R.


Lindgren,


M.Phil.


,J.D.


Assistant Dean for


Deve


opment and Alumni


Affairs


Dixie


B. Miller, B.S.


Michael Patrick, B


M.S.E.


, Spec. in Ed.


.. .... Director of Placement
.......... Assistant Dean for
Admissions and Financial Aid


W.T.


Coram


M.A.E.


I ,


............... Coordinator of Continuing











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FACULTY


AND


ADMINISTRATION


KENNETH G. ANDERSON, Adjunct Lecturer. B.A., 1953, North


Carolina


.D., 1958,


George Washington. Professor Anderson


was a member of Law Review and Coif


Florida Bar. He has practiced


and is admitted to the


as a trial attorney with the Internal


Revenue Service and worked in private practice


in Jacksonville


since 1965.


FLETCHER N.


BALDWIN JR., Professor of Law.


, Georgia; LL.M.,


1962, Illinois; LL.M.


1968


Professor Baldwin


joined the Florida faculty in 1962. He was a


Fulbrigh


Professor at Makerere University in Kampala,


Uganda,


taught at Princeton and Brown Universities, both the Mexican
and Cambridge-Warsaw Summer Programs, and he has parti-
cipated extensively in international legal affairs. Professor Bald-


win was Executive Editor of the Law Journal
of Phi Beta Kappa, Phi Kappa Phi and Coif


and is a member
Admitted to the


Georgia Bar, his practice is primarily appellate. Professor Bald-


win's pr
criminal


principal


academic


procedure.


interests are constitutional


He will teach Constitutiona


Procedure; and serve as faculty advisor to Moot Court


Criminal
in 1984-


MANDIE M. BARNES, Assistant Dean for Student and Minority


Affairs.


, 1972,


Tougaloo;


M.S.,


1973,


Western


Illinois


, George Washington.


Dean Barnes is a native


Mississippi and joined the Florida administration in


983. She


a -


I


A.B.,


J.D.,


983. She






MARTIN H.


Temple;


BELSKY,
, 1968,


Associate Professor of Law. A.B


Columbia


Diploma,


., 1965,


Cambridge.


Professor Belsky joined the Florida faculty in 1982 as Director
of the Center for Governmental Responsibility. A member of the


Pennsyl
Temple.


vania and Florida Bars, he has taught at Georgetown and


Professor Belsky was


Editor


-in-Chief of the Columbia


Transnational Law Journal and an International Fellow.


He has


worked as Philadelphia's Assistant District Attorney and Chief
of Prosecutions, and later was in private practice and served as
Counsel to the U.S. House. He was Assistant Administrator before
coming to Florida. He will be teaching Professional Responsibility
and Constitutional Law in 1984-85.


GERALD T. BENNETT, Professor of Law. B.A.


1958


College


M.A.


962, Barry


Florida.


native Floridian and is admitted to the Florida Bar.


He is a
professorr


Bennett was a member of Coi
law after graduation. He was


and Phi Kappa Phi.


He practiced


a charter member of the Criminal


Law Section of the Florida Bar and was the


Professor Bennett's principal


1982 Chairman.


academic interests are litigation,


criminal procedure, and law and psychiatry. He will teach Crim-


inal Procedure; Tria


inar in


Practice, and the Law and Psychiatry Sem-


984-85.


GERTRUDE BLOCK, Writing Specialist,


M.A.T., 196


Florida.


Ms. Block has taught English,


Penn State;
Humanities


and Transformational Grammar. She has been Writing Specialist


at the College of Law since 1974.


sional interest is legal


Block's principal profes-


semantics. She teaches the Writing Clinic,


in connection with the legal research and writing program,
tutors J.D. and LL.M. candidates on an individual basis.


IRIS A. BURKE, Director, Legal Research and Writing Program.


B.A., Brooklyn College, NYC,
NYC, 1977. She was a men
Brooklyn Law School lourna


1967


, Brooklyn Law School,


iber of the editorial board of the


I ",I


International Law and of the


,


I







MARY ELLEN CALDWELL, Professor of Law. A.B., 1943, N


.S.C.L


.D., 1955, L.S.U.; LL.M.,
he Florida faculty in 197


959, Yale.


Professor Caldwell join


4. She has taught at Ohio State Uni-


versity, and is admitted to the Louisiana Bar and the U.S. Supreme
Court. Professor Caldwell was a member of the Board of Editors
of the Louisiana State Law Review and Coif. She clerked for
Judge Wayne G. Borah on the Fifth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals
before attending Yale as a Stering Fellow. At Yale, she was appointed


Research Associate and Lecturer. Professor Caldwe
Contracts; Evidence; Legislative Drafting Seminar; ar


Drug Law


II will teach
Id Food and


in 1984-85.


DENNIS A. CALFEE. Professor of Law. B.B.A.


968, J.


Gonzaga


LL.M.


1975


Florida. Professor Ca


joined the


ida faculty in


1975 and has twice been named Teacher of the


Year at the Law College. He has taught at the University of Leiden
in the Netherlands, is admitted to the Washington State Bar and


is a Certified Public Accountant.


Following graduation, Professor


Calfee clerked for the Washington State Court of Appeals. His
principal academic interest is taxation. He will teach Taxation of


Gratuitous
Income Ta


Transfers


nation


Income
984-85.


Taxation of


Estates &


Trusts


STUART A. COHN


Professor of Law. B.A.


1964,


Honors Schoo


of Jurisprudence,


Oxford; LL.B.,


1966


Yale. Professor Cohn joined the Florida faculty in


1977. He is


admitted to the Illinois Bar and practiced in Chicago from 1966-
1977. He was founding member and Director of the Chicago
Council of Lawyers and was a Director and General Council of
the Independent Voters of Illinois. He has served as a consultant


to the Florida Division of Securities. Professor Cohn


principal


professional interests center on the regulation of business enter


prise.


He will teach Corporations; Corporate Finance;


Securities


Regulation


and Franch


Enterprise Seminar


1984-85.


MARSHALL M. CRISER
sor of Law. B.S.B.A., 1


, President of the University and Profes-


949, J.D.,


Florida.


He became


President of the University in


984, following a distinguished


career as a practicing attorney in Palm Beach.


He has been


n :J_I _. r' I i-. i r I I P i I i






BARRY A.


CURRIER


Professor of Law. B.A.


p


1971, University of Southern California.


joined the Florida faculty in


1968, U.C.L.A.;
Professor Currier


1977. He has taught at Kentucky


and Duke, and is admitted to the California Bar. Professor Currier
was a member of Law Review and Coif. Following graduation,


he clerked for the U


Court of Appeals District of Columbia


Circuit and


later practiced


in Los Angeles.


Professor Currier


served as Acting Director of the Graduate Tax Program in 198


and 1984


. His principal academic interests are regulation,


and development of real property, and taxation.


Proper


and Advanced Property Seminar


c


He will teach
)84-85.


JEFFREY DAVIS, Professor of Law.


U.C.L.A.


1972,
Davis


Loyola Marymount;


LL.M.


joined the Florida faculty in


1973


, Michigan.


Professor


981. He has taught at New


York University,


Rutgers-Camden and the University of South


Dakota, and is admitted to the California Bar. At Loyola,


fessor Davis was a member of the St.


Thomas More Law Honor


Society,


Law Review, and was a Student


Teaching Fellow.


was a Cook Fellow at Michigan. His principal academic interests


are contracts, commercial,


law. Professor Dav


will tf


consumer banking and bankruptcy
each Creditors' Remedies; Banking


Regulations


Seminar


and Debtor-Creditor Law in 1984-85


GEORGE L. DAWSON


Professor of Law. A.B.


1966


Princeton


1969


, Chicago. Professor Dawson joined the Florida fac-


ulty ir


11


981 and was the Teacher of the Year in


and 1983.


He has taught at Oregon and Michigan,


and is admitted to the


Colorado Bar. Professor Dawson was an editor of the Chicago
Law Review. He is active in the Law School Admission Council
and is an adviser to the National Committee to Develop Joint
Technical Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing.


Professor Dawson


decedents'


principal interests are commercial law and


estates and trusts. He will teach Estates and Trusts;


Secured Transactions


and Social Science


Techniques Seminar


984-85.


JAMES E. DIXON,


Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs.


1972, Talladega


M.A.


, Notre Dame; M.A.


University of Ghana; J.D., 197;
ioined the Florida administration


Notre Dame.


in 1980.


Dean Dixon


A native of Tamna.






JAMES


FREELAND, Distinguished Service Professor. A.B.


,1950,


Duke; J.D
faculty in


1954, Florida. Professor Freeland joined the Florida


and directed the Graduate


Tax Program from


1977-82. He has taught at N.Y.U. and Arizona. Professor Free-
land is a Florida native and is admitted to the Florida Bar. He


has been recognized repeatedly


as an outstanding professor and


was named 1981 Outstanding Tax Lawyer by the Tax Section of
the Florida Bar. He was a member of the Law Review and Coif.
He was recently elected to the American College of Tax Counsel.


He will teach Income


Income


Tax of Trusts and Estates


Advanced Corporate Tax; and Corporate Tax in


984-85.


DONALD GIFFORD, Professor


of Law. B.A.


1973


Wooster


1976


Harvard.


Professor Gifford practiced


in Ohio for


several years prior to


joining the law faculty of the University of


Toledo. Professor Gifford will teach Civil Clinic; Criminal Liti-
gation; and Torts in 1984-85.


MANDALL GLICKSBERG, Professor of Law. B.A.,


1949


1951, Florida; LL.M.,
the Florida faculty in


1958


, N.Y.U. Professor Glicksberg joined


1953, has twice been recognized as an


outstanding professor, and has taught at N.Y.U. A native of Miami
Beach and a member of the Florida Bar, he was an editor of


Law Review.


Following graduation, he practiced law in Miam


Beach and later served as a member of the U.S. Air Force Judge
Advocate General's Department. Professor Glicksberg directed
the 1975 and 1981 revisions of the Florida Uniform Title Stan-


dards and serves as supervisor to


of the Florida Law Review.
Seminar; Land Transactions
erty Seminar in 1984-85.


He wil


he Title Standards Program
teach Property, Sports Law


and Finance


and Advanced Prop-


MICHAEL


W. GORDON


Professor of Law.


1957


1963, Connecticut; M.A.,


968, Trinity


de Droit Com-


pare,


1973,


Strasbourg.


Professor Gordon joined the Florida


faculty in 1968. He has been a visiting professor at Duke,


Frank-


I (






KERMIT L. HALL


, Associate Professor of History and Affiliate


Associate Professor of Law. B.A.,


Akron


M.A.


Syrac
1980


use;


Ph.D.,


1972,


Minnesota;


Master of Study of Law,


, Yale. Professor Hall joined the Florida faculty in


1981.


He has taught at Wayne State and Vanderbilt, is a director of the
American Society for Legal History, and is a recipient of numer-
ous grants and fellowships. His principal academic interests are


judicial selection and behavior, and U.S.
He will teach American Legal History in


constitutional history.
1984-85.


JEFFREY L. HARRISON,


Professor of Law.


1967


M.B.A


1968,


Ph.D.,


1970,


Florida;


1977


North Carolina.


member of the Texas


faculty


Bar, Professor Harrison joined the Florida


as a visiting professor in 1983. He has taught at Houston


and North Carolina.


He will teach Contracts; and Antitrust Law


in 1984-85.


DAVID M.
Wake Fores


HUDSON, Associate Professor of Law. B.S.,


)t


1974, Florida State; LL.M.,


1968,


1975, Florida;


LL.M.,
ulty in


1980, London. Professor Hudson joined the Florida fac-


1980.


He is admitted to the District of Columbia and


Florida Bars. Since graduation, he has served as Assistant Attor-
ney General with the Tax Section of the Florida Attorney Gen-


Office


and as


Department of Busines


Deputy General Counsel of the Florida
is Regulation. Professor Hudson's principal


academic interests are international taxation and tax policy. He


will teach


income


x; and Tax of Foreign


Income and Persons


984-85


JERE H.


1961
son j


HUDSON


, Nebraska; M


Assistant Dean for Administration. B. Ed.,
S., 1968, George Washington. Dean Hud-


oined the College of Law in 1973. He completed a career


with the U


Air Force in 1972 and won a Ford Fellowship to
__.. S i


K J






E. L. ROY HUNT, Professor of Law. B.A., 1955, Vanderbilt;


1960, M


Florida faculty in


ciate Dean


ppi; LL.M.,


962, Yale. Professor Hunt join


962 and has served as Assistant Dean


, Acting Dean and


ed the
Asso-


Interim Dean. A native of Ten-


nessee and a member of the Mississippi Bar,


Professor Hunt


taught at Mississippi and was a Fulbright Lecturer at South Korea's


Seoul
Missis


National University.


He was an Associate Editor of the


i Law Journal. He serves as President of the Florida


Trust for Historic Preservation and a member of Florida's Historic


Preservation Advisory Council. He


will teach International La


Conflict of Laws


Patent,


Trademark


& Copyright Law;


and His-


toric Preservation Law Seminar in


1984-85.


THOMAS R. HURST, Professor of Law. A.B.


Wisconsin


1969, Harvard. Professor Hurst joined the Florida facu


in 1974. He is a member of the


Wisconsin Bar and has taught


at Texas. Following graduation, he worked in the Solicitor's Office


of the U.S. Labor Department and practiced in Milwaukee


1971-1974.


He has served as


consultant to the U.S.


from
energy


Department, the Solar Energy Research Institute and the Center


for Governmental R
research interests are


responsibility.


Professor Hurst's prince


contracts, corporations and antitrust law.


He will teach Corporate Finance and Reorganiz


Seminar; Corporations


and Ant


itrust Law


ation; En
984-85.


ergy Law


STANLEY N.


College
faculty


in 1972.


INGBER
, 1972,


Professor of Law. B.A.


Yale. Professor


Ingber


, 1969, Brook


joined the Florida


A native of Brooklyn and a member of the New


York Bar, he has ta
Boston. He was on
row Wilson Fellow.


iught at


Illinois


, San Diego,


Tennessee and


the Yale Law Journal and is a former Wood-


Professor


Ingbe


r's prin


academic inter


ests are constitutional law, criminal law, jurisprudence, criminal


procedure and torts. He will teach Constitutional Law


Criminal


Procedure; Jurisprudence;


and a


seminar


in Law


& Literature


during


984-85.


ERNEST M. JONES, Professor of Law. B.B.A.


1949


LL.B.


Mississi
faculty
at Missi
principc


J.S.D.,


in


1965, Yale. Professor Jones


joined the Florida


1954. A member of the Mississippi Bar, he has taught


ssippi, George Washington and Denver. Professor


academic interests are administrative law


and con-


El


al






JULIAN C.


jUERGENSMEYER,


Professor of Law. A.B


I.D., 1963, Duke; Cert. D'Etudes Polit., 1960,


Bordeaux


., 1959,
, France;


Diplomas
Professor


& II Comparative Law, 1968-69, Strasbourg, France.


uergensmeyer joined the faculty in


practiced in Cleveland and taught at


1972.


Indiana University,


He has
Tulane


and Ethiopia


Haile Selassie I University. He was on the Duke


Law Journal and is a member of Coif. Professor juergensmeyer
directs the Cambridge-Warsaw International Trade Law Program


and co-directs the Agricultura


y; Agricultural


Advanced Property Seminar


OSEPH R. JULIN,


Law Center. He will teach Prop-


Land Use Planning and Control


984-85.


Professor of Law and Dean Emeritus.


1950, J.D., 1952, Northwestern.


Professor Julin


oined the Flor


ida faculty in 1971 and served as Dean from 1971-80. A native


of Chicago and member of the


Illinois


and Michigan Bars, he


was Professor and Associate Dean at Michigan until 1970. He
was Associate Editor of the Northwestern Law Review and is a


member of Coif


After graduation, he practiced in Chicago and


lectured at Northwestern. Professor Julin serves as President of


the Association of American Law


Schools.


He will teach Prop-


Natural Resources; and Future


Interests in 1984-85.


JEFFREY E.
1966, J.D.,


LEWIS
1969.


Associate Dean and Professor of Law.


Duke.


Dean Lewis joined the Florida faculty


in 1972 and has been Associate Dean since 1982


A native of


Ohio and a member of the Ohio Bar, he taught at Akron, and
was in private practice in Ohio. He has served as a consultant
to the Florida State Court's Administrator and as an arbitrator in
the aluminum and steel industries. He was named 1977 Out-


standing Law Professor. He


is presently serving a three year term


on the Accreditation Committee of the Association of American


Law Schools.


He will teach Evidence


and Evidence Seminar in


984-85.


STEPHEN A. LIND, Professor of Law.


962, i


1965


Cal., Berkeley
ida faculty in


N.Y.U


Professor Lind joined the Flor-


A native of California and a member of the


California Bar, he will be on leave at Hastings College in the fall






ROBERT R. LINDGREN, Assistant Dean and Lecturer. B.S.B.A.,


1976


,J.D


, Florida; M.Phil.,


1978, Oxford. Dean Lind-


gren was named Assistant Dean for Development and Alumni
Affairs in 1982 and has served as Campaign coordinator for the
College's Law Center Building Campaign. He is admitted to the


Florida


Bar and


coordinates


the College's


external


activities


including fundraising,


continuing legal education and alumni


activities.


While


in law school,


he served as an


istant to


University President Robert Q.


Marston.


JOSEPH W. LITTLE, Professor of Law.


Duke


1961
Little


Worcester


Polytechnic; J.D.,


963, Michigan.


Professor


oined the Florida faculty in 1967. He is admitted to prac-


tice in Florida, Georgia, the District of Columbia and Michigan.
He was a member of the Gainesville City Commission from
1973-77, serving as mayor from 1975-76, and has been actively


involved with environmental and public safety issues.


He will


teach Torts; Local Government Law, Finance and Taxation


ish and Commonwealth Constitutional Law Seminar


and serve


as Law Review facu


ty advi


sor in


984-85


W. D. MACDONALD, Professor of Law. B.A.,


Toronto; Barr. at Law,


1936


939, Osgoode Hall, LL.M.,


, LL.B.
1947,


1939


1956, Michigan. Professor Macdonald came as a visiting pro-


fessor in


1948 and stayed on after


State Board of Control to hire him.


his students petitioned the
A native of Nova Scotia, he


was a member of the Ontario Bar until becoming an American


Citizen in


1951. He was a Ford Foundation Fellow in Europe


and Brazil, a Harvard Research Scholar


and a Fulbright


in Inter-American Affairs


Scholar in Brazil. He has taught in French (Cam-


A


*-aw


- -


bodia and Luxembourg) and in Portuguese


Fiduciary Administration


Estates & Trusts


Brazil


minar;


He will teach
and Conflict


of Laws in


1984-85.


ROBERT T. MANN, Professor of Law.


, Florida; M.A.


946, J.


, 1948, George Washington; LL.M.,


Harvard; LL.M.,


1968,


LL.D.


1979


Stetson


fessor Mann joined the Florida faculty in


974. A member of


the Florida and Massachusetts Rars he was a Florida Statp Rpn-







TONI MASSARO,
Northwestern; J.D.,


Visiting Assistant Professor.


, 1977,


980, William and Mary. Professor Massaro


was Editor-in-Chief of Law Review and a member of Coif. She
has practiced in Chicago and taught at Washington and Lee.
Her principal academic interests are labor law, private associ-


ation law, and school


Professor Massaro will teach Ci


Procedure; Evidence; and Public Education Law Seminar in 1984-
85.


FRANCIS T. McCOY, Professor of Law. B.A.,
J.D., 1955, Florida. Professor McCoy joine(
in 1955. A member of the Florida Bar, he w


M.A.


d the Florida faculty


as in the U


Army


Reserve from 1942-1972, served in the U.(
and later was a Sterling Graduate Fellow at Yale.


principal


. Foreign Service
Professor McCoy's


academic interests are admiralty, family law, legal his-


tory and comparative law. He will teach Legal History;


Admir-


Admira


ty Law


Seminar


and Family Law in


984-85


STEPHAN P. MICKLE


1965


M.Ed.


, 1966,


, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Law. B.A.,
J.D., 1970, Florida. Professor Mickle has


been an Alachua County Judge since 1979. Prior to graduation


from law
Public Ins
Federal


school,
itruction.


Office


he taught for the Brevard County Board of


After graduation,


Economic


he was staff attorney in


Opportunity,


I


Gainesville, and joined the Florida faculty in


practice(
1971.


Professor


Mickle's principal


academic interests are lega


tional law, and trial practice.


He wil


ethics, constitu-


teach Practice Court in


1984-85


C. DOUGLAS MILLER, Professor of Law. B


Kansas; LL.M.,


1962


966, N.Y.U. Professor Miller joined


,1965,


the Florida


faculty in
rrrtiro,,4


A member of the Kansas and Florida Bars


1QnKmIQ17; tta nnht tat Arlnirntan


.


in thn h ink ,,A/nt Crrr'n






DIXIE MILLER, Director of Placement, B.S.,


1973, Florida. Ms.


Miller has worked as personnel technician for the


Trainin


Development and Central Employment sections of the University


of Florida Personnel Division


A native of Florida, she has been


with the College of Law since 1976, handling placement of both
J.D. and LL.M. graduates. Ms. Miller is active in the National


Association for Law Placement at the


regional and national lev-


els. She is currently serving as Southeastern Regiona
nator for the National Association for Law Placement.


Coordi-


JON MILLS,
Stetson; J.D.


Adjunct Asso


ciate Professor of Law.


B.A., 1969,


1972, Florida. Professor Mills was a member of


Law Review and Coif
for Governmental Re!


. He served as the Director of the Center
sponsibility and the Executive Impound-


ment Project. He is admitted to the Florida Bar and has practiced
in Gainesville since 1981. He has been a member of the House


of Representatives, State of Florida since
selected Speaker-Designate for the 198(


1978 where he was


)-1988 Term


He will


teach a seminar in Legislative Drafting in 1984-85


ROBERT B. MOBERLY, Professor


Law. B


963, J.


,1966,


Wisconsin. Professor Moberly joined the


Florida faculty in 197


A member of the Wisconsin and Tennessee Bars, he served as
arbitrator, mediator and administrative law judge with the Wis-


consin Employmen


Relations


Commission and later practiced


with a Milwaukee firm. He has taught at


Tennessee, Louvain,


Belgium, and the Polish Academy of Sciences. Professor Mob-


early was


on the Wisconsin Law Review. After graduation,


clerked for the Wisconsin Supreme Court. His principal aca-


demic interests are labor law and


teach Labor Law


Public Sector-Labo


conflict
r Relation


resolution. HI
ns: Labor Law


e will
Sem-


and Lawyers as Negotiators in


1984-85.


ROBERT C. L. MOFFAT, Professor of Law.


LL.B.,


1962, Southern Methodist; LL.M.,


B.A.
1966


1958


M.A.


, Sydney. Pro-


fessor Moffat joined the Florida faculty in 1966. A member of


the Texas Bar, he was Russell Sage Resident at Cal.,


Berkeley,


* *






MICHAEL J. MOORHEAD, Professor of Law. B.S., 1966, George


Washington; J.D., 1
the Florida faculty in


969, Howard. Professor Moorhead joined
1978. A member of the District of Colum-


bia Bar, he has taught at Howard and Richmond, has served as
Executive Director and President of the Council on Legal Edu-
cation Opportunity, member of the Board of Trustees of the Law
School Admission Council. Professor Moorhead was Editor-in-


Chief of the Howard Law Journal. After graduation,


he clerked


=11
a'"t >4>


for Judge Spottswood W.


Robinson


III on the U


Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.


Court


He will teach Labor


Property;


Administrative Law


Seminar; and Administrative


Law in 1984-85.


WINSTON P. NAGAN, Professor of Law. B.A.


South


Africa; B.A. (J
1970, MM. L.,


uris),


1966


1970, Duke


joined the Florida faculty


M.A.


.S.D.


in 1975


(Juris),


, Oxford; M.C.L.


, 1977, Yale. Professor Nagan
. A naturalized American cit-


izen, he was a


ames B. Warburg Fellow to the University Con-


sortium for World Order and has taught at Virginia Polytechnic,


Valparaiso and DePau


Professor Nagan


principal academic


interests are private international law, domestic relations, civil
procedure, jurisprudence, human rights and international law.


He will teach Jurisprudence; Family Law; Conflict of Laws


Inter-


national


Business Law


and Sports Law Seminar in 1984-85.


GENE NICHOL, Professor of Law. B.A.


1976,


, Oklahoma State;


Texas. Professor Nichol was a member of Coif has


been admitted to practice


in Alaska.


After practicing several


years in Alaska and Ohio, he taught at West Virginia and William


and Mary. His principal


academic interests are civil procedure


and civil rights. He will teach Constitutional Law; Federal Prac-
tice; and Remedies in 1984-85.


MICHAEL A. OBERST, Associate Professor of Law. B.B.S., 1963,
J.D., 1968, Florida. Professor Oberst joined the Florida faculty
in 1979. He was a member of Law Review, and is admitted to


nractice


in California and the District of Columbia.


Following






J. MICHAEL PATRICK, Assistant Dean for Admissions and Finan-


cial Aid.


B.S.E.,


, 1970,


Specialist in Ed.,


1975


Drake. Mr. Patrick joined the Florida administration in 1980. He


was employed in the Iowa public


school system and Des Moines


Area Community College.


He later served


as a state officer


the Iowa Personn


and Guidance Association of College Adm


sions Counselors. He is currently active with the Law School
Admissions Council, the Florida Association of Collegiate Regis-


trars and Admissions Officers, and the American


Association of


Collegiate Registrars and Adm


missions


Officers.


RICHARD N.
igan; LL.B.,


PEARSON


Professor of Law. B.B.A.


1956, Boston University;


1950


LL.M


Mich-
. Pro-


fessor Pearson joined the Florida faculty in 1982.


A member of


the New Hampshire and Massachusetts Bars, he practiced for
six years in Concord, New Hampshire, and taught at Connecticut
and Boston University. He was Comment Editor of the Boston


Law Review.


Professor Pearson


principal academic interest is


torts.


He will teach


Products Liability


and Criminal Law


in 1984-85


DON C. PETERS


Professor of Law. B.A.


Northern Iowa


J.D.,
1973.


1968, Iowa.


Professor Peters joined the Florida faculty


A member of the Florida


Iowa


, and Colorado Bars, he


was a Fulbright
pur, Malaysia,


Scholar at the University of Malaya,


Kuala Lum-


was a Reginald Heber Smith Community Law


Fellow and has lectured at Colorado. He


was Comment Editor


of the Law Review and a member of Coif. He later


clerked for


W. E.


Doyle of U


.S. District Court, Denver. He has practiced


law in Miam


, Florida and in Boulder, Colorado.


He wil


teach


Civil Procedure


Civil Clinic


and Civ


Litigation


1984-95


JAMES R. PIERCE,


Professor of Law.


961, J.


, 1965,


Florida.


Professor Pierce joined the Florida faculty in


established the College of Law


clinics and has served


as Director


of Clinics


since


1968.


He served


as the first Assistant Public


_1






WALTER PROBERT, Professor of Law. B


1949


, J.D.,


a


Oregon


faculty in 19


.S.D., 1957, Yale.


Professor Probert joined the Florida


9. A member of the Oregon Bar, he practiced in


Portland, taught at Case Western Reserve, Northwestern, Den-
ver, Washington, and Texas, and served as Director of the National


Science Foundation Law and Social Science Program.


He has


received the Blue Key Distinguished Teacher Award and also
teaches in the College of Medicine. He was a member of Law


Review, Coif,
sional Respon


and St. Ives.


sibility


He will teach


and Torts


urisprudence


Profes-


984-85


JAMES C. QUARLES, Professor of Law. B.A.


Virginia.


942, J.


Professor Quarles joined the Florida faculty in


1945,
1969.


He began teaching at Mercer in


Mercer Law School from


956-69


947 and was Dean of the
He is a member of the fed-


eral, Georgia and Virginia Bars and of the American Law Institute,
and served as Executive Director of the Florida Law Revision
Commission. Professor Quarles was Senior Editor of the Virginia
Law Review and was elected to membership in Coif. After grad-


uation


he clerked for Chief


udge John


Parker of the U.S.


Court of Appeals.
and constitution
Criminal Law in 1


His principal academic interests are criminal
law. He will teach Consitutional Law; and


984-85.


FRANK T. READ, Dean and Professor of Law. B


1960, Brigham


Young;


D., 1963,


Duke.


Dean Read joined the Florida faculty


He was Dean and Professor at both Tulsa and


Indiana


University-Indianapolis,
Professor at Duke. He i;


Assistant


Dean


Associate Dean and


s a member of the Minnesota,


Missou


New York and Oklahoma Bars, the American Law Institute and
a fellow of the American Bar Foundation. He was a member of


the Law journal and Coif.
was an attorney with AT&"


He practiced in Minnesota and later
r. He is President of the Law School


Adm


missions


Council.


He will teach Professional Responsibility in


1984-85.


DAVID M. RICHARDSON


Professor of Law and Director of


Graduate
^-. S I .


Tax Program.


Rensselaer


LL.B.


. > - > i> I r V. .1.........


1& J





EDWARD SAWYER, Visiting Assistant Professor. B.B


1980,


Western


Illinois;


1983,


LL.M


., 1984,


Florida.


Sawyer is admitted to practice in Florida and is a certifi


Professor
ed public


accountant. He will teach Corporate Taxation; Legal Accounting;
and Taxation of Gratuitous Transfers in 1984-1985.


CHRISTOPHER SLOBOGIN
1973, Princeton; J.D., 197;


, Assistant Professor of Law. A.B.,


7, LL.M.,


1979


, University of Vir


ginia.


Professor


Slobogin joined the Florida faculty in


982. A


member of the Virginia Bar, he taught at Virginia and directed


the University


Forensic Evaluation Training and Research Cen-


ter. He is also a reporter for the American Bar


Association's


Crimina


justice Standards. His


principal academic interests are


juvenile law, criminal procedure and law and the behavioral


sciences. Professor


Slobogin will teach Civil Procedure; Law and


Psychiatry


Seminar


and Criminal Procedure


984-85.


DAVID T. SMITH


Boston.


Professor of Law. B.A.


Professor Smith


Admitted to practice in


joined the


Florida


Massachusetts and


Supreme Court, he taught at Indiana,


,Yale; J.
faculty


before the


Duquesne and Case


ern Reserve. He received the Florida Blue


Key Distingu


1960,
1968.
U.S.
West-
lished


Faculty


Award in


1974.


Professor Smith is a member of the


American Law


institute, the American Judicature Society, and


Florida Blue Key. He was Articles Editor of the Boston Law Review


and is a member of Coif


His principal academic interests are


in the area of estates and trusts. He will teach Estates


Trusts;


Future Interests; Fiduc
Seminar in 1984-85.


iary Administration


and Estates


& Trusts


ANNE


L. SPITZER,


Assistant


Professor


Swarthmore; M.A., Ph.D.,


1966, Harvard


1975


Iowa.


Professor Spitzer joined the Florida faculty in 1979. She


s admit-


ted to the Florida and Iowa Bars and several federal Bar circuits.
She practiced in Iowa and later taught at the University of Iowa.






GRACE W. BETTYY


TAYLOR, Professor of Law, Director, Legal


Information Center. A.B.


1962


Florida.


1949


M.A.


Professor Taylor joined


, 1950, Florida State; J.D.,
the Florida faculty in 1950


and has held various positions in the University Library and the
Law Library She serves on the Executive Board of the American


Association of Law Libraries


, Solinet, WESTLAW Advisory Board,


the American Bar Association Law Library Committee, and the


University of Florida


Task Force on Use of Computer in Edu-


cation. Professor Taylor was Research Editor of the Florida Law


Review. She was elected as an alumnus


~.. Key and Phi Beta Kappa.


to Coif, Florida Blue


She will teach Computers and Law in


984-1985.


WINNIE F. TAYLOR, Associate Professor of Law,


Grambling State


J.D.,


1975,


Buffalo; LL.M.,


Professor Taylor joined the Florida facu


Wisconsin.
A native of


Louisiana and a member of the New York Bar, she practiced in
Rochester for several years. She serves as consultant to the Credit
Union National Association and a number of state credit union
leagues on federal credit regulations compliance. Professor Tay-
lor is a member of the Federal Reserve Board's Consumer Advi-
sory Council. Her principal academic interests are consumer,


contract and commercial


College in


She will be on leave at Hastings


984-85.


MARY POE TWITCHELL,


Hollin
1982,


.


i; M.
Yale.


Assistant Professor of Law. B.A.


,1970, North Carolina; J.D.,


1977, Florida


1966
LL.M.


Professor Twitchell joined the Florida faculty in 1982.


A member of the Florida Bar, she practiced in Gainesville three
years. She was Articles Editor of the Florida Law Review, a mem-


ber of Coif and Omicron Delta Kappa.


Professor


Twitchell's


principal


academic interests are civil procedure and torts. She


will teach Federal Practice: Civil Procedure: and Civil Procedure


Seminar


984-85.


W. SCOTT VAN ALSTYNE, JR., Professor of Law. B.A.


1948


Buffalo


Van Alstyne


.,.1953, S.J.D.


1954


joined the Florida faculty in


Wiscor
1972.


isin. Professor
A member of


the Wisconsin Bar, he practiced in Milwaukee and has taught






KATHLEEN WAITS


, Assistant Professor of Law. A.B., 197


nell; J.D.,


1975, Harvard.


Professor Waits joined the Florida


faculty in 1979. A member of the District of Columbia,


Illinois


and Florida Bars, she practiced in Washington for the Solicitor's
Office of the U.S. Labor Department and has taught at American
University. Professor Waits' principal academic interests are civil


procedure, professional responsibility, and


sex discrimination.


teach


Professiona


Professional Respon


Responsibility


sibility Seminar; and


Sex-Di


Procedure;
scrimination


Seminar


in 1984-85.


WALTER O. WEYRAUCH


Professor of Law. Dr.


ur. 1951


Frank-


furt Main
Harvard;


, Germany; LL.B.,


Florida faculty in


1962,
1957.


1955, Georgetown


esso


r Weyrauch


LL.M


joined the


He is a native of Germany and


admitted to the German Bar and the U.S. Court of Appeals of


the Allied High Commission,


Germany. He has taught at Yale,


Rutgers


Newark),


Berkeley and Frankfurt. He is a Honorarpro-


fessor of Law at the University of Frankfurt. He received the


Florida Blue


Key Distinguished Faculty Award in


983, and he


is a member of the Board of Editors of the American Journal of
Comparative Law and of the Family Law Quarterly. He will teach


Business Orl
Comparative


ganizations


Family


Legal


Counseling;


in 1984-85.


WINTON E. WILLIAMS. Professor of Law. B.B.A.


, Tulane;


LL.B.


1962


issippi


LL.M.,


joined the Florida faculty in


He is


ale. Professor Williams
a native of Mississippi


and a member of the Mississippi Bar. Professor Williams


was on


the Mississippi Law Journal and was Chairman of the Moot Court
Board. After graduation, he practiced in his home state. His


principal


academic interests are commercial transactions and


debtor-creditor law.


actions in the fal


He will teach Sales; and Secured Trans-


term and be on leave during the spring.


STEVEN J. WILLIS,


Associate Professor of Law. B


1974


L.S.U


LL.M.


1980


N.Y.U. Professor Willis


joined the


Florida faculty in


He is


admitted to the Louisiana Bar,


a certified public accountant in Louisiana, and has


taught at


was











EMERITI


VERNON W. CLARK, Professor of Law Emeritus. A.B.E.,


1932, J.D.


1942


Florida


M.S.,


1939


N.Y.U.


Professor Clark joined the Florida faculty in 1946 and was a faculty member


for approximately 30 years. A native Floridian and a member of the Florida Bar, he served
as a District Supervisor for the Florida Probation and Parole Commission and as a State


Auditor. Prior to entering the College of Law


as a student, he was Supervising Principal of


Tallah


assee


schools.


Professor Clark is an honorary member of Co


, Florida Blue Key


and the American Trial Lawyers Association.


He taught in the areas


criminal law,


criminal


procedure, taxation and municipal corporations.


DEXTER DELONY, Professor of Law Emeritus. B


1937


LL.B.


Alabama


LL.M.,


Harvard.


practice,


Professor Delony joined the Florida faculty in


an attorney with the federal government, and taught at the


was in private


Pennsylvania Wharton


School of Finance, and the University of Denver College of Law. He has served as consultant


to committees of the U.S.


Congress, and is a member of the labor arbitration panels of the


Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service, the American Arbitration Association,


and the


U.S. Postal Service.


Professor Delony


principal academic interests are labor law and com-


mercial law.


HENRY A. FENN, Distingu


ished


Service Professor and Dean Emeritus.


1932


Dean Fenn joined the


Florida faculty in


948 as Dean and served until 1958


in that capacity. He practiced in New York City and has taught at Yale,


Vanderbilt


North


Carolina


KENNETH B.


and Southern California.


His principal academic interest


HUGHES, Professor of Law Emeritus. B.A.,


is estates and trusts.


LL.B.


Southern Cal.


LL.M.,


1951


, S.J.D.,


1961, Harvard. Professor Hughes joined the Florida facu


ty in 1968


and has been named Outstanding Teacher of the Year on several occasions. He has taught


at Southern Cal.


U.C.L.A


., Puerto Rico, Boston University, Boston College and


Indiana at


Bloomington. He is a member of the California, District of Columbia,


and practiced fifteen years in Los Angeles and Beverly Hills.


and Puerto Rico Bars


Professor Hughes was a Brandeis


Fellow and member of Coif


, and served as Admiralty Counsel to the U


Maritime Com-


mission.
cedure.


His principal academic interests are evidence, federal practice and criminal pro-
He will teach Criminal Procedure and Evidence in 1984-1 985.


RICHARD B.


STEPHENS, Professor of Law Emeritus.


1939


Rochester


LL.B.


1942


Michigan. Professor Stephens joined the Florida faculty in


Outstanding Professor in


was selected as the first


1965, and received the Florida Blue Key Distinguished Faculty







of the Florida, New York and various federal Bars, and has served on the faculties of Cornell,


Texas and the University of The South.


Professor Ward retired in 1979.


DAVID WEISS, University Librarian Emeritus. S.B.,


Pittsburgh


Harvard.


Professor Weiss


oined the Legal


Information Center


969, and was appointed Affiliate


Professor of Law in 1976. After practicing law in Pennsy


vania from


1940 to 1955, h


e was


employed as a


Tax Administrator in Denver through


969. He served


as a labor arbitrator


for the United Steel Workers of America, Kai


ser Aluminum


& Chemical Corp. and Bethlehem


Steel Corp., is a member of Beta Gamma Sigma, a life member of American Association


of Law Libraries, and taught Legal Writing and Research.


Professor Weiss


retired in


1982.


FOREIGN


EXCHANGE


FACULTY


JAN F.M. GIELE, Professor of Law, University of Leyden. Professor Giele has been associated


with the University of Leyden since 1964 where he has taught tax law. At present, he


serves


as aj


justice in the Superior Court of 's-Hertogenbosch,


Court of Appeals.


He will teach Current Federal Tax Problems


Tariefcommiss


in the


and the Central


fall term


PATRICK KILBRIDE, Professor of Law. LL.B., 1
Kilbride taught at Canterbury and Otago prior


960; LL.M.


New Zealand.


Professor


oining the faculty at Monash University.


For the past three years he has served as Sub-Dean of Graduate Studies.


principal


academic interests are administrat


CENTER


criminal law,


FOR


and environmental law.


GOVERNMENTAL


RESPONSIBILITY


C. DAVID COFFEY,


Assistant Director. B.A.


Florida.


Mr. Coffey joined


the CGR staff in 1981 and has served as the Director of the


Energy Law Program and Local


Government Law Program. He is a member of the Florida Bar, Gulf Universities


Research


. 1 ri







Director of the Legal Research for the Crystal River
will teach a seminar in Water Law in 1984-1985.


Manatee Management Plan Project. He


MARY HILKER,


Assistant Director. B.A.,


1968


M.A.


South Florida


Ph.D.


, 1983,


Florida.


Dr. Hilker


serves


as Assi


stant in Sociological Research and has been associated with


CGR


since 1980. Her principal academic interests are the sociology of aging, sociology of


the family


juvenile justice. She is affiliated with the Florida Council on Family Relations,


Southern Gerontological Society and American


biological


Association.


ELIZABETH McCULLOCH


Assistant Director. B.G


1972


, Michigan


Duke.


Ms. McCulloch is the Director of both the Enforcement of Court-Ordered Child Support


Project and Family Law Program,


and a member of the Florida


supreme Court Matrimonial


Law Commission


Sub-committee.


Prior to joining CGR she was a staff attorney with Jack-


sonville Area Legal Aid.


LEGAL


INFORMATION


CENTER


ARTHUR DON NELLY,


Assistant Librarian.


1972


, Georgia; M.L.


1974


, Ed.D.,


1978


Vanderbil


Dr. Donnelly


oined the


Legal


Information Center staff in


and is


responsible for Media Services. Prior to coming to Florida he was Coordinator of Library


Services
College.


at New River Community College,


Virginia and Head of Media


vices at Georgia


CAROL FELTZ,


Assistant Librarian.


Florida


M.L.S.


, 1980, Florida State.


Feltz joined the Legal Information Center staff in 1977
Catalog Department and became Assistant Librarian, A


as Library Technical Assistant in the
acquisitions Department in 1982. Her


professional affiliations include the Special Libraries


Assoc


iation and the University of Florida


Librarians


Association.


SUSY GILMAN


Assistant Librarian.


1974


, Florida; M.


1975


Florida State. Ms.Gilman


has been with the Legal


Information Center since


1979.


serves


as Assistant Librarian


with responsibility for the Circulation and


Interlibrary Loan Departments.


CAROLE GROOMS, Assistant Librarian.


Southern Methodist


., 1974,


Florida State.


Ms. Grooms


joined the Legal


Information Center in 1974.


She serves as Head


of the Catalog Department.







LEGAL


RESEARCH


AND


WRITING


PROGRAM


MARTIN ASH LEY,


Assistant Director. B.A.


Lake Forest


1976


Illinois.


Mr. Ashley


is admitted to the Bars of I llinois


and Kentucky and was a m


ember of Law Review. He has


worked for


seven


ral years


as a criminal appeals


attorney.


LYNNE CAPEHART,


Assistant Director.


, 1962


Oklahoma


Florida.


Capehart has been involved in legal research projects in the areas of energy and en


viron-


mental law. Ms. Capehart is a member of the Florida Bar and the American Bar Associations.


She was appointed by the Gainesville City Commission t
mittee which developed an energy element to the city


:o a Citizens Energy Advisory Com-
's comprehensive plan; she served


as chairman of that committee for two years. She also


serves


as a member of the Governin


Board of the St.


Johns


River Water Management District.


GEORGE GRAMBLING


Assistant Director.


B.A., 1980, Emory


, 1983


Florida.


Grambling was a member of the Council of Ten and Moot Court. He clerked for Judge R.


A. Green of the 8th Judicial Circuit prior to joining the Legal Resea
and has published several articles in the area of environmental lay


rch and Writing Program


SHERRY HIEBER, Assistant Director. B.A.,


1977


Vermont;


Florida.


Ms. Hieber


is a member of the Florida Bar and American Bar


Association.


-I -~ -P I -


I I











GENERAL


INFORMATION


The


University


and


the


College


Law


The University


- Past


The University of Florida is a combined state University and land-grant college located


in the


northern center of the state. Its beginning is traced back to privately-owned Kingsbury


Academy, established in 18


he Civil War.


53, and merged with state-owned East Florida Seminary following


A few years later the passage of the Morril Act provided lands for state


institutions of higher learning which would promote agriculture, mechanical arts and military


science


, resulting in the beginnings of the College of Agriculture, the


College of Engineering


and the Agricultural Experiment Station.


By 190


there were a half-dozen state-supported institutions of higher learning in Florida,


located in various parts of the state and struggling for existence.


At that time, the Florida


Legislature took a step unprecedented in the history of education in any state by passing
the Buckman Act, which abolished the six State Colleges and provided for the establishment
of two new institutions, of which the University of Florida was one. It was established for


men


at Gainesville


, and placed under the direction of the Board of Control, a body created


by the Buckman Act.


The seven members of the board represented the seven geographical


sections of the state, and served without compensation except for


expenses incurred in the performance of duty.


ravel and incidental


1947, the University was made coedu-


national. The thirteen member Board of Regents replaced the Board of Control in 196


addition


regent has represented students since


The University


- Present


Florida


he University of Florida


one of America's


truly distinctive universities.


Along with Ohio State University and the University of Minnesota, the University of Florida


offers more academic programs on a single campus than any of the nation


's other universities,


private and public.


It is also among the nation's


25 largest universities; yet its division into


9 colleges and school


s, with their 140 departments, gives students the opportunity to know


and work closely with most of their classmates and teachers. Its location in Florida's University


- Gainesville


- dedicated from its founding to serve as a home away from home for


college students adds immeasurably to the educational and social opportunities for students.


In short


, the University of Florida


a residential campus, with rich resources available


because of its size, that provides a learning and living environment for the whole person.







GENERAL INFORMATION


Leadership Training

One of the most important facets of a complete education that the University of Florida


offers is leadership training. Its results are proven.


More than half of Florida's Cabinet Mem-


bers, in


cluding the Governor, are University of Florida graduates,


as are approximately one-


third of the state senators, members of the State House of Representatives,


Floridians in the


U.S Congress and State Supreme Court justices. Half of the ten persons named in 1978


Florida's most influenta


governmental, professional and business persons has attended the


University of Florida. Thousands of other University of Florida graduates occupy key positions


in every known professional endeavor throughout
of the world.

Setting and Environment


the state


, in the nation and in many parts


The University of Florida


located in Gainesville. a


city of approximately 88,000


situated


in north central Florida,


midway between the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico.


Gainesville is in the heart of Florida


rolling woods,


akes, springs and river country. And it


is equidistant


- only a two hour drive from the fishing and boating Gulf Coast and the


swimming, surfing and beaching Atlantic Coast.


Interstate


75 and good airline service keep


the University


n the mainstream of commerce midway between Atlanta and Miami.


In addition to a moderate climate


of the University. An


, Gainesville offers many other advantages to students


8-hole golf course is on the campus, and swimming and boating


accommodations


are available at nearby springs and rivers.


The lakes in the vicinity abound


in fresh water fish


while the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico are within a two hours'


drive.


The


College


Law


A Short History


THE COLLEGE OF LAW. founded in 1909


, began its work in the Thomas Hall Dormitory


for men under the deanship of Albert J.


Farrah


, a graduate of the University of Michigan,


who served from


1909 until 1912.


Following the administration of Dean Farrah,


until 1915.


The Law Building, built in


Thomas W. Hughes served as Dean from
, was one of the first permanent units on


the campus.


Harry R.
deanship in 19


Trusler, also a graduate of the University of Michigan,


1


and served in the capacity until 194


was appointed to the


. During his administration the College


of Law was accredited by the New York State Board of Regents in 1917,


admitted to mem-


I -. I . p a - -


I







36/GENERAL INFORMATION


Dean Fenn elected to return to full-time teaching in the fall of


Maloney succeeded him as dean,


1958 and Frank E.


after serving as acting dean for a year.


Under Dean Maloney


guidance,


he University of Florida Law Association was formed


in 1960.


The Association has established substantial loan funds to attract highly qualified


students to the College.


Largely as a result of Dean Maloney


resourcefulness and untiring


effort, the College occupied its present academic building in February 1969.


This building


is the first unit of the Spessard L.


Holland Law Center. Present facilities


include classroom,


courtroom
volumes.


, and administrative space, as well as a library collection in excess of 330,000


Dean Maloney elected to return to full-time teaching in the fall of 1970.


Former Assistant


Dean E.
Joseph R.


L. Hunt served as


Julin,


Acting Dean until the appointment in winter,


of Dean


formerly Associate Dean and Professor of Law at the University of Michigan


Law School.


During Dean


tenure the College experienced impressive qualitative growth as


evidenced by creation of the College's Center for Governmental Responsibility and its highly


successful


Master of Laws


in Taxation program.


Upon Dean Julin


resignation from the deanship and return to teaching in March,


1980,


Associate Dean E. L. Hunt was name Interim Dean.


Under Dean Hunt's direction, the College


of Law changed from a quarter to a semester system and made major curriculum revisions
to improve the quality of legal education at the Holland Law Center.


On July 1


Frank T. Read assumed the deanship.


Dean Read formerly served as


Associate Dean and Professor of Law at Duke University, Dean and Professor of Law at the


Univers


y of Tulsa, and as Dean of the


Indiana University School of Law, Indianapolis.


helping to guide the College of Law into greater national prominence in the 1980's.


The College of Law is celebrating


its 75th Anniversary in 1984-85.


be commenced with the dedication of Bruton-Geer Hall on September 15,


Fhe celebration will
1984. The 40.000-


square-foot building was included in the original plans for the Law Center. Donations from


alumni


, friends, and faculty of the College of Law and a $1.5 million appropriation from


the State Legislature made possible the $3.9 million facility.


parents of Judge and Mrs.


The building is named for the


. D. Bruton, Jr. of Plant City, Florida.


1














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f^*fci 'JB


4i
a:
-
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8 *4
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'af


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- i,1


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114 55


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ADMISSIONS


AND


DEGREE


REQUIREMENTS


Admission-juris


Doctor


Preparation For The Study of Law
A lawyer's education may be divided into pre-legal training, law school career, and post-


legal education.


Pre-legal training involving a set undergraduate program has deliberately


not been prescribed by the College of Law.


The faculty feels


that in view of the diverse


nature of the lawyer's tasks,


the best program is similarly one of broad diversification in


which the student gains a knowledge of the formative processes of our civilization,


of people and their institutions, and something of the technology of our


the nature


age; the capacity


for understanding, independent and challenging thinking; and, finally, the ability to express


onesel


clearly and forcefully in the English language.


Since


concepts expressed in words are the primary tools


of the legal profession,


cannot be emphasized too strongly that the beginning law student must bring into lega


education the fundamental skills necessary for effect


oral and written communication.


Students may also find that an understanding of basic accounting prin


ciples will be helpful


in some areas of the curriculum.


For additional


information


, see the current Pre-Law Handbook, published annually,


prepared by the Law School Adm


ssion Council and the Association of American


Schools. This book includes material on lawyers and the law, pre-law preparation, application


to law schools


, the study of law, and individualized information on most American law


schools.


It may be ordered from the Law School Adm


registers for the Law


School Admi


ssion Service at the time an applicant


ssions Test.


Admissions Policy


Admission to the University of Florida College o


determined by the applicant's


potential for success


in the College of Law,


he legal profession,


and in other law-related


careers. Each applicant's credentials are measured against others applying for the same class.

Approximately fifty percent of each entering class is chosen solely by reference to a
combination of LSAT score and the cumulative undergraduate grade point average (UGPA)


leading to the first baccalaureate degree. In the absence of disciplinary problems,


with quantitatively


applicants


superior records will be automatically admitted.






ADMISSIONS AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS/39

leadership and other relevant activities;
evaluations by persons in a position to form an objective judgment as to the potential


of the applicant (e.g.,


undergraduate professors, employers where the type of work


is likely to indicate potential for the study an practice of law);
maturing experience (employment, military service, etc.); anc


the applicant's racial, ethnic,


cultural and economic background,


and geographic


origin


inside and outside of Florida.).


n accordance with Board of Regents'


program,


policy and the University


affil


approximately ten percent of each entering class may be admitted


to the above criteria through the Minority Admissions


Program.


rmative action
as exceptions


This program is limited to


black applicants and to applicants qualifying under the pre-law study program of the Council


on Legal Education Opportunity (CLEO).


information regarding the CLEO program is available


at undergraduate colleges and universities.


The Board of Regents has also ruled that the State University


stem of Florida will


accept non-Florida residents in numbers not to exceed ten percent of the total systemwide
enrollment. Accordingly, admission standards for non-residents are substantially higher than
those for residents.


Minimum admissions standards are filed with the Graduate


Gainesville


School, University of Florida,


Florida 32611


Admission Procedure

Before an application can be considered the following documents must be received in
a timely manner by the College of Law: Law School application forms, Law School Application


Matching Form, and LSAT/LSDAS Report from Law School Admission Service and,


applicant has attended another law


if the


school, a written statement concerning his or her previous


attendance at the other law


Dean


school plus


, indicating the applicant's class rank and


complete transcript and a certificate from the
certifying that he or she is in good academic


standing at that institution.

All applicants (including present and former University of Florida students) must register


with the Law School Data Assembly Service.


Applications for admission of non-University


of Florida students must be accompanied by an application fee of $15.00.


This application


fee is not refundable.

For Beginning Students: Beginning students are admitted only in August and January.
Applications may not be filed more than one year in advance of the intended month of
entry.


Applications


and the LSA Matching Forms cannot be accepted for consideration after


February


and July 1 for the following fall and spring


classes respectively. Early completion


-f -nn imrtinr


within thp nPrinrck cnnrified i ctrmnonalu rornmmonrlri inrcmn.rh


ac 11 cEnarm


* II n 1| [ 1 1r *III II II IE I *






40/ADMISSIONS


AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS


average or class rank prescribed above. No more than 28 semester or 42 quarter hours will


be transferred.


The completed application consists of:


University of Florida College of Law application forms, completed and signed;


a law school transcript with grades for at least


14 quarter or 12


semester hours;


a copy of the applicant's LSAT/LSDAS report from the law school from which transfer
is sought;


a letter from the dean of the applicant's law


school, indicating the applicant's class


rank and certifying that he or she is in good academic standing and eligible to
continue studies there; and


a statement to the Admissions


Committee relating your


reasons for now wanting to


attend the University of Florida College of Law.
All students must complete a total of 86 semester hours credit for the juris Doctor. A


minimum of 58 must be completed in this College.


prescribed first-year curriculum,


Additionally, students must satisfy the


as well as the Professional Responsibility and Advanced


Writing requirements.

All completed materials must be received in room 164C Holland Hall, Gainesville, Florida
32611 prior to the application deadline.

Admission Requirements


Beginning Students: A


applicants for adm


ssion to the College of Law must hold


prior


to beginning classes) a baccalaureate degree from a qualified institution and a satisfactory


score on the Law School Admission Test


LSAT).


The minimum acceptable score on the LSAT required for admission varies with the total
grade point average achieved by the applicant on all college work attempted by the applicant
prior to the receipt of the bachelor's degree. The mean LSAT score and overall undergraduate


average of classes currently being


selected are 650 on the old scale 3


on the new scale


and 3.41 (4.00 system), respectively. In the absence of documentation that a candidate was


ill, or that some other unusual condition occurred at one of the testing,


multiple LSAT scores


are averaged. Standards for non-Florida residents are substantially higher than those for
residents.


Law School Admission Test:


The LSAT is given by Law


School


Admission Services in


cooperation with leading law schools throughout


he country and


should be taken at least


one year prior to the desired entry date.

For information on the LSAT fee schedule please consult the LSAT/LSDAS Registration


Packet prepared by Law School Adm


ssion Services.


Tests are given four times a year.


ADolicants aDoolvine for fall admission should take the LSAT in June,


October, or December.


f






ADMISSIONS AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS/4


Law School Data Assembly Service: ALL applicants must submit the Law School Appli-


cation Matching Form (LSA


Matching Form) for the current processing year with the law


school's copy of the application.
this LSA Matching Form. The L


No action wil


be taken on any application until receipt of


SA Matching Forms are contained within the LSAT/L


SDAS


registration materials in the Law School Adm


isslons


Bulletin.


LSDAS reports will be produced


by LSAS for candidates who have submitted the LSA Matching Form with their law


school


application to this or other law schools, providing the


applicant


applying to more than


one law


school.


Considerable lead time (approximately 4 to 6


wee


ks) must be allowed for LSAS


prepare an LSAT/LSDAS report ONCE THEY HAVE RECEIVED YOUR LSAT/LSDAS REGIS-


TRATION FORM AND TRAN


RIPTS.


Registration for the LSDAS


valid only for a


2-month period beginning on the date


Law School Admission Services processes your


signed and completed LSAT/LSDAS regis-


tration form.

Those who make application for spring admission are reminded of the July 1 deadline


and are warned that if they apply at the deadline,


transc


their LSAS file must be complete with all


ripts on file.


Evaluations:


Three letters of


evaluation are requested of al


applicants.


These letters


may be submitted with the application,


but must be


submitted prior to the receipt of the


LSAT/LSDAS report.


report will usually arrive in two to three weeks from the


requested.

Advanced Standing: An applicant wishing to transfer with advanced standing on the
basis of work completed at another law school may be considered for admission provided
he or she meets the following criteria:


the other law school is


approved by the American Bar


Association and is a member


of the Association of American Law Schools;
(2) the applicant has earned a cumulative law school average of 2.65 or higher, or is
in the upper one-half of his or her class; and,
(3) the applicant is in good standing and eligible to continue his or her study at the
other law school.
Courses completed with a grade of C or higher in other ABA/AALS approved law schools
will be acceptable (subject to faculty approval) for credit up to but not exceeding a total of 28
semester hours. The Admissions Committee will consider applications meeting the above criteria
early in the term preceding that in which matriculation is desired.

Acceptance of a transfer applicant is conditioned upon his or her maintaining the law school
average or class standing prescribed above for all work undertaken subsequent to the application
C. a. _- -






42/ADMISSIONS AND DECREE REQUIREMENTS


shall submit all information required of other applicants for admission and, in addi-
tion, shall supply a detailed curriculum vitae indicating all professional activities
engaged in since law school.
All foreign lawyer applications shall be initially considered by the Admissions and


Financial


Aid Committee.


The Committee shal


forward all applications which it


affirmat


vely recommends to the full faculty,


which must approve or deny such


applications. Admission of any such applicants shall only be recommended based
on a prior record that suggests that the applicant is exceptional in terms of
scholastic and career potential and that such applicant's presence will substantially
enrich the educational experience of the J.D. program. Any applicant with foreign


credentials other than a "foreign lawyer"


shall be considered in accordance with


the general


D admission policy,


as revised in August,


When the Admissions


and Financial Aid Committee meets to consider foreign lawyer applications,


it may


request that faculty members who are not members of the Committee, but who
possess expertise in evaluating foreign lawyer applications, participate in its delib-
erations or submit written evaluations of such applicants to assist it in its deliberations.
The College of Law may consider for admissions applicants who have foreign law


study experience,


or have been admitted to the practice of law abroad.


Such


applicants are advised that, although admission will be based upon criteria in this
policy, advance standing or credits will only be given in line with (a) Standard 308


of the American Bar


Association


ABA) Standards and Rules of Procedures, the


pertinent section of which reads as follows:
(a) "Advanced standing and credit allowed for foreign study shall not exceed one-
third of the total required by the Standards for the first professional degree unless
the foreign study related chiefly to a system of law basically followed in the
jurisdiction in which the admitting school is located; and in no event shall the
maximum advanced standing and credit allowed two-thirds of the total required
by the Standards for the first professional degree."


b) American Association of Law Schools


AALS) sections


.8 and


.9 which


read as


follows:


.8 Advanced standing. A member school may grant a student academic


credit


("academic standing") for work successfully completed at another member school
or, much more cautiously, at a non-member law school approved by the Amer-


ican Bar


Association


ABA).


Similarly, advanced standing toward a first degree


in law may be allowed in respect to study outside the United States, if related
to courses substantially equivalent to those given in member schools and if
undertaken in an institution whose admissions standards are comparably high.
2.9 Advanced standing for foreign study. Advanced standing for foreign study
shall not exceed one year unless the foreign study related chiefly to a system


of law basically followed in the


located; and in no event shal


The Admissionn and Financia


jurisdiction in which the member school is


it exceed two years."


Aid Committee shall annoint a faculty advisor for


1






ADMISSIONS


AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS/43


conditioned on the student attaining a cumulative grade point average of at least


.50 on a 4.0 scale


courses taken at the College of Law.


A foreign lawyer may not receive credit retroactively for courses audited or in which
the student otherwise participated prior to admission to the College of Law or, if
excluded for academic reasons, prior to readmission to the College of Law, unless
specifically approved by the faculty.
No action will be taken on a request for admission until receipt of a completed


application
for the fall


A completed application must be received on or before February


semester and July 1st for the spring


semester.


A completed application


consists of:
application forms, completed and signed;
application fee of $15.00;


- official transcripts (translated


into English);


an LSAT/LSDAS report, indicated the applicant's LSAT score;
TOEFL score if applicant is from a non-English speaking country;
detailed curriculum vitae indicating all professional activities engaged in since
law school;
a personal statement from the applicant, informing the Committee of the
reasons for wishing to attend this law school; and,
at least three letters of evaluation from persons in a position to objectively
form a judgement as to the potential of the applicant.
Applicants are advised that criteria for admission to the Bar in the United States


differ from one


jurisdiction to another and that admission to and completion of a


J.D. program with advanced standing may or may not qualify one to take the Bar


examination


in a particular state.


inquiries regarding precise eligibility status should


be directed to the highest court in the state of the Bar Association of the state in


which the foreign lawyer plans


to live and practice.


All of the above, with the exception of the LSAT/LSDAS Report, should be mailed directly


to the Law


School Admissions


, 164 Holland Hall,


University of Florida College of Law,


Gainesville


, Florida, 32611, U.S.A. For more information write directly to the above address.


N - a


E" "F~






44/ADMISSION


AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS


Orientation


Program


For


Beginning


Students


In order to acquaint entering law students with the College of Law and law school


teaching methods, an orientation program of one or more days


class.


is held for each entering


Applicants accepted for admission will be advised of the exact date, prior to the


commencement of regular classes, on which the orientation for that class will begin.


As part of the orientation program,


Advisor.


These advisors are second- and


entering students will be assigned a Small Group
third-year law students who will be available to


help beginning students adjust to their first year of law school.


Requirements


for


Degree


- J.D.


The faculty of the College of Law will recommend for


he degree of juris


Doctor (J.D.


candidates who


complied with the following requirements:


Completion with a passing grade of courses totaling at least 86 semester hours credit
of which at least 58 must have been completed in this College.
Satisfactory completion of:


Legal Research and Writing, LAW


5792


, with a grade of S or better.


Appellate Advocacy, LAW


5793


, with a grade of


or better.


The Advanced Writing Requirement.
Professional Reponsibility, LAW 675C


Maintenance of a


.0 honor point average on all work attempted in this College.


Fulfillment of course requirements as set forth hereafter


under "Curriculum."


Completion of at least 90 weeks of full time study in residence in an accredited law


school of which at least 60 must have


been in residence in this College.


With permission of the Dean,


upon good cause shown,


work not to exceed 28


semester hours may be taken at another ABA/AALS approved law school.


cases


of superior scholarship and intellectual attainments the Juris


Doctor degree


may be recommended With Honors or With High Honors. Ordinarily to be eligible for


consideration for the degree of Juris


Doctor with honors the candidate must have maintained


a grade point average of 3.0 on all work attempted, and to be eligible for the degree of juris
Doctor With High Honors the candidate must have maintained a grade point average of 3.5
on all work attempted.









ADMISSIONS AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS/45


- Im H .






46/ADMISSIONS AND DECREE REQUIREMENTS


joint


Degree


Programs


Admissions/General Information
The College of Law and the Graduate


School offer the following joint degree programs:


Juris Doctor/Master of Accounting

Juris Doctor/Master of Arts in Business Administration


Juris Doctor/Master of Arts in Political


Science-Public Administration


juris Doctor/Master of Arts in Sociology

Juris Doctor/Master of Arts in Urban and Regional Planning


Doctor/Doctor of Philosphy


Interested students should apply to both the Holland Law Center and the Graduate


School, noting on the application the


point nature of their admission request. Alternatively,


students may apply to the Graduate School during their first year of law school. Candidates
must meet the entrance requirements and follow the entrance procedures for each college.
Students must be accepted by each college and satisfy the curriculum requirements for each
degree. Further information is available from the College of Law, the College of Business


Administration, the Departments of History,


Sociology and Political


Science-Public Admin-


istration in the College of Liberal Arts and Science, and the Department of Urban and


Regiona


Planning in the College of Architecture. The College of Law faculty advisor for all


joint degree programs is Assistant Dean James Dixon.

juris Doctor/Master of Accounting
The College of Law and the School of Accounting of the


College of Business Adminis-


tration offer a joint degree program designed for students who have an undergraduate degree
in accounting and interested in advanced studies in both accounting and law. Candidates
for the program must meet the entrance requirements and follow the entrance procedures


for both the College of Law and School of Accounting.
both the College of Law and School of Accounting. Th<


Applicants must be accepted by
? program is not open to students


who have already earned one of the degrees nor is it open to students who have not
completed the equivalent of a major in accounting at the undergraduate level. Students must
satisfy the requirements of each degree.

Juris Doctor/Master of Business Administration


The College of Law and the Graduate School (College of Business Administration


) offer







ADMISSIONS AND DEGREE REQUIREMENTS/4


law study begins no later than the third semester after commencement of study at the


College of Business Administration.


commence courses


Any student who participates in the joint degree must


in the second disciple no later than the beginning of the third semester.


Juris Doctor/Master of Arts in Political Science-Public Administration


The College of Law and the Graduate School


Department of Political Science-Public


Administration) offers a four-year program culminating in both a Juris


Doctor and a Master


of Arts in Political Science-Public Administration. This program allows the student to combine


his or her interest in law with the area of public administration.


The student receives both


degrees at the end of four


years of study. Students must satisfy adm


ssions requirements of


both coil


eges.


Juris Doctor/Master of Arts in Sociology


The College of Law and the Department of
Sciences offer a four-year program leading to a Ji


Sociology of the College of Liberal Arts and
uris Doctor and Master of Arts in Sociology.


The program is designed to benefit those students who want to blend their


with social


legal education


science knowledge, pursue public interest careers, or to better understand social


problems of the modern world in which they practice.


This program is not open to students


who have already earned one of the degrees. Students wishing to pursue the program must


be admitted to both the College of Law and the Graduate


School. Requirements for both


degrees must be fulfilled before the joint degree is awarded.

juris Doctor/Master of Arts in Urban and Regional Planning


A four-year program leading to a


Doctor and Master of Arts


in Urban and Regional


Planning is offered under the joint auspices of the College of Law and the Graduate School
(College of Architecture, Department of Urban and Regional Planning). The program provides
students interested in the legal problems of urban and regional planning with an opportunity


to blend their


law studies with relevant coursework in the planning curriculum.


The student


receives both degrees at the end of a four-year course of study whereas separate matri


would require five years. Students must take the GRE and LSAT prior to adm


culation


ssion and must


separately gain admission to each program.

Juris Doctor/Doctor of Philosophy in History

The College of Law and the Department of History in the College of Liberal Arts and


iences offer a five-year program which would enable students to obtain the Ju


Doctor


and Doctor of Philosophy in History. The program emphasizes the values of historical method
and provides students with an inter-disciplinary perspective on contemporary issues of law


and legal development.


The program is not open to persons who have already earned one


of the degrees, and students must be admitted to both the College of Law and Graduate
School. Requirements for both degrees must be fulfilled before the joint degree is awarded.










REGISTRATION,


FEES


AND


ACADEMIC


POLICIES


Registration


Registration dates for other than beginning students are set forth


n the College of Law


Calendar. All students must adhere to the registration procedure announced by the Office
of the Registrar. Students are responsible for registering on those specified dates. Late reg-
istration fees will be charged for students registering anytime after the specified registration
period.


Change of Registration


- A student is not permitted to drop a course, exchange one


course for another, elect or revoke the satisfactory/unsatisfactory option,


or change sections


in the same course without the approval of the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs.


students will receive credit for any course which he or she is not properly registered.


Dates


within which courses may be dropped or added are set forth in the College of Law Calendar.


Fees


and


Expenses


Note: While the College of Law Calendar may deviate from the University Calendar


in some


respects, law students must comply with all general University fee payment deadlines.

A Florida student will pay a fee of approximately $42.00 per semester credit hour, and
a non-Florida student will pay a fee of approximately $120.00 per semester credit hour.


Alien students will pay the same fee as a non-Florida student. In addition,


health fee per semester wil


a $27.00


be paid by both Florida and non-Florida students.


All fees must be paid in accordance with University regulations. Late registration increases


the registration fee by $25.00;


increased fee will not be waived for any reason. Pro-


spective students should note that all fees are subject to increase without notice after the
publication of this catalog.

Applications for admission of non-University of Florida students to the College of Law


must be accompanied by an application fee of $15.00.


fee is not refundable.


Though expenses vary considerably with individual students, an unmarried student
Sl+kn rlC/ Il*^^^ I f^llr. Irtn nn cVt I n, rk .Al t'rn,4r nnr nrn c i. ,;lfl tt 4. tS ,











REGISTRATION, FEES AND ACADEMIC POLICIES/49


a-lf^
- -*l - *#..(.


:t4
L &1 ?1


- -


tS.4b~4.


I,


,. ^*"-


-~'~(C






50/REGISTRATION, FEES AND ACADEMIC POLICIES


Refund


Fees


Fees will be refunded in full for:


a.
b.
2. W
gat
a.
b.
c.


Credit hours dropped during the drop/add period.
Courses cancelled by the University.
th the exception of amounts required for collection under bond and trust obli-
ions, fees may be refunded in instances of:
Involuntary call to active duty.
Death of a student.
Illness of the student of such duration or severity, as confirmed by a physician,
the completion of the semester is precluded, or
Exceptional circumstances, upon approval of the University President.


Refunds may be obtained at Student Accounts,
documentation.


THE HUB,


upon presentation of proper


Academic


Policies


American Bar Association Standards
The Council of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar of the American Bar Asso-


ciation requests that attention be called to the Standards of


adopted
amended
a public e
at least th
of law stu
sufficient


in 1921 and by it recommended for enactment by
provide in effect that every candidate for admission
examination shall give evidence of graduation from a
wree years of acceptable college work as a condition
idy for longer if not a full-time school, which shall h
number of teachers giving their entire time to the sc


he American Bar Association
all states. These standards as


save


he bar, in
r school w
admission
an adeqi


hool to ensur


addition to taking
whichh shall require
, and three years
uate library and a
e actual personal.


acquaintance and influence with the whole student body, and which shall not be operated
as a commercial enterprise.


Student Employment


The College of Law of the University of Florida is a full-time law school as defined by
the Association of American Law Schools. Association policy requires that its students be
"full-time" students who devote substantially all of their working hours to the study of law.
Pursuant to this policy, academic schedules and minimum load requirements are intentionally
designed to require substantially the full working time of students of this College. Deviations
from the required curriculum or the minimum load are never authorized solely to enable
students to engage in part-time employment. Therefore, no student should plan to depend
on part-time employment as a means of financing concurrent attendance at this College.

Maximum and Minimum Loads
.*. p S* .- t ^- i






REGISTRATION, FEES AND ACADEMIC POLICIES/5


Graduate Level Course Option


With the advance approval of the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs, students may
enroll in a maximum of two graduate courses outside of the law school for credit toward


law school graduation.


Under this option a student may receive no more than a total of 6


semester credit units.


Two such courses may be taken in one semester. Although the


grade


is not computed in a student's grade point average, a B or higher must be earned to receive
credit hours for the course. Students on probation are not eligible for the option.


Grading Scale


- good


- A student's work is graded according to the following scale.


- satisfactory; D


- poor, and E


- failure.


The grades of B +,


- excellent;
and D+ are


awarded to those students whose work is evaluated at a level between the five primary


grades.


In addition, the grade of H (deferred grade) may be given when a student has


been


excused from completing a course within the


grading period.


Grades of


Incomplete) and X (absent from examination) are automatically


changed


to E's at the deadline set in the University Calendar. However, under no circumstances may


a grade of


or X be changed after


one year. An H grade may not be changed after two


years.


Grades of Satisfactory


S) or Unsatisafactory


are given in Legal Research


& Writing


(LAW


6942),


5792),


Appellate Advocacy


Law Review


5793),


LAW 6950) and Moo


Civil Clinic


Court


LAW 6951


LAW 6940),


Criminal Clinic


Trial Advocacy


LAW 6361


and Criminal Practice


LAW 6941


may be graded on a satisfactory-unsatisfactory or graded


s, at the option of the instructor.


Satisfactory-Unsatisfactory Grading System


hours of work


- Students who have received credit for


n the College of Law are permitted to take one non-seminar elective course


on a satisfactory-unsatisfactory grading system.


The standard for satisfactory work shall be


the grade of C.


or U grade wil


become part of the student's record, but will not be


counted in computing the student's grade point average.


This option


is available only to


students in good standing who are not on any type of probation.


The burden of assuring


that the final class roll reflects a proper election of the option rests solely upon the individual


student.


The option of having the grade for a course determined on the S-U basis must be


exercised by the student in any course before the expiration date of the Drop/Add period.
Therefore, the option must be exercised before the end of the first week of classes and then


becomes final. (See calendar.


Students should carefully consider the risk of exerc


ising this


option in their


final term.


Petition For Exception to Academic Policies

Only in exceptional circumstances is a student permitted to deviate from standard


policies.


All exceptions must be approved by the Assistant Dean for


Academic Affairs.







52/REGISTRATION, FEES AND ACADEMIC POLICIES


consideration.


Action by the


Associate Dean will be taken the next working day absent


exigent circumstances.

The decision of the Associate Dean will be timely posted on the faculty bulletin board.
The decision of the Associate Dean is final unless there is a written request for review by


a faculty member within ten


10) c


days.


Such request must be received by the Chair-


person of the Academic Standards Committee.

Once such a request is received, the Committee will promptly render a decision which
will be posted on the faculty bulletin board. Should a faculty member disagree with the
decision of the Committee, the faculty member may request that the matter be placed on
the agenda for the next regularly scheduled faculty meeting. Such request must be made


within ten


class days.


Action by the faculty would represent final disposition of the


matter.


Determination of Honor Point Average


The honor point average is determined by com-


putting the ratio of honor points of semester hours of work attempted in courses in which
letter grades are assigned. The student receives honor points according to the following scale:


GRADE


HONOR POINTS


GRADE


HONOR POINTS


* . 3



*. .. 2
3

2


. ..... . 1.5


.. . .. .. 0


(Incomplete)


X (absent from exam)


.. ....... . .. 0


Grades of H
computed in


Deferred grade),


factory


and U (Unsatisfactory


are not


the student's grade point average.


Attendance


Class attendance is a primary obligation of each student,


whose right to continued


enrollment in the course and to take the examination is conditioned upon a record of


attendance satisfactory of the professor. Students


should become familiar


with the


following


ABA requirements dealing with attendance.

ABA Rule 305 states in pertinent part:


Attendance:


Subject to


he qualifications and exceptions contained in th


Chapter, the law


school


- L.II .i. .. i*a


*--.t Jt- ,- I : .


n--rli. &Lh jNv-.ar:jr..ninn nt - rn&J-ILB ar nt r t an ..ut .r A -rf-L


. . ...... . ........ ..0







REGISTRATION, FEES AND ACADEMIC POLICIES/53


Regular and punctual class attendance is necessary to satisfy residence and c


hours


requirement.

Drop Policy

Between the end of the official drop/add period and the date designated by the registrar's


office as the last day for withdrawing without receiving failing grades in all courses,


each


student who has completed the first year of


school is


allowed two automatic drops


follow


s; no more than one per semester, providing a student's course load does not fall below


twelve hours


in the semester


in which a course is dropped.


Exceptions to the above policy must be approved by the Assistant Dean for Academic


Affairs.


If should be recognized that as to any exception the burder is upon


he student to


demonstrate that a


serious problem (su


ch as illness),


for which documentation


is provided


and over which the student has no control, has necessitated his or her request.


Approval


of other than the two free drops cannot be expected if the course is to be dropped because

a. More hours are registered for than should have been


The drop is simply to avoid a low grade which would lower the average


c. It has been belatedly decided that the course


is no


onger needed.


Repeating Courses

A student who has passed a course cannot repeat it. A student who has failed a course


cannot repeat it except that in exceptional


of a failed course.


circumstances


This rules does not apply to LAW 579


e Dean may permit repetition
and 5793, Legal Writing and


Appellate Advocacy, both of which must be completed with a grade of S or better, even if


this requirement necessitates repeating these courses.


Nor does th


rule apply to LAW 6951


6950


and 6930


where no failure


is involved.


Examinations


- Examinations


for each course are generally given only at the end of each


semester. Students are given exam numbers before each examination period.


Faculty mem-


bers are given keys


for these exam numbers upon request.


While most faculty members


grade anonymously, they are not required to do so. Each faculty member, during the semester,


will advise students what grading procedure wil


be followed in the course.


Examination


papers are retained by instructors for a period of not less than one year after administration


of the examination.


Usually, students are given an opportunity to review, within a reasonable


, any written work upon which a student's grade


is based


in whole or in part. Re-


examinations are not given.


See Academic Policies for delay in taking examinations.


Delay in Taking Examinations

Psrmiccinn will nnnt hn aivnn fnr a ctnrilnt tn dlIav takinro a crhadalad PYaminatinn







54/REGISTRATION, FEES AND ACADEMIC POLICIES


miss a scheduled examination.


office for taking


Arrangements must be made with the administration


he examination late.


An examination will,
scheduled consecutively ul
utive examination periods.


under no circumstances


, be delayed because of several being


here are at least three examinations


When


scheduled for consec-


he examination schedule requires a student to take three


examinations


in three con


secutive examination


times


, the student may elect to defer only


seco


nd examination


in that sequence,


and then that examination must be taken on the


subsequent examination day on which the student has no other examination


schedule


Under no circumstances will permission be given to take an examination before the


scheduled time.


Departure and Reentry


Subjec


to the catalog rules governing probation and exclusion and in compliance with


ABA and AALS standards where applicable,


a student who has been evaluated on at least


one full


semester of work may withdraw or depar


, retaining


he right to reenter this College


within five years from the ending date of the last term in which such student earned law


school


credit.


Upon the expiration of the period of five years, or unless


special circumstances


are shown


, a student who desires to return and otherwise entitled to continue to this College


must apply for admission as a beginning student, or with advanced standing as appropriate.


The determination of special circumstances shal


be made by the


Dean with reference to


the particular


circumstances of each student.


A student who registers as a beginning student


but withdraws prior to completion of a full semester's work, must


submit a new application


for admission to a subsequent


class, and will be considered with regard to standards


at the time of subsequent application.

jury Duty

Each law student's obligation to function


as a member of this


prevailing


law college community


udes the duty to appear when notified of


selection for service as a jurior on Practice


Court or Clinic trials.


Periodic notices of


selection are posted on the official


bulletin board


his College.


Unexcused failure to di


charge this


duty will result


in permanent loss of registration


priority for all courses upon which enrollment limitations


are placed,


including seminars,


practice court, and clinic


programs.


A student thus penalized who wishes to regain reg-


istration priority may request perm


mission from the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs


perform jury service at


such times as may


Students who for compelling reasons


* I


I


be designated by the A

are unable to appear for


assistant Dean.


ury duty when notified


may obtain permission from the Assistant Dean to substitute another person without penalty.
Post facto requests will be treated on the same basis as unexcused absences.












ACADEMIC


HONESTY


GUIDELINES


The conduct set forth hereinafter constitutes a violation of the Academic


Honesty


Guidelines.


Those adjudged to have committed such conduct shall be


subject to the pen-


alties:


reprimand,


conduct probation,


suspension,


expulsion,


payment of damages,


reduced or failing grade.


Taking of


Information


- copying graded homework assignments from another student;


working together with another individuals) on a take-home test or homework when not


specifically permitted by the teacher;
paper during an examination; looking
examination when not permitted.


looking or attempting to look at another student's
g or attempting to look at test or notes during an


Tendering of


Information


- giving your work to another student to be used or copied


giving someone answers to exam questions


either when the exam is being given or after


taking an exam; informing another person of questions that appear or have appeared on an


exam in the same academic term


giving or selling a term paper or


other written materials


to another student.


Plagiarism


- copying homework answers from your text to hand in for a grade; quoting


text or other written materials submitted to a teacher when requested by the teacher to
present your own work; handing in a paper as your own work which was purchased from


a term paper service; retyping a friend


paper and handing it in as your own work, taking


a paper from fraternity files and handing it in as your own work.


Conspiracy


- planning with one or more persons to commit any form of academic


dishonesty, including but not limited to, giving your term paper to another student who you
know will plagiarize it.


Misrepresentation
it in as your own work;


- having another student do your computer program and handing
ying to a teacher to increase your grade; or any other act or omission


with intent to deceive a teacher as to the authorship of oral or written materials
or presented to a teacher which would affect your grade.


submitted


Bribery


- offering, giving, receiving,


or soliciting money or any


item or service to a


teacher or any other person so as to gain academic advantage for yourself or another.

Academic Dishonesty Procedures


The Academic Dishonesty Procedures of the University of Florida,


which are applicable


.1 ,-' ii F hi







56/LEGAL INFORMATION CENTER


The student should be:


a. given a notice of


charges; and


given an opportunity in a hearing with the faculty member to present his


or her


hearing will in


she may have,


case.
include an opportunity for the student to present any witnesses he or


the right to have an advisor present, the right to confront any student who


allegedly saw him or her cheating, and to understand his or her rights prior to the beginning


of the hearing.


The maximum penalty that the faculty member may assign is a grade of "E"


in the course. If this issue is not resolved as a result of this hearing, i.e., there has not been


agreement on the matter between faculty member and student, it is


recommended that the


faculty member refer the case to the Director of Student Judicial Affairs who will then transmit
it to the University of Florida Student Honor Court for adjudication.
If the issue is resolved as a result of the hearing held between the student and the
faculty member, the Director of Student Judicial Affairs should be contacted and notified of


the offense, its circumstances, and its resolution.


In this manner the University will be able


to keep a central registry of all students who have committed academic violations.


If the faculty member feels that a


case


of academic dishonesty may warrant possible


all-University disciplinary action, the faculty member should refer the case to the
Director of Student Judicial Affairs, who will then transmit it to the Student Honor


Court.


case


will then be adjudicated by the Student Honor Court. Penalties the


Student Honor Court can recommend are:
a. formal reprimand.
b. probation.


C. SUSpension,
d. expulsion


An "E" in a course involved may also be recommended to the faculty member who, of
course, retains the responsibility and authority to assign all grades. If the student desires to
appeal the decision recommended by the Student Honor Court he/she may do so through
the Director of Student Judicial Affairs to the Vice President for Student Affairs within two
days of the hearing.

Official Notices


The privilege insofar as permitted by law and in accordance with legal requirements


reserved to modify, amend, or revoke any rules, regulations,


make changes in the


requirements for degree, or to


curriculum set forth in this catalog and published academic schedules.


All students are required to acquaint themselves with matters posted on the Official
Bulletin Board.

Fxrlncinn fnr Aradpmir Rpaenns






LEGAL


INFORMATION CENTER/ 57


is less than 2.0 at the end of the first term of the first year of law study will be on


scholastic


probation and will not be eligible to continue if the grade point average is less than 2.0 at
the end of the probationary term.


For purposes of these probation and exclusion rules, the grades


and X are treated as


the grade of E until they are changed to permanent grades, and at that time the grade point


average will be recomputed and the student's standing wil


the permanent grades. The grades


be determined on the basis of


and U are not used in computing grade point averages.


Only grades earned at this College will be considered in computing a student's grade point


average under these


A student


rules.


eligible to continue under these rules will not be readmitted except by


action of the Academic Standards Committee of the College,


and the Academic Standards


Committee will not entertain a petition from a student who has received a grade of H in


one-fourth or more of the credit hours for which


he student was enrolled at the time of


exclusion.

Reinstatement


Except as otherwise provided,


a student who


is ineligible to continue in the College


may petition the Academic Standards Committee for reinstatement.


Students petitioning for


reinstatement must submit their written petitions to the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs
at least one week prior to the start of classes in the term for which the student seeks


reinstatement. The Committee's dec


final, and may incorporate appropriate terms


conditions.


1 ^'3 ilrl











LEGAL INF'

The College of Law opened in


FORMATION


CENTER


1909 with a very meager collection of books.


In fact,


ten years later, at the end of the academic year,
volumes.


918, the collection numbered only 4,548


Growth was not dramatic during the next two decades; nevertheless,


the collection


reached the 10,000 figure in 1933,


almost


and by the end of the academic year, 1940,


4,000 volumes in the Law Library, nearly a threefold in


there were


crease since its earlier years.


In the postwar period the enrichment of the curriculum and opportunity for broader


and deeper training and research had its impact on the library.
and 1950, the collection nearly doubled in number of volumes.


In the decade between 1940


The following decade


showed


corresponding growth, the collection more than doubling, so that by the end of the
61 academic year the collection reached 60,000 volumes.


In December,


since


the 100.000th volume was added.


970, the library collection again doubled in


With increasing appropriations


size by 1975. The current count exceeds


370,000 volumes which ranks Florida


In the last decade


9th in law school library holdings


in the country.


ust under $3,000,000 was appropriated for legal materials.


For two


years the budget was the largest among law
it was second only to Harvard. These fund


school libraries in the country and a third year
s enabled the library to acquire in depth, rich


resources for an expanding student body and faculty.


The Legal


information Center, formerly known as the Law Library, provided compre-


hensive coverage of materials in all areas of American Law, including complete holdings of


state and federal laws and court reports,
the two standard legal periodical indices,


800 law review and legal periodicals indexed in


and extensive


treatise


collection


, broad coverage


in looseleaf services


, comprehensive tax materials for graduate research and a vast collection


of other supporting secondary authority. While the federal documents collection in the Legal


Information Center is expanding,
University Libraries as well as its


he extensive regional federal documents depository of the
2V2 million volumes are totally accessible to law students


and faculty.


Other segments of the library


book collection include substantial holdings of English


and other common law


jurisdictions


as well as those of various


other foreign countries.


large Latin American law collection is shared wi
in Caribbean and Latin American publications.


ith the University Libraries,


which specializes


Our Brazilian holdings rank among the best


nationally.






LEGAL


INFORMATION CENTER


law school. Half-inch black and white color videotape is used extensively


in recording the


mock trials


in the law center.


The professional audio-v


sual and courtroom facilities


in the


Bruton-Geer addition provide for more extensive usage of the media resources.


Fifty-two computer terminals are currently in operation,
research, one for automated programmed instruction, an(


automated library system.


two for cataloging, two for legal
J six to initiate a campus-wide


individualized library services are provided to students and faculty


members by a staff of professional librarians who assist in learning how to use the automated


systems for study and research.


The center has recently acquired forty-one IBM personal


computers for word processing, computer-assisted instruction,


access to national law and


law-related data bases, and faculty, staff,


and student research projects.


Two terminals


available for public use. These terminals use the LEXIS,


WESTLAW, and PLATO systems.


Information Center was the first law


school subscriber to WESTLAW


and an early


subscriber to LEXIS. Through access to these systems, users may search extensive databases
for federal and state laws, cases, and administrative publications in addition to other mis-


cellaneous databases


, including English and French, and the European Common Market.


Many students learn the basics for some classes through use of the programmed courses,


the computer assisted instruction system.


The Center has recently acquired an extensive


collection of legal computer-assisted programs on floppy discs that can be used by faculty
and students on the IBM personal computers.


pc~











STUDENT


PROGRAMS


AND


SERVICES


Financial
Entering


Aid


Students


Policy


the policy of the University of Florida Law Center Association and the College of


Law to meet the financial needs of qualified law students,


insofar


as funds are available


what is in essence a revolving fund. Accordingly, the bulk of available funds is directed


toward loans rather than


scholarships.


Loans and Scholarships


University of Florida Law Center Association Merit Loan


- Each year the Law Center


Association awards approximately


0 Merit Loans


to entering freshmen who are Florida


residents.


Merit Loans provide a lump sum of $900 for the first academic year (2 semesters)


of study. Additional loans of $900 each for the second and third academic years will be
reserved for the recipient, if the recipient achieves satisfactory grades.

University of Florida Law Center Association Merit Loans do not require co-endorsers.


No interest is charged until six


months after the date of graduation or termination of law


school attendance, whichever comes first.


The interest rate is 4%


per annum.


No payment


of interest or principal is required until five years after graduation or termination of law school


attendance.


The total time for repayment is five years from the date on which the payment


of interest and principal


first becomes due.


Ralph R. Bailey Scholarship Fund


The estate of Ralph R.


Bailey has established a


fund, the income of which provides scholarships grants to a number of incoming and advanced


students.


Recipients must have been bona fide residents of Broward County for one year


prior to the date of application to law school. Scholarships are awarded on the basis of


academic standing, need for financial


assistance


, sound character, integrity, good achieve-


ment in extra curricular service activity while in undergraduate or graduate school.


Karl B. Block, Jr. Memorial Loan Fund


Block


, established by the friends of Karl


provides long-term loans in the amount of $900 per academic year to beginning


freshmen who are bona fide residents of Dade County.


These


oans are only available for


fall entering classes.






STUDENT PROGRAMS AND SERVICES/6


financial need.


This loan may not be available for each


class depending on the availability


of funds.


Robinson Reese Saunders Memorial Loan


This fund


was established by the law firm


Saunders, Curtis,


Ginestra


& Gore.


The amount of the loan will be $900 per academic


year. The award will be made to beginning freshmen in recognition of the applicant's financial


need and promise for


success


in the College of Law and the legal profession.


This loan may


not be available for each beginning class depending on the availability of funds.


Non-resident Tuition


-resident Tuition Scholarships.


- Qualified non-residents of the State of Florida may be granted


The Non-resident Tuition scholarship pays the difference


between non-resident and


resident tuition fees.


The Non-resident tuition Scholarship is


continued for two semesters, provided the student maintains a 2.80 grade point average.

Basis of Award


Merit Loans


and Non-resident


students on the basis of


Tuition Scholarships are awarded only to entering law


scholastic record, need,


character, aptitude, and apparent promise


success


Admission Test


in the legal profession.


scores


The undergraduate grade point average and Law


are the basis for first year awards.


School


To be eligible to apply for a Merit


Loan or Non-resident Tuition Scholarship,


an applicant must have an overall undergraduate


grade point average of at least 3.20 on a 4.0 system, and obtain an LSAT score of 36 (625


on old scale) or higher. These are minimum


credentials.


criteria. Successful applicants will have superior


Those applicants who do not meet the quantitative requirements stated above


should write directly to the University


Financial


Aid Office


111 Anderson Hall


for details


concerning the federal and state loans available.

Financial Assistance


Federal and State sponsored


versity-wide basis.


oans and employment programs


are handled on a Uni-


Information and application forms concerning National


Direct Loan


Federally Insured Loans, College Work Study Employment, and OPS employment may be


obtain from the Student Financial Affairs Office


11 Anderson Hall, University of Florida,


Gainesville


Florida 32611


Non-Florida residents may apply to the designated agency in


their respective states for a guaranteed bank loan under the Higher Education Act.

How to Apply

If your credentials and financial needs meet the requirements for a University of Florida


Law Center Association Merit Loan or a Non-resident Tuition


Scholarship, it is suggested that


you request financial assistance. The College of Law participates in the Graduate and Profes-


sional


hool Financial Aid Service (GAPSFAS),


and uses the GAPSFAS report to select


recipients for financial aid.


To apply for financial assistance, write to GAPSFAS for an appli-


cation form and


, in completing the form,


indicate the Holland Law Center


as recipient. The






62/ STUDENT PROGRAMS AND SERVICES


STUDENT


ONLY. It is not intended for use


by currently enrolled law students, Non-residents


or transfer students.

Minority Applicants


The following finan


aid is available for entering minority students.


Applications may


be obtained by contacting the Assistant Dean of Student and Minority Affairs.


Non-resident Tuition Waiver
and resident tuition fees.


- The waiver pays the difference between non-resident


Minority Grant The grants are awarded for
range in amounts of $500 to $2,000. Awards


academic year


(2 s


are made on the


semesters) and may
basis of academic


achievement.


Virgil Hawkins Fellowship


The Fellowships were established by the Legislature


and provide $5,000 for the academic (2 semester) year.


Recipients are required to


attend a summer program designed to introduce them to the study of law.


availability and renewability of the Fellowships


contingent on legislative


funding.


following financial


available from private sources:


Earl Warren Legal Training Scholarships The purpose of the scholarships is to increase


the number of Black attorneys in the United States.


For more information


contact The Ear


Warren Lega


Training Program,


99 Hudson Street


New York


New York


0013.


Council on Legal Education Opportunity (CLEO)


- CLEO provides an opportunity for


educationally and economically disadvantaged students successfully matriculate in law school


via regional summer institutes for prospective


law students, and the provision of a $1,000


grant for the academic year. For more information,


contact CLEO


, 1800 M Street, N.W.,


Suite 290


, North Lobby, Washington,


Scholarships


and


20036


Loans


Scholarships for Advanced Law Students


The following scholarship funds


forms


are available fi


for these scholarships can be obtained in the


or advanced law students. Application
Administration Office of the College of


Crandall Memorial Scholarships


late Kathleen B.


The scholarships were established though the will


Crandall in honor of her husband, the late Dr. Clifford W. Crandall,


formerly a member of the faculty of the


College of Law of the University of Florida.


Presently


there is one scholarship with an annual stipend of $600.


scholarship is awarded to a


student who has completed at least two and not more than three semesters. Mrs. Crandall's
will provides that the scholarships are to be awarded to good students in need of financial
*^J- r4 F a--M J A D A On I "L t e J n rain 4jn AE I. riLr. 0 a h -r ..* n it.. rinn a' I I I n. ,n *r I nJ CIJ Ir^A I -






STUDENT PROGRAMS AND SERVICES/63


Max David Bisk.


A $200 cash scholarship is awarded annually on the basis of financial need


to students who have completed their first year in


school.


scholarship is awarded


in the fall term.


Justice Richard W. Ervin Scholarship Fund


of Ervin


- This fund was established by the law firm


, Jacobs, and Odom. One scholarship is awarded annually in the spring to a


graduating senior with high academic standing.


Joseph J.


Gersten Key


This award was established by Joseph


Gersten while ser


as chairman of the Florida Board of Bar Examiners to honor the outstanding law school


senior


judged on the basis of academic achievement and leadership in activities relating to the law


school's educational program,


guished career.


extracurricular interests, character and promise of a distin-


This scholarship is awarded annually to a spring graduate.


Law Review Fellowships


This program is funded by the Law Center


Association. It


provides $500 each to six senior editors and the editor-in-chief each semester during the


regular academic year. Additionally, $500 i


s awarded to the editor-in-chief during the summer


term of the editor's tenure.


Julius F. Parker Scholarship
lius F. Parker, past president


This fund was established by the Parker family in honor


he Florida State Bar


Association.


scholarship of


$500 is awarded annually to a senior with high academic standing.


Only summer and fall


graduates are eligible.


Phi Alpha Delta Scholarship


Alpha Delta Law Fraternity makes ten five hundred


dollar ($


scholarships available nationally each year. Students who have


completed two


years of law school


and who are members of the fraternity may be eligible for such a


scholarship. Applications and detailed information can be received from the Faculty Advisor


or the Chapter


justice.


Phi Delta Ph


Scholarship


Delta Ph


International Legal


Fraternity annually grants


two $


00 awards. The awards


are made to two initiated members of Cockrell Inn who have


best exhibited a high degree of
the College of Law.


scholastic achieve


ent, as well as service to the


Inn and


Walter L.


"Bud" Robison,


, Memorial Scholarship


scholarship in memory of


alumnus and past John Marshall Bar Association President Walter L.


"Bud" Robison


established by his family, members


of the


class of 1966, and other friends.


An award of


$750 is made annually on the basis of need to an outstanding student


or third year of law school.


in his or her second


This scholarship is awarded in the fall.


was





64/STUDENT PROGRAMS AND SERVICES


Loans


Funds


for


Advanced


Law


Students


From time to time, on an emergency basis, long-term loans


in the amount of $300 per


academic year may be granted if the student:
demonstrates financial need;
has completed at least one semester in the College of Law and has earned a law
school average of 2.0 or higher;


* is registered for at least 1


semester hours and possesses a validated fee card before


processing the loan; and
* has loans and grants for the academic year (2 semesters) not exceeding $2,500.


(Tuition waivers for special students are not included in this $2,


500.)


Application forms for the following loan funds are in the law


school


Administration


Office and are available at the beginning and end of each semester. Applications are not
available during the summer term.


Brevard County Bar Association Scholarship Fund


- Applicants are limited to Brevard


County residents attending a Florida law school, and must be at least second semester students


in good academic standing.


Funds are limited to $1,000 per student per year,


payable


immediately prior to the beginning of the term and divided into equal payments based upon


the school's system.


the selection


The financial need of the student is a paramount importance in making


, and the Bar reserves the right to inquire into the financial status of the parents


of a student under 2


years of age. In order to provide a continuing fund,


the grant


is paid


back over five years commencing one year after graduation.


Clearwater Bar Association Memorial Loan Fund A loan fund established as a memo-
rial to deceased members of the Clearwater Bar Association. Loans from this fund are available


to students residing in the Clearwater-Largo area.


james W. Day Memorial Loan Fund


- Admirers of Mr. Day have provided a fund of


loans to needy students with good academic records. Preference


given to third year law


students.


The Florida Bar Foundation, Glenn Terrell Scholarship Fund


- This scholarship loan


is limited to only those students attending Florida law schools who have completed two full
semesters of study. A total not to exceed $3,000 may be loaned to each applicant. Application


forms and additional information may be obtained from


The Florida Bar


Foundation


Suite


300, 880 N.


Orange Avenue, Orlando,


Florida 32801.


Eldridge Hart Loan Fund
Mrs. Marion Houghtelin Hart.
assist them in completing their


loan fund was established through the wil


The loan fund
legal training.


is made available


of the late


to worthy law students to





STUDENT PROGRAMS AND SERVICES/65


L. David Llewelyn Loan Fund


- Friends and family of L.


David Llewelyn have established


this loan fund in memory of David Llewelyn,


1975.


Giddings E. Mabry Loan Fund


- This loan fund was established by Mrs.


William J.


Dann


r., in honor of her father.


Frank E. Maloney Memorial Loan Fund


- Students


alumni and other friends of the late


Dean Frank E.


Maloney established


as a memorial a fund to assist law students.


Miami Beach Bar Association Scholarship Fund


- Applicants must be, or have


been


resident of Dade County attending a Florida Law School and must be at least second semester
student in good academic standing. The student's grades must meet the approval of the Bar's


Scholarship Loan Committee. Funds


are limited to $500 and are repayable without interest


one year


after graduation.


The financial need of the student is of paramount importance


and the Bar will require an explanation of the circumstances of the student's financial need.


Phi Alpha Delta Loans Phi Alpha Delta Law Fraternity,


international offers a program


of Endowment Fund Loans to law student members of the Fraternity who are in need of


such loans to complete their law school


education.


,500.00 and repayment does not begin unti


The maximum amount of such loans is


after graduation.


n addition, the Fraternity


offers a program of Endowment Fund Loans to members of minority groups who are attending
law school.


Delta Phi Loan Fund


-Ph


Delta Ph


International Lega


Fraternity provides loans


to local chapter members in amounts up to $500.


Recipients may repay these loans without


interest within two years subsequent to graduation from law school.

Dean Slagle Memorial Loan Fund An anonymous donor has provided a fund for loans


to needy law students with good academic records.
students.


C. J. TeSelle Memorial Fund


Preference is given to third-year law


- An anonymous donor has provided a fund for loans to


needy law students with good academic records.


Preference is given to third-year law


students.


The University Catalog or the University Student Financial Aid Bulletin


should be con-


suited for
students.


information as to other scholarship and loan funds


that may be available to law


Short-Term


Loan


Funds


Administered


the


College


Law


The ten funds listed below are administered by the College of Law internally and can


T~Ij- anw^ rla ntL.# a


U ~ r]~ ~LI 1 *L:( *L LI1A AY CI)IA LA)(~L L I:L~ CL ~~ I:nCL~:~~ IC~Y C~rr in rr n






66/STUDENT PROGRAMS AND SERVICES


Marshal


Association, the student organization of the College of Law, in conjunction with


the Sun Bank of Gainesville. Loans are made on the basis of


individual student need.


Martha B.


Culpepper Memorial Loan Fund


This fund was established in memory of


Martha B. Culpepper, the first administrative assistant of the University of Florida Law Review,
to provide short-term loans to students who have completed two semesters of Law School.


Harriet-Horner Memorial Loan Fund
Harriett and Jack Horner, provides short-terr


- This fund, established in memory of George
n loans to students in the second and third years


law study.


Justice Story Book Exchange Loan Fund


- This


short-term loan fund was established


by the student book exchange to provide emergency loans for students who have completed


two semesters of law


school.


Young Lawyers Section


- John Marshall Bar Association Emergency Loan Fund


Young Lawyers Section of The Florida Bar


has made available to the John Marshall


Association funds for emergency loans up to $200 to students in their second semester or
above.


Minority Law Student Emergency Loan Fund


- Loans in the amount of $200 per


academic year


are awarded through the Assistant Dean for Minority Affairs.


Established to


provide short-term relief for unexpected happenings.


Laura T. Plum Loan Fund


This short-term loan fund was established through the wil


of the late Laura T. Plum to assist worthy and needy law students.


Randolph Ross Thomas, Jr. Memorial Loan Fund


made available to students
Randolph Ross Thomas, Jr


Housing


On-Campus


- Short-term loans from this fund are


in the graduate tax program on the basis


ingle students may find accommodations


of need


in on-campus,


in memory of


light house-


keeping apartments,


and married students in on-campus married housing.


These are owned


and operated by the University of Florida.


Off-Campus There are numerous off-campus


modern apartments near the University.


For further information on housing for single and married students contact:


Off-campus


On-campus


Supervisor, Off-campus Housing


Director of Housing





STUDENT PROGRAMS AND SERVICES/6


juvenile
revision


justice, sunshine legislation and privacy,,


legal concerns


of the elderly, constitutional


, bar reform and ethics, complaint handling and ombudsman services.


Students at the Center are involved


in activities


such as testimony, public hearings,


publication,


administrative hearings, and legislative analysis and drafting.


Publications include educational pamphlets, academic lega


articles, testimony, court


briefs, and technical project reports. Funding sources for Center projects include federal and


state agencies, private corporations, foundations,


and the Florida Legislature.


Applications are accepted from students in the third semester and beyond


interviews are conducted upon project position openings. Students are


personal


selected for partic-


ipation on the basis of undergraduate, graduate and law
Student participants are provided financial compensation.


school record and


experience.


Clinical


Program


The translation of legal theory


and studying


clinical programs at the College of Law.


"non-traditional"


into practice, representing actual


in actual


skills of lawyering, is available to students enrolled


The total spectrum of lega


cases
in the


practice, from inter


viewing, counseling, case development, research, discovery and negotiation, through the
full range of trial skills can be experienced in the context and immediacy of representing


indigent clients. Legal concepts such as divorce, eviction,


adoption,


administrative regula-


tions, consumer's rights,


arrest,


confronted in a clinical program.
riencing and applying these rule


bail, probation and habeas corpus take on reality when
Procedural and evidentiary learning is enhanced by expe-
s in concrete cases.


Students may enroll in one of two programs: The Civil Clinic or the Criminal Clinic:

(a) The Civil Clinic operates out of the College of Law and represents clients whose


financial posture and civil legal problems


meet guidelines set by the Florida Supreme Court.


Students are given primary responsibility for handling each


case. Close


supervision by faculty


supervisors who are experienced members of The Florida Bar ensures professional respon-
sibility and a climate encouraging feedback and reflection.


The Civil Clinic provides a one-semester experience


n all practice


areas of civil legal


practice and an exposure to a variety of substantive areas of law.


In addition there is a


classroom component in which the student performs in controlled simulated situations which


are videotaped and critiqued by peers and supervisors.


In the course of the semester the


student will confront problems of interviewing, counseling, investigation, discovery, nego-


tiation and handle all areas of trial practice,


including preparation of trial tactics, presentation


nf o ,iAonr'o ntin orrrenatnn r{ x/itnnccac 2nrd rl tinrnckln tAuith thi trier ni f3r't Pnrtfirinrtinnf






68/STUDENT PROGRAMS AND SERVICES

Selections for the Clinic will be made on the basis of these applications. Although there
are no formal course prerequisites, Evidence and Professional Responsibility are strongly


encouraged prior to beginning the

(b) The Criminal Law Clinic c


clinic program.


ommences with a course in Criminal Practice for 3 units


of credit, following which students are certified a
term to the Criminal Clinic course for 6 units of


.s interns and may progress in the following
credit. Enrollment in the Criminal Practice


course


limited to 24 students.


Twelve of these positions are reserved for students who


wish to progress to the Clinic course.


The remaining 12 positions are available to students


who wish to take just the Criminal Practice course. Application is made in the middle of


the semester before enrollment,


normally the two weeks before regular preregistration.


Application forms are available during this time at the Clinic Office,


Room 323.


Criminal Practice course is organized largely upon a Practice Court motif,


provision made for more conventional teaching methods such


as lecture and


class discussion.


During the course the


class


as a group will develop a single simulated criminal


case


through


the entire formal criminal process from arrest through trial. Other more abbreviated simu-


lations will also


be conducted. The course is designed to provide the student with an overview


of the entire criminal pretrial and trial processes and to acquaint the student with the basic
lawyering skills required to function in this context.


n the following term students who elect to do so will be assigned


as interns to either


the Office of Public Defender or State Attorney for the Eighth Judicial Circuit in Gainesville.
While assigned to these offices, interns will perform all attorney functions of the office under


the supervision of selected staff members of the offices.


During the course of the semester,


interns will be assigned to misdemeanor, felony, and juvenile


involved in interviewing clients and witnesses, investigating


cases


cases,


and may expect to be


doing all pretrial pleading


and discovery, negotiating and conducting actual jury and nonjury trials.


In all of these


activities, interns will be closely supervised by staff members of the offices who, in turn,
will be supervised by members of the law faculty.


For further information,


see course description under LW 6940,


6941


and 694


Inter-


ested parties may contact Professor Don Peters (for the Civil Clinic) and Professor James
Pierce (for the Criminal Clinic) at the Office of the Clinics at the College of Law.


Distinguished


Professor


Visiting


Program


The University of Florida Law Center Assocation periodically assists the College of Law


in attracting eminent law teachers,


jurists, and public figures to participate in and teach


seminar courses. Past visitors have included the late Tom C.
a


Clark,


Associate Justice of the


a a. A" k*I *.





STUDENT PROGRAMS AND SERVICES/69


O'Connell was a


Chief Justice


successful


justice on the Florida Supreme Court from 1955


-1967


1967 before he was appointed president of the University.


completion of the funding for the Chair,


He served as
Prior to the


it was used as a visiting position to


distinguished scholars at the College of Law for seven years.
1984-85 to find the distinguished educator to fill this Chair.


The Ed Rood Eminent Scholar Chair


A search will be conducted


of Trial Advocacy and Procedure was established


in December


1983 by combining the gifts of $500,000 from


Tampa alumnus Edward B.


Rood and $100,000 from the West Palm Beach law firm of Montgomery, Lyta


Reiter, Denny


and Search with $400,000 from the state to


create a million dollar


Chair for teaching and


research at the College of Law.


Rood graduated from the University of Florida in
administration and was awarded his law degree from the


1939 with a degree in business


University in


He is senior


partner in the Tampa firm of Rood and Webster.

Created by the Florida legislature in 1979, the Eminent Scholar Trust Fund is designed
to attract the world's premier educators and researchers to Florida universities. For every
$600,000 a university receives it may claim $400,000 from the trust fund to create a million


dollar endowment. A search will be conducted in


984-85 to find a distinguished scholar


to fill the Rood Chair.


A gif


of $600,000 from the estate of former University of Florida professor and law


alumnus Huber C.


Hurst and $400,000 from the state's Eminent


Scholar


Trust Fund has


established the Huber C. Hurst Chair at the College of Law.


Established in May


Chair honors Huber C. Hurst, a student, teacher, and


loyal supporter of the University. Born in Degraff,


Ohio, Hurst graduated from Ohio State


University and later earned his law degree from UF in


1927.


distinguished career, he served as director of the Federal Housi


During the course of his
ng Administration and as


Jacksonville Postmaster as well as a professor of business law and economics at UF for 26


years. Hurst willed his entire estate,


valued in


excess


of $1


million


, to the University. A


search will be conducted by the College of Law in
the Chair.


984-85 to find a premier


scholar


Minority


Affairs


The College of Law is committed to providing minorities


with full opportunity


for the


study of law and increasing the number of minorities represented in the legal profession.


This commitment is reflected in the admission policy (see Adm


ssion Policy), recruitment,


financial aid


, and academic and social support activities.


These efforts are designed to


provide a positive and supportive experience for minority students in their pursuit of a legal


education.
. f *


Interested minority group members are strongly encouraged to apply. For more
a. -k A Sh a a. At *. St aiu jk *






70/STUDENT PROGRAMS AND SERVICES


In addition to coordinating activities between students and employers, the staff of the
placement office is available at all times to provide individual counseling to students. Assisting


in resume preparation,


advising on interviewing techniques, and providing information con-


cerning the variety of positions and opportunities available are


he placement office.


ust a few of the activities of


A placement bulletin is also available for graduates of the Holland Law


Center.

Typically approximately 70% of those law graduates seeking employment have jobs at


graduation.
$27,000.


The average starting salary for the May


983 graduating class was approximately





STUDENT PROGRAMS AND SERVICES/


International


Law


Programs


International Law Society


The International Law Society is a student a


ssoc


nation affiliated with


he American


Association of Student


International Law Societies


n Washington, D.C. Membership is open


to all interested law students.


international Law Society conducts a speakers program,


with a series of luncheons throughout the year with a guest speaker experienced in


inter-


national law and foreign relations.


international Law Society also


administers the


ticipation in the Phillip C.


essup


international Law Moot Court competition.


International Law Moot Court Competition


The law school participates annually in the Phillip C.


Jessup


International Law Moot


Court competition.


The program is administered by the


International Law


Society, but is


open to all law students who participate by means of intramural competitions conducted
each year. At the beginning of each Spring semester a five member team is chosen to represent


the law


school


in the annual Phillip C.


essup


international Law Moot Court competition.


The initial, regional round is held each year at a law school in the South.


team goes on to the national finals held ea
of that competition argues against teams


in April in Washington,


The successful
and the winner


from law schools from around the world.


subject each year deals with a hypothetical but timely issue of international law, with memo-


rials (briefs) prepared for argument before the


International


Court of


justice.


International Summer Law Programs


Since


1970 the College of Law has sponsored summer law programs abroad,


allow a student to study international and comparative


law topics


which


at associated lega


tutions in other countries.
Inquiries concerning plans
for Academic Affairs.


In the past the two programs have been offered in alternate years.


for the summer of 1984


should be referred to the Assistant Dean


There are international


summer


aw programs


offered by universities other than the


University of Florida.


Before enrolling in such other programs, a student must check with


Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs to ascertain whether or not residence credit and


academic credit may be transferred to the University of Florida.


A list of A.B.A.


summer law programs located both in the United States and abroad
Administration Office for student use.

Cambridge-Warsaw International Trade Law Program


The College of Law, in cooperation with


approved


is available in the


Trinity College of Cambridge University and


the Institute of Lega


Sciences of the Polish Academy of Sciences,


program in England and Poland.


conducts a summer


The program is conducted entirely in English,


taught by


S...I-- L -.. . ---t" .. 1 - 1 I ___-- I . .. 1 r_ m L-L- 1_ _J .1 A






72/STUDENT PROGRAMS AND SERVICES


summer
August.


aw program in Mexico City.


The program begins


in late June and ends in mid-


Conducted entirely in English, the program is taught by faculty members from law
schools in both the United States and Mexico. United States law students are offered an
opportunity to study a variety of subject ranging from the broad areas of International and
Comparative Law to the more specific area of Latin American and particularly Mexican Law.
All courses are conducted in accordance with the requirements of the Association of Amer-


ican Law Schools and the American Bar

Law Center Association


Association.


The University of Florida Law Center


Association was


formed in


as a support


group for the College of Law.


a 501 (c)


3) type organization under the Internal Revenue


Code, serving


as a repository for nearly all of the private support given to the College.


Unrestricted monies provided through the


Association help fund a number of programs and


purposes at the College of Law including student scholarships and loans, placement, library


support services, the Graduate Tax


The Law Center


Program,


Trustees were organize


visiting professors and research.

d in 1960 and act as an informal board of


advisors to the Dean and College.


They are involved in managing the assets of the Law


., legislative liaison work and securing private funds.


were instrumental in the successful campaign to raise funds for Bruton-Geer Hall


for the Endowed Chairs at the College of Law. The


'48, a practicing attorney in Jacksonville,

A second support group also plays a


e Trustees
as well as


984-85 Trustees Chairman is Mark Hulsey


Florida.


key role in assisting the College of Law. The College


of Law Alumni Council was established in


972 and reorganized in 1983.


Its membership


includes representatives from each class of the College who assist with the Annual Enrichment


Fund and class reunions.


The Alumni Council also is involved in continuing legal education,


career development, and special events at the College of Law.


Tampa attorney,


- -


T. Terrell Sessums


the 1984-85 Alumni Council President.




m


*


-a-
.4.
,h
ka


Center Association,


1 1111





STUDENT PROGRAMS AND SERVICES I


Law Center Association
Board of Trustees


Sam Y.
Robert
William
John C.


AIIlgood Jr.


New Port


Richey


Alan G.


Austin Jr., Leesburg


Belcher, St.


Bierley,


Greer, Miam


Harrell, Pensacola


Petersburg


Tampa


W. Samuel Holland


Dan H.


Miami


Honeywell, Orlando


Susan H.
Robert A.


Dennis


James


Black, Jacksonville


Bryan,


A. Calfee


Gainesville
Gainesville


D. Camp Jr., Ft. Lauderdale


Mark Hulsey, Jacksonville
E. L. Roy Hunt, Gainesville


Michael L. Jamieson,


Rutledge R.


Tampa


Liles, Jacksonville


Sam T. Dell, Gainesville


Robert Q.


Marston


Gainesville


C. Harris


Dittmar,


W. Dexter Douglass,


acksonville


Tallahassee


Robert M. Montgomery Jr
Frank T. Read, Gainesville


West Palm Beach


Lucius M.
Charles B.


Dyal Jr.,


Tampa


Edwards, Ft. Myers


Doyle Rogers,


T. Terrell Sessums,


Palm Beach


Tampa


Raymond Ehrlich,


Tallahassee


George T. Eidson Jr., Orlando


Sidney A. Stubbs, West Palm Beach


J. Ardene Wiggins,


Gainesville


Robert L. Gibson


Lake Wales


Council members and class representatives meet at the College of Law.











ORGANIZATIONS,

ACTIVITIES,


HONORS


AND


AWARDS


John Marshall Bar Association


The John Marshall Bar


Association


the student bar


assoc


nation affiliated with the Law


Student Di


vision of the American Bar


Association and The Florida Bar. Membership


is open


to all law students.


MBA arranges for prominent members of the Bar to address


law students.


The organization also appoints student members to faculty committees in order to


achieve


student input into matters of common interest.


In addition to service functions


MBA sponsors


many


social events throughout the year.


The Council of Ten


The Council of Ten is an organization primarily concerned with the dev


new programs


elopment of


of benefit to students in the College of Law. An affiliate of the John Marshall


Bar Association


, the Council has been recognized by the American Bar


most outstanding organization of its kind among the nation


Association as the


schools.


Members are


selected on the basis


of interviews


conducted by the Council during fall and spring semesters.


Current Council projects include the


Teaching Fellows


Tutorial Program for first semester


students


, the Judicial Clerkship Program,


academic advisement booklet


Volunteer


income


Tax Assistance


Program,


Clerking stipends


and Professors' Handbook.


Black Law Student Association


The purpose of BLSA is to provide Black students and other students of


with the means of expressing their


similar interest


views of an orderly and constructive fashion.


This organization also aids in the recruitment of Black Students to the law school and
provides academic assistance for entering Black students during their period of transition
from an undergraduate to a legal academic environment.
Environmental Law Society


ELS is an


assoc


nation open to all students interested in doing legal research on specific


projects for environmental groups.
Spanish American Law Student Association


SALSA


is an association open to all students interested in a cultural educational


with Latin American Law students. The


assoc


exchange


iation aids in the recruitment of Latin American


ct inpntc tAn thp Iw


crhnnl and nrnvidep ardpmir ;iktanrp to all mpmhprs.






ORGANIZATIONS, ACTIVITIES, HONORS AND AWARDS/75


Legal Fraternities


Alpha Delta Since 1924,


the Duncan U


Fletcher Chapter of Ph


Alpha Delta Law


Fraternity has provided a balance of service and social activities for law students, faculty,


and alumni. Recent programs include tours of various Florida prisons,
Supreme Court, and numerous, well-known state and local lecturers.


Phi Delta Phi Cockrel


fraternity.


a trip to the Florida


nn is the local chapter of the nation's oldest and largest legal


Inn activities provide a professional and social atmosphere in which members may


associate informally with both faculty and Ph


Delta Ph


alumni


members of the Florida


bench and bar. Inn members are


eligible for


scholastic and merit awards, as well


as national


fraternity benefits such as student loans and group insurance plans.
rush twice a year and all students are invited to participate.


Cockrell


Inn conducts


Delta Theta Phi The Fred M.


Vincent Senate of the Delta Theta Phi Law Fraternity was


recently re-chartered at the University of Florida in


1982.


Though a young chapter, Delta


Theta Phi is a growing organization intent upon providing a unique opportunity for students,
faculty, and alumni to participate in the development of an alternative social and service


fraternity. In the tradition of one of the nation's oldest fraternities,


the Fred M.


Vincent Senate


maintains and promotes high standards of both academic and social achievement.


In addition to the organizations mentioned above, the law


school also


has Law Student


Divisions of both The Florida Bar and the American Bar Association.

Moot Court


The Moot Court program


currently encompasses participation


in six


state and national


appellate competitions. Members are selected by means of intramural competitions con-


ducted every semester.


These competitions are open to al


students in the two semesters


subsequent to their successful completion of Appellate Advocacy.
Each spring semester the Moot Court team sponsors the Maguire,


Cup Competition.


Voorhis and Wells


This competition is open to all students who have completed Appellate


Advocacy. The Cup Competition culminates in a final round in which four competitors argue


before a panel of state and federal


udges.


Plaques,


books, awards and money prizes are


awarded to the finalists.
Persons selected for Moot Court membership are eligible to participate in a number of


inter-collegiate competitions.


The National Moot Court Competition


eld each fall.


ing virtually all law schools in the United States, the National competition has a regional


round in Atlanta, sponsored by the Georgia Bar,


and a final competition in New York City


sponsored by the Bar of the City of New York.
In the spring, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill sponsors a competition


in which approximately thirty law schools participate.


Also in the spring,


The Florida Bar


sponsors a statewide competition (won by the University of Florida 16 of the last


held in conjunction with the annual Bar convention.


23 years)


The final round of argument is held








76/ORGANIZATIONS, ACTIVITIES, HONORS AND AWARDS


er
x xx


t"


i. '9:'btt


a ilkM


.lsatn.


-: T pctta





ORGANIZATIONS, ACTIVITIES, HONORS AND AWARDS/77

University of Florida Law Review


The University of Florida Law Review is a I
student Editorial Board assisted by the faculty ad'


egal journal published quarterly by the
visor. The publication consists of articles


written by legal
members of the
the student Edito
achievement. At
completing the f


scholars
Law Rev
rial Board
the begir
irst year c


expert in various areas of the law, and works prepared by student
'ew. All work is selected, edited and prepared for publication by
i. Law Review candidates are selected on the basis of high academic
dining of the second year, the top ten percent of the class satisfactorily
:urriculum is invited to participate on the Review. All other students


in good
may wri
In additi
publicati
nor can


standing
te in the (
on to the
ion in the
academic


who
3pen
open
Law
cred


have successfully completed
Writing Competition during
writing competition, any stuck
Review, but this approach ca
lit be given. For regular law


Legal Resear
the first seme
Jent may subr
innot lead to
Review partic


ch and Writii
.ster of their
nit a work to
Law Review
ipants, up to


ng LW 5792
second year.
compete for
membership
three hours


of academic credit can be earned with approval of the faculty advisor.


Scholastic


Honoraries


Order of the Coif


The College of Law has a chapter


with chapters
spirit of careful
of scholarship.
nomination is
bership student
for graduation


at the leading law scho
study and to mark in a
Election to the society
determined once each
ts must be in the upper
with honors.


r of The Order of the Coif, a legal scholarship society
lols of the country. The purpose of Coif is to foster a
suitable manner those who have attained a high level
is based on scholarship and character. Eligibility for
year (normally in June). To be considered for mem-
ten percent of three graduating classes and be eligible


Phi Kappa Phi

Phi Kappa Phi is a national honor society, the primary objective of which is the rec-
ognition and encouragement of superior scholarship in all fields of study. Honor graduates
within the top ten percent of each class are eligible for nomination.


Prizes


and


Awards


Students


American Jurisprudence Awards. The
bound volume of an appropriate title from
the highest grade in each section of the follow


publishers of American jurisprudence award a
American Jurisprudence to the student making
ing courses: Constitutional Law 1 & 2. Contracts






78/ORGANIZATIONS, ACTIVITIES,


HONORS AND AWARDS


The Bureau of National Affairs Award.


- A one-year subscription to U.S.


Law Week


is given annually to the graduating student


who has made the most satisfactory progress in


the senior year.


The Nathan Burkan Memorial Awards.


- Sponsored by the American


Society of Com-


posers, Authors and Publishers, these awards are presented each year to the students at this


school submitting the best


essays


on the subject of copyright law.


Tom A. Cole Memorial Award.


To encourage excellence in trial advocacy, the Public


Defender's office of the Sixth Judicial Circuit of Florida has established an award in memory


of alumnus Tom A.
the highest grade in


Cole.


An award of $50 is presented each term to the student making


Criminal Procedure Adversary System.


Corpus juris Secundum Awards.


- Each year the publishers of Corpus Juris Secundum


award a bound volume of an appropriate title from Corpus


uris Secundum to the member


of each class who is deemed to hve made the most significant contribution toward overall
legal education.


William C. Gaither Memorial Award.


- A gift, the income of which is used to encourage,


promote, and support appellate advocacy within the College of Law, annually recognizes
student for outstanding leadership and service to the College's Moot Court program.


William M. Hicks Award.


- The author of Trial Handbook for Florida Lawyers awards


volume each term to the student making the highest grade in Practice Court.


The Attorney's Title Insurance Fund.


- A business trust of Florida


, closely affiliated with


The Florida Bar, annually awards cash prizes to law students in the law schools of Florida


for papers in the field of real property law.
paper at each school.


A cash prize


of $1


50 is awarded for the best


Little, Brown Award.


- Little


Brown


& Company awards an appropriate book annually


to the student making the highest grade in


aw and Medicine


LAW 6720.


Local Government Section of the Florida Bar Award.


- The Local Government Section


of The Florida Bar awards a plaque each year to the student receiving the highest grade in
Local Government Law.


Frank E. Maloney Memorial Award.


- The Fletcher Chapter of Ph


Alpha Delta Law


Fraternity annually presents this award to the student who has rendered the most outstanding


service to the fraternity.


The award consists of $25


and a certificate.


Frank E. Maloney Environmental Law Writing Contest.
by the Environmental Law Section of The Florida Bar will be


of the Florida law schools.


- This annual contest sponsored
: open to law students from each


The author of the winning article will be a guest, at the section





ORGANIZATIONS, ACTIVITIES, HONORS AND AWARDS


in leadership and service to the law school.


The award consists of a cash prize and a


certificate.


Claude Pepper Award.


This honor is accorded annually to the member of the Fletcher


Chapter of Ph


Alpha Delta Law Fraternity who


evidences


distinction in scholarship and


campus


activities


, thereby indicating a possible interest in going into public life in the future.


The award consists of a prize


of $100 and a


citation.


Phi Delta Ph


Award.


- Cockrell Inn of Ph


Delta Ph


International Legal Fraternity


annually recognizes
school by inscribing


the student who makes the highest average in the first


the student's name on a


semester at law


scholarship plaque.


Phi Delta Phi Graduate of the Year.


- Each spring, Cockrell


Inn of Phi Delta Phi selects


a candidate for the


International Fraternity's


Graduate of the Year


Contest. Candidates are


awarded appropriate
of up to $300.00.


certificates of recognition and may win a cash prize for the local inn


Prentice-Hall Prize.


- Prentice-Hall,


awards a bronze plaque annually to each of


the leading students in Corporate Taxation,


Income Taxation of Estates and Trusts


and Part-


nership Taxation.


Jonathan Norton Roth Memorial Award in Law and Medicine.


- This


award


as estab-


lished by Dr. and Mrs.


Neal M.


Roth of Jacksonville to honor the memory of their son,


onathan.


The award is presented annually to the


student who


evidences


interest


, ability,


and distinguished achievement in the area of Law and Medicine.


The Campbell Thornal Memorial.


- This fund was


established in memory of Mr.


justice


Campbell Thornal by his friends.


Income from the first $10,000 will be devoted to


support


of the Campbell Thornal Moot Court Competition,


and any additional income will be used


to provide Campbell Thornal Scholarships for deserving law students in this College.


Trial Lawyers Section of The Florida Bar Award.


- The Trial Lawyers Section awards a


ticket of admission to the Trial Advocacy program sponsored by the Trial Lawyers Section
of The Florida Bar. A ticket will be awarded twice a year to the outstanding student parti-


cipating in Practice Court.


Recipients of this award must have graduated,


taken the Bar and


be admitted to practice prior to the date of the program.


The University of Florida Society of International Law Essay Award.


- To insure the


continued contribution of The Florida Bar to the development of the practice of private


international law in this


State, the University of Florida Society of


International Law


occa-


sionally awards a cash prize to the student of th
a chosen topic of private international law.


law school submitting the best


essay






80/ORGANIZATION


, ACTIVITIES, HONORS AND AWARDS


Attorneys' Title Insurance Fund Grant. The Attorneys' Title Insurance Fund,


trust of Florida lawyers closely affiliated with


a business


The Florida Bar, has established an annual


grant of $1,000 to supplement the salary of a distinguished professor or professors in the


field of real property. The grant is presently held b

Stephen C. O'Connell Chair. The first endowed


y Professor Mandell Glicksberg.


chair at the University of Florida College


of Law recognizes the contributions of Stephen C. O'Connell, sixth president of the University
of Florida, and former Chief justice of the Florida Supreme Court. The O'Connell Chair was
held by Visiting Professor Roger A. Cunningham during the 1982 spring semester, by visiting
Professor Rennard J. Strickland during the 1983 spring semester, and will be held by Professor
Walter Raushenbush in 1983-84.























































, < x x


* S
*** *^ ;
i * .. .


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1: de v y K d dx :


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(i







CURRICULUM


The program of study consists of


six semesters or its equivalent of work beginning in


he fall or spring semesters of the academic year. As at most law schools, the first year


curriculum consists of prescribed cou


rses.


The broad purpose of the law school's first year


is to teach the student how to read and analyze


cases,


and how to research points of law


efficiently and express them clearly in the context of subject matter basic to the student's


future legal education.


This objective is to be achieved by offering a range of courses that


represent the fields of commerce, personal injury, property, procedure, and public law.


The curriculum is the subject of continuing faculty study.


The course offerings listed


below govern students commencing their law studies during the 1984-85 academic year:



Fall Class


Fall Semester


Spring Semester


Summer Term


Contracts


Contracts II
Torts II


Civil Procedure I
Criminal Law
Jurisprudence
Research & Writing


Civil Procedure II
Property I
Constitutional Law I
Appellate Advocacy


Property


Constitutional


Electives


*Those students who enter in the fall semester and do not enroll for the


immediately following their second semester must take Property
II at the first possible opportunity thereafter.



Spring Class


summer term


and Constitutional Law


Spring Semester


Contracts


Torts


Civil Procedure I
Criminal Law
Jurisprudence
Research & Writing


Summer Term
(Required)**
Contracts II


Torts II


Property


Fall Semester


Electives
Civil Procedure II
Property II


Constitutional


Law I


Appellate Advocacy





CURRICULUM


Additional


Requirements


Legal Writing/Appellate Advocacy Requirement


These courses are graded on the basis of Honors


Satisfactory (S),


Deferred Grade


or Unsatisfactory


U), and must be completed with a grade of S or better to fulfil


requirement, even if this necessitates repeating both courses.
Students who must repeat either or both of these courses must do


opportunity after the first year, and failure to do so may resul


so at the first available


exclusion from the College


of Law. Students must make arrangements for repetition with the Director of the Legal Writing


and Research Program


Repeated hours may not be counted toward the minimum load


requirement nor toward the 86 hour graduation requirement.


Second-


and


Third-Year


Requirements


Professional Responsibility Requirement


All students are required to satisfactorily complete LAW 6750,


Professional Responsibility


and the


Legal Profession,


in their fourth or fifth


semester. For purposes of th


latter require-


ment, the summer term


is considered a semester.


Seminar and Advanced Writing Requirement


Each student is required to accomplish a major fin


individual research. Effective with the entering c


shed written work


of January, 1981


as a resu


students must complete


this requirement through the vehicle of a seminar. All seminar offerings wil


the opportunity to complete the advanced writing requirement.


afford students


The intended purpose of


the seminar requirement is to give all students an intense, small group learning experience


with close interpersonal contact with faculty and other students.


commenced no later than the fifth semester.


The program should be


Students are also encouraged to enroll


seminars for purposes other than satisfying the advanced writing require


alternative mode of evaluation will


ent. Whether


be available for those students who do not require


advanced writing


certification is left to the discretion of the individual facu


ty member


conducting the seminar. No more than 1


students will be permitted in any particular seminar


except upon approval of the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs and the


professor teaching


the seminar.
Students who commenced their studies in the College of Law prior to 1981 may satisfy


' I


*^~l~- iAk a AM n r a F a n .


rl. L~.,,,. .. .. nrJ ... )l.: . ..... :l .. .. J.:. . A .t-ll. ..:.. .. .






CURRICULUM


Designated Second-Year Courses
The Curriculum Committee of the faculty has designated the courses listed below as


second year courses
and methodological


. In the opinion of the Committee these courses provide substantive
preparation for third year courses.


LAW 6010
LAW 6063
LAW 6330
LAW 6430
LAW 6520
LAW 6600
LAW 6750


Sales
Corporations
Evidence
Estates and Trusts
Administrative Law


Income Taxation (or Law 660


Professional Respon


Tax I)


sibility


Sales provides methodological preparation for the study of a codified branch of the
common law and other branches of the law that are largely codified.
Corporations provides an understanding of the corporate form of doing business in
preparation for commercial, business planning, finance, and some tax courses.
Evidence provides essential background in the elements of proofmaking in preparation
for all trial practice and litigation courses.
Estates and Trusts provides essential background in the transmission of property at death
and intervivos in preparation for more advanced property, estate administration and some
tax courses.
Administrative Law provides basic background in administrative rule making, adjudi-
cation and practice in preparation for many public law courses.
Income Taxation provides an introduction to the internal revenue code, is a prerequisite


to all other tax courses and is useful in many commercial,


property, and planning courses.


Professional Responsibility examines the basic tenets of professional


responsibility that


should be in the mind of the student in resolving every legal issue that is confronted in the
second and third years.
These courses are not mandatory and few students will be able to take all of them in


the second year.


Therefore, although the Committee anticipates that second year students


will make up most of their enrollment, the courses remain open to third year students.


Some students wil


the second year.


have selected a firm area of course concentration before beginning


The Committee recommends that those students place priority on taking


courses from the intended area of concentration and select remaining electives from the
designated second year courses.


Course Offerings by


Area


Other than the requirements listed above,


second and


hird year


students are free to


choose their courses from any area, subject only to prerequisites which may exist. (See
Prerequisite Chart.)
T n n-c,,ra n',ncrn tn m krn l rnti rco rt ctmri it ic rarnmmpnrljrl ctldanntc clp rt n







CURRICULUM


Commercial Law


LAW 6010-
LAW 6020 -
LAW 6040 -
LAW 6050 -


Sales


Commercial Paper .... ......
Consumer Law . . . . . .
Debtor-Creditor Law ........


* c.....
* C C C C S C
* 0*0C C


* c c C 0 C C C

CC9 * C CCC


. . . . . . 2/3
. . . . . . 2/3
.. ....... 2/3


LAW 6051
LAW 6052
LAW 6062


LAW 6063 -
*LAW 6064 -
LAW 6080 -


- Secured Transactions


- Creditors'


in Personal Property


...... .3


Remedies and Bankruptcy


- Business Organizations ......... ...


Corporations .....
Corporate Finance


S. . . .3
2/3


& Reorganization


Insurance...


. 2/3
.. 2/3


Perspective


LAW 6200
LAW6210
LAW 6220
LAW 6221
LAW 6226


- Legal Process


-Advanced


jurisprudence


......... 2/3
. .. . . .. .. .2


- English Legal History .................
- Legal History Other than Common Law
-American Legal History ............


LAW 6250 -
LAW 6260 -


Comparative Law
International Law


S. . . . . . . . . . . ....... . . . . . . .3


Procedure


LAW 6111
LAW 6112


* LAW 6302-
LAW 6304-
LAW6320-
LAW 6330-


LAW 6340


- Criminal Procedure-Police


- Criminal Procedure-Adversary


& Police Practices


. .. . . . . . . .. .3


system


. .~ ....3


Federal Practice


Appellate Practice
Remedies .......


Evidence ..


.. .2


.. 2/3
4 4


Conflict of Laws


Property


LAW 6420
LAW 6430
*LAW 6433
*LAW 6440
* LAW6450
LAW 6460
LAW 6624


- Land Transactions


Estates


& Finance


Trusts..


*. 3/4


S. . . . . . .3


- Future Interests


- Fiduciary Administration I ....
- Estate Planning ..... .......
- Land Use Planning and Control
- Fiduciary Administration II ....


. . . . .... .... .3


Public Law


LAW 6470


- Environmental Law


. . .... .. ..3/4


. . . ..2
t ft 2/3


S. .3


. .. .......... 2/3


.................................. . .... ... .3


.. .. .3


. . . . . . . .2
. . . . . . 3/4


.... . .. .2


.......


.. t ... ....







CURRICULUM


LAW 6552
LAW 6560
LAW 6570
LAW 6580


- Regulated


Industries


- Securities Regulation ........


Patent


Food


Trademark


* CC. SC*4 .. C CSC. . 46. . 2/3
************ *C *5 5 5 5*5 5 S *SS *55 3*ii
. . . . . . . . . . . . . .32
. ... ... .... . .2


, and Copyright Law


, Drug and Cosmetic Law


. . . . . .2


Taxation


LAW 6531
LAW 6600


- Local Government Law, Taxation and Finance
- Income Taxation . . . . . . .


.................. 2/3
5 C C C e 4 S g C C C C S 4 S C. C C .4


LAW 6601


*LAW 6606 -
*LAW6610-
*LAW6616-
* LAW 6620 -


*LAW 6621


- Taxation I


. . .*...... *....... . 2


Taxation II


Corporate Taxation ...
Partnership Taxation .
Taxation of Gratuitous


- Income Taxation of Estates


S .. * *. . 2


.... *.. 25 *** *** .. *.. .2
S. .. ....... ........... .... ........ .2


Transfers


& Trusts


Legal Skills


*LAW 6361
*LAW 6362
* LAW 6363
LAW 6380
LAW 6385
*LAW 6712
*LAW 6940
* LAW 6941
* LAW 6942


- Trial Advocacy
- Practice Cou r
- Trial Practice
- Legal Counsel
- Lawyers as Ne


- Domestic Relations


- Civil Clinic


- Criminal Law Litigation
-Criminal Clinic ......


. .... . ... . ...... . ..... . .... .. .. . . .3
t. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . .. .3
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... . . .4
ing . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .2
gotiators . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . ..2


Practice m


. . . . . ... . ...... .3


9 (6 in


summer)


. . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . ..... .3


Unclassified


LAW 6261


LAW 6474-
LAW 6510-
LAW 6710 -
LAW 6720 -
LAW 6730-
LAW 6750 -
LAW 6751 -
LAW 6760 -


- International Bu


siness


Agricultural Law ......
Political and Civil Rights
Family Law ........
Law and Medicine ....


Admiralty


S. . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . 2/3

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2
. .. .. .... . ..... . . ... .. ... .3
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
.. .......................... ..... .....


Professional Responsibility and the Lega


Law Office Economics


Legal Accounting


* C S C 4
.e 555. 5 *


* S C C S


Profession

C C C .* g C C


. . . . . . .2

. . . . . . . .2


LAW 6905
LAW 6930


LAW 6950 -


LAW 6951
LAW 6953


1 to3


- Independent Study Course
- Selected Legal Problems ..


Law Review


- Moot Court ........
- Advanced Research,


Writing


, and Appellate Advocacy...
;, and Appellate Advocacy


. . . . . . 2/3

S.... . ......1

I .. . .... ..2






CURRICULUM / 8


LAW 6235
LAW 6262
LAW 6285
LAW 6286
*LAW 6335
*LAW 6336
LAW 6405
LAW 6455
LAW 6465
LAW 6505
LAW 6512
*LAW 6524
LAW 6525
*LAW 6545
LAW 6586
*LAW 6605
*LAW 6715
LAW 6725
*LAW 6726
*LAW 6731
*LAW 6752
LAW 6936


*Prerequisite required


Course Desci


- Law and Society Seminar


- International


Business


Law Seminar


- Latin American Legal Institutions


- Latin American Trade and


Investment


minar


minar


- Evidence Seminar


-Civ


Procedure Seminar


- Advanced Property Seminar
- Estates and Trusts Seminar
- Historic Preservation and the Law
- Constitutional Law Seminar


- Human Rights,


Law and Policy


- Legislative Drafting Seminar
- Administrative Law Seminar
- Labor Law Seminar
- Law and Communication Se


- Federa


minar


minar


mlnar


Taxation Seminar


- Family Law Seminar
- Law and Psychiatry Seminar


Hospital Law


seminar


- Admiralty Law Seminar
- Professional Responsibility Seminar


Current Legal Problems


Seminar


- see Prerequisite Chart.


riptions


Public post-secondary institutions in Florida are required to implement a common course


numbering system developed at the state leve


The objective is to provide a common


classification system for all disciplinary and interdisciplinary categories and sub-catergories


based on the professional j


udgement of the faculties in the given discipline areas.


The course offerings described below are identified by the statewide course numbering
system. The statewide course number includes a three-letter prefix and a four-digit number.


The three letters identify the general


subject matter. The


first digit indicates the course level.


The next three digits were assigned by the faculty in the appropriate discipline according


to the common course numbering procedures.


course


A blank space indicates that the statewide


number had not been determined at the time of catalog printing.


The University of Florida will accept for full


credit all transfer courses that have a common


prefix and number


as soon


as the common numbers become


available.


First-Year


LAW 5793


Courses


- APPELLATE ADVOCACY


I -- ^ A. .A_ -_ .. .* .. I A i A f r-^n A J _A L -- J * -* J -


____


1 I I 1 I


ql


**


r 1


I *





.r I.






88 / CURRICULUM


5301


credits.


- CIVIL PROCEDURE II


Trial of a civil lawsuit; right to trial by jury, selection and instruction of jury,


respective roles of judge,


ury, and lawyer; trial and post-trial motions;


judgments.


LAW 5501


- CONSTITUTIONAL LAW


3 credits. The establishment and operation of judicial review, intergovernmental relations in
the federal system; the powers of Congress, the President, and the states.


LAW


5502


- CONSTITUTIONAL LAW


credit.


individual procedural rights; impediments to legislative regulation


of contract; personal liberties


- general, speech,


press, assembly, religion


the impairment
the Fourteenth


Amendment; federal powers as to civil right; citizenship.


LAW 5000


credits.


- CONTRACTS


An introduction to the law and theory of legally enforceable agreements and


promises, including elements of contract formation and consideration.


LAW 5001


- CONTRACTS II


3 credits. Effects of non-performance of legally enforceable contractual obligations


tions for relief from or discharge of obligations


condi-


theory and application of third party bene-


ficiary contracts and assignments.


LAW


5100


- CRIMINAL LAW


credits.


The substantive law of crimes covering, in addition to basic principles and


elements of typical crimes, such concepts as relations
and defenses.


and inchoate


crime, responsibility,


LAW 5210


JURISPRUDENCE


3 credits. A study of the relationships between the practical and theoetical dimensions of


law and legal process; of the complexity composed of legal, ethical and moral experi


in light of historical and contemporary sociolega


ence


problems.


LAW


5792


- LEGAL RESEARCH AND WRITING


credit.


The first half of a two-part course, both parts required for graduation.


Includes


emphasis on basic legal research and writing legal memoranda.


The course is graded on a


scale of Satisfactory (S),


Honors


Unsatisfactory


or Deferred Grade


and must


be completed with a grade of


or better even


if this


requirement necessitates repeating the


course.


5400


- PROPERTY


credits.


The acquisition and possession of property, real and personal; estates


in land;


introduction to future interests; landlord and tenant.





CURRICULUM/89


LAW 5701 TORTS II


credits.


Continued development of the material initiated


in LAW


5700.


Second-


and


Third-


Year


Courses


6520


- ADMINISTRATIVE LAW


3 credits. Analysis of the administrative process,
heard, compulsory process to obtain information,
of decision.


LAW 6730


with emphasis


on the opportunity to be


elements of fair procedure, and the process


- ADMIRALTY


credits.


jurisdiction; choice of law


right to navigate


sickness


, persona


injury, and death


of seamen,


longshoremen,


and others


in maritime occupations; collisions;


government


responsibilities related to navigation; maritime salv


pilotage; maritime


liens.


LAW 6210


- ADVANCED


JURISPRUDENCE


credits.


is a course in Advanced


urisprudence.


See description under


5210.


LAW 6940


- CIVIL CLINIC


credits fall and spring; 6 credits summer. Completion of 48 semester hours. Recommended:


LAW 6330.


Participation in the conduct of civil legal matters under a scheme of systematic


supervision combined with substantial related forma


instruction.


One-third of the credits


taken may be awarded on a letter grade basis at the option of the instructor. The remaining


credits will be awarded on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis.


If a letter grade is not awarded


for one-third of the credits taken


basis.


, all credits will be graded on a satisfactory


Not available to students who have taken Criminal


unsatisfactory


Clinic LAW 6942.


LAW 6365


- CIVIL LITIGATION


credits.


Prerequisite LAW 6330 and,


at option of instructor, LAW 6361


or LAW 6363.


Examination of law office and pre-trial lawyering in


vil litigation,


including


interviewing,


case


development,


investigation,


pleading,


discover


pre-trial motion practice,


litigation


techniques, simulated exercises and trial videotape critiques.


LAW 6953


- ADVANCED RESEARCH


WRITING AND APPELLATE ADVOCACY


credits.


Students


serve


as instructors in the first year Research Writing and Appellate


Advocacy course under the direction of the Director of the Program.


Letter grades awarded


on the basis of writing


assignments,


instruction and counseling prepared and performed by


the student instructors. Enrollment with permission of the Director only. LAW 6954 must be


taken in addition to LAW 695


otherwise, no


credit towards graduation will be allowed for


LAW 6953.


LAW 6954 ADVANCED RESEARCH
2 credits. Continuation of LAW 6953.
uation will be allowed for LAW 6953.


WRITING AND APPELLATE ADVOCACY


LAW 6954 must be taken or no credit towards grad-













544


SrtiJ


- S^
At
'

S si


i" II lllMW~
'1 ^ -4
a den.


19 Wi ..


C


W i






CURRICULUM


LAW 6550


- ANTITRUST LAW


3 credits. A analysis of the legal, economic and policy issues engendered by efforts to
prescribe standards of business conduct and preserve competitive market structures under


Sherman Act, Clayton Act, Federal Trade Commission Act,


LAW 6304


and related legislation.


- APPELLATE PRACTICE


2 credits. Methods of review of federal and Florida appellate courts,
courts and administrative bodies.


LAW 6062


including review of trial


- BUSINESS ORGANIZATIONS


or 3 credits.


A consideration of the various


alternatives


of doing business


as sole


proprietorship, a partnership or a corporation. Emphasis


will be placed on the partnership.


Some consideration will additionally be given to the unique forms
including nonprofit corporations and professional associations.


small


nesses


LAW 6020


- COMMERCIAL PAPER


or 3 credits.


A study of negotiable bil


s, notes and other commercial paper, banking


relating to the collection of


checks, and suretyship


n the negotiable paper


context.


LAW 6250


- COMPARATIVE LAW


or 3 credits.


The first part of this


course deals with a


cross-cultural comparison of law


and the legal profession; the second part deals with more
prison of American and foreign case materials.


specific applications,


com-


LAW 6340
3 credits.


- CONFLICT OF LAWS


Problems arising whenever at least one of the operative


facts of the


case


connected with a state other than the
judgments; federal-state conflicts.


forum


jurisdiction of courts


enforcement of foreign


LAW 6040


- CONSUMER LAW


or 3 credits.


The prin


cipal subject areas are consumer sales and consumer


credit trans-


actions and their judicial legislative, administrative


and extra-legal regulation. The


postulation


and evaluation of legal correctives for perceived problems will be the base from which the
focal consideration of remedies and their administration will be developed.


LAW 6064


- CORPORATE FINANCE AND REORGANIZATION


or 3 credits.


An inquiry into the legal problems involving the methods used


in finan


the corporation payment of dividends, the reacquisition by a corporation of its own shares
and problems of mergers, consolidations and other forms of corporate reorganization. Pre-
requisites: LAW 6063 and LAW 6760 (or an undergraduate accounting course).


LAW 6610


- CORPORATE TAXATION


credits. Prerequisites: LAW 6600, LAW 6063.


The tax considerations


in corporate for-


mation


, distributions, and liquidation.






CURRICULUM


and priority produced by judicial process. Bankruptcy focuses principally on liquidation
proceedings and the trustee's powers to avoid transfers, with greater attention being given


to business workouts when the course
additional credit for this course.

LAW 6942 CRIMINAL CLINIC


is taught for 4


credits.


Credit for LAW 6050 precludes


credits.


Prerequisites: LAW 6361


Trial Advocacy or LAW 6363,


Trial Practice. Participation


in the conduct of actual


State Attorneys
tisfactory basis.


criminal legal matters


or Public Defender's Office.


as an intern supervised by a member of the


Credit will be awarded on a satisfactory/unsa-


Not available to students who have taken LAW 6940


Civil Clinic.


LAW 6941


- CRIMINAL LAW LITIGATION


credits.


Prerequisite: LAW 636


, Trial Advocacy or LAW 6363,


Trial Practice. Students


receive instruction in the various skills, techniques and procedures necessary for the conduct
of criminal law practice. Students will learn practice skills while participating in simulated


exercises


dealing with all phases of criminal litigation. Students who commit theme


enroll the following term in Criminal Clinic


LAW 6942)


will receive registration priority.


Students receiving registration priority must complete LAW 6942 to obtain
graduation for LAW 6941.


credit toward


LAW 611
3 credits.


- CRIMINAL PROCEDURE


- ADVERSARY SYSTEM


This course covers the commencement of formal


criminal proceedings


bail, the


decision to prosecute, the grand jury, the preliminary hearing, venue, joinder and severance,


and speedy trial. Trial concerns such


as guilty pleas,


discovery,


ury trial, prejudicial publicity,


professional ethics and double


eopardy are also considered.


LAW 6111
3 credit. Po


- CRIMINAL PROCEDU
Jlice as a social institution


RE


- POLICE AND POLICE PRACTICES


, including personnel, bureaucratic structure and incen-


tives.


Police practices such


as arrest,


search


, seizure,


wiretapping, eavesdropping, use of


informers, entrapment, confessions and lineups are also covered.


LAW 6050


- DEBTOR


- CREDITOR LAW


credits. A survey of the individual collection of monetary judgements, bankruptcy, and


the principles of secured transactions


under Artic


Nine of the Uniform Commercial Code


the course is intended for the student not desiring the broader coverage provided by LAW


6051 and LAW 6052.


LAW 671
3 credits.


Credit for this course precludes credit for LAW 60


- DOMESTIC RELATION


51 and 6052


PRACTICUM


Prerequisite LAW 6710. Simulated handling of a complex domestic relations


case.


Entails


written and oral presentations; analysis of substantive and procedural issues


formance of law office, pre-trial and trial lawyering tasks; and


for handling lawyering tasks.


I AAI Cf3 n


exploration of various models


Taught jointly by faculty members and practitioners.


_ FMCI ICI- I I FAI MI-lCTTDlV






CURRICULUM


LAW 6450


- ESTATE PLANNING


credits.


Prerequisites:


LAW 6430, LAW 6440 and LAW 6620. Objectives


of lifetime and


testamentary planning of estates; procedures for analysis


small and large estates


elimination


, mitigations,


and offsetting of adverse factors


corrective


procedures


and their


implementation.


LAW 6430


- ESTATES AND TRUSTS


3 credits. Prerequisite:


5400. Recommended


LAW 5401


Intestate succession


, gifts,


exec


ution of wills


creation of trusts


charitable


trusts;


ademption and lapse; powers and


appointment.


LAW 6330


- EVIDENCE


4 credits. Prerequisite: LAW


5300 and


issues of fact before a judicial t


ribunal.


5301


A study of the


Topics covered may


law gov
include i


earning the


proof of


judicial notice, pre-


sumptions, b
entific proof,


burden of proof


hearsay, relevancy, testimonial proof, demonstrative and


documentary proof, and privileged communications.


Emphasis is placed on


the common law and modern developments such


LAW 6710


as the Federal Rules of Evidence.


- FAMILY LAW


credits. Nature of contract to marry and of marriage; requisites for validity


doctrines; divorce


causes,


grounds,


defenses, jurisdiction


problems


of the


child


annulment
: economic


and tort relations between spouses and parent and child.


LAW 6302


- FEDERAL PRACTICE


credits. Prerequisites:


5300 and LAW 5301


Recommended


5501 and LAW


5502.


Analysis of the federal


udicia


system and of its relationship to the state's


udicia


systems,


including consideration of the applicable


jurisdictional, procedural, and substantive


LAW 6440


- FIDUCIARY ADMINISTRATION


credit. Prerequisite: LAW 6430. Problems and the administration of decendents'


estates


and of non-commercial trusts; probate procedure;
of fiduciaries and their attorneys.


powers


of the fiduciary


compensation


LAW 6624


- FIDUCIARY ADMINISTRATION


credits.


Prerequ


isite: LAW 6440.


Recommended:


LAW 6620.


Problems of the


ciary


in the allocation of receipts and disbursements between principal and income in the admin-


istration of trust and estates; the Uniform Principa
burden of death taxes.


LAW 6521


income Act; the allocation of the


- FLORIDA ADMINISTRATIVE LAW


credits.


Coverage of Florida Administrative


Procedure Act


FAPA),


rule making under


the FAPA, decisions affecting substantial interests,


review under the FAPA, non-FAPA


enforcement of agency action,


judicial review, government


judicial


in the sunshine and public


j






CURRICULUM


producers and dist


butors of regulated products.


The course does not deal with control of


drugs of abuse or with issues of products liability.


LAW 6433


- FUTURE


INTERESTS


or 3 credits.


Prerequisite:


LAW 6430.


Protection of the family


termination of trusts


assification of possessory and future interests; gifts to classes


LAW 6600


the Rule Against Perpetuities.


- INCOME TAXATION


credits.


Recommended:


LAW 6760 to precede or be taken concurrently.


Taxation of


individuals
deductions


- Identification of taxpayer; concepts of gross income; adjusted gross income,


, exemptions, and taxable income; recognition,


characterization, and other prob-


incident to the sale, exchange, or other disposition of property. Analysis includes the


various provisions of the Internal Revenue Code, interpretative material


issued by the Treasury


and major court decisions. Not available to students who have taken LAW 6601


LAW 6621
2 credits.


- INCOME TAXATION OF ESTATES AND TRUSTS
Prerequisites: LAW 6600. It is recommended that LAW 6430 and LAW 6440


precede this course.


The taxation of income of trusts and estates with emphasis on income


required to be distributed currently, equivocal distributions of income or corpus, and accu-


mulation distributions; other fidu


ciary tax problems,


including the treatment of income in


respect of decedents.


LAW 6905


- INDEPENDENT STUDY COURSE


1 to 3 credits. Content of course to be determined initially by student and will be determined


by Curriculum Committee. Course must be completed in two academic terms or less.
awarded may not be applied to reduce minimum course load per semester (12 hrs.)


Credit
Open


only to students who have completed four terms. Independent study courses are not used


to cover materials covered in courses offered


LAW 6080


as part of the regular curriculum.


- INSURANCE


or 3 credits.


The various forms of policies,


and Accident; Floaters, etc.


; concepts of marketing,


.e., Fire; Homeowners, Automobile,


claims


Health


, processing, and insurance insti-


tutions


, principles of indemnity, risk transference, reasonable expectancies,


and uncons-


cionable advantages.


LAW 6261


- INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS LAW


or 3 credits. Legal problems arising in transactions


or relations


that involve individuals,


business enterpr


other private


institutions, or governments of two or more nations.


LAW 6260


- INTERNATIONAL LAW


3 credits.


An introduction to international law as applied between nations and


in American


courts.


I AW AH54


- LABOR LAW


LI fI Y tJ Jt L.I-/ IU LJ WV





CURRICULUM


LAW 6460


- LAND USE PLANNING AND CONTROL


3 or 4 credits. Prerequisite LAW 5401


A study of the legal aspects of the allocation and


development of land resources; private controls through covenants and easements; public
regulation and control through zoning and subdivision regulation; social, economic and


political


implications of land regulations


eminent domain; selected current problems


as growth


management,


historic


preservation,


environmental


regulations,


urban


development.


LAW 6720


- LAW AND MEDICINE


or 3 credits.


The relationship between law and


the medical


sciences


, with particular


emphasis on medical proof in litigation.


LAW 6751


- LAW OFFICE ECONOMICS


1 credit. An examination of career alternatives


within the


legal profession narrowing to the


ision to open a solo law office; an examination of law office management covering


library, accounting, overhead and the like; lawyers' incomes generally, billing


clients, deve


oping a clientele


and a survey of the problems of expansion,


partnerships,


assoc


iates, the


incorporated law firm, and related matters. Restricted to fifth and sixth semester law students.


This course requires a written examination.


LAW 6950


Regular letter grades are awarded.


- LAW REVIEW


credit per semester. Maximum credits allowed are three.


Research, writing, and editorial


work for the


University of Florida Law Review. Limited to students whose


scholastic average


meets the requirements for law review work.


No letter grades are given for the course.


NOTE: Students who successfully complete an open writing candidacy for law review,


certified by the law review faculty advisor, may register for one credit of LAW 69


50 res-


trospectively


in the term of enrollment of that student next


succeeding the term in which


the candidacy was completed.


LAW 6385 LAWYER AS A NEGOTIATOR
2 credits. An examination of the negotiation skills which must be utilized by lawyers.

LAW 6760 LEGAL ACCOUNTING


credits. Elements of accounting; interpretation of finan


accounting problems


cial statements and audit reports


likely to arise in a lawyer's practice. Designed for students with little


or no accounting background. Students with more than 6 semester hours of accounting
courses must seek special permission of the instructor.


LAW 6380


- LEGAL COUNSELING


credits. Methods of interviewing and counseling


clients


scussion of the attorney-c


relationship based on actua


case histories


involving counseling.


LAW 6221


- LEGAL HISTORY OTHER THAN COMMON LAW






96 / CURRICULUM


LAW 6523


- LEGISLATION


2 credits.


Role of the leg


islature in the legal process; function of representation;


codification


and revision of the common law; judicial interpretation of statutes
techniques; relationship of statutes to other types of law.


LAW 6531


regulatory and sanctioning


- LOCAL GOVERNMENT LAW, TAXATION AND FINANCE


credits.


Examination of the substantive and procedural law of


ocal governments,


including organization,
state and local taxation


powers,


procedure,


, special assessments,


personnel, and of financing sources,


including


user fees and borrowing.


LAW 6951


- MOOT COURT


credit per semester. Maximum credits allowed are three.


practice,


Advanced training in appellate


including both the briefing and argument of cases on appeal, as a result of partic-


ipation in appellate moot cour


proceedings.


No letter grades


are given for the course.


NOTE: Students who successfully complete a moot court candidacy, as certified by the
moot court faculty advisor, may register for one credit of LAW 6951 retrospectively in the
term of enrollment of that student next succeeding the term in which the candidacy was


completed.


Retrospective credit


shall not other


be granted.


LAW 6480


- NATURAL RESOURCES


or 3 credits.


A study of the lega


aspects of the conservation and development of natural


resources


, particularly water, minerals,


oil and gas.


Special emphas


placed on statutory


enactments and administrative regulation by federal and state governments.


LAW 6616


- PARTNERSHIP TAXATION


2 credits. Prerequisite:


LAW 6600.


It is recommended that LAW 6062 precede th


course.


The tax meaning of "partnership"; problems attending formation transactions


ner and partnership


between part-


determination and treatment of partnership income; sales or exchange


of partnership interest


distributions


retirement; death of a partner; drafting the partnership


agreement.


LAW 6570


- PATENT, TRADEMARK & COPYRIGHT LAW


credit.


Patentability


patent proceedings; construction of letters patent; transfers,


assign-


ments


licenses


and contracts


, infringements.


Rights in literary property


preserving and


renewing copyright


LAW 651(


credits.


transfers and infringements.


) POLITICAL & CIVIL RIGHTS
An examination of the changing relationship between the individual and the state


as demonstrated by developments in the areas


of free speech,


press,


association


, religion,


and privacy. While focus will be on first amendment doctrine,


study will also include con-


sideration of various political and philosophical theories of individual/state.


1 ABAl OLO


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fnltn / S K-. I 3S*L flI f L- U A it B i






CURRICULUM


LAW 6750


- PROFESSIONAL RESPONSIBILITY AND THE LEGAL PROFESSION


credit.


This course examines the role of the individual


lawyer and the legal profession as


an entity in contemporary society. Topics covered include: the role of the lawyer as advocate,


counselor and community leader; the ethical and moral obligations


of the


awyer to his


client, other lawyers and society as derived from general ethical and moral principles and


as embodied in the Code of Professional Respon
in representing particular categories of clients,


sibility


problems encountered by the lawyer


including corporations,


criminal defendants


and indigents.


LAW 6544


- PUBLIC


SECTOR LABOR RELATIONS


or 3 credits. A study of labor relations


he public


governmental) sector


the United


States.


aws concerning the rights of public employers and


employees with respect to


the organization of unions, collective bargaining, concerted activities and related subjects
will be considered. Special attention is given to the Florida Public Employees Relations Act,


which represents one of the model leg


islative enactments.


When the course


is taught for 3


credits, federal sector labor relations wil


be covered.


LAW 6552


- REGULATED


INDUSTRIES


or 3 credits. Prerequisite: LAW 6520. Recommended


and economic problems when


LAW 6550.


selected industries are


An examination of the


subjected to varying forms of


administrative control; the public policy goals
istrative process in furthering and balancing th


of antitrust remain relevant and operative in


LAW 6320


of regulation; the effectiveness of the admin-
lese goals; and the extent to which principles


this area.


- REMEDIES


or 3 credits.


Analysis and comparison of legal, equitable,


statutory and extra-judicial


remedies. Coverage includes injury to business interests


remedies available to vendor and


vendee of real estate; restitution of benefits conferred under unenforceable agreements
remedies in transactions induced by misrepresentation or mistake.


LAW 6010


- SALES


or 3 credits.


The law applicable to the sale of goods,


including bulk transfers, with emphasis


on the legal devices utilized in the distribution of such property.


LAW 6051


- SECURED TRANSACTIONS


IN PERSONAL PROPERTY


3 credits. Selected problems in financing of security interests in personal property, principally


under Article Nine of the Uniform Commercial Code. The course addresses


the attachment


and perfection of security interests, their enforcement and priorities among competing inter-


ests. Credit for Law 6050 precludes additional


credit for this course.


LAW 6560 SECURITIES REGULATION
3 credits. Prerequisite: LAW 6063. Examination of the controls and exemptions relating to


the sale and distribution of securities by corporations,


underwriters and others


, including


* a J a a I & *






CURRICULUM


gross income; deductions,
have taken LAW 6600.


LAW 6606


exemptions and taxable income. Not available to students who


- TAX II


credits. Prerequisite:


LAW 6601


Taxation


incident to the sale, exchange,


and other dis-


position of property


recognition and characterization of income.


LAW 6620


- TAXATION OF GRATUITOU


TRANSFERS


3 credits. Prerequisites: LAW 6430 and LAW 6600. Fundamenta


of federal estate and gift


taxation.


LAW 6361


3 credit
to trials


ts.


- TRIAL ADVOCACY
Prerequisites: LAW 6330


, trial tactics and trial techniques.


entations and a three hour


"laboratory"


A study of the tria


process, including the law relating


Consists of two hours of classroom/lecture pres-


period each week involving role-playing and critical


evaluation of performance. Letter grades may be given


at the option of the instructor.
semester students in that order.


Registration preference


n lieu of satisfactory-unsatisfactory
shall be given to fifth and fourth


LAW 6363


- TRIAL PRACTICE


4 credits. Prerequisite or concurrent:


LAW 6330.


The tria


process including law relating to


trials


trial tactics


, and trial techniques.


The first half consists of classroom work and a weekly


three hour laboratory,


involving role playing and critical evaluation.


The second half consists


of simulated trials and critical evaluation.


factory basis.


Credit will be awarded on a satisfactory-unsatis-


Not available to students who have taken Trial Advocacy, LAW 636


LAW 6548
3 credits.


- WORKERS'


COMPENSATION AND OTHER EMPLOYMENT RIGHTS


Rights of employees and duties of employers under modern social programs


including workers'


compensation,


wage and hour regulations, social security, old age, dis-


ability and medical problems and anti-discrimination laws.




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