• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Copyright
 Title Page
 Front Matter
 Table of Contents
 Main
 Back Cover














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00612
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: June 1995
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00612
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Page 1
    Copyright
        Page 2
    Title Page
        Page 3
    Front Matter
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Table of Contents
        Page 6
        Page 7
    Main
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
        Page 21
        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
        Page 32
        Page 33
        Page 34
        Page 35
        Page 36
        Page 37
        Page 38
        Page 39
        Page 40
        Page 41
        Page 42
        Page 43
        Page 44
        Page 45
        Page 46
        Page 47
        Page 48
        Page 49
        Page 50
        Page 51
        Page 52
        Page 53
        Page 54
        Page 55
        Page 56
        Page 57
        Page 58
        Page 59
        Page 60
        Page 61
        Page 62
        Page 63
        Page 64
        Page 65
        Page 66
        Page 67
        Page 68
        Page 69
        Page 70
        Page 71
        Page 72
        Page 73
        Page 74
        Page 75
        Page 76
        Page 77
        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
        Page 81
        Page 82
        Page 83
        Page 84
        Page 85
        Page 86
        Page 87
        Page 88
        Page 89
        Page 90
        Page 91
        Page 92
        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
        Page 104
        Page 105
        Page 106
        Page 107
        Page 108
        Page 109
        Page 110
        Page 111
        Page 112
        Page 113
        Page 114
        Page 115
    Back Cover
        Page 116
Full Text



































































a y*
-W ** *


x xx
x x


"~"kI~,,


I


I








We envision the University of Florida College of Medicine to be, and to be recognized as, one of the leading
medical schools in the United States. We envision an institution deeply committed to excellence, quality and
scholarship in pursuit of its integrated educational, clinical and investigative mission. We envision a caring
environment filled with enthusiasm, intellectual ferment, mutual support, and pride in personal, departmental,
collegiate and university accomplishments.


The University of Florida College of Medicine is an equal opportunity employer within the meaning of Title VII
of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.


Volume LXXXX Series 1, No.


3, June 1995


THE UNIVERSITY RECORD (USPS 652-760) published quarterly by the University of Florida, Office of
Publications, Gainesville, Florida 32611. Second-class postage paid at Gainesville, Florida 32601.
POSTMASTER: Send address change to the Office of the Registrar, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611.

This publication has been adopted as a rule of the University pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 120 of the
Florida Statutes. Addenda to the University Record Series, if any, are available upon request to the Office of
the Registrar.








University of Florida College of Medicine


1995-96 Catalog


1 :


Aerial view of the UF Health Science Center






STATE OF FLORIDA
Lawton Chiles
Governor

BOARD OF REGENTS


Hon. Audrea I. Anderson


Ft. Myers
Hon. Julian Bennett, Jr.
Panama City
Hon. Frank Brogan
Commissioner of Education, Tallahassee
Hon. Paul L. Cejas
Tampa
Hon. Charlton B. Daniel, Jr.
Gainesville
Hon. Perla Hantman
Miami Lakes


Hon. Gwendolyn F. McLin
Okahumpka


Hon.


Jon C. Moyle


Chairman, West Palm Beach
Hon. Charles B. Reed, Ed.D.
Chancellor, State University System
Hon. Jason J. Rosenberg
Student Regent, Gainesville
Hon. Dennis M. Ross
Tampa
Hon. Steven J. Uhlfelder
Tallahassee


Hon.


Hon. James F. Heekin, Jr.
Vice Chairman, Orlando
Hon. Elizabeth G. Lindsay
Sarasota


Welcom H. Watson


Ft. Lauderdale


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


John V. Lombardi, Ph.D.
President

Barbara Talmadge, A.M.
Registrar


David R. Challoner, M.D.
Vice President for Health Affairs

Allen H. Neims, M.D., Ph.D.
Dean, College of Medicine and Associate


Vice President for Clinical Affairs


MEDICAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS
1995-96


Norman Anderson, M.D.
Ocala/Class of 1981
Donnie Batie, M.D.
Baton Rouge, LA/Class of 1979
Robert J. Brill, M.D.
Ocala/Class of 1981
Ben Crowder, M.D.
Winter Haven/Class of 1964
Robert W. Dein, M.D.
Venice/Class of 1971
Nancy Evans, Coordinator
Office of Medical Alumni Affairs
T ica araih MN T


Peggy 0. Henderson, M.D.,
President
Gainesville/Class of 1978
Hugh M. Hill, M.D., Associate Dean
Student and Alumni Affairs
Alma B. Littles, M.D.
Quincy/Class of 1986
Burton W. Marsh, M.D.
Ocala/Class of 1967
Charles D. Musfeldt, M.D.,
Past President
Chicago, IL/Class of 1982
Allen H. Neims. M.D.. Ph.D.. Dean


Katherine J. Pierce, M.D.
Charlotte, NC/Class of 1982
Alan Porter, M.D.
Sarasota/Class of 1971
J. Daniel Raulerson, M.D.
Brewton, AL/Class of 1968
Gene Ryerson, M.D.
Gainesville/ Housestaff 1979
Kevin J. Soden, M.D.
Charlotte, NC/Class of 1974
Eric C. Walker, M.D.
Oviedo/Class of 1982




































Shands Hospital at the University of Florida


Gainesville Veterans Affairs Medical Center


':Bj:::i?d~Ei~j~aifR~~,5S~~ i"i


University of Florida's Shands Cancer Center


University Medical Center-Jacksonville






ABLE OF CO




8 The University of Florida
10 Academic Calendar
14 Dean's Staff
16 Department Chairmen

GENERAL INFORMATION

18 Students
20 Faculty
21 Research
21 Facilities
22 University of Florida Health Science Center-Jacksonville (UFHSC-J)
23 Community Medicine
23 Harrell Professional Development & Assessment Center

ACADEMIC INFORMATION

26 The Art and Science of Medicine
26 Admission Information
26 The Applicant Pool
27 Undergraduate Education
27 Medical College Admission Test
27 Application and Acceptance Procedures
28 Regular Admission
28 Junior Honors Medical Program
30 Program in Medical Sciences (PIMS)
30 Admission to the College of Medicine at an Advanced Standing Status
31 Professional Education Leading to the M.D. Degree
32 Preclinical (Years One and Two)
32 First Year
32 Second Year
33 Third Year
33 Fourth Year
33 Evaluation
35 Standards of Performance
35 Probation and Dismissal
36 Removal of Probation
36 Appeals
36 Probation for Students Who Successfully Appeal Dismissal
37 Academic Honesty Guidelines
37 Health Science Center Student Conduct Standards Committee
38 Student Conduct Code
38 Violation of the Code of Conduct
40 Sexual Harassment Information and Procedures
40 Policy for HIV and Other Infectious Diseases
*^^^^ka .*: 1.1 1 ** 1r^MM I^^^L ^^R T i^^^B--^^^^k.^^^-^^K l 1B 1 7'^^K--^RW^^^^^B--'^--^^''''''^^-


























J-* TT ^,1 1 T-^ 1 *! * T











41 Graduate Education in the Medical Sciences
43 Medical Scientist Training Program (Combined M.D./Ph.D. Degree)
44 Graduate Medical Education (Residencies and Fellowships)
44 Licensure
45 Continuing Medical Education

STUDENT INFORMATION

46 Financial Considerations
46 Scholarships
49 Scholastic Awards
52 Loan Funds
54 Fellowships
55 Living Accommodations

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

56 First Year
58 Second Year
59 Third Year
60 Fourth Year
61 Graduate Courses in the Medical Sciences
62 Anatomy and Cell Biology
62 Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
62 Immunology and Medical Microbiology
63 Neuroscience
63 Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
64 Pharmacology and Therapeutics
64 Physiology
64 Interdisciplinary Programs Cell Structure and Function
64 Mammalian Genetics
65 Toxicology
65 Vision Science Training
66 Joint Master of Business Administration/Master of Science
66 Undergraduate Courses
67 Independent Interdisciplinary Major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

ACADEMIC PERSONNEL

68 Faculty
89 Courtesy Faculty

STUDENTS

104 Medical Students
112 Graduate Students






UNIVERSITY


OF


FLORIDA


MISSION


The University of Florida belongs to an ancient
tradition of great universities. We participate in an
elaborate conversation among scholars and students
that extends over space and time linking the experi-
ences of Western Europe with the traditions and his-
tories of all cultures, that explores the limits of the
physical and biological universes, and that nurtures
and prepares generations of educated people to
address the problems of our societies. While the
University of Florida recognizes no limits on its
intellectual boundaries, and our faculty and students
remain free to explore wherever the mind and imag-


nation lead,


we live in a real world whose constraints


limit what we can do. Out of the conflict between our
universal intellectual aspirations and the limitations


programs, masters degree programs, and the like.
The University of Florida shares these traditions..


an American university,


we have a major commit-


ment to undergraduate education


as the foundation


of our academic organization and we pursue gradu-
ate education for the Ph.D. as well as many other
graduate degrees in professional fields.
We are, in addition, a major public, compre-
hensive, land-grant, research university. Each of
these adjectives defines one of our characteristics,
and through frequent repetition, this description
takes on the style of a ritual incantation: rhythmic,
reverent, and infrequently examined. What, then,
does each of these key words mean?


of our environment, comes the


definition of the


Major


university's goals.


Here, at the head of the list,


we find one of our


Education


most important aspirations. We will be, we must be,
and we are, a major university. We define ourselves


American colleges and universities share the
fundamental educational mission of teaching students.
The undergraduate experience, based in the arts and
sciences, remains at the core of higher education in
America. The formation of educated people, the
transformation of mind through learning, and the
launching of a lifetime of intellectual growth: these
goals remain central to every university. The under-
graduate foundation of American higher education


has grown more complex


in comparison to the best universities


we can find.


We need not be the absolutely unambiguously best,
but we must be among the best universities in the
world. Exact ranking of the best universities is a
meaningless exercise, but most of us can name 60
great universities. By whatever indicator of quality
we choose, our university should fall into this group.


Public


as the knowledge we


teach has grown more complex. Where once


we had


a single track through the arts and sciences leading
to a degree we now have multiple tracks leading to
many degrees in arts and sciences as well as in a
range of professional schools. Yet even with the
variety of degrees, American university undergrad-
uate education must rest on the fundamental
knowledge of the liberal arts and sciences.
In our academic world we recognize two rather
imprecisely defined categories of higher education:
colleges and universities. The traditional American
college specializes in a carefully crafted four-year
undergraduate program, generally focused almost
entirely on the arts and sciences. Universities extend
the range of this undergraduate education to


We exist thanks to the commitment and invest-
ment of the people of the State of Florida. Generations
of tax dollars have constructed the facilities we enjoy
and have paid the major portion of our operating
budget. The graduates of this institution, educated
with tax dollars, have provided the majority of our
private funding. Our state legislators created the
conditions that permit our faculty to educate our
students, pursue their research, conduct their clinical


practice, and


serve


their statewide constituencies.


We exist, then, within the public sector, responsible
and responsive to the needs of the citizens of our state.
The obligations we assume as a public university
determine many of our characteristics.
We have many more undergraduates than







and we operate in cooperative symbiosis with our
state's media. We also experience an often too-close
interaction with the political process. Private univer-
sities do not respond in the same ways to these
issues and have a different profile. We, as a public
university, must maintain a close, continuous, and
effective communication with our many publics.

Comprehensive


This adjective recognizes the universal reach of
our pursuit of knowledge. As a matter of principle,
we exclude no field from our purview. We believe
that our approach to knowledge and learning, to
understanding and wisdom, requires us to be ready
to examine any field, cultivate any discipline, and
explore any topic that offers insight or intellectual
tools. Resource limits, human or financial may con-
strain us from cultivating one or another academic
subspecialty, but we accept, in principle, no limit on
our field of view. Even when we struggle with bud-
get problems and must reduce a program or miss an
intellectual opportunity, we do so only to meet the
practical constraints of our current environment. We
never relinquish the commitment to the holistic pur-
suit of knowledge.


Land-grant


Florida belongs to the set of American universities
whose mandate includes a commitment to the
development and transmission of practical knowl-
edge. As one of the land-grant universities identified
by the Morrill Act of 1862, the University of Florida
has a special focus on agriculture and engineering
and a mandate to deliver the practical benefits of
university knowledge to every county in the state.
In our university, the Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences and the College of Engineering respond to
this definition most obviously, but over time, the
entire university has to come to recognize its com-
mitment to translating the benefit of abstract and
theoretical knowledge into the marketplace, where it
can sustain the economic growth that supports us all.
This commitment permeates the institutional
culture and defines us as one of some 72 such insti-
tutions in America. The land-grant university is, of
course, a peculiarly American invention and captures
nnp nf the nnwerftil rulhiral beliefs of our country:


Research


Research defines a certain type of university.
Our faculty must dedicate themselves not only to
the bedrock function of education, not only to the
landgrant function of service, but equally to the
essential activity of research.
By research we mean the effort to expand our
understanding of the natural world, the world of the
mind, and the world of the senses. We define research
to include the theoretical abstractions of the mathe-
matician, the experimental discoveries of the geneti-
cist, the insights of the semiotician, the recreations of
the historian, or the analysis of the anthropologist.
We define research to capture the business professor's
analysis of economic organization, the architect's
design, and the musician's interpretation or the
artist's special vision. Research by agronomists
improves crops, and research by engineers enhances
materials. Medical and clinical research cure and
prevent disease. The list of research fields continues
as endlessly as the intellectual consensus of our fac-
ulty and the academic vision of our colleges.


INSTITUTIONAL PURPOSE


The University of Florida is a public, land-grant
research university, one of the most comprehensive
in the United States; it encompasses virtually all aca-
demic and professional disciplines. It is the oldest
and largest of Florida's nine universities and a member
of the American Association of Universities. Its fac-
ulty and staff are dedicated to the common pursuit
of the University's three-fold mission: education,
research and service.
Education-undergraduate and graduate
through the doctorate is the fundamental purpose-of
the University. Research and scholarship are integral
to the educational process and to expanding
humankind's understanding of the natural world,
the mind and the senses. Service is the University's
obligation to share the benefits of its knowledge for
the public good.
These three interlocking elements span all of
the University of Florida's academic disciplines and
multidisciplinary centers and represent the
University of Florida's academic disciplines and
multidisciplinary centers. They also represent the
TTI r T r crn I n 4 n cr rnr v j o fjns ar i c








the past. Every dimension of the University
bespeaks its commitment to a culturally and interna-
tionally diverse intellectual environment in which
teaching, research and service are fully integrated
with its interdisciplinary pursuits to meet the changing
needs of the global community.
The University of Florida is committed to pro-
viding the knowledge, benefits and services it produces
with quality and effectiveness. It aspires to further


national and international recognition for its initia-
tives and achievements in promoting human values
and improving the quality of life.
The University of Florida is accredited by the
Commission on Colleges of the Souther Association
of Colleges and Schools to award the degrees of
bachelor, master, specialist and engineer, as well as
doctoral and professional degrees.


ACADEMIC CALENDAR 1995-1996

CLASS OF 1999 -FIRST YEAR


Required Orientation


Classes Begin


Labor Day (Holiday)

Veteran's Day (Holiday)

Thanksgiving Vacation


Classes Resume

Classes End

Winter Break


Classes Begin


Martin Luther King, Jr. Day(Holiday)


Spring Break

Health-Care Issues Day


Memorial Day (Holiday)


Classes End


Thursday, August 17 through
Tuesday, August 22, 1995

Wednesday, August 23, 1995


Monday, September 4, 1995

Friday, November 10, 1995

Thursday, November 23
through Sunday, November 26, 1995

Monday, November 27, 1995

Wednesday, December 20, 1995

Thursday, December 21, 1995 through
Wednesday, January 3, 1996


Thursday, January 4, 1996


Monday, January 15,


TBA

Wednesday, April 10, 1996


Monday, May


Friday, June 7, 1996







CLASS OF 1998 SECOND YEAR


Monday, August 21, 1995


Labor Day (Holiday)

Veteran's Day (Holiday)

Thanksgiving Vacation


Classes Resume


Classes End


Winter Break


Monday, September 4, 1995

Friday, November 10, 1995

Thursday, November 23
through Sunday, November 26, 1995


Monday, November 27, 1995


Friday, December


Saturday, December 23, 1995 through


Sunday, January


7.1996


Classes Begin


Monday, January


Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (Holiday)


Monday, January 15,


1996

1996


Spring Break


Health-Care Issues Day

Classes End

USMLE Exam Step I


Summer Break

Introduction to the Clerkships
(Required)


CLASS OF 1997


Introduction to the Clerkships
(Required)


Rotation I Begins


Rotation I Ends


Labor Day (Holiday)

Rotation II Begins


Wednesday, April 10, 1996

Friday, May 17, 1996

Tuesday, June 11 through
Wednesday, June 12, 1996

Friday, June 14 through
Thursday, July 4 1996
Friday, July 5, 1996


- THIRD YEAR


Friday, July


Sunday, July 9, 1995


Saturday, September 2, 1995


Monday, September 4, 1995

Tuesday, September 5, 1995


Classes Begin


1









Veteran's Day (Holiday)
Thanksgiving (Vacation)


Rotation III Resumes

Rotation Ill Ends


Winter Break


Friday, November 10, 1995
Wednesday, November 22, 1995, 6 p.m.
through Sunday, November 26, 1995

Monday, November 27, 1995

Friday, December 22, 1995, 6 p.m.


Friday, December 22, 6 pm
through Saturday, January 6, 1996


Rotation IV Begins


Sunday, January 7, 1996


Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (Holiday)


Monday, January 15,


Rotation IV Ends


Thursday, February


1996, 6 p.m.


Spring Break


Friday, March 1, 6 pm
through Monday, March 4, 1996


Rotation V Begins


Tuesday, March


Health-Care Issues Day


Rotation V Ends


Wednesday, April 10, 1996


Saturday, April


Rotation VI Begins


Sunday, April


Memorial Day (Holiday)


Rotation VI Ends


Monday, May


Saturday, June


1996

1996


Sunday, June 23 through
Saturday, June 29, 1996


Senior Electives Begin


CLASS OF 1996

Elective Period One


Elective Period Two
Advanced Pharmacology (Required)


Fall Break


Sunday, June 30, 1996


- FOURTH YEAR

Sunday, July 2 through
Saturday, July 29, 1995

Sunday, July 30 through
Saturday, August 26, 1995

Sunday, August 27 through
Q3 -T irA Cr 9 1 T^V^ r^^i 1 I QQ


Summer Break








Elective Period Three


USMLE Step 1


Sunday, September 3 through
Saturday, September 30, 1995


Wednesday, September 27 and
Thursday, September 28, 1995


Elective Period Four


Elective Period Five


Elective Period


Sunday, October 1 through
Saturday, October 28, 1995

Sunday, October 29 through
Saturday, November 25, 1995


Sunday, November 26 through
Friday, December 22, 1995


Winter Break


Friday, December 22, 1995, 6 p.m.
through Saturday, January 6, 1996


Elective Period Seven


Elective Period Eight


Elective Period Nine


NRMP Match Day (holiday)

Elective Period Ten


Health-Care Issues Day


Elective Period Eleven


Graduation


Sunday, January 7 through
Saturday, February 3, 1996

Sunday, February 4 through
Saturday, March 2, 1996


Sunday, March 3 through
Saturday, March 30, 1996

Wednesday, March 13, 1996

Sunday, March 31 through
Saturday, April 27, 1996

Wednesday, April 10, 1996


Sunday, April 28 through
Friday, May 24, 1996


Saturday, May 25, 1996





DEAN'S


STAFF


Allen H. Neims, M.D., Ph.D.
Dean, College of Medicine and
Associate Vice President for
Clinical Affairs


Jerome H. Modell, M.D.
Senior Associate Dean for
Clinical Affairs and Associate
Vice President for UF Health
Science Center Affiliations


Louis S. Russo, Jr., M.D.
Senior Associate Dean for
Jacksonville Programs


Robert T. Watson, M.D.
Senior Associate Dean for
Educational Affairs



















Ronald Carzoli, M.D.
Associate Dean
for Student Affairs


J. Ocie Harris, M.D.
Associate Dean for
Community Programs


Myra Hurt, Ph.D.
Assistant Dean for Program
in Medical Sciences


Lamar E. Crevasse, M.D.
Associate Dean
for Continuing
Medical Education


Tom. V. Harris, M.B.A.
Assistant Dean for
Administrative Affairs


Mohan K. Raizada, Ph.D.
Associate Dean for
Graduate Education


Peter Gearen, M.D.
Assistant Dean
for Clinical Affairs


Robert L. Hatch, M.D.
Chairman, Medical Selection
Committee


Lynn J. Romrell, Ph.D.
Associate Dean for Medical
Education and Director,
Junior Honors Program


Eloise M. Harman, M.D.
Chairman,
Curriculum Committee


Hugh M. Hill, M.D.
Associate Dean for Student
and Alumni Affairs


Frank Smith
Associate Dean for
Administrative Affairs


U


--


J rr







DEPARTMENT CHAIRMEN


Michael H. Ross, Ph.D.
Chairman, Anatomy and
Cell Biology


Michael K. Miller, Ph.D.
Interim Chair Director,
Institute for Health Policy
Research


Melvin Greer, M.D.


Roy F. Cucchiara, M.D.
Chairman, Anesthesiology


James E. McGuigan, M.D.
Chairman, Medicine


William G. Luttge, Ph.D.


Daniel L. Purich, Ph.D.
Chairman, Biochemistry and
Molecular Biology


Richard W. Moyer, Ph.D.
Chairman, Molecular
Genetics and Microbiology


Byron J. Masterson, M.D.
--. - *i


R. Whit Curry, Jr., M.D.
Chairman, Community Health
and Family Medicine


Albert L. Rhoton, M.D.


Chairman,


Neurological Surgery


Mark Sherwood, M.D.
r,1* r-^ 1. 1



























R. William Petty, M.D.
Chairman,
Orthopaedic Surgery


Nicholas J. Cassisi, D.D.S., M.D. Noel K. Maclaren, M.D.
Chairman, Otolaryngology Chairman, Pathology and
Laboratory Medicine


Douglas Barrett, M.D.
Chairman, Pediatrics


Stephen P. Baker, Ph.D.
Chairman, Pharmacolgy
and Therapeutics


Ian M. Phillips, D.Sc.
Chairman, Physiology


Dwight L. Evans, Ph.D.
Chairman, Psychiatry


Nancy P. Mendenhall, M.D.
Chairman, Radiation Oncology


Edward V. Staab, M.D.
Chairman, Radiology


Edward M. Copeland, M.D.
Chairman, Surgery











Medical education is a continuous learning
process that begins with the decision to become a
physician and ends with retirement from the profession.
The formal component of this continuum is divided
into three stages. The first is premedical education
occurring in an undergraduate university setting.
This stage should provide a combination of liberal
education with science prerequisites concluding
with the awarding of a bachelor's degree.
The next stage is medical undergraduate
education, usually requiring four years and leading
to the M.D. degree.
The third formal stage is graduate medical
education in specialty programs. These residency
programs of patient care under supervision, take
place predominantly in a hospital environment and
generally require three to six years, depending upon
the specialty.
Residency training prepares the physician for
specialty certification and the independent practice
of medicine.
Further graduate medical education in a sub-
specialty can be pursued in fellowship programs.
Licensure to practice medicine is achieved
through a three step examination sequence during
medical school and residency training. The United
States Medical Licensing Examination is adminis-
tered by the National Board of Medical Examiners.
These formal stages of medical education,
lasting from 11 to 14 years, lead to licensure and
specialty certification, but thereafter the physician
is responsible to maintain and enhance their
competence through formal and informal
continuing medical education.
It is the responsibility of colleges of medicine
to select medical students, provide their education
leading to the M.D. degree, prepare them for spe-
cialty training in residency programs and ensure
that each understands the critical importance of the
enduring phase of continuing education throughout
their independent medical careers.
The most critical part of this educational con-
tinuum is medical school. Only colleges of medicine
can grant the M.D. degree. The University of Florida
College of Medicine is the cornerstone of the
T-T __ _.... -r' -- -- ..-J- T T--- -1- -- -- ....L.'.


The University of Florida College of Medicine
has strived for excellence since admitting its first
class in September, 1956. It first received full accred-
itation from the Liaison Committee on Medical
Education in 1960, and again in 1963, 1969, 1976,
1983 and 1993.
Rapid expansion in education, biomedical
research, clinical care and other services have per-
mitted the College to offer a curriculum leading to a
Ph.D. degree in each of the basic medical sciences
and a combined M.D./Ph.D. program in addition to
the M.D. degree.
Graduate medical education is provided pre-
dominantly in cooperation with Shands Hospital,
the Gainesville Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and
its urban campus at University Medical Center in
Jacksonville. This is through residency and fellow-
ship programs accredited by the Accreditation
Council on Graduate Medical Education.
Affiliations with community health care programs
provide additional opportunities for the College's
educational and clinical care activities.
The University of Florida Health Science
Center, including Shands Hospital and the
Gainesville Veterans Affairs Medical Center, is
located at the southeast corner of the University of
Florida campus. The structural unity of the Health
Science Center and the geographic location on the
university campus promote an interdisciplinary
approach to education, research and patient care.
The University of Florida Health Science Center
in Jacksonville is located 90 miles from Gainesville.


STUDENTS


The College of Medicine recognizes its obliga-
tion to graduate, for the State of Florida and society,
highly competent and responsible physicians. The
realization of this goal is not possible without excel-


lent students.


The College strives for a diverse stu-


dent population without preconceptions about what
constitutes an ideal applicant. Equal opportunity
and ethnic, racial, religious, gender and cultural
diversity are important principles for our students
and faculty. The University of Florida agrees with
i 1 i* *.........

































- .


i Ib


f!i. u 1 .. ** *
t ii=js u-u ^ a Mi.5 ^WM:1:.:*-::-*.".;.-". -, -:...--


.f


.* ..t- .'.


i-':. ..


S: .. .l








Interest in becoming a physician, in having the
opportunity to contribute to caring for the health
needs of fellow humans, begins before medical
school. The faculty of the College of Medicine nurtures
this interest whenever it occurs and encourages
those with desire and talent to be confident they can
become physicians.
Part of this encouragement is through prepro-
fessional counseling provided cooperatively by the
College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the College
of Medicine.
Volunteering in communities and hospitals
also is an important way to nurture interest and learn
about the variety of opportunities in health care.
Exposure to biomedical research is an additional
avenue for exploring opportunities in health care.
All of these experiences help prospective medical
students decide if they have the necessary desire
and dedication to become physician members of the
healthcare team.
Admission to the College of Medicine is based
on quantitative and qualitative criteria. Quantitative
criteria are grade point average and performance on
standardized examinations, such as the Medical
College Admissions Test. Qualitative criteria include
attitudes, values and personality characteristics.
After an applicant's academic potential to suc-
ceed in challenging learning situations is deter-
mined by quantitative criteria, the admissions com-
mittee is charged to concentrate on the applicant's
social and personal history to focus on potential as a
physician. During the interview process, admission
committee members seek indicators of altruism,
community service, concern for the broader human
condition, judgement, interpersonal characteristics
and a deep desire to prevent illness and care for the
sick that might predict a future physician who is
competent, compassionate and trustworthy.
Students accepted to the College of Medicine
begin a challenging learning experience leading to a
potentially exciting and rewarding career in com-
munity practice, academic medicine or government


service.


The knowledge base necessary to be an


effective physician requires that each student have the
requisite ability, aptitude and premedical preparation.
But more is needed to become a good physi-
cian than adequate knowledge. The social contract
that exists between patient and physician demands
-. 4 4 4*


ities that the profession combines. Early exposure to
clinician role models in the academic setting and
practicing community is part of a learning experi-
ence designed to incorporate them into the family of
physicians who are responsible for the health needs
of society.
For the four years in medical school, concern
and effort from the faculty are directed toward
imparting to all students the importance of the art as
well as science of medicine-enabling them to find the
optimal balance between knowing and caring, and
helping them understand their inevitable limitations.
It is the responsibility of the College of Medicine
to help all students develop the combination of
knowledge and maturity that is sufficient for assuming
incremental responsibility.
Upon graduation, every student should be pre-
pared to assume the responsibilities required in a
supervised clinical care setting, whatever area of
specialized training they might pursue, and to have
developed an appreciation of the need for continued
self-learning.
It is the philosophy of this College of Medicine
that all patients in need of care will be provided that
care, even though caring for patients with some ill-
nesses may put the safety of staff and students in
jeopardy. Caring for others more than self is part of
the tradition of medicine and helps graduates
become aware that they have the great privilege of
asking fellow humans to allow them to care for their
health needs and it is their obligation to maintain
that trust.


FACULTY


The evolution of modem academic health centers
has produced many opportunities for students and
faculty. The knowledge and skills needed to deliver
technologically advanced clinical care and to make
scientific discoveries have become highly specialized.
This provides the opportunity for students to learn
of the most recent advances in a large number of
disciplines and to participate in rigorous research.
This necessary degree of specialization can make
the provision of a generalists education in basic science
and clinical medicine more difficult. It is the respon-
sibility of the College to provide the faculty and
environments for learning that ensure its students







and is a measure of academic success. Efforts are
made to encourage and facilitate educational, per-
sonal, and social faculty-student interaction.
Recognition by students that the faculty are con-
cerned about them as people is essential to a quality
learning environment.

RESEARCH

Exploring new ways to understand health and
disease through biomedical research is an exciting
mission of any academic health center. Research that
ranges from structural biology to medical sociology
is conducted in the laboratories and offices of the
College of Medicine and its affiliated institutions.
The College is especially proud of its research
focus at the intersection of basic and clinical science.
The College has more than 35 endowed research
professorships, numerous federally funded research
opportunities for medical students and a long-standing
clinical research center. A soon to be constructed
Brain Institute will allow the College of Medicine to
be a leader in research into the next century.
The future will include even more collaborative
research between basic scientists and clinicians, an
effort that will bring the unsolved scientific problems
discovered at the bedside to the laboratories of
skilled investigators. Increased collaboration
between the College of Medicine and other Health
Center colleges and with University programs in
agriculture, education, engineering, nuclear sciences,
physics, psychology and others is vital to utilizing
available talent and making exciting discoveries.

AFFILIATIONS AND FACILITIES

Most programs and faculty are housed in the
University of Florida Health Science Center. The
Health Science Center's facilities include the
Chandler A. Stetson Medical Sciences Building, the
Communicore (library, teaching laboratories and
classrooms), the Academic Research Building, the
Colleges of Dentistry, Health Related Professions,
Medicine, Nursing, Pharmacy, Veterinary Medicine,
Shands Hospital and the Gainesville Veterans
Affairs Medical Center.
The 548-bed Shands Hospital has more than
25,000 inpatient admissions recorded each year.


and research sources. Both institutions offer ample
opportunity for hospital-based bedside and ambula-
tory teaching.
Formal educational affiliations have been
established in Tallahassee, Pensacola, Jacksonville,
Leesburg, Broward County and Orlando which provide
additional basic science and clinical science resources.
The Communicore is a facility unique to the
College of Medicine. This building houses lecture
and seminar rooms, multidisciplinary teaching labo-
ratories, study areas and a center for the develop-
ment and utilization of audiovisual and automated
learning aids.
In addition, the Health Science Center Library
has a collection of over 215,000 books and periodi-
cals. Computer-based bibliographic retrieval ser-
vices, such as MEDLINE, are available to support
teaching and research activities. The library








































UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER
JACKSONVILLE (UFHSC-J)

Several hospitals in nearby Jacksonville form the
University of Florida Health Science Center
Jacksonville (UFHSC-J), originally named the
Jacksonville Health Education Programs, Inc. (JHEP),
with the goal of improving medical education in
the community.
In 1969, by action of the Board of Regents,
UFHSC-J became a division of the J. Hillis Miller
Health Science Center in Gainesville. One hundred
and eighty three full-time faculty of the University
of Florida College of Medicine are located in
Jacksonville. In 1988, University Medical Center was
designated by the Board of Regents as the urban
campus of the Health Science Center.
,'-1- 1 t 1 1 1 I 1 1 ... ---


ambulatory facilities and to become acquainted with
the many aspects of health care delivery in an urban
area.
In addition to supervision by full-time faculty,
the student may have the opportunity to learn from
community-based practitioners.
Fifteen accredited residency programs are offered
in Jacksonville. Residents participate in the teaching
of students. UFHSC-J conducts a number of pro-
grams for continuing education for practicing physi-
cians to which students are welcome.
A nationally patterned medical library system
supports the teaching and research activities with
extensive periodical holdings, bibliographic services
and audiovisual collections.
Pediatric Programs of the University of Florida in
Jacksonville are enriched by their collaborative rela-
tionships with the Nemours Children's Clinic. This
multispecialty pediatric outpatient facility provides







Center have coordinated pediatric inpatient services
at University Medical Center and the Wolfson's
Children's Hospital, a new 180-bed hospital dedicat-
ed solely to the treatment of medical and surgical
diseases of childhood. These combined efforts pro-
vide an excellent resource for research, education
and clinical service.


COMMUNITY MEDICINE

The College of Medicine, primarily through the
departments of Community Health and Family
Medicine, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, and
Obstetrics/ Gynecology, has had community-based
programs for more than 20 years. The rural compo-
nent of these educational experiences are well recog-
nized for their innovative contributions to patient
care and medical education.
In response to community needs, as well as the
need for changes in medical education mandated by
changes in the teaching environment of teaching
hospitals, the College of Medicine has established
an Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) Program
for the purpose of planning, developing and imple-
menting more extensive community-based educa-
tional activities.
Through this program, students in each of the
four years of medical school will have the opportu-
nity to participate in clinical training activities in
clinics and private physicians' offices throughout
north Florida.
The delivery of primary health care is the major
focus of these activities and students have an oppor-
tunity to become familiar with common medical
problems which are seldom seen in the hospital set-
ting. Working with community physicians provides
the student with valuable role models for the practice
of medicine.
The AHEC Program has established the
Community Health Scholars Program for second-
year students. This eight -week experience for select-
ed students takes place during the summer after the
first year. Students work on community health
projects supervised by a community preceptor and
faculty from the College of Medicine.
A basic premise of the community health
programs of the College of Medicine is that they
will direct the talents of faculty toward problems
of health care delivery and engage the interest and


HARRELL PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT & ASSESSMENT CENTER

Named for the founding Dean of the College of
Medicine, George T. Harrell, Jr., M.D., the Harrell
Professional Development and Assessment Center
was designed to help students and faculty better
learn the art of medicine.
Using state-of-the-art technology, the Harrell
Center includes a suite of patient examination
rooms, adjacent computer carrels, a conference
room, a reception area, and an audiovisual control
center. The patient rooms and conference room are
equipped with closed-circuit, color television cam-
eras and stereo microphones which are linked to the
control center. Custom designed audio and commu-
nications systems housed in the control room pro-
vide the ability to display and record
student/patient interactions from the eight exami-
nation rooms. These encounters can be critiqued by
students and faculty.
Direct observation into each patient room is also
available through a one-way window from the cen-


tral hallway. The conference room doubles


as an


observation theatre for group demonstrations


as the


patient rooms can be directly observed from the
conference room via a closed circuit monitor.
The Harrell Center houses an exciting, unique
educational resource, the standardized patient pro-
gram. Standardized patients are individuals trained
to provide specific histories, simulate signs and
symptoms of specific ailments or who have stable,
abnormal physical findings. Students interact with a
standardized patient just as they would with an
actual patient to take a history, perform a physical
examination, counsel and educate the patient or
negotiate a treatment plan.











Students entering medical school today will be
independent practitioners in the 21st century. It is
not possible to visualize clearly the structure of the
next century's health-care system, but it is certain
that it will be far different from today's.
The cost of health care will be an increasing
focus of concern and significant changes in physician
and hospital reimbursement are inevitable. A solution
to the paradox of having the best possible care in the
world, but inaccessible to millions of our own citi-
zens will be demanded by many and likely legislated
by government.
Judicious investment in health maintenance
through prevention of illness and injury will be seen
as wiser than the present expense of treating sickness.
Health care will become more a wellness than
sickness industry.
With continued aging of our population, caring
for the chronically ill and elderly will become a sig-
nificant component of the physician's time and
expertise.
Sophisticated media and a more informed pub-
lic will continue the demystification of the profes-
sion, and people will be more involved in decisions
about the use of technology in their treatment, and
the treatment of family members incapable of mak-
ing decisions. This involvement is but a step from
the willing acceptance of health-care rationing.
There will be more concern about quality of life
and more indignation about impersonal death.
Unless physicians are sensitive to the health needs
of their community and society, the profession will
no longer be held in high esteem. Nonphysicians
will assume many of the duties and responsibilities
now reserved for physicians.
Education of medical students in this country is
the exclusive responsibility of medical schools. In
discharging this responsibility, medical schools have
the obligation to anticipate and introduce change
and explore ways to prepare students for these


changes.


This responsibility to continuously revise


the educational process is made difficult because of
multiple missions.
The future success of this, and other colleges of
medicine, will be the realization of a single mission:
provision of healthcare for society through a svner-


cooperatively pursued. Our students, faculty and
staff approach this challenge with enthusiasm.
The University of Florida College of Medicine
has the responsibility to provide health care to the
referral community it serves and the obligation to
prepare physicians to independently provide com-
passionate and skillful care in their own community.
This responsibility and obligation provides our
mission: to educate students and physicians in the
humanistic, scientific and technical principles of
medicine; to provide the environment and faculty to
make important biomedical discoveries; and to
deliver the highest quality health care to the patients
we serve.
The educational program of the College has
three specific objectives. First, to provide a humane
environment and a thoughtful faculty to foster and
nurture the proper attitudes and behaviors during
the professional development of each student.
Second, to provide the variety of experiences that
will allow each student to choose the field and spe-
cialty that will provide them a satisfying career of
service. Third, to prepare each student academically
and emotionally for the rigors and responsibilities of
residency training and later independent communi-
ty clinical practice, academic medicine or govern-
ment service.
An essential prerequisite to being an effective
physician is a solid background in the sciences basic
to medicine. The relevance of this scientific knowl-
edge to clinical medicine is important for learning,
retaining and applying the large amount of avail-
able information.
Our curriculum provides significant clinical
experience with academic and community physi-
cians in the first year of medical school. The purpose
of this early experience is not to teach the knowl-
edge base and technical skills of the physician, but
to participate with skilled physicians in communi-
cating with their patients, serving their communities
and utilizing a relevant scientific basis in the care of
their patients.
Whatever the precise structure of the future
healthcare system, it is apparent the College's cur-
riculum should meet current objectives while
nrenarinp nhvsicians for society's expectations of








































a, I
0 H







today's students finish their professional careers, the
number of people over age 65 will have doubled-
from about 32 million in the mid 1990s to about 66
million by 2030. There also will have been a large
increase in African, Asian and Hispanic-American
populations.
These future demographic changes, combined
with the current perception that the high cost of
health care does not meet society's expectations for
equal access, healthier lives and rational use of tech-
nology, will certainly lead to change.
Some changes are reasonably predictable. First,
more emphasis will be placed on preventive medi-
cine and maintaining health-promoting life styles.
Second, everyone in this country will have
access to basic health care, both prevention and
primary care.
Third, there will be rational assessment, cost
effective use and involvement of patients in decid-
ing the use of technology.
Fourth, physicians will work more closely with
other health-care providers in managing coordinat-
ed care and with their communities to provide this
care cost effectively.
Fifth, greater emphasis will be placed on
humane care of the chronically ill, ethical counsel-
ing, acceptance of inevitable death, and rational use
of rehabilitation.
Sixth, while meeting these expectations, physi-
cians will continue to be expected to provide the
most sophisticated available diagnostic and thera-
peutic care when appropriate. The ever expanding
knowledge base needed to provide such diagnosis
and therapy will require skilled information man-
agement.
Flexibility and creativity in the curriculum and
programs, and from the faculty and its sponsors,
will be needed to meet the challenges and opportu-
nities ahead. The College is excited about these chal-
lenges and is confident it can lead the way in pro-
viding opportunities for students and faculty.

THE ART AND SCIENCE OF MEDICINE

The scientific basis of medicine is universally
accepted as a prerequisite for medical practice.
Often however, we are confronted with the idea that
the practice of medicine is an art rather than a sci-
enrce. and that tn mc ic in mrh ripnp in ipdral pnr-


Frequently medical students state that entrance
into medical school really does not bring about the
expected change in fulfillment of their motivational
desires. Often they feel removed from the art of
medicine to the point in which satisfaction or gratifi-
cation of emotional needs cannot be achieved.
As a result, a cynical attitude may emerge
toward medical and patient problems, with a subse-
quent loss of motivation toward learning.
The educational experience must help the stu-
dent achieve a high quality blend of humanism and
science, which will enable optimal medical care to
be provided to patients. The faculty strives to blend
the art and science of medicine into the College of
Medicine's programs.
Through careful planning, an effort is made to
use the fundamental knowledge of the basic sci-
ences in a meaningful relation to career goals in


medicine.


Traditionally during the first and second


years the emphasis is on the sciences basic to medi-
cine, but clinical medicine will be introduced during
the first and second years. Advanced clinical medi-
cine will be the primary focus during the third year.
The opportunity to advance in both fields in a corre-
lated fashion will be offered in the elective period of
the fourth year.
The introduction of clinical medicine in the first
and second years and the opportunity to select basic
science courses during the elective year are of spe-
cial significance for modern medicine. There is
widespread recognition that delay between scientific
discovery and its clinical application is too long and
must be shortened. It is expected that graduates of
the present program will have less difficulty in
retaining a true feeling for a close relationship between
basic medical science and its clinical application.

ADMISSION INFORMATION


The Applicant Pool

Students applying for admission to the
University of Florida College of Medicine should
plan to complete the requirements for a bachelor's
degree at an accredited university or college by the
time of matriculation. In exceptional instances, stu-
dents upon whom the degree has not been conferred
may be admitted.
A _. 1-_ ._ L--_ --'11 1 --- -11 .1







the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT) and
personal interviews if granted by the selection committee.
Applicants currently pursuing graduate level
work toward a Ph.D. degree or other professional
degrees are obligated to complete all degree
requirements prior to application to the College of
Medicine for study toward the M.D. degree.
The College of Medicine does not discriminate
on the basis of race, sex, creed, age, disability, or
national origin. Further details on technical standards
for medical school admission may be found on page
115. Although Florida residents are given preference
in admission, the College of Medicine does consider
a limited number of nonresident applicants each
year. Nonresident applicants must demonstrate
superior qualifications. The College of Medicine
welcomes applications from minority students
regardless of state residence. Only United States citizens
and permanent resident aliens will be considered.

Undergraduate Education

Basic Science Requirements: The minimum science
admissions requirements include basic introductory
courses and laboratories in the following subjects:

* Biochemistry-4 semester hours
* Biology-8 semester hours (12 quarter hours)
* General (Inorganic) Chemistry-8 semester hours
(12 quarter hours)
* Organic Chemistry-4 semester hours (12 quarter
hours)
* Physics-8 semesters hours (12 quarter hours)


Consideration should be given by the student to
participation in honors courses, independent study
and scientific research. These activities present
opportunities for an unstructured learning experience.

Electives: The remainder of the college work
should be distributed throughout the humanities,
social and behavioral sciences. The student should
select subjects which tend to broaden the educa-
tional experience.

Extracurricular Activities: Extracurricular
activities and employment both during the academic
year and the summers are important contributions
to an individual's development. Experience in medical
and paramedical areas often contributes toward an
understanding of health care delivery problems and
helps to solidify the basis of the student's motivation
toward a career in medicine.

Medical College Admission Test

Every applicant must take the Medical College
Admission Test (MCAT) at a time that enables scores
to be received by the Admissions Office prior to the
application deadline. The test is given twice yearly in
many colleges and universities. Only scores for MCAT
exams taken after 1991 will be accepted. Scores are
only acceptable up to two years prior to a current
application. For further information about the test
write: MCAT Program, P.O. Box 4056, Iowa City, IA


52243 (319)


337-1357.


An undergraduate general biochemistry course
is strongly recommended. Students with one or
more semesters of undergraduate biochemistry find
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Disease
(BMS 5204) more interesting and rewarding. For stu-
dents who desire additional background in science,
courses in genetics, microbiology and physiology
might be considered. It is not necessary to choose
one of the sciences as a college major.
No specific requirement is set in the area of
mathematics since, at most colleges, some mathe-
matics is prerequisite to physics and chemistry.
Some college work in calculus is strongly recom-
mended. Familiarity with the principles of statistics
and their application to the analysis of data is an


Application and Acceptance Procedures

Admission to the College of Medicine is highly
competitive. The college seeks students who demonstrate
those personal and intellectual characteristics
expected of physicians: compassion, communica-
tiveness, character, captaincy and competence.
There are three routes of admission to the
University of Florida College of Medicine:


Regular Admission (73 places)
Junior Honors (12 places)
P.I.M.S. Tallahassee (30 places)








Regular Admission


The Medical Selection Committee has 28 members,
including the Chair, appointed by the Dean of the
College of Medicine. Members include clinical and
basic science faculty and community physicians
who serve rotating terms. The Associate Dean for
Student and Alumni Affairs, the Director of the
Program in Medical Sciences and the Assistant Dean
and Director for Minority Relations are permanent
members.


(1) Students apply for admission through the
American Medical College Application Service
(AMCAS). All materials should be submitted as
early as possible but the deadline for AMCAS is
December 1. Students are encouraged to have basic sci-
ence requirements completed prior to application.


(2) Personal statements, academic performance and
MCAT scores submitted in the AMCAS application
are reviewed and competitive applicants are sent
materials for formal (secondary) application.
Applicants who are "advised not to apply" but wish
to continue with the application process may
request a secondary application be sent to them.
Formal application requires a $20 fee to the
University of Florida. This fee is non-refundable.

(3) Materials in the completed secondary applica-
tion are reviewed by the Chair with additional
review of the formal folders by other members of
the committee at the Chair's request. On the basis of
personal qualifications, academic record, expanded
personal statements, and letters of recommendation,
competitive applicants are invited for interview.


(4) Interviews are held on Fridays from September
through March at the University of Florida's College
of Medicine. Applicants meet with the Chair for ori-
entation and follow-up discussions. Tours of the
facilities are provided. Each applicant has interviews
with two members of the Selection Committee. A
subset of the Committee is designated to interview
applicants on a particular Friday.


(5) The subset of committee members who inter-
viewed applicants meet to present and discuss the
-- f I .-1:nl nt ^ r. .1/* k> h IJ W^~ ^> F I /^ rtj -^t J- 4^b >Wn 1n- /-J ^h rl. n:U4J^ 1 ^V 1

against those of the entire applicant pool. With the
approval of the Dean, the Chair of the Selection
Committee makes the final determination of each
applicant's status. Acceptance follows a "rolling
admission process" whereby acceptance are made
throughout the year. The class is usually filled by April.

(6) Following acceptance, a candidate has two
weeks to provide a written statement of intent to the
Admissions Office. No deposit is required from
accepted applicants. If the applicant is subsequently
accepted by another school which he or she prefers,
the applicant is obligated to notify the College of
Medicine Admissions Office immediately with a
written letter of intent to withdraw acceptance.


(7) When the class is filled, a non-ranked alternate
list is established by the Chair based on academic
and personal qualifications and the recommenda-
tions by the committee. As withdrawals occur, the
positions are filled from the alternate list.


(8) An applicant who is not successful in gaining
admission and wishes to reapply for the next entering
class must initiate the new application through AMCAS.

The above procedures follow the guidelines of
the Association of American Medical Colleges.

Junior Honors Medical Program

The Junior Honors Medical Program (JHMP) is a
combined (seven year) B.S./M.D. program offered
by the University of Florida or Florida A & M
University. This program is intended for undergrad-
uate students who have demonstrated superior
scholastic ability and personal development during
their first two academic years.

Application is made during the student's second
year of college (sophomore). Although most appli-
cations are received from students of the University
of Florida and Florida A & M University, applica-
tions are accepted from students from other colleges.
Non-Florida residents also are eligible to apply. The
program is limited to 12 students per year.


Application Process:







February 1. By the end of the second year of under-
graduate work, applicants must complete:
* Biology-8 semester hours (12 quarter hours),
* General (Inorganic) Chemistry-8 semester
hours (12 quarter hours),
* Organic Chemistry-8 semester hours (12 quarter
hours), and
* the University's general education requirements
in English, social sciences and humanities.

Additionally, applicants must have an overall GPA of
at least 3.5 and SAT score of at least 1100. The 8
semester hour physics requirement for admission to
medical school can be completed during the junior year.

2. After review of the preliminary application,
competitive applicants are sent materials for the formal
(secondary) application. Applicants who were advised
"not to apply" but wish to continue with the appli-
cation process may request a secondary application
to be sent to them. Formal application requires a
$20.00 fee. This fee is non-refundable. Formal appli-
cations are due March 1.


3. Materials in the completed secondary applica-
tion are reviewed by the Director of the JHMP and
Chair of the Medical Selection Committee with
additional review of the formal folders by other
members of the Selection Committee at the Chair's
or Director's request. On the basis of personal quali-
fications, academic record, expanded personal state-
ments, and letters of recommendation, competitive
applicants are invited for interview.

4. Interviews are held from March through April
at the University of Florida College of Medicine.
Applicants meet with the Director and Chair and have
interviews with two members of the Selection Committee.

5. The recommendations of the interviewers are
sent to the Director and Chair. They are responsible
for weighing the recommendations of the interview-
ers and the qualifications of each applicant against
those of the entire applicant pool. With the approval
of the Dean, the Director and Chair make the final
determination of each applicant's status. Applicants
accepted into the program are notified by May 15.

6. Following acceptance a candidate has two weeks to
provide a written statement of intent to the JHMP Office.


of the Medical Selection Committee. As withdrawals
occur, positions are filled from the alternate list.


8. An applicant who is not successful in gaining
admission into the JHMP and who wishes to apply
for regular admission to the College of Medicine
must initiate a new application process through AMCAS.

9. Selection into the program secures admission
into the College of Medicine at the University of
Florida, contingent upon satisfactory completion of
the junior year (third year). Each student's progress
is reviewed at the end of the junior year to deter-
mine whether the student has complied with the
prerequisites and maintained the high standards
expected of a student participating in this accelerated
honors program. A satisfactory score on the Medical
College Admission Test (MCAT) is required prior to
entrance into the College of Medicine.

During the junior year (third year of under-
graduate training), students take courses on the
undergraduate campuses and three seminars taught
by College of Medicine faculty. During the senior
year (fourth year of undergraduate training), students
who have successfully completed the third year
merge into the standard first year medical program.
Then, at the end of the first year of medical school
(the fourth year of college), students in the Junior
Honors Program receive a B.S. degree either from
the University of Florida or Florida A & M University.


Year 3 Year 4

Seminar
College of Medicine
College of
Liberal Arts & Sciences

Year 5 Year 6

College of Medicine College of Medicine


I -- -I








The junior year seminars provide extensive fac-
ulty contact and a solid background in biochemistry


and other areas of preclinical science.


The emphasis


Florida may apply through the American Medical
College Application Service. Successful applicants
show evidence in their lifestyle of a commitment to


is placed on student participation in a relatively
non-structured and informal format.
Past Junior Honors participants have found
this to be an educational experience of great value in
the development of a critical and inquiring
approach to learning. In addition to these seminars,
students continue to register for course work within
the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Many stu-
dents in the program also participate in research
projects.
Additional information about the Junior
Honors Medical Program and the application proce-
dures may be obtained by writing the Junior Honors
Program, Office of Admissions, College of Medicine,
University of Florida, Box 100216, Health Science
Center, Gainesville, FL 32610 or the Preprofessional


Office, Florida A


& M University, Tallahassee,


Florida 32307.

Program in Medical Sciences (PIMS)

Since 1971, Florida State University has partici-
pated in an inter-university program with the
University of Florida College of Medicine. The first
year of basic medical science courses is spent at FSU
and the remaining three years of medical education,
leading to the M.D. degree, are completed at the
University of Florida College of Medicine in
Gainesville. The students selected for PIMS begin
their first year of medical education in May, and the
curriculum includes clinical preceptorships with


local primary care physicians.


the service of others,


as personal attributes are an


important factor in the selection process. The pre-
medical curriculum should include a course in bio-
chemistry.
Detailed information may be obtained by calling
the Program offices, (904) 644-1855 or FAX (904) 644-5766
or writing to the Program in Medical Sciences,
Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306.

Admission to the College of Medicine at
an Advanced Standing Status

A person may seek transfer to the College of
Medicine from a Liaison Committee on Medical
Education (LCME) accredited United States or
Canadian medical school. Individuals who already
have received a degree from a college of medicine
will not be admitted to the M.D. curriculum at


m45


The program is


designed to attract students with a special interest in
primary health care, particularly those who might
desire to practice in medically underserved Florida
communities.
The PIMS Admissions Committee has 22 rotat-
ing members composed of faculty from Florida State
University, Florida A & M University, the
University of West Florida and local physicians as
well as the PIMS Director and staff administrator.
The Chair of the University of Florida Selection
Committee and the Dean for Student Affairs are per-
manent members.
There is an early application process open to
,- ~ ~ ... -,_ --- 2 ^.. -- !. C 171 - .: ~- C t t i- I T ; .-^-.;r. ,








advanced standing status. A person may be admitted
to the College of Medicine at an advanced standing
status within the context of the following guidelines:

1) A vacancy must exist for the admission of a
person to advanced standing status in the
appropriate class.

2) There must be extenuating family reasons
which would be alleviated by transfer.

3) Previous professional or graduate education
must be adjudged adequate in quantity, quality,
and time frame to have been competitive for
admission as a first-year student at this college
and to permit entry into the curriculum at a
level beyond the first year. An applicant who
is, for any reason, on probation or not in good
academic standing at the school from which
transfer is sought will not be recommended for
transfer to this college.


4)There must be no history of attitudinal,
behavioral or emotional problems.


5) Applicants currently pursuing graduate level
work toward a Ph.D. degree or other professional
degrees are required to complete all degree
requirements prior to application for admission
to the College of Medicine for study toward the
M.D. degree.

6) Only under extraordinary circumstances will
an applicant who was previously not accepted
by the Admissions Committee be considered
for transfer at Advanced Standing status. Any
such request will be considered by the
Chairperson of the Admissions Committee at
the time the student was not accepted and the
Associate Dean for Student Admissions and
Activities in consultation with the Senior
Associate Dean for Educational Affairs.

Initial consideration of an applicant for
advanced standing will be undertaken only when
the applicant furnishes the following information
upon request:


1 ) A siPned narrative written hv the annlirant


2) A letter of recommendation from the dean
of the professional or graduate school in
which the applicant either was enrolled or is
presently enrolled. This letter must also state
that the applicant is free of attitudinal, behavioral,
or emotional problems.

3) Official transcripts of all post-high school
academic course work.

4) Medical College Admission Test official scores.

5) A properly executed information form
furnished by the College of Medicine Office
of Admissions.


6) United States citizenship or permanent
resident alien certification.


An applicant judged to be qualified on the
basis of the furnished information may be extended
an interview.
Final determination of admission at Advanced
Standing status will be made by the Senior Associate
Dean for Educational Affairs, the Associate Dean for
Student Affairs and the Chair of the Admissions
Committee with approval by the Dean.
Special programs of study leading to graduate
degrees in the basic medical sciences and admission
requirements for these programs are outlined on
page 41 of this catalog.

Professional Education Leading
to the M.D. Degree

Once a decision has been reached by both the
medical school and the applicant, the student will
pursue his or her educational endeavors from the
vantage of a physician striving to achieve well-
rounded capacities as a physician-humanist and sci-
entist in his or her profession and community.
The four years of medical education are divid-
ed into three blocks of time, which are identified as
Preclinical Coursework (two years), Clinical
Clerkships (one year), and Postclerkship Electives
and Required Courses (one year). During the pre-
clinical period, students are provided a core of basic
science and general clinical information. The








anesthesiology, community health and family medicine,
medicine, neurology, obstetrics and gynecology,
pediatrics, psychiatry and surgery. The fourth year
includes four weeks of required advanced pharma-
cology, four weeks required advanced medicine
clerkship and four-week selectives in surgery and
ambulatory care. The remainder of the fourth year is
devoted to elective course work.
The provisions of this catalog are not to be con-
strued as an irrevocable contract between the student
and the College of Medicine. The curriculum is con-
stantly undergoing evaluation and refinement.
Changes may occur from year to year in order to
improve the educational program of the undergraduate
student of medicine.
The college reserves the right to effect policy
and regulatory changes at any time.

Preclinical (Years One and Two)

The preclinical course work is designed to pro-
vide students with essential basic science and gener-
al clinical information necessary for their clinical


training.


Teaching teams from both basic and clini-


cal science departments will participate.
Students may elect the option of taking the pre-
clinical basic science courses over a three-year peri-
od of time. This option provides an opportunity for
the M.D. /Ph.D. candidates and other students to begin
research activities earlier and in more depth. It also
provides the opportunity for students to pursue course
work outside the traditional medical school curriculum.
Additionally this less intense three-year track
may be advantageous to students with less intensive
science backgrounds who would benefit from more
moderately paced course work.
Contact hours per week for the standard two-
year curriculum range from 20-25. In the three-year
track, contact hours would range from 8-25 with an
average of about 17 contact hours per week.
A student's request to participate in the three-
year track must receive prior review and approval
by the associate dean for education and the chair-
man of the academic status committee.
During the first academic year, a student who
is in good academic standing can choose to move
into the three-year program. To take advantage of
the opportunities that the three-year option offers,


who meets the standards for dismissal and is given
the option of repeating an academic year in its
entirety is not eligible to elect the three-year option.
The course schedule under the standard two-


year curriculum proceeds


as follows. Complete


course descriptions begin on page 56.

FIRST YEAR


Anatomy by Diagnostic Imaging (BMS 5190)

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of
Disease (BMS 5204)


Medical Cell and Tissue Biology (BMS 5110)

Introduction to Clinical Practice (BMS 5173)

Basic Clinical Skills (BCC 5015)

Introduction to Psychiatry and Human
Behavior (BMS 5151)


Medical Aspects of Human
Genetics (BMS 5003)

Medical Human Anatomy (BMS 5100C)

Medical Neuroscience (BMS 5020)


Principles of Physiology (BMS


5500)


SECOND YEAR


Clinical Diagnosis (Introduction to
Clinical Medicine) (BMS 5831)


Epidemiology and Public Health
(BMS 5823)


General Pathology (BMS 5608)

Introduction to Clinical Radiology
(BMS 5191)


Medical Microbiology and
Infectious Disease (BMS 5300)








Physical Diagnosis (BMS 5830)

Social and Ethical Issues in
Medicine (BMS 5822)


Systemic Pathology and Laboratory
Medicine (BMS 5600)

THIRD YEAR


The third year is devoted to clinical clerkships,
in which groups of students rotate among the major
clinical services experiencing direct patient contact.
The required clinical clerkships include: medicine,
surgery, pediatrics, community health and family
medicine, psychiatry, obstetrics and gynecology,
neurology and anesthesiology. Students will spend
about 10 weeks participating in clerkships at
UFHSC-Jacksonville. Housing will be provided
during this period of time.
During these clinical clerkships, the student
becomes an integral member of the medical team
and has direct responsibility for his/her assigned
patients during rotation.
Students are allowed to displace one clerkship
rotation into the fourth year and take two elective
units in place of the clerkship, in order to provide
some flexibility in choice.
To ensure that each clerkship has a relatively
constant number of students, no more than three
students can displace any one clerkship at a given time.
Delaying a clerkship requires approval of the
course director, the student's advisor, the course
director for the chosen elective, the associate dean
for student affairs and the associate dean for education.
Each clinical service conducts a variety of semi-
nars and conferences. These are considered to be
part of the clerkship and attendance is expected.

CLERKSHIPS (Third Year)
Medicine, Pediatrics, Obstetrics/Gynecology and
Surgery (8 weeks each); Psychiatry (7 weeks),
Community Health (6 weeks), Neurology (2 weeks)
and Anesthesiology (1 week).

FOURTH YEAR


The fourth year occupies the last 11 months of
.1. *1 1 --


Students are permitted considerable freedom in
designing their program. For students who have
already chosen a specialty, fourth-year programs
may be designed to provide early experiences related
to their career choice.
For students who have not yet chosen a specialty,
the curriculum may be designed to permit an explo-
ration of their interests in several different specialties
or to provide a very broad clinical experience that
would be useful in many different specialties. In
addition, the fourth-year elective program may help
students with known weaknesses in clinical or basic
science areas to strengthen their knowledge base
prior to housestaff training.
All elective choices must be made carefully in
conjunction with the student's faculty advisor.
Clinical electives are available in all of the
major disciplines of medicine. In the clinical electives,
students may work as advanced clerks, assuming
greater responsibilities than they had in the third year.
Elective courses in the basic sciences also are
available. Additionally, independent study pro-
grams may be designed to allow study of areas in
medicine not represented by formal course offerings.
Students who apply for more than three
months of extramural rotations must obtain their
advisor's permission and approval of the Academic
Status Committee. Students who rank in the lower
third of their class must have the approval of the
Academic Status Committee before applying for any
externship.
Each student must complete a minimum of 40
semester credit hours in the fourth year to be eligible
for graduation. However, students must remain en-
rolled and take coursework up to the time of graduation
regardless of the total credit hours accumulated.


ELECTIVES (Fourth Year)
Advanced Medicine Clerkship
(4 weeks)
Advanced Pharmacology
(4 weeks)
Ambulatory Care Selective
(4 weeks)
Surgery Selective (4 weeks)
Electives (6, 4-week units)


EVALUATION








College of Medicine regarding promotion and grad-
uation. Members of the committee include faculty
representatives from each department of the College
of Medicine, coordinators for the preclinical courses
and third-year clerkships, the director of minority
relations, the associate dean for education, and the
associate dean for student affairs (who serves as


chairman).


The overall performance of a student will be
considered by the Academic Status Committee in
preparing recommendations regarding promotion,
graduation and general academic ranking.
Information upon which recommendations will be
made include grades, written evaluations, and cog-
nitive and noncognitive data submitted by the facul-
ty of the various curricular units, scores on the
United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE),
and performance on the Objective Structured
Clinical Examinations (OSCE) given at the end of the
second year and beginning of the fourth year. The
OSCE's are designed to assess students' competence


and to provide feedback to both the student and the
faculty. Students who perform unsatisfactorily are
required to remediate before progressing to the next
phase of the curriculum.
All students are required to take Steps 1 and 2
of the USMLE before graduation. Second-year stu-
dents will sit for Step 1 prior to beginning the third
year and fourth-year students will sit for Step 2 at
the beginning of the senior year.
The College of Medicine expects all medical
students to be professional in their dealings with
patients and to exhibit caring and compassionate
attitudes. These and other non-cognitive qualities/
attitudes will be evaluated during patient contacts
and in other relevant settings. Attitudes inconsistent
with compassionate care or refusal by the student to
participate in learning or patient care directed at cer-
tain patient groups may be grounds for dismissal.
All students will be informed of their academic
progress on a regular basis.








Standards of Performance

Students' performance in academic course
work will be evaluated by letter grades A through F
or Pass/Fail. The Pass (P) or Fail (F) grading system
will be used in special circumstances as approved
by the Curriculum Committee. Passing grades are A
through C in order of excellence.
A grade of D connotes unsatisfactory perfor-
mance; F, Failure and WF, Withdrew Failing. If a
grade of D or F is assigned, remediation of this


grade is required.


The I (Incomplete) or F grade


may be given to a student who fails to complete
course requirements or who fails to attend or partic-
ipate in required course activities. Students must
receive a passing grade in every course to be recom-
mended for graduation. If approved for remediation
by the Academic Status Committee, any student
with a D or F grade must complete required remedial
coursework with a passing grade.
Remediation requirements will be determined
by the appropriate course director and approved by
the chairman of the respective department and the
Academic Status Committee. Remediation must be
completed prior to entering the next academic year,
unless the plan for remediation, submitted by the
course director and approved by the Academic
Status Committee, allows continuation into the first
months of the next academic year.
Any incomplete coursework must be complet-
ed within a prescribed period of time or the grade
will be converted to F.
The Academic Status Committee will review
the performance of all fourth-year students to be
considered for graduation. In addition to the satis-
factory completion of all required and elective
coursework, the student must have a grade point
average of 2.0 or better and must have satisfactorily
completed all remedial work with a grade of C or
higher. Students receiving a grade of less than C in
remedial work may be dismissed. USMLE steps 1
and 2 must be taken before the student is approved
for graduation.
Students who have demonstrated outstanding
academic achievements will be recommended for
graduation with honors. Excellence of different
types in varied fields will be considered, such as
superior academic work, outstanding student
research and thesis and other special achievements.


Probation and Dismissal

Students who fail to achieve satisfactory
progress may be placed on academic probation or
dismissed. The purposes of probation are: to identi-
fy unsatisfactory performance at an early date; to
provide an opportunity for the student to receive
counseling; to provide the student whose progress is
unsatisfactory with further opportunity to improve
and perform satisfactorily; and to notify the student
that satisfactory progress is not being made toward
standards required for graduation.
In accordance with university regulation, any
student with less than a 2.0 grade point average will
be placed on probation. Additionally, the following
standards apply to students of the College of Medicine:


1) Preclinical first year-Any student receiving F
grades in coursework totaling 9 or more credit
hours or Ds or Fs in coursework totaling 13 or more
credit hours during the first year will be automati-
cally dismissed. Any student receiving an F in any
course work or Ds in coursework totaling 5 or more
credit hours will be placed on probation.


2) Preclinical second year-Any student receiving
Ds or Fs in course work totaling 10 or more credit
hours will be automatically dismissed. Any student
receiving an F in any coursework or Ds in course
work totaling 4 or more credit hours will be placed
on probation.

Students electing to take the basic sciences
under the three-year optional tract will be governed
by the following criteria: During the first two years
of the option, any student receiving Fs in course-
work totaling 7 or more credit hours or Ds or Fs in
coursework totaling 9 or more credit hours will be
automatically dismissed. Any student receiving a D
or F in any coursework will be placed on probation.
During the final year of the three-year option, any
student receiving Ds or Fs in course work totaling
10 or more credit hours will be automatically dis-
missed. Any student receiving an F in any course-
work or Ds in coursework totaling four or more
credit hours will be placed on probation.
No student will be allowed to begin the clinical
clerkships until all basic science coursework has been sat-
isfactorily completed. Students who have received D, F,
11 1








3) Third year-Any student receiving a D or F in
any clerkship will be automatically placed on proba-
tion for one year. A student receiving a D or F in any
clerkship while on probation will automatically be
dismissed. Any student receiving a grade of
incomplete will be reviewed by the Academic
Status Committee.

The progress of any student who has been on
academic probation for two consecutive years will
be reviewed by the Academic Status Committee for
consideration of dismissal. Students who fail to
demonstrate appropriate academic progress for pro-
motion and graduation may be dismissed.
Fourth year students are not allowed to begin
their elective work until all D, F, or I grades given
during clinical clerkships have been remediated or
the student has received the approval of the
Academic Status Committee to proceed with elec-
tives pending remediation of the coursework.
Students who apply for more than three months of
extramural rotations must obtain their advisor's per-
mission and approval of the Academic Status
Committee.
Students who rank in the lower third of their
class must have the approval of the Academic Status
Committee before applying for any externship.


4) Fourth year-Any student receiving an F in a
required fourth-year course, clerkship or selective or
Ds or Fs in elective coursework totaling 8 or more
credit hours during this academic period will be
automatically dismissed. A student receiving a D in
any required fourth-year course, clerkship or selec-
tive or a D or F grade in an elective course will be
automatically placed on probation. No student will
be recommended for graduation until remedial
work has been completed successfully.


Removal of Probation


A student will be removed from academic pro-
bation by action of the Academic Status Committee
when he or she has received no grade of less than C
for any coursework during a period of one calendar
year after being placed on probation and the student
has maintained a grade point average of 2.0 or better.


intent to appeal must be submitted by the student in
writing to the chairman of the Academic Status
Committee within two working days after receiving
written notification of dismissal or other actions.
The student will be notified in writing and invited
to attend a meeting of the Academic Status
Committee which will be convened within 10 calen-
dar days to hear the student's appeal, unless justifi-
cation exists for a delay, in which case the
student's appeal will be heard as promptly
thereafter as possible.
A negative decision by the Academic Status
Committee may be appealed to the dean of the
College of Medicine. The intent to appeal to the
dean of the College of Medicine must be submitted
by the student in writing to the dean within two
working days after receiving written notification of
an adverse action by the Academic Status
Committee. The decision of the dean in all appeals is
final unless the president of the university or the
president's designee agrees to hear the appeal. A
student must notify the dean and submit the appeal
to the president's office within two working days.


Probation for Students Who Successfully
Appeal Dismissal


Students whose academic dismissal is reversed
by successful appeal and who are permitted to
repeat coursework will be automatically dismissed
if a grade of less than C is received in any course
during the repeated time period. If the coursework
is satisfactorily completed, students will continue on
probation for an additional calendar year, at which
time the student may be removed from probation by
favorable action of the Academic Status Committee.
Students who are allowed to repeat fourth year
coursework will remain on probation until they
have successfully completed all of the requirements
for graduation.


Recourse for Students Who are Unsuccessful in
Their Appeal


A student who is unsuccessful in an appeal for
reinstatement may apply for readmission as an
entering student. If the student wishes to apply for
readmission with advanced standing she/he may


A . .. 1t







ACADEMIC HONESTY


The University of Florida expects students to
be honest in all of their university classwork.
Therefore, students are required to commit them-
selves to academic honesty by signing the following
statement as part of the admissions process.

"I understand that the University of Florida expects
its students to be honest in all of their academic work.
I agree to adhere to this commitment to academic hon-
esty, and understand that my failure to comply with
this commitment may result in disciplinary action,
up to and including expulsion from the University."

This statement serves to remind students of the
obligations they assume as students at the
University of Florida. Matters of violations of acad-
emic honesty are adjudicated by the Student Honor
Court, the Health Center Student Conduct
Standards Committee and faculty.

Academic Honesty Guidelines

Cheating: The giving or taking of any informa-
tion or material of academic work considered in the
determination of a course grade.
Taking of information includes, but is not limit-
ed to, copying graded homework assignments from
another student; working together with other indi-
vidual(s) on a take-home test or homework when not
specifically permitted by the teacher; looking or
attempting to look at another student's paper during
an examination; looking or attempting to look at text
or notes during an examination when not permitted.
Tendering of information includes, but is not
limited to, giving your work to another student to
be used or copied; giving someone answers to exam
questions either when the exam is being given or after
having taken an exam; informing another person of
questions that appear or have appeared on an exam
in the same academic term; giving or selling a term
paper or other written materials to another student.

Plagiarism: When an individual attempts to pass
off the work of another as the product of his or her own
thought, whether the other's work is published or
unpublished, or simply the work of a fellow student.
Di :--, 4,n- -i *1 i. 4- c n- 1 ln i-)A to n n T


teacher when requested by the teacher to present
your own work; handing in a paper as your own
work which was purchased from a term paper ser-
vice; retyping a friend's paper and handing it in as
your own work; taking a paper from fraternity/
sorority files and handing it in as your own work.

Bribery: The offering, giving, receiving or solic-
iting of anything of value to influence a grade.
Bribery includes, but is not limited to, offering, giv-
ing, receiving or soliciting money or any item or ser-
vice to a teacher or any other person so as to gain
academic advantage for yourself or another.

Conspiracy: Planning with one or more persons
to commit any form of academic dishonesty, including
but not limited to, giving your term paper to another
student you know will plagiarize it.

Misrepresentation: Having another student do
your computer program and handing it in as your
work; lying to a teacher to increase your grade; or
any other act or omission with intent to deceive a
teacher as to the authorship of oral or written mate-
rials submitted or presented to a teacher which
would affect your grade.

HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER STUDENT
CONDUCT STANDARDS COMMITTEE

At the discretion of the University's Office of
Student Services, the Health Science Center Conduct
Standards Committee may assume responsibility for
the adjudication of alleged violations of the
University of Florida Academic Honesty Guidelines
for students enrolled in the College of Medicine. The
committee, appointed by the President, is comprised
of five faculty members and two studentsfrom each of


the six health center colleges.


When a hearing is con-


vened for possible student conduct violations, the
committee is composed of four faculty members and
one student from the college of the accused student
and two faculty members and one student from
another health center college. Five members of the
committee must be present for a hearing. When such
charges are referred to the committee, the Director of
Student Judicial Affairs or his/her designee shall
advise the student of his/her rights and privileges.
These include the following:








The right to present evidence and witnesses in
his/her own defense;


C) The right to know the nature and source of
evidence which will be used against him/her;

D) The right to question adverse witnesses;

E) The right to freedom against compulsory
self-incrimination; and

F) The right to appear with an advisor at the hearing.

If the student is adjudicated responsible for an acad-
emic honesty violation, the committee shall recom-
mend one or more sanctions to the Dean for Student
Services. The student has the right to a meeting with
the Dean for Student Services prior to a decision if a
meeting is scheduled within 24 hours following the
decision of the Committee. The Dean's decision may
be appealed to the Vice President for Student Affairs
within five working days of notification of the deci-
sion. The Vice President's decision is final.

Student Conduct Code


Students enjoy the rights and privileges that
accrue to membership in a university community
and are subject to the responsibilities that accompany
that membership. In order to have a system of effec-
tive campus governance, it is incumbent upon all
members of the campus community to notify appro-
priate officials of any violations of regulations and
to assist in their enforcement. All conduct regulations
of the University are printed and made available to
all students and are applicable upon publication in
the Independent Florida Alligator, the undergraduate
catalog, the UF student guide, or other reasonable
means of notification.
The president is charged with the responsibili-
ty for establishing and enforcing regulations govern-
ing student life. Regulations are designed to enable
the university to protect against the conduct of those
who, by their actions, impair or infringe on the rights
of others or interfere with the orderly operations of
the university. Discipline may be imposed for
offenses against the Student Conduct Code occur-
ring at any of the following locations or activities:


Property or housing units assigned for respon-
sibility to the University, including, but not
limited to fraternity and sorority property;


D. Activities sponsored by the University;

E. Activities officially approved by the University
which are conducted by University chartered
organizations; and

F. Off-campus activities as described in section VI
of the Student Conduct Code in the University's
undergraduate catalog.

The primary judicial bodies authorized by the
president and charged with the administration and
enforcement of this code shall formulate and furnish
to students charged with an offense, rules of proce-
dure which shall ensure basic procedural fairness
including, but not limited to:


A. The right to be notified in writing of the
charges against him /her with sufficient detail
and time to prepare for the hearing;

B. The right to a prompt hearing before an appro-
priate official, committee, or court;

C. The right to know the nature and source of the
evidence which will be used against him/her;

D. The right to present evidence in his/her own
behalf;

E. The right to freedom against compulsory self-
incrimination; and

F. The right to appear with an adviser at the
hearing.

Violation of the Code of Conduct

A student may be expelled or receive any lesser
penalty for the following offenses:


Furnishing false information to the University.

Forgery, alteration, or misuse of University
documents, records, or identification cards.







Actions or statements which amount to
intimidation, harassment, or hazing.


Participation in or continued attendance at a
raid on a University living area, after warning
to disperse by a University official or any law
enforcement officer.


Possession or use of fireworks, explosives,
dangerous chemicals, ammunition or weapons
(including, but not limited to, bows and arrows
or switch blade knives).


Actions which are committed with disregard of
the possible harm to an individual or group, or
which result in injury to an individual or group.


Disorderly conduct as defined in Florida Statutes.


Disrupting the orderly operation of the
University as defined in Florida Statutes, and
the demonstration policy of the University.


Failure to comply with any University rule or
regulation, including, but not limited to, the
Alcoholic Beverages Rule and the Academic
Honesty Guidelines.


Violations of Housing, Inter-Residence Hall
Association, and area government regulations.


Violation of any discipline sanction, including,
but not limited to, conduct probation.


Possession, use, or delivery of controlled sub-
stances as defined in Florida Statutes.


Possession or use of a firearm on the University
campus except as specifically authorized in
writing by the University.

Action(s) or conduct which hinders, obstructs,
or otherwise interferes with the implementation
or enforcement of the Student Conduct Code.

Failure to appear before any of the disciplinary
authorities and to testify as a witness when
reasonably notified to do so. Nothing in this
subsection shall be construed to compel self-
incrimination.

Violation of any municipal ordinance, law of
the State of Florida, law of the United States, or
rule promulgated by the Florida Board of
Regents.

Ticket scalping, i.e., selling tickets to any
University of Florida function or event being


Any actions, including those of a racial or sexual
nature or involving racial or sexual activities,
which are intimidating, harassing, coercive, or
abusive to another person, or which invade the
right to privacy of another person.

Any action without authorization from the


University which does or causes to,


access,


use,


modify, destroy, disclose or take data,
programs or supporting documentation
residing in or relating in any way to a computer,
computer system or computer network or causes
the denial of computer system services to an
authorized user of such system.


Further information concerning the Code of
Conduct (i.e. off-campus conduct, postponement of
hearing due to pending or possible criminal or civil
charges, student's waiver of right to a hearing, sum-
mary of hearings, conflicts of jurisdiction, sanctions,
and appeals) are detailed in the University's under-
graduate catalog.

Student Counseling and Development

The Office of Student Counseling and
Development was established to provide professional,
confidential assistance to students in the College of
Medicine. The services offered by this office include
counseling for individuals and couples and a series
of workshops on various topics developed form a
survey of students' needs and interests. A number
of students have utilized these services for help
with both personal and professional concerns.
Examples of issues which have been discussed in
counseling include relationships, anxiety/stress,
depression, career ambivalence, and residency deci-
sions. Examples of workshop topics which have
been offered include stress management, test anxiety,
selecting a mentor, sexual harassment, and inter-








significant others (e.g., spouses, fiances/fiancees,
friends) in the lives of medical students and con-
ducts several support groups which meet regularly
for discussions on a variety of themes.
Students are encouraged to stop by the office
and peruse the collection of self-help books which
are available to be checked out. There are many
selections to choose from including books on coping
in medical school, stress management, surviving the
dissertation, self-esteem, relationships issues, and
communication.
To schedule an appointment or obtain addi-
tional information contact the Program Director at
392-5482 or drop by the office located in CG 82.
Please note that any contact with this office will
not be disclosed to the faculty or administration,
nor will it be included in your student record; all
communication will be maintained confidential
barring when disclosure is required by law.


Sexua


Harassment Information and


Procedures


The University of Florida College of Medicine
is committed to maintaining a supportive and pro-
ductive environment for its students, staff, house-
staff and faculty. Appropriate professional behavior
is expected at all times by and toward every mem-
ber of the College. The College of Medicine has
adopted policies and procedures for addressing a
serious form of inappropriate behavior: sexual
harassment.
As stated in the University of Florida Policy on
Sexual Harassment, "Sexual harassment occurs
when the submission or acquiescence in conduct of
a sexual nature is made a term or condition of an
individual's employment of academic performance;
Conduct of a sexual nature by an individual is
used as the basis for decisions such as employment,
promotion, transfer, selection for training, perfor-
mance evaluation or the basis of academic evaluation;
Conduct of a sexual nature creates an intimi-
dating, hostile, or offensive work or educational
environment or interferes substantially with an
employee's work performance or student's academ-
ic performance;
A sexual element is introduced into what
should be a sex-neutral situation causing the bound-


pursue a sexual relationship."
Basically, sexual harassment is any unwelcomed
sexual reference or behavior (including verbal, ges-
tural, pictorial or physical) which can create a
hostile environment.
Individuals can help discourage sexual harass-
ment by speaking up when incidents are observed
or experienced; by being aware of possible misinter-
pretations of behavior that may be intended as
friendly; by not being intimidated by threats of
retaliation; by seeking assistance with any concerns
that arise; and by reporting substantive instances.
In the College of Medicine, the Director of the
Office of Student Development and Counseling has
been designated as the first contact for any student
seeking information, advice or counseling regarding
a matter of sexual harassment. All communication
will be held confidential. The initial inquiry and
counseling may 1) advise how to prevent future
inappropriate advances or situation, 2) offer media-
tion between two parties, or 3) explain all options
and advise a course of action. If, as a result of infor-
mation shared in the counseling session, it is deter-
mined that harassment has occurred, the student
will be strongly advised to file a formal complaint.
A separate counselor is available as first contact
for members of the housestaff and faculty who wish


to seek confidential advice, mediation and


assis-


tance in matters of sexual harassment.
Programs to educate the College of Medicine
community on the issue of sexual harassment and
professional behavior will be presented regularly
throughout each academic year. A primary goal of
the Sexual Harassment Committee is to develop
and promote effective programs to encourage
appropriate professional behavior and to prevent
the occurrence of sexual harassment in the College
of Medicine.

Policy for HIV and Other Infectious
Diseases


A personal health history questionnaire com-
pleted by the student is required prior to registra-
tion at the University. Students are also required to
present proof of two immunizations against
measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) and in the absence
of such proof will be reimmunized by Student







the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) should
report immediately to Employee Health and file an
accident report. For HIV exposures, it is most
important that this take place within an hour. If
Employee Health is closed, report to the Shands
Emergency Room. The exposure will be investigated
in a confidential manner to estimate the risk of the
exposure and to recommend prophylaxis should this be
necessary.
Exposures which occur at other hospitals or
settings, such as the Gainesville Veterans Affairs
Medical Center, health department clinics or physi-
cians offices should be reported to the appropriate
staff of those institutions or sites.
Currently, Shands Hospital does not recom-
mend routine HIV testing of patients or health-care


workers.


When testing is medically advisable, it is


subject to informed consent. The results are held
confidential. However, legislation both at the feder-
al and state levels may result in changes in the crite-
ria for testing and reporting.
If HIV infection occurs in a student, any recom-
mendations made or actions taken by the hospital or
the College of Medicine will respect the confiden-
tiality and welfare of the student in addition to the
welfare of patients, the hospital and the medical
school.
All communicable diseases contracted by stu-
dents will be handled according to the protocols for
Employee Health and Infection Control to prevent
dissemination to patients and other health-care
workers. Certain infections will be reported to the
state as required by law.


Health and Disability Insurance


The College of Medicine requires all medical
students to be covered by health insurance. This
insurance may be through a family policy with a
private agency or through the group policy offered
by the University of Florida. Students must provide
proof of insurance to the Office of Student
Admissions and Activities, College of Medicine
before registering for classes.
The College of Medicine strongly advises all
medical students to acquire disability insurance.
Information on disability policies will be available to
all students in the Office of Student Admissions and
Activities, College of Medicine.


College of Medicine Dress Code


Policy


The official dress code of the College of
Medicine is: clean shirts and shoes for graduate stu-
dents and students in the preclinical years. No
shorts are to be worn. Ties for men, and white lab
coats with name tags shall be worn by all students
and housestaff who have contact with patients or
are in patient care areas.
All College of Medicine students, at all levels of
education and training, are expected to maintain a
proper professional image in their behavior and
appearance at all times.

GRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE
PROGRAMS

Graduate Education in the Medical
Sciences


Programs Leading to the Ph.D. Degree
The educational continuum of the medical sci-
ences is designed to provide flexibility in terms of
the type of degree which may be earned as well as
the type of subject matter which may be included in
the individual curriculum.
Programs leading to the Ph.D. degree in med-
ical sciences are offered by the College of Medicine
through the Graduate School of the University. The
programs offered in anatomy and cell biology, bio-
chemistry and molecular biology, immunology and
medical microbiology, neuroscience, pathology and
laboratory medicine, pharmacology and therapeutics,
and physiology are intended to give talented indi-
viduals an opportunity to engage in careers of
research and teaching in the basic science medical
disciplines. In addition, interdisciplinary programs
including mammalian genetics, toxicology, vision
science, neurobiomedical sciences, neurobiology of
aging, alcohol research are offered to provide stu-
dents highly focused training. The Department of
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology also offers a
program leading to the Ph.D. in biochemistry.
Many departments also offer specialized M,S.
programs. For example, the Department of
Mammalian Genetics and Microbiology's M.S. pro-
gram is designed for students who wish to have
careers in the biomedical industry, become teachers











































Medicine's M.S. program specializes in clinical
chemistry and toxicology. Individual departments
should be consulted directly for further information
on these and other related programs.
The prime requirements for admission to these
programs are personal integrity, motivation, and
general scholastic achievement. Candidates must
satisfy the general requirements for admission to the
Graduate School and produce a satisfactory score on
the Graduate Record Examination.
Candidates should have an undergraduate
major in a biological or physical science, but other
undergraduate areas of concentration appropriate
for study in the basic medical sciences are engineer-
ing and mathematics.
In order to remedy deficiencies in their back-


The completion of a satisfactory dissertation
based on original research is the most important sin-
gle requirement of the Ph.D. program. Most of the
work involved in the dissertation ordinarily will be
done in the last two years of residence, but candi-
dates will be encouraged to begin their research in a
preliminary exploratory fashion toward the end of
their first year.
Graduate education in the basic medical sci-
ences is planned from an interdisciplinary point of
view, but with a major in the fields of anatomy and
cell biology, biochemistry and molecular biology,
immunology and medical microbiology, neuroscience,
pathology and laboratory medicine, pharmacology
and therapeutics, or physiology. A minor is not
required but may be elected in any relevant disci-







Graduate students have the opportunity of
assisting in the teaching of medical and undergrad-
uate courses and most students are advised to do so
as part of their training. Teaching and research
assistantships and nonresident tuition scholarships
are available to most students.


Medical Scientist Training Program
(Combined M.D./Ph.D. Degree)

The Medical Scientist Training Program
(MSTP) is designed for highly qualified students
who are strongly motivated toward an academic
career in the medical sciences. This is a flexible six-
to-seven year program which attempts to provide
in-depth graduate education in a basic science disci-
pline, a rigorous medical education, and an intro-
duction to clinical investigation. The program is
administered by the Medical Scientist Training
Program Steering Committee consisting of members
of both clinical and basic science departments.
Candidates for the program must satisfy
admission requirements for the College of Medicine
and the Graduate School. Since successful candi-
dates are selected from those admitted to the
College of Medicine, application begins with stan-
dard application to the medical school.
All candidates who receive the supplemental
application forms will be given the option to apply
for the Medical Scientist Training Program.
Direction for such application is provided at that
time. Successful applicants are expected to achieve
satisfactory scores on the Medical College
Admission Test and to have personal qualities of
high order, superior intellectual accomplishments,
research experience and genuine interests in human
welfare and an academic career.
The Graduate Record Examination is required
before matriculation into the Ph.D. portion of the
program. Students already enrolled in medical
school may apply to the program.
The student will enroll in all courses for the
M.D. degree. In addition, the student will be
required to complete the requirements for the Ph.D.
as established by the university and the MSTP pro-
gram. Normally the student's mentor will be chosen
from members of the seven basic science depart-
ments in the college of medicine, but under special
circumstances, other departments in the University


training in each of the basic sciences. Students in the
program will also be exposed to special seminars
and courses in human biology and clinical research
which are incorporated into the program. Therefore,
the "normal" course requirements expected of grad-
uate Ph.D. students by the individual basic science
departments will be waived and only one core
course, determined by the student's mentor in con-
sultation with appropriate members of the student's
department, will be required.
In some cases, this requirement may have
already been met through courses taken during the
first two years of the medical curriculum. The stu-
dent's Ph.D. graduate advisory committee reflects
the interdisciplinary nature of the program and will
be composed of the student's mentor and members
of both the mentor's department and the MSTP pro-
gram's educational committee.
The MSTP educational committee, consists of
the MSTP steering committee plus appropriate qual-
ified faculty approved by the MSTP steering committee.
The program is designed to be flexible, and the
Medical Scientist Training Program Steering
Committee will assist in planning the curriculum
and determining progress throughout the student's
career, in keeping with the interdisciplinary nature
of the program.
In most cases, the student will be expected to
initiate a research project during the summer before
starting medical school and, if necessary, a second
research project the summer following the first
and/or second year after matriculation into the program.
The student usually selects a mentor for the Ph.D.
thesis by the end of the second year of the program.
Standards of evaluation for both the M.D. and Ph.D.
portions of the combined program will be similar to
those in the separate M.D. and Ph.D. programs.
The Committee on Academic Status of the
College of Medicine will evaluate the student's per-
formance and recommend promotion to the next
class or awarding of the M.D. degree. The Graduate
Advisory Committee, in conjunction with the MSTP
steering committee, will assess graduate performance.
Most, if not all, students accepted to the pro-
gram can anticipate financial support (graduate
research assistantships) during the graduate portion
of the program. In addition, select students will be
awarded annual stipends of at least $9,000 while in
the medical portion of the program on the condition
J L L ^-^1^ t. rt ^-^----/- rt V /








Graduate Medical Education (Residencies


and Fellowships)


Graduate Medical Education is an integral part
of the training of the practicing physician. The
University of Florida recognizes the importance of
graduate medical education and sponsors programs
leading to board eligibility in virtually all the spe-
cialties recognized by the Accrediting Council on
Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). All of the
programs sponsored by the University of Florida are
approved by the ACGME and listed in the directory
of approved residencies.
Most of the residency training occurs in Shands
Hospital or the adjacent Veterans Affairs Medical
Center. The family practice residency is primarily
based at Alachua General Hospital.
Certain specialty programs rotate residents to
other hospitals in the region in order to maximize
their educational experience. All hospitals in which
graduate education is conducted hold certification
from the Joint Commission on Accreditation of
Health Care Organizations.
Formal residency programs are offered in anes-
thesia, dermatology, family practice, general
surgery, internal medicine, neurology, neuro-
surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, ophthalmology,
orthopaedic surgery, otolaryngology, pathology,
pediatrics, plastic surgery, psychiatry, radiology
and its subspecialties, thoracic surgery, urology and
vascular surgery. Salaries and benefits are competi-
tive with salaries and benefits paid to other house-
staff in this region of the country.
A limited number of clinical fellowships, some
of which lead to subspecialty board eligibility are
offered in the various subspecialties of anesthesiolo-
gy, family practice, medicine, pathology, pediatrics,
psychiatry, radiology and surgery. Most depart-
ments offer the opportunity to do research during
residency training, and there is the opportunity to
work toward advanced degrees in collaboration
with the basic science departments if the trainee so
selects.
Application to the residency program should
be made through the matching program or directly
to the residency program directors at the University
of Florida.
University of Florida residency programs only
f* ^-tJ-l ~ <-l ^ 41 -- * f ,'^ ^ 1t- T1 --. . _J-- 1-*Jf ,< -*J -*j- l r H -- ^S H j^f


Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates
(ECFMG) certificate and have passed NBME Parts I
and II, FLEX or USMLE Steps 1 and 2.
For detailed program information and applica-
tion, the applicant should write the appropriate
department or contact the Office of Housestaff
Affairs, Box 100371 UFHSC, Gainesville, Florida
32610-0371.

Licensure

The United States Medical Licensing
Examination (USMLE) is a single examination sys-
tem for use by all U.S. medical licensing jurisdic-
tions to assess all candidates equitably for initial
medical licensure.
Initial licensure to practice medicine and
surgery in Florida can be obtained by completing all
three progressive steps required in the USMLE.
The USMLE replaces the two currently existing
examination sequences used in the medical licensing
process: the Federation Licensing Examination
(FLEX) and the certifying examination of the
National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME).
Phase-in of USMLE begins in 1992 with the first
administration of the USMLE Step 1 in June. Full
implementation of the USMLE Steps 1-3 and phase-
out of the FLEX Components one and two and
NBME Parts I, II and III will be completed by 1995.

Step 1 focuses on key concepts of basic biomedical
science, with special emphasis on principles and
mechanisms underlying disease and modes of therapy.

Step 2 focuses on clinical science essential for prac-
tice within a supervised setting.

Step 3 will focus on aspects of biomedical and clini-
cal science essential for the unsupervised practice of
medicine.

The single examination system ensures the
maintenance of high standards based on perfor-
mance required of students in, or graduates of, med-
ical schools accredited by the LCME; strives for cost-
containment and efficiency in combining two exami-
nation sequences; and preserves the complementary
roles of medical licensing examinations and other
rpmnlirpmrpntc fnr lirpnQirp giich aq -hp nnaliltv and







Since various state laws differ as to licensure
requirements, it is the responsibility of the medical
student to become familiar with the qualifications
for licensure in the state or states which he or she


the needs of the practicing physician and, working
with its advisory committee, plans workshops, con-
ferences, seminars and symposia for the practicing


physician.


These programs meet the standard of the


might consider as potential locations for the
of medicine.


practice


Continuing Medical Education

The College of Medicine recognizes its respon-
sibility in the continuum of medical education by
assisting the physician-in-practice to gain new
knowledge and expertise to improve patient care.
The Office of Continuing Medical Education
(CME), under the Associate Dean for CME, assesses


American Medical Association for the Physician's
Recognition Award. In addition, departments and
divisions within the College of Medicine offer spe-
cialty rounds and conferences that the practicing
physician is eligible to attend. All of these programs
enable the physician to fulfill the requirements of
licensure in the State of Florida.
Other programs in CME are conducted in cooperation
with the Florida Board of Medicine, the Florida
Medical Association, the Florida Academy of Family
Physicians, and a variety of medical specialty groups.






STUDENT INFORMAL


FINANCIAL CONSIDERATIONS

The fee structure for Florida residents and non-
residents in the M.D. program of the College of
Medicine is subject to change from year to year and
is payable in accordance with university regulations.
Fee information can be obtained after July 1, 1995,
by contacting University Financial Services,
S-113 Criser Hall, Gainesville, Florida, 32611.
Students are registered for two semesters during
their first and fourth years and for three semesters
the second and third years. (Tuition is established
on a yearly basis and is independent of the number
of semesters for which a student is registered.) The


tuition includes fees for Student Health


Services


a Student Activity fee for each of the semesters.
Most of the services and facilities of the Student
Health Services are available to students without


additional charge.


The activity fee covers the stu-


dent's attendance at a wide variety of social, athletic
and cultural events which are offered by the
University.
Textbooks and instruments needed by a first-
year student will require an expenditure of about
$1,200. Purchase of a microscope will not be
required as the College of Medicine, through a spe-
cial fund, has established a microscope bank and
provides each entering student with a microscope
on a loan basis.
The minimal annual cost for a single Florida
resident for the first year is approximately $11,000
plus tuition.

SCHOLARSHIPS


The amounts of scholarships vary each year
depending on the amount available in the fund and
the number of students who apply.

AMA-ERF Scholarship: These scholarships are
awarded to medical students on the basis of finan-
cial need.

W. Paul Bateman Scholarship: Established by the
Bateman Foundation, this scholarship assists worthy


Fred Bear Scholarship: An endowed fund estab-
lished by Mr. Fred B. Bear in 1987 to provide schol-
arship support to students who have demonstrated
strong merit and who have a demonstrated financial


need.


Preference in awarding scholarship aid will


be given to students who have expressed a desire to
pursue a specialty in pulmonary medicine.

Jean Lester Bennett, M.D. Scholarship Fund: An
endowed scholarship given to a senior medical stu-
dent who has decided on a career in pediatrics.

Ralph G. Blodgett Scholarship: Established by Mrs.
R. G. Blodgett, this scholarship was established to
support qualified students in the College of
Medicine who need financial assistance.

Dr. Mark David Buehler Scholarship Fund: This
scholarship, established by the family and friends of
Dr. Buehler, will be used to support a student in the
Junior Honors Program with preference given to a
student within this program who expresses an inter-
est in emergency room medicine.

The Jules B. Chapman, M.D., Scholarship Fund:
An endowed fund established in memory of Dr.


Chapman.


This three-year scholarship is to be


awarded to a second-year medical student who is a
Florida resident who has demonstrated a compas-
sionate and caring manner, is interested in pursuing
a career in primary care, has achieved academic suc-
cess and is in need of financial assistance.

The Maurice H. Givens Scholarship Fund: An
endowed fund established in 1975 to provide finan-
cial assistance to students in the College of
Medicine.

The Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Godron Scholarship Fund:
This unrestricted endowed fund was established in
1977 to assist worthy male students who demon-
strate a need for financial assistance.

Gold Family Scholarship Fund: Provides need-
based scholarship awards with priority given to
bl1'trkL rtr A rir~ari / Amron'rin chiiAonc Aahn ,rP Or2C111-









., u, . ,,


1~I Z
i~l ~~ 9(L~ i ix~ i t 1ii ,~i lEF: :;;:

i~iix~ L~iYEEh:~;~i~ie:~ :~l" k~l]~i;i"I*


i ~ ii ~ii i,,, mm>", ,iii


.I. -


II



K .' ina,
dL 1F


.i'" '.
d n* *.
rIjg '^ *Ii;.'''-'..


l,-
: nBi~i"T
J ^ ^f Fjr


)"". '* ,








Federal Scholarship for Students of Exceptional


Financial Need (EFN):


A federal scholarship award-


ed by the school, established to encourage students
with exceptional financial need to enter health pro-
fessions schools. Awards assist with payment of
tuition and all other reasonable expenses.
Beginning in 1993, scholarship recipients are
required to enter and complete a residency training
program in a primary healthcare specialty (family
medicine, general internal medicine, general pedi-
atrics, and preventive medicine) not later than four
years after completing the undergraduate medical
education program, and practice in the primary
healthcare specialty for five years after completing
the residency program.

Financial Aid for Disadvantaged Health
Professions Students (FADHPS): A federal scholar-
ship awarded by the school, made available to stu-
dents with exceptional financial need or students
that come from an environment that has inhibited
the individual from obtaining the knowledge, skills
and abilities required to enroll in and graduate from
a medical school. Recipients must agree to meet the
same primary health care service requirements as
required of EFN scholarship recipients.

Hugh M. Hill, M.D. Fund for Student Financial
Assistance: This fund was established in 1991 to
honor the Associate Dean for Student and Alumni
Affairs, Hugh M. Hill, M.D. This fund includes
alumni donations and is to be used to assist needy
students in the College of Medicine.


The George Graham Hunter Scholarship Fund:
This scholarship is awarded each year to an under-
graduate medical student in the field of


orthopaedics.


The recipient of the scholarship shall


be designated by the orthopaedic faculty and
approved by the dean of the College of Medicine.

C. J. Miller Scholarship: An endowed fund whose
purpose is to support a junior or senior medical stu-
dent in good academic standing who is in need of
financial assistance.


Avonelle C. Noah Scholarship Fund: An endow-
ment fund was established in 1968 under the terms


of the will of Mrs. Avonelle C. Noah.


The income


from this fund is to be used to assist worthy stu-
dents in the College of Medicine.

Palm Beach County Medical Auxiliary
Scholarship: This scholarship is given to a third-
year medical student who is a graduate of a Palm
Beach County high school.

Susan O. Rasmussen Scholarship: This fund pro-
vides financial assistance to students from central
Florida who are enrolled in the College of Medicine
and have financial need.

Scholarships for Disadvantaged Students: A feder-
al scholarship awarded by the school, giving prefer-
ence to students who are from disadvantaged back-
grounds and for whom the costs of attending the
school would constitute a severe financial hardship..

J. Craig Spencer Memorial Scholarship:
Established by the family and friends in memory of


Dr. Spencer.


This scholarship is to be awarded to


an individual with a compassionate and caring man-
ner and who has achieved academic success.

Wheat Medical Scholarship Fund: An endowment
fund was established in 1967 under the terms of the


will of Mrs. Eva H. Wheat.


The income from this


fund is to be used to assist worthy male medical stu-
dents selected by the College of Medicine to contin-
ue their education.


William Warren and Marie C. Wolff Scholarship:
This scholarship was established to assist needy,
worthy, and talented young men and women medical
students who are dedicated to the science of medicine,
and who otherwise could not receive such education.

County Scholarships: Various counties in Florida,
such as Broward, Lee and Palm Beach, have estab-
lished scholarship awards to residents who attend
the University of Florida College of Medicine.


The Nell C. Miller Scholarship: This endowed fund
was established in 1982 under the terms of the will








SCHOLASTIC AWARDS


Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society: The
Beta Chapter of Florida was installed at the
University of Florida College of Medicine on May
9,1960. A small number of students of the junior
and senior classes are eligible for membership.
Selection is based upon high academic standing,
personal and professional character, and promise
for future contributions to medicine.


Alumni Scholarship Award: This award was estab-
lished by the University of Florida Medical Alumni
Association from donations by its members and is
awarded at the end of the junior year to students
who are judged outstanding scholastically.

The American College of Physicians Award: This
award, established by the American College of
Physicians, is given by the Department of Medicine
to a senior student for outstanding performance in
internal medicine.

The Thorkild W. Andersen Award: The
Department of Anesthesiology established this
award to honor of the department's first faculty
member. It is presented to the senior medical student
who has made the greatest overall contribution to the
College of Medicine and his or her fellow students.

The Charles O. Andrews, Jr. Scholarship Fund: A
merit scholarship fund established in 1978 in the
memory of Judge Andrews and awarded annually
to a M.D./ Ph.D. student.

The Dean Mitchell Baker Award: This scholarship
was established by Dr. and Mrs. Roy M. Baker of
Jacksonville in memory of their son and is awarded
each year to a graduating medical student for excel-
lence in the field of pediatric cardiology.

Bythewood & Baker Memorial Scholarship Award
for Women Medical Students: An endowed fund
was established in 1968 by Miss Martha Isabel Mays
and is awarded to a junior female medical student
who is judged to be academically outstanding.

The Hugh and Cornelia Carithers Award:
FEtahlichpd hv b r H-Dr.h and Cnmplia Carithers of


accomplishments and aptitudes in child health and
human development.


Joel Cohen, Patricia Ann Maddalone Memorial
Award: This award was established in memory of
Joel Cohen who demonstrated superior skill, imagi-
nation and industry in the laboratory research of
drug hypersensitivity, and is to be presented each
year to that student demonstrating outstanding pro-
ficiency in clinical or laboratory investigation in the
field of immunology.


Charles Collins Obstetrical and Gynecological
Award: Established in 1975 by the Florida
Obstetrical and Gynecological Society to honor Dr.
Charles Collins of Orlando, this award is given each
year on a rotating basis to a graduating medical stu-
dent in one of the three medical schools in the state
who has shown academic excellence and outstanding
performance in the field of obstetrics and gynecology.

The Dr. Robert R. Donahoe Memorial General
Surgery Award: This award, established in memory
of Dr. Donahoe, is to recognize a senior student who
has chosen a career in the field of general surgery
and who has exhibited superior skill and dedication
to patients.

Class of 1980 Donegan Scholarship Award: The
Class of 1980 established this award for peer recog-
nition of academic excellence, personal integrity and
financial need of a rising senior medical student and
to honor Miss Hazel Donegan of the Office of Student
Admissions and Activities, College of Medicine.

Paula Ellis Scholarship Award: The Gainesville
junior Woman's Club established this award as a
memorial to Paula Ellis. It is given to a medical stu-
dent chosen for academic excellence and/ or merito-
rious service who shows promise and interest in the
prevention or treatment of cancer.

W.F. Enneking Award: Established and funded by
the Musculoskeletal Oncology Fellows of the
Department of Orthopaedics, this award is to be
given annually to the graduating medical student
who, in the opinion of the faculty of the orthopaedic
department, shows the most promise of making a
contribution to medicine through an academic career.








and music, an active participant in class projects
and, most importantly, courage and perseverance.

Florida Obstetric-Gynecologic Society Award:
Given by the Society, this award recognizes a senior
student who has distinguished him/herself academ-
ically in the field of obstetrics and gynecology and
has demonstrated a dedication to patient care.


Eugene Craig Haufler Award: This award


The Faculty Award for Research: This award is
given to the graduating medical student who has
made the most outstanding contribution through
research during the course of medical school.

Florida Chapter of the American College of
Surgeons Award: Given to an outstanding student
in the graduating class this award honors a student
who will pursue a career in surgery.

The John Gorrie Award: This award, instituted by
Dr. Theodore F. Hahn, Jr., is presented each year to
the graduating medical student who, in the opinion
of the faculty of the College of Medicine, is the best
all-around student showing promise of becoming a
practitioner of the highest type.

Scott Gross, M.D., Memorial Book Award: This
award was established by the Class of 1988 in mem-
ory of their classmate, Scott Gross, who died of can-
cer shortly after graduation. The class requests that


is given


to a graduating medical student to recognize overall
excellence in pediatrics.

Samuel D. Harris Scholarship Awards: These
scholarships were established by Mr. George Harris
of St. Augustine, in honor of his brother, to recognize
senior medical students who have shown proficiency
in geriatrics, urology, pulmonary and ophthalmology.

The Luther W. Holloway Award: The Florida
Pediatric Society established this award in honor of
the late Dr. Luther W. Holloway. It is to be awarded
to the senior medical student showing the greatest
proficiency in child health.

Juri V. Kaude, M.D., Ph.D. Medical Student
Research Award in Radiology: This award, estab-
lished by the Department of Radiology, recognizes a
senior student who has been involved in research in
Diagnostic Radiology. Research may be either
investigative or clinical and the student may have
participated either as the primary investigator or as
a member of the team.

Albert G. King Award for Scientific Achievement
in Research: This award is presented each year by
the Watson Clinic of Lakeland to the medical student
chosen for productive effort and scientific contribu-


tion.


The research must have been presented at a


Medical Student Research Conference during the
academic year.

Lyerly Neurosurgical Group Award: The Department
of Neurological Surgery presents this award to the
graduating medical student who has distinguished
himself /herself in the field of neurological surgery.

Genevra Todd and Henry E. Meleney Memorial
A rn-.- 1 11I"1 1 11 1i .1 1







The Professor James M. Murdoch Therapeutics
Award: This award recognizes a senior medical stu-
dent's outstanding knowledge and excellence in the
field of therapeutics.


Dr. Peter Regan Award: This award, named in
honor of the first chairman of the Department of
Psychiatry, is given to recognize a senior student
who has demonstrated excellence and has a career


goal in the field of psychiatry.


Netter Atlas Award: Sponsored by Ciba
Pharmaceutical Company, this award is given each
year in recognition of a medical student who has
contributed the most to community service.


Walt Oppelt Memorial Award: Established in mem-
ory of the late Dr. W. Walter Oppelt by friends, asso-
ciates, and the Departments of Pharmacology and
Therapeutics and Medicine, this annual award will
be presented to a medical student who has excelled
in the field of pharmacology and therapeutics.


William Osler Award in Internal Medicine: This
award was established by the Department of
Medicine and is donated by past and present chair-
men of the Department of Medicine, chiefs of the
Medical Service at the Veterans Affairs Medical
Center and chief residents in medicine. It is given to
the graduating medical student who has demon-
strated outstanding proficiency and excellence in the
field of internal medicine.


Guillermo J. Perez Memorial Scholarship Award:
The Department of Pediatrics established this award
in memory of the late Dr. Perez, a former member of
the pediatric faculty, to recognize a senior medical
student who demonstrated an interest in adolescent


Sandoz Award: Instituted by Sandoz
Pharmaceutical, this award is presented annually by
the Department of Community Health and Family
Medicine to a senior medical student in recognition
of superior academic achievement and contribution
to health care.

The Betty Schmidt Memorial Award: Given in
memory of Mrs. Betty Schmidt, a charter member of
the University of Florida Medical Guild, this award
is presented to a junior or senior medical student
who has worked constructively for the improve-
ment of academic life and the learning of the sci-
ences of medicine.


Roger G. Schnell Neurology Book Award: Dr.
Roger G. Schnell, of Ft. Lauderdale, established this
award is to honor a medical student who has shown
excellence in the field of clinical neurology.

The George T. Singleton, M.D. Award: Established
by the Department of Otolaryngology to honor Dr.
Singleton, this award is presented to a senior med-
ical student who has shown academic achievement,
research interest, clinical skills and exemplary work
habits while rotating on the otolaryngology service.


medicine.


The Haven M. Perkins Award: This award, in
honor of the first resident in the Department of
Anesthesiology, is presented to a second-year stu-
dent who has achieved the highest academic stand-
ing in the basic sciences.


Senior Excellence Award in Radiology: Given by
the Department of Radiology, this award recognizes
a senior student, entering any specialty, who has
demonstrated outstanding achievement in the
Senior elective in Radiology.

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Award: The
Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
established this award to recognize that senior med-


The Marian Solowy Memorial Award: This award,
given by Mrs. Solowy's family, recognizes a gradu-
ating medical student who has distinguished him-
self herself in the field of neonatal-perinatal medicine.

John Harrington Tanous, M.D. Cancer Research
Award: Presented each year by the Watson Clinic of
Lakeland, this award recognizes outstanding
research by a medical student in the general area of
clinical or basic aspects of cancer and cell growth.

The William C. Thomas, Sr. Award: This award
honors an outstanding senior medical student with
an interest in obstetrics and gynecology. The award
is made possible by the Florida Obstetric
Gynecological Society.








F. Eugene Tubbs, M.D., J.D., Memorial Award:
This award was established in 1979 in memory of
the late Dr. Tubbs, a former resident physician in the
College of Medicine and member of the Florida


House of Representatives.


This award is given jointly


each year to a University of Florida senior medical
student and a Florida State University law student
who have demonstrated excellence in their field.


The University Medical Guild Memorial Award
for Academic Excellence: This award is presented
to a graduating senior by the University Medical
Guild to recognize academic excellence through four
years of medical school.


The University Medical Guild Academic
Scholarship: Given each year to a first-year student
based on scholastic accomplishments and financial


need.


This award is for four consecutive years of


medical school provided scholastic merit is maintained.

The University Medical Guild Scholarship
Awards: These awards are presented each year by
the University Medical Guild to a second-year and
third-year student who are judged to be outstanding
scholastically and to an entering student on the basis
of need and scholastic excellence.

The University Medical Guild Graduate Research
Awards: Presented each year to four graduate stu-
dents in the basic medical sciences who are judged
to have performed the best research during their
graduate studies.

The University of Florida Medical Guild Award in
Memory of Mrs. J. Hillis Miller: Given annually to
a first-year student, this award is to recognize out-
standing academic achievement by a student during
the first year of medical school.

The University Medical Guild Professional
Development Scholarship Award: This scholarship
is awarded each fall to a senior medical student
based on scholastic achievements and financial need.

Upjohn Achievement Award: The Upjohn
Company Achievement Award program presents
this award to the graduating medical student who
-ti __ 1 . . ^ - - _ -- a .


Westwood Pharmaceutical Award: The Division of
Dermatology presents this award to a senior med-
ical student who has shown ability, enthusiasm and
motivation in the field of dermatology.

Edward R. Woodward Surgical Award: This
award, established by the Department of Surgery, is
given to a senior medical student who best demon-
strates strengths of moral and ethical fiber, social
consciousness, and the traits of intelligence, tenacity
and perspicacity.

LOAN FUNDS


College of Medicine Loan Funds: Loans from these
funds are available to students enrolled in the
College of Medicine who are in good academic
standing and can show sufficient evidence of finan-
cial need. Interest (at 9 percent) begins at gradua-
tion and continues until repayment is completed.
Repayment ordinarily begins one year after gradua-
tion. Short-term loans are available through the
Office of Student Financial Services and the College
of Medicine for emergencies, but must be repaid
within the semester borrowed.


These funds have been made possible by grants
from the W. K. Kellogg Foundation; the Selby
Foundation; the Patrick J. O'Shaughnessy Memorial
Fund; the John J. Tigert Memorial Fund; the
Frederick F. Kumm, M.D., Memorial Loan Fund; the
Helen Stargardt Memorial Loan Fund; the George
M. Green, M.D., Memorial Loan Fund; the Algia
Collins,Jjr., M.D., Memorial Fund; George W.
Jenkins Foundation/Publix Scholarship; Alachua
County Medical Auxiliary; Gainesville Medical
Group; and by gifts from several organizations and
individuals within the State of Florida. Loans are
administered by the College of Medicine's faculty-
comprised Financial Aid Committee.

AMA-ERF Loan: This loan was established in 1994
by the AMA education and Research Foundation
from donations by its members and administered in
accordance with the procedures established for the
College of Medicine Loan Fund.

University of Florida College of Medicine Alumni
-. rw,. I l1 1 11 Ii







Dudley Beaumont Loan Fund: This fund was left to
the College of Medicine early in the school's history.
as a memorial loan fund to assist in meeting the
financial needs of its students. It is administered in
accordance with the procedures established for the
College of Medicine Loan Fund.

Robert A. and Martha Eifert Loan Fund: This
revolving loan fund was established to assist needy
and worthy students in the College of Medicine.

Health Professions Student Loan (HPSL): A federal
loan that is awarded by the medical school to stu-
dents with exceptional financial need at an interest
rate of 5 percent. Any student receiving this loan
must agree to enter and complete a residency train-
ing program in primary health care (family medi-
cine, general internal medicine, general pediatrics
and preventive medicine) not later than four years
after the date on which the student graduates from
the school; and to practice in such care through the
date on which the loan is repaid in full. Students
who received their first HPSL funds before July 1,
1993, are exempt from this requirement.


The George Graham Hunter Loan Fund: This trust
fund, established in 1968, is for the purpose of making
loans available to qualified medical students or resi-
dents in orthopaedics.

Loans for Disadvantaged Students (LDS): A feder-
al loan that is awarded by the medical school to stu-
dents with exceptional financial need and/or a stu-
dent that comes from an environment that has
inhibited the individual from obtaining the knowl-
edge, skills, and abilities required to enroll in, and


graduate from, a school of medicine.
rate is 5 percent.


The interest


Ronald A. Julian Memorial Fund: This fund was
established as a memorial loan fund to assist med-
ical students in financing their education. It is
administered in accordance with the procedures
established for the College of Medicine Loan Fund.


The Barbara S. Michael Loan Fund: A revolving
loan fund established in 1977 for needy and worthy
students in the College of Medicine.








The Dr. P. Phillips Foundation Loan: This loan
fund was established to assist financially needy
students from Orange County who have shown
academic achievement.

Maude Halstead Rhodes Loan: This fund was
established in 1987 to provide loans to third and
fourth year students up to a maximum of $3000
per year.

Federal Direct Stafford Loan (FDSL): This is a fed-
erally insured program that has a variable interest
rate, capped at 8.25 percent for loans made on or


after July 1, 1994.


Hugh and Mabel Wilford Loan Fund: This trust
fund was established in 1970 for the purpose of
making loans available to assist worthy and needy
students to attend the University of Florida College
of Medicine. This loan fund will be administered in
accordance with procedures established for the
Health Professions Student Loan Program.

Other Sources: Many students have received finan-


cial support from local sources.


These may be dis-


covered by inquiries addressed to voluntary health
agencies, medical organizations, service clubs,
church organizations, or trust departments of banks.


The interest is paid by the federal


government while the student is in school.


There is


an origination fee of 4 percent which is charged at
disbursement. Graduate and Professional students
can borrow up to $8,500 per year up to $65,500,


including undergraduate loans.


The amount of eli-


gibility is dependent on a student's need within the
constraints of an approved budget. Financial need
is determined from the Free Application for Federal
Student Aid (FAFSA). All graduate/professional
students are considered independent for financial
aid purposes.

Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans
(FDUSL): This program is the same as the Federal
Direct Stafford Loan, except the borrower is respon-
sible for repaying the interest beginning on the date
of their first disbursement. A borrower can request
a deferment, however, the loan is subject to "capital-


FELLOWSHIPS

Student Research Fellowships: These fellowships
are made possible by grants from voluntary health
agencies in Florida, pharmaceutical firms, the
National Institutes of Health, and other agencies.
Medical student research holds high priority in
the College of Medicine with the primary objective
being that of involving the inquisitive student in a
self-learning experience in medical research.
As an incentive to become involved in research,
students are offered an opportunity to apply for fel-
lowship support which is available on a part-time
basis during the academic year and on a full-time
basis during summer vacations.
These fellowships are available to incoming
medical students during the summer prior to their


matriculation.


The only other time that full time


This loan is not need based. Students may


borrow funds over and above their eligibility for
FDSL, up to their cost of education minus other aid,
or FDSL program limits, whichever is less.
Graduate and Professional students may borrow up
to $18,500 per year (less amounts borrowed through
FDSL) if within the budget, up to $73,000 total,
including undergraduate loans.
Additional information and applications can be
obtained from the Financial Aid Division, Office of
Student Admissions and Activities, College of
Medicine, University of Florida, PO Box 100216
UFHSC, Gainesville, FL 32611.

Marie Rosa Valicenti Loan Fund: Established in
memory of Mrs. Valicenti by the Carmen Valicenti


research (10 weeks) is generally available is during
the summer between the first and second year of
medical school. Fellowships are awarded on a com-
petitive basis with a progress report and continua-
tion application required for each semester. In
addition to providing fellowships for research, this
program also sponsors a Research Day for medical
students to report the findings of their research and
will contribute funds (when available) to the travel
expenses of medical students who present the
results of their research at national conferences.
On the basis of the results of the research pro-
jects and their presentation, medical students are eli-
gible for the annual Faculty Research Award, Albert
G. King Award, John Harrington Tanous, M.D.
Cancer Research Award, and the Alpha Omega


. r n k 1 4~ 1 I I *


ization".







LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS


On-campus housing may be arranged by con-
tacting the Division of Housing, University Housing
Office, University of Florida, PO Box 112100,
Gainesville, Florida 32611-2100, (904) 392-2161.
On-campus housing is limited; medical stu-
dents are encouraged to apply for housing immedi-
ately upon acceptance to the College of Medicine.
Housing is available to medical students in the
New Residence Facility and Village Communities.
The New Residence Facility features apartment-
style housing for single residents. Each apartment
has four single bedrooms, two baths, a kitchen and


living room area.


The 1994-95 rent rate is $1,245 per


resident, per semester and includes limited utilities,
cable television service and local phone service.


Apartments for single and married medical
students are available in several Village
Communities on campus. Most villages are two-
story brick buildings featuring one, two and three-


bedroom apartments.


The 1994-95 rent rate ranges


from $213 to $379 per month and includes local


phone service and cable television service.


Cable


television service is additional in Corry Village.
Other utilities are additional.
Off-campus housing information is available
from the Division of Housing and may be requested
in person or through the mail. Students are encour-
aged to make personal inspection of facilities and
meet with landlords before leases are signed. Initial
contracts should be made at a minimum of 30 days
before classes begin.






COURSE


The following courses comprise the preclinical
component of the curriculum for the M.D. degree
and are offered to medical students during the first
and second years. Some of the courses are available
to graduate students in the university, but the num-


ber of students who can be accepted is


limited by


laboratory facilities, and enrollment requires the
approval of the course director.


FIRST YEAR


BMS 5015 BASIC CLINICAL SKILLS
2 credits. This course introduces students to patient
evaluation, including communication,interview
and physical examination skills. The majority of
instruction occurs in small groups led by clinical
faculty. This course makes extensive use of the
Harrell Professional Development and Assessment
Center where students are given the opportunity to
practice with their peers and standardized patients.
The material presented is correlated with the other
first-semester courses wherever possible. Students
are expected to exhibit competency in several areas
as measured by multi-station objective practical
examinations.


BMS 5020 MEDICAL NEUROSCIENCE
5 credits. This course provides an integrated and
multidisciplinary approach to the study of central
nervous system structure and function. The course
includes the study of neuroanatomy, neurochem-
istry, neuroembryology, neurohistology, and neuro-
physiology. Sensory and motor system functions are
also stressed. The laboratory portion of the course is
intensive, allowing students to develop a working
knowledge of human brain structure and organiza-
tion. There is also a strong emphasis on applying
basic science information to actual clinical problems.

BMS 5100C MEDICAL HUMAN ANATOMY
8 credits. This course introduces basic principles of
the human body primarily in a laboratory setting.
Clinical oriented lectures are used to emphasize
basic anatomical relationships. Lectures on human
embryology are presented also in a systemic format


BMS 5110C MEDICAL CELL AND TISSUE
BIOLOGY
6 credits. The microscopic structure and function of
the cells, tissues and organs of the human is taught.
Correlation of structure and function at a cellular
level is emphasized in lectures, discussions and lab-
oratories. An additional focus of the course is the
relevance of the study of histology and cell biology
to clinical disciplines.


BMS 5190 ANATOMY BY DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING
2 credits. The goal is to describe normal human
anatomy in three dimensions (frontal, [coronal],
sagittal and axial) using imaging modalities avail-
able to diagnostic radiologists. The course is orient-
ed to organ systems describing not only the regional
anatomy of the organ but also its vasculature and
topographic anatomy. The course includes 10 didac-
tic lectures, computer-aided instruction and a teach-
ing set of films depicting normal anatomy.

BMS 5003 MEDICAL ASPECTS OF HUMAN
GENETICS
2 credits. Designed to familiarize the student with
the medical aspects of human genetics, this course
presents both theoretical and clinical information in
cytogenetics, population genetics, and molecular
genetics together with a review of its application in
the diagnosis, risk prediction and treatment/pre-
vention of genetic diseases. Special topics such as
cancer genetics and gene therapy also are covered.

BMS 5204 BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR
BIOLOGY OF DISEASE
6 credits. A general biochemistry course is a strong-
ly recommended prerequisite. Lectures and small
group discussions are designed to build on the stu-
dent's basic biochemical knowledge of cellular func-
tion. Emphasis is placed on the biochemical and
molecular biological basis of pathobiology. Topics
include nutrition, physical biochemistry, metabo-
lism and molecular biology.

BMS 5500 PRINCIPLES OF PHYSIOLOGY
6 credits. The basic physiology of the respiratory,
.,-ai- . .... U n1 r,-. n I . 1 .I .~n- A ,... ,n.rtn ?,nA n 1 i-d-4 n- 4 ., r 1






























































































ir'" .: ; ,n.ll i W I ,"Xi r :n
:." x i. .. '. . x.. E t.
,,,, x ,,, :: | :-. "*::*"
*,, : . ,* ... ,,-4 ,,,
; r... ,,, ,sif ., . u
::$ 4*: ": ,: : x ,H


N


H.I:


::: .. "
. ... .- ,,:: ,. ,,.


~~,~~








BCC 5151 HUMAN BEHAVIOR
4 credits. This course offers an introduction to the
biological, psychological and social interactions
which underline human behavior in both health and
illness. Course teaches students to conduct medical
and psychiatric interviews, perform the mental sta-
tus exam and become familiar with the variety of
psychological responses to issues.
Alcoholism, substance abuse, impaired physicians,
human sexuality and an introduction to psychiatric
treatment also are presented. Small group teaching
is devoted to lecture-demonstrations and patient
interviewing.


BCC 5173 INTRODUCTION TO


CLINICAL PRACTICE


and an innovative computer program will all be
used to present the material.

BMS 5404 PHARMACOLOGY
6 credits. This introductory course presents concepts
of drug action (drug-receptor interactions, drug
absorption, distribution, and elimination), intro-
duces most of the major classes of drugs, and
emphasizes the biochemical and physiological basis
for understanding drug action. Groups of drugs
considered include anesthetic, autonomic, central
nervous system, adrenal, cardiovascular and antimi-
crobial compounds.


BMS 5600 SYSTEMIC PATHOLOGY AND LABO-


RATORY MEDICINE


3 credits. During this course, students will be
assigned to a physician preceptor who practices pri-
mary care medicine. Students will spend three
weeks on location with the physician on a full-time
basis. Students will have the opportunity to utilize
their interview and physical examination skills.

SECOND YEAR


BMS 5191 INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL
RADIOLOGY
2 credits. Prerequisite: BMS 5190. This course intro-
duces the student to diagnostic imaging in the clini-
cal setting. A short description of radiation physics,
risks of radiation and prevention of radiation injury


is given.


The diagnostic approach to different dis-


ease entities is described, emphasizing the impor-
tance of sequence of studies and the diagnostic
information which can be obtained by different
imaging modalities (plain radiographs, contrast
studies, ultrasound, radionuclide studies, computed
tomography and magnetic resonance imaging).
Samples of pathology in different organ systems are
discussed. The course includes a 10-hour didactic
lecture series, small-group sessions and a teaching
set of images depicting pathology.

BMS 5300C MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY AND
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
7 credits. This course will provide learning opportu-
nities in the principles of medical microbiology and
the essentials of infectious disease. It will cover basic


9 credits. Prerequisites: Satisfactory completion of
the first year of medical school and BMS 5608.
Building upon general principles learned in BMS
5608, the student studies in detail the pathology of
organ systems. The morphologic, biochemical and
biological behavior of various diseases are covered
in lecture and amplified by laboratory materials.
Functional and clinical implications are discussed,
including the appropriate use of the clinical labora-
tory for diagnosis and therapy.

BMS 5608 GENERAL PATHOLOGY
4 credits. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the
first year of medical school. The course introduces
second-year medical students to basic processes
involved in cellular injury and adaptation, inflam-
mation as a reparative and disease causing process,
and hemodynamic disorders with emphasis on ath-
erosclerosis, thrombosis and its consequences. The
role of the immune system in disease causation and
transplantation is presented. Cancer is defined and
categorized with a discussion of etiology, pathogen-
esis and host response. Pathologic alterations in
infection are illustrated by relevant clinical examples.

BMS 5630 ONCOLOGY
2 credits. This course is taught in parallel with
pathology and provides correlation between treat-
ment of patients with cancer and oncology topics
being addressed in pathology.

BMS 5822 SOCIAL AND ETHICAL ISSUES IN
MFFfIC'AI. PRACTICE







and how to communicate with patients and col-
leagues about those problems. Students also learn
problem-solving strategies which can help resolve
these problems. This course is organized around
small-group activities and discussion which focus
on analysis of social and ethical problems in actual
medical cases.


BCC 5100 ANESTHESIOLOGY CLERKSHIP
1 credit. One week. Intensive lectures and laboratory
instruction in life support systems, including prac-
tice in the skills necessary to approach and treat the
patient suffering from acute cardiopulmonary col-
lapse of varying etiology.


BCC 5110 MEDICAL CLERKSHIP 1


BMS 5823 EPIDEMIOLOGY AND PUBLIC


HEALTH


2 credits. This course provides instruction in clinical
epidemiology, biostatistics, preventive medicine


and public health.


The critical appraisal of the


8 credits. Eight weeks. Active participation in the
care of ward and clinic patients is provided under
supervision. Close tutorial relationship with staff in
lectures, conferences, and teaching rounds provides
a rich learning experience.


medical literature is emphasized.


BCC 5120 NEUROLOGY CLERKSHIP


BMS 5830 PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS
2 credits. Students are introduced to basic compo-
nents of the physical examination with emphasis on
normal findings.


BMS 5831 CLINICAL DIAGNOSIS (Introduction


to Clinical Medicine)


6 credits. Prerequisite: BMS 5830. Conducted by the
Department of Medicine, with participation by the
Departments of Neurology, Orthopaedics,
Ophthalmology and Pediatrics. Students develop
medical interviewing and physical examination
skills; learn methods of collecting, organizing and
communicating data; develop an understanding of
the genesis of signs and symptoms; and are intro-
duced to the techniques of problem-solving in phys-
ical diagnosis.


THIRD YEAR


2 credits. Two weeks. Students participate on the
inpatient and outpatient services of the neurology
department at Shands Hospital, VA Medical Center,
and University Hospital at Jacksonville. The student
learns how to evaluate patients by assuming ongo-
ing responsibility for their care while studying vari-
ous physiologic, chemical and pathologic aspects of
neural function.


BCC 5130 OBSTETRICAL AND
GYNECOLOGICAL CLERKSHIP
8 credits. Eight weeks. Participation in the outpa-
tient and inpatient medical and surgical care of
women at Shands Hospital and University Hospital
in Jacksonville. Lectures, seminars and active
involvement provide exposure to obstetrics, gyne-
cology, oncology and reproductive endocrinology.
Focus is on primary as well as intensive care.


BCC 5140 PEDIATRIC CLERKSHIP


During the third year, students rotate through eight
clinical clerkships. The clerkships in medicine,
surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, and pediatrics
are eight weeks in length; psychiatry, seven weeks;
community health and family medicine, six weeks;
neurology, two weeks; and anesthesiology, one
week. During the clerkships the medical student
participates as a member of the health care team in
the care of hospitalized and ambulatory patients.
Teaching occurs in various settings including clini-
cal rounds, conferences and lectures as well as at the
bedside or during surgery. Students will spend 5-10
weeks participating in clerkships at UFHSC-
Jacksonville. Housing will be provided during this


8 credits. Eight weeks. Students actively participate
in inpatient and outpatient medical management of
infants and children. Teaching occurs on the wards,
in the pediatric clinics and in the emergency rooms
at Shands Hospital and the University Medical
Center at Jacksonville and in rural clinics. Focus is
upon development of history and physical diagnos-
tic skills, preventive medicine, patient management
and consequences of illness in children and among
their families.

BCC 5150 PSYCHIATRIC CLERKSHIP
7 credits. Seven weeks. Observation and supervised
treatment of psychiatric patients in the Shands
TT ", 1 IT A 1- 1 r-' .. 1_ i--t CL--k:Il'...L:'/.








University Medical Center at Jacksonville inpatient,
outpatient, and consultation services. Weekly didac-
tic seminars, conferences and individual instruction
are given in the application of this material to the
practice of medicine.


under resident and faculty supervision. Students are
responsible for the performance of simpler diagnostic
procedures. Self-education is stressed, but students are
encouraged to attend major departmental conferences.


SURGICAL SELECTIVE


BCC 5160 SURGICAL CLERKSHIP
8 credits. Eight weeks. Students participate in the
care of surgical patients in the ward and in the oper-
ating room at Shands Hospital, the VA Medical
Center and University Medical Center/Jacksonville.
Instruction in the care of the surgical patient is pro-
vided by a series of daily seminars and lectures.


BCC 5170 COMMUNITY HEALTH & FAMILY


4 credits. 4 weeks. Students further develop skill in
pre-operative evaluation, surgery, and postopera-
tive care and follow-up. Patient-oriented seminars
are provided by faculty. The student will be an
active member of the surgical team.


AMBULATORY CARE SELECTIVE


4 credits. Students must take a four-week experience
in primary care medicine from an approved list of


electives.


Six weeks. Students are provided learning


experiences which foster development of the knowl-
edge, attitudes and approaches to health problems
in the primary care setting. The emphasis will be on
health promotion, disease prevention and manage-
ment of common health problems in outpatient set-
tings. Students will spend four weeks in a family
practice center in either Gainesville, Daytona Beach
or Jacksonville and two weeks in a rural clinic with-
in commuting distance. Housing is furnished for
rotations in Jacksonville and Daytona Beach.


These electives provide the students with


additional experience in the care of ambulatory
patients.

MEL 5930 ELECTED TOPICS/NEUROLOGY
2-20 credits. Offered by the Department of
Neurology as an opportunity for concentrated work
in a field of particular interest to the student.
Individual response, preceptorship, or clinical clerk-
ship in the college or in another medical center in
this country or abroad may be elected. Students may
take more than one topic in this department per


semester.


FOURTH YEAR


MEL 5931 ELECTED TOPICS/Neurological Surgery


The fourth year is divided into 11 four-week long
units (of 4 credit hours each). During the year, stu-
dents plan their own curriculum which must be
approved by their advisor and the fourth-year coor-
dinator prior to the beginning of the academic year.
Students are required to take four units: advanced
medicine clerkship, advanced pharmacology, a
surgery selective and an ambulatory medicine selec-
tive. The remaining seven units consist of elective
courses and clerkships offered by the basic science
and clinical departments.


BMS 5473 ADVANCED PHARMACOLOGY
4 credits. Lectures and conferences. Fundamentals
of drug action are studied with emphasis on cardio-
vascular, neurological, and endocrine systems.
Clinical faculty participate in the teaching of basic
aspects of clinical pharmacology.


2-20 credits. Same


as MEL 5930


MEL 5932 ELECTED TOPICS/Obstetrics and
Gynecology
2-20 credits. Same as MEL 5930.

MEL 5933 ELECTED TOPICS/Ophthalmology
2-20 credits. Same as MEL 5930.

MEL 5934 ELECTED TOPICS/Orthopaedic Surgery
2-20 credits. Same as MEL 5930.

MEL 5935 ELECTED TOPICS/Otolaryngology
2-20 credits. Same as MEL 5930.

MEL 5936 ELECTED TOPICS/Pathology
2-20 credits. Same as MEL 5930.

MEL 5937 ELECTED TOPICS/Pediatrics 2-20 credits.
Same as MEL 5930.


MEDICINE


6 credits.







MEL 5941 ELECTED TOPICS/Biochemistry 2-20 credits.
Same as MEL 5930.


MEL 5942 ELECTED TOPICS/Immunology and Medical
Microbiology
2-20 credits. Same as MEL 5930.

MEL 5943 ELECTED TOPICS/Neuroscience
2-20 credits. Same as MEL 5930.

MEL 5944 ELECTED TOPICS/Pharmacology
2-20 credits. Same as MEL 5930.

MEL 5945 ELECTED TOPICS/Physiology
2-20 credits. Same as MEL 5930.

MEL 5946 ELECTED TOPICS/Anesthesiology
2-20 credits. Same as MEL 5930.


MEL 5947 ELECTED TOPICS/Community Health and
Family Medicine
2-20 credits. Same as MEL 5930.

MEL 5948 ELECTED TOPICS/Medicine
2-20 credits. Same as MEL 5930.

MEL 5949 ELECTED TOPICS/Radiation Oncology 2-20
credits. Same as MEL 5930.


MEL 5950 ELECTED TOPICS/Radiology
2-20 credits. Same as MEL 5930.

MEL 5951 ELECTED TOPICS/Surgery
2-20 credits. Same as MEL 5930.

GRADUATE COURSES IN THE


Biology. Training in this scientific discipline is planned
to give experience in research and teaching, rather
than in clinical practice for which the M.D. degree
program is designed.
Although no graduate major may be completed
without adequate course work at the 6000 level or
higher, the 5000 level courses listed for each individ-
ual department also are available for graduate credit
as part of the candidate's major.
The following general courses are offered by
each participating department. Most of these courses,
as well as others listed below, also are available to
qualified graduate students from other divisions of
the university.

GMS 6905 RESEARCH IN MEDICAL SCIENCES
1 to 10 credits. May be repeated for credit.
Supervised research other than that toward fulfill-
ment of the thesis or dissertation research in the
Departments of Anatomy and Cell Biology,
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Immunology
and Medical Microbiology, Neuroscience, Pathology,
Pharmacology and Therapeutics, and Physiology.

GMS 6910 INTRODUCTION TO SUPERVISED
RESEARCH
1 to 5 credits. Credit not applicable toward degrees.
May be repeated up to a total of 5 credits.

GMS 6940 INTRODUCTION TO SUPERVISED
TEACHING
1 to 5 credits. Credit not applicable toward degrees.
May be repeated up to a total of 5 credits.


MEDICAL SCIENCES


GMS 6971 MASTER'S RESEARCH


Programs leading to the Ph.D. and M.S.


degrees


in the medical sciences (with a major in anatomy and
cell biology, biochemistry and molecular biology,
molecular genetics and microbiology, neuroscience,
pathology and laboratory medicine, pharmacology
and therapeutics, or physiology) are offered by the
College of Medicine.
In addition, interdisciplinary programs leading
to the Ph.D. in medical science also are offered. These
interdisciplinary programs include mammalian
genetics, toxicology, and vision sciences. A joint
Master of Business Administration/Master of
Science degree is offered through the College of
Business Administration and the College of Medicine's


1 to 15 credits. Anatomy and Cell Biology,
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Immunology
and Medical Microbiology, Neuroscience, Pathology,
Pharmacology and Therapeutics, and Physiology.

GMS 7979 ADVANCED RESEARCH
1 to 9 credits. Anatomy and Cell Biology,
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Immunology
and Medical Microbiology, Neuroscience, Pathology,
Pharmacology and Therapeutics, and Physiology.

GMS 7980 DOCTORAL RESEARCH
1 to 15 credits. Anatomy and Cell Biology,
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Immunology








Descriptions of all courses for each department
may be found in the current University of Florida
Graduate Catalog.


ANATOMY AND CELL BIOLOGY


The department offers a program leading to the
Ph.D. in medical sciences. The graduate training
specialization within the department is cell and
developmental biology.
The program prepares the student for the Doctor
of Philosophy degree in medical sciences. Research
interests in the department include several different
areas of cell biology, developmental biology, repro-
ductive biology and vertebrate morphology.
Applicants should have a strong background in
biology, chemistry, or physics and have taken
undergraduate courses in organic chemistry, calculus,
physics, cell biology, and biochemistry. Deficiencies may
be made up during the first year of graduate study.

BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR
BIOLOGY

The Department of Biochemistry and
Molecular Biology offers the Doctor of Philosophy
degree in biochemistry with specialization in physical
biochemistry, molecular biology and medical
biochemistry. The department, as one of the basic
medical sciences, also offers these subjects as part of
the program leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. in
medical sciences.
Specific areas of study include structure and
function of cellular and nuclear membranes in mam-
malian cells; transport of molecules into the cell; reg-
ulation of cell division and gene expression; assem-
bly and regulation of the cytoskeleton; biochemistry
of differentiation; biochemical genetics; molecular
biology of nucleic acids; replication and repair in
bacterial and eukaryotic cells; biosynthesis and
structure of nucleic acids, proteins, polysaccharide,
lipids, lipoprotein, isoprenoid metabolism; physical
biochemistry of nucleic acids and proteins; site-
directed mutagenesis mechanism of enzyme action
and molecular evolution.
New graduate students should have adequate
training in general, organic, quantitative and physi-
cal chemistry as well as in physics, biology and cal-


6206, 6415, 6876, and 6936. Depending upon interests
and background of the student, additional courses
are recommended from the following list: BCH 6296,
6746, 7410, and 7257. The curriculum for doctoral
candidates may also include advanced chemistry,
physiology, microbiology and genetic courses.


MOLECULAR GENETICS AND


MICROBIOLOGY


The Department of Molecular Genetics and
Microbiology offers a program leading to the Doctor
of Philosophy degree in medical sciences. The pro-
gram is designed to train students broadly in the
areas of molecular genetics, virology, bacterial
pathogenesis and immunology, while emphasizing
laboratory research as the single most important
component of graduate education. Specific research
areas in the department include molecular genetics
of pathogenesis and replication of RNA and DNA
viruses, gene targeting and development of viral
vectors for gene therapy, recombinant viral vaccines,
binding proteins, RNA splicing, intracellular protein
trafficking, developmental regulation of vision
genes, mitochondrial DNA replication, molecular
genetics of mammalian development and disease,
and primordial germ cell biology.
The first year of graduate study consists of both
laboratory rotations and formal courses. This experi-
ence provides students with a general background
in molecular genetics and microbiology, and a prac-
tical introduction to research in the department
research. Following satisfactory completion of the
preliminary examinations in the second year of the
student, students devote virtually all of their attention
to laboratory research in preparation for writing a
dissertation. Throughout their training, students
participate in a variety of departmental seminars
which provide an in-depth and current perspective
on research within the department and a forum for
discussion of related research by scientists at other
universities. The seminars also provide students
ample opportunity to perfect their presentation
skills. The department takes pride in maintaining a
very modern scientific perspective and an extremely
collegial atmosphere which together foster creativity
and a free exchange of ideas.
The department does not have rigid entrance







istry (including Organic), and which may include
statistics, calculus, physical chemistry, biochemistry
and genetics. A bachelor's degree in bacteriology or
microbiology is not required.


NEUROSCIENCE


The department offers programs leading to the
Ph.D. degree in medical sciences with specialization
on the basic neural and neurobehavioral sciences.
While there are no fixed entrance prerequisites,
prospective students should obtain a reasonable
undergraduate background in biochemistry, physi-
ology, statistics and behavioral science. Students
admitted with deficiencies in these areas will be
required to obtain remedial training. All students
will receive core training in neuroanatomy, neuro-
physiology, neurobehavioral science, neurochem-
istry, neuroendocrinology, neurohistology, and neu-
ropharmacology. The remainder of the program will
consist of laboratory research, journal clubs, advanced
courses and seminars from this and other departments.
Neural cell biology and metabolism will be dis-
cussed with a particular emphasis on the relation-
ships of molecular mechanisms to neural function.

ORAL BIOLOGY


The Department of Oral Biology, a unit of the
College of Dentistry, offers a program leading to the
degree of Doctor of Philosophy in medical sciences
with specialization in oral biology.
Training includes appropriate course work and
research in areas such as microbiology, immunolo-
gy, molecular biology, pathology, histology, and
speech dysfunction due to anatomic malformations.


Students are taught research methods in a super-
vised program of laboratory rotations and in the
selected laboratory. Independent advanced research
is conducted prior to admission to candidacy and
for the doctoral dissertation.
Prerequisites for admission in addition to those
of the Graduate School, include a broad base of
courses in mathematics, physics, organic and analyt-
ic chemistry, advanced biology, and statistical meth-
ods. Specific requirements may be obtained from the
Graduate Coordinator. For additional information,
write to the Department of Oral Biology, P.O. Box
100424, University of FLorida, Gainesville 32610 or
call (904) 392-4370.


PATHOLOGY AND LABORATORY
MEDICINE


The Department of Pathology and Laboratory
Medicine offers a program leading to the Doctor of
Philosophy degree in medical sciences, emphasizing
immunology and molecular pathology.
Students carry out their dissertation research in
the department under the direction of a faculty
member with a graduate faculty appointment. Areas
of research within the program include cellular and
molecular immunology, immunogenetics, immuno-
chemistry, immunopathology, autoimmunity, trans-
plantation, toxicology, immunology of infectious
disease, molecular oncogenesis, tumor biology,
human and animal retroviruses including HIV, mol-
ecular biology and comparative and nutritional
pathology. Disease-related research involves renal
calculi formation, autoimmune endocrine disease
(including insulin dependent diabetes), and forensic
and environmental toxicology.
The department also offers a program leading
to the Master of Science degree in medical sciences,
specializing in clinical chemistry and toxicology,
and participates in an interdisciplinary program
leading to a specialization in toxicology. The pro-
gram in clinical chemistry emphasizes laboratory
training of management and supervision of clinical
laboratories and research concerning mechanisms of
toxicity. The graduate program in toxicology is
administered through the Center for Environmental
and Human Toxicology and the participating pro-
gram within the Department of Pathology and
. abnratnrv Medicinne It emnhasizes clinical and








form basic and/or clinical research in immunology,
pathology and genetic engineering in an academic or
industrial setting, and teaching. Graduate students
entering the immunology and molecular pathology
program should have adequate undergraduate
training in chemistry, biology, physics and mathemat-
ics, with special emphasis on physiological, develop-
mental, biochemical and cellular biological sciences.

PHARMACOLOGY AND THERAPEUTICS

The Department of Pharmacology and
Therapeutics offers a program leading to the degree
of Doctor of Philosophy in the medical sciences with
specialization in pharmacology.
The general research focus of the department is
mechanistic, at the cellular and molecular levels.
Specific areas of research include receptor and mem-
brane pharmacology; signal transduction; drug
development, autonomic, renal, developmental,
endocrine, gastrointestinal and neuropharmacology;
teratology; fluid secretion and carbonic anhydrase
inhibition; cancer chemotherapy and carcinogenesis;
physical chemistry and enzymes; drug metabolism;
and environmental and marine toxicology.
Applicants should present undergraduate
course credits in chemistry, elementary physics and
biology, and mathematics through calculus.
Otherwise, well-qualified students with certain defi-
ciencies in preparation will be allowed to make
these up during the first year of graduate study. In
addition to elementary and advanced study in phar-
macology, candidates will pursue courses in bio-
chemistry, physiology, and other medical sciences
as determined by consultation with their advisory
committees.


PHYSIOLOGY


The Department of Physiology offers a program
leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree in the
medical sciences with specialization in physiology.
Areas of specialization within the Department
of Physiology include cellular physiology, general
endocrinology, neuroendocrinology, neurophysiolo-
gy, respiration, circulation, physiology of muscle,
cellular electrophysiology, cardiac electrophysiolo-
gy, epithelial transport, neonatal physiology.


lowing courses are especially useful as a background
for the study of physiology: general biology, verte-
brate biology, general chemistry, analytical chem-
istry, organic chemistry, physical chemistry, general
physics, calculus, and statistics. Students may find it
necessary to remedy deficiencies in their back-
ground by taking undergraduate courses after
admission to Graduate School.

INTERDISCIPLINARY PROGRAMS

Mammalian Genetics


Interdisciplinary study in mammalian genetics
provides students with a research background in the
application of eukaryotic and mammalian genetics,
human genetics, cytogenetics, and quantitative
genetics to problems related to the genetic basis of
disease. The Graduate Program in Mammalian
Genetics has been designed to provide flexibility in
the educational experience of the individual student
and emphasizes molecular approaches to the under-
standing of genetics, through a core genetics cur-
riculum and original laboratory research. Publication
in nationally and internationally recognized referred
journals prior to graduation is strongly encouraged.
Approximately 25 faculty members affiliated
with the Center for Mammalian Genetics participate
in the graduate program. The Center conducts and
facilitates interdisciplinary genetics research by pro-
viding state-of-the-art equipment, computer core
facilities, and biological resources for gene mapping,
genetic data analysis, and nucleotide sequence
analysis. Center faculty research interests include:
regulation of eukaryotic gene expression; viral
genetics; somatic genome stability; immunogenetics,
neurogenetics population and evolutionary genetics;
cytogenetics; clinical genetics and dysmorphology;
genetic and physical mapping of disease genes in
humans and mouse models of human disease;
mutation analysis of human disease genes; and gene
therapy.
Core courses taken during the first year will
include molecular genetics, cell biology, mammalian
genetics, and one additional course of the student's
choice. Students will meet with faculty of the Center
for Mammalian Genetics to discuss research oppor-
tunities and select three laboratories in which to do







dent's dissertation committee will consist of faculty
members from the Center and from the major
department. Qualifying exams will be administered
jointly by the Center and departmental faculty. The
later years of graduate study will be devoted to con-
ducting independent research. The Ph.D. degree
will be awarded by the major department.
Applicants should have a sound background in
general chemistry, general biology, general physics,
genetics and organic chemistry and should have
taken two or more advanced courses in natural sci-
ences, genetics, biochemistry, physiology, develop-
mental biology, and cell biology. In addition to this
graduate program, other training opportunities
available through the Center include the
M.D./Ph.D. program, post-doctoral fellowships,
and clinical fellowships designed to integrate basic
genetics research with the clinical arena. For addi-
tional information contact the Graduate Coordinator,
Center for Mammalian Genetics, College of Medicine,
Box 100226 UFHSC, Gainesville, FL 32610.

Toxicology

The Center for Environmental and Human
Toxicology serves as the focal point for activities
concerning the effects of chemicals on human and


animal health.


The Center's affiliated faculty is


composed of approximately 20 to 30 scientists and
clinicians, interested in elucidating the mechanisms
of chemical-induced toxicity, and is drawn from the
Colleges of Medicine, Veterinary Medicine, Pharmacy,
and the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences.
The broadly based, interdisciplinary expertise pro-
vided by this faculty also is used to address complex
issues related to the protection of public health and
the environment.
Students who wish to receive graduate training
in interdisciplinary toxicology leading to a Ph.D.
enroll through one of the participating graduate
programs, such as Pharmacology and Therapeutics,
Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Medicinal
Chemistry, Veterinary Sciences, or Food Science and
Human Nutrition. The number of graduate pro-
grams involved in interdisciplinary toxicology, as
well as the variety of perspectives provided by their
disciplines, allows a great deal of flexibility in pro-
viding a plan of graduate study to meet an individ-
ual student's interests and eoals in toxicoloev.


of the student's major department. Dissertation
research may be conducted either in the student's
department or at the toxicology laboratory facilities
located at the Center.


Vision Science Training

The Department of Ophthalmology maintains a
Vision Sciences Training Program for students seek-
ing the Ph.D. degree. Primary financial support for
the program is provided by an NIH National Eye
Institute Training Grant. This program is designed
for training in the areas of molecular/cellular biolo-
gy, biochemistry, and immunology with particular
emphasis on vision. The program is organized to
rigorously instruct and reinforce skills pertinent to
experimental science and involves coursework in
molecular and cell biology, genetics and immunology
as well as independent research, oral presentations,
written research proposals, peer review and the
sharpening of communicative skills.
The program is interdisciplinary and utilizes a
core group of 12 faculty preceptors with active
vision research and training programs whose prima-
ry and joint appointments span the majority of the
basic science departments at the University of
Florida College of Medicine. The Department of
Ophthalmology will serve as the administrative and
logistical center for this program, but individual fac-
ulty preceptors maintain primary graduate training
appointments in the departments of Anatomy and
Cell Biology, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology,
Immunology and Medical Microbiology, Neuro-
science, Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, and
Pharmacology and Therapeutics. Many preceptors
share cross appointments in multiple basic science and
clinical departments thus allowing trainees to gain
access to virtually the full range of scientific and
training expertise available in the College of Medicine.
Outside the goals of the training grant, training in the
anatomy and pathophysiology of the retina is avail-
able with emphasis on the aging process and glauco-
ma (circulation).
Qualified students in any area of biological
science will be considered for the program with or
without commitment to a specific area of vision
research and will, within the first year, choose a
preceptor under whose supervision thesis work will
ensue. All enrolled students will receive the standard








The program is designed specifically for those
individuals who wish to have a career in the bio-


medical industry


aim of the program is to produce Ph.D. or M.D.
/Ph.D. investigators capable of sustaining produc-
tive research careers in the vision sciences. Decisions
for admission to the program are made by late April
to begin in the program each August. Interested
individuals should inquire no later than February to
receive application materials. Initial inquiries should
be sent to Director of Visual Science Training
Program, Department of Ophthalmology, Box
100284 JHMHSC, Gainesville, Florida 32610.


as either researchers or adminis-


trators. Research will be done in one of the Inter-
disciplinary Center for Biotechnology Research Core
laboratories in conjunction with a member of the
Department of Molecular Genetics and Microbiology.
Specialization may be in molecular genetics, bacterial
pathogenesis, virology or mammalian genetics.

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

These courses are offered by the College of
Medicine for students majoring in other colleges.
Individual interdisciplinary programs leading
to an Interdisciplinary Studies major may be designed
and initiated, with review and approval by the IDS
Committee of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences,
by a student whose academic goals are not met by
an existing departmental undergraduate major.
The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular
Biology, the Department of Neuroscience and the
Junior Honors Medical Program offer IDS majors in
conjunction with the College of Liberal Arts and


Sciences'


Joint Master of Business
Administration/Master of Science


undergraduate degree granting program.


BSC 3096 HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY


In response to the growing number o


business-


es engaged in the sophisticated biotechnological sci-
ences, the University of Florida offers a joint MBA/MS
program. Sponsored by the MBA program in the
College of Business and the Department of Molecular
Genetics and Microbiology in the College of Medicine,
in cooperation with the Biotechnology Program, the
program culminates in both a Master of Business
Administration and Master of Science degrees. In
addition, the student will have had work experience
in a biotechnology laboratory and/or the biomedical
industry.
If issued separately, these two degrees would


take four


years


of study. Under the joint program,


both degrees can be obtained in three years. The
joint program requires one full year of science
courses, one full year of business courses and a year
devoted to research and electives in business and
science. The research may be presented in the form
of a dissertation, although a formal report may also


3 credits. Prerequisite: ZOO 2013C. Open to students
in the College of Health Related Professions, students
in the Physician Assistants program and to others


by permission of instructor.


The structure and


physiological function of selected human systems.

BCH 4024 INTRODUCTION TO
BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
4 credits. Prerequisite: Organic chemistry. An intro-
duction to physical biochemistry, intermediary
metabolism and molecular biology. Topics include a
survey of structure, chemistry and function of pro-
teins and nucleic acids, enzyme kinetics and mecha-
nisms and catalysis; a survey of the pathways of car-
bohydrate, lipid and nitrogen metabolism and their
metabolic control; regulation of gene expression at
the level of DNA, RNA and protein synthesis. This
course is offered fall and spring semesters.

BMS 4401 PHARMACOLOGY


2 credits. This course


is designed to introduce the










BCH 4905 BIOCHEMISTRY SENIOR RESEARCH
3 to 5 credits; maximum 15. Prerequisites: BCH 4313,
CHM 3210-3211 or equivalent, or department
approval. Enrollment limited to independent inter-
disciplinary majors. Laboratory investigations of
contemporary biochemical problems. May be
repeated with change of content up to a maximum
of 15 credits. Senior thesis required.

BMS 4905 MEDICAL SCIENCES
SENIOR RESEARCH
3 to 5 credits. Prerequisite: Department approval.
Corequisite: BCH 4313. Laboratory or literature
investigations of problems of current interest in the
medical sciences. May be repeated.

Enrollment for the following courses is restrict-
ed to students accepted in the Basic Biological and
Medical Sciences Program:


BMS 4010 INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL SCI-
ENCES SEMINAR
3 credits. Selected in-depth special topics in the pre-
clinical basic sciences and their application to clini-
cal problems.


BMS 4011 INTRODUCTION TO
MEDICAL SCIENCES SEMINAR
3 credits. Continuation of BMS 4010.


BMS 4012 CELL BIOLOGY SEMINAR
4 credits. Cellular functions in health and disease.
The structure and molecular biology of the mam-
malian cells are stressed including such things as
virus-cell interactions, inborn errors of metabolism
and bacterial growth. Identical to PCB 4930.

BMS 4013 INTRODUCTION TO
MEDICAL SCIENCES SEMINAR III


credits. Continuation of BMS 4010.


INDEPENDENT INTERDISCIPLINARY
MAJOR IN BIOCHEMISTRY AND
MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

Students matriculating in the College of Liberal
Arts and Sciences who desire an undergraduate
emphasis in biochemistry and molecular biology,
should consider the Independent Interdisciplinary
Major Program. The program is designed for stu-
dents who wish to pursue either graduate research
in biochemistry and related medical sciences, or
with a strong interest in academic medicine. An
independent interdisciplinary major in biochemistry
may be arranged through the Department of
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and submitted
for approval by the Committee of Interdisciplinary
Studies of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
Program applicants must have a strong background
in chemistry and biology courses.
The advanced level course work required
includes BCH 4024, two semesters of BCH 4905
Biochemistry Senior Research and submission of
senior thesis. The latter provides an opportunity for
an exceptionally well-qualified student to partici-
pate with a particular faculty member on an individ-
ualized research program in the faculty member's
research laboratory. Enrollment in BCH 4024 is a
suggested prerequisite for submission of a proposed
independent interdisciplinary major in biochemistry
to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and for
enrollment in BCH 4905. Electives include
advanced undergraduate offerings of the
Departments of Botany, Chemistry, Computer
Sciences, Microbiology and Cell Science,
Neuroscience and Zoology.
Application should be made during the sopho-
more year to enter the program during the junior
year to the Department of Biochemistry and
Molecular Biology.







FACULTY


* BLOCK,


ANATOMY & CELL BIOLOGY

* ARIS, JOHN P., Ph.D (Stanford Univ.)
Assistant Professor


* BENNETT, GUDRUN


S., Ph.D. (Rockefeller Univ.)


Research Professor
* DUNN, WILLIAM A., JR., Ph.D. (Pennsylvania State U.)
Associate Professor
* FELDHERR, CARL M., Ph.D. (Univ. of Pennsylvania)
Professor


* HOLBROOK, KAREN


Professor


* HOLLINGER, THOMAS G.,


A., Ph.D. (Univ. of Washington


Ph.D. (Purdue


Ur


Associate Professor
* LARKIN, LYNN H., Ph.D. (Univ. of Colorado
Professor
* LINSER, PAUL J., Ph.D. (Univ. of Cincinnati)


Associate


Professor


diversity)

)


* PADDY, MICHAEL R., Ph.D. (Univ. of Oregon)
Assistant Professor
PAWLINA, WOJCIECH, M.D.
(Nicolaus Copernicus Medical Academy)
Assistant Scientist
* RAREY, KYLE E., Ph.D. (Indiana University)
Associate Professor
* ROMRELL, LYNN J., Ph.D. (Utah State University)
Professor and Associate Dean for Education
* ROSS, MICHAEL H., Ph.D. (New York University)
Professor and Chairman
* SELMAN, KELLY, Ph.D. (Harvard University)
Associate Professor


* WALLACE, ROBIN


Ph.D.


(Columbia University)


Professor
* WEST, CHRISTOPHER M., Ph.D. (Calif. Inst. of Tech.)
Associate Professor


ANESTHESIOLOGY


A. JAY, M.D. (Johns Hopkins)


Professor and Professor & Chief of Pulmonary Medicine
* CATON, DONALD, M.D. (Columbia Univ.)
Professor and Chief, Obstetric Anesthesiology and
Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
COHEN, JERRY A., M.D. (Univ. of Miami)
Associate Professor
CUCCHIARA, ROY F., M.D. (Louisiana State Univ.)
Professor and Chairman
DAVIES, LAURIE K., M.D. (University of Florida)
Associate Professor and Chief, Cardiothoracic
Anesthesiology
DAVIS, D. SCOTT, M.D. (Univ. of Texas Southwestern)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
DENNIS, DONN M., M.D. (Univ. of Michigan)
Assistant Professor
DE PADUA, CONSTANTE B., M.D. (Univ. of Philippines)
Associate Professor
DE SOTO, HERNANDO, M.D. (Univ. Nacional
Pedro H. Urena)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
ENNEKING, F. KAYSER, M. D. (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant Professor
FLORETE, ORLANDO G., Jr., M.D. (Cebu Institute of
Medicine)
Visiting Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
GALLAGHER, THOMAS J., M.D. (Univ. of Kentucky)
Professor and Chief, Critical Care Medicine and
Professor of Surgery
GARCIA, LORENZO M., M.D.
(Univ. of Santo Tomas, Philippines)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
GIBBY, GORDON L., M.D. (Emory Univ.)
Associate Professor & Associate Professor of Medicine
GOOD, MICHAEL L., M.D. (Univ. of Michigan)
Associate Professor
GOODWIN, SALVATORE R., M.D. (Univ. of Kentucky)
Associate Professor and


Associate Professor of Pediatrics


BANNER, MICHAEL J., Ph.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of Physiology
BERGER, JERRY J., M.D. (Duke University)
Associate Professor
BERMAN, LAWRENCE S., M.D. (Jefferson Medical Col.)
Associate Professor and Associate Professor of Pediatrics
BINGHAM, H. LOCKE, M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ


GRAVENSTEIN, JOACHIM S., M.D. (Harvard University)
Graduate Research Professor
GRAVENSTEIN, NIKOLAUS, M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Professor and Executive Associate Chairman and
Professor of Neurosurgery


GRAVES, SHIRLEY


A., M.D. (Univ of Miami)


Professor and Chief, Pediatric Anesthesiology and
Professor of Pediatrics


BJORAKER, DAVID G
Associate Professor
BLACK, SUSAN, M.D.


., M.D. (Univ. of Minnesota)


(University of Alabama)


GUYTON, THOMAS
Assistant Professor


S., M.D. (Harvard University)


JAMES, CHRISTOPHER F., M.D. (Univ. of Maryland)


* A-------


A * n _ _












KIRBY, ROBERT R., M.D.
(Univ. of California-San Francisco)


Professor


SIDI, AVNER, M.D. (Hadassah Hebrew University
Associate Professor


SKORA, IRENA


A., M.D. (Jagiellonski University)


LAMPOTANG, SAMSUN, Ph.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant Professor and Assistant
Professor of Mechanical Engineering
LANGEVIN, PAUL B., M.D. (University of Missouri)
Assistant Professor
LAYON, ABRAHAM J., M.D. (Univ. of California-Davis)
Associate Professor and


Associate Professor of Medicine
LOBATO, EMILIO B., M.D.
(Universidad Nacional Autonoma de


Mexico)


Associate Professor of Anesthesiology/UFHSCJ
MAHLA, MICHAEL E., M.D. (Jefferson Medical College)
Associate Professor & Chief, Neurosurgical


Anesthesiology


& associate Professor of Neurosurgery


MELKER, RICHARD J., M.D., Ph.D.
(Albert Einstein Medical College)
Associate Professor and Associate Professor of Surgery
MITCHELL, HELEN, M.D.
(Univ. of Miami School of Medicine)
Clinical Assistant Professor of Anesthesiology/UFHSCJ
MODELL, JEROME H., M.D. (Univ. of Minnesota)
Professor and Senior Associate Dean for Clinical
Affairs and Associate Vice President for UF Health
Science Center Affiliations
MUNACH, SHELDON D., M.D. (Univ. of California,
Irvine California College of Medicine)
Clinical Assistant Professor
MURPHY, MAHIN R., M.D. (National Univ. of Iran)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
PAIGE, GLENN B., M.D. (Louisiana State University)
Assistant Professor
PASHAYAN, ANNETTE G., M.D. (Bowman-Gray
School of Medicine)
Associate Professor & Associate Professor of Neurosurgery
PATEL, JYOTI, M.D. (Rutgers University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
PAULUS, DAVID A., M.D. (University of Vermont)
Professor and Professor of Mechanical Engineering
PERKINS, HAVEN M., M.D. (University of Louisville)
Professor Emeritus
RAIZADA, MOHAN K., Ph.D. (University of Kanpur)
Professor and Professor of Physiology
REDFERN, ROBERT E., M.D. (Medical College of Georgia)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ


ROWE, DANIEL


S., JR., M.D. (Jefferson Medical


College)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
SAGA-RUMLEY, SEGUNDINA A., n1


(Univ. of Philippines)
Associate Professor
FT7FR NANCY M (I Tnivorcifv nf Miamin


Associate Professor and Associate Chairman/UFHSCJ
and Associate Professor of Dental Education/UFHSCJ
STOLTZFUS, DANIEL P., M.D. (Univ. of Texas/Houston)
Assistant Professor
SULEK, CHERI A., M.D. (University of Texas)
Assistant Professor


TRANKINA, MARK F
Assistant Professor


., M.D. (Chicago Medical School)


UTTERBACK, DAVID B., M.D. (Univ of Illinois)
Assistant Professor
VAN DER AA, JOHANNES J., Ph.D. (Eindhoven Univ.)
Assistant Professor
VAN MEURS, WILLEM L., Ph.D. (Paul Sabatier Univ.)
Assistant Scientist
WEBB, ALISTAIR I., B.V.Sc., Ph.D. (Univ. Bristol)
Professor and Professor of Veterinary Medicine
WHITE, SNO E., M.D. (Jefferson Medical College)
Assistant Professor


BIOCHEMISTRY AND
MOLECULAR BIOLOGY

* ALLEN, CHARLES M., JR., Ph.D. (Brandeis University)
Professor
* ALLISON, R. DONALD, II, Ph.D.
(University of Calif-Santa Barbara)
Associate Scientist
* CAIN, BRIAN D., Ph.D. (Univ. of Illinois)
Associate Professor
* CHUN, PAUL W., Ph.D. (University of Missouri)
Professor
* COHEN, ROBERT J., Ph.D. (Yale University)
Associate Professor


DENG, TILIANG, Ph.D.,


(Ohio State University)


Assistant Professor
* DENSLOW, NANCY D., Ph.D. (University of Florida)
Associate Scientist
* DUNN, BEN M., Ph.D. (Univ. of Calif.-Santa Barbara)
Professor


* FROST, SUSAN


, Ph.D. (University of Arizona)


Associate Professor
* KILBERG, MICHAEL S., Ph.D. (Univ. of South Dakota)
Professor and Associate Chairman


* KOROLY, MARY J.,


Ph.D. (Bryn Mawr College)


Associate Scientist
* LAIPIS, PHILIP J., Ph.D. (Stanford University)
Professor
* MAREC1, THOMAS H., Ph.D. (Oxford University)
Associate Professor
* McGU1RE, PETER M., Ph.D. (Univ. of North Carolina)








* PURICH, DANIEL L., Ph.D. (Iowa State University)
Professor and Chair
* SCHUSTER, SHELDON M., Ph.D. (Univ. of Arizona)
Professor
* YANG, THOMAS P., Ph.D. (Univ. of Calif., Irvine)
Associate Professor


COMMUNITY HEALTH AND
FAMILY MEDICINE


AHMED, OSMAN I., M.D., D.P.H.
(Cairo University, Egypt)
Assistant Professor
ALLEN, WILLIAM L., J.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant Professor
ANTIPORDA, GLORIOSA R., M.D.
(University of the East Ramon Magsaysay)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
BAILEY, DAVID W., M.D. (McGill University)
Clinical Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
BERRY, RONALD L., M.D. (Univ. of South Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor
BROWN, ROBERT L., M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
BURG, MARY ANN, Ph.D. (University of Florida)


Assistant Professor
CAIN, ROGERS, M.D. (Morehouse College)
Clinical Instructor/UFHSCJ
CHANG, KU-LANG, M.D. (Univ. of Witwa
South Africa)
Clinical Assistant Professor
CLARK, CHRISTINE S., M.S.W. (Florida Sta
Assistant in CHFM
CLARKE, MARK, M.D. (New Jersey Medic
Clinical Instructor/UFHSCJ
COLASANTE, ONA M., M.D. (Temple Uni'
Clinical Assistant Professor
COLLANTE, ERLINDA Y., M.D. (Far Easte
Philippines)
Clinical Assistant Professor
CORPUS, LORENZO M., M.D. (Univ Santo
Philippines)
Clinical Instructor/UFHSCJ
CURRY, ROBERT W., JR., M.D. (Duke Univ
Professor and Chairman
De HAVEN, MARK J., Ph.D. (Univ. of Flori
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
DEWAR, MARVIN A., M.D., J.D. (Univ. of
Florida)


tersrand,


ite Univ.)

al School)

versity)


rn Univ.


Tomas,


'ersity)


da)


South


Associate Professor and Program Director
DOUGLAS, HERSCHEL L., M.D. (Univ. of Oklahoma)
Professor/UFHSCJ
DUERSON, MARGARET, Ph.D. (University of Florida)
Associate Professor


FELLER, DAVID B., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor
FERRER, ASTERIA A., M.D. (Univ. of Santo Tomas)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
FUNDERBURK, MARCIA W., M.D. (Univ. of Iowa)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
GRAUER, KENNETH A., M.D. (SUNY-Upstate)
Professor
GRISNIK, JOHN A., Jr., M.D. (University of Pittsburgh)
Clinical Assistant Professor and Chief /UFHSCJ
GROOMS, ANN M., M.D. (Univ. of Tennessee)
Clinical Assistant Professor
HADDAD, CHARLES J., M.D. (Universidad Mundial)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
HADDAD-LACLE, JUDELLA EDWINA M., M.D.
(Intec, Dominican Republic)
Clinical Instructor/UFHSCJ
HATCH, ROBERT L., M.D., M.P.H
(Univ. of California at Los Angeles, UCLA)
Assistant Professor
HUEY, MICHAEL J., M.D. (UCLA)
Clinical Associate Professor and Director
JERNIGAN, JAMES E., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor
KANTROWITZ, MICKI A., M.D. (Tufts University)
Clinical Assistant Professor
KANE, ANDREW J., M.D. (SUNY-Buffalo)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
KELLETT, BOYD A., M.D. (McGill University)
Clinical Assistant Professor and Program Director
KELLOGG-ROBINSON, MARY P., M.D. (Univ. of
Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
KOSCH, SHARON G., Ph.D. (University of Florida)
Professor
LARIMER, CYNTHIA L., M.D. (UCLA)
Assistant Professor
LAVINA, JOEL S., M.D. (Univ. of Santo Thomas,
Manila, Philippines)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
LIPKOVIC, LIDA, M.D. (Univ. of Zagreb, Yugoslavia)
Clinical Assistant Professor and Chief /UFHSCJ
MAUN, ALICIA R., M.D. (Far Eastern Univ.
Phillippines)
Clinical Assistant Professor
McCRARY, S. VAN, Ph.D., J.D. (Univ. of Texas Medical
Branch)
Assistant Professor
McLAMB, JAMES N., M.D. (Univ. of North Carolina)
Associate Professor & Associate Chairperson/UFHSCJ
McTIERNAN, MICHAEL J., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor
MICOLUCCI, VICTOR C., M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
MII T.AN SUI SAN B.. M.D. (University of Florida)








MOSELEY, RAY E., Ph.D. (Georgetown University)
Associate Professor and Director, Medical Humanities
Program
MURPHREE, DUAINE D., M.D. (Univ. of South
Alabama)
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
OBER, VINCENT H., JR., M.D. (Medical College of VA)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
PETERSON, FREDERICK C., M.D. (Univ. of South
Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor
RATHE, RICHARD J., M.D. (University of Minnesota)
Assistant Professor
REEDER, HAROLD B., M.D. (Univ. of Tennessee)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
ROBINSON, JAMES D., PHARM. D. (Univ. of
Cincinnati)
Professor of Pharmacy and Professor of Community
Health and Family Medicine
ROOKS, LARRY G., M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor
RUSH, JOSEPH M., M.D. (Univ. of Miami)
Assistant Professor
SCHMIDT, SIEGFRIED O.F., M.D., Ph.D (Univ. of
Cologne, Germany)
Clinical Assistant Professor
SHAHADY, EDWARD J., M.D. (W.Virginia Univ.
School of Medicine)
Professor and Program Director
SILVA, BRIDGET M., M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor
SILVERSTEIN, JANET H., M.D. (Univ. of
Pennsylvania)
Professor of Pediatrics and Professor of Community
Health and Family Medicine
SOLOMON, WILLIAM C., JR., M.D. (Univ. of South
Alabama)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
STEWART, ERIC B., M.D. (University of Iowa)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
WILSON, GEORGE., III, M.D. (Univ. of Mississippi)
Clinical Assistant Professor &
Program Director/UFHSCJ
WRIGHT, BEVERLY VIDAURRETA, Ph.D. (Southern
Illinois University/ Carbondale)
Clinical Assistant Professor


YOUNG, CATHY


G., M.N. (University of Florida)


Lecturer


HEALTH POLICY
AND EPIDEMIOLOGY


MILLER, MICHAEL K., Ph.D. (Penn State Univ.)
Professor and Interim Chair; Director, Institute
for Health Policy Research
POLLOCK, BRADLEY H., Ph.D. (Univ. of California)
Research Associate Professor


MOLECULAR GENETICS
AND MICROBIOLOGY

* BAKER, HENRY V., II, Ph.D. (University of Maryland)
Associate Professor
BRANNAN, CAMILYNN, Ph.D. (Princeton University)
Assistant Professor
* CONDIT, RICHARD C., Ph.D. (Yale University)
Professor
* CRANDALL, RICHARD B., Ph.D. (Purdue University)
Professor Emeritus
* DUCKWORTH, DONNA H., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins)
Professor
* FLANEGAN, JAMES B., Ph.D. (Univ. of Michigan)
Professor


GIFFORD


, GEORGE E., Ph.D. (Univ. of Minnesota)


Professor Emeritus
* GULIG, PAUL A, Ph.D. (University of Texas)
Associate Professor
* HAUSWIRTH, WILLIAM W., Ph.D. (Oregon State
Univ.)
Professor and Professor and
Eminent Scholar, Ophthalmology
HORIKAMI, SANDRA M., Ph.D. (Vanderbilt Univ.)
Assistant Scientist
* LEWIN, ALFRED S., Ph.D. (University of Chicago)
Professor
* MOYER, RICHARD W., Ph.D. (UCLA)
Professor and Chairman
* MOYER, SUE A., Ph.D. (Columbia University)
Professor and Professor of Pediatrics
MUZYCZKA, NICHOLAS, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins
University)
Professor
RESNICK, JAMES, Ph.D. (Univ. of Pittsburgh)
Assistant Professor
* SMALL, PARKER A., JR., M.D. (Univ. of Cincinnati)
Professor and Professor of Pediatrics
* SWANSON, MAURICE S., Ph.D. (Univ. of California)
Assistant Professor
TURNER, PETER C., Ph.D. (Cambridge Univ.)
Research Assistant Professor
* YOUNG, D. MICHAEL, M.D. (Duke University)
Professor


ALBRECHT, STAN L., M.D. (Washington State Univ.)
-n C _ .








MEDICINE


Medicine and Community Programs


FOSTER, MALCOLM T., M.D. (Bowman Gray)
Professor and Chief/UFHSCJ
* McGUIGAN, JAMES E., M.D. (St. Louis University)
Professor and Chairman, Department of Medicine and
Professor of Immunology and Medical Microbiology
* MORELAND, ALVIN F., D.V.M. (Univ. of Georgia)
Professor and Professor of Comparative Medicine
* STEIN, GERALD H., M.D. (Univ. of Pennsylvania)
Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor of
Nursing and Psychology
ZEBOOKER, PATRICIA, M.D. (Temple University)
Visiting Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ


Allergy, Rheumatology and
Clinical Immunology


CONETTA, DONALD A., M.D. (Duke University)
Associate Professor & Director/UFHSCJ
CONTI, JAMIE, M.D. (University of Florida)
Assistant Professor
CONTI, C. RICHARD, M.D. (Johns Hopkins)
Eminent Scholar; Departments of Medicine &
Physiology; Chief of Cardiology
CREVASSE, LAMAR E., M.D. (Duke University)
Professor and Associate Dean for Continuing
Medical Education
CURTIS, ANNE, M.D. (Columbia Univ.)
Associate Professor


GEISER, EDWARD


M.D. (University of Cincinnati)


Professor & Associate Director, CRC
GEORGE, FERRIS, M.D. (Medical College of Georgia)
Visiting Assistant Professor
GILMORE, PAUL S., M.D. (Creighton University)
Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
GOLDMAN, DANIEL S., M.D. (University of Miami)
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ


GREEN, J.,


RUSSELL, JR., M.D. (University of Virginia)


BUBB, MICHAEL, M.D. (Johns


Hopkins)


Assistant Professor
EDWARDS, N. LAWRENCE, M.D. (Univ. of Miami)
Associate Professor


KINGSMORE, STEPHEN, M.D.


(Queens University of


Belfast)
Assistant Professor
POPP, JAMES D., M.D. (Medical College of Virginia)
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
SCHIFFENBAUER, JOEL L., M.D. (Albert Einstein
College)
Associate Professor
SOBEL, ERIC, M.D. (Case Western Reserve Univ.)
Assistant Professor
STAUD, ROLAND, M.D. (Freie Universitat Berlin)


Professor and Professor of Community Health
and Family Medicine


HILL, JAMES A
Professor


, M.D. (University of Maryland


KERENSKY, RICHARD A.,


M.D. (Univ. of Florida)


Assistant Professor


LEW, DAVID C., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor
LEWIS, JANNET, M.D. (Louisiana State University)
Associate Professor
LIMACHER, MARIAN, M.D. (St. Louis University)
Associate Professor
MARTIN, LILLA G., M.D. (Univ. of Mississippi)
Clinical Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
MEHTA, JAWAHAR, M.D. (Panjab Univ., India)
Professor


Assistant Professor
STEIN, GERALD H.,
Assistant Professor
WILLIAMS, RALPH


M.D. (Univ. of Penn


C., JR.,


M.D. (Cornell Univ.)


Eminent Scholar and Chief


Cardiology

BASS, THEODORE, M.D. (Brown University)
Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
BELARDINELLI, LUIZ, M.D. (Medical Catholic
Faculty Foundation, Porto Alegre, Brazil)
Eminent Scholar; Departments of Medicine,
Physiology and Pharmacology and Therapeutics
BERTOLET, BARRY, M.D. (University of Mississippi)
Assistant Professor
BRECHUE, WILLIAM, Ph.D. (Indiana University)
A ccicc-r, n Zr Son ontu


MILLER, ALAN B.,


M.D. (University of Pittsburgh


Professor and Director for CME/UFHSCJ
MILLS, ROGER, M.D. (Univ. of Penn. School of
Medicine)
Associate Professor
NICHOLS, WILMER W., Ph.D. (Univ. of Alabama)


Associate Professor


Associate Professor of


Physiology
PEPINE, CARL J., M.D. (New Jersey Medical School)
Professor and Chief /VAMC
PERCY, ROBERT F., M.D. (University of Mississippi)
Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
POLLOCK, MICHAEL L., Ph.D. (Univ. of Illinois)
Professor of Medicine, Physiology,
and Health and Human Performance
SHRYOCK, JOHN C., III, Ph.D. (Thomas Jefferson
Univ.)
Associate Scientist








M.D. (West Virginia


Univ.)


Associate Professor


Computer Sciences


ARIET, MARIO, Ph.D. (University of Florida)
Professor and Chief, Computer Sciences and
Professor of Community Health and Family Medicine
CREVASSE, LAMAR E., M.D. (Duke University)


Professor and


Associate Dean for Continuing Medical


Education


Gastroenterology, Hepatology
and Nutrition


ACHEM, SAMI, M.D.
(Facultad de Medicinade Torreon, Mex.)
Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
CAMPBELL-THOMPSON, MARTHA, Ph.D
(Univ. of Florida)
Research Assistant Professor
CERDA, JAMES J., M.D. (University of Maryland)
Professor and Associate Chairman
DAVIS, GARY L., M.D. (Univ. of Minnesota)


Professor


Dermatology


EAKER, ERVIN Y


., JR., M.D. (Univ. of Miami)


Associate Professor


CHUN, KEVIN, M.D. (University of Puerto Rico)
Clinical Assistant Professor
FLOWERS, FRANKLIN P., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Professor and Chief and Professor
of Pathology
FORD, MICHAEL, M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant Professor


RAMOS-CARO, FRANCISCO


A., M.D. (U. of Puerto


Associate Professor


SAWAYA, MARY, M.D. (University of Miami)
Assistant Professor


Endocrinology and Metabolism


FORSMARK, CHRISTOPHER, M.D. (Johns Hopkins)
Assistant Professor
KESSEL, EVELYN, M.D. (University of Michigan)
Instructor


KOLTS, BYRON E.,


M.D. (University of Rochester)


Associate Professor and Division Chief /UFHSCJ
LAU, JOHNSON, M.D. (University of Hong Kong)
Associate Professor
McGEE, JR., JAMES B., M.D. (Louisiana State Univ.)
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
McGUIGAN, JAMES E., M.D. (St. Louis University)
Professor and Chairman and Professor of Immunolo


and Medical Microbiology
MYERS, BRENT, M.D. (Univ. of Texas)
Assistant Professor


EDWARDS, CATHERINE, M.D. (Univ. of Michigan
Assistant Professor
FISHER, WALDO R., M.D., Ph.D. (Univ. of
Pennsylvania)
Professor of Medicine and
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
FREUND, GERHARD, M.D. (Goethe University)
Professor and Professor of Neuroscience
GRANT, MARIA B., M.D. (University of Florida)
Associate Professor


SNINSKY, CHARLES


., M.D. (Temple University


Associate Professor of Medicine and Pharmacy


TOSKES, PHILLIP P., M.D.
Professor and Chief


VALENTINE, JOHN F.,


Texas/Houston)
Assistant Professor

Internal Medicine


(University of Maryland)


M.D. (Univ. of


HENDERSON, GEORGE N., Ph.D.
(Indian Inst. of Tech., Madras, India)


Assistant Scientist


MISBIN, ROBERT I., M.D. (Johns Hopkins)
Associate Professor
QUINN, SUZANNE, M.D. (University of Florida)
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
SKOWSKY, RONALD, M.D. (Albany Medical College)
Associate Professor and Chief /UFHSCJ
STACPOOLE, PETER W., Ph.D., M.D. (Vanderbilt)
Professor of Medicine and Biochemistry and Molecular
Biology and Director, Clinical Research Center
THOMAS, WILLIAM C., M.D. (The New York


AUERBACH, DAVID, M.D. (State Univ. of New


York)


Clinical Associate Professor


BASS Jr., ROBERT, M.D. (Brown University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
CARANASOS, GEORGE J., M.D. (Johns Hopkins)
Professor and Chief and Professor of Community
Health and Family Medicine
DAVIDSON, RICHARD A., M.D. (Vanderbilt Univ.)
Associate Professor
EDWARDS, KERRY I., M.D. (LSU)
Assistant Professor
HARWARD, MARY, M.D. (Duke Univ.)
Assistant Professor


WARGOVICH, THOMAS J.,








LOWENTHAL, DAVID T., M.D. (Temple University)
Prof. of Medicine and Pharmacology and Dir. GRECC
McKAY, JULIE M., M.D. (Wayne State University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
MEULEMAN, JOHN R., M.D. (Washington Univ.,
St. Louis)
Associate Professor


TOOMEY, JAMES M. M.D. (Northwestern University)
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ


VANDEVELDE, ALEXANDER G.,
Louvain)
Associate Professor and
Acting Associate Chair/UFHSCJ


M.D. (Univ. of


MEYERS, BRUCE W., M.D. (Univ. of Miami)
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
MILLAN, TERANCE, M.D. (University of Florida
Clinical Assistant Professor
PERCY, ROBERT T., M.D. (University of Miami)
Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
ROBERTSON, LINDA M., M.D. (East Carolina Ur
Associate Professor/UFHSCJ


SPEVETZ, ANTOINETTE, M.D. (Hahnemann Univ.)
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
WILSON, MAX, M.D. (University of Rochester)
Clinical Assistant Professor
WOODARD, MICHELLE, M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor
VEGA, AIDA, M.D. (Boston University)
Clinical Associate Professor

Hematology


Nephrology


ARMITAGE, FRANCES, Ph.D.


(University of Florida)


Assistant Scientist


ARORA, NEERU, M.D.D.S.


(All India Inst. of


Medical Science, New Delhi)
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
CADE, J. ROBERT, M.D. (Univ. of Texas-Southwestern)
Professor of Medicine and Physiology
GUZMAN, NICHOLAS, M.D. (Cayetano Heredia
Univ.)
Assistant Professor of Medicine and Pharmacology
KONE, BRUCE C., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant Professor
MADSEN, KIRSTEN M., M.D. (Aarhus, Denmark)
Associate Professor of Medicine and Anatomy
MARS, RONALD L., M.D. (St. Louis Univ.)
Associate Professor/UFHSCJ


KITCHENS, CRAIG


, M.D. (University of Florida)


PETERSON, JOHN
Associate Professor


., M.D. (University of Florida)


Professor and Professor of Pathology and Assistant
Department Chair and Chief of Medical
Service/VAMC


REED, JILL V., DVM (Louisiana State)
Assistant Scientist
ROSS, EDWARD, M.D. (Boston Univ.)


GUTHRIE, TROY H., JR., M.D. (Med.
Professor and Chief /UFHSCJ


Col. of Georgia)


Associate Professor


SANDRONI, STEPHEN E., M.D. (New York Med. Col.)


LOTTENBERG, RICHARD, M.D. (Univ. of Florida)


Associate


Professor and Chief/UFHSCJ


Professor of Medicine and


Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
NOYES, WARD D., M.D. (University of Rochester)
Professor and Chief


TISHER, C. CRAIG, M.D. (Washington University)
Eminent Scholar; Departments of Medicine and
Pathology; Chief of Nephrology
WEINER, DAVID, M.D. (Vanderbilt Univ.)


STREIFF, RICHARD R., M.D. (University o
Professor and Associate Chief of Staff for


Basel)


Assistant Professor
WINGO, CHARLES


M.D. (Louisiana State)


Education/VAMC


Professor


Infectious Diseases


Oncology


BENDER, BRADLEY S. M.D. (University of Maryland)
Associate Professor


CARROLL, ROBERT, M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor


CLUFF, LEIGHTON, M.D.
Clinical Professor


(George


Washington Univ.)


FOSTER, MALCOLM T. (Bowman Gray)
Prof. and Chief/UFHSCJ
RAMPHAL, REUBEN, M.D. (McGill University)
Associate Professor and Associate Professor of
Immunology and Medical Microbiology
SHANDS, JOSEPH W., Jr., M.D. (Duke University)
Professor and Professor of Immunology and


GADDIS, THOMAS C.,


M.D. (Louisiana State Univ.)


Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
GUTHRIE, TROY H., JR., M.D. (Medical College
of Georgia)
Professor and Chief /UFHSCJ
LYNCH, JAMES W., Jr., M.D.
(Eastern Virginia Medical School)
Assistant Professor


McCARLEY, DEAN L.,


M.D. (Duke University)


w








MOREB, JAN S., M.D. (Hadassah-Hebrew University
Medical School, Israel)


Assistant Professor


ZUCALI, JAMES R., Ph.D. (New York Univ.)
Professor


Physicians Assistant Program


BOTTOM, WAYNE D., M.P.H. (University of
Alabama / Birmingham)
Associate Professor and Program Director
CURREY, CHARLES J., M.H.A. (University of Health
Sciences/The Chicago Med. School)
Assistant Professor
EVANS, HARVEY, PA, M.S. (Trinity University)
Visiting Assistant Professor
MULTAK, NINA L., B.S. (Hahnemann Univeristy)
Lecturer
RAGAN, PATRICIA D., M.P.H. (Univ. of S. Carolina)


Clinical Assistant Professor


RICE, RALPH, B.H.S. (University of Florida)
Lecturer
SCHWARTZ, DANIEL, PA, M.H.S.E., (University of
Florida)


Clinical Assistant Professor


Pulmonary Medicine


AFESSA, BEKELE W., M.D. (Athens Medical School)
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
AREPALLY, ARUNDHATI, M.D. (Medical College of
Georgia)
Clinical Assistant Professor
BLOCK, A., JAY, M.D. (Johns Hopkins)
Professor and Chief and Professor of Anesthesiology
BLOCK, EDWARD R., M.D. (Johns Hopkins)
Professor of Medicine and Associate Chief of Staff for
Research/VAMC
CICALE, MICHAEL J., M.D. (Georgetown University)
Associate Professor and Program Director
CURY, JAMES DAVIS, M.D. (University of Miami)
Associate Professor/UFHSCJ


GONZALEZ-ROTHI, RICARDO J.,


SPEVETZ, ANTOINETTE, M.D. (Hahnemann Univ.
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
THOMAS, DWAYNE, M.D. (Louisiana State Univ.)


Assistant Professor and Assistant Dean


NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY


ANDERSON, DOUGLAS K, PH.D. (Michigan State
University)
Eminent Scholar amd Professor of Neuroscience
ARCE, CARLOS A., M.D. (Cayetano Heredia Univ.,
Peru)
Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
DAY, ARTHUR L., M.D. (Louisiana State University)
Eminent Scholar
FAILLACE, WALTER, M.D. (Univ. di Roma)
Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
FESSLER, RICHARD G., M.D., Ph.D. (University of
Chicago)
Associate Professor of Neurological Surgery &
Neuroscience


FRIEDMAN, WILLIAM


A., M.D. (Ohio


Sate Univ.)


Professor and Professor, Neuroscience


JACOB, R. PATRICK, M.D. (University of Florida)
Assistant Professor and Chief/VAMC
MICKLE, J. PARKER, M.D. (Vanderbilt University)
Professor and Professor, Pediatrics
NGUYEN, TAI QUYEN, M.D. (University of Saigon)
Associate Professor and Associate Chairman/UFHSCJ


M.D. (New York


Univ.)
Associate Professor
HARMAN, ELOISE M., M.D. (Johns Hopkins)
Professor
HARRIS, J. OCIE, M.D. (University of Mississippi)
Professor and Chief/VAMC; Associate Dean for
Community Based Programs
PATEL, JAWAHARLAL M., Ph.D. (Marathawanda
Univ.)
Res. Associate Professor








REIER, PAUL J., Ph.D. (Case Western Reserve)
Eminent Scholar and Professor of Neuroscience
RHOTON, ALBERT L., JR., M.D. (Washington Univ.)
R.D. Keene Family Professor and Chair
RITZ, LOUIS A., Ph.D. (University of Florida)
Associate Professor and
Associate Professor of Neuroscience
ROPER, STEVEN N., M.D. (Univ. of Texas Medical
Branch, Galveston)


Assistant Professor of Neurological


Surgery


NEUROLOGY


BAUER, RUSSELL, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania State Univ.)
Associate Professor and Associate Professor of
Clinical Psychology
BOWERS, DAWN, Ph.D. (University of Florida)
Associate Professor and
Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology
CROSSON, BRUCE A., Ph.D. (Texas Tech Univ.)
Affiliate Professor and Professor of Clinical Psychology
DESHMUKH, VINOD D., M.D. (India)
Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
DOTY, LEILANI, Ph.D. (University of Florida)
Associate Scientist
FENNELL, EILEEN M., Ph.D. (University of Florida)
Professor and Professor of Clinical Psychology
GILMORE, ROBIN L. (Ohio State Univ.)
Associate Professor of Neurology and Pediatrics
GONZALEZ-ROTHI, LESLIE, Ph.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Associate Professor of Neurology
GREER, MELVIN, M.D. (New York Univer.)
Professor and Chairman of Neurology
and Professor of Pediatrics
GUY, JOHN, M.D. (University of Miami)
Associate Professor and Associate
Professor of Ophthalmology
HARTLEY, TODD C., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
HEILMAN, KENNETH M., M.D. (Univ. of Virginia)
Professor and Director of Neurology,
Professor of Clinical Psychology
JASSEMIDIS, LEONIDAS D., Ph.D. (Univ. of Michigan)
Research Assistant Professor
LEGARDA, STELLA M., M.D. (Univ. of Sherbrooke)
Affiliate Assistant Professor and
Assistant Professor of Pediatrics
MARIA, BERNARD L., M.D. (Univ. of Sherbrooke)
Affiliate Associate Professor and
Associate Professor of Pediatrics
MOTT, MARY S., M.D. (University of Florida)
Visiting Assistant Professor
MUSELLA, LILLI, Ph.D. (McGill University)
Assistant Professor


ROSS, JOHN J., M.D. (Harvard Medical School)
Affiliate Professor and Professor of Pediatrics
RUSSO, LOUIS S., JR., M.D. (New York University)
Professor and Senior Associate Dean/UFHSCJ
SACKELLARES, J. CHRIS, M.D. (Medical College of
Georgia)
Professor and Chief of VA Neurology Service
SCHMIDT, RICHARD P., M.D. (Univ. of Louisville)
Professor Emeritus; VA Distinguished Physician in
Neurology
TRIGGS, WILLIAM J., M.D. (University of Florida)
Assistant Professor
UTHMAN, BASIM M., M.D. (American Univ. of
Behruit)
Assistant Professor
VALENSTEIN, EDWARD, M.D. (Albert Einstein)
Professor and Chief of Neuromuscular Service
WATSON, ROBERT T., M.D. (University of Florida)
Professor of Neurology and Neuroscience and
Senior Associate Dean for Educational Affairs
WILDER, BUNA JOE, M.D. (Duke University)
Professor Emeritus

NEUROSCIENCE


ACHE, BARRY W., Ph.D. (Univ. of Cal.-Santa Barbara)
Professor of Neuroscience and Professor of Zoology
ANDERSON, DOUGLAS K., Ph.D. (Michigan State
Univ.)
C.M. and K. Overstreet Professor of Neuroscience and
Neurological Surgery


ANDERSON, KEVIN


Ph.D. (Univ. of Kentucky)


Associate Professor of Neuroscience and
Associate Professor of Physiological Sciences
* ANDERSON, PETER A.V., Ph.D.
(University of Calif.-Santa Barbara)
Professor of Neuroscience and Professor of Physiology
* BATTELLE, BARBARA-ANNE, Ph.D. (Syracuse)
Professor of Neuroscience
* BENNETT, GUDRUN S., Ph.D. (Rockefeller Univ.)
Professor of Neuroscience and Research Professor
of Anatomy
BOVA, FRANK J., Ph.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Professor of Neuroscience and
Professor of Radiation Oncology
* COOPER, BRIAN Y., Ph.D. (University of Iowa)
Associate Professor of Neuroscience and
Associate Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
* DAWSON, WILLIAM W., Ph.D. (F.S.U.)
Professor of Neuroscience;
Professor of Ophthalmology and Physiology
FESSLER, RICHARD G., M.D., Ph.D. (Univ. of Chicago)
Associate Professor of Neuroscience and
Associate Professor of Neurological Surgery








* FRIEDMAN, WILLIAM A., M.D. (Ohio State Univ.)
Professor of Neuroscience and
Professor of Neurological Surgery
GOLD, MARK S., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Professor
* HEATON, MARIETA B., Ph.D. (N.C. State University)
Professor of Neuroscience
* HUNTER, BRUCE E., Ph.D. (University of Florida)
Associate Professor of Neuroscience
JOHNSON, RICHARD D., Ph.D. (Univ. of Calif. Davis)
Associate Professor of Neuroscience and


* STREIT, W. JAKE, Ph.D. (Med. Sch. of South Carolina)
Associate Professor of Neuroscience
* SUMMERS, COLIN, Ph.D. (Univ. of Southampton)
Professor of Neuroscience and Professor of Physiology
* THOMPSON, FLOYD J., Ph.D. (Indiana University)
Associate Professor of Neuroscience
* VAN HARTESVELDT, CAROL J., Ph.D. (Univ. of
Rochester)
Professor of Neuroscience and Professor of Psychology;
Co-Director, Center for Neurobiological Sciences
* VICKROY, THOMAS W., Ph.D. (Univ. of Texas)


Sciences


KALTRA, SATYA P., Ph.D. (Univ. of Delhi)


Professor


* LEONARD, CHRISTIANA M., Ph.D. (M.I.T.)


Professor of Neuroscience


* LUTTGE, WILLIAM G., Ph.D. (Univ. of Calif.-Irvine)
Professor and Chairman of Neuroscience
* MacLENNAN, A., JOHN, Ph.D.
(Univ. of British Columbia)


Assistant Professor of Neuroscience
* MAHAN, PARKER E., D.D.S., Ph.D.
(Emory; Univ. of Rochester)
Eminent Scholar of Neuroscience and
Eminent Scholar of Basic Dental Sciences


* MARIA, BERNARD L., M.D. (Univ. of Sherbrooke)
Associate Professor of Neuroscience and
Associate Professor of Pediatrics
* MIDDLEBROOKS, JOHN C., Ph.D.
(Univ. of Calif.-San Francisco)
Associate Professor of Neuroscience and
Associate Professor of Otolaryngology
MUIR, DAVID F., Ph.D. (Mount Sinal School of Med., NY)
Assistant Professor of Neuroscience and Assistant
Professor of Pediatrics
* MUNSON, JOHN B., Ph.D. (University of Rochester)
Professor of Neuroscience and Joint Professor of
Neurological Surgery
* REEP, ROGER L., Ph.D. (Michigan State University)
Associate Professor of Neuroscience and Physiological
Sciences
* REIER, PAUL J., Ph.D. (Case Western Reserve Univ.)
Mark F. Overstreet Professor of Neurological Surgery
and Professor of Neuroscience
* RITZ, LOUIS A., Ph.D. (University of Florida)
Associate Professor of Neuroscience and
Associate Professor of Neurological Surgery
SAHU, ABHIRAM, Ph.D. (Univeristy of Calcutta)
Associate Scientist
* SHAW, GERARD P.J., Ph.D. (University of London)
Associate Professor of Neuroscience
* SEMPLE-ROWLAND, SUSAN L., Ph.D. (Univ. of
Florida)
Assistant Scientit of Neirn'science


Associate Professor of Neuroscience and


Associate Professor of Physiological Sciences
* VIERCK, CHARLES J., JR., Ph.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Professor of Neuroscience and Affiliate Professor of
Psychology and Director Center for Neurobiological
Sciences
* WALKER, DON W., Ph.D. (Texas Christian University)
Professor of Neuroscience
WIDMER, CHARLES, G., D.D.S., M.S (SUNY)
Associate Professor of Neuroscience and Associate
Professor of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery


OBSTETRICS AND


GYNECOLOGY


* ABRAMS, ROBERT M., Ph.D., D.D.S. (Univ. of Pa.)
Professor
ANDREWS, STEPHEN J., M.D. (Case Western Reserve)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Pensacola
BENNETT, BARBARA B., M.D. (Univ. of Miami)
Assistant Professor
BENRUBI, GUY I, M.D. (SUNY-Brooklyn)
Professor/UFHSCJ
BUCCIARELLI, RICHARD L., M.D. (Univ. of
Michigan)
Affiliate Professor and Professor of Pediatrics
BUHI, WILLIAM C., Ph.D. (University of Florida)
Associate Professor
CATON DONALD, M.D. (Columbia University)
Joint Professor and Professor of Anesthesiology
CHEG1NI, NASER, Ph.D. (Univ. of Southampton, Eng.)
Associate Professor
CLARK, PENELOPE R., Ph.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant Professor
CLARKE, LESLIE L., Ph.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Research Assistant Professor
CRUZ, AMELIA C., M.D. (Far Eastern University)
Professor
DAVIS, JOHN D., M.D. (Bowman Gray)
Assistant Professor
DELKE, ISAAC, M.D. (Haile Sellassie I Medical School)
Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
del VALLE, GERARDO O., M.D. (Univ. of Puerto Rico
l-i- -- ( s A A.A-


Associate Professor of Physiological








FABER, BARBARA M., M.D. (University of Iowa)
Instructor
GAUDIER, FRANCISCO L., M.D. (Ponce School of
Medicine)
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
GELDER, MARK S., M.D. (Univ. of Virginia)
Assistant Professor
HARDT, NANCY S., M.D. (Loyola/Stritch School of
Medicine)
Joint Associate Professor and Associate Professor
of Pathology
HILL, HUGH M., M.D. (Johns Hopkins)
Professor and Associate Dean for Student and
Alumni Affairs
ILLIONS, EDWARD H., M.D. (Jefferson Medical
College)
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
JOHNSON, JOHN W. C. JR., M.D. (Univ. of Virginia
Professor
JONES, JAMES L., M.D. (Univ. of Miami Sch. of Med
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
KAUNITZ ANDREW M., M.D. (Columbia Universit
Professor/UFHSCJ
KELLNER, KENNETH R., M.D., Ph.D. (SUNY-
Downstate)
Professor
KIPERSZTOK, SIMON, M.D. (Tufts)
Assistant Professor
KLEINMAN, GARY E., M.D. (Creighton University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Pensacola
McLEAN, FREDERICK W., M.D. (Marquette Univ.)
Associate Professor
MAHAN, CHARLES S. JR., M.D. (Northwestern Uni
Professor
MAHER, JAMES E., III, M.D. (Medical College of
Georgia)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Pensacola
MARTIN, DAVID A., M.D. (Indiana University)


Assistant Professor
MASTERSON, BYRON J., M.D. (Washington
J. Wayne Reitz Professor and Chair
MORGAN, LINDA S., M.D. (Med. Col. of
Pennsylvania)
Professor


SCHULTZ, GREGORY S., Ph.D. (Oklahoma State Univ.)
Professor
SHIVERICK, KATHLEEN T., Ph.D. (Univ. of Vermont)
Affiliate Professor and Professor of Pharmacology
STALNAKER, BENJAMIN L., JR., M.D. (Univ. of
Florida)
Professor and Associate Chair/Pensacola
STONE, I. KEITH. M.D. (University of Virginia)


)


1.)


Associate Professor
SWARTZ, DOUGLAS A., M.D. (Univ. of 7
Affiliate Associate Professor and
Associate Professor of Urology/UFHSC
THOMPSON, ROBERT J., M.D. (Wayne
Prof. and Associate Chairman
for Jacksonville Programs/UFHSCJ
WELLS, DAVID S, M.D. (Univ. of Texas
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
WILKINSON, EDWARD J., M.D. (Med.
Joint Professor and Professor of Patholoi
WILLIAMS R. STAN, M.D. (Univ. of No
Associate Professor


. .


Texas/Houston)


I
State Univ.)


Southwestern)


Col. of Wis.)
rth Carolina)
rth Carolina)


y)


OPHTHALMOLOGY

ARENDT, ANATOL, Ph.D. (Technical Univ of Gdansk,
Poland)
Associate Scientist
BETCHKAL, JANET A., M.D. (Rush University)
Clinical Assistant Prof. & Associate Chair/UFHSCJ
DAWSON, WILLIAM W., Ph.D. (Florida State Univ.)


iv.)


Univ.)


NDUBISI, BONIFACE U., M.D. (Texas Tech)
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
NUSS, ROBERT C., M.D. (Jefferson Medical College)
Professor and Assistant Dean/UFHSCJ
RICHARDS, DOUGLAS S., M.D. (University of Utah)
Associate Professor
RIPPS, BARRY A., M.D. (University of Alabama)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Pensacola
SANCHEZ-RAMOS, LUIS, M.D.,
(Universidad Autonoma Santo Domingo)


Professor
DOYLE, JAMES WILLIAM, M.D., Ph.D. (Univ. of
Florida)
Assistant Professor
DRIEBE, WILLIAM T., JR., M.D. (Univ. of Virginia)
Associate Professor
GUY, JOHN, M.D., (University of Miami)
Associate Professor
HALPERN, JESSE I., M.D. (State Univ. of New York)
Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
HAMED, LATIF M., M.D. (Indiana Univ. School of Me
Associate Professor
* HARGRAVE, PAUL A., Ph.D. (Univ. of Minnesota)
Professor and Eminent Scholar
* HAUSWIRTH, WILLIAM W., Ph.D. (Oregon State Un
Professor and Eminent Scholar
HAZARIWALA, KAUSHIK M., M.D. (Baroda Univ.)
Assistant Professor
HOPE, G., MARION, Ph.D. (University of Florida)
Associate Scientist
McDOWELL, J., HUGH, Ph.D. (Florida State Univer.
Associate Scientist
PHILLIPS, BARRY D., O.D. (Indiana University Schc
of Optometry)


d.)


iv.)


)


)ol









RUBIN, MELVIN L., M.D. (Univ. of Calif-San Francisco)


OTOLARYNGOLOGY


Eminent Scholar


SHERWOOD, MARK B., M.D. (Manchester Univ.,
England)


Associate


Professor and Chair


SMITH, MARY FRAN, M.D. (Northwestem University)
Assistant Professor
SMITH, WESLEY CLAY, Ph.D. (Yale University)
Assistant Scientist


STERN, GEORGE


M.D.


Professor


TIMMERS, ADRIAN, Ph.D. (Univ. of Nym
Assistant Scientist


ORTHOPAEDICS


CHIDGEY, LARRY K., M.D. (Univ. of South Florida


ANTONELLI, PATRICK J., M.D. (Univ. of Minnesota)
Assistant Professor
BROWNLEE, RICHARD JR., M.D. (Univ. of N. Carolina)
Assistant Professor
* CASSISI, NICHOLAS J., D.D.S., M.D. (Univ. of Miami)
Professor and Chair
Professor of Oral Surgery and Dentistry
ISAACS, JOHN, JR., M.D. (Abraham Lincoln Sch. of Med.)
Associate Professor and Associate Chair/UFHSCJ
LERNER, DONALD NEAL, M.D. (Univ. of Miami)
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
MIDDLEBROOKS, JOHN C., Ph.D. (Univ. of California)
Associate Professor of Otolaryngology and
Neuroscience
POOLE, MICHAEL D., M.D., Ph.D. (Univ. of North


Associate


Professor


Carolina)


DELL, PAUL C., M.D. (University of Florida
Professor


ENNEKING, WILLIAM F., M.D. (Univ. of Wisconsin)
Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus
GEAREN, PETER F., M.D. (Loyola-Stritch Med. School)


Associate Professor


* SINGLETON, GEORGE T., M.D. (Baylor University)
Professor
STRINGER, SCOTT P., M.D. (Univ. of Southwestern
Texas)


Assoc


iate Professor and Assistant Dean for Clinical


Associate Professor


Affairs


INDELICATO, PETER A., M.D. (N.Y. Medical College)
Professor
KALEN, VICKI, M.D. (Temple Univ.)


PATHOLOGY AND
LABORATORY MEDICINE


Associate


Professor


KOPACH, KATHLEEN, M.D. (Penn.


State Univ.)


Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
MACMILLAN, MICHAEL, M.D. (Univ. of North
Carolina)
Associate Professor
MEISTER, KEITH, M.D. (Boston University)
Assistant Professor
MILLER, GARY J., Ph.D. (University of Florida)
Associate Professor/Bioengineering
MYERS, SCOTT L., M.D. (University of Iowa)
Assistant Professor
PERRY, JAMES M., M.D. (University of Florida)
Assistant Professor and Associate Chair/UFHSCJ
PETTY, R. WILLIAM, M.D. (University of Arkansas)
Professor and Chair
SCARBOROUGH, MARK T., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant Professor
SPANIER, SUZANNE S., M.D. (University of Florida)


Associate


Professor


STRATES, BASIL S., M.D. (Univ. of Thessaloniki)
Research Professor


VANDERGRIEND, ROBERT A.,


M.D. (Univ. of Florida)


Associate Professor
WRIGHT, THOMAS W., jr., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)


* ATKINSON, MARK


A., Ph.D. (Univ. of Florida)


Associate Professor
* BAER, HERMAN, M.D. (University of Basel,
Switzerland)
Director of Clinical Microbiology; Director of Autopsy
and Professor of Pathology and Immunology and
Medical Microbiology
* BERTHOLF, ROGER L., M.D. (Univ. of Virginia)
Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
* BRAYLAN, RAUL C., M.D. (Buenos Aries Medical
School)
Professor and Director of Flow Cytometry Core
Laboratory and Hemapathology
CLAPP, WILLIAM L., M.D. (University of Tennessee)
Assistant Professor


* CRANDALL, CATHERINE


Professor Emeritus


* CROKER, BYRON P.,


A., Ph.D. (Purdue Univ.)


JR., M.D., Ph.D. (Duke Univ


Professor and Chief of Laboratory Services/ VAMC
* DONNELLY, WILLIAM H., JR., M.D. (Univ. of Ottawa)
Professor and Professor of Pediatrics
DREW, PETER A., M.D. (Eastern Virginia Medical
School)
Assistant Professor
VCTTAT 'TT.IflAC A AN fl /T Tnwirrn.r4-.r rS \/rlt;r-b








* GOODENOW, MAUREEN M., Ph.D. (Albert Einstein
College)
Associate Professor
GRAMS, RALPH R., M.D. (University of Minnesota)
Professor
HACKETT, RAYMOND L., M.D. (Univ. of Vermont)
Professor; Associate Chair and Director of
Administration and Education
HAMMETT-STABLER, CATHERINE, Ph.D. (Univ of
Alabama)
Assistant Professor
HARBISON, RAYMOND D., M.S., Ph.D., (Univ. of Iowa)
Professor
HARDT, NANCY S., M.D. (Loyola U. Stritch Sch. of Med.)
Associate Professor
HARDY, NED M., M.D. (University of Florida)
Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
* HENDRICKS, JAMES B., Ph.D. (Univ. of Wisconsin)
Assistant Professor


* POTTS, WAYNE K., Ph.D. (Univ. of Washington)
Assistant Professor
* RAND, KENNETH H., M.D. (Stanford University)
Professor of Pathology, Immunology and Medical
Microbiology, and Dir. of Clinical Microbiology and
Virology and Acting Medical Director of Clinical Labs
RHATIGAN, RONALD M., M.D. (University of Iowa)
Professor of Jacksonville Programs/UFHSCJ
ROJIANI, AMYN M., M.D. (Univ. of Karachi,
Pakistan)
Assistant Professor
SALZLER, MICHAEL J., M.D. (SUNY Buffalo)
Assistant Professor
SCORNIK, JUAN C., M.D. (Univ. of La Plata, Argentina)
Professor and Chief of Immunogenetics


SCOTT, GREGORY


V., M.D. (University of Florida)


Assistant Professor
* SHE, JIN-XIONG, Ph.D. (Academie De Montpelier)
Assistant Professor


JENKINS, STEPHEN G., Ph.D. (University o


Vermont)


Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
* KAO, KUO-JANG, M.D., Ph.D.
(National Taiwan Univ. Duke)
Professor and Director of Blood Bank
* KHAN, SAEEDUR R., Ph.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Associate Professor
KITCHENS, CRAIG, M.D. (University of Florida)
Professor and Professor of Medicine
* KLEIN, PAUL A., Ph.D. (University of Florida)
Professor and Director of Hybridoma Core Laboratory


LAUWERS, GREGORY


de Medecine)


Assistant Professor


Y., M.D., (Univ. of Paris Faculte


* MACLAREN, NOEL K., M.B., Ch.B. (Univer. of Otago)
Professor of Pathology and Pediatrics and
Chairman of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine
MASIH, ANEAL S., M.D. (St. Louis University)
Assistant Professor
MASOOD, SHAHLA, M.D. (Shiraz U. Sch. of Med., Iran)
Associate Professor and Associate Chair/UFHSCJ
* McCORMACK, WAYNE T., Ph.D. (Florida State Univ.)
Assistant Professor
MONTEIRO, CARMELA, M.D. (Univ. do Estado da
Guanabara)
Clinical Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
MUIR, ANDREW B., M.D. (University of Toronto)
Assistant Professor
MULLINS, DIANE L., M.D. (Northeastern Ohio Univer.)
Assistant Professor
MURPHY, WILLIAM M., M.D. (Harvard Medical
School)
Professor and Program Director of
Anatomic Pathology
NORMANN, SIGURD J., M.D., Ph.D. (Univ. of Wash.)


* SMITH, LINDA


Ph.D. (University of Texas-Austin


Assistant Professor of Pathology and Director of
Molecular Diagnostic Laboratories
* SMITH, RICHARD T., M.D. (Tulane University)
Professor
SONG, YAO HUA, Ph.D. (Uppsala Univ., Sweden)
Assistant Scientist
TENNYSON, GARY S., M.D. (Suny-Stony Brook)
Associate Professor/UFSHCJ
VILLAS, BRUCE H., M.D. (UMDNJ/Rutgers)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
* WAKELAND, EDWARD K., Ph.D. (Univ. of Hawaii)
Professor & Director of the Center for Mammalian


Genetics


* WILKINSON, EDWARD J., M.D. (Marquette Univer.)
Professor
* WINTER, WILLIAM E., M.D. (Loyola University)
Associate Professor
YACHNIS, ANTHONY T., M.D. (George Washington
Univ.)
Assistant Professor
ZANDER, DANI S., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant Professor and Chief of Lab Services VAMC


PEDIATRICS


General Pediatrics

ALFINO, MYRA W., M.D. (Temple University)
Clinical Assistant Professor
BAILEY, DAVID W., M.D. (McGill University)
Clinical Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
DABROW, SHARON M., M.D. (Boston University)
Clinical Assistant Professor
nAVTI TI M k (tAnlc I 1nivnrrciHtv









DUMONT-DRISCOLL, MARILYN C., M.D., Ph.D.
(Albany Medical College)
Assistant Professor
GAMAS, CARLOS H., M.D. (Colegio Mayor de
Nuestra Senora del Rosario-Columbia)
Visiting Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
GENTRY, JAMES L., M.D. (Medical College of Georgia)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
GENUARDI, FRANK J., M.D. (Univ of South Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
GOLDHAGEN, JEFFREY L., M.D. (Univ. of Pittsburg)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
GOUDARZI, TAJVAR, M.D. (Tehran Medical School)
Clinical Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
GRINENKO, DAWN, M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor
HINCHCLIFFE, ANNETT M., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Instructor/UFHSCJ
MARTIN, SALLY J., M.D. (Univ. of Texas)
Clinical Assistant Professor
MAULDIN, OLIN, M.D. (Univ. of Mississippi)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
MORALES, FRANCES, M.D. (Univ. of Puerto Rico)
Clinical Instructor/UFHSCJ
MONEM, GAMAL F., M.D. (Cairo University)
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
MURPHY, MARY D., M.D. (Medical College of Virginia)
Professor and Chief/UFHSCJ
NACKASHI, JOHN A., M.D. (University of Florida)
Associate Professor and Chief
REISS, JOHN G., Ph.D (University of Florida)
Assistant Professor
ROGERS, CHERYL W., M.D. (Univ. of Kentucky)


MILLER, ROBERT, M.D. (University of Florida)
Professor and Division Chief /UFHSCJ
SCHIEBLER, GEROLD L., M.D., Ph.D. (Harvard Univ.)
Professor and Associate Vice President for
Health Affairs for External Relations
VICTORICA, BENJAMIN E., M.D. (U. of Cuyo, Argentina)
Professor


Critical Care


DENICOLA, LUCIAN, M.D. (Columbia University)
Associate Professor and Chief /UFHSCJ
GAYLE, MICHAEL O., M.D. (Univ. of the West Indies)
Associate Professor of Pediatrics/UFHSCJ
KISSOON, NIRANJAN, M.D. (Univ. of the West Indies)
Professor/UFHSCJ

Endocrinology

BAKER, TOREE M., M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor
HAYMOND, MOREY W., M.D. (Washington Univ.)
Director of Pediatrics and
Professor/Jacksonville/Nemours
ROSENBLOOM, ARLAN L., M.D. (Univ. of Wisconsin)
Professor


SCHATZ, DESMOND
Associate Professor


A. (Univ. of Witwatersrand)


SILVERSTEIN, JANET, M.D. (Univ. of Pennsy
Professor and Chief

Gastroenterology


lvania)


Assistant Professor


SHENKMAN, ELIZABETH, Ph.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant Professor
WEBER, F. THOMAS, M.D. (University of Cincinnati)
Associate Professor


WHITWORTH,JAY M.,


M.D. (Indiana University)


Associate Professor/Jacksonville / Nemours


ANDRES, JOEL M., M.D. (SUNY-Buffalo)
Professor and Chief
GONZALEZ, REGINO, M.D. (Univ. Central del Est)
Assistant Professor


NOVAK, DONALD
Associate Professor


., M .D. (Univ. of


South Florida)


Genetics


Cardiology


ARMSTRONG JR., GEORGE F., M.D. (Duke Univ.)
Visiting Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
BAYNE, EDWARD J., M.D. (Med. College of Virginia)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
GESSNER, IRA H., M.D. (University of Vermont)
Eminent Scholar
MARANGI, DONALD, M.D. (Far Eastern Univ)
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
MARVIN, WILLIAM J., JR., M.D. (University of Iowa)


DRISCOLL, DANIEL J., M.D., Ph.D. (Albany Med.
College)
Assistant Professor
WALLACE, MARGARET, Ph.D. (Indiana Univ.)
Assistant Professor


WILLIAMS, CHARLES


, M.D. (University of Florida)


Associate Professor and Chief
ZORI, ROBERTO T., M.D. (Odense University)
Assistant Professor


rr -








GRAHAM-POLE, JOHN, M.D.,
(St. Bartholomews Hospital, London)


Professor


& Associate Director


CHRISTENSEN, ROBERT, M.D. (Columbia University)
Professor and Chief
CHIU, THOMAS T. W., M.D. (Univ. of Hong Kong)


KEDAR, AMOS, M.D. (Hebrew University
Assistant Professor


- Israel)


MEHTA, PAULETTE S., M.D. (University of Louvain
Professor and Acting Chief
PITEL, PAUL A., M.D. (Brown University)
Assistant Professor/Jacksonville /Nemours


Immunology, Infectious Diseases
and Allergy


AYOUB, ELIA M., M.D. (American Univ. of Beirut)
Distinguished Service Professor and Chief
BARRETT, DOUGLAS, M.D. (Univ. of South Florida)
Eminent Scholar and Chairman
HUANG, SHIH-WEN, M.D. (National Taiwan Univ.)
Professor
MOYER, SUE A., Ph.D. (Columbia University)
Professor
PARYANI, SHARON, M.D. (University of Florida)
Associate Professor/UFHSCJ


RATHORE, MOBEEN, M.D. (King Edward's
College)


Medical


Assistant Professor and Acting Chief/UFHSCJ
REUMAN, PETER, M.D. (Univ. of Chicago)
Associate Professor
RYAN-POIRIER, KATHLEEN, M.D. (University of
Massachusetts)
Assistant Professor
SLEASMAN, JOHN, M.D. (Univ. of Tennessee)
Associate Professor and Chief

Medical Education


Professor and Associate Chairman


UFHSCJ


COOPER, REBECCA, M.D.(SUNY-Downstate)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
CUEVAS, DANILO C., M.D. (Far Eastern University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
CUEVAS, LILLY L., M.D. (Far Eastern University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
DRUMMOND, WILLA H., M.D. (Univ. of Pennsylvania)
Professor
EITZMAN, DONALD V., M.D. (Univ. of Iowa)
Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus
ENGELHARDT, ELIZABETH, M.D. (Washington Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor
EYLER, FONDA, Ph.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Associate Professor
FREEDMAN, STEVE A., Ph.D. (Florida State Univ.)
Associate Professor and Director
GARRISON, R. DONALD, M.D. (Univ. of North
Carolina)
Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
HUTCHINSON, ALASTAIR A., M.B.Ch.B.
(Univ. of Aberdeen, Scotland)
Associate Professor


KIRK, JAMES


D.O. (Philadelphia College of


Osteopathic)
Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics/UFHSCJ
KNIGHT, MATTHEW, M.D. (Univ. of Iowa)
Assistant Professor
LEDBETTER, SANDRA J., M.D. (Univ. of Washington)
Visiting Assistant Professor
LI, YAN, PhD. (West China Univ. for Medicine)
Research Assistant Professor
MARTINEZ-CRUZ, MARIA D., M.D. (University of
Puerto Rico)


VAN MIEROP, LODEWYK, M.D. (State Univ. of Leiden)
Graduate Research Professor
ARRAY, VICTORIA C., M.D. (Univ. of Central America)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
DAVID JR., JOSEPH K., M.D. (Duke University)
Visiting Clinical Professor/UFHSCJ
SCOTT, KAMELA K., Ph.D (Univ. of North Texas)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ


Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
NEU, JOSEF, M.D. (Univ. of Wisconsin)
Professor
OHLS, ROBIN, M.D. (University of Utah)
Assistant Professor
RAWLINGS, D. JAMES, M.D. (University o
Clinical Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
RESNICK, MICHAEL B. (Univ. of Florida)


Professor


Neonatology


ALANA, CARLOS, M.D. (Univ. de Montemorelos)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
BEHNKE, MARY LOU, M.D. (University of Florida)
Associate Professor
BUCCIARELLI, RICHARD, M.D. (Univ. of Michigan)
Professor and Associate Chairman


REYES-LEE, MARTHA E., M.D. (Univ. of El Salvador)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
ROTH, JEFFREY, Ph.D. (University of Florida)
Research Assistant Professor
SHARMA, RENU, M.B.B.S. (H.P. Medical College, Simla)
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
VAUGHN, ARTHUR J., 111, M.D. (Ohio State Univ.)
Associate Professor/ UFHSCJ


Utah)









Nephrology


FENNELL, ROBERT S., III, M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Professor/Director of Pediatrics Dialysis Unit
LEVIN, SIDNEY, M.D. (Baylor)
Professor and
Program Director/Jacksonville/Nemours
MASSENGILL, SUSAN, M.D. (East Carolina Univ.)
Assistant Professor
NEIBERGER, RICHARD, M.D. (Univ. of Louisville)
Associate Professor


RICHARD, GEORGE A.,


M.D. (Univ. of Pittsburg)


Professor and Chief
TOLAYMAT, ASAD, M.D. (Damascas School of
Medicine)


Professor and Chief


/UFHSCJ


Neurology


LEGARDA, STELLA, M.D. (St. Louis University)
Assistant Professor
MARIA, BERNARD L., M.D. (Univ. of Sherbrooke,
Canada)
Associate Professor and Chief
MUIR, DAVE, Ph.D. (Mt. Sinal School of Medicine)
Assistant Professor
ROSS, JOHN J., M.D. (Harvard University)
Professor and Program Director
PRICE, MORRIS, M.D. (Emory University)
Visiting Clinical Associate Professor

Pulmonary


BROWN, DANIEL
Assistant Professor


., M.D. (Univ. of South Carolina)


CHESROWN, SARAH, M.D. (Med.


College of


Virginia)
Associate Professor
SHERMAN, JAMES M., M.D. (Univ. of South Florida)
Associate Professor and Chief
V1SNER, GARY, D.O. (Michigan State Univ.)
Assistant Professor
WAGNER, MARY H., M.D. (University of Florida)
Assistant Professor

Community Physicians at
After Hours Clinic


ANDERSEN, TORSTEN, M.D. (University of Florida)
Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor
BANKS, JUDITH, M.D. (University of Chicago)
Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor


DELL, GEORGE A., M.D. (St. Louis University)
Adjunct Clinical Professor
FORTUNATO, ROSARIO, M.D. (University of Florida)
Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor
HELLRUNG, JOHN M., M.D. (Univ. of South Florida)
Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor
KERNS, SUSAN F., M.D. (University of Virginia)
Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor
LANDAY, STEPHEN E., M.D. (Univ. of Pittsburgh)
Adjunct Clinical Professor
MILLA, PAULINA, M.D. (De Universided El Salvador)
Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor
PASHAYAN, MARK, M.D. (Bowman Gray School of
Medicine)
Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor
SARANTOS, KATHERYN, M.D. (University of Florida)
Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor
SENATOR, LAURA J., M.D. (University of Rochester)
Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor
SANDERS, SANDY K., M.D. (University of Florida)
Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor
TUMARKIN, LISA C., M.D. (University of Florida)
Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor
WORTHINGTON, NANCY, M.D. (East Virginia School
of Medicine)
Adjunct Clinical Assistant Professor
ZAVELSON, THOMAS M., M.D. (Duke University)
Adjunct Clinical Professor


PHARMACOLOGY & THERAPEUTICS

* BAKER, STEPHEN P., Ph.D. (University of Aston)
Professor and Chairman
BORST, STEPHEN E., Ph.D. (UCLA)
Assistant Professor
* CREWS, FULTON T., Ph.D. (University of Michigan)
Professor
* GARG, LAL C., Ph.D. (University of Florida)
Professor
* GUZMAN, NICOLAS J., M.D.
(Cayetano Heredia University, Peru)
Assistant Professor
* HARRISON, JEFFREY K., Ph.D. (Univ. of Michigan)
Assistant Professor
JONES, HAZEL C., Ph.D. (University of Hull)
Research Professor
* KEM, WILLIAM R., Ph.D. (University of Illinois)
Professor
* MAREN, THOMAS H., M.D. (Johns Hopkins)
Graduate Research Professor
* MEYER, EDWIN M., Ph.D. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech.)
Associate Professor
-* 'f*r T -r-rr rn r r. m r T't.t S A I,* fl fli r^ iT 1 t T \








* PAPKE, ROGER L., Ph.D. (Cornell University)
Assistant Professor
* ROSS, WARREN E., M.D. (University of Florida)
Professor and Executive Associate Vice President
* ROWE, THOMAS C., Ph.D. (University of Florida)
Associate Professor
* SCARPACE, NIHAL T., Ph.D. (Hacettepe Univ.,
Turkey)
Associate Professor
* SCARPACE, PHILIP J., Ph.D. (Univ. of Rochester)
Professor
* SHIVERICK, KATHLEEN T., Ph.D. (Univ. of Vermont)
Professor
* SILVERMAN, DAVID N., Ph.D. (Columbia University)
Professor and Professor of Biochemistry and Molecular
Biology
* TU, CHINGKUANG, Ph.D. (University of Miami)
Associate Scientist

PHYSIOLOGY


* ANDERSON, PETER A., Ph.D. (St. Andrews Univ.,


Scotland)
Professor


* CASSIN, SIDNEY, Ph.D. (Univ. of Texas-Galveston)


Professor


CASTRO, MARIA I., Ph.D. (Wake Forest University)
Assistant Scientist
* FREGLY, MELVIN J., Ph.D. (University of Rochester)
Graduate Research Professor
GELBAND, CRAIG J., Ph.D. (University of Miami)


Assistant Professor
* GERENCSER, GEORGE A.,


Professor


Ph.D. (Indiana University)


* JAEGER, MARC J., M.D. (Univ. of Berne, Switzerland)
Professor
* KALRA, PUSHPA S., Ph.D. (University of Delhi)
Professor
* OTIS, ARTHUR B., Ph.D. (Brown University)
Professor Emeritus
* PHILLIPS, M. IAN, D.Sc. (Univ. of Birmingham,
England)
Professor and Chair
* POSNER, PHILIP, Ph.D. (SUNY-Downstate)


Professor


PSYCHIATRY


BARNARD, GEORGE W., M.D. (Univ. of North Carolina)
Professor Emeritus


BARNES, ALAN J.,


M.D. (McGill University)


Clinical Associate Professor
BAXTER, ALIX LOVITZ., M.D. (Univ. of North Carolina)
Clinical Associate Professor
* BLASHFIELD, ROGER K., Ph.D. (Indiana University)


Professor of Clinical Psychology


in Psychiatry and


Professor of Clinical Psychology
BOTIOM, WAYNE D., P.A.C., M.P.H. (Univ. of Alabama)
Joint Associate Professor/Associate Professor and
Program Director Physicians Assistant Program
BUSSING, REGINA, M.D. (Justus Liebig Univ., Giessen)
Assistant Professor
BYERLY, MATTHEW J., M.D. (University of Arizona)
Clinical Fellow/Instructor
CHEONG, JOSEPHA A., M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Fellow/Instructor
CHRISTENSEN, RICHARD C., M.D. (Wright State Univ.)
Assistant Professor
DELGADO, EMILIANO, M.D. (Havana University)
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
EVANS, DWIGHT L., M.D. (Temple Univ.)
Professor and Chairman and
Joint Professor of Medicine and Neuroscience


GAROFALAKIS, MARY


S., M.A. (Univ. of Florida)


Assistant in Psychiatry
GARY, FAYE H., ED.D. (University of Florida)
Joint Professor of Psychiatric Nursing in
Psychiatry/Professor of Nursing
GEFFKEN, GARY, Ph.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Associate Professor of Clinical Psychology in
Psychiatry
GETTES, DAVID R., B.S. (University of Vermont)
Assistant in Psychiatry
GOBLE, LARRY K., M.S.W. (Ohio State University)
Associate in Psychiatry
GOLD, MARK, S., M.D. (University of Florida)
Joint Professor
GOODMAN, WAYNE K., M.D. (Boston University)
Professor


GREER, RICHARD
Assistant Professor


M.D. (Univ. of Florida)


* RAIZADA, MOHAN K., Ph.D. (Univ. of Kanpur, India)
Professor and Associate Dean for Grad. Education
* STAINSBY, WENDELL N., Sc.D. (Johns Hopkins Univ.)
Professor
* STEVENS, BRUCE R., Ph.D. (U. of Calif.-Los Angeles)
Associate Professor
* SUMNERS, COLIN, Ph.D. (U. of Southampton, England)
Professor
* WOOD, CHARLES E., Ph.D. (U. of Calif.-San Francisco)


HARRIS, HOPE E., Ph.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant in Psychiatry
HERBLY HAZEM, M.D. (Aleppo Univ. Medical School)
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
HERKOV, MICHAEL J., Ph.D. (Auburn University)
Assistant Professor of Clinical Psychology
in Psychiatry
HILL, SUSAN M., RN, MSN, ARNP (Florida State Univ.)
Associate in Psychiatry









JOHNSON, SUZANNE B., Ph.D. (SUNY-Stony Brook)
Joint Professor in Psychiatry/Professor of
Clinical Psychology and Director for Pediatric
Psychology Research
KEMPH, JOHN P., M.D. (Ohio State University)
Professor and Chief of Child Psychiatry
KULDAU, JOHN M., M.D. (Case Western Reserve)
Professor and Director of Education
LENOX, ROBERT H., M.D. (University of Vermont)
Professor
LEONARD, CHRISTIANA M., Ph.D. (MIT)
Affiliate Professor of Neuroscience in
Psychiatry / Professor
of Neuroscience
LEWIS, MARK H., Ph.D. (Vanderbilt University)
Associate Professor
MANDOKI, MIGUEL, M.D. (Univ. Autonoma de Mexico)


STEWART, RONALD B., M.S. (University of Florida)
Joint Professor of Pharmacy Practice in Psychiatry/
Professor and Chairman of Pharmacy Practice
SUMNER, GAYLA, Ph.D. (Florida State University)
Associate In Psychiatry/UFHSCJ
SZLABOWICZ, JERZY W., M.D.
(Acad. of Med., Gdansk, Poland)
Assistant Professor/VAMC
TUETH, MICHAEL J., M.D. (Univ. of Illinois)
Assistant Professor/VAMC
VERA, MARIA I., M.S.W., Ph.D. (Florida State Univ.)
Associate Professor of Social Work in Psychiatry
VOELLER, KYTJA K.S., M.D. (Columbia Univ.)
Associate Professor of Neurology in Psychiatry
WATSON, DAVID G., Ph.D. (Ohio State University)
Assistant Scientist


Associate
Associate


Professor and Chief /UFHSCJ and
Professor of Pediatrics/UFHSCJ


RADIATION ONCOLOGY


MAPLE, MARILYN J., Ph.D. (University of Florida)
Courtesy Instructor/Coordinator of Educational Media
MARCHESE, MICHAEL J., M.D. (Columbia Univ.)
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
MARTIN, CAMILO, M.D.
(Univ. of Autonoma de Santo Domingo)
Clinical Assistant Professor/VAMC
MAURER, RALPH G., M.D. (Yale University)
Associate Professor and Chief, Child Inpatient Service
McELROY, ROSS A., JR., M.D. (Univ. of Texas)
Associate Professor and Chief, Adult Out-patient Clinic
MILLER, ERNEST C., M.D. (Tulane University)
Clinical Assistant Professor and Associate Chair/
UFHSCJ
MORRIS, MARCIA R., M.D. (Yale University)
Clinical Assistant Professor
MUNIZ, CARLOS E., M.D. (Havana Univ. Med. Center)
Professor
MURPHY, TANYA, M.D. (University of Florida)
Instructor
MYERS, WADE C., M.D. (Temple University)
Assistant Professor
PERRY, NATHAN W., JR., Ph.D. (Florida State Univ.)
Affiliate Professor of Clinical Psychology in
Psychiatry/Professor and Chair of Clinical
Psychology
PETITTO, JOHN M., M.D. (UNC/Chapel Hill)
Assistant Professor
PLUTZKY, MAX, M.D. (Havana Univ. Medical Sch.)
Professor Emeritus
RADELET, MICHAEL L., Ph.D. (Purdue University)
Professor of Sociology in Psychiatry/
Professor of Sociology
RAND, COLLEEN S. W., Ph.D. (Stanford University)
Accnriaft o grtin*ic+ n Pc,,rhint-r,


AMORNMARN, RUMPA, M.D. (Siriraj Med. School)
Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
BOVA, FRANCIS J., Ph.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Professor
BUATTI, JOHN M., M.D. (Georgetown University)
Assistant Professor
CRAIG, RENE, M.S. (Georgia Institute of Technology)
Assistant in Radiology
FREEMAN, DEBRA, M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant Professor
LIU, CHIHRAY, Ph.D. (Univ. of Nebraska)
Assistant Professor
MACK, YVONNE, M.D. (Bowman-Gray School of
Medicine)
Assistant Professor
MARCUS, ROBERT B., JR., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Professor
MENDENHALL, NANCY P., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Associate Professor and Chair
MENDENHALL, WILLIAM M., M.D. (U. of South
Florida)
Professor
MILLION, RODNEY R., M.D. (Indiana University)
Professor Emeritus
MITCHELL, THOMAS P., M.S. (Louisiana Poly. Univ.)
Assistant in Radiology
PALTA, JATINDER, Ph.D. (University of Missouri)
Associate Professor
PARSONS, JAMES T., M.D. (Duke University)
Professor
PREMPREE, THONGBLIEW, M.D., Ph.D.
(Sariraj Med. Sch., Thailand)
Professor and Associate Chair/UFHSCJ
SOMBECK MICHAEL D. (Southern Illinois Univ.)
* A *y ~ r








FOTOPOULOS, JOHN P., M.D. (Tufts University)
Clinical Professor/UFHSCJ
GRANTHAM, JAMES R., M.D. (Univ. of Virginia)
Assistant Professor/VAMC
HAWKINS, IRVIN F., JR., M.D. (Univ. of Maryland)
Professor and Chief, Interventional Radiology
HONEYMAN, JANICE C., Ph.D. (Kansas State Univ.)
Associate Professor
HUDA, WALTER, Ph.D. (University of London)
Associate Professor


KAUDE, JURI V., M.D
Professor Emeritus


RADIOLOGY


ABBITT, PATRICIA L., M.D. (Tufts Univ.)
Associate Professor and Director, Ultrasound
AGEE, 0. FRANK, M.D. (L.S.U.-New Orleans)
Professor
ANDREW, E. RAYMOND, Ph.D. (Cambridge, England)
Graduate Research Professor
BALLINGER, J. RAY, M.D. (University of Miami)
Assistant Professor
BOOTH, ROBERT P., M.D. (Medical College of Georgia)
Assistant Professor of Radiology/UFHSCJ
BRADSHAW, JAMES A., M.D. (Med. Col. of Virginia)
Clinical Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
BRATEMAN, LIBBY, Ph.D. (University of Florida)
Associate Professor
BRIGGS, RICHARD W., Ph.D. (University of Arkansas)
Associate Professor


BURTON. SHARON


S., M.D. (Univ. of N.C.


- Chapel Hill)


Assistant Professor
BUSH, CHARLES H., M.D. (Mount Sinal)
Assistant Professor
BUTLER, ROBERT T., JR., M.D, Ph.D (Medical Univ. of
South Carolina)
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
CARIDI, JAMES G., M.D. (University of Florida)
Assistant Professor


CARRUTHERS, CATHERINE, M.D.


(Indiana Univ.


School of Medicine)


Instructor


CLAYMAN, DAVID


A., M.D. (Wright State Univ.)


Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
CLORE, FORREST C., M.D. (University of Michigan)
Associate Professor/VAMC
CUMMING, WILLIAM A., M.D. (Univ. of Toronto)
Professor
DRANE, WALTER E., M.D. (Emory Univ.)
Professor, Director, Nuclear Medicine
FAGIEN, MICHAEL, M.D. (Univ. of Florida)


., Ph.D. (University of Kiel)


KERNS, SCOTT R., M.D. (Univ. of Virginia)
Assistant Professor
KUPERUS, JOHN H., Ph.D., R.Ph.
(Pacific Western Univ.)
Radiopharmacist
LACY, GEORGE D., M.D. (Univ. of South Alabama)
Clinical Associate Professor of Radiology/UFHSCJ


LANIER, LINDA,


M.D. (University of Florida)


Associate Professor


MANCUSO, ANTHONY


A., M.D. (Univ. of Miami)


Professor
MAO, JINTONG, Ph.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Res. Assistant Professor


MASTIN, SUZANNE T., M.D. (Univ.


of Florida)


Assistant Professor


MAUDERLI, WALTER, D.Sc.


(Fed. Inst. of Technology)


Professor Emeritus
MERGO, PATRICIA J., M.D. (Univ. of South Florida)
Assistant Professor
MILLER, ROBERT I., M.D. (Hahnemann Medical College)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ


MLADINICH, CHRIS, D.V.M.
Assistant Scientist/VAMC


(Univ. of Georgia)


MONTGOMERY, WILLIAM J., M.D. (U. of Chicago)
Associate Professor and Director, Musculoskeletal
Radiology
MURAKAMI, MARCIA E., M.D. (Chicago Med. School)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
NORTHUP, H. MARTIN, M.D. (Univ. of Arkansas)
Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
PETERS, KEITH R., M.D. (Univ. of Virginia)
Assistant Professor
PETTIGREW, JAMES C., JR., D.M.D. (Univ. of S.C.)
Associate Professor
QUISLING, RONALD G., M.D. (Univ. of Wisconsin)
Professor
ROS, PABLO R., M.D. (Universitat Autonoma de
Barcelona)
Professor and Director, Abdominal Imaging and
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
SANFORD, E. DONALD, JR., B.S. (Univ. of Alabama)
Assistant in Radiology
SCHUTZ. GEORGE F., M.D. (University of Oklahoma)








SHUKLA, SHAILENDRA S., Ph.D. (Ohio University)
Research Assistant Professor/VAMC
STAAB, EDWARD V., JR., M.D. (Univ. of Minnesota)
Professor and Chairman
STEINBACH, BARBARA G., M.D. (Univ. of Pittsburgh)
Associate Professor and Director, Mammography
STEINBACH, JEHUDA J., M.D.
(Johannes Gutenburg, West Germany)
Clinical Associate Professor/VAMC
TORRES, GLADYS M., M.D. (Univ. of Puerto Rico)
Associate Professor
VINES, FREDERICK S., M.D. (University of Virginia)
Professor and Associate Chairman/UFHSCJ
WATTS, DAVID C., M.D. (University of Texas)
Instructor
WILF, LARRY H., M.D. (Medical College of Penn.)
Assistant Professor and Program Director/UFHSCJ
WILLIAMS, CLYDE M., M.D., Ph.D. (Baylor University
[M.D.]; Oxford, England [Ph.D.])
Professor Emeritus
WILLIAMS, JONATHAN L., M.D. (Thomas Jefferson)
Professor and Chief Pediatric Radiology and
Associate Chairman
WYNN, GREGORY C., M.D. (Univ. of South Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ


SURGERY


Emergency Medicine


AUGENSTEIN, LYNN, M.D. (Ohio State Univ.)
Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
DIXON, E. HOWARD, 111, M.D. (Univ. of Georgia
Assistant Professor of Surgery/UFHSCJ
FUERST, RONNIE S., M.D. (Tulane Univ.)
Assistant Professor
HARWOOD-NUSS, ANN L., M.D. (University of Ic
Professor and Program Director for Graduate
Medical Education/ UFHSCJ
IDRIS, AHAMED H., M.D. (Rush Medical College)
Associate Professor
JAGODA, ANDY S., M.D. (Georgetown University
Assistant Professor of Surgery/UFHSCJ
JOSEPH, MADELINE M., M.D. (Tichreen Univ., Sy
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
KUNISAKI, THOMAS A., M.D. (Chicago Medical Sc
Visiting Clinical Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
L1, SERGIO, M.D. (University of Miami)
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
LIGHT, JENNIFER K., M.D. (Univ. of Tenn.)
Clinical Assistant Professor
LUETKE, CHARLES W., M.D. (Univ. of Wisconsin


ORBAN, DAVID J., M.D. (St. Louis University)
Associate Professor and Chief
PETERS, CARL W., M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor
RODENBERG, HOWARD D., M.D. (Univ. of Missouri)
Associate Professor
SHEPHERD, SUZANNE M., M.D. (Georgetown Univ.)
Associate Professor of Surgery/UFHSCJ
STENKLYFT, PHYLLIS, M.D. (Louisiana State Univ.)
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
VUKICH, DAVID J., M.D. (University of Colorado)
Associate Professor and Division Chief /UFHSCJ
WEARS, ROBERT L. (Johns Hopkins)
Associate Professor/UFHSCJ


General Surgery


BOWERS, GARY JOHN, M.D. (University of Miami
Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
COPELAND, EDWARD M., III, M.D. (Cornell Univ.)
The Edward R. Woodward Professor and Chairman
DENNIS, JAMES, M.D. (Indiana Univ.)
Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
FLYNN, TIMOTHY C., M.D. (Baylor University)
Professor/VAMC, Chief of Surgery/VAMC
FRYKBERG, ERIC R., M.D. (Med. College of Virginia)
Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
HARWARD, TIMOTHY RS., M.D. (Duke University)
Associate Professor
HOCKING, MICHAEL P., M.D. (Univ. of Michigan)
Associate Professor/VAMC
HOWARD, RICHARD J., M.D., Ph.D. (Yale University)
Professor


)


HUBER, THOMAS S., M.D. (Univ. of Michigan)
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
IMAMI, EMRAN, M.D. (University of Florida)
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
LAMPARD, SIMON D., M.D. (Univ. of Washingtor
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
LIND, DAVID S., M.D. (Eastern V. Medical School)


owa)


a)

ria)


hool)


1)


Assistant Professor
MOLDAWER, LYLE L, Ph.D. (Univ. of Gothenbery)
Associate Professor
PFAFF, WILLIAM W., M.D. (Buffalo University)
Professor and Director, Transplantation Program
REED, ALAN I., M.D. (Cornell University)
Assistant Professor
ROUT, W. ROBERT, M.D. (University of Louisville)
Associate Professor
SEEGER, JAMES M., M.D. (Medical College of Georgia)
Professor/VAMC
VAUTHEY, JEAN-NICOLAS, M.D., Ph.D. (Lausanne
Univ. Medical School)
A ckitant Prnfcpqnr


)


Assistant Professor


n








VOGEL, STEPHEN B., M.D. (Un
Professor


diversity of Florida)


WOODWARD, EDWARD R., M.D. (Univ.
Professor Emeritus


Urology


of Chi


ALLEN, REGINALD A., M.D. (Univ of Wisconsin)


Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ


Pediatric Surgery

KAYS, DAVID W., M.D. (Northwestern
School)


Assistant Professor


COHEN, MARC S., M.D.


V. Medical


(Univ. of Texas)


Associate Professor
DRYLIE, DAVID M., M.D. (Bowman Gray
Professor and Chief


EPSTEIN HOWARD B., M.D. (Univ.


Associate


of Florida)


Professor


LANGHAM, MAX, JR., M.D. (Johns Hopkins Sch. of
Medicine)


Associate Professor


LEDBETTER, DANIEL J., M.D. (University of Florida)
Assistant Professor
MOLLITT, DANIEL L., M.D. (St. Louis University)
Professor/UFHSCJ and Associate Professor of
Pediatrics/UFHSCJ


TALBERT, JAMES L.,


M.D. (Vanderbilt)


Professor and Chief and Professor of Pediatrics
TEPAS, JOSEPH J., III, M.D. (Georgetown University
Professor and Associate Chair/UFHSCJ
and Professor of Pediatrics/UFHSCJ

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery


NARAYAN, PERINCHERY, M.B.B.S., (St. John's


Medical College-India)
Professor and Chief
NEWMAN, ROBERT C.,


M.D. (Oklahoma University)


Associate Professor


SWARTZ, DOUGLAS A.,


M.D. (University of Texas)


Associate Professor and Chief/ UFHSCJ
WAJSMAN, LEW, M.D. (Hadassah Medical School)
Professor
WALKER, R., DIXON, 111, M.D. (University of Miami)
Professor of Surgery and Pediatrics


Courtesy Faculty

ANATOMY AND CELL BIOLOGY


BINGHAM, HAL G., M.D. (University of Kansas)
Professor and Chief
CAFFEE, H. HOLLIS, M.D. (University of Florida)
Professor and Chief /VAMC
PHILLIPS, JAMES W., M.D. (Univ. of Louisville)
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ
SEAGLE, MICHAEL B., M.D. (Vanderbilt University
Assistant Professor
THEOPHELIS, LEE G., M.D. (Univ. of Michigan)
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ


Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery


LAWLESS, JOHN
Professor


, M.D., Ph.D. (Univ. of Chicago


SHIRK, PAUL D, Ph.D. (Texas A


Associate


& M University)


Professor


ANESTHESIOLOGY


ANDERSON, MARK D., M.D. (Darthmouth)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
ANDREWS, THOMAS W., M.D. (Univ. of Illinois)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando


ANGERT, KEVIN


C., M.D. (Northeastern Ohio Univ.)


Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando


, M.D. (Duke University)


Professor and Chief and Professor of Pediatrics
BRIDGES, CHARLES R., M.D. (Harvard University)
Assistant Professor/UFHSCJ


CEITHAML, ERIC L., M.D. (Case


Western Reserve)


Associate Professor and Chief /UFHSCJ
EDWARDS, FRED H., M.D. (Univ. of Kentucky)
Associate Professor/UFHSCJ


GREENE, MICHAEL
Assistant Professor


A., M.D. (Univ. of Missouri)


KNAUF, DANIEL G., M.D. (Northwestern University)
Associate Professor
MARTIN, TOMAS D., M.D. (Univ. of Texas)
Associate Professor/VAMC, Chief of Surgery
PFTRQnM PTrC-An I M D (Mav Mpdical Schnol)


ARCARIO, THOMAS J., M.D. (Univ of Rochester)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
BENEKEN, JAN E. W., Ph.D.
(State Univ., Utrecht, Holland)
Professor
BLACKSHEAR, ROBERT H., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Sandy, Utah
BRESSON, VICTOR L., M.D. (Univ. of Minnesota)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
CARLSEN, JAMES, M.D. (Wright State Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
CHAPMAN, ROY L., JR., M.D. (Univ. of Tennessee)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
CHEN, AVIS SHIRLEY, M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Nemours/lacksonville


ALEXANDER, JAMES








DAVIS, STEPHEN B., M.D. (Univ of Nebraska)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
DENISCO, RICHARD A., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Winter Park
DESAUTELS, DAVID A., M.P.A. (Nova University)
Assistant in Anesthesiology/Gainesville
DOBSON, CHRISTOPHER E., II, M.D. (Baylor Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
DOUGLAS, MICHAL E., M.D. (Univ. of Arizona)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Boone, N.C.
GALLO, JOSEPH A., JR., M.D. (State Univ. of New York)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
GRAVENSTEIN, DIETRICH, M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
GUSKIEWICZ, ROBERT A., M.D. (Univ. of Pittsburgh)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Winter Park
HELFFRICH, RICHARD A., M.D. (Univ of Nevada)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Nemours/Jacksonville
HONSKA, MARK E., (Univ of Oklahoma)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
HOUSE, JEFFREY T., M.D. (Univ. of Chicago)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
JAMES, JOHN M., JR., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando, FL
KRUSE, JOHN C., M.D. (George Washington Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
KUNICHIKA, ERIC T., M.D. (University of Hawaii)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
LEIGHTY, SCOTT J., M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
MERRELL, WALTER J., M.D. (Vanderbilt University)
Clinical Associate Professor
MURRY, IVES P., M.D. (George Washington Univ.)
Assistant Professor/Denver, CO
NOEL, THEODORE, A., 11, M.D. (Loma Linda Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
PALMIRE, VINCENT C., JR, M.D. (Baylor Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Ocala
PARKER, JERRY A., B.S. (University of Florida)
Assistant in Anesthesiology/ Gainesville
RILEY, JAMES L. M.D. (Loma Linda Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
ROSS, NORMAN L., M.D. (University of Miami)
Clinical Instructor/Venice
STEPHENS, PATRICIA CAMPBELL, M.D. (LSU)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Nemours/Jacksonville
STONE, DENNIS R., M.D. (Univ of Miami)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Nemours/Jacksonville
TAINSH, ROBERT E., M.D. (Brown University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
THONI, KEVIN P., M.D. (Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
VENUS, BAHMAN, M.D. (University of Jandi)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville


WILSON, G. EDWIN, M.D. (University of Louisville)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando

COMMUNITY HEALTH AND FAMILY MEDICINE

ACHOLONU, FELIX, M.D. (Downstate Medical Center)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
ANDERSON, MERRILL A., M.D. (Thomas Jefferson Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
BEACH, THOMAS B., M.D. (University of Wisconsin)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
BIGGERSTAFF, JAMES R., M.D. (Louisiana State Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville/SVMC
BURKE, CHARLES H., M.D. (Emory University)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
BUSH, CLINTON G., M.D. (Columbia University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
CARTER, ANN D., M.D. (Louisiana State University)
Clinical Instructor/Jacksonville
CHAMBON, GREGORY, M.D. (Univ. of Missouri)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
CHODOSH, LANCE I., M.D. (Georgetown Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor
COOPER, GARY R., M.D. (Tulane University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
DeFORD, JAMES, M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville
EAGLSTEIN, N. FRED, D.O.
(Univ. of Health Sciences, Col. of Osteopathic Med.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
FOSTER, FRANK D., M.D.
(American Univ. School of Medicine)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
GIBSON, JOHN O., M.D. (Univ. of Texas)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
GIURATO, GERALD A., M.D. (Ohio State University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
HONIGMAN, JOSEPH, M.D. (Jefferson Med. College)
Clinical Professor/Gainesville
HUNTER, OREGON K., M.D. (Univ. of California)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
JANOUSEK, JAMES M., M.D. (Loyola Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Live Oak
JERNIGAN, JAMES A., M.D. (Washington Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville
KURITZKY, LOUIS, M.D. (Medical College of Virginia)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
LANE, TIMOTHY T., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor
LARIMORE, WALTER L., M.D. (LSU)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Kissimmee
LEVY, NORMAN S., M.D. (Case Western Reserve)
Clinical Associate Professor/Lake City
McINTOSH, BRUCE J., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
-- - **- -* *1*







MEDLEY, EVAN SCOTT, M.D. (Univ. of Kentucky)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
POLLOCK, BRUCE D., M.D. (Univ. of Miami)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
RAINS, CAROLINE S., M.D. (Univ. of South Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
RAY, BELTON CRAIG, JR., M.D. (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville/SVMC
ROGERS, BRUCE J., M.D. (SUNY, Downstate)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
ROZBORIL, MICHAEL B., M.D. (Blackburn College)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
SELANDER, GUY T., M.D. (New Jersey Med. College)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
TARRANT, DARRELL G., M.D. (Univ. of Kentucky)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
UPSHAW, THOMAS S., M.D. (Univ. of Chicago)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
VAUGHEN, JUSTINE L., M.D. (Temple University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
WAGNER, JAMES T., Ph.D. (University of Florida)
Assistant Professor/Gainesville
ZALMAN, BARRY, D.O. (Univ. of Health Science
College of Osteopathic Medicine)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville


MEDICINE


GREENWOOD, SCOTT D., M.D. (Washington 1
Clinical Assistant Prof./Orlando Regional Med
GROSS, HOWARD E., M.D. (Univ. of Nebraska
Clinical Assistant Prof./Orlando Regional Med.
HERRADA, RAUL J., M.D.
(Univ. of Santiago de Compostela, Spain)
Clinical Instructor/Orlando Regional Med. Ce'
HESS, DAVID S., M.D. (Duke University)


Jniv.)
. Ctr.
i)
. Center


enter


Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
IRA, GORDON H., JR., M.D. (Duke University)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
JOHNSON, MELVIN J., III, Ph.D. (Tufts Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando Regional Med. Ctr.
McINTOSH, HENRY D., M.D. (University of Penn.)
Clinical Professor/Lakeland
LLIFF, BENJAMIN C., jr., M.D. (Med. Col. of Ga.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
PARTAIN, JONATHAN 0., M.D. (Vanderbilt Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando Regional Med. Ctr.
ROARK, STEVEN F., M.D. (Duke Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
SAHAB, JOSEPH G., M.D. (French Faculty of Medicine)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Leesburg
SCHONBERG, ALLAN, M.D. (George Washington Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
SEALS, ALLEN A., M.D. (Medical College of Georgia)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
SILVERSTEIN, BURTON V., M.D. (Univ. of Pa.)


Cardiology


ANDERSON, GEORGE A., M.D. (Bowman Gray)
Clinical Professor/Jacksonville
ANDREWS, JOHN W., M.D, (Emory University)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
BAKER, ROY M., M.D. (Emory University)
Clinical Professor/Jacksonville
BAKER, SCOTT, M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
BEACH, THOMAS B., M.D. (University of Wisconsin)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
BURNS, MARSHALL A., M.D. (Tulane University)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
CHINOY, DAVID A., M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
COOPER, GARY R., M.D. (Tulane University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
CURRY, R. CHARLES, M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando, FL
DILLON, MICHAEL C., M.D. (Univ. of Kentucky)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
EL SHAHAWY, MAHFOUZ, M.D. (Vienna Med. Sch.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Sarasota
FLEMING, JACK W., M.D. (Emory University)
Clinical Associate Professor/Pensacola
GILBERT. CLARENCE M., M.D. (Univ. of Pennsylvania)


Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
SOLER, RAUL D., M.D. (University of Havw
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
TAUSSIG, ANDREW S., M.D. (Emory Univ
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando


ana)


ersity)


VAN CLEVE, ROBERT B., M.D. (Columbia University)
Clinical Professor/Jacksonville
VLIETSTRA, RONALD E., M.D. (Otago Medical School)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville, FL
WAINWRIGHT, W. RANDOLPH, M.D. (Med. Col. of Ga.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
WEINSTEIN, IRWIN R., M.D. (SUNY-Buffalo)
Clinical Instructor/Orlando
WHITWORTH, HALL B., JR., M.D. (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando


Dermatology

ARAUJO, OSCAR, Ph.D. (Purdue University)
Clinical Professor/Gainesville
BROWNLEE, RICHARD, M.D. (Univ. of North Carolina)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
BOUDREAUX, CLARENCE E., M.D. (LSU)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
CHILDERS, RICHARD C., M.D. (Univ. of Rochester)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
COGNETTA, ARMAND B., M.D. (Univ. of Connecticut)


I








HESKEL, NEIL S., M.D. (Univ. of Pennsylvania)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Vero Beach
HONIGAN, JOSEPH, M.D. (Jefferson Medical College)
Clinical Professor/Philadelphia, PA
MILLNS, JOHN L., M.D. (Ohio State University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Tampa
POULOS, EVANGELOUS, M.D. (University of Miami)
Clinical Professor/Ft. Lauderdale
SLAZINSKI, LEONARD, M.D. (Jefferson Med. Col.)
Clinical Instructor/Sarasota
SLOAN, KENNETH, Ph.D. (Univ. of North Carolina)
Assistant Professor/Gainesville
SMITH, EDWARD W.P., M.D. (Ohio State Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
STOER, CHARLES B., M.D. (Louisiana State Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
TRIMBLE, JAMES W., M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
UNIS, MARK E., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Instructor/Ft. Lauderdale
WILKERSON, RUTH C., M.D. (Med. Col. of Va.)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville


Endocrinology and Metabolism

COBLE, YANK D., JR., M.D. (Duke University)
Clinical Professor /Jacksonville
CROCKETT, SAMUEL E., M.D. (Ohio State Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando Regional Med. Ctr.
KNIZLEY, HOMER, JR., M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville
LONDONO, JAVIER H., M.D. (Univ. of Antioquia)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
MONTGOMERY, CHARLES T., M.D. (Univ. of Miami)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
OATES, THOMAS W., M.D. (Ohio State University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Lakeland
ROBERTS, VICTOR L., M.D.
(Autonomous Univ. Guadalajara)
Clinical Instructor/Orlando Regional Med. Center
THOMAS, WILLIAM C., JR., M.D. (Cornell University)
Clinical Professor


Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition

BAUMGARTNER, THOMAS G., Pharm. D.
(University of the Pacific)
Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville
BONE, FRANK C., M.D. (Boston Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
BORLAND, JAMES L., JR., M.D. (Johns Hopkins)
Clinical Professor/Jacksonville
BUELOW, ROBERT G., M.D. (Temple University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville


KANNER, ROBERT S., M.D. (Creighton University)
Clinical Instructor/Jacksonville
KRAMER, DEAN C., M.D. (University of Missouri)
Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville
LANGFITT MURRY L., M.D. (University of Iowa)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
MORRIS, WALTER E., JR., M.D. (Univ. of Alabama)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
SHAH, GAURANG N., M.B.B.S. (Baroda Med. Col., India)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
TEK, HONG TAING, M.D. (Univ. of Phnom-Penh)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
UHLEMANN, EDWARD R., M.D. (Johns Hopkins)
Clinical Instructor/Orlando Regional Med. Center
WIDNER, VICTOR R., M.D. (Kansas Univ. Sch. of Med.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville

Internal Medicine


ALLEN, MARY LYNN, M.D. (Univ. of Missouri)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville, FL
ANDERSON, RICHARD M., M.D. (Emory Universi
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
BRASHEAR, BILLY, M.D. (University of Louisville)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
BROOKS, ROBERT G., M.D. (Wayne State Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/Orlando, FL
COLLINS, MICHAEL, M.D. (Univ. of Miami)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando Regional Med.
CONLIN, MARY M., B.S.N. (Boston College)
Assistant In/Gainesville, FL
CUNNINGHAM, RICHARD W., M.D. (Univ. of Flor
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
DEAL, WILLIAM B., M.D. (Univ. of North Carolina


ty)


ida)


)


Clinical Professor
EMMEL, G., LEONARD, M.D. (University of Penn.)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
FADEM, JEROLD J., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Associate Professor/Orlando
FALK, JAY L., M.D. (SUNY-Brooklyn)
Clinical Associate Professor/Orlando
FRENCH, KATHRYN K., M.D. (Univ. of Tennessee)
Clinical Instructor/Trenton
GAGNIER, DOROTHY R., Ph.D. (Univ. of Michigan)
Assistant Professor/Gainesville
HALE, WILLIAM E., M.D. (Medical College of Virginia)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Dunedin
HARRISON, I. BARNETT, M.D. (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Tallahassee
HOFFMAN, NANNETTE B., M.D. (Albany Medical Col.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
HOLCOMB, ALLEN K., M.D. (Emory Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
JONES, STEVEN C., M.D. (Emory Univ.)







NELSON, JOHN R., M.D. (Bowman Gray)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
PALMER, ROBERT, JR., M.D. (Tulane University)
Clinical Associate Professor/Pensacola
PICKERING, MICHAEL J., M.D. (University of Fl
Clinical Associate Professor/Tampa
ROBERT, VICTOR B., M.D. (Buenos Aires Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
ROSENBERG, STEPHEN J., M.D. (Univ. of
Pennsylvania)
Clinical Associate Professor/Orlando
SAAVEDRA, OSWALD T., M.D. (Moscow Univer
Clinical Instructor/Orlando
SLATON, ROBERT C., M.D. (University of Florid;
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
TEW, FRANKLIN T., M.D. (Univ. of North Caroli
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
VARRAUX, ALAN R., M.D. (Temple Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
WEBB, MICHAEL J., M.D. (University of Miami)
Clinical Instructor/Winter Park
WEIGEL, WALTER W., M.D. (Emory University)
Clinical Instructor/Palatka
YOUNG, MARTIN D., Sc.D. (Johns Hopkins)
Research Professor/Gainesville


MANSHEIM, BERNARD, M.D. (Univ. of Wisconsin)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
MAUCERI, ARTHUR A., M.D. (Georgetown Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
SIEGER, BARRY, M.D. (Boston Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando

Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology


orida)






sity)


a)


CALDWELL, JACQUES R., M.D. (Johns Hopkins)
Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville
FRIEDLAENDER, SIDNEY, M.D. (Wayne State Univ.)
Clinical Professor/Gainesville
KOHEN, MICHAEL D., M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Daytona Beach
PRAVDA, JAY, M.D. (University of Puerto Rico)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
STROUD, ROBERT M., M.D. (Harvard)
Clinical Professor/Ormond Beach
THOBURN, ROBERT, M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville


na)


Hematology


ABRAMSON, NEIL, M.D. (Albert Einstein)
Clinical Professor/Jacksonville
ANDERSON, AXEL, III, M.D. (Univ. of Buffalo)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando Regional Med. Ctr.
BROWN, CLARENCE H., III, M.D. (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando Regional Med. Ctr.
DUNN, PHILIP H., M.D. (Duke University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando Regional Med. Ctr.
MARKS, ALAN R., M.D. (Univ. of Brussels, Belgium)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
PAWLIGER, DAVID F., M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
SIDDIQUI, TARIQ, M.D. (Dow Medical College,
Pakistan)
Clinical Professor/Jacksonville
TROTTER, GEORGE S., M.D. (University of Maryland)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
WHITTINGTON, RICHARD M., M.D. (Jefferson)
Clinical Professor


Infectious Disease

BROOKS, ROBERT, G., M.D. (Wayne University)
Clinical Associate Professor/Orlando Regional Med. Ctr.
CLUFF, LEIGHTON E., M.D. (George Washington Univ.)
Clinical Professor/Gainesville, FL
FI FTCHER. R AN. M.D. (American Univ.- of Beirut)


Oncology

CUSUMANO, CHARLES L., M.D. (Georgetown Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville
HARRIS, JAMES N., M.D. (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/West Palm Beach
KENTRO, TENNEY B., M.D. (George Washington Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
McKEEN, ELISABETH A., M.D. (Albany Med. College)
Clinical Assistant Professor/West Palm Beach
ROTHSCHILD, NEAL E., M.D. (New Jersey Med. Sch.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/West Palm Beach
STECHMILLER, BRUCE K., M.D. (Johns Hopkins)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville


Nephrology


FINLAYSON, GORDON C., M.D. (Univ. of Flor
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
FULLER, THOMAS J., M.D. (Northwestern Uni
Clinical Associate Professor/Ocala
TARRANT, DARRELL G., M.D. (Kentucky Med.
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville, FL


ida)


versity)

School)


PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT PROGRAM


BUERK, CHARLES A., M.D. (Case Western Reserve
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando, FL
BURNISON, THOMAS B., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Navarre, FL
CAMPBELL, WAYNE E., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assisant Professor/Crestview, FL
CONKLIN, JULIE M., P.A., M.H.S. (Duke Univ.)








DeORIO, KEITH, M.D. (George Washington Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville, FL
FLYNN, TIMOTHY C., M.D. (Baylor Univ.)
Professor of Surgery/Gainesville, FL
HELBAOUI, AMER, M.D. (Damascus Univ., Syria)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville, FL
HENDERSON, WILLIAM N., M.D. (Duke Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Dowling Park, FL
HOFFMAN, NANNETTE B., M.D. (Albany Med. College)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville, FL
JOHNSON, WILBUR L., P.A. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville, FL
LITTLES, ALMA B., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Quincy, FL
MENNELLA, ANTHONY, P.A.(Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville, FL
NESMITH, MARCH A., JR., M.D. (Duke Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville, FL
NITA, NIPONT, M.D. (Chulalongkorn Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville, FL
PARARO, LUTHER L., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Tallahassee, FL
PERCY, KEVIN D., P.A. (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant In/Ponte Vedra, FL
RUBIN, JEFFREY, M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Micanopy, FL
QUINTERO, STEPHEN M.,M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Tallahassee, FL
RACHESKY, INGRID J., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Panama City, FL
TENNANT, JUANITA D., P.A. (Univ. of Alabama)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville, FL
THIGPEN, RAMON L., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Crestview, FL
THOMAS, RONALD G., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville, FL
UNDERKOFLER, JANET F., P.A. (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant In/Jacksonville, FL

Pulmonary

AUERBACH, DAVID, M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
GREENBERG, ROBERT A., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
HELLARD, DONALD W.
Assistant in Medicine/Gainesville
HERRAN, JUAN J., M.D., (Univ of Puerto Rico)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
JACKLER, IRA M., M.D. (University of Oklahoma)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
McLEOD, IAN, M., B.S. (Ball State Univ.)
Assistant in Medicine/Gainesville
NEDER, GEORGE A., M.D. (Emory Univ.)


NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY


BOGGS, J. SCOTT, M.D. (University of Michigan)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
CAUTHEN, JOSEPH C., Ill, M.D. (Duke University)
Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville
FREEMAN, JAMES V., JR., M.D. (Univ. of Tennessee)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
GARCIA-BENGOCHEA, FRANCISCO, M.D. (Tulane)
Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus/Gainesville
GOMEZ, JAIME G., M.D. (National Univ. of Columbia)
Professor/Gainesville
HUDSON, CALVIN H., M.D. (University of Tennessee)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
KAPLAN, BARRY J., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Ocala
LOHSE, DEAN C., M.D. (University of Minnesota)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
MAULDIN, RONALD L., M.D. (University of N.C.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
MOZINGO, JAMES P., M.D. (Univ. of Mississippi)
Clinical Associate Professor
REID, STEVEN A., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor of Neurosurgery
SCOTT, THOMAS E., M.D. (Univ. of Tennessee)
Clinical Professor/Daytona Beach
SPEIGELMANN, ROBERTO, M.D. (Univ. of Uruguay)
Clinical Assistant Professor
TWEED, CLYDE G., M.D. (Duke Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/Daytona Beach
WHANG, CHOONG JIN, M.D. (Seoul National Univ.)
Clinical Professor
ZENGEL, JANET B., Ph.D. (Univ. of Miami)
Associate Professor/Gainesville


NEUROSCIENCE


* KING, MICHAEL A. Ph.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant Research Scientist of Neuroscience
NICHOLLS, ROBERT D., Ph.D. (University of Oxford)
Assistant Professor Neuroscience
WARNER, JOSEPH J., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant Professor of Neuroscience
* ZENGEL, JANET E., Ph.D. (Univ. of Miami)
Associate Professor of Neuroscience and
Neurological Surgery


OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY

ANTONETTI, EMILIO A., M.D. (Texas Tech)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Pensacola
BAIRD, TIM, M.D. (Univ. of Texas-Galveston)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
BANCROFT, JOE W., JR., M.D. (University of Miami)








BOOTHBY, RICHARD A., M.D. (Univ. of South Florida)
Clinical Associate Professor/Orlando
BUJNOSKI, JOANNE L., D.O. (Univ of Osteopathic
Medicine & Surgery, Des Moines)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Pensacola
BUSH, SUZANNE Y., M.D. (Univ. of
Alabama / Birmingham)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Pensacola
BYERS, JOHN W., M.D. (Univ. of North Carolina)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
CARLAN, STEPHEN J., M.D. (Med. College of Georgia)
Clinical Associate Professor/Orlando
CASTALDO, THOMAS, M.D. (Cornell Univ. Med. Ctr.)
Clinical Associate Professor/Orlando
CHRISTIAN, SAMUEL, M.D. (Med. College of Georgia)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
COUCH, GORDON T., M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Pensacola
DOCKERY, J. LEE, M.D. (Univ. of Arkansas)
Clinical Professor/Evanston, Ill.
DRURY, KENNETH C., Ph.D. (Univ. of Geneva,
Switzerland)
Clinical Assistant Professor
FERGUSON, KAREN L., M.D. (Univ. of Missouri)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Melbourne
FRANZEN, LENNART E., M.D., Ph.D. (Linkoping
Univ. Medical School)
Clinical Associate Professor/Sweden
FRIEDLINE, DAVID P., M.D. (Temple University)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
GLENN, J. EUGENE, M.D. (Univ. of North Carolina)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
GRABER, BENJAMIN, M.D. (Texas Tech)
Clinical Associate Professor/Tallahassee/Coral Springs
GRANZIG, WILLIAM ARON, Ph.D. (Loyola Univ.)
Clinical Professor/Jacksonville
HALL, DOUGLAS C., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Associate Professor/Ocala
HAYES, JAMES FRANKLIN, JR., M.D. (Univ. of Tenn.)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
HORAN, CHAS A., III, M.D. (Temple Univ)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Pensacola
JAFFE, SHARON B., M.D. (Albert Einstein Col.
of Medicine)
Clinical Associate Professor/Orlando
KHAW, PENG T., M.D. (Southampton University)
Clinical Associate Professor/London
KIRBY, TAYLOR H., JR., M.D. (George Washington Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville
LUKOWSKI, MICHAEL J., M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor
MAYER, GEORGE L., M.D. (University of Arkansas)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
MAYS, STRICKER C., M.D. (University of Alabama)


McNEILL, H. WYATT, M.D. (University of Miami)
Clinical Professor/Jacksonville
MEEKS, RITA A., M.D. (Medical Univ. of South Carolina)
Clinical Assistant Professor
MILLER, HERMAN, JR., M.D. (University of Miami)
Clinical Instructor/Jacksonville
MOJADIDI, QUADRATULLAH, M.D. (Kabul Univ.)
Clinical Professor/Jacksonville
MYERS, RICHARD L., M.D. (Med. College of Georgia)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
OBERDORFER, PAUL W., M.D. (Tulane University)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
PACK, NORMAN W., M.D. (University of Kansas)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
PAULK, WILFORD, M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
PHELAN, TIMOTHY M., M.D. (Georgetown Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
PLATOCK, GERALD M., M.D. (Med. College of Georgia)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
PYLE, ROBERT C., M.D. (Univ. of Miami)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Pensacola
QUIGLEY, MARTIN M., M.D. (Georgetown Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/Pensacola
QUINLAN, RAYMOND W., M.D. (Hahnemann
Medical Colllege)
Clinical Associate Professor/Birmingham, Alabama
RODRIGUEZ, JAMIE J., M.D. (Univ. Autonoms de
Guadajara)
Clinical Associate Professor/Pensacola
ROSIN, ALEXANDER P., M.D. (Tulane University)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
RUST, WILBUR C., M.D. (Albany Medical College)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
SAGER, NEIL, D.O. (Col. of Osteopathic Med. & Surg.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
SCHOENFELD, ORENE, M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville
SEKINE, KENNETH M., M.D. (Autonoma Univ., Mexico)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
SHAYKH, MARWAN M., M.D. (American Univ.
of Beirut)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
SMITH, KARL, M.D. (Northwestern Univ. Med. School)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
TUCKER, ELISABETH D., M.D. (Univ. of South Alabama)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Pensacola
TURNER, DAVID A., M.D. (Med. College of Georgia)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Pensacola


OPHTHALMOLOGY

ADAMS, CHARLES, JR., M.D. (Emory Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
A T r7 n 1TTflV T AKLT T 'I J t t-^ TT *-----I-------------* 1 ^









BOWDEN, FRANK, Ill, M.D. (Meharry Med. College)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
DONOVAN, JOHN P., M.D. (Albany Medical College)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
HERED, ROBERT W., M.D. (Univ. of Indiana)
Assistant Professor/Nemours/Jacksonville
LAMBROU, FRED H., M.D. (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
LESSNER, ALAN M., M.D. (Albany Medical College)
Clinical Assistant Professor
LEVENSON, JEFFREY H., M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Instructor/Jacksonville
NICOLITZ, ERNST, M.D. (University of New Mexico)
Clinical Professor/Jacksonville
POGREBNIAK, ALEXANDER E., M.D. (Univ. of
Michigan)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Nemours/Jacksonville
ROSE, HOWARD N., M.D. (Chicago Medical School)
Clinical Professor/Jacksonville


MAZUR, JOHN M., M.D. (Univ of Pittsburgh)
Clinical Associate Professor/Nemours/Jacksonville
McCLUSKEY, WILLIAM P., M.D., (Univ. of
Pennsylvania)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Nemours/Jacksonville
McLEOD, WILLIAM P., M.D. (Georgetown)
Clinical Assistant Professor


MESSIEH, SAMUEL S., M.D., F.R.C.S
Univ. Medical School)


.(C) (Dalhousie


Clinical Assistant Professor


PATRICK, CHRIS (Eastern Kentucky Univ.)
Assistant in Orthopaedics
SHAARA, RICHARD B., M.D. (University of Texas)
Clinical Assistant Professor
TESSLER, RICHARD H., M.D. (Univ. of Miami)
Clinical Assistant Professor/New Smyrna Beach
TODD, ETHAN O., M.D. (Med. Col. of South Carolina)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
WHITAKER, DALE, M.D. (Univ. of South Florida)


STAMAN


, JAMES A.,


M.D. (Temple University)


Clinical Instructor/Jacksonville


Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville


OTOLARYNGOLOGY


ORTHOPAEDICS


BITTAR, EDWARD S., M.D. (Temple Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/Palm Bay
BLOOMBERG, MARK S., M.D. (Purdue Univ.)
Affiliate Professor
CUMMINGS, ROBERT J., M.D. (Queens Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Nemours/Jacksonville
FIPP, GEORGE J., M.D. (Indiana University)
Clinical Instructor/Jacksonville
FRY, RICHARD M., M.D. (Temple University)
Clinical Associate Professor
GILLESPY, THURMAN, JR., M.D. (Jefferson Med. Col.
Clinical Instructor/Daytona Beach
GREIDER, JACK L., M.D., JR., (Medical College of
Wisconsin)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
HAHN, GEORGE A., JR., M.D., (Temple Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Nemours/Jacksonville
HOCKER, JOHN, M.D. (University of Kansas)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
HOGSHEAD, HOWARD P., M.D. (University of Iowa)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
HUTTON, PATRICK M., M.D. (NY Medical College)
Clinical Instructor/Jacksonville
KANELL, DANIEL R., M.D. (Univ. of Pittsburgh)
Clinical Associate Professor


KLEINHANS, ROBERT J., M.D. (Univ. of Louisville)
Clinical Instructor/Jacksonville
LANCASTER, STEVEN J., M.D. (Med. Col. of Virginia)
Clinical Instructor/Jacksonville
1 fI\JTflV Tfl-TIM P TT \A f (T Tnirwrhcirw nf T1lnr>sl


ATKINS, JAMES S., M.D. (University of Florida)
Assistant Professor
BECKER, FERDINAND F., M.D. (Tulane School of Med.)
Clinical Assistant Professor
DUBBIN, CLIFFORD B., M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
EARLY, STEPHEN V., M.D. (Univ. of Virginia)
Clinical Assistant Professor
FARRIOR, RICHARD T., M.D. (Duke University)
Clinical Professor/Tampa
FOOTE, PERRY A., JR., M.D. (University of Florida)
) Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
GARLINGTON, JAMES C., M.D. (Yale University)
Clinical Associate Professor
MARCUS, M. JEFFERY, M.D. (Univ. of Virginia)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Inverness
MOKRIS, MICHAEL S., M.D. (University of Cincinnati)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
REESE, BRADLEY R., M.D. (Temple University)
Clinical Assistant Professor
) SELTZER, H. MICHAEL, JR., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Daytona Beach


SMITH, LARRY N.,


M.D. (University of Tenn


essee)


Clinical Assistant Professor
STUBBS, WILLIAM K., M.D. (Tulane Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor
WALKER, JAMES H., M.D. (University of Alabama)
Assistant Professor


PATHOLOGY








CHAN, MING SAN, Ph.D. (Polytechnic Inst. of
Brooklyn)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
CHARLTON, RONALD K., Ph.D. (Univ. of N.C.)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
CUDDEBACK, JOHN K., M.D. (Indiana Univ.)


Assistant Professor/Gainesville
FLORO, BONIFACIO T., M.D. (Univ. of Ea
Magsaysay)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
GOLDSTEIN, JEFFREY D., M.D. (Emory U
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
HAMILTON, WILLIAM F., M.D. (Univ. of
Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville
HUMES, JAMES J., M.D. (Jefferson Medica
Clinical Professor/Jacksonville
JENKINS, STEPHEN G., Ph.D. (University


,st Roamon


university)

Miami)

1 Col.)

of Vermont)


Associate Professor/UFHSCJ
KEITT, ALAN S., M.D. (Harvard Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor
LIPKOVIC, PETER, M.D. (Univ. of Beograd,
Yugoslavia)
Clinical Professor/Jacksonville
MULLEN, S. ALLEN, M.D. (Univ. of South Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
MULLEN, SANFORD A., M.D. (Columbia University)
Clinical Professor/Jacksonville
REDFERN, NANCY L., M.D. (Duke University)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
RYDEN, SALLY E., M.D. (Univ. of Michigan)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
SMITH, DENNIS M., JR., M.D. (Univ. of Tenn.)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville


PEDIATRICS

ALEXANDER, GREGOR, M.D. (Juveriana University)
Clinical Associate Professor/Longwood
ARN, PAMELA H., M.D. (University of Virginia)


Clinical
AXLEY,
Clinical
BALLET
Clinical
BAKER,
Clinical


Assistant Professor/Jacksonville/Nemours
JOHN, M.D. (University of Maryland)
Assistant Professor/PEP/Pensacola
, LAURA LYONS, Ph.D. (Northwestern Univ.)
Assistant Professor/Jacksonville/ Nemours
ROY M., M.D. (Emory University)
Professor/Jacksonville


BLOOM, FREDERICK L., M.D. (Medical Colllege of
Wisconsin)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Sarasota
BORGER, JAMES A., M.D. (Univ. of Tennessee)
Clinical Associate Professor of Pediatrics and Surgery/
Jacksonville/Nemours
BRIGHT, GEORGE M., M.D. (Univ. of Connecticut)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville/Nemours
BRILL, THOMAS M., M.D. (University of Michigan)
Clinical Professor / Gainesville
BULLARD, JOHN F., JR., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/PEP/Pensacola
CHEEK, JAMES W., M.D. (Univ. of North Carolina)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
CHEN, AVIS S., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and
Anesthesiology/Jacksonville/Nemours
CHIARO, JOSEPH, M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Associate Professor/Orlando
CLEMENT, STEPHEN P., M.D. (Harvard Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Sarasota
CLUBBS, ROGER C., M.D. (University of Arkansas)
Clinical Assistant Professor/PEP/Pensacola
COHAN, ROBERT H., M.D. (Univ. of North Carolina)
Clinical Associate Professor/PEP/Pensacola
COLYER, ROBERT F., JR., M.D. (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
COMMINS, STEPHEN, M.D. (SUNY-Buffalo)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville/Nemours
CONDRON, COLIN J., M.D. (University of Dublin)
Clinical Professor and Department Chair/Orlando
CUMMINGS, ROBERT J., M.D. (Med. Col. of Georgia)
Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and
Orthopaedics/Jacksonville/Nemours
DAVID, CLIFFORD B., M.D. (Duke University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville/Nemours
DAVID, JOSEPH K., M.D. (Duke University)
Clinical Professor/Jacksonville
DEEB, LARRY, M.D. (Emory University)
Clinical Professor/Tallahassee


DESROSIERS, PAUL M., M.
Clinical Professor/Orlando
DOKLER, MARYANNE L.,
Clinical Assistant Professor
Surgery/Jacksonville / Nem
ESCHENBURG, CHARLES


D. (Univ. of North Carolina)

M.D. (Creighton Univ.)
of Pediatrics and
ours
,M.D. (Univ. of Colorado)


BARRAZA, MARK A., M.D. (Univ. of Mississippi)
Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and Surgery/
Jacksonville/Nemours
BARTLETT, JOHN, M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Fort Myers
BELL, WILLIAM R., M.D. (Duke University)
Clinical Professor/Director of
Pediatric Services/PEP/Pensacola
nfl. rrra ,.- fl-I* Ir flY-i nr n T* g nn- in i r /f 1 I T *-----------


Clinical Assistant Professor/Delray Beach
EVANS, JONATHAN S., M.D. (Cornell University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville/Nemours
FINDLAY, PRENTISS E., M.D. (Emory University)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville/Nemours
FRANKLIN-BERNARD, WENDY ANN, M.D. (Johns
Hopkins)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Pensacola
~nT-7rlnw ir?\/'rn nflr flm't' xA X fl t I \ T.^-;A .^ I T.i.ir








GAYLE, MICHAEL O., M.D. (Univ. of the West Indies)
Associate Professor of Pediatrics/ UFHSCJ
GEORGE, DONALD E., M.D. (SUNY at Buffalo)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville/Nemours
GILLIS, HARRY G., M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Associate Professor/Daytona Beach
GINTER, MYRNA B., M.D. (University of Havana)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
GIUSTI, VINCENT F., M.D. (Univ. of Pennsylvania)
Clinical Associate Professor/Orlando
GRANAT, LLOYD E., M.D. (SUNY-Downstate)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
GROSS, SAMUEL, M.D. (University of Rochester)
Professor Emeritus/Orlando
GOODE, JANET C., M.A. (Univ. of Florida)
Instructor
GOWDA, NARAYANA, M.D. (Bangalore Medical Coll.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Atlantis
GUTTERY, EDWIN III, M.D. (University of Louisville)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Fort Myers
HADERO, AYELE, M.D. (Addis Ababa University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville


HELFRICH, RICHARD


A., M.D. (Univ. of Nevada)


Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and
Anesthesiology/Jacksonville/Nemours
HERED, ROBERT W., M.D. (Indiana Univ. School of Med.)
Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and
Ophthalmology/Jacksonville/Nemours
HORN, KENNETH A., M.D. (N.Y. Univ. School of Med.)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
HSIANG, HELEN Y., M.D. (National Taiwan Univ.)


LAFER, DENNIS J., M.D. (Columbia Col. of Phys. and
Surgs.-N.Y.)
Clinical Associate Professor of Pediatrics and
Surgery/Jacksonville/Nemours
LANE, JOHN G., JR., M.D. (George Washington Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
LASPADA, ANTHONY, M.D. (University of Bologna)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
LAZOFF, STEPHEN, M.D. (Boston Univ. Sch. of Med.)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
LIPMAN, BRIAN, M.D. (Univ. of the Witwatersrand)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
MADDERN, BRUCE R., M.D. (Tulane University)
Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and
Surgery/Jacksonville / Nemours
MANKINEN, CARL B., M.D. (Univ. of California)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville/Nemours
MARRIOT, HENRY J., M.D. (Oxford University)
Clinical Professor/St. Petersburg
MAZUR, JOHN M., M.D. (Univ. of Pittsburgh)
Clinical Associate Professor of Pediatrics and
Orthopaedics/Jacksonville/Nemours
McCLUSKEY, WILLIAM P., M.D. (Univ. of Penn.)
Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and
Orthopaedics/Jacksonville /Nemours
McINTOSH, CHARLES B., M.D. (Meharry Medical Col.)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
McREYNOLDS, JOHN W., M.D. (Univ. of Oklahoma)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
McWILLIAMS, NEIL E., M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Associate Professor/PEP/Pensacola


Clinical Assistant Professor/Gulf Breeze
INGLE, ERON B., M.D. (Tulane Medical School)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Louisiana
JENKINS, THOMAS G., M.D. (Univ. of Nebraska
Clinical Assistant Professor/PEP/Pensacola


MIGNEREY, THOMAS


G., M.D. (Ohio State Univ.)


Clinical Assistant Professor/PEP/Pensacola
MORGAN, WILLIAM C., M.D. (University of Florida)
) Clinical Assistant Professor/Sarasota


NADKARNI, SHAILAJA


S., M.D. (Univ. of Indore)


JONES, JIMMY E., M.D. (University of Tennessee)
Clinical Assistant Professor/PEP/Pensacola
JONGCO, GERMELINA R., M.D. (Univ. of Santo Tomas)
Clinical Assistant Professor/PEP/Pensacola
JOYCE, MICHAEL J., M.D. (St. Louis University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville/Nemours
KAYS, MAUREEN A., M.D. (Northwestern Univ.)
Clinical Instructor
KELLY, WALTER C., M.D. (Temple University)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville


Clinical Associate Professor/Orlando
NATHANSON, IAN T., M.D. (SUNY at Buffalo)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville/Nemours
O'DANIEL, JOSEPH R., M.D. (Univ. of Kentucky)
Clinical Instructor/Pensacola
OSTRER, HARRY, M.D. (Columbia University)
Clinical Associate Professor
PATTERSON, TODD, D.O.(College of Osteopathic
Medicine and Surgery)
Clinical Associate Professor/Tallahassee


KIRK, JAMES J.,


D.O. (Philadelphia College of


PENA-ARIET, OLGA P., M.D.


Osteopathic)
Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics/UFHSCJ
KNICKERBOCKER, DONALD E., M.D. (Univ. of
Michigan)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Michigan
KOHLER, WILLIAM C., M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Accnrintp Prnfccanr/Tallahacc~


(Universidad Central del Este)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville/Nemours
PICARDI, MERCEDES E., M.D. (Univ. of Puerto Rico)
Clinical Assistant Professor/PEP/Pensacola
PICKENS, JAMES C., M.D. (University of Alabama)
Clinical Assistant Professor/PEP/Pensacola
PIOCRFRBNAK. ALEXANDER F. M.D. (UJniv. of








POLLACK, MICHAEL, M.D. (Albert Einstein)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
POTTER, MARTHA N.,M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Associate Professor
POWERS, DAVID W., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Associate Professor
PRICE, MORRIS, M.D. (Emory University)
Visiting CLinical Associate Professor
PRYOR, NORMAN D., M.D. (University of Missouri)
Clinical Professor/Orlando
RAMOS, AGUSTIN, M.D. (University of Barcelona)
Clinical Associate Professor/Orlando
RAPTOULIS, ARTHUR, M.D. (SUNY-Brooklyn)
Clinical Professor/Orlando
REDD, HENRY J., M.D. (Johns Hopkins)
Clinical Associate Professor/Lakeland
RINEY, THOMAS D., M.D. (Loma Linda Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor
RITROSKY, JOHN, JR., M.D. (SUNY-Syracuse)
Clinical Associate Professor/Fort Myers
ROBINSON, DAVID, M.D. (Vanderbilt University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
RONGSTAD, MERIEL S., M.D. (Univ. of Wisconsin)
Clinical Assistant Professor
ROSENBERG, STEVEN, M.D. (SUNY-Brooklyn)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
SALLENT, JORGE, M.D. (Central Escolar Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor
SHANKS, DANIEL E., M.D. (Univ. of Virginia)
Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and
Neurology/Jacksonville/Nemours
SIGNER, RICHARD D., M.D. (Chicago Medical School)
Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville
SKINNER, RICHARD G., M.D. (Emory University)
Clinical Professor/Jacksonville
SMALLWOOD, DONALD, M.D. (Indiana Med. School
Clinical Assistant Professor
SMITH, EDWARD W. P., M.D. (Ohio State Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
SNODGRASS, GREGORY D., M.D. (West Virginia Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
SOUD, GARY G., M.D. (Univ. of Barcelona)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
STEPHENS, PATRICIA C., M.D. (Louisiana State Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and
Anesthesiology/Jacksonville/Nemours
STEVENS, PETER S., M.D. (Emory University)
Clinical Associate Professor of Pediatrics and
Surgery/Urology/Jacksonville/Nemours
STONE, DENNIS R., M.D. (University of Miami)
Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics
and Anesthesiology/Jacksonville/Nemours
TAN, LUKAS H., M.D. (University of Airlangga)
Assistant Professor of Pediatrics/UFHSCJ
f-^ T^nr ,*'/.rr nr-/ nrT-M*nrr. t I fl IT V / -V I I t. t _


TURK, WILLIAM R., M.D. (Case Western Reserve)
Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics and
Neurology/Jacksonville/Nemours
VINSON, ROBERT H., M.D. (Univ. of North Carolina)
Clinical Professor/Vero Beach
WALKER, JAMES W., M.D. (University of Tennessee)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
WEBB, HOWARD W., M.D. (Emory University)
Clinical Professor of Pediatrics and
Surgery/Jacksonville/Nemours
WELTY, PAUL B., M.D. (Tulane University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/St. Petersburg
WESTMARK, EDWARD R., M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Professor
WHITCOMB, JOHN H., M.D. (Harvard Med. School)
Clinical Professor/Pensacola
WHITNEY, RICHARD H., JR., M.D. (Univ. of Alabama)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Pensacola
WILEY, HENRY E., III, M.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Tampa
WIKINSON, ALBERT H., III, M.D. (Jefferson Med. Col.)
Clinical Professor of Pediatrics and
Surgery/Jacksonville / Nemours
WILKINSON, DIANE M., M.D. (Univ. of Mississippi)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Pensacola
WILSON, ROBERT K., M.D. (University of Alabama)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Pensacola
WOODWARD, PAT, M.D. (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor
WORRELL-WHTTE, CYNTHIA, M.D. (Univ. of Arkansas)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Pensacola
WUBBENA, PAUL F., JR., M.D. (Emory University)
Clinical Associate Professor/Jacksonville
VILEISIS, RITA A., M.D. (Northwestern University)
Associate Professor of Pediatrics/UFHSCJ


)


PSYCHIATRY


AMIEL, MICHAEL J., M.D. (Univ. of Montpelier)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
ASHAMALLA, MEDHAT G., M.D. (Univ. of
Alexandria, Egypt)
Clinical Assistant Professor/US Military Service
BORDINI, ERNEST J. (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
BUCHHOLZ, ROBERT A., M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Fort Myers
CASSISI, ELAYNE E., M.D. (University of Miami)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
CERRA-FERNANDEZ, DOMINGO, M.D. (University
of Guadalajara)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Ocala
COLAPELLE-SNODGRASS, NATALIE J., M.D. (West
Virginia Univ.)
rfl'I *rl-1 Ae n Prnr'^Tt T]fnfotnnrc /fl" tocAzillP


)









DIRECTOR, KENNETH L., M.D. (Albany Med. College)
Clinical Associate Professor/Vero Beach
FRANKEL, BERNARD L., M.D. (Albert Einstein
College of Medicine)
Clinical Professor/Orlando
FULLER, ARTHUR K. (Med. College of Georgia)
Clinical Associate Professor/Georgia
GELFAND, FRANCINE L., M.D. (New Jersey Col. of


Med.


& Dentistry


Clinical Assistant Professor/Leesburg
GFELLER, EDUARD, M.D. (Univ. of Bern, Switzerland)
Clinical Professor/Orlando


GIES, A. DENNIS, M


.A. (Ball State)


Clinical Instructor/ Gainesville
GOSSINGER, GARY T., M.D. (University of Michigan)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
GREENBERG, SAMUEL I. M.D. (Rush Medical Univ.
of Chicago)
Clinical Professor / Gainesville
HALL, RICHARD C.W., M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Professor/Orlando
HENDERSON, C. BROOKS, M.D. (Univ. of Penn.)
Clinical Associate Professor/ Gainesville
HERSHBERGER, EVE A., M.D. (Med. College of Georgia)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
HOLLIS, LYNNA G., M.D. (East Tennessee State)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
INNOCENT, ANTOINE J., M.D. (Sch. of Med. &
Pharm., Rep. of Haiti)
Clinical Instructor/Jacksonville
KANTER, GARY L., M.D. (University of Rochester)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
KOEHLER, SHIRLEY M., Ph.D. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
KOLIN, IRVING S., M.D. (SUNY-Upstate)
Clinical Associate Professor/Orlando
LANGEE, HARVEY R., M.D. (Stanford University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
LAPORTA, LAUREN D., M.D. (UMD/NJ)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
LEGUM, LOUIS, Ph.D. (Virginia Commonwealth Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
LEVAI, N4ARIAN A., M.D. (University of Michigan)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
LLINAS, JOSE J., M.D. (Havana Univ. Med. School)
Clinical Professor/Gainesville
LOBAO, CEISO B., M.D. (Michigan State Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Venice
LYLES, WILLIAM B., M.D. (Univ. of South Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
McELROY, LINDA P., Ph.D. (Catholic Univ. of America)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
McMAHON, ELIZABETH A., Ph.D. (Univ. of Florida)
(Thniril A cdclcm'n Prr/^^occnr /C4npci\7l11


MOSKOVITZ, RICHARD A., M.D. (Harvard)
Clinical Associate Professor/Ocala
NELSON, JOHN F., M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
NEWMAN, E. GUSTAVE, M.D. (Duke University)
Clinical Professor/Gainesville
RAISANI, KAMAL K., M.D., COL., U.S.A.F. (Dow
Medical)
Clinical Assistant Professor/San Antonio, TX
REID, PARLANE J., M.D. (University of Connecticut)
Clinical Associate Professor/Sarasota


SAPP, EVELYN D.,


J.D. (University of Florida)


Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
SARKIS, ELIAS H., M.D. (Faculte de Medicine, France)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
SHAW, THEODORE A., M.Ed. (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
STEIN, BARBARA A., M.D. (Univ. of South Florida)
Clinical Asssistant Professor/Palm Harbor
STEIN, JOEL M., M.D. (University of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
STEWART, JONATHAN T., M.D. (Univ. of South Florida)
Clinical Associate Professor/Bay Pines
STRAUSS, CYD C., Ph.D (Univ. of Georgia)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
SULLWOOD, ARTHUR F., M.D. (Louisiana State Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Ocala


TABOADA, VIOLA Y


., M.D. (Cebu Institute of


Technology)
Clinical Instructor/Crystal River
THOMPSON, JOHN W., JR., M.D. (Univ of Texas at
Galveston)
Clinical Assistant Professor/USAF
TINGLE, DAVID, M.D. (Univ. of Sheffield, England)
Clinical Associate Professor/Vero Beach
TURKAT, IRA D., Ph.D. (University of Georgia)
Clinical Associate Professor/Bradenton
VAUGHN, RUFUS M., M.D. (Medical College of
Alabama)
Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville
VERGARA, ALEJANDRO F., M.D. (Univ of Havana)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville


WALDMAN, ALAN


M.D. (Case Western Reserve)


Clinical Assistant Professor/Palm Harbor
WELLBORN, WALTER H., JR., M.D. (Emory Univ.)
Clinical Professor/Tarpon Springs
WHITE, CYNTHIA J., M.D. (Ohio State Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
ZEBOOKER, EDWARD B., D.O. (Phila. Col. of
Osteopathic Med.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Macclenny


RADIOLOGY




University of Florida Home Page
© 2004 - 2010 University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries.
All rights reserved.

Acceptable Use, Copyright, and Disclaimer Statement
Last updated October 10, 2010 - - mvs