• TABLE OF CONTENTS
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 Front Cover
 Copyright
 Title Page
 Front Matter
 Table of Contents
 Main
 Back Cover














Title: University record
ALL VOLUMES CITATION THUMBNAILS PAGE IMAGE ZOOMABLE
Full Citation
STANDARD VIEW MARC VIEW
Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00610
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: 1999
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00610
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Front Matter
        Page 2
        Page 3
    Table of Contents
        Page 4
        Page 5
    Main
        Page 6
        Page 7
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        Page 113
    Back Cover
        Page 114
Full Text










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We envision the University of Florida College of Medicine to be, and to be recognized


as, one of the leading


medical schools in the United


States.


We envision an institution deeply committed to excellence, quality and


scholarship in pursuit of its integrated educational, clinical and investigative mission. We envision a caring
environment filled with enthusiasm, intellectual ferment, mutual support, and pride in personal, departmental,
collegiate and university accomplishments.


The University of Florida College of Medicine is an equal opportunity employer within the meaning of Title VII
of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

For an application or further information please contact:
Office of Student Affairs, Box 100216, Health Science Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610
(352) 392-3097


* College of Medicine
Home page: www.med.ufl.edu


* Admissions


Home page: www.med.ufl.edu/admiss/
E-mail: robyn@dean.med.ufl.edu


* Student Affairs


* Student Financial


Services


Home page: www.med.ufl.edu/oea/osa/index.html
E-mail: rleacock@dean.med.ufl.edu


Home page: www.med.ufl.edu/oea/finaid
E-mail: eparris@dean.med.ufl.edu
















University


of Florida College of Medicine


1999 -


2000 Catalog


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STATE OF FLORIDA
Jeb Bush
Governor

BOARD OF REGENTS


Hon. Audrea I. Anderson
Ft. Myers
Hon. Julian Bennett, Jr.
Panama City
Hon. Charlton B. Daniel, Jr.
Gainesville


Hon. Tom Gallagher
Commissioner of Education, Tallahassee
Hon. James F. Heekin, Jr.
Orlando


Hon. Adolfo Henriques


Miami


Hon. Elizabeth G. Lindsay


Sarasota


Hon. Jon C. Moyle
West Palm Beach
Hon. Gwendolyn F. McLin
Vice Chairman, Okahumpka
Hon. Dennis M. Ross
Chairman, Seminole
Hon. Steven J. Uhlfelder
Tallahassee
Hon. Welcom H. Watson


Ft. Lauderdale


Adam W. Herbert, Ph.D.
Chancellor, State University System
Hon. Philip D. Lewis
Riviera Beach


Hon. Michelle C. Oyola
Student Regent, Boca Raton


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


John V. Lombardi, Ph.D.


President


Kenneth I. Berns, M.D., Ph.D.
Vice President for Health Affairs/


Dean, College of Medicine
Barbara Talmadge, A.M.
Registrar



MEDICAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION BOARD OF DIRECTORS
1998-99


Norman H. Anderson
Ocala/Class of 1981


Donnie Batie, M.D. (President)
Baton Rouge, LA/Class of 1979
Kenneth L. Berns, M.D., Ph.D.
Dean
Jean Cook, M.D.
Gainesville, FL/Class of 1983
John Downs, M.D.
Tampa, FL/Class of 1969
Lisa A. Farah, M.D.


Ricardo Gonzalez-Rothi, M.D.
Gainesville, FL/Housestaff 1982
J. Ocie Harris, M.D.
Gainesville, FL/Housestaff 1969
Peggy O'Neil Henderson, M.D.
Gainesville, FL/Class of 1978
Hugh M. Hill, M.D.
Associate Dean, Student-Alumni
Affairs
Randy Hobgood, M.D.
Pensacola, FL/Class of 1970


Charles Ozaki, M.D.
Lake City, FL/Class of 1960
Richard L. Parker, Jr., M.D.
Gainesville, FL/Class of 1965
Katherine Pierce, M.D.
Charlotte, NC/Class of 1982
Ed Schlein, M.D.
Leesburg, FL/Class of 1965
Russell C. Sklenicka, M.D.
Lakeland, FL/Class of 1973
Stuart Tullis, M.D.



























Shands Hospital at the University of Florida


University of Florida's Shands Cancer Center


Malcom Randall Veterans Affairs Medical Center
in Gainesville












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Shands-Jacksonville


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ABLE OF CONTENTS




6 The University of Florida
8 Academic Calendar
12 Dean's Staff
15 Department Chairmen

GENERAL INFORMATION
18 Students
20 Faculty
21 Research
21 Facilities
22 University of Florida Health Science Center-Jacksonville (UFHSC-J)
23 Community Medicine
23 Harrell Professional Development & Assessment Center

ACADEMIC INFORMATION
26 The Art and Science of Medicine
26 Admission Information
26 The Applicant Pool
27 Undergraduate Education
27 Medical College Admission Test
27 Application and Acceptance Procedures
27 Regular Admission
28 Junior Honors Medical Program
30 Program in Medical Sciences (PIMS)
30 Admission to the College of Medicine at an Advanced Standing Status
31 Professional Education Leading to the M.D. Degree
32 Preclinical (Years One and Two)
32 First Year
32 Second Year
32 Third Year
33 Fourth Year
33 Evaluation
35 Standards of Performance
36 Probation and Dismissal
38 Action of Probation
38 Appeals
38 Probation for Students Who Successfully Appeal Dismissal
38 Leave of Absences
40 Academic Honesty Guidelines
40 Health Science Center Student Conduct Standards Committee
41 Student Conduct Code
41 Violation of the Code of Conduct
43 Sexual Harassment Information and Procedures
qt11A l- rhllt h T-Jnolt b T1-TlZ; i-I- Trn cilrnnro 2nA Ternriinf-v













48 Graduate Education in the Medical Sciences
49 Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences
49 Interdisciplinary Ph.D./MBA Program
50 Ph.D. in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
50 M.S. in Biotechnology and the M.S./MBA Program
51 M.S. in Clinical Chemistry
51 Biomedical Engineering Program
51 Other Interdisciplinary Programs, Centers and Institutes
51 Medical Scientist Training Program (Combined M.D./Ph.D. Degree)
52 Graduate Medical Education (Residencies and Fellowships)
53 Licensure
53 Continuing Medical Education

STUDENT INFORMATION
54 Financial Considerations
54 Scholarships
56 Scholastic Awards
66 Loan Funds
62 Fellowships
63 Living Accommodations

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS
64 First Year
66 Second Year
67 Third Year
69 Fourth Year
70 Policy Statement on Completion of Course Work
71 Undergraduate Courses
73 Independent Interdisciplinary Major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

THE PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT PROGRAM
74 Admission
76 Expenses and Financial Aid
76 Health Policies
76 Academic policies
77 Graduation Requirements
77 Curriculum
78 Course Descriptions

ACADEMIC PERSONNEL
84 Faculty

STUDENTS








UNIVERSITY


OF


FLORIDA


MISSION


The University of Florida belongs to an ancient
tradition of great universities. We participate in an
elaborate conversation among scholars and students
that extends over space and time linking the experi-
ences of Western Europe with the traditions and his-
tories of all cultures, that explores the limits of the
physical and biological universes, and that nurtures
and prepares generations of educated people to
address the problems of our societies. While the
University of Florida recognizes no limits on its
intellectual boundaries, and our faculty and students
remain free to explore wherever the mind and imag-
ination lead, we live in a real world whose constraints
limit what we can do. Out of the conflict between our


universal intellectual aspirations


professional programs,


masters degree programs,


and the like. The University of Florida shares these


traditions. As


an American university, we have a


major commitment to undergraduate education as
the foundation of our academic organization and we
pursue graduate education for the Ph.D. as well as
many other graduate degrees in professional fields.
We are, in addition, a major public, compre-
hensive, land-grant, research university. Each of
these adjectives defines one of our characteristics,
and through frequent repetition, this description
takes on the style of a ritual incantation: rhythmic,
reverent, and infrequently examined. What, then,
does each of these key words mean?


and the limitations


of our environment,
university's goals.


comes


the definition of the


Major


Education


American colleges and universities share the
fundamental educational mission of teaching students.
The undergraduate experience, based in the arts and
sciences, remains at the core of higher education in
America. The formation of educated people, the
transformation of mind through learning, and the
launching of a lifetime of intellectual growth: these
goals remain central to every university. The under-
graduate foundation of American higher education
has grown more complex as the knowledge we
teach has grown more complex. Where once we had
a single track through the arts and sciences leading
to a degree, we now have multiple tracks leading to
many degrees in arts and sciences as well as in a
range of professional schools. Yet even with the
variety of degrees, American university undergrad-
uate education must rest on the fundamental
knowledge of the liberal arts and sciences.
In our academic world, we recognize two
rather imprecisely defined categories of higher edu-
cation: colleges and universities. The traditional
American college specializes in a carefully crafted
four-year undergraduate program, generally
I 1 1 .* 1 .1 1 .


Here, at the head of the list, we find one of our
most important aspirations. We will be, we must be,
and we are, a major university. We define ourselves
in comparison to the best universities. We need not
be the absolutely unambiguously best, but we must
be among the best universities in the world. Exact
ranking of the best universities is a meaningless
exercise, but most of us can name 60 great universi-
ties. By whatever indicator of quality we choose, our
university should fall into this group.

Public


We exist thanks to the commitment and invest-
ment of the people of the State of Florida. Generations
of tax dollars have constructed the facilities we enjoy
and have paid the major portion of our operating
budget. The graduates of this institution, educated
with tax dollars, have provided the majority of our
private funding. Our state legislators created the
conditions that permit our faculty to educate our
students, pursue their research, conduct their clinical
practice, and serve their statewide constituencies.
We exist, then, within the public sector, responsible
and responsive to the needs of the citizens of our state.
The obligations we assume as a public university










and we operate in cooperative symbiosis with our
state's media. We also experience an often too-close
interaction with the political process. Private univer-
sities do not respond in the same ways to these
issues and have a different profile. We, as a public
university, must maintain a close, continuous and
effective communication with our many publics.

Comprehensive


This adjective recognizes the universal reach of
our pursuit of knowledge. As a matter of principle,
we exclude no field from our purview. We believe
that our approach to knowledge and learning, to
understanding and wisdom, requires us to be ready
to examine any field, cultivate any discipline, and
explore any topic that offers insight or intellectual
tools. Resource limits, human or financial, may con-
strain us from cultivating one or another academic
subspecialty, but we accept, in principle, no limit on
our field of view. Even when we struggle with bud-
get problems and must reduce a program or miss an
intellectual opportunity, we do so only to meet the
practical constraints of our current environment. We
never relinquish the commitment to the holistic pur-
suit of knowledge.


Land-grant


Florida belongs to the set of American universities
whose mandate includes a commitment to the
development and transmission of practical knowl-
edge. As one of the land-grant universities identified
by the Morrill Act of 1862, the University of Florida
has a special focus on agriculture and engineering
and a mandate to deliver the practical benefits of
university knowledge to every county in the state.
In our university, the Institute of Food and Agricultural
Sciences and the College of Engineering respond to
this definition most obviously, but over time, the
entire university has to come to recognize its com-
mitment to translating the benefit of abstract and
theoretical knowledge into the marketplace, where it
can sustain the economic growth that supports us all.
This commitment permeates the institutional
culture and defines us as one of some 72 such insti-
-l,-irnn in Amorir'a Tho l1nrdl-crrant lnirrcrcihT ic nf


Research


Research defines a certain type of university.
Our faculty must dedicate themselves not only to
the bedrock function of education, not only to the
land-grant function of service, but equally to the
essential activity of research.
By research we mean the effort to expand our
understanding of the natural world, the world of the
mind and the world of the senses. We define research
to include the theoretical abstractions of the mathe-
matician, the experimental discoveries of the geneti-
cist, the insights of the semiotician, the recreations of
the historian, or the analysis of the anthropologist.
We define research to capture the business professor's
analysis of economic organization, the architect's
design, and the musician's interpretation or the
artist's special vision. Research by agronomists
improves crops, and research by engineers enhances
materials. Medical and clinical research cure and
prevent disease. The list of research fields continues
as endlessly as the intellectual consensus of our fac-
ulty and the academic vision of our colleges.


INSTITUTIONAL PURPOSE


The University of Florida is a public, land-grant
research university, one of the most comprehensive
in the United States; it encompasses virtually all
academic and professional disciplines. It is the oldest
and largest of Florida's nine universities and a member
of the American Association of Universities. Its
faculty and staff are dedicated to the common
pursuit of the university's three-fold mission:
education, research and service.
Education-undergraduate and graduate
through the doctorate-is the fundamental purpose
of the university. Research and scholarship are inte-
gral to the educational process and to expanding
humankind's understanding of the natural world,
the mind and the senses. Service is the university's
obligation to share the benefits of its knowledge for
the public good.
These three interlocking elements span all of
the University of Florida's academic disciplines and
multidisciplinary centers. They also represent the
- --- i- -2 ,-, -. 1.i'. 1 1 .2 L- 1. -- .- 11 -- -- C










diverse intellectual environment in which teaching,
research and service are fully integrated with its
interdisciplinary pursuits to meet the changing needs
of the global community.
The University of Florida is committed to
providing the knowledge, benefits and services it pro-
duces with quality and effectiveness. It aspires to


initiatives and achievements in promoting human
values and improving the quality of life.
The University of Florida is accredited by the
Commission on Colleges of the Southern Association
of Colleges and Schools to award the degrees of
bachelor, master, specialist and engineer, as well as
doctoral and professional degrees.


further national and international recognition for its


ACADEMIC CALENDAR 1999-2000

CLASS OF 2003- FIRST YEAR


Required Orientation


Classes Begin Fall Semester

Deadline for Fall Fees without
an established fee waiver


Thursday, August 12 through
Tuesday, August 17, 1999

Wednesday, August 18, 1999


Friday, September


1999 before 3:30 p.m.


Labor Day (Holiday)

Veterans Day (Holiday)

Thanksgiving Vacation


Classes Resume

Classes End

Winter Break


Classes Begin Spring Semester

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (Holiday)

Deadline for Spring Fees without
an established fee waiver


22nd Annual Family Day


Monday, September 6, 1999

Thursday, November 11, 1999

Thursday, November 25
through Sunday, November 28, 1999

Monday, November 29, 1999

Friday, December 17, 1999

Saturday, December 18, 1999 through
Sunday, January 2, 2000

Monday, January 3, 2000

Monday, January 17, 2000

Friday, January 21, 2000 before 3:30 p.m.


Saturday, February 12, 2000


Spring Break


Saturday, March


25 through


Sunday, April 2, 2000


Classes Resume


Monday, April


2000


Health Care Issues Day


Wednesday, April 5, 2000










CLASS OF 2002


Classes Begin


- SECOND YEAR

Monday, August 16, 1999


Deadline for Fall Fees without
an established fee waiver

Labor Day (Holiday)

Veterans Day (Holiday)

Thanksgiving Vacation


Classes Resume


Classes End


Winter Break


Friday, September


1999 before 3:30 p.m.


Monday, September 6, 1999

Thursday, November 11, 1999

Thursday, November 25
through Sunday, November 28, 1999


Monday, November 29, 1999

Friday, December 17, 1999

Saturday, December 18, 1999
through, Sunday, January 2


Classes Begin


Martin Luther King, Jr. Day (Holiday)

Deadline for Spring Fees without
an established fee waiver


Monday, January

Monday, January


3, 2000

17, 2000


Friday, January 21, 2000 before 3:30 p.m.


Spring Break


Saturday, March


25 through


Classes Resume


Health-Care Issues Day


Classes End


White Coat Ceremony

Required Clerkship Orientation


Clerkships Begin


CLASS OF 2001


White Coat Ceremony


Required Clerkship Orientation


Rotation I Begins

Rotation I Ends


Sunday, April 2, 2000

Monday, April 3, 2000

Wednesday, April 5, 20

Friday, May 19, 2000

Sunday, July 9, 2000

Monday, July 10, 2000


Tuesday, July 11,


- THIRD YEAR


Monday, July 5

Tuesday, July 6


Wednesday, July 7, 1999

Friday, August 13, 1999


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Labor Day (Holiday)

Rotation II Ends


Rotation III Begins

Rotation Ill Ends


Rotation IV Begins

Veterans Day (Holiday)

Thanksgiving (Holiday)


Rotation IV Resumes

Rotation IV Ends


Winter Break


Monday, September 6, 1999

Friday, September 24, 1999

Monday, September 27, 199'

Friday, November 5, 1999

Monday, November 8, 1999

Thursday, November 11, 19


Wednesday, November 24, 6:00 p.m.
through Sunday, November 28, 1999


Monday, November 29, 1999

Friday, December 17, 1999


Friday, December 17, 1999, 6:00 p.m.
through Sunday, January 2, 2000


Rotation V Begins

Martin Luther Kin


Monday, January


g, Jr. Day (Holiday)


3, 2000


Monday, January 17, 2000


Deadline for Spring Fees without
an established fee waiver


Friday, January 21,


000, 3:30 p.m.


Rotation V Ends


Rotation VI Begins

Rotation VI Ends


Friday, February 11, 2000

Monday, February 14, 2000

Friday, March 24, 2000


Rotation VII Begins

Health Care Issues Day

Rotation VII Ends


Monday, March


27,2000


Wednesday, April


Friday, May


Rotation VIII


Begins


Monday


y, May


Memorial Day (Holiday)


Monday, May


2000


Friday, June 16, 2000


NBME Subject Exam Make-up Day

Summer Break


Electives Begin


Thursday, June 22, 2000

Friday, June 16, 6:00 pm
through Sunday, July 9, 2000


Monday, July 10, 2000


Rotation VIII Ends










CLASS OF 2000

Elective Period One


Elective Period Two


Elective Period Three


- FOURTH YEAR

Tuesday, July 6 through
Saturday, July 31, 1999

Sunday, August 1 through
Saturday, August 28, 1999

Sunday, August 29 through
Saturday, September 25, 1999


Deadline for Fall Fees without
an established fee waiver


Friday, September


1999, 3:30 p.m.


Elective Period Four


Elective Period Five


Elective Period


(Required Advanced Pharmacology)

Winter Break


Sunday, September 26 through
Saturday, October 23, 1999

Sunday, October 24 through
Saturday, November 20, 1999

Monday, November 22 through
Friday, December 17, 1999, 6:00 p.m.

Friday, December 17, 1999, 6:00 p.m.


Elective Period Seven


through Sunday, January 2,

Monday, January 3 through
Saturday, January 29, 2000


2000


Deadline for Spring Fees without
an established fee waiver

Elective Period Eight


Elective Period Nine


Friday, January 21, 2000, 3:30 p.m.

Sunday, January 30 through
Saturday, February 26, 1999

Sunday, February 27 through


Saturday


NRMP Match Day (Holiday)

Elective Period Ten


Health Care Issues Day

Elective Period Eleven


Graduation Rehearsal (Required)


Graduation


, March 25, 2000


Thursday, March 16, 2000

Sunday, March 26 through
Saturday, April 22, 2000


Wednesday, April


Sunday, April 23 through
Friday, May 19, 2000


Wednesday, May 17, 2000, 11:00 a.m.


Saturday, May 20, 2000, 9:00 a.m.,
Center for the Performing Arts







DEAN'S


STAFF


Kenneth I. Berns, M.D., Ph.D.


Dean


, College of Medicine


Louis


Nicholas Cassisi, M.D.
Senior Associate Dean


Russo, Jr., M.D.


Senior Associate Dean for
Jacksonville Programs


I






























Josepha A. Cheong, M.D.
Chairman, Medical Selection
Committee


J. Ocie Harris, M.D.
Associate Dean for
Community Programs


Frank Genuardi, M.D.
Director of Undergraduate
Medical Education for
Jacksonville Programs


Ann Harwood-Nuss, M.D.
Assistant Dean for Educational
Affairs, Assistant Dean for
Administrative Affairs,
Jacksonville Programs


Michael Good, M.D.
Assistant Dean for Veterans
Affairs Medical Center
Relations


Hugh M. Hill, M.D.
Associate Dean for Student
and Alumni Affairs


Myra Hurt, Ph.D.


Robert C. Nuss Ph.D.





























Shahla Masood, M.D.
Assistant Dean for Research,
Jacksonville Programs


Lynn J. Romrell, Ph.D.
Associate Dean for Medical
Education and Director,
Junior Honors Program


Donna M. Parker, M.D.
Assistant Dean for
Minority Affairs


Larry Rooks, M.D.
Chairman,
Curriculum Committee


Colin Sumners, Ph.D.
Associate Dean for
Graduate Education


Regina A. Smith, Ph.D.
Associate Dean for Research


Timothy Van Sustren, Ph.D.
Associate Dean for
Continuing Medical


Beverly V. Wright, Ph.D.
Assistant Dean for
Minority Affairs









DEPARTMENT CHAIRS


Stephen P. Sugrue, Ph.D. Nikolaus Gravenstein, M.D.


Chairman, Anatomy and
Cell Biology


David J. Vukich, M.D.
Chairman, Department
Emergency Medicine


Chairman,
Anesthesiology


James Burt Flannegan, Ph.D.
Interim Chairman,


Biochemistry
Biology


Michael K. Miller, Ph.D.
Chair, Institute for Health


& Molecular


Phillip P. Toskes, M.D.
Chairman, Medicine


Policy Research


R. Whit Curry, Jr., M.D.
Chairman, Community Health
and Family Medicine


Richard W. Moyer, Ph.D.
Chairman, Molecular Genetics


and Microbiology


u r, a


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Mark Sherwood, M.D.


Chairman,


Ophthalmology


B. Hudson Berrey, Jr., M.D.
Chairman,


Orthopaedic


Nicholas J. Cassisi, D.D.S., M.D.
Chairman, Otolaryngology


Surgery


James M. Crawford, M.D., Ph.D.
Chairman, Pathology and
Laboratory Medicine


Douglas Barrett, M.D.
Chairman, Pediatrics


Stephen P. Baker, Ph.D.
Chairman, Pharmacolgy
and Therapeutics


Ian M. Phillips, D.Sc.
Chairman, Physiology


Wayne K. Goodman, M.D.
Chairman, Psychiatry


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PROFILE


The University of Florida College of Medicine,
the largest of six colleges at the UF Health Science
Center, opened in 1956 with a mission to increase
Florida's supply of highly qualified physicians, pro-
vide access to the most advanced health-care ser-
vices available and foster discovery in science and
medical care. Since graduating its first 40 medical
students in 1960, the college has graduated more
than 3,000 physicians. The Physician Assistant
Program, also part of the College of Medicine,
graduated its 25th class in 1998.
The college's Gainesville campus is comprised
of 22 clinical and basic science departments staffed by
more than 600 faculty members. The Jacksonville
campus, located 75 miles to the northeast, is home to
more than 200 physicians and scientists delivering
medical care in an urban setting, performing research
and educating medical students and residents.
The faculty on both campuses generated more
than $100 million in external grants and contracts in
fiscal year 1997-98; $40 million of these awards were
from the National Institutes of Health. College of
Medicine researchers have attained national leader-
ship in patient care, research and education related
to the brain and spine, cancer, diabetes, drug design,
genetics and organ transplantation. The success of
College of Medicine faculty has helped rank UF
among the top 10 U.S. universities in royalties
earned for licensed technologies and number of


patents awarded. The new $60 million, 210,000-
square-foot University of Florida Brain Institute
building, headquarters for most of the campuswide
brain- and spinal cord-related research, was dedicated
in October 1998. Another NIH-funded project, the
Women's Health Initiative, was funded at UF in
1994 to participate in a 10-year clinical study of the
leading health problems in women. A new UF
Center for the Research of Women's Health also is
developing rapidly, with more than 70 researchers
involved. The Health Science Center also is home to


the College of Medicine


federally-funded Clinical


Research Center, where volunteer human patients
take part in studies aimed at finding more effective
ways to treat or prevent disease. The UF Center for
Clinical Trials Research, with active units in
Gainesville and Jacksonville, also recently opened to
coordinate and speed the process by which new
therapies are evaluated for potential application in
patient care.
The college's research and teaching programs
are greatly enhanced through close collaboration with
Shands HealthCare, a statewide clinical enterprise,
and with the North Florida/South Georgia Veterans
Health System, which includes the Malcom Randall
Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Gainesville the
VA Medical Center in Lake City and a network of
ambulatory clinics.








GENERAL


Medical education is a continuous learning
process that begins with the decision to become a
physician and ends with retirement from the profession.
The formal component of this continuum is divided
into three stages. The first is premedical education
occurring in an undergraduate university setting.
This stage should provide a combination of liberal
education with science prerequisites concluding
with the awarding of a bachelor's degree.
The next stage is medical undergraduate edu-
cation, usually requiring four years and leading to
the M.D. degree.
The third formal stage is graduate medical edu-
cation in specialty programs. These residency pro-
grams of patient care take place under supervision,
in a variety of health care environments and gener-
ally require three to six years, depending upon the
specialty.
Residency training prepares the physician for
specialty certification and the independent practice
of medicine. Further graduate medical education in
a subspecialty can be pursued.
Licensure to practice medicine is achieved
through a three-step examination sequence during
medical school and residency training. The United
States Medical Licensing Examination is adminis-
tered by the National Board of Medical Examiners.
These formal stages of medical education,
lasting from 11 to 14 years, lead to licensure and
specialty certification, but thereafter the physician
is responsible to maintain and enhance his or
her competence through formal and informal
continuing medical education.
It is the responsibility of colleges of medicine to
select medical students, provide their education
leading to the M.D. degree, prepare them for spe-
cialty training in residency programs and ensure
that each understands the critical importance of the
enduring phase of continuing education throughout
their independent medical careers.
The most critical part of this educational con-
tinuum is medical school. Only colleges of medicine
can grant the M.D. degree. The University of Florida
CollePe of Medicine is the cornerstone of the


class in September 1956. It first received full accredi-
tation from the Liaison Committee on Medical
Education in 1960, and again in 1963, 1969, 1976,
1983 and 1993.
Rapid expansion in education, biomedical
research, clinical care and other services has permit-
ted the College to offer a curriculum leading to a
Ph.D. degree in each of the basic medical sciences
and to a combined M.D./Ph.D. program in addition
to the M.D. degree.
Graduate medical education is provided pre-
dominantly in cooperation with Shands HealthCare,
the Malcom Randall Veterans Affairs Medical
Center in Gainesville, and the Health Science
Center's urban campus at Shands Jacksonville. This
is through residency programs accredited by the
Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical
Education. Affiliations with community health-care
programs and the North Florida Area Health
Education Centers (AHEC) provide additional
opportunities for the college's educational and clini-
cal care activities.
The University of Florida Health Science Center,
including Shands at UF and the Malcom Randall
Veterans Affairs Medical Center, is located at the
southeast corner of the University of Florida campus.
The structural unity of the Health Science Center
and the geographic location on the university campus
promote an interdisciplinary approach to education,
research and patient care.
The urban campus at Shands Jacksonville is
located 90 miles from Gainesville.


STUDENTS


The College of Medicine recognizes its obligation
to graduate, for the state of Florida and society, highly
competent and responsible physicians. The realization
of this goal is not possible without excellent students.
The college strives for a diverse student population
without preconceptions about what constitutes an
ideal applicant. Equal opportunity and ethnic, racial,
religious, gender and cultural diversity are important
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needs of fellow humans, begins before medical
school. The faculty of the College of Medicine nurtures
this interest whenever it occurs and encourages
those with desire and talent to be confident they can
become physicians.
Part of this encouragement is through prepro-
fessional counseling provided by the College of
Liberal Arts and Sciences, the College of Agriculture
and the College of Medicine.
Volunteering in communities and hospitals
also is an important way to nurture interest and learn
about the variety of opportunities in health care.
Exposure to biomedical research is an additional
avenue for exploring health care. All of these experi-
ences help prospective medical students decide if
they have the necessary desire and dedication to
become physician members of the health-care team.
Admission to the College of Medicine is based
on quantitative and qualitative criteria. Quantitative
criteria are grade point average and performance on
standardized examinations, such as the Medical
College Admissions Test. Qualitative criteria include
attitudes, values and personality characteristics.
After an applicant's academic potential to suc-
ceed in challenging learning situations is deter-
mined by quantitative criteria, the admissions com-
mittee concentrates on the applicant's social and
personal history to focus on potential as a physician.
During the interview process, admissions committee
members seek indicators of altruism, community
service, concern for the broader human condition,
judgement, interpersonal characteristics and a deep
desire to prevent illness and care for the sick that
might predict a future physician who is competent,
compassionate and responsible.
Students accepted to the College of Medicine
begin a challenging learning experience leading to a
potentially exciting and rewarding career in com-
munity practice, academic medicine or government
service. The knowledge base necessary to be an
effective physician requires that each student have the
requisite ability, aptitude and premedical preparation.
More is needed to become a good physician
though than adequate knowledge. The social con-
tract that exists between patient and physician
demands attention to the highest standards of moral
and ethical behavior.


practicing community is designed to incorporate
students into the family of physicians who are
responsible for the health needs of society.
For the four years in medical school, the faculty
direct concern and effort toward imparting to all
students the importance of the art-as well as the
science -of medicine. This enables students to find
the optimal balance between knowing and caring,
and helps students understand their inevitable limi-
tations.
Upon graduation, every student should be pre-
pared to assume the responsibilities required in a
supervised clinical care setting, whatever area of
specialized training he or she might pursue, and to
have developed an appreciation of the need for con-
tinued self-learning.
It is the philosophy of this College of Medicine
that all patients in need of care will be provided that
care, even though caring for patients with some ill-
nesses may put the safety of staff and students in
jeopardy. Caring for others more than self is part of
the tradition of medicine. It helps graduates recog-
nize that they have the great privilege of asking fel-
low humans to allow them to care for their health
needs, and it is their obligation to maintain that trust.


FACULTY


The evolution of modern academic health centers
has produced many opportunities for students and
faculty. The knowledge and skills needed to deliver
technologically advanced clinical care and to make
scientific discoveries have become highly specialized.
This provides the opportunity for students to learn
of the most recent advances in a large number of
disciplines and to participate in rigorous research.
This necessary degree of specialization can
make the provision of a general professional education
in basic science and clinical medicine more difficult.
The college provides the faculty and environments
for learning to ensure that its students receive the
appropriate general professional education while
learning about the latest scientific and clinical advances.
The commitment to education at the college is
high. This commitment is a criterion for employment
and is a measure of academic success. Efforts are
made to encourage and facilitate educational, per-










RESEARCH

Exploring new ways to understand health and
disease through biomedical research is an exciting
mission of any academic health center. Research
ranging from structural biology to medical sociolo-
gy is conducted in the laboratories, offices and at the
bedside in the College of Medicine and its affiliated
institutions.
The college is especially proud of its research
focus at the intersection of basic and clinical science.
The college has more than 40 endowed research pro-
fessorships, numerous federally funded research
opportunities for medical students and a long-
standing clinical research center. The newly opened
University of Florida Brain Institute will allow the
College of Medicine to be a leader in research into
the next century.
The future will include even more translational
research between basic scientists and clinicians, an
effort that will bring the unsolved scientific problems
discovered at the bedside to the laboratories of
skilled investigators. Increased collaboration
between the College of Medicine and other Health
Science Center colleges and with university pro-
grams in agriculture, education, engineering, nuclear
sciences, physics, psychology and others is vital to
making exciting discoveries.

AFFILIATIONS AND FACILITIES


Most programs and faculty are housed in the
University of Florida Health Science Center the
most comprehensive academic health center in the
Southeast. The center encompasses the colleges of
Medicine, Dentistry, Health Professions, Nursing,
Pharmacy and Veterinary Medicine, as well as the
flagship referral hospital known as Shands at UF.


Shands, with


576 beds, draws more than 25,000


inpatient admissions each year, and more than
330,000 annual visits at its outpatient clinics.
Closely affiliated is the regional clinical delivery
network known as Shands HealthCare, which encom-
passes six acute care hospitals, two specialty hospi-
tals and a regional home care program, plus 40
satellite clinics staffed by UF College of Medicine
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The UF Health Science Center also also has a
close working affiliation with the North
Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System,
which includes the 427-bed Malcom Randall
Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Gainesville,
(located across the street from the UF Health Science
Center), the VA Medical Center in Lake City and a
network of ambulatory care clinics.
These UF-affiliated hospitals and health-care
networks offer ample opportunity for hospital-
based bedside and ambulatory teaching.
The Health Science Center's campus facilities
include the Chandler A. Stetson Medical Sciences
Building, the Communicore (library, teaching labo-
ratories and classrooms), the academic research
building, and the UF Brain Institute. The









































The Health Science Center Library is among the
largest biomedical libraries in the Southeast, with a
collection of more than 328,000 books and journals.
Computer-based bibliographic retrieval services,
such as MEDLINE, are available to support teaching
and research activities. The library also has a 2,000-
square-foot public access computer laboratory and
participates in a regional network of medical
libraries to supplement its information resources.

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER
JACKSONVILLE (UFHSC-J)

A significant portion of the educational experi-
ences for University of Florida College of Medicine
students takes place at the UF Health Science Center's


Medical Center in Jacksonville with the Shands


HealthCare network. UMC had hosted UF's


urban


campus programs since 1969.
The University of Florida Health Science Center-
Jacksonville (UFHSC-J) enriches the educational
experience of UF medical students. They receive the
opportunity to observe and participate in the treat-
ment of patients in a variety of tertiary and commu-
nity hospital settings and in multiple ambulatory
facilities. Students also become acquainted with the
many aspects of health-care delivery in a major met-
ropolitan area. In addition to supervision by more
than 200 full-time faculty physicians, students also
have the opportunity to learn from community-
based practitioners.
Twenty accredited residency programs are
offered in Jacksonville. Residents also participate in
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access to multiple databases available through the
Health Science Center Library and the internet.
Pediatric programs of the University of Florida
in Jacksonville are enriched by their collaborative
relationships with Nemours Children's Clinic,
Baptist Medical Center, and Wolfson's Children's
Hospital, a 180-bed hospital dedicated solely to the
treatment of medical and surgical diseases of child-
hood. This provides an excellent resource for
research, education and clinical service.

COMMUNITY MEDICINE

The College of Medicine, primarily through the
departments of Community Health and Family
Medicine, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics, and
Obstetrics/Gynecology, has had community-based
programs for more than 20 years. The rural compo-
nents of these educational experiences are well rec-
ognized for their innovative contributions to patient
care and medical education.
In response to community needs, and to the
changing medical education environment of teaching
hospitals, the College of Medicine has established an
Area Health Education Centers (AHEC) Program for
the purpose of planning, developing and imple-
menting more extensive community-based educa-
tional activities.
Through this program, students in each of the
four years of medical school will have the opportunity
to participate in clinical training activities in clinics and
private physicians' offices throughout north Florida.
The delivery of primary health care is the major
focus, and students have an opportunity to become
familiar with common medical problems seldom seen


in the hospital setting.


Working with community


HARRELL PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT & ASSESSMENT CENTER

Named for the founding dean of the College of
Medicine, George T. Harrell, Jr., M.D., the Harrell
Professional Development and Assessment Center
was designed to help students and faculty better learn
the art of medicine.
Using state-of-the-art technology, the Harrell
Center includes a suite of patient examination rooms,
adjacent computer carrels, a conference room, a
reception area, and an audiovisual control center.
The patient rooms and conference room are equipped
with closed-circuit, color television cameras and stereo
microphones that are linked to the control center.
Custom-designed audio and communications systems
housed in the control room provide the ability to
display and record student-patient interactions from
the eight examination rooms for critiquing by
students and faculty.
Direct observation into each patient room is
also available through a one-way window from the
central hallway. The conference room doubles as an
observation theatre for group demonstrations as the
patient rooms can be observed directly from the
conference room via a closed-circuit monitor.
The Harrell Center houses an exciting, unique
educational resource: the standardized patient pro-
gram. Standardized patients are individuals trained
to provide specific medical histories, and to simulate
signs and symptoms of specific ailments. Students
interact with a standardized patient just as they would
with an actual patient to take a history, perform a
physical examination, counsel and educate the patient
or negotiate a treatment plan.


physicians provides the student with valuable role
models for the practice of medicine.
The AHEC Program has established the
Community Health Scholars Program for second-
year students. This eight-week experience for selected
students takes place during the summer after the first
year. Students work on community health projects
supervised by a community preceptor and faculty
from the College of Medicine.
The community health programs direct the talents
of College of Medicine faculty toward problems of








ACADEMIC INFORMATION


Students entering medical school today will be
independent practitioners in the 21st century. It is
not possible to visualize clearly the structure of the
next century's health-care system, but it is certain to
be different from today's.
The cost of health care will be an increasing
focus of concern, and significant changes in physi-
cian and hospital reimbursement are occurring. A
solution must be found to the paradox of having the
best possible health care in the world, that is inac-
cessible to millions of our own citizens.
Judicious investment in health maintenance
through prevention of illness and injury will be seen
as wiser than the present expense of treating sickness.
Health care will become more a wellness than
sickness industry. With continued aging of our pop-
ulation, caring for the chronically ill and elderly will
become a significant component of the physician's
time and expertise.
Sophisticated media and a more informed pub-
lic will continue the demystification of the profes-
sion, and people will be more involved in decisions
about the use of technology in their treatment, and
in the treatment of family members incapable of
making decisions. This involvement is but a step
from the willing acceptance of health-care rationing.
There will be more concern about quality of life
and more indignation about impersonal death.
Unless physicians are sensitive to the health needs
of their community and society, the profession will
no longer be held in high esteem. Non-physicians
will assume many of the duties and responsibilities
now reserved for physicians.
Education of medical students in this country is
the exclusive responsibility of medical schools. In
discharging this responsibility, medical schools have
the obligation to anticipate and introduce change
and explore ways to prepare students for these


changes.


This responsibility to continuously update


the educational process is made difficult because of
multiple missions.
The future success of this, and other colleges of
medicine, will be the realization of a single mission:
provision of health care for society through a syner-


The University of Florida College of Medicine
has the responsibility to provide health care to the
referral community it serves and the obligation to
prepare physicians to independently provide com-
passionate and skillful care in their own communities.
This responsibility and obligation underlies our
mission: to educate students and physicians in the
humanistic, scientific and technical principles of
medicine; to provide the environment and faculty to
make important biomedical discoveries; and to
deliver the highest quality health care to the patients
we serve.
The educational program of the college has
three specific objectives. First, to provide a humane
environment and a thoughtful faculty to foster and
nurture the proper attitudes and behaviors during
the professional development of each student.
Second, to provide the variety of experiences that
allows each student to choose the field and specialty
that will provide him or her a satisfying career of
service. Third, to prepare each student academically
and emotionally for the rigors and responsibilities of
residency training and later independent community
clinical practice, academic medicine or government
service.
An essential prerequisite to being an effective
physician is a solid background in the sciences basic
to medicine. The relevance of this scientific knowl-
edge to clinical medicine is important for learning,
retaining and applying the large amount of available
information.
Our curriculum provides significant clinical
experience with academic and community physi-
cians in the first year of medical school. The purpose
of this early experience is not to teach the knowl-
edge base and technical skills of the physician, but
to participate with skilled physicians in communi-
cating with their patients, serving their communities
and utilizing a relevant scientific basis in the care of
their patients.
Whatever the precise structure of the future
health-care system, it is apparent the college's cur-
riculum should meet current objectives while
preparing physicians for society's expectations of



















































































































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from about 32 million in the mid-1990s to about 66
million by 2030. There also will have been a large
increase in African, Asian and Hispanic-American
populations.
These future demographic changes, combined
with the current perception that the high cost of
health care does not meet society's expectations for
equal access, healthier lives and rational use of tech-
nology, will demand change.
Some changes are reasonably predictable.
First, more emphasis will be placed on preven-
tive medicine and maintaining health-promoting life
styles;
Everyone in this country will have access to
basic health care, both prevention and primary
care;
There will be rational assessment, cost effective
use and involvement of patients in deciding the use
of technology;
Physicians will work more closely with other
health-care providers in managing coordinated care
and with their communities to provide this care cost
effectively;
Greater emphasis will be placed on humane care
of the chronically ill, ethical counseling, acceptance
of inevitable death, and rational use of rehabilitation;
Finally, while meeting these expectations,
physicians will continue to be expected to provide
the most sophisticated available diagnostic and ther-
apeutic care. The ever expanding knowledge base
needed to provide such diagnosis and therapy will
require skilled information management.
Flexibility and creativity in the curriculum and
programs, and from the faculty and its sponsors,
will be needed to meet the challenges and opportu-
nities ahead. The college is excited about these chal-
lenges and is confident it can lead the way in pro-
viding opportunities for students and faculty.

THE ART AND SCIENCE OF MEDICINE

The scientific basis of medicine is universally
accepted as a prerequisite for medical practice. Often,
however, the practice of medicine is an art rather
than a science, and too much science in medical edu-
cation renders the future physician insensitive to the
human needs of patients. There is a fine balance.


medicine to the point in which satisfaction or gratifi-
cation of emotional needs cannot be achieved. As a
result, a cynical attitude may emerge toward med-
ical and patient problems, with a subsequent loss of
motivation toward learning.
The educational experience must help the student
achieve the right blend of humanism and science,
needed to provide optimal medical care of patients.
The faculty strives to blend the art and science of
medicine into the College of Medicine's programs.
Through careful planning, an effort is made to
use the fundamental knowledge of the basic sci-
ences in a meaningful relation to career goals in


medicine.


Traditionally during the first and second


years, the emphasis is on the sciences basic to medi-
cine, but exposure to clinical medicine is also intro-
duced. Advanced clinical medicine will be the pri-
mary focus during the third year. The opportunity
to advance in both fields in a correlated fashion will
be offered in the elective period of the fourth year.
The introduction of clinical medicine in the first
and second years and the opportunity to select basic
science courses during the elective year hold special
significance for modern medicine. There is wide-
spread recognition that delay between scientific
discovery and its clinical application is too long. It is
expected that graduates of the present program will
have less difficulty in retaining a true feeling for a
close relationship between basic medical science and
its clinical application.


ADMISSION INFORMATION


The Applicant Pool

Students applying for admission to the
University of Florida College of Medicine should
plan to complete the requirements for a bachelor's
degree at an accredited university or college by the
time of matriculation. In exceptional instances,
students upon whom the degree has not been
conferred may be admitted.
Applicants will be carefully appraised on the
basis of personal attributes, academic record,
evaluation of achievements, references, performance
on the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT)
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requirements prior to matriculation into the College
of Medicine for study toward the M.D. degree.
The College of Medicine does not discriminate


on the basis of race,


sex, creed, age, disability or


national origin. Further details on technical standards
for medical school admission may be found on page
113. For disability information, contact the Chair of
the Americans with Disabilities Act Assessment
Committee (352) 392-3469. Hearing and/or speech-
impaired individuals may utilize the Florida Relay
Service by calling 1 (800) 955-8771 (TDD). Although
Florida residents are given preference in admission,
the College of Medicine does consider a limited
number of nonresident applicants each year.
Nonresident applicants must demonstrate superior
qualifications. The College of Medicine welcomes
applications from minority students regardless of
state residence. Only United States citizens and perma-
nent resident aliens will be considered.

Undergraduate Education

Basic Science Requirements: The minimum science
admissions requirements include basic introductory
courses and laboratories in the following subjects:


* Biochemistry-- semester hours (6 quarter hours)
* Biology-8 semester hours (12 quarter hours)
* General (Inorganic) Chemistry-8 semester
hours (12 quarter hours)
* Organic Chemistry-4 semester hours (6 quarter
hours)
* Physics-8 semester hours (12 quarter hours)

For students who desire additional background
in science, courses in genetics, microbiology and
physiology might be considered. It is not necessary
to choose one of the sciences as a college major.
No specific requirement is set in the area of
mathematics since, at most colleges, some
mathematics are prerequisite to physics and chemistry.
Some college work in calculus is strongly recom-
mended. Familiarity with the principles of statistics
and their application to the analysis of data is an
important asset for any medical student. A knowl-
edge of computers and computer programming is
valuable in medical education. but is not required.


Electives: The remainder of the college work
should be distributed throughout the humanities,
social and behavioral sciences. The student should
select subjects which tend to broaden the educa-
tional experience.

Extracurricular Activities: Extracurricular
activities and employment, both during the academic
year and the summers, are important contributions
to an individual's development. Experience in medical
and paramedical areas often contributes toward an
understanding of health-care delivery problems and
helps to solidify the basis of the student's motivation
toward a career in medicine.

Medical College Admission Test

Every applicant must take the Medical College
Admission Test (MCAT) at a time that enables scores
to be received by the Admissions Office prior to the
application deadline. The test is given twice yearly in
many colleges and universities. Scores are only
acceptable up to two years prior to a current appli-
cation. For further information about the test write:
MCAT Program, P.O. Box 4056, Iowa City, IA 52243;
(319) 337-1357.


Application and Acceptance Procedures

Admission to the College of Medicine is highly
competitive. The college seeks students who demonstrate
those personal and intellectual characteristics
expected of physicians: compassion, communica-
tiveness, character, captaincy and competence.
There are three routes of admission to the
University of Florida College of Medicine:

Regular Admission (73 places)
Junior Honors (12 places)


P.I.M.S.


- Tallahassee (30 places)


Regular Admission

The Medical Selection Committee has 30 members,
including the Chair, appointed by the Dean of the
College of Medicine. Members include clinical and










(1) Students apply for admission through the
American Medical College Application Service
(AMCAS). All materials should be submitted as
early as possible, but the deadline for AMCAS is
December 1. Students are encouraged to have basic sci-
ence requirements completed prior to application.

(2) Personal statements, academic performance and
MCAT scores submitted in the AMCAS application
are reviewed and competitive applicants are sent
materials for formal (secondary) application.
Applicants who are "advised not to apply," but
wish to continue with the application process, may
request a secondary application be sent to them.
Formal application requires a $20 fee to the
University of Florida. This fee is non-refundable.


(3) Materials in the completed secondary applica-
tion are reviewed by the Chair with additional
review of the formal folders by other members of
the committee at the Chair's request. On the basis of
personal qualifications, academic record, expanded
personal statements, and letters of recommendation,
competitive applicants are invited for interview.


(4) Interviews are held on Fridays from September
through March at the University of Florida College
of Medicine. Applicants meet with the Chair for ori-
entation and follow-up discussions. Tours of the
facilities are provided. Each applicant has interviews
with two members of the Medical Selection
Committee. A subset of the committee is designated
to interview applicants on a particular Friday.


(5) The subset of committee members who inter-
viewed applicants meet to present and discuss the
applicants and make recommendations to the Chair.
The Chair is responsible for weighing these recom-
mendations and the qualifications of each applicant
against those of the entire applicant pool. With the
approval of the Dean, the Chair of the Medical
Selection Committee makes the final determination
of each applicant's status. Acceptance follows a
"rolling admission process" whereby acceptance
are made throughout the year. The class is usually
filled by April.


the applicant is obligated to notify the College of
Medicine Admissions Office immediately with a
written letter of intent to withdraw acceptance.


(7) When the class is filled, the chair establishes a
non-ranked alternate list based on academic and
personal qualifications and the recommendations by
the committee. As withdrawals occur, the positions
are filled from the alternate list.


(8) An applicant who is not successful in gaining
admission and wishes to reapply for the next entering
class must initiate the new application through AMCAS.

The above procedures follow the guidelines of
the Association of American Medical Colleges.

Junior Honors Medical Program

The Junior Honors Medical Program (JHMP) is a
combined (seven year) B.S./M.D. program offered
by the University of Florida or Florida A&M
University. This program is intended for undergrad-
uate students who have demonstrated superior
scholastic ability and personal development during
their first two academic years.

Application is made during the student's second
year of college (sophomore). Although most appli-
cations are received from students of the University
of Florida and Florida A&M University, applications
are accepted from students from other colleges. Non-
Florida residents also are eligible to apply. The pro-
gram is limited to 12 students per year.

Application Process:
1. Students apply for admission to the program
through the College of Medicine Office of


Admissions.


The preliminary application is due


February 1. By the end of the second year of under-
graduate work, applicants must complete:
Biology-8 semester hours (12 quarter hours),
General (Inorganic) Chemistry-8 semester
hours (12 quarter hours),
Organic Chemistry-8 semester hours (12
quarter hours), and










The 8-semester-hour physics requirement for admis-
sion to medical school can be completed during the
junior year.

2. After review of the preliminary application,
competitive applicants are sent materials for the formal
(secondary) application. Applicants who were advised
"not to apply," but wish to continue with the appli-
cation process, may request a secondary application
to be sent to them. Formal application requires a $20
fee. This fee is non-refundable. Formal applications
are due March 1.

3. Materials in the completed secondary applica-
tion are reviewed by the Director of the JHMP and
Chair of the Medical Selection Committee with
additional review of the formal folders by other
members of the Selection Committee at the Chair's
or Director's request. On the basis of personal quali-
fications, academic record, expanded personal state-
ments, and letters of recommendation, competitive
applicants are invited for interview.

4. Interviews are held from March through April
at the University of Florida College of Medicine.
Applicants meet with the Director and Chair and have
interviews with two members of the Medical Selection
Committee.


5. The recommendations of the interviewers are
sent to the Director and Chair. They are responsible
for weighing the recommendations of the interview-
ers and the qualifications of each applicant against
those of the entire applicant pool. With the approval
of the Dean, the Director and Chair make the final
determination of each applicant's status. Applicants
accepted into the program are notified by May 30.

6. Following acceptance, a candidate has two weeks
to provide a written statement of intent to the JHMP
Office.

7. When the program is filled, a non-ranked alternate
list is established based on students' academic and
personal qualifications and the recommendations of the
members of the Medical Selection Committee. As
withdrawals occur, positions are filled from the
alternate list.


9. Selection into the program secures admission
into the College of Medicine at the University of
Florida, contingent upon satisfactory completion of
the junior year (third year). Each student's progress
is reviewed at the end of the junior year to deter-
mine whether the student has complied with the
prerequisites and maintained the high standards
expected of a student participating in this accelerated
honors program.

During the junior year (third year of under-
graduate training), students take courses on the
undergraduate campuses and three seminars taught
by College of Medicine faculty. During the senior
year (fourth year of undergraduate training), students
who have successfully completed the third year
merge into the standard first-year medical program.
Then, at the end of the first year of medical school
(the fourth year of college), students in the Junior
Honors Program receive a B.S. degree either from
the University of Florida or Florida A&M University.

Year 1 Year 2

College of College of
Liberal Arts & Sciences Liberal Arts & Sciences


Year 3 Year 4

Seminar
College of Medicine
College of
Liberal Arts & Sciences

Year 5 Year 6

College of Medicine College of Medicine


The junior year seminars provide extensive fac-
ulty contact and a solid background in biochemistry


and other areas of preclinical science.


The emphasis


Year 7

College of Medicine









approach to learning. In addition to these seminars,
students continue to register for course work within
the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Many stu-
dents in the program also participate in research
projects.
Additional information about the Junior
Honors Medical Program and the application proce-
dures may be obtained by writing the Junior Honors
Program, Office of Admissions, College of Medicine,
University of Florida, Box 100216, Health Science
Center, Gainesville, FL 32610.

Program in Medical Sciences (PIMS)

Since 1971, Florida State University has partici-
pated in an inter-university program with the
University of Florida College of Medicine. The first
year of basic medical science courses is spent at FSU
and the remaining three years of medical education,
leading to the M.D. degree, are completed at the
University of Florida College of Medicine in
Gainesville. The students selected for PIMS begin
their first year of medical education in May in a cur-
riculum that includes clinical preceptorships with


local primary-care physicians.


Information also maybe obtained on the PIMS web
site at .

Admission to the College of Medicine at
an Advanced Standing Status

A person may seek transfer to the College of
Medicine from a Liaison Committee on Medical
Education (LCME)-accredited United States or
Canadian medical school. Individuals who already
have received a degree from a college of medicine
will not be admitted to the M.D. curriculum at
advanced standing status. Acceptance at advanced
standing status will be provided rarely and only
under extraordinary circumstances. This will be con-
sidered within the context of the following guidelines
all of which must be met:


A vacancy must exist for the admission of a
person to advanced standing status in the
appropriate class.


The program is


designed to attract students with a special interest in
primary health care, particularly those who might
desire to practice in medically underserved Florida
communities.
The PIMS Admissions Committee is composed
of faculty from Florida State University, and local
physicians as well as the PIMS director and staff
administrator. The chair of the University of Florida
Selection Committee and the associate dean for stu-
dent affairs are permanent members.
There is an early application process open to
outstanding students of Florida State University,
Florida A&M University and the University of West
Florida. All legal residents of Florida may apply in
the general admission cycle-which begins each
September-through the American Medical College
Application Service. Successful applicants show evi-
dence in their lifestyle of a commitment to the ser-
vice of others, as personal attributes are an impor-
tant factor in the selection process. The premedical
curriculum should include a complete basic course
in biochemistry.









There must be extraordinary family reasons
which would be alleviated by transfer.

Previous undergraduate, professional or
graduate education must be adjudged
adequate in quantity, quality, and time
frame to have been competitive for admission
as a first-year student at this college and to
permit entry into the curriculum at a level
beyond the first year. An applicant who is,
for any reason, on probation or not in the
upper one-half at the school from which
transfer is sought will not be recommended
for transfer to this college.


There must be no history of attitudinal,
behavioral or emotional problems.

Applicants currently pursuing graduate
level work toward a Ph.D. degree or other
professional degrees are required to
complete all degree requirements prior to
application for admission to the College of
Medicine for study toward the M.D. degree.


Only under extraordinary circumstances
will an applicant not previously accepted by
the Admissions Committee be considered
for transfer at advanced standing status. Any
such request will be considered by the
Chairperson of the Admissions Committee
at the time the student was not accepted and
the Committee for Advanced Standing Status.


Initial consideration of an applicant for
advanced standing will be undertaken only when
the applicant furnishes the following information
upon request:


1) A signed narrative written by the applicant
expressing the circumstances which
prompted the request to transfer at an
advanced standing status.
2) A letter of recommendation from the dean
of the professional or graduate school in
which the applicant either was enrolled or is
presently enrolled. This letter must discuss


3) Official transcripts of all post-high school
academic course work.

4) Medical College Admission Test official scores.

5) A properly executed information form
furnished by the College of Medicine Office
of Student Affairs and Registration.

6) United States citizenship or permanent
resident alien certification.


7) An interview may be required of an
applicant judged to be qualified on the basis
of the furnished information.


Final determination of admission at advanced
standing status will be made by the Senior Associate
Dean for Educational Affairs, the Associate Dean for
Student Affairs, the Associate Dean for Medical
Education and the Chair of the Admissions
Committee with approval by the Dean.
Special programs of study leading to graduate
degrees in the basic medical sciences and admission
requirements for these programs are outlined on
page 51 of this catalog. Application for Admission at
advanced standing status will be available after
December 1 from the Advanced Standing Selection
Committee, Office of Student Affairs/Registration,
College of Medicine, PO Box 100216 UFHSC,
Gainesville 32610. The deadline for all advanced
standing application materials is April 1.


Professional Education Leading
to the M.D. Degree

Once a decision has been reached by both the
medical school and the applicant, the student will
pursue his or her educational endeavors from the
vantage of a physician striving to achieve well-
rounded capacities as a physician-humanist and sci-
entist in his or her profession and community.
The four years of medical education are divid-
ed into three blocks of time-Preclinical Course
work (two years), Clinical Clerkships (one year),
and Postclerkship Electives and Required Courses
(nn0 7o1ar










Changes may occur from year to year in order to
improve the educational program of the undergraduate
student of medicine.
The college reserves the right to affect policy
and regulatory changes at any time.

Preclinical (Years 1 and 2)


The preclinical course work is designed to pro-
vide students with essential basic science and gener-
al clinical information necessary for their clinical


training.


Teaching teams from both basic and clini-


cal science departments will participate.
Students may elect the option of taking the pre-
clinical basic science courses over a three- or four-
year period. This option provides an opportunity for
the M.D. /Ph.D. candidates and other students to begin
research activities earlier and in more depth. It also
lets students pursue course work outside the tradi-
tional medical school curriculum.
Additionally, this extended time track may be
advantageous to students with less intensive science
backgrounds who would benefit from more moder-
ately paced course work.
Contact hours per week for the standard two-
year curriculum range from 20-25. In the three-year
track, contact hours would range from 8-25 with an
average of about 17 contact hours per week.
A student's request to participate in the three-
year track must receive prior review and approval
by the Associate Dean for Education and the
Chairman of the Academic Status Committee.
During the first academic year, a student who
is in good academic standing can choose to move
into the three- or four- year program. To take advan-
tage of the opportunities that the three- or four-year
option offers, the decision should be made prior to
beginning the first year or prior to the first day of
the second semester. A student who fails any course
work or who meets the standards for dismissal and
is given the option of repeating an academic year in
its entirety is not eligible to elect the three-year option.
The course schedule under the standard two-


year curriculum proceeds


as follows. Complete


course descriptions begin on page 64.

FIRST YEAR


Disease (BMS 5204)

Medical Cell and Tissue Biology (BMS 5110)

Introduction to Clinical Practice (BMS 5173)

Essentials of Patient Care I and II
(BMS 5015, EPC II)


Human Behavior (BMS 5151)

Medical Aspects of Human
Genetics (BMS 5830, BMS 5003)

Medical Human Anatomy (BMS 5100C)

Medical Neuroscience (BMS 5020)

Principles of Physiology (BMS 5500)

SECOND YEAR


Epidemiology and Public Health


(BMS


5823)


General Pathology (BMS 5608)

Introduction to Clinical Radiology
(BMS 5191)

Medical Microbiology and
Infectious Disease (BMS 5300)

Oncology (BMS 5630)

Pharmacology (BMS 5404)

Physical Diagnosis and Clinical Diagnosis
(BMS 5830, BMS 5831)

Ethical and Legal Issues in Medical


Practice (BMS


5822)


Systemic Pathology and Laboratory
Medicine (BMS 5600)

rT/ T7 A fl










The required clinical clerkships include: surgery,
pediatrics, psychiatry, obstetrics and gynecology, an
interdisciplinary generalist clerkship and an inte-
grated clerkship in medicine, geriatrics, neurology


to strengthen their knowledge base prior to house-
staff training.
All elective choices must be made carefully in


conjunction with the student's


faculty advisor.


and anesthesiology. Students will spend


10 to 12


Clinical electives are available in all of the


weeks participating in clerkships at UFHSC-
Jacksonville. Housing will be provided during the
Jacksonville clerkships.
During these clinical clerkships, the student
becomes an integral member of the medical team
and has direct responsibility for his/her assigned
patients during rotation.
To provide some flexibility in the schedule, stu-
dents are allowed to defer a four-week unit of anes-
thesiology and neurology to the fourth year and
take an elective unit.
Deferring a clerkship requires approval of the
student's advisor, the clerkship director, the course
director for the chosen elective, and the Associate
Dean for Education.
Each clinical service conducts a variety of semi-
nars and conferences. These are considered to be
part of the clerkship and attendance is expected.


major disciplines of medicine. In the clinical electives,
students may work as advanced clerks, assuming
greater responsibilities than they had in the third year.
Elective courses in the basic sciences also are
available. Additionally, independent study programs
may be designed to allow study of areas in medicine
not represented by formal course offerings.
Students who wish to take more than three
months of extramural rotations must obtain their
advisor's permission and approval of the Academic
Status Committee. Students who rank in the lower
third of their class must have the approval of the
Academic Status Committee before applying for any
externship.
Each student must complete a minimum of 40
semester credit hours in the fourth year to be eligible
for graduation. However, students must remain en-
rolled and take coursework up to the time of graduation
regardless of the total credit hours accumulated.


CLERKSHIPS (Third Year)


Obstetrics/Gynecology, Pediatrics,
Psychiatry and Surgery (6 weeks each);
Interdisciplinary Generalist Clerkship (
weeks); MANA (an integrated 12-week
clerkship in Medicine, Anesthesiology,
Neurology and ACLS).


FOURTH YEAR


The fourth year occupies the last 11 months of
the curriculum and consists of seven elective experi-
ences, required advanced pharmacology, a four-
week advanced clerkship in medicine, pediatrics or
community health and family medicine and the
advanced surgery clerkship.
During the fourth year, students are permitted
considerable freedom in designing their programs.
For students who have already chosen a specialty,
fourth-year programs may be designed to provide
experiences related to their career choice.
For students who have not yet chosen a specialty,
the curriculum permits an exploration of interests in


REQUIRED COURSES AND ELECTIVES
(Fourth Year)
Senior Medicine, Pediatric or Community
Health and Family Medicine Clerkship
(4 weeks)
Advanced Pharmacology (4 weeks)
Senior Surgery Clerkship (4 weeks)
Electives (seven 4-week units)


POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR
EVALUATION, ADVANCEMENT AND
GRADUATION


The College of Medicine has adopted the following
policies and procedures to regularly review and


assess


the progress and performance of each student


in academic work, competence, professional con-
duct, clinical skills and overall performance ...


Administrative Structure

n..^










the final disposition of all student issues related
to performance and professional conduct.

* Senior Associate Dean for Educational Affairs
The senior associate dean is responsible for all
educational programs, including medical and
graduate student education, graduate medical
education and continuing medical education.


The senior associate dean


serves


as an ex- officio


member of the Academic Status Committee (ASC).


* Associate Dean for Student Affairs
The associate dean for student affairs is responsi-
ble for administrative actions related to student
admission, registration status and progress
through the curriculum.
The Office of Student Affairs maintains the offi-
cial student academic records and assists in
maintenance of the student database; therefore,
the associate deans for Student Affairs and
Medical Education are jointly responsible for
management and maintenance of student data


* Associate Dean for Medical Education
The associate dean for medical education is
responsible for the educational programs for the
M.D. degree. The associate dean also is responsi-
ble for management and maintenance of student
programs through the curriculum and related


student databases.


The associate dean also pro-


vides counseling and approves examination
absences and certain leaves of absences. The
associate dean is also an ex-officio member of the
Academic Status Committee.


needed for


and Executive Committee


deliberations and actions.


* Faculty
The College of Medicine faculty is responsible for
the evaluation of medical students in the courses,
clerkships and electives that comprise the
curriculum.


* Academic Status Committee
The Academic Status Committee has the respon-
sibility to review the progress of each student









and to determine the status of each student with
regard to promotion, remediation, probation or


dismissal.


The Committee also makes recome-


dations to the dean regarding graduation.
The ASC maintains direct responsibility for
appeals and actions such as leaves of absence
that exceed six weeks, dismissals, returns to reg
istration from disciplinary and academic leaves
of absence.
Nine voting members of the committee, includ-
ing the chairperson, are appointed by the dean
and include members of the clinical and basic
science faculty, one senior medical student and
one resident who is a graduate of this school. Ex-
officio members include the senior associate dean
for educational affairs, associate dean for medical
education, associate dean for student affairs,
assistant dean for minority relations, chair of the
admissions committee and all course and
clerkship directors.


formance may occasionally be superior, but not
consistently so; no significant portion of his/her
performance has been below the minimum level
of competency.

* D (Unsatisfactory): The student has performed
in a manner adjudged as marginal in relation to
the minimal level of competency. In some
aspects, performance may have been above the
minimum level, but in other aspects or at other
times performance has been below the minimum
level; confidence has not been engendered that
the student has demonstrated adequate mastery
of the pertinent competency. Review is required.


* F (Failure): The student performed in a manner
adjudged to be below the minimum level of
competency; while his/her performance may
occasionally meet or even exceed the minimum
acceptable level, this is the exception rather than
the rule.


Standards of Performance


The overall performance of each student is
reviewed on a regular basis by the Academic Status
Committee. Information upon which determinations
is made includes grades, written evaluations, pro-
fessional behavior and data submitted by the faculty
regarding cognitive and noncognitive skills; scores
on the United States Medical Licensing Examination
(USMLE); and scores on Performance Based exami-


nations (PBEs) given at intervals to
competence and clinical skills.


assess


students


Academic Performance

Students' performance in academic course work
is evaluated by letter grades A through F or Pass/Fail,
based upon demonstration of competency:

A (Exemplary): The student has performed con-
sistently in a manner adjudged as truly out-
standing. The performance is worthy as a model.

B (Superior): The student has performed consis-
tently in a manner adjudged to be clearly above
average comnetencv: his/her performance mav


* I (Incomplete): The I is to be used for students in
courses where the work is incomplete because
the student fails to complete required components
of a course. Grade requires the completion of all
requirements within one semester of notification
of grade for the pre-clinical course in which the
Incomplete grade is assigned, and within six
months of notification of the clinical clerkship in
which the Incomplete grade is assigned. Unless
an extension is granted by the ASC, Incomplete
grades change to F grades if the deadline is not
met. (The deadline for completion of Incomplete
grades does not apply while a student is on an
approved leave of absence.) This grade will be
replaced on the transcript when a final grade has
been assigned. Students with grades of I in pre-
clinical courses must complete the work neces-
sary for removal of the incomplete grade before
they can begin the third- year clerkships. All
Incomplete grades must be removed before a
student is eligible for graduation.

* H (Hold): The grade of H may be given when a
student is unable to complete course work due


to serious illness.


The grade does not convert


*










Professional Behavior

The College of Medicine expects all medical
students to be professional in their dealings with
patients, colleagues, faculty and staff and to exhibit
caring and compassionate attitudes. These and other
qualities will be evaluated during patient contacts
and in other relevant settings. Professional behavior
is defined as appropriate behavior to the circum-
stance. Behavior of a medical student reflects on a
student's qualification and potential to become a
competent physician. Attitudes or behaviors incon-
sistent with compassionate care, refusal by or inabil-
ity of the student to participate constructively in
learning or patient care, derogatory attitudes or
inappropriate behaviors directed at patient groups,
peers, faculty or staff, or other unprofessional con-
duct can be grounds for dismissal.
In conferring the M.D. degree, the University of
Florida certifies that the student is competent to
undertake a career as a Doctor of Medicine. It also
certifies that in addition to competency in medical
knowledge and skills, the graduate possesses those
personal traits essential to the profession of medi-
cine. Professionalism encompasses altruism,
accountability, compassion, duty, excellence and
respect for others.


United States Medical Licensing
Examination (USMLE)

All students are required to take Steps 1 and :
of the USMLE before graduation. Beginning with
the Class of 2002, all students are required to take
and pass Step 1 prior to proceeding through the
clerkship year and take Step 2 prior to graduation.

Criteria and Policies for Unsatisfactory
Performance


A grade of F indicates that the student per-
formed at a level requiring such a substantial
degree of remediation that repeating the course
would usually be recommended by the course or
clerkship director. Repeated course work must


result in a passing grade. Failure to do


so may


result in dismissal.

2. USMLE
Students are required to take and pass Step
1 of the U.S. Medical Licensing Examination
before beginning the required third-year clerk-
ships. Students are required to take Step 2
before they are allowed to graduate.

3. Performance-Based Exams (PBEs)
Students who do not perform satisfactorily
on the PBEs will be offered remediation prior to


retesting.


Unsuccessful performance following


initial remediation may result in a requirement
to repeat a portion of the curriculum and may
result in dismissal.

Probation and Dismissal

Students who fail to achieve satisfactory
progress are placed on probation or dismissed. The
purposes of probation are: to identify unsatisfactory
performance at an early date; to provide an oppor-
tunity for the student to seek academic or personal
counseling; to provide the student with further
opportunity to perform satisfactorily; and to notify
the student that satisfactory progress is not being
made toward standards required for graduation.
Failure to achieve a passing grade in remediated
course work or unsuccessful performance on a PBE
following remediation may result in dismissal. In accor-
dance with University regulations, any student with
less than a 2.0 grade point average is placed on pro-
bation. Additionally, the following standards apply
to students of the College of Medicine:


Remediation


1. Standard Four-Year Curriculum


1. Grades


A grade of D requires remediation of the
course work. Remediation requirements will be
oroDosed by the appropriate course or clerkship


a. First Preclinical Year


ovt0 ,, .-










No student is allowed to begin the second
year until all first-year courses has been
satisfactorily completed or the Academic
Status Committee has granted promotion.


Fourth Year


Probation
* D in required fourth year clerkship


Automatic Dismissal D or F in any elective
Automatic Dismissal


* F grades in course work totaling 10 or more
credit hours.
* D or F grades in course work totaling 14 or
more credit hours.
* Any grade less than C while on probation.

b. Second Preclinical Year


Automatic Dismissal
* F in required fourth year course or clerkship.
* D or F in elective course work totaling eight
or more credit hours.
* Any grade less than C while currently on
probation.


2. Optional Three-Year Preclinical Tract
Probation


* An F grades in course.
* D grades in course work totaling more than
four but fewer than 10 credit hours.

Automatic Dismissal
* D or F grades in course work totaling 10 or
more credit hours.
* Any grade less than C while on probation.

No student is allowed to begin the clinical
clerkships until all basic science course work
has been satisfactorily completed.
Students who have received D, F or I grades in
preclinical work are not allowed to continue
into the third year clerkships until the
Academic Status Committee has approved
appropriate remediation of that course work.

c. Third-Year Clerkship


First two years of the three-year option:

Probation
* Any D or F grades in course work fewer than
seven credit hours.

Automatic Dismissal
* F grades in course work totaling seven or
more credit hours.
* D or F grades in course work totaling nine or
more credit hours.
* Any grade less than C while on probation.

Third year of the three-year preclinical
option:


Probation
* Any F
* D grades in course work totaling four or


Probation more credit hours.
Probatron


* D or F grade in any clerkship.

Automatic Dismissal
* Any grade less than C in any clerkship while
currently on probation.

No student is allowed to begin the fourth
year until all D, F or I grades given during the
clinical clerkships have been remediated or the
student has received the express approval of
l-t n A --a -c Cf',-iClc C n'< mifnF, *r rYTrc'Al


Automatic Dismissal
* Any grade less than C while on probation.
* D or F in course work totaling 10 or more
credit hours.

No student is allowed to begin the clinical
clerkships until all basic science course work
has been satisfactorily completed. Students
who have received D, F, or I grades in preclinical
work are not allowed to continue into the










Action on Probation


A student will be removed from probation by
the action of the ASC when he or she has received
no grade of less than C for any course work during a
period of one calendar year after being placed on
probation and the student has maintained a grade
point average of 2.0 or better. The progress of any
student who has been on academic probation for
two consecutive years will be reviewed by the
Academic Status Committee for consideration of


dismissal.


of the


ASC.


Students who are allowed to repeat


fourth year course work will remain on probation
until they have successfully completed all of the
requirements for graduation.
Students whose dismissal for inappropriate
professional behavior is reversed by successful
appeal and who are permitted to continue in the col-
lege, will be on probation and will be dismissed
automatically if further unprofessional behavior is
found by the ASC. The committee will review the
status of all students on probation annually.


Recourse for Students Who are


Appeals for Reinstatement

A student has the right to appeal dismissal or
any other actions that affect his or her status to the
ASC.
The intent to appeal must be submitted by the stu-
dent in writing to the chairperson of the ASC two
working days after receiving written notification of


dismissal or other actions.


Unsuccessful in Their Appeal

A student who is unsuccessful in an appeal for
reinstatement may apply for new admission. In
such cases, the action of the ASC will be available to


the Medical Selection Committee.


LEAVE OF ABSENCES


The student will be noti-


fied in writing and invited to attend a meeting of the
ASC which will be convened within ten working
days to hear the student's appeal, unless justification
exists for a delay, in which case the student's appeal
will be heard as promptly thereafter as possible.
A denial of an appeal by the ASC may be appealed


to the dean of the College of Medicine.


The intent to


appeal to the dean of the College of Medicine must
be submitted by the student in writing to the dean
within two working days after receiving written
notification of a denial of appeal by the ASC. The
decision of the dean in all appeals is final unless the
president of the university or the president's
designee agrees to hear a further appeal. A student
must notify the dean and submit the appeal to the
president's office within two working days.


Students who are unable to complete required
courses or clerkships due to illness, hardship, or
special circumstances must contact immediately the
Offices of Medical Education and Student Affairs.
The student requesting temporary withdrawal must
submit a letter outlining the reasons for the request
to the associate dean for education and the chair of
the ASC.
Short-term leave or withdrawal for periods of
six weeks or less may be approved by the associate
dean for education. Leave periods of time greater
than six weeks requires review and approval of the


ASC.


All incomplete course work must be complet-


ed by the time specified in the letter sent by the
associate dean or education or chair if the ASC
approving the request for temporary leave.


Probation for Students Who Successfully
Appeal Dismissal


Leave of Absence


Academic


Students whose academic dismissal is reversed
by successful appeal and who are permitted to
repeat course work will be placed on probation and
will automatically be dismissed if a grade of less


A student is placed on academic leave of
absence by the Academic Status Committee for aca-
demic difficulties. Only the ASC can approve the
return to registration from an academic leave of
absence.










dent to registration from a disciplinary leave of
absence. The ASC may consider requests to return
from disciplinary leave of absence only when
accompanied by the results of a mandatory psychi-
atric evaluation.


Clerkships and Elective

A. Required Third-Year and Fourth-Year
Clerkships


- Educational/Research


Educational/research leaves of absence may be
granted by the associate dean for medical education.
The associate dean for medical education may
return students to registration from educational/
research leaves of absence.
The progress of medical students on education-
al/research leave of absence who are enrolled in the
MD/PhD, MD/JD or MD/MBA program will be
monitored for time spent out of "medical student"


registration.


All University of Florida College of
Medicine students must take their required
third- and fourth-year required courses and
clerkships on the University of Florida cam-
pus or at sites utilized by the required clerk-
ships. In case of extraordinary circumstance,
appeals for exceptions to this policy will be
considered and approved by the Academic
Status Committee. No student from other
institutions will be allowed to take any of the
required courses or clerkships.

Deferment of Third-Year Clerkships


- Personal/Medical


Personal/medical leaves of absence (including
maternal leave of absence related to pregnancy) may
be granted by the associate dean for medical educa-
tion to students who have compelling personal cir-
cumstances that are temporarily impeding their aca-
demic progress, or for documented medical reasons.
Only the ASC can return students from personal/


medical leaves of absence.


The ASC or the associate


deans for educational or student affairs, may require
a student to submit a physician's evaluation or
undergo a psychiatric evaluation before considering
a request to return to registration.


Leave of Absence


- USMLE


Students who do not pass the USMLE Step 1
examination are placed on USMLE-leaves of absence
by the associate dean for medical education.
Students will be reinstated upon successful comple-
tion of the examination.


Total time spent out of registration on leave of
absence may not exceed one year unless specifically
approved by the ASC on a prospective annual basis.
the associate dean for educational affairs, or


All students may defer up to four weeks
of the required anesthesiology and neurology
clerkships to the fourth year with approval of
the student's academic advisor, the course
director for the course elective and the associ-
ate dean for medical education. In case of
extraordinary circumstances, requests to defer
other clerkships may be made to the dean for
education. The elective to be taken in place of
the deferred clerkship must be designated at
the time of the application for deferment and
must have the approval of the elective director.
This information is specified on the deferment
forms. The deferred clerkships must be com-
pleted by the end of April in the senior year.

C. During the fourth year, students are allowed
to take electives and externships. All elec-
tives taken at locations other than Shands at
UF teaching hospital, the Malcom Randall
Veterans Affairs Medical Center in
Gainesville, Shands Jacksonville and Orlando
Regional Medical Center are considered to be
externships. Most students will be limited to
a maximum of three externships.

The following policies govern externships:


Leave of Absence


Leave of Absence










the Academic Status Committee before apply-


ing for any externship.


The ASC automatical-


ly reviews the status of all third year students
prior to the deadline for submission of the
requests for fourth year courses and electives.


Students who rank in the lower third and
wish to apply for more than one externship
rotation must have the permission of their
advisor and the ASC.


Any student who wishes to take three months
of externship rotations must obtain their advi-


sor's permission and the approval of the


ASC.


Requirements and Recommendations for
Graduation


The Academic Status Committee will review
the overall academic and professional performance
of each fourth year student in determining recom-


mendation for graduation.


To be considered for


graduation, a student must be judged to be in good
standing with a GPA of 2.0 or better, have success-
fully completed the OSCEs, and have taken and


passed Step 1 and taken Step


of the USMLE.


Graduation with Honors


Students who have demonstrated outstanding
achievements will be recommended for graduation
with honors. Excellence of different types in varied
fields will be considered, such as superior academic
work, outstanding student research and thesis and
other special achievements. Nomination of students
for graduation with special honors will be made by
the faculty. Selection will be made by the college's
Executive Committee.

ACADEMIC HONESTY


The University of Florida expects students to
be honest in all of their university classwork.
Therefore, students are required to commit them-
selves to academic honesty by signing the following
statement as part of the admissions process.


This statement serves to remind students of the
obligations they assume as students at the University
of Florida. Matters of violations of academic honesty
are adjudicated by the Student Honor Court, the
Health Science Center Student Conduct Standards
Committee and faculty.


HEALTH SCIENCE CENTER STUDENT
CONDUCT STANDARDS COMMITTEE


At the discretion of the University's Office of
Student Services, the Health Science Center Student
Conduct Standards Committee may assume respon-
sibility for the adjudication of alleged violations of
the University of Florida Academic Honesty
Guidelines for students enrolled in the College of
Medicine. The committee, appointed by the
President, is composed of five faculty members and
two students from each of the six health center col-


leges.


When a hearing is convened for possible stu-


dent conduct violations, the committee is composed of
four faculty members and one student from the col-
lege of the accused student and two faculty members
and one student from another health center college.
Five members of the committee must be present for a
hearing. When such charges are referred to the com-
mittee, the director of Student Judicial Affairs or
designee shall advise the students of their rights and
privileges. These include the following:

A) The right to be notified in writing of the
charges against him/her with sufficient detail
and time to prepare for the hearing;

B) The right to present evidence and witnesses in
his/her own defense;


The right to know the nature and source of
evidence which will be used against him/her;


The right to question adverse witnesses;


E) The right to freedom against compulsory
self-incrimination; and

F) The right to appear with an advisor at the
hearing.










a decision if a meeting is scheduled within 24 hours
following the decision of the Committee. The Dean's
decision may be appealed to the Vice President for
Student Affairs within five working days of notification


of the decision. The Vice President's


decision is final.


Student Conduct Code

Students enjoy the rights and privileges that
accrue to membership in a university community
and are subject to the responsibilities that accompany
that membership. In order to have a system of effec-
tive campus governance, it is incumbent upon all
members of the campus community to notify appro-
priate officials of any violations of regulations and
to assist in their enforcement. All conduct regulations
of the university are printed and made available to
all students and are applicable upon publication in
the Independent Florida Alligator, the undergraduate
catalog, the UF student guide, or other reasonable
means of notification.
The president is charged with the responsibili-
ty for establishing and enforcing regulations govern-
ing student life. Regulations are designed to enable
the university to protect against the conduct of those
who, by their actions, impair or infringe on the rights
of others or interfere with the orderly operations of
the university. Discipline may be imposed for
offenses against the Student Conduct Code occur-
ring at any of the following locations or activities:


University campus;


University-owned or controlled property;

Property or housing units assigned for respon-
sibility to the university, including, but not
limited to fraternity and sorority property;


Activities sponsored by the university;


E. Activities officially approved by the university
which are conducted by university-chartered
organizations; and

F. Off-campus activities as described in section VI
of the Student Conduct Code in the university's
iin ornrahrrlir t ratalncr


dure which shall ensure basic procedural fairness
including, but not limited to:


The right to be notified in writing of the
charges against him/her with sufficient detail
and time to prepare for the hearing;

The right to a prompt hearing before an
appropriate official, committee or court;

The right to know the nature and source of the
evidence which will be used against him/her;

The right to present evidence in his/her own
behalf;

The right to freedom against compulsory self-
incrimination; and

The right to appear with an adviser at the hearing.


Violation of the Code of Conduct

A student may be expelled or receive any lesser
penalty for the following offenses:


Furnishing false information to the university.

Forgery, alteration, or misuse of university
documents, records or identification cards.

Unauthorized use, taking possession or
destruction of public or private property on
campus, or acts committed with disregard of
possible harm to such property.

Actions or statements which amount to
intimidation, harassment or hazing.

Participation in or continued attendance at a
raid on a university living area, after warning
to disperse by a university official or any law
enforcement officer.

Disorderly conduct as defined in Florida Statutes.

Disrupting the orderly operation of the
university as defined in Florida Statutes, and
. ** 9 i. C














































Violations of Housing, Inter-Residence Hall
Association and area government regulations.


Violation of any discipline sanction, including,
but not limited to, conduct probation.


Possession, use, or delivery of controlled sub-
stances as defined in Florida Statutes.


Possession or use of a firearm on the university
campus except as specifically authorized in
writing by the university.


Action(s) or conduct which hinders, obstructs,
nr nthorhr^ic inforforoC \Azith Th( i rnnlmpntaftinn


subsection shall be construed to compel self-
incrimination.

Violation of any municipal ordinance, law of the
State of Florida, law of the United States, or rule
promulgated by the Florida Board of Regents.


Ticket scalping, i.e., selling tickets to any
University of Florida function or event being
held or to be held on the university's campus
for more than $1.00 over the original price.

Possession or use of fireworks, explosives,
dangerous chemicals, ammunition or weapons
(incl1dlin_ bhut not limited to. bows and arrows










Any actions, including those of a racial or sexual
nature or involving racial or sexual activities,
which are intimidating, harassing, coercive or
abusive to another person, or which invade the
right to privacy of another person.

Any action without authorization from the
university that does or causes to, access, use,
modify, destroy, disclose or take data,
programs or supporting documentation
residing in or relating in any way to a computer,
computer system or computer network or causes
the denial of computer system services to an
authorized user of such system.


Further information concerning the Code of
Conduct (i.e., off-campus conduct, postponement of
hearing due to pending or possible criminal or civil
charges, student's waiver of right to a hearing, sum-
mary of hearings, conflicts of jurisdiction, sanctions,
and appeals) are detailed in the university's under-
graduate catalog. Students in the College of
Medicine may request a copy of this information.

Student Counseling and Developing

The Office of Student Counseling and
Development provides assistance to all College of
Medicine students. The services provided by this
office include short-term personal counseling, sup-
port groups and workshops. Together with the
College of Medicine Education Center, this office
also coordinates the following career counseling
activities: MedCAREERS, the Glaxo Welcome
Pathway Evaluation Program, Myers-Briggs Type
Indicator and the Advisor/Mentor Program.
The topic of personal relationships has been the
most commonly discussed issue in counseling.
Other topics include: anxiety, stress, depression,
career ambivalence and residency selection.
Workshops are scheduled periodically throughout
the year on stress management, medical specialty
decision-making, and residency application and
interviewing, among others. Support groups for sig-
nificant others meet weekly when there is sufficient
interest.
Tn matters repardina possible mistreatment.


This information is not included in official student
records nor is it disclosed to the administration or
faculty. Understandable, some students may feel
more comfortable scheduling a counseling session
away from the College of Medicine. Therefore, an
alternate location has been arranged and students
may express this preference upon calling for an
appointment.
To obtain additional information or schedule
an appointment, students may stop by the office in
CG-82, call (352) 392-5482, or send an e-mail mes-
sage to . After hours,
students may contact the UF counselor-on-call at
(352) 392-1171 or the Alachua County Crisis Center
at (352) 334-0888.


Sexual Harassment Information and
Procedures

The University of Florida College of Medicine
is committed to maintaining a supportive and pro-
ductive environment for its students, staff, house-
staff and faculty. Appropriate professional behavior
is expected at all times by and toward every mem-
ber of the college. The College of Medicine has
adopted policies and procedures for addressing a
serious form of inappropriate behavior: sexual
harassment.
As stated in the University of Florida Policy on


Sexual Harassment:


"Sexual harassment occurs when


the submission or acquiescence in conduct of a sexual
nature is made a term or condition of an individual's
employment or academic performance;
Conduct of a sexual nature by an individual is used
as the basis for decisions such as employment, promotion,
transfer, selection for training, performance evaluation or
the basis of academic evaluation;
Conduct of a sexual nature creates an intimidating,
hostile, or offensive work or educational environment or
interferes substantially with an employee's work perfor-
mance or student's academic performance;
A sexual element is introduced into what should be
a sex-neutral situation causing the boundaries zohich nor-
mally exist between the professional role and the personal
relationship to become blurred; or
Subtle or overt coercion and threats are used to pur-
cIsc a c, lnl r7ln-inn;clim "










Individuals can help discourage sexual harass-
ment by speaking up when incidents are observed
or experienced; by being aware of possible misinter-
pretations of behavior that may be intended as
friendly; by not being intimidated by threats of
retaliation; by seeking assistance with any concerns
that arise; and by reporting substantive instances.
In the College of Medicine, the Program
Director of the Office of Student Counseling and
Development has been designated as the first con-
tact for any student seeking information, advice or
counseling regarding a matter of sexual harassment.
All communication will be held confidential. The
initial inquiry and counseling may 1) advise how to
prevent future inappropriate advances or situations,
2) offer mediation between two parties, or 3) explain
all options and advise a course of action. If, as a


result of information shared in the counseling


ses-


sion, it is determined that harassment has occurred,
the student will be strongly advised to file a formal
complaint.
A separate counselor is available as first contact
for members of the housestaff and faculty who wish
to seek confidential advice, mediation and assis-
tance in matters of sexual harassment.
Programs to educate the College of Medicine
community on the issue of sexual harassment and
professional behavior will be presented regularly
throughout each academic year. A primary goal of
the Sexual Harassment Committee is to develop
and promote effective programs to encourage
appropriate professional behavior and to prevent
the occurrence of sexual harassment in the College
of Medicine.


Student Grievance


creates unnecessary hardship. Such grievances may
concern, but are not limited to, the following: acade-
mic problems (excluding grades, except when there
is an allegation of illegal discrimination or where a
grade penalty has been imposed without proper
authority), mistreatment by any university employ-
ee, wrongful assessment of fees, records and regis-
tration errors, student employment and because of


race, national origin,
or disability.


sex, marital status, religion, age


College of Medicine Grievance Procedure
Prior to invoking the procedures described
below, a student is strongly encouraged to consult
the program director of the Office of Student
Counseling and Development, who is designated as
the first contact for any student seeking information,
advice or counsel. Subsequently, the student may
be encouraged to discuss his or her grievance with
the persons) alleged to have caused the grievance.
The discussion should be held as soon as the student
first becomes aware of the act or condition that is
the basis of the grievance.
Additionally, or in the alternative, the student
may wish to present his or her grievance in writing
to the persons) alleged to have caused the griev-
ance. In either case, the person alleged to have
caused the grievance must respond to the student
either orally or in writing within 10 business days.


Initial Review
If a student decides not to present his or her
grievance to the persons) alleged to have caused
the grievance, or if the student is not satisfied with
the response, he or she may decide to file a griev-
ance with the Student Advocacy Committee, which
shall conduct an investigation as warranted to


The University of Florida College of Medicine
is committed to a policy of treating all members of
the college community fairly in regard to their per-


sonal and professional concerns.


The student griev-


ance procedure ensures that concerns are promptly
dealt with and resolutions reached in a fair and just
manner. The college's procedure enables students to
bring complaints and problems to the attention of
the College of Medicine administration; the college
commevl c r rnl, b ,," zr ri r l-r, ," n 1 n c4-'.-n i i nnT l-c ,c 'br,


resolve any factual disputes.


The Student Advocacy


Committee will determine and present facts to the
department chair, who will be responsible for a
decision and disposition of the grievance.
The department chair's response should be
transmitted to the student and the dean within 10
business days from the date the Student Advocacy
Committee findings were provided to the department
chair. If the disposition extends beyond the 10 busi-
ness davs. the departmental chair should inform the









If there is a grievance against a department
chair, the Student Advocacy Committee will report
its findings directly to the dean, who will respond to
the student as described for the chair.
If the student is not satisfied with the decision of the
dean on the student's appeal or the grievance
against a department chair, the student may appeal
to the university's vice president of academic affairs,


whose decision constitutes final agency
university.


action of the


Substance Abuse Policy

The academic community must be able to rec-
ognize behaviors that are indicative of possible sub-


stance abuse.


Suspicion of abuse may be provided


by violation of the university student conduct codes
or failure in academic performance.
The college uses the services of the State of


Florida Physicians Recovery Network (PRN).


Once


it is felt that a student may have a substance abuse
problem, the PRN is notified and the college steps
aside once the investigation begins. The PRN iden-
tifies the problem, arranges for rehabilitation and
monitors follow-up. Expense for the rehabilitative
services is the responsibility of the student.
However, the PRN makes certain that lack of finan-
cial resources does not prevent needed rehabilita-
tion. Following reassessment, the college makes
every effort to see that the students gets "back on
track" to complete the requirements for graduation.
The Academic Status Committee requires approval
from the PRN for a student to reenter medical
school and proof of the probationary term is to be
continued.
A student who recognizes that he/she may
have a substance abuse problem or is concerned
about a fellow classmate may contact Dr. Beverly
Vidaurreta Wright, College of Medicine counselor
or Dr. Mark Gold in the Department of Psychiatry
for guidance or referral.


STUDENT HEALTH, HEALTH
INSURANCE AND IMMUNIZATIONS

The College of Medicine has a long-standing


the onset of actual patient contact. In addition, the
Office of Student Affairs offers educational pro-
gramming to assist students in the attainment and
maintenance of optimal physical and mental health.
Ultimately, each student is responsible for
his/her health and safety in the clinical/educational
setting. All students should learn appropriate poli-
cies and procedures to follow in the event that they
are injured or potentially exposed to bloodborne
pathogens or other communicable diseases. During
the orientation of both first- and third-year students,
presentations are given on universal blood and
body fluid precautions, infection control and pre-
vention of the spread of communicable disease. In
addition, the Student Advocacy Committee moni-
tors student health policies and procedures in order
to insure compliance with institutional and state
health requirements.

Pre-matriculation Health and
Immunization Requirements

Prior to matriculation in the UF College of
Medicine, a student must submit the following doc-
umentation:


J A screening health history form provided by
the Student Health Care Center (SHCC).


O A University of Florida College of Medicine
Health Agreement form

O Proof of current health insurance. Certification
of current health insurance is mandatory for
each registered year at the College of Medicine.


O Proof of two immunizations against measles,
mumps and rubella (MMR), or laboratory evi-
dence of a positive (immune) titer against each
of the three infections. In the absence of proof
of either immunization or immunity, students
will be reimmunized by the SHCC.


O Proof of a PPD skin test for tuberculosis (by
Mantoux) within the past year, and if positive,
proof of a chest X-ray negative for active disease.









cella vaccine must be submitted. In the absence
of proof of either immunization or immunity,
students can be immunized by the SHCC.

O Proof of the three-dose immunization against
hepatitis B, or completion of the three-dose
immunization series prior to the completion of
the first semester of the first year. Immunizations
can be obtained at the SHCC. Proof of the
completion of the hepatitis B immunization
series is required prior to patient contact.

In addition to the above required immuniza-
tions, up-to-date immunization against
tetanus/diphtheria is highly recommended.

Health and Disability Insurance

All UF medical students must be covered by
major medical insurance. It is not sufficient for the
student to seek care through the Student Health
Care Center, which offers only primary outpatient
care. Insurance may be acquired through a family
major medical policy, through a private insurance
agency, or by purchasing the University of Florida
Student Government Health Insurance Plan B. It is
highly advisable that the insurance plan chosen
offer appropriate, comprehensive coverage in
Gainesville and Alachua County, and not simply at


a distant city/county/state.


It is important for stu-


dents to realize that medical expenses for care pro-
vided by Shands hospitals and hospitals affiliated
with the College of Medicine, including laboratory
procedures and emergency care, are the responsibil-
ity of the student and not the College of Medicine or
the University.
The College strongly advises all medical stu-
dents to acquire disability insurance, to provide pro-
tection in the event of a long-term illness or injury.
Information on disability insurance policies will be
available to all students in the Office of Student Affairs.


Policies for Potential Exposures to
Bloodborne Pathogens and
Communicable Diseases

Policies and procedures concerning bloodborne
pathogen exposures and exposures to communica-
ble diseases are addressed during the orientation
sessions for first- and third-year students. These
policies are reinforced during the Surgery and
Internal Medicine clerkships, and may be accessed
via the internet at
.
It is the responsibility of the student to report
sharps injuries, needle sticks or other potential expo-
sure to bloodborne pathogens via blood or body flu-
ids immediately to the supervisor at the facility
where the accident occurs.
If the student contracts a communicable disease
that potentially poses a risk to patients or co-work-
ers (e.g. tuberculosis, varicella), steps will be taken
to prevent dissemination in accordance with student
health, public health and/or CDC protocols.
Certain communicable diseases may also be report-
ed to county or state health authorities as required
by law.

Potential Bloodborne Pathogen Exposures

It is the goal of the UF Student Health Care
Center to offer timely, state-of -the-art care for stu-
dents who have experienced potential bloodborne
pathogen exposures in the UF/Shands health sys-
tem. Time is frequently critical in managing blood-
borne pathogen exposures. Some treatment regi-
mens must be started within two hours of exposure
to be maximally effective.
In the event of a potential bloodborne pathogen
exposure, students should immediately contact a
medical provider at the Student Health Care Center
at (352) 392-1161. A member of the medical staff is
available for phone consultation 24-hours a day. The
SHCC medical provider will make recommenda-
tions for immediate evaluation and care as follows:

1) If the student is within a one-hour radius of
Gainesville (including the Shands at UF hospi-









Student Health Care Center facilities:

(a) The Student Health at Shands satellite
clinic, (352) 395-6979, Room A1-132,
located in the hallway across from the
Hyperbaric Chamber, open Monday
through Friday 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

(b) The Student Health Care Center
(SHCC) on campus at the main Infirmary
Building on Fletcher Drive, located next to
the Florida Gym, (352) 392-1161. During
spring and fall semesters, the SHCC is
open 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., Monday through
Friday, and noon to 4 p.m. on weekends


and many holidays.


During summer


follow current CDC guidelines in determining the
need for post-exposure HIV prophylaxis. If the
provider has questions, he/she could call the SHCC
at (352) 392-1161 or the Shands at UF Emergency
Department at (352) 395-0050. Appropriate first aid
should also be given for the injury in question, and a
tetanus booster when indicated.
If a student's health insurance ultimately deter-
mines that it will not cover a medically appropriate
course of prophylactic treatment for the student's
potential exposure to HIV (when exposure occurred
in the course of the student's college studies and
activities), the College may assist the student and
pay for the treatment. A student may request the
College's assistance by discussing their situation
with a representative of the Office of Student Affairs.


semester and semester breaks, the SHCC is
open Monday through Friday from 8 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m.


2) If the student is at an off-site rotation more
than an hour from Gainesville (including
Shands Jacksonville and rotations in Orlando),
the student should notify his/her rotation
supervisor and the UF SHCC, and then seek
care at the Emergency Department or
Employee Health clinic at their hospital, or at a
nearby hospital emergency center.
Subsequently, the student should call to make
an appointment at the SHCC at Shands or the
main SHCC at the Infirmary Building for
appropriate follow-up care.

3) After hours, the student should seek immediate
care for potential bloodborne pathogen expo-
sures at the Shands at UF Emergency
Department, (352) 395-0050, or at the local
emergency department for distant off-site rota-
tions. Once again, the student should call to
make an appointment at the SHCC at Shands
or the main SHCC at the Infirmary Building for
appropriate follow-up care.

In the event of any potential bloodborne
pathogen exposure, the student should obtain the
name of the source patient, medical record number,
room number and diagnosis. This information will


Students Ill with Communicable Diseases


By College of Medicine and Shands HealthCare
policy, students with communicable diseases or con-
ditions may not be allowed patient contact. This
restriction may be necessary to protect the health
and safety of UF and Shands patients and staff.
Persons with the following medical conditions
will not be allowed patient contact without a med-
ical clearance: Active chicken pox, measles, German
measles, herpes zoster (shingles), hepatitis A,
hepatitis B, hepatitis C, tuberculosis oral herpes
with draining lesions group A streptococcal disease
(i.e., strep throat) until 24 hours of treatment
received diarrhea lasting over three days or accom-
panied by fever or bloody stools, draining or infect-
ed skin lesions and conjunctivitis
If an ill student is unsure whether he/she should
participate in patient care, the student should con-
tact the SHCC clinical staff at (352) 392-1161.


Standard Universal Precautions

When providing patient care, regardless of the
real or perceived communicable disease status of the
patient, all students and staff should follow stan-
dard universal precautions:

Wash hands before and after patient contact,
according to hospital nolicv. even if gloves are










* Use gloves appropriately according to aseptic


and/


or sterile techniques, and change gloves


between patients.


In the event of a potential bloodborne pathogen
exposure in a student, the medical provider will rec-


ommend HIV testing


as a baseline and also at fol-


low-up intervals of six weeks, three months and


* Wear gowns/aprons


when soiling of clothing


months.


When testing is medically advisable, it is


with blood or body fluids is likely.


subject to informed consent and results are treated
confidentially.


* Wear masks, face shields and eye protection
when aerosolization of blood or body fluids


College of Medicine Dress Code


Policy


may occur.


* Dispose of sharps in designated rigid sharps


The official dress code of the College of
Medicine requires clean shirts and shoes for gradu-


containers.


Never recap by hand.


ate students and students in the preclinical


years.


Dispose of waste saturated with blood or body
fluids in designated red-bag trash containers.

College of Medicine Policies Regarding
HIV/AIDS and Other Communicable


Diseases


No shorts are to be worn. Ties for men and white lab
coats with name tags shall be worn by all students
and housestaff who have contact with patients or
are in patient-care areas.
All College of Medicine students, at all levels of
education and training, are expected to maintain a


proper professional image
appearance at all times.


in their behavior and


It is the policy of the University of Florida to


assess


the needs of students or employees with HIV


infection or other communicable diseases on a


case-


GRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE
PROGRAMS


by-case basis. If any such infection occurs in a med-
ical student, any recommendations made or actions
taken by the College of Medicine or the Shands hos-
pitals will respect the confidentiality and welfare of
the student, while also recognizing and responding
to issues regarding the welfare of patients, the
College of Medicine and the hospital. Each student's


situation will be evaluated by the College on a


case


case-


basis. With the permission of the affected


student, the director of the Student Health Care
Center (a physician) will assist in the coordination of
resources and services.
The UF College of Medicine and the Shands
HealthCare hospitals do not recommend the routine
HIV testing of patients, students or healthcare work-
ers. However, it is certainly prudent for individual
healthcare workers, including students, to be aware


of their own individual HIV status


so that they can


take appropriate precautions and measures.


With


current advances in HIV and AIDS treatment, early
intervention can be crucial to maintaining well-
being and delaying complications of the illness. If


Graduate Education in the Medical
Sciences


Programs Leading to M


., Ms/MBA and


Ph.D./MBA Degrees

The College of Medicine offers two graduate
programs leading to a Ph.D. degree: the
Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Biomedical
Sciences and the departmental Ph.D., program in
biochemistry and molecular biology. The college
also offers two M.S. degree programs: the col-
legewide M.D. in biotechnology and the M.S. in clin-
ical chemistry offered through the Department of
Pathology and Laboratory medicine. In collabora-
tion with the College of Business Administration,
the College of Medicine also offers combined
M.S./MBA and Ph.D./MBA degrees, which com-
bine the M.S. in biotechnology or the Ph.D.
Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Biomedical
nripnrpg with training in business administration.









hosts several additional interdisciplinary centers,
institutes and programs through which students
enrolled in degree-granting programs can obtain
specialized training. Complete descriptions of all
graduate programs are published in the University
of Florida Graduate Catalogue, which also is avail-
able online at http://web.ortge.ufl.edu/education/.

Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in
Biomedical Sciences


The basic science departments in the College of
Medicine together offer graduate training in bio-
medical research leading to a Ph.D. degree through
a single integrated graduate program the
Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in Biomedical
Sciences. The program prepares students for a
diversity of careers in research and teaching in acad-
emic and commercial settings. It provides a modern,
comprehensive graduate education in biomedical
science while providing both maximum program
flexibility and appropriate specialization for gradu-
ate students. Participating basic science departments
include Anatomy and Cell Biology; Biochemistry
and Molecular Biology; Molecular Genetics and
Microbiology; Neuroscience; Pathology and
Laboratory Medicine; Pharmacology and
Therapeutics; and Physiology; plus the Department
of Oral Biology in the College of Dentistry.
The Interdisciplinary Graduate Program in
Biomedical Sciences represents a cooperative effort
among six interdepartmental graduate concentra-
tions with a total membership of almost 200 faculty.
The six concentrations are biochemistry and molecu-
lar biology, genetics, immunology and microbiolo-
gy, molecular cell biology, neuroscience, and physi-
ology and pharmacology.
During the first year of study, incoming gradu-
ate students undertake a comprehensive interdisci-
plinary core curriculum consisting of five basic com-
ponents:


(1) an integrated two-semester lecture course
with associated discussion sections and grand
rounds covering the fundamentals of biomed-
ical science;


(4) a "survival skills" course which provides prac-
tical background in issues such as bioethics,
radiation safety and career opportunities;

(5) a weekly seminar program.

Students select from any of the affiliated
College of Medicine faculty for participation in labo-
ratory rotations conducted throughout the first year.
By the end of their first year, students select a labo-
ratory in which to conduct their dissertation
research, again choosing from any of the affiliated
graduate medical faculty. Students also elect an
affiliation with one of the six graduate concentra-
tions for their advanced training. Formal selection of
an advanced concentration and mentor is made after
completion of the core curriculum to maximize flexi-
bility and facilitate an informed decision. However,
students may make an informal commitment to an
advanced concentration or lab at any time. Through
the individual advanced interdisciplinary graduate
concentrations, students have access to advanced
courses and seminars in their chosen specialty,
which can be undertaken along with their disserta-
tion laboratory research.

Interdisciplinary Ph.D./MBA program

The joint Ph.D./MBA program trains scientists
to assume responsibilities as active research man-
agers in the biomedical sciences. The program com-
bines the Interdisciplinary Program in Biomedical
Sciences (described above) with MBA training pro-
vided through the College of Business
Administration. A student can obtain both degrees
in five to seven years approximately a year sooner
than it would normally take to obtain both degrees
if pursued consecutively.
Enrolled students take the Interdisciplinary
Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences core cur-
riculum during the first year, followed by a summer
of research. During the second year, students take
only MBA courses and complete the first-year MBA
core. Third-year students take courses and conduct
research in the College of Medicine, plus take one
business course each semester. During the fourth
year, students do mainly research, with some busi-










Ph.D. in Biochemistry and Molecular
Biology

The biochemistry and molecular biology facul-
ty provides students with an intellectually challeng-
ing and rewarding environment for research train-
ing in biochemistry and molecular biology. Students
can pursue a broad range of investigative opportu-
nities, including gene regulation, enzymology,
metabolic regulation, intracellular trafficking, mem-
brane biology and structural biology.
During fall and spring semesters of the first
year, students take three advanced level graduate
courses that include advanced molecular biology,
advanced metabolism and advanced structural biol-
ogy/physical biochemistry. Early in the fall semes-
ter, students also choose three faculty members with
whom to do short rotations, providing students
with different research experiences and perspec-
tives. At the end of the fall semester, students select
one of these faculty members as their research advi-
sor. Students and their advisor also choose a disser-
tation advisory committee, which helps guide stu-
dents during the remainder of their graduate career.
During fall of the second year, students write a
research proposal and defend it before the advisory
committee and members of the graduate studies
committee. A successful defense qualifies the stu-
dents as candidates for the Ph.D. in biochemistry
and molecular biology. Students will participate in a
weekly depart journal club and may take selective
advanced level courses, some of which their adviso-
ry committee may suggest as pertinent to the stu-
dent's research interests. Research progress toward
degree completion is overseen by the advisory com-
mittee, which meets twice annually to monitor
achievement. Research must be novel and add sig-
nificantly to the base of scientific knowledge.
Successful completion of the degree includes writing
the final dissertation and defending it in a public
forum.

M.S. in Biotechnology and the M.S./MBA
Program


The M.S. program in biotechnology trains stu-


supervision by a committee composed of members
of the university's graduate research faculty.
Specialization may be in any of the fields of research
being pursued in the College of Medicine and
includes molecular genetics, gene therapy, bacterial
or viral pathogenesis, protein structure, toxicology,
mammalian genetics, wound healing and congenital
eye diseases. The research is presented in the form
of a thesis which is defended in a public forum.
Students begin their laboratory experience with
a six-week intensive course in laboratory tech-
niques, then immediately identify and begin work
with a mentor of their choice. By the end of the first
year, the student should be able to define a thesis
project and know the techniques necessary to com-
plete it. In some cases, research may be completed
by the end of the first summer.
First-year training also includes lecture courses
and the biotechnology seminar, which provides an
in-depth and current perspective on a variety of
biotechnological problems whose solutions are of
interest to the business world and is the cement
which holds the two aspects of the NM.S./MBA
program together. The content of the lecture courses
addresses a critical need for a strong foundation in
molecular and cell biology, and provides an
advanced level curriculum in the specialty disci-
plines represented in the College. Both the seminars
and the lecture courses provide preparation for mas-
ter's research which should be well underway by the
end of the second semester. Ideally, students will
continue their research during the summer.
The second year of graduate study for the M.S.
student is devoted to finishing the required courses
and doing thesis research. An appropriate master's
theses project should involve learning a technique,
using the technique independently in a research
project, and analyzing and reporting the results.
Upon completion of the laboratory research, the stu-
dent writes and defends a thesis based on the
research.
The joint M.S./MBA program is designed
specifically for individuals who seek a career in the
biomedical industry as either researchers or admin-
istrators. The second year of study is devoted to
courses in the College of Business Administration,
with the third year devoted to finishing the MBA









M.S. in Clinical Chemistry

The Department of Pathology, Immunology
and Laboratory Medicine offers a master of science
degree in medical science with an emphasis on clini-
cal chemistry. The program encompasses the study
and application of analytical biochemistry to the
body in health and disease. A dynamic part of labo-
ratory medicine, the clinical chemistry field contin-
ues to grow and evolve into one of the more multi-
disciplinary areas of pathology, blending biochem-
istry, analytical chemistry, pharmacology, toxicolo-
gy, physiology, immunology, molecular pathology,
laboratory information systems, and management
science.
The program is designed for students seeking a
career in research and development in the medical
sciences, and for medical technologists seeking to
advance their careers toward laboratory manage-
ment, industry or teaching. The program may also
serve to prepare individuals for further graduate
studies. Courses in clinical chemistry, toxicology,
immunology, statistics, biochemistry, molecular
pathology, pharmacology and management are
required and will be tailored to each student's
needs. Completion of a research thesis is required
prior to graduation.


Biomedical Engineering Program

The Biomedical Engineering Program is an
interdisciplinary and collaborative graduate degree
(M.S. and Ph.D.) granting program with designated
departments in the College of Engineering, which
administers the program, and the College of
Medicine acting as partners in the education of bio-
medical engineers. The focus of the program is to
obtain a solid engineering background with an
understanding of how basic engineering principles
apply to a diversity of biomedical applications.
Several areas of specialization are offered within the
program including biomechanics, biomaterials, cel-
lular and tissue engineering, and biomedical imag-
ing and signal processing.


Other Interdisciplinary Programs, Centers


ty interdisciplinary programs, centers and institutes
through which students may enhance and specialize
their education. These include alcohol research,
biotechnology research, the Brain Institute, the
Cancer Center, environmental toxicology, gene ther-
apy, hypertension, mammalian genetics, neurobio-
logical sciences, neurobiology of aging, signal trans-
duction and drug development, structural biology,
toxicology, vision research and wound research.

Medical Scientist Training Program
(Combined M.D./Ph.D. Degree)

The Medical Scientist Training Program
(MSTP) is designed for highly qualified students
who are strongly motivated toward an academic
career in the medical sciences. This is a flexible six-
to seven-year program that attempts to provide in-
depth graduate education in a basic science disci-
pline, a rigorous medical education and an introduc-
tion to clinical investigation. The program is admin-
istered by the Medical Scientist Training Program
Steering Committee, consisting of members of both
clinical and basic science departments.
Candidates for the program must satisfy
admission requirements for the College of Medicine
and the Graduate School. Since successful candidates
are selected from those admitted to the College of
Medicine, application begins with standard
application to the medical school.
All candidates who receive the supplemental
application forms will be given the option to apply
for the Medical Scientist Training Program.
Direction for such application is provided at that
time. Successful applicants are expected to achieve
satisfactory scores on the Medical College
Admission Test and to have personal qualities of
high order, superior intellectual accomplishments,
research experience and genuine interests in human
welfare and an academic career.
The Graduate Record Examination is required
before matriculation into the Ph.D. portion of the
program. Students already enrolled in medical
school may apply to the program.
The student will enroll in all courses for the
M.D. degree. In addition, the student will be
required to complete the requirements for the Ph.D.









circumstances, other departments in the university
may be accepted as alternatives.
It is recognized that MSTP students in the first
two years of medical school will have received some
training in each of the basic sciences. Students in the
program also will be exposed to special seminars
and courses in human biology and clinical research
that are incorporated into the program. Therefore,
the "normal" course requirements expected of grad-
uate Ph.D. students by the individual basic science
departments will be waived and only one core
course, determined by the student's mentor in con-
sultation with appropriate members of the student's
department, will be required.
In some cases, this requirement may have been
met already through courses taken during the first
two years of the medical curriculum. The student's
Ph.D. graduate advisory committee reflects the
interdisciplinary nature of the program and will be
composed of the student's mentor and members of
both the mentor's department and the MSTP pro-
gram's educational committee.
The MSTP educational committee consists of
the MSTP steering committee plus appropriate qual-
ified faculty approved by the MSTP steering committee.
The program is designed to be flexible, and the
Medical Scientist Training Program Steering
Committee will assist in planning the curriculum
and determining progress throughout the student's
career, in keeping with the interdisciplinary nature
of the program.
In most cases, the student will be expected to
initiate a research project during the summer before
starting medical school and, if necessary, a second
research project the summer following the first
and/or second year after matriculation into the program.
The student usually selects a mentor for the Ph.D.
thesis by the end of the second year of the program.
Standards of evaluation for both the M.D. and Ph.D.
portions of the combined program will be similar to
those in the separate M.D. and Ph.D. programs.
The Committee on Academic Status of the
College of Medicine will evaluate the student's per-
formance and recommend promotion to the next
class or awarding of the M.D. degree. The Graduate
Advisory Committee, in conjunction with the MSTP
steering committee, will assess graduate performance.


the medical portion of the program on the condition
that both degrees are obtained.

Graduate Medical Education (Residencies
and Fellowships)

Graduate Medical Education is an integral part
of the training of the practicing physician. The
University of Florida recognizes the importance of
graduate medical education and sponsors programs
leading to board eligibility in virtually all the spe-
cialties recognized by the Accrediting Council on
Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). All of the
programs sponsored by the University of Florida are
approved by the ACGME and listed in the directory
of approved residencies.
Most of the residency training occurs in Shands
at UF or the adjacent Veterans Affairs Medical
Center. The family practice residency is based
primarily at the Shands at AGH hospital in
Gainesville.
Certain specialty programs rotate residents to
other hospitals in the region in order to maximize
their educational experience. All hospitals in which
graduate education is conducted hold certification
from the Joint Commission on Accreditation of
Health Care Organizations.
Formal residency programs are offered in anes-
thesia, dermatology, family practice, general surgery,
internal medicine, neurology, neurosurgery, obstet-
rics and gynecology, ophthalmology, orthopaedic
surgery, otolaryngology, pathology, pediatrics, plas-
tic surgery, psychiatry, radiology, thoracic surgery,
urology and vascular surgery. Salaries and benefits
are competitive with salaries and benefits paid to
other house-staff in this region of the country.
A limited number of clinical fellowships, some
of which lead to subspecialty board eligibility, are
offered in the various subspecialties of anesthesiology,
family practice, medicine, pathology, pediatrics,
psychiatry, radiology and surgery. Most departments
offer the opportunity to do research during residency
training, and trainees also can apply to work toward
advanced degrees in collaboration with the basic sci-
ence departments.
Application to the residency program should
hb mn, tmlo m th o mnarrhia nrncrrnm nr clirpctlv









schools accredited by the LCME and graduates of
foreign medical schools who hold the Educational
Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates
(ECFMG) certificate and have passed NBME Parts I
and II, FLEX or USMLE Steps 1 and 2.
For detailed program information and applica-
tion, the applicant should write the appropriate
department or contact the Office of Housestaff Affairs,
Box 100371, UFHSC, Gainesville, Florida 32610-0371.

Licensure

The United States Medical Licensing
Examination (USMLE) is a single examination sys-
tem for use by all U.S. medical licensing jurisdic-
tions to assess all candidates equitably for initial
medical licensure.
Initial licensure to practice medicine and
surgery in Florida can be obtained by completing all
three progressive steps required in the USMLE.

Step 1 focuses on key concepts of basic biomedical
science, with special emphasis on principles and
mechanisms underlying disease and modes of therapy.


Continuing Medical Education

The College of Medicine recognizes its respon-
sibility in the continuum of medical education by
assisting the physician-in-practice to gain new
knowledge and expertise to improve patient care.
The Office of Continuing Medical Education (CME),
under the direction of the Associate Dean for CME,
assesses the needs of the practicing physician and,
working with its advisory committee, plans work-
shops, conferences, seminars and symposia for the
practicing physician. The office also offers programs


using distance education technology.


These pro-


grams meet the standard of the American Medical
Association for category 1 credit. In addition,
departments and divisions within the College of
Medicine offer specialty rounds and conferences
that the practicing physician is eligible to attend. All
of these programs enable the physician to fulfill the
requirements of licensure in the State of Florida.
Other programs in CME are conducted in cooperation
with the Florida Board of Medicine, the Florida
Medical Association, the Florida Academy of Family
Physicians, and a variety of medical specialty groups.


Step 2 focuses on clinical science essential for prac-
tice within a supervised setting.

Step 3 will focus on aspects of biomedical and clini-
cal science essential for the unsupervised practice of
medicine.

The single examination system ensures the
maintenance of high standards based on perfor-
mance required of students in, or graduates of, med-
ical schools accredited by the LCME; strives for cost-
containment and efficiency in combining two exami-
nation sequences; and preserves the complementary
roles of medical licensing examinations and other
requirements for licensure, such as the quality and
amount of medical education and postgraduate
training.
Since various state laws differ as to licensure
requirements, it is the responsibility of the medical
student to become familiar with the qualifications
for licensure in the state or states that he or she
might consider as potential locations for the practice








STUDENT INFORMATION


FINANCIAL CONSIDERATIONS


The fee structure for Florida residents and non-
residents in the M.D. program of the College of
Medicine is subject to change from year to year and
is payable in accordance with university regulations.
Fee information can be obtained after July 1 by con-
tacting University Financial Services, S-113 Criser
Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611.
Students are registered for two semesters during
their first and fourth years and for three semesters
the second and third years. (Tuition is established
on a yearly basis and is independent of the number
of semesters for which a student is registered.) The
tuition includes fees for Student Health Services and
a student activity fee for each of the semesters. Most
of the services and facilities of the Student Health
Services are available to students without additional


charge.


The activity fee covers the student's atten-


dance at a wide variety of social, athletic and cultur-
al events which are offered by the university.
Textbooks and instruments needed by a first-
year student will require an expenditure of about


$1,400.


Purchase of a microscope will not be


required as the College of Medicine, through a spe-
cial fund, has established a microscope bank and
provides each entering student with a microscope
on a loan basis.
The minimal annual cost for a single Florida
resident for the first year is approximately $11,000
plus tuition.
By submitting a College of Medicine Financial
Aid application, you will be considered for the fol-
lowing scholarships and loans.


merit and who have a demonstrated financial need.
Preference in awarding scholarship aid will be given
to students who have expressed a desire to pursue a
specialty in pulmonary medicine.


Jean Lester Bennett, M.D., Scholarship Fund: An
endowed scholarship given to a senior medical stu-
dent who has decided on a career in pediatrics.


Ralph G. Blodgett Scholarship: Established by
Mrs. R. G. Blodgett, this scholarship supports quali-
fied students in the College of Medicine who need
financial assistance.


Dr. Mark David Buehler Scholarship Fund: This
scholarship, established by the family and friends of
Dr. Buehler, supports a student in the Junior Honors
Program with preference given to a student within
this program who expresses an interest in emer-
gency room medicine.

The Jules B. Chapman, M.D., Scholarship Fund:
An endowed fund established in memory of Dr.


Chapman.


This three-year scholarship is awarded


to a second-year medical student from Florida who
has demonstrated a compassionate and caring man-
ner, is interested in pursuing a career in primary
care, has achieved academic success and is in need
of financial assistance.

Denny M. Cook, M.D., Scholarship: An endowed
scholarship established in 1997 by the family and
friends of Denny M. Cook, a 1966 graduate of the
University of Florida College of Medicine.


SCHOLARSHIPS


Scholarships are need-based and the amounts
vary each year depending on the amount available in
the fund and the number of students who apply.


Hilda W. Dobbins Scholarship: Endowed scholar-
ship established in 1994 with preference going to
medical students from the eastern section of Palm


Beach County.


This scholarship is to be awarded to


qualified students in the College of Medicine.


W. Paul Bateman Scholarship: Established by the
Bateman Foundation, this scholarship assists worthy


The Maurice H. Givens Scholarship Fund: An
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1977 to assist worthy students who demonstrate a
need for financial assistance.


Avonelle C. Noah Scholarship Fund: An endow-
ment fund was established in 1968 under the terms


of the will of Mrs. Avonelle C. Noah.


Gold Family Scholarship Fund: Provides need-
based scholarship awards with priority given to
black or African-American students who are gradu-
ates of New Jersey high schools.


Hugh M. Hill, M.D., Fund for Student Financial
Assistance: This fund was established in 1991 to
honor the Associate Dean for Student and Alumni
Affairs, Hugh M. Hill, M.D. This fund includes
alumni donations and is used to assist needy stu-
dents in the College of Medicine.


The George Graham Hunter Scholarship Fund:
This scholarship is awarded each year to an under-
graduate medical student in the field of


orthopaedics.


The recipient of the scholarship shall


be designated by the orthopaedic faculty and
approved by the Dean of the College of Medicine.


Kenneth Leathers Scholarship: This endowed
scholarship was established in 1995 to assist second-,
third- and fourth-year medical students who have
shown leadership and have financial need.


Joyce Lindy Levin Scholarship: This endowed
scholarship was established in 1996 to to help needy
medical students with high academic standards.
Students from the Florida Panhandle area will be
considered first.

Charlotte Liberty Scholarship: An endowed fund
established in 1995 under the terms of the will of
Charlotte Liberty to provide financial assistance to
College of Medicine students.

C. J. Miller Scholarship: An endowed fund whose
purpose is to support a junior or senior medical stu-
dent in good academic standing who is in need of
financial assistance.


The Nell C. Miller Scholarship: This endowed fund
was established in 1982 under the terms of the will
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The income


from this fund is used to assist worthy students in
the College of Medicine.


Susan O. Rasmussen Scholarship: This fund pro-
vides financial assistance to students from central
Florida who are enrolled in the College of Medicine
and have financial need.


Scholarships for Disadvantaged Students: A feder-
al scholarship awarded by the school, giving prefer-
ence to students who are from disadvantaged back-
grounds and for whom the costs of attending the
school would constitute a severe financial hardship.


Wheat Medical Scholarship Fund: An endowment
fund was established in 1967 under the terms of the


will of Mrs. Eva H. Wheat.


The income from this


fund is used to assist worthy male medical students
selected by the College of Medicine to continue their
education.


William Warren and Marie C. Wolff Scholarship:
This scholarship was established to assist needy,
worthy and talented young men and women medical
students who are dedicated to the science of medicine,
and who otherwise could not receive such education.


SCHOLASTIC AWARDS

Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society: The
Beta Chapter of Florida was installed at the University
of Florida College of Medicine on May 9, 1960. A
small number of students of the junior and senior
classes are eligible for membership. Selection is
based upon high academic standing, personal and
professional character, and promise for future con-
tributions to medicine.


Alumni Scholastic Award: This award was estab-
lished by the University of Florida Medical Alumni
Association from donations by its members and is
awarded at the end of the junior year to students
1 1 1 i 1" 1 1 11









to a senior student for outstanding performance in
internal medicine.


Paula Ellis Award: The Gainesville Junior Woman's


Club established this award


as a memorial to Paula


Ellis. It is given to a medical student chosen for aca-


The Thorkild W. Andersen Award: The


demic excellence and/or meritorious


service


Department of Anesthesiology established this award
to honor one of the department's first faculty mem-
bers. It is presented to the senior medical student
who has made the greatest overall contribution to the
College of Medicine and his or her fellow students.


The Dean Mitchell Baker Award: This award was
established by Dr. and Mrs. Roy M. Baker of
Jacksonville in memory of their son and is awarded
each year to a graduating medical student for excel-
lence in pediatric cardiology.


Bythewood & Baker Memorial Academic Award
for Women Medical Students: An endowed fund
was established in 1968 by Miss Martha Isabel Mays
and is awarded to a junior female medical student
who is judged to be academically outstanding.

The Hugh and Cornelia Carithers Award:
Established by Dr. Hugh and Cornelia Carithers of
Jacksonville, this endowed award is presented each
year to a graduating student on the basis of overall
accomplishments and aptitudes in child health and
human development.


shows promise and interest in the prevention or
treatment of cancer.

W.F. Enneking Award: Established and funded by
the Musculoskeletal Oncology Fellows of the
Department of Orthopaedics, this award is given
annually to the graduating medical student who, in
the opinion of the faculty of the orthopaedic depart-
ment, shows the most promise of making a contribu-
tion to medicine through an academic career.


The Faculty Award for Research: This award is
given to the graduating medical student who has
made the most outstanding contribution through
research during the course of medical school.


Florida Chapter of the American College of
Surgeons Award: Given to an outstanding student
in the graduating class, this award honors a student
who will pursue a career in surgery.

The John Gorrie Award: This award, instituted by
Dr. Theodore F. Hahn Jr., is presented each year to
the graduating medical student who, in the opinion


of the faculty of the College of Medicine,


Charles Collins Obstetrical and Gynecological
Award: Established in 1975 by the Florida
Obstetrical and Gynecological Society to honor
Dr. Charles Collins of Orlando, this award is given
each year on a rotating basis to a graduating medical
student in one of the three medical schools in the state
who has shown academic excellence and outstanding
performance in obstetrics and gynecology.

The Dr. Robert R. Donahoe Memorial General
Surgery Award: This award, established in memory of
Dr. Donahoe, is to recognize a senior student who has
chosen a career in general surgery and who has exhib-
ited superior skill and dedication to patients.


is the best


all-around student showing promise of becoming a
practitioner of the highest caliber.


Scott Gross, M.D., Memorial Book Award: This
award was established by the Class of 1988 in memory
of their classmate, Scott Gross, who died of cancer
shortly after graduation. The class requests that the
prize, a pathology text, be given to a rising second-
year student who best represents the attributes
displayed by Scott-a sense of humor, interest in art
and music, an active participant in class projects
and, most importantly, courage and perseverance.

Florida Obstetric-Gynecologic Society Award:


Class of 1980 Donegan Award: The Class of 1980
established this award for peer recognition of academic


Given by the Society, this award


recognizes


a senior


student who has distinguished himself/herself
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chosen for productive effort and scientific contribu-


tion.


The research must have been presented at a


Mark W. Herrbold Memorial Award:


This award


was established by Francis Herrbold, a member of
the Class of 1998, in memory of his father. It is to be
awarded each year to a third-year medical student
who has demonstrated "extraordinary determina-
tion and perseverance in their pursuit of a medical
education."

The Luther W. Holloway Award: The Florida
Pediatric Society established this award in honor of
the late Dr. Luther W. Holloway. It is to be awarded
to the senior medical student showing the greatest
proficiency in child health.


Juri V. Kaude, M.D., Ph.D., Medical Student
Research Award in Radiology: This award, estab-
lished by the Department of Radiology, recognizes a
senior student who has been involved in research in


diagnostic radiology.


Research may be either inves-


tigative or clinical, and the student may have partic-
ipated either as the primary investigator or as a


Medical Student Research Conference during the
academic year.

Lyerly Neurosurgical Group Award: The Department
of Neurological Surgery presents this award to the
graduating medical student who has distinguished
himself /herself in the field of neurological surgery.

Genevra Todd and Henry E. Meleney Memorial
Award: This award, established originally by the late
Dr. Henry E. Meleney in memory of his wife, is
given to a medical student for outstanding achieve-
ment during the first two years of medical study.

Walt Oppelt Memorial Award: Established in
memory of the late Dr. W. Walter Oppelt by
friends, associates, and the departments of Pharmacology
and Therapeutics and Medicine, this annual award
is presented to a medical student who has excelled
in the field of pharmacology and therapeutics.

William Osler Award in Internal Medicine: This
award was established by the Department of Medicine
and is donated by past and present chairmen of the
Department of Medicine, chiefs of the Medical
Service at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center and
chief residents in medicine. It is given to the
graduating medical student who has demonstrated
outstanding proficiency and excellence in internal
medicine.

Palm Beach County Medical Society Auxiliary
Award: This award is given by the Palm Beach
County Medical Society Auxiliary to a third-year
medical student who is a graduate of a Palm Beach
County high school and who had the highest grade
point average of the Palm Beach County students at
the end of his or her second year in medical school,
with a grade of "B" or better being acceptable.

Guillermo J. Perez Memorial Scholarship Award:
The Department of Pediatrics established this award in
memory of the late Dr. Perez, a former member of the
pediatric faculty, to recognize a senior medical student









dent who has achieved the highest academic
standing in the basic sciences.

Senior Excellence Award in Radiology: Given by
the Department of Radiology, this award recognizes
a senior student, entering any specialty, who has
demonstrated outstanding achievement in the
senior elective in radiology.

Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Award: The
Division of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery
established this award to recognize that senior med-
ical student who has shown academic achievement
and excellence in this surgical specialty.

Dr. Peter Regan Award: This award, named in
honor of the first chairman of the Department of
Psychiatry, is given to recognize a senior student
who has demonstrated excellence and has a career
goal in the field of psychiatry.

Sandoz Award: Instituted by Sandoz Pharmaceutical,
this award is presented annually by the Department
of Community Health and Family Medicine to a senior
medical student in recognition of superior academic
achievement and contribution to health care.


ating medical student who has distinguished him-
self/herself in neonatal-perinatal medicine.

J. Craig Spencer Memorial Award: Established by
the family and friends in memory of Dr. Spencer.
This award is given to an individual with a compas-
sionate and caring manner and who has achieved
academic success.

John Harrington Tanous, M.D., Cancer Research
Award: Presented each year by the Watson Clinic of
Lakeland, this award recognizes outstanding
research by a medical student in the general area of
clinical or basic aspects of cancer and cell growth.

The William C. Thomas Sr. Award: This award
honors an outstanding senior medical student with


an interest in obstetrics and gynecology.
is made possible by the Florida Obstetric


The award


Gynecological Society.

F. Eugene Tubbs, M.D., J.D., Memorial Award:
This award was established in 1979 in memory of
the late Dr. Tubbs, a former resident physician in the
College of Medicine and member of the Florida


House of Representatives.


This award is given jointly


The Betty Schmidt Memorial Award: Given in
memory of Mrs. Betty Schmidt, a charter member of
the University of Florida Medical Guild, this award
is presented to a junior or senior medical student
who has worked constructively for the improve-
ment of academic life and the learning of the sci-
ences of medicine.


each year to a University of Florida senior medical
student and a Florida State University law student
who have demonstrated excellence in their field.


The University Medical Guild Academic
Scholarship: Given each year to a first-year student
based on scholastic accomplishments and financial


need.


This award is for four consecutive years of


medical school provided scholastic merit is maintained.


Roger G. Schnell Neurology Book Award: Dr.
Roger G. Schnell, of Ft. Lauderdale, established this
award to honor a medical student who has shown
excellence in clinical neurology.


The George T. Singleton, M.D., Award:
Established by the Department of Otolaryngology to
honor Dr. Singleton, this award is presented to a
senior medical student who has shown academic
achievement, research interest, clinical skills and
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The University Medical Guild Scholarship
Awards: These awards are presented each year by
the University Medical Guild to a second-year and
third-year student who are judged to be outstanding
scholastically and to an entering student on the basis
of need and scholastic excellence.


The University Medical Guild Graduate Research
Awards: Presented each year to four graduate stu-
rdpnt- in thp basic mprlnial qipnrp whn arp iidcrpd









The University of Florida Medical Guild Award in
Memory of Mrs. J. Hillis Miller: Given annually to
a first-year student, this award is to recognize out-
standing academic achievement by a student during
the first year of medical school.

The University of Florida Medical Guild Memorial
Award for Academic Excellence: This award is pre-
sented to a graduating senior by the University
Medical Guild to recognize academic excellence
through four years of medical school.


AMA-ERF Loan: This loan was established in 1994
by the AMA Education and Research Foundation
from donations by its members and administered in
accordance with the procedures established for the
College of Medicine Loan Fund.

University of Florida College of Medicine Alumni
Association Loan: This loan was established by the
members of the college's Alumni Association from
donations by its members and awarded to worthy
students in financial need.


The University Medical Guild Professional
Development Scholarship Award: This scholarship
is awarded each fall to a senior medical student
based on scholastic achievements and financial need.


Westwood Pharmaceutical Award: The Division of
Dermatology presents this award to a senior medical
student who has shown ability, enthusiasm and
motivation in the field of dermatology.


Edward R. Woodward Surgical Award: This award,
established by the Department of Surgery, is given to a
senior medical student who best demonstrates strengths
of moral and ethical fiber, social consciousness, and
the traits of intelligence, tenacity and perspicacity.


LOAN FUNDS


College of Medicine Loan Funds: Loans from these
funds are available to students enrolled in the College
of Medicine who are in good academic standing and
can show sufficient evidence of financial need. Interest
(at 9 percent) begins at graduation and continues until
repayment is completed. Repayment ordinarily begins
one year after graduation and completed within five
years. Short-term loans are available through the Office
of Student Financial Services and the College of
Medicine for emergencies, but must be repaid within
the semester borrowed.

These funds have been made possible by grants from
the W. K. Kellogg Foundation; the Selby Foundation;
the Helen Stargardt Memorial Loan Fund; the George


Dudley Beaumont Loan Fund: This fund


was left to


the College of Medicine early in the school's history
as a memorial loan fund to assist in meeting the
financial needs of its students. It is administered in
accordance with the procedures established for the
College of Medicine Loan Fund.


Robert A. and Martha Eifert Loan Fund: This
revolving loan fund was established in 1994 to assist
needy and worthy students in the College of Medicine.


Primary Care Loan (PCL): A federal loan that is
awarded by the medical school to students with
exceptional financial need at an interest rate of 5
percent. Any student receiving this loan must agree
to enter and complete a residency training program
in primary health care (family medicine, general
internal medicine, general pediatrics or preventive
medicine) no later than four years after the date on
which the student graduates from the school; and to
practice in such care through the date on which the
loan is repaid in full.


The George Graham Hunter Loan Fund: This trust
fund, established in 1968, is for the purpose of making
loans available to qualified medical students or resi-
dents in orthopaedics.


Loans for Disadvantaged Students (LDS):


A federal


loan that is awarded by the medical school to students
with exceptional financial need and/or a student that
comes from an environment that has inhibited the
individual from obtaining the knowledge, skills and
ahl-ili;aoc roniror f n onrnl1 in and crradnhat' frmm a










tered in accordance with the procedures established
for the College of Medicine Loan Fund.


W.K. Kellogg Foundation Medical Loan Fund: This loan
was established in 1958 to assist needy medical students.

M.D./Ph.D. Forgivable Loan: This loan is available to
students in the program during their medical student years
and provides up to $23,000 per year, depending on funding.

The Barbara S. Michael Loan Fund: A revolving
loan fund established in 1977 for needy and worthy
students in the College of Medicine.

The Dr. P. Phillips Foundation Loan: This loan
fund was established to assist financially needy
students from Orange County who have shown
academic achievement.


Maude Halstead Rhodes Loan: This fund was estab-
lished in 1987 to provide loans to third- and fourth-
year students up to a maximum of $3,000 per year.


William and Mary Selby Loan Fund: The Selby
Foundation established this loan fund in 1958 to
assist needy medical students.


Federal Direct Stafford Loan (FDSL): This is a fed-
erally insured program that has a variable interest
rate, capped at 8.25 percent for loans made on or


after July 1, 1994.


The interest is paid by the federal


government while the student is in school.


There is


an origination fee of 4 percent which is charged at
disbursement. Graduate and professional students
can borrow up to $8,500 per year up to $65,500,


including undergraduate loans.


The amount of eli-


gibility is dependent on a student's need within the
constraints of an approved budget. Financial need
is determined from the Free Application for Federal
Student Aid (FAFSA). All graduate/professional
students are considered independent for financial
aid purposes.


Federal Direct Unsubsidized Stafford Loans (FDUSL):
This program is the same as the Federal Direct
Stafford Loan, except the borrower is responsible for










repaying the interest beginning on the date of their
first disbursement. A borrower can request a defer-
ment, however, the loan is subject to "capitaliza-
tion." This loan is not need-based. Students may
borrow funds over and above their eligibility for
FDSL, up to their cost of education minus other aid,
or FDSL program limits, whichever is less.
Graduate and professional students may borrow up
to $18,500 per year (less amounts borrowed through
FDSL) if within the budget, up to $73,000 total,
including undergraduate loans.
Additional information can be obtained from
the Financial Office College of Medicine, University
of Florida, PO Box 100216, UFHSC, Gainesville, FL
32610-0216.


Marie Rosa Valicenti Loan Fund: Established in
memory of Mrs. Valicenti by the Carmen Valicenti
Trust to provide loans for students from the north-
ern part of Brevard County or Orange County.

Hugh and Mabel Wilford Loan Fund: This trust
fund was established in 1970 for the purpose of
making loans available to assist worthy and needy
students to attend the University of Florida College
of Medicine. This loan fund will be administered in
accordance with procedures established for the
Health Professions Student Loan Program.
Other Sources: Many students have received finan-


cial support from local sources.


These fellowships are available to incoming
medical students during the summer prior to their
matriculation. The only other time that full-time
research (10 weeks) is generally available is during
the summer between the first and second year of
medical school. Fellowships are awarded on a com-
petitive basis with a progress report and continua-
tion application required for each semester. In
addition to providing fellowships for research, this
program also sponsors a Research Day for medical
students to report the findings of their research and
will contribute funds (when available) to the travel
expenses of medical students who present the
results of their research at national conferences.
On the basis of the results of the research projects
and their presentation, medical students are eligible
for the annual Faculty Research Award, Albert G. King
Award, John Harrington Tanous, M.D. Cancer Research
Award, and the Alpha Omega Alpha Research


These may be dis-


covered by inquiries addressed to voluntary health
agencies, medical organizations, service clubs,
church organizations or trust departments of banks.

FELLOWSHIPS

Student Research Fellowships: These fellowships
are made possible by grants from voluntary health
agencies in Florida, pharmaceutical firms, the
American Medical Association Education and
Research Foundation, the National Institutes of
Health and other agencies.
Medical student research holds high priority in
the College of Medicine with the primary objective
being that of involving the inquisitive student in a
self-learning experience in medical research.


-<










Graduating students may also be considered


for Graduation with Honors based on research.


LIVING ACCOMMODATIONS

On-campus housing may be arranged by con-
tacting the Division of Housing, University Housing
Office, University of Florida, PO Box 112100,
Gainesville, FL 32611-2100, (352) 392-2161/
Fax: (352) 6819.
On-campus housing is limited; medical students
are encouraged to apply for housing immediately
upon acceptance to the College of Medicine.
Housing is available to medical students in the
New Residence Facility and Village Communities.
The New Residence Facility features apartment-
style housing for single residents. Each apartment
has four single bedrooms, two baths, a kitchen and


living room area.


Award.


The 1998-99 rent rate is $1,597 per


resident, per semester and includes limited utilities,
cable television service and local phone service.


Apartments for single and married medical
students are available in several Village Communities
on campus. Most villages are two-story brick build-
ings featuring one-, two- and three-bedroom apart-
ments. The 1998-99 rent rate ranges from $261 to
$464 per month and includes local phone, water,
garbage and cable television service. Cable televi-
sion service is additional in Corry Village. Other
utilities are additional.
Off-campus housing information is available
from the Division of Housing and may be requested
in person or through the mail. Students will be
placed on a waiting list according to the date their
application is received by the Housing Office.







..: .* : *':
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The following courses constitute the preclinical
component of the curriculum for the M.D. degree
and are offered to medical students during the first
and second years. Some of the courses are available
to graduate students in the university, but the num-
ber of students who can be accepted is limited by
laboratory facilities, and enrollment requires the
approval of the course director.


FIRST YEAR


BMS 5015 ESSENTIALS OF PATIENT CARE I


4 credits.


This course is the first in a series covering


the skills and behaviors necessary to care for


patients.


The course consists of four interlocking


components: communication and interviewing
skills; ethical and legal issues; Keeping Families
Healthy; and Basic Clinical Skills.
The communication and interviewing skills
portion covers the following topics: the fundamen-
tals of good communication; patient-centered and
physician-centered interviewing; history of present
illness; review of systems; past medical history; rec-
ognizing and responding to emotions; and present-
ing patients to other health professionals. The ethics
and law component will focus on: the process of
resolving problems in biomedical ethics, ethical
aspects of various models of patient/physician rela-
tionships, basic and ethical and legal issues in
informed consent, confidentiality and truth-telling.
Keeping Families Healthy is a year-long experience
that includes home visits with families in the com-
munity. During the first semester the focus is on
family systems, interactions with the health-care
system, and health beliefs. Keeping Families
Healthy continues in the second semester with a
focus on health promotion and disease prevention.
Basic Clinical Skills is a yearlong introduction to the
physical examination. Working in the Harrell
Assessment Center, students will learn and practice
the skills of physical diagnosis.

BMS 5016 ESSENTIALS OF PATIENT CARE II


AV r1 I


"i'1_ *|_- ; ....-_* ....- r r t... . .-


dent's expertise in the performance of the physical
examination. Small groups integrated with the
Human Behavior course will address issues such as
death and dying, addictions, aging, sexuality and
advanced interviewing skills. Each home visit will
be aligned with a task related to course content, such
as nutritional status, cardiovascular risk appraisal
and cancer screening knowledge. Each home visit
will be discussed in a small group debriefing, allow-
ing each student the opportunity to discuss, analyze
and share their community experiences.


BMS 5020 MEDICAL NEUROSCIENCE
5 credits. This course provides an integrated and
multidisciplinary approach to the study of central
nervous system structure and function. The course
includes the study of neuroanatomy, neurochem-
istry, neuroembryology, neurohistology, and neuro-
physiology. Sensory and motor system functions
also are stressed. The laboratory portion of the course
is intensive, allowing students to develop a working
knowledge of human brain structure and organiza-
tion. There also is a strong emphasis on applying
basic science information to actual clinical problems.


BMS 5100C MEDICAL HUMAN ANATOMY
8 credits. This course introduces basic principles of
the human body primarily in a laboratory setting.
Clinical oriented lectures are used to emphasize
basic anatomical relationships. Lectures on human
embryology are presented also in a systemic format
to assist students to learn pertinent normal organ
development and morphogenesis. The course mate-
rials are integrated with radiologic and microscopic
anatomy.

BMS 5110C MEDICAL CELL AND TISSUE
BIOLOGY
6 credits. The microscopic structure and function of
the cells, tissues and organs of the human is taught.
Correlation of structure and function at a cellular
level is emphasized in lectures, small-group discus-
sions and laboratories. An additional focus of the
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sagittal and axial) using imaging modalities avail-
able to diagnostic radiologists. The course is orient-
ed to organ systems describing not only the regional
anatomy of the organ but also its vasculature and
topographic anatomy. The course includes 10 didac-
tic lectures, computer-aided instruction and a teach-
ing set of films depicting normal anatomy.


BMS 5003 MEDICAL ASPECTS OF HUMAN
GENETICS
2 credits. Designed to familiarize the student with
the medical aspects of human genetics, this course
presents both theoretical and clinical information in
cytogenetics, population genetics, and molecular
genetics together with a review of its application in
the diagnosis, risk prediction and treatment/pre-
vention of genetic diseases. Special topics such as
cancer genetics also are covered.

BMS 5204 BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR
BIOLOGY OF DISEASE
6 credits. A general biochemistry course is a strong-
ly recommended prerequisite. Lectures and small
group discussions are designed to build on the stu-
dent's basic biochemical knowledge of cellular func-
tion. Emphasis is placed on the biochemical and
molecular biological basis of pathobiology. Topics
include nutrition, physical biochemistry, metabo-
lism and molecular biology.

BMS 5500 PRINCIPLES OF PHYSIOLOGY
6 credits. Basic medical physiology of the respirato-
ry, cardiovascular, endocrine, renal and gastroin-
testinal systems is presented. Concepts of physiolo-
gy are taught in conjunction with clinical applica-
tions of the basic science facts.

BCC 5151 HUMAN BEHAVIOR
4 credits. This course offers an introduction to the
biological, psychological and social interactions that
underline human behavior in both health and ill-


ness.


Course teaches students to conduct medical


and psychiatric interviews, perform the mental sta-
tus exam and become familiar with the variety of
psychological responses to issues. Alcoholism, sub-
stance abuse, impaired physicians, human sexuality
and an introduction to nsvchiatric treatment also are


BCC 5173 INTRODUCTION TO
CLINICAL PRACTICE
3 credits. During this course, students will be
assigned to a physician preceptor who practices pri-
mary care medicine. Students will spend three
weeks on location with the physician on a full-time
basis. Students will have the opportunity to utilize
their interview and physical examination skills.


SECOND YEAR

BMS 5191 INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL
RADIOLOGY
2 credits. Prerequisite: BMS 5190. This course pro-
vides imaging correlation to the pathologic entities
discussed during the second year. All imaging
modalities including plain film, CT, MR, ultrasound
and contrast students will be presented. The empha-
sis of the course will be the review of the natural
history of the disease process allowing the imaging
features to be understood. The course is a lecture
series, many of which are interactive with faculty


from Radiology, Pathology and Clinical


Services.


BMS 5300C MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY AND
INFECTIOUS DISEASE
5 credits. This course will provide learning opportu-
nities in the principles of medical microbiology and
the essentials of infectious disease. It will cover basic
host defense mechanisms and the interaction of
pathogens with these host defenses. Bacterial, viral,
fungal and parasitic pathogens and the diseases
they cause will be considered. Lectures, laboratories,
small-group discussions, self-instructional material,
and an innovative computer program will be used
to present the material.

BMS 5404 PHARMACOLOGY
6 credits. This introductory course presents concepts
of drug action (drug-receptor interactions, drug
absorption, distribution, and elimination), intro-
duces most of the major classes of drugs, and
emphasizes the biochemical and physiological basis
for understanding drug action. Groups of drugs
considered include anesthetic, autonomic, central
nervous system, adrenal, cardiovascular and antimi-
1 1 1










BMS 5608. Building upon general principles learned
in General Pathology and Immunology, the student
studies in detail the pathology of organ systems. The
morphologic, biochemical and biological behavior of
various diseases are covered in lecture and amplified
by laboratory materials. Functional and clinical
implications are discussed, including the appropriate
use of the clinical laboratory for diagnosis and therapy.


BMS 5630 ONCOLOGY
2 credits. This course is taught in parallel with
pathology and provides correlation between treat-
ment of patients with cancer and oncology topics
being addressed in pathology.

BMS 5822 ETHICAL AND LEGAL ISSUES IN
MEDICAL PRACTICE


2 credits.


BMS 5608 GENERAL PATHOLOGY AND
IMMUNOLOGY
6 credits. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of the
first year of medical school. The course introduces
second-year medical students to immunology and
inflammation, emphasizing their interaction and


The course builds on the ethics and law


component of the Essentials of Patient Care taught


in the first year.


This course covers specific ethical


and legal issues in medical practice. Students learn
how to identify ethical and legal problems, to com-
municate effectively with patients and colleagues
about those problems and develop problem-resolv-


ing strategies.


This course is organized around


small-group activities and discussion focusing on
analysis of ethical and legal problems that arise in
medical cases.

BMS 5823 EPIDEMIOLOGY AND PUBLIC
HEALTH
2 credits. This course provides instruction in clinical
epidemiology, biostatistics, preventive medicine


and public health.


function in host protection, transplantation and dis-
ease causation. Morphologic and chemical correlates
of cell injury, vascular disorders and cancer are pre-
sented, as well as tissue and host response to viral
and fungal agents. Relevant clinical examples are
nrnvirlpd Thic rniirQp nrnvidpc thp h rnnrntal] basis


The critical appraisal of the


medical literature is emphasized.

BMS 5830 PHYSICAL DIAGNOSIS
2 credits. Students are introduced to basic compo-
nents of the physical examination with emphasis on
normal findings.

BMS 5831 CLINICAL DIAGNOSIS
6 credits. Prerequisite: BMS 5830. Conducted by the
Department of Medicine, with participation by the
departments of Neurology, Orthopaedics, Ophthalmology
and Pediatrics. Students develop medical interview-
ing and physical examination skills; learn methods
of collecting, organizing and communicating data;
develop an understanding of the genesis of signs
and symptoms; and are introduced to the techniques
of problem-solving in physical diagnosis.


THIRD YEAR


During the third year, students rotate through eight
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ambulatory specialty clinics, is 12 weeks in length;
surgery, obstetrics and gynecology, pediatrics and
psychiatry are 6 weeks each. During the clerkships,
the medical student participates as a member of the
health-care team in the care of hospitalized and


University Medical Center in Jacksonville. Students
assume responsibility for patient care and learn how
to logically and scientifically define treatable neuro-
logic disease and provide the most effective therapy.


ambulatory patients.


Teaching occurs in various


BCC 5130 OBSTETRICS AND


settings including clinical rounds, conferences and
lectures as well as at the bedside or during surgery.
Students will spend 10 to 12 weeks participating in
clerkships at UFHSC-Jacksonville. Housing will be
provided during the Jacksonville rotation. Students
are required to complete all clerkship work within
the University of Florida setting.


BCC 5100 ANESTHESIOLOGY CLERKSHIP
2 credits. Two weeks. This course consists of didac-
tic lectures, simulator exercises and clinical instruc-
tion on perioperative patient care. Emphasis will be
placed on preoperative assessment, airway and ven-
tilator management and postoperative care, includ-
ing pain management.

BCC 5110 MEDICINE CLERKSHIP
8 credits. Eight weeks. Active participation in the
care of ward and clinic patients is provided under
supervision. Close tutorial relationship with staff in
lectures, conferences and teaching rounds provides
a rich learning experience.


GYNECOLOGY CLERKSHIP
6 credits. Six weeks. Participation in the outpatient
and inpatient medical and surgical care of women at
Shands at UF and University Medical Center in
Jacksonville. Interactive conferences and active clini-
cal involvement provide exposure to obstetrics,
gynecology, oncology and reproductive endocrinol-
ogy. The curriculum includes preventive, primary
and intensive care.


BCC 5140 PEDIATRIC CLERKSHIP
6 credits. Six weeks. Students actively participate in
inpatient and outpatient medical management of
infants and children. Teaching occurs on the wards,
in the pediatric clinics, in the emergency rooms at
Shands at UF and the University Medical Center at
Jacksonville and in rural clinics. Focus is upon
development of history and physical diagnostic skills,
preventive medicine, patient management and con-
sequences of illness in children and among their
families.


BCC 5150 PSYCHIATRY CLERKSHIP


BCC 5120 NEUROLOGY CLERKSHIP
2 credits. Two weeks. Students participate on the
inpatient and outpatient services of the neurology
department at Shands at UF, VA Medical Center and


6 credits. Six weeks. Observation and supervised
treatment of psychiatric patients in the Shands
Hospital, VA Medical Center, Shands at Vista and
University Medical Center at Jacksonville's inpa-
tient, outpatient, and consultation services. Weekly
didactic seminars, conferences and individual
instruction are given in the application of this mate-
rial to the practice of medicine.

BCC 5160 SURGERY CLERKSHIP
6 credits. Six weeks. Students participate in the care
of surgical patients in the ward and in the operating
room at Shands at UF, the VA Medical Center and
University Medical Center/Jacksonville. Instruction
in the care of the surgical patient is provided by a
series of daily seminars and lectures.

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focus on the ambulatory management of common,
acute and chronic medical problems in a primary-
care setting. Continuity of preceptor and patient


population will be a feature of this course.


Students


will rotate in family medicine, internal medicine,
pediatrics and speciality clinics emphasizing broad
primary care practice. Students also will participate
in a series of case-based discussions on common
core topics in general practice. In addition, there will
be a series of workshops on other key topics
pertinent to the generalist.

FOURTH YEAR


The fourth year is divided into 11 four-week units
(of 4 credit hours each). Students are required to be
enrolled for 10 of the 11 four-week units. During the
year, students plan their own curriculum with the
approval of their advisor and the fourth-year coor-
dinator prior to the beginning of the academic year.
Three units are required: medicine, an advanced
pediatrics or community health and family medicine
clerkship; advanced pharmacology; and the
advanced surgery clerkship. The seven units consist
of elective courses and clerkships offered by the


basic science and clinical departments.


given increased responsibility for patient care under
supervision of pediatric residents and faculty. Patient-
oriented seminars and conferences are available on a
daily basis with emphasis on self-directed education.

BCC 5161 SENIOR SURGERY CLERKSHIP
4 credits. Four weeks. Students further develop skill
in pre-operative evaluation, surgery, and postoperative
care and follow-up. Patient-oriented seminars are
provided by faculty. The student will be an active
member of the surgical team.


The remain-


ing 4-week unit may be used for residency inter-
views. Rules governing the required and elective
courses taken in the fourth year are outlined in the
"Senior Elective Catalog." Students may choose
from over 200 electives listed in this catalog.

BMS 5473 ADVANCED PHARMACOLOGY
4 credits. Lectures and conferences. Fundamentals
of drug action are studied with emphasis on cardio-
vascular, neurological and endocrine systems.
Clinical faculty participate in the teaching of basic
aspects of clinical pharmacology.

BCC 5111 SENIOR MEDICINE CLERKSHIP
4 credits. Four weeks. Increased level of patient care
responsibility compared to the third-year medicine
clerkship. Students serve as the primary physician
under resident and faculty supervision. Students are
responsible for the performance of simpler diagnostic
procedures. Self-education is stressed, but students are
encouraged to attend major departmental conferences.


BCC 5171 SENIOR COMMUNITY HEALTH AND
FAMILY MEDICINE CLERKSHIP
4 credits. Four weeks. Students serve as the primary
physician under resident and faculty supervision in
both the inpatient and ambulatory setting. The level
of patient care is increased compared to the third
year Interdisciplinary Clerkship.

MEL 5930 ELECTED TOPICS/NEUROLOGY
2-20 credits. Offered by the Department of Neurology
as an opportunity for concentrated work in a field of
particular interest to the student. Individual
response, preceptorship or clinical clerkship in the
college or in another medical center in this country
or abroad may be elected. Students may take more
than one topic in this department per semester.

MEL 5931 ELECTED TOPICS/Neurological Surgery
2-20 credits. Same as MEL 5930

MEL 5932 ELECTED TOPICS/Obstetrics and










MEL 5934 ELECTED TOPICS/Orthopaedic Surgery
2-20 credits. Same as MEL 5930.

MEL 5935 ELECTED TOPICS/Otolaryngology
2-20 credits. Same as MEL 5930.

MEL 5936 ELECTED TOPICS/Pathology


2-20 credits. Same


POLICY STATEMENT ON
COMPLETION OF COURSE WORK

Deferment or Withdrawal from Required Courses
and Clerkships Due to Hardship, Illness, or
Special Circumstances.


as MEL 5930.


MEL 5937 ELECTED TOPICS/Pediatrics
2-20 credits. Same as MEL 5930.

MEL 5938 ELECTED TOPICS/Psychiatry
2-20 credits. Same as MEL 5930.

MEL 5940 ELECTED TOPICS/Anatomy
2-20 credits. Same as MEL 5930.

MEL 5941 ELECTED TOPICS/Biochemistry
2-20 credits. Same as MEL 5930.

MEL 5942 ELECTED TOPICS/Immunology and Medical
Microbiology 2-20 credits. Same as MEL 5930.

MEL 5943 ELECTED TOPICS/Neuroscience


2-20 credits. Same


as MEL 5930.


Students who are unable to complete required
courses or clerkships due to illness, hardship or spe-
cial circumstances must immediately contact the
Offices of Medical Education and Student Affairs.
The student requesting temporary withdrawal must
submit a letter outlining the reasons for the request
to the Associate Dean for Education and the Chair of
the Academic Status Committee. Short-term leave
or withdrawal for periods of six weeks or less may
be approved by the Associate Dean for Education.
Leave periods greater than six weeks requires
review and approval of the Academic Status
Committee. All incomplete course work must be
completed by the time specified in the letter sent by
the Associate Dean of Education or Chair if the
Academic Status Committee is approving the
request for temporary leave.


MEL 5944 ELECTED TOPICS/Pharmacology


5930.


MEL 5945 ELECTED TOPICS/Physiology
2-20 credits. Same as MEL 5930.


MEL 5946 ELECTED TOPICS/Anesthesiology
2-20 credits. Same as MEL 5930.


Deferment of Required Third-Year Clerkships to
the Fourth Year to Take an Elective


All students may defer up to four weeks of the
required anesthesiology and neurology clerkships to
the fourth year with approval of the student's acad-
emic advisor, the course director for the course elec-


MEL 5947 ELECTED TOPICS/Community Health and
Family Medicine


2-20 credits. Same


as MEL 5930.


MEL 5948 ELECTED TOPICS/Medicine


2-20 credits.


Same as MEL 5930.


tive and the Associate Dean for Education.


The elec-


tive to be taken in place of the deferred clerkship
must be designated at the time of the application for
deferment and must have the approval of the elec-
tive director. Only specified clerkships may be
deferred. This information is specified on the defer-


MEL 5949 ELECTED TOPICS/Radiation Oncology
2-20 credits. Same as MEL 5930.

MEL 5950 ELECTED TOPICS/Radiology
2-20 credits. Same as MEL 5930.


MEL 5951 ELECTED TOPICS/Surgery
2-20 credits. Same as MEL 5930.


ment forms.


The deferred clerkships must be com-


pleted by the end of April in the senior year.

Required Third and Fourth Year Clerkship


All University of Florida College of Medicine
students must take their required third- and fourth-
year required courses and clerkships on the University
nrf Pllnrira ramn1c nr 2at- ciiIc lltili7PrI hxV this rpn1irprl


2-20 credits. Same as MEL










Elective Courses, Clerkships and Externships

During the fourth year, students are allowed to
take electives and externships. All electives taken at
locations other than Shands at UF, Malcom Randall
Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Gainesville,
University Medical Center/Jacksonville, and
Orlando Regional Medical Center are considered to
be externships. Most students will be limited to a
maximum of three externships.

The following policies govern externships:

1) All students must have the approval of their
academic advisor prior to applying for any
externship.

2) Students who rank in the lower third of the
class also must have the approval of the
Academic Status Committee before apply-


ing for any externship.


The Academic


Status Committee reviews the status of all
third-year students prior to the deadline for
submission of the requests for fourth-year
courses and electives.

3) Students who wish to apply for more than
one externship and rank in the lower half of
the class must be reviewed and approved
by the Academic Status Committee.

4) All students who apply for more than three
externships must be reviewed and
approved by the Academic Status Committee.


UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

These courses are offered by the College of
Medicine for students majoring in other colleges.
Individual interdisciplinary programs leading
to an Interdisciplinary Studies major may be designed
and initiated, with review and approval by the IDS
Committee of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences,
by a student whose academic goals are not met by
an existing departmental undergraduate major.
The Department of Biochemistry and Molecular
Biology, the Department of Neuroscience and the
Junior Honors Medical Program offer IDS majors in
conjunction with the College of Liberal Arts and
Sciences' undergraduate degree granting program.

BSC 3096 HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY
3 credits. Prerequisite: ZOO 2013C. Open to students
in the College of Health Professions, students in the
Physician Assistant program and to others by per-
mission of instructor. The structure and physiologi-
cal function of selected human systems.

BCH 4024 INTRODUCTION TO
BIOCHEMISTRY AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY
4 credits. Prerequisite: Organic chemistry. An intro-
duction to physical biochemistry, intermediary
metabolism and molecular biology. Topics include a
survey of structure, chemistry and function of pro-
teins and nucleic acids, enzyme kinetics and mecha-
nisms and catalysis; a survey of the pathways of car-
bohydrate, lipid and nitrogen metabolism and their










BMS 4401 PHARMACOLOGY
2 credits. This course is designed to introduce the
subject to interested students in a research and topi-
cally oriented manner and will be of particular value
to students considering research-oriented careers in
the biological or medical sciences.


BCH 4905 BIOCHEMISTRY SENIOR RESEARCH
3 to 5 credits; maximum 15. Prerequisites: BCH 4313,
CHM 3210-3211 or equivalent, or department
approval. Enrollment limited to independent inter-
disciplinary majors. Laboratory investigations of
contemporary biochemical problems. May be
repeated with change of content up to a maximum
of 15 credits. Senior thesis required.


BMS 4010 INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL SCI-
ENCES SEMINAR
3 credits. Selected in-depth special topics in the pre-
clinical basic sciences and their application to clini-
cal problems.


BMS 4011 INTRODUCTION TO
MEDICAL SCIENCES SEMINAR
3 credits. Continuation of BMS 4010.


BMS 4012 CELL BIOLOGY SEMINAR
4 credits. Cellular functions in health and disease.
The structure and molecular biology of the mam-
malian cells are stressed including such things as
virus-cell interactions, inborn errors of metabolism
and bacterial growth. Identical to PCB 4930.


BMS 4905 MEDICAL SCIENCES


SENIOR RESEARCH


3 to 5 credits. Prerequisite: Department approval.
Corequisite: BCH 4313. Laboratory or literature
investigations of problems of current interest in the
medical sciences. May be repeated.
Enrollment for the following courses is restrict-
ed to students accepted in the Basic Biological and
Medical Sciences Program:


BMS 4013 INTRODUCTION TO
MEDICAL SCIENCES SEMINAR III
3 credits. Continuation of BMS 4010.


BMS 5005 INTRODUCTION TO THE
PROFESSIONS OF MEDICINE
3 credits. Spring semester. The history, current sta-
tus and future of the science and practice of medi-










cine are surveyed from the perspectives of the major
medical disciplines. Topics ranging from surgery,
pediatrics, psychiatry and other clinical areas of
medicine to topics on pharmacology, immunology
and cell biology will be introduced. The course is
designed for preprofessional students with an inter-
est in medicine.


INDEPENDENT INTERDISCIPLINARY
MAJOR IN BIOCHEMISTRY AND
MOLECULAR BIOLOGY


The advanced level course work required
includes BCH 4024, two semesters of BCH 4905
Biochemistry Senior Research and submission of
senior thesis. The latter provides an opportunity for
an exceptionally well-qualified student to partici-
pate with a particular faculty member on an individ-
ualized research program in the faculty member's
research laboratory. Enrollment in BCH 4024 is a
suggested prerequisite for submission of a proposed
independent interdisciplinary major in biochemistry
to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and for


enrollment in BCH 4905.


Electives include


Students matriculating in the College of Liberal
Arts and Sciences who desire an undergraduate
emphasis in biochemistry and molecular biology
should consider the Independent Interdisciplinary
Major Program. The program is designed for stu-
dents who wish to pursue either graduate research
in biochemistry and related medical sciences, or
who have a strong interest in academic medicine.
An independent interdisciplinary major in biochem-
istry may be arranged through the Department of
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology and submitted
for approval by the Committee of Interdisciplinary
Studies of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.
Program applicants must have a strong background
in chemistry and biology courses.


advanced undergraduate offerings of the
Departments of Botany, Chemistry, Computer
Sciences, Microbiology and Cell Science,
Neuroscience and Zoology.
Application should be made during the sopho-
more year to enter the program during the junior
year to the Department of Biochemistry and
Molecular Biology.













The Physician Assistant Program is designed
to prepare health-care professions who will perform
certain functions traditionally performed by


licensed physicians.


The physician assistant typical-


ly will provide comprehensive health care under the
supervision of a licensed physician to family mem-


bers of various ages.


The curriculum of this pro-


gram offers the student in-depth content in the basic
and medical sciences.
The Physician Assistant Program accepts one
new class each year in the Summer B semester (late
June) and runs for 24 continuous months, granting a
Master of Physician Assistant Studies degree. It
consists of 12 months of didactic instruction in
Gainesville and 12 four-week clinical rotations
assigned by the program in medical and surgical


specialties.


In addition, the PA Program maintains listings of
currently available jobs.

ADMISSION TO THE PROGRAM

All potential applicants should contact the PA
Program to receive a detailed information packet,
which is updated frequently. It contains consider-
able information on the program's curriculum,
admissions requirements, recent class profile,
national board scores, etc. Requests for information
should be directed to Physician Assistant Program,
University of Florida, P.O. Box 100176, UFHSC,


Gainesville, FL 32610-0176.


Telephone (352) 395-7955.


)r, visit the PA Program web site at:
www.medinfo.ufl.edu/pa/index.html


These rotations will be in the hospitals


and clinics of the University of Florida Health
Science Center in Gainesville, Jacksonville, and at
hospitals, clinics and physicians' private practices
throughout Florida.
As part of the program's support for the prima-
ry care health needs of rural populations, all stu-
dents will take at least one of their clinical rotations
in a rural area.
The program supports the need for increased
clinical training and placement in community-based


settings.


Toward this end, students may apply to be


selected for a special track that will allow most of
their clinical rotations to be taken in community-
based practices. (Details are included in the pro-
gram information packet.)
The program is fully accredited by the
American Medical Association's Committee on
Allied Health Education and Accreditation, which
was succeeded by the Commission on Accreditation
of Allied Health Education Programs on July 1,


1994.


The accreditation status of the Physician


Prerequisites

Every applicant must complete a bachelor's
degree from an accredited college or university
before entering the PA Program.
Every applicant must also complete the follow-
ing preprofessional prerequisites by the end of the
fall semester before the program begins:

Anatomy and Physiology, including lab if
offered 6-8 semester hours
Microbiology, including lab if offered 3-5
semester hours


* General Chemistry:


The complete sequence


(2-3 semesters) at the pre-med level includ-
ing labs 8-10 semester hours
* Introduction to Statistics 3 semester hours
* Medical Terminology 2-3 semester hours
(May be taken as a correspondence course.)


Assistant Program has been transferred to the new
organization. Graduates are eligible to take a
national certifying examination conducted by the
National Commission on Certification of Physician
Assistants.
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A grade of C or higher must be earned in each
of the above courses. CLEP examination or
advanced placement credit may not be used to meet
any of the above requirements.
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all of the Physician Assistant Program's required
preprofessional prerequisites.
All applicants must submit scores from the
Graduate Record Exam (GRE).
All applicants must complete a Basic Life
Support course approved by the American Heart
Association. Certification must be valid for one year
after the beginning of the program.
Because of the rapid evolution of the basic sci-
ences, preference may be given to applicants who
have completed their preprofessional prerequisite
courses during the five years before applying to the
Physician Assistant Program.
It is recommended that all applicants complete
the equivalent of at least one year (2,000 hours) of
direct patient-care experience before entering the


program.


Application Steps


Other requirements may be added from time to time
by the faculty.
Students are responsible for their transporta-
tion, housing and living expenses during their clini-
cal year. Costs will vary depending on the location
of their clinical rotation sites. While the program
makes every effort to arrange free housing, this may


not be possible.


The final responsibility is the student's.


Information and decisions about financial aid
are handled entirely by the Office for Student
Financial Affairs, Box 114025, University of Florida,


Gainesville, FL 32611-4025.


Phone (352) 392-1275.


HEALTH POLICIES


The Physician Assistant Program requires evi-
dence of sound physical health, mental health and
emotional stability for admission. Personnel of the
Department of Student Health will test students for


sensitivity to tuberculosis.


Contact the Physician Assistant Program for a
complete information packet and all application


materials.


(See address on page 70)


The application deadline is December 1st for
the following Summer B semester.
The deadline to complete the preprofessional
prerequisites is the end of the fall semester before
the program begins.
Completed applications are reviewed by the
admissions committee and the best applicants are
invited to the program for an interview. An inter-
view is required for all successful candidates.
From this group, the final class selection is
made, based on the applicant's total record, includ-
ing academic competence, clinical experience,
demonstrated commitment to a health-care career,
understanding of the physician assistant profession,
interpersonal and communication skills and person-
al maturity and stability.
Admissions decisions are announced in April.
Admission to the Physician Assistant Program
is a selective process and satisfaction of minimum
requirements for admission to the University does
not guarantee automatic admission to the program.
Limitations in staff, faculty and facilities require a
limited enrollment.


The Department of


Student Health will verify immunization against
diphtheria, rubella (German measles) and tetanus,
and document immunity for varicella (chicken pox)
by titer or immunization. Students are required to
be immunized against the Hepatitis B virus.
Each student is required to have some form of
hospitalization insurance. Students are eligible for
the health insurance plans sponsored by Student
Government, which may be purchased at the time of


registration.


This policy provides 12-month cover-


age. In addition, each student is strongly encour-


aged to carry disability insurance.


Currently, the


College of Medicine does not have a group policy
available; therefore, students are encouraged to
explore this option through their own insurance car-
rier or through the American Academy of Physician
Assistants' insurance provider.


ACADEMIC POLICIES


Student Responsibilities

Once accepted into the PA Program, students
are responsible for following all program policies as
described in handbooks, memos and announcements.
Any questions should be directed to program faculty.









the PA Program curriculum. Transfer students are
not accepted after a class has begun. PA classes are
open to enrolled PA students only.

Probation and Suspension

Only grades of C or above represent acceptable
professional work for the Physician Assistant
Program. Any grade below a C in any course,
didactic or clinical, is not acceptable and will be
grounds for dismissal from the program for acade-
mic reasons, subject to faculty decision. Academic
probation may be instituted at the discretion of the
faculty, and the student will be given specific guide-
lines in writing as to what necessary steps may be
taken to remove the academic probation status.

Drops


Students must complete any end-of program
examination successfully.

PHYSICIAN ASSISTANT CURRICULUM
DIDACTIC YEAR

Semester 1 (Summer B)


Gross and Radiographic Anatom


(PAS 5022C)


Medical Communications for PAs (PAS 5003C)

Semester 2 (Fall)


Introduction to Medicine


for PAs (PAS 5010)


Behavioral and Community Medicine
(PAS 5005)


for PAs


All courses in the PA curriculum are required
and are offered once a year in the designated
sequence. Dropping a didactic year course will nor-
mally require withdrawal from the program. Any
remediation and consideration of a reapplication
request is at the discretion of the faculty.

Withdrawal


Any student wishing to withdraw from the
program must state this in writing both to the pro-
gram and to the Office of the University Registrar
and follow all University procedures for withdrawal.

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

The entire University of Florida Physician
Assistant Program Curriculum must be completed
successfully.
Promotion into the clinical phase of the pro-
gram as well as graduation from the program
requires the recommendation of the PA Program
Professional Standards and Promotions Committee.
This recommendation is based on satisfactory acade-
mic performance as demonstrated by the successful
completion of all courses, as well as the demonstra-
tion of the personal and professional maturity neces-
-. JV C -


Human Physiology for PAs (PAS 5025)

Physical Diagnosis for PAs (PAS 5000C)


Semester 3 (Spring


Introduction to Medicine II for PAs (PAS 5020)


Behavioral and Community Medicine II for PAs
(PAS 5009)

Pharmacotherapeutics for PAs (PAS 5026)

Patient Evaluation and Hospital Practicum for PAs
(PAS 5001C)

Clinical Problem Solving/Differential Diagnosis for
PAs (PAS 5004)

Clinical Procedures for PAs (PAS 5007C)


Electrocardiographic Interpretation and Life
Support Techniques for PAs (PAS 5027C)


Semester 4 (Summer A)










Clinical Epidemiology for Physician Assistants
(PAS 5021)

Advanced Clinical Practicum for Physician
Assistants (PAS 5008C)


CLINICAL YEAR


Semester


(Summer B)


Clinical Rotations (2)


Special Topics (PAS 5930)


Semester 6 (Fall)


Clinical Rotations (4)


Special Topics (PAS 5930)


Semester


(Spring)


PAS 5003C Medical Communications for the
Physician Assistant. SS.
2 credits. Communication skills in medical history-
taking; complete medical history; problem-oriented
medical record.


PAS 5004 Clinical Problem Solving/Differential
Diagnosis for the Physician Assistant. S.
1 credit. An introduction to critical thinking in the
development of the medical diagnosis and treat-
ment plan.


PAS 5005 Behavioral and Community Medicine I
for the Physician Assistant. F.
1 credit. A biopsychosocial systems approach to the
individual, the family, and the community within
the health-care delivery system; a study of the
American health-care system emphasizing the role
of the PA on the health-care team; patient educa-
tion/preventative medicine/community health;
medicolegal ethics.


Clinical Rotations (4)


PAS 5007C Clinical Procedures for the Physician


Special Topics (PAS 5930)


Assistant.


Semester 8 (Summer A)


Clinical Rotations (2)

Special Topics (PAS 5930


A total of 40 credits for the Didactic Year and 40 credits
for the Clinical Year are required for graduation.

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

PAS 5000C Physical Diagnosis for the Physician
Assistant. F.
2 credits. A course with extensive clinical exposure
to techniques used in the proper performance and
recording of the physical examination of patients.


1 credit; S/U. Skills needed to perform diagnostic
and therapeutic procedures; indications and con-
traindications; lectures and laboratory experiences
utilizing models and other training aids.


PAS 5008C Advanced Clinical Practicum for the


Physician Assistant. SS.


2 credits.


This clinical experience will build on the


student's initial hospital practicum experience by
refining evaluative, integrative and differential diag-
nosis skills in a clinical setting. In addition, students
will present case histories from an epidemiologic
standpoint and suggest appropriate problem solving
methods referenced by medical literature citations.


PAS 5009 Behavioral and Community Medicine II
for the Physician Assistant. S.


1 credit.


The second course in the PAS 5005, 5009


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PAS 5010 Introduction to Medicine I for the
Physician Assistant. F.


6 credits.


The first course in the sequence PA 5010,


PAS 5024 Pathogenic Microbiology for the
Physician Assistant.
1 credit. A study of normal body flora and patho-


5020. Signs, symptoms and pathophysiology of
common diseases affecting pediatric, adult and
geriatric patients; diagnosis, therapeutic interven-
tion and follow-up; patient education/preventive
medicine.


PAS 5012 Research Design and Biostatistics for the
Physician Assistant. SS.


2 credits.


This course introduces the student to the


quantitative and qualitative foundation of research
methodology and analysis of data in the clinical set-
ting. Emphasis will be on data collection and the
selection of the appropriate statistical tests in applied
research. In addition to the lecture, students will
participate in small groups for hands-on experience.


PAS 5020 Introduction to Medicine II for the


Physician Assistant.


6 credits; Prereq: PAS 5010.


The second course in


the sequence PAS 5010, 5020. Signs, symptoms and
pathophysiology of common diseases of all ages.


PAS 5021 Clinical Epidemiology for the Physician
Assistant. SS.
1 credit. Introduces the student to the basic con-
cepts of epidemiology including the causes and
occurrences of disease, lifestyle and environmental
risk factors, and the frequency and distribution of


disease in communities.


The focus will be on appli-


cation of these principles in a clinical setting.


genic microorganisms; microbial physiology


associ-


ated with pathogenicity of bacteria, viruses, fungi
and common parasites; host responses to invasion of
these organisms; diagnostic tests used for identifica-
tion of pathogens; antimicrobial agents and funda-
mentals of immunology.


PAS 5025 Human Physiology for the Physician
Assistant. F.
4 credits. Physiological function of the major organ


systems of the human body.


Open to students of


the College of Medicine, Physician Assistant
Program and to a limited number of other students
by permission of the instructor.


PAS 5026 Pharmacotherapeutics for the Physician
Assistant. S.
4 credits. Pharmacology, including action and func-
tion of classes of drugs; use of specific drugs; con-
traindications and incompatibilities; drug interac-
tions; side effects and their treatment; dosages and
calculations.


PAS 5027C Electrocardiographic Interpretation and
Life Support Techniques for the Physician
Assistant. S.


1 credit.


A study of the principles and practical


applications of electrocardiography for the physi-
cian assistant; practice in Basic and Advanced
Cardiac Life Support measures for life-threatening


emergencies.


PAS 5022CL Gross and Radiographic Anatomy. SS
3 credits. An intensive study of human anatomy;
systemic and regional approaches; human dissection;
the establishment of sound anatomical principles
that underlie clinical sciences, combined with a sys-
tematic approach to radiographic interpretation.


PAS 5023 Pharmacotherapeutics I for the Physician
Assistant. F.


PAS 5028 Pathophysiological Basis of Disease I for
the Physician Assistant. SS.
2 credits. First course in the sequence PAS 5028,
5029. An introduction to the underlying pathologic
basis for specific disease processes.

PAS 5029 Pathophysiological Basis of Disease II
for the Physician Assistant. F.










PAS 5100L Internal Medicine I. F, S, SS.
2 to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic with
departmental approval. A clinical rotation in which
the student learns basic medical knowledge. The
student is exposed to the common medical problems
encountered on the inpatient medical service. The
emphasis is on the history and physical examination
as well as the processes required in the proper
work-up and management of a patient.
Opportunity is also available for the student to per-
form the usual ward therapeutic procedures.


PAS 5101L Internal Medicine II. F, S,


2 to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic with
departmental approval. Continuation of PAS 5100L.


PAS 5120L Neurology F,


2 to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic


with departmental approval.


This clinical rotation


introduces the student to the common inpatient and
outpatient neurologic disorders. Emphasis is on the
complete neurologic history and physical examina-
tion and the techniques used on the service. The
student is further introduced to the diagnostic and
therapeutic procedures unique to neurologic service.


PAS 5125L Psychiatry. F,S, SS.
2 to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic with
departmental approval. During this clinical rotation,
the student is introduced to patients admitted to the


psychiatry service.


The student participates in daily


PAS 5102L Internal Medicine III. F, S, SS.
2 to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic with


departmental approval.


rounds and learns the proper use of various medica-
tions for various psychiatric disorders. Group ther-
apy sessions are a major part of the student's learn-
ing experience.


Continuation of PAS 5100L.


PAS 5150L Nephrology. F,


PAS 5105L Rehabilitative Medicine. F,S, SS.
2 to 5 credits; May be repeated zuith change of topic with


The student spends time in an


institution that deals primarily with the rehabilita-


tion of the spinal cord or stroke patients.


The stu-


dent will spend time with the physical therapy
department, learning the various techniques utilized


on the disabled patient.


The student is involved in


2 to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic with


departmental approval.


The student takes histories and


performs physical examinations on patients with


common renal problems.


The student is introduced to


hemodialysis procedures including peritoneal dialysis.


PAS 5160L Gastroenterology. F,


the entire management and discharge planning of
the patient requiring some type of continual care.
Exposure is also given to the various community
services and agencies available to the patient in the
rehabilitative centers.


2 to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic with


departmental approval.


This clinical rotation deals


primarily with the diagnosis, pathophysiology anm
essentials of therapy for various gastroenterologic


problems.


The student learns to perform nasogas-


PAS 5110L Hematology/Oncology. F,


tric intubation and to interpret gastric analysis.
Instruction in secretion testing, small bowel biopsies,


and proctosigmoidoscopies is provided.


The student


2 to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic with
departmental approval. During this clinical rotation,
the student performs a peripheral blood differential


of white cells.


The student further learns the princi-


is further instructed in the correlation of the results
of the various diagnostic procedures with the clinical
course of the patient.


ples of blood transfusions and the steps in manage-
ment of untoward reactions to whole blood therapy.
The student is introduced to procedures such as
bone marrow aspiration and bone marrow biopsies.
rr.1 1 .1 1 .1 -


PAS 5170L Rheumatology. F, S, SS.
2 to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic with
departmental approval. A clinical rotation providing
1 .1 I .9 1


departmental approval.










PAS 5180L Pulmonology. F, S,


2 to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic zoith
departmental approval. A clinical rotation exposing
students to the common problems of the pulmonary


patient.


mon to the elderly. In addition, the student will
learn skills in case presentations and clinical
research, as well as methodologies for approaching
the rehabilitation of the aged in a team approach.


The student develops skills in the perfor-


mance of histories and physical examinations with
emphasis on the respiratory system. The student
will gain specific knowledge in procedures such as
pulmonary function testing, inhalation therapy,
arterial punctures, and the interpretation of chest


roentgerograms.


The student develops an under-


standing of basic pulmonary diseases, their diagno-
sis, treatment and complications.


PAS 5182L Cardiology. F, S, SS.
2 to 5 credits; May be repeated with


departmental approval.


change


of topic with


The cardiology rotation is


designed to introduce the student to the basic car-


diac abnormalities.


The student is introduced to the


EKG and the interpretation of both normal and


abnormal tracings.


The student also is exposed to


the coronary care unit and its functions.


The meth-


ods of performing necessary diagnostic procedures
for the evaluation of disorders of the cardiovascular
system are also studied.


PAS 5184L Infectious Disease. F, S,


2 to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic with
departmental approval. A clinical rotation surveying
the findings and effects of numerous pathogenic
bacteria and fungi as they relate to infectious disease


processes.


The student is actively involved in an


inservice rotation, primarily a consulting service.
The student is required to perform a complete history
and physical examination on the patient and is fur-
ther required to correlate laboratory findings with
the clinical manifestations of the infectious disease.
The student is further introduced to the manifesta-
tions of the illnesses and the rationale for therapy.


PAS 5185L Gerontology. F, S,


2 to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic with
departmental approval. Rotation in which the student
becomes familiar with the common physical and


PAS 5190L Dermatology. F,


2 to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic with


departmental approval.


The student will gain under-


standing of common dermatological diseases; their
pathophysiology, diagnosis, management and com-


plications.


The student will develop skills in per-


forming common dermatological diagnostic studies,
including KOH slides, and skin biopsies.


PAS 5200L General Surgery. F,


2 to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic with
departmental approval. A clinical rotation exposing
the student to a variety of clinical problems routine-
ly seen on the surgical services. Emphasis is placed
on pre-operative and post-operative management of
the patient. Aseptic technique and operating room
principles are emphasized. Management of the sur-
gical patient, both in the operating room and on the
ward, are basic to this rotation.


PAS 5210L Cardiovascular Surgery. F,


2 to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic up
to a maximum of 9 credits with departmental approval.
The student will obtain clinical instruction and prac-
tical experience in assessing and managing patients
undergoing cardiovascular surgical procedures.
Pre-operative, post-operative and intraoperative
experiences will be included.


PAS 5220L Plastic Surgery. F,


2 to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic with
departmental approval. A clinical rotation in which
the student is instructed in basic wound care. Also
emphasized is surgical repair and management of
the simple laceration. Some operating room expo-
sure is available for the more extensive care and
repair of wounds. Exposure to burn treatment is
also provided.










patient as well as pre-operative and post-operative
care of the surgical patient. In-hospital management
as well as outpatient management of the
orthopaedic patient is emphasized.


PAS 5301L Pediatrics II. F,


2 to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic with
departmental approval. Continuation of PAS 5300.


PAS 5260L Neurosurgery. F,


2 to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic with
departmental approval. During this clinical rotation,
the student is taught an understanding of the prob-
lems unique to the diagnosis, treatment and man-


PAS 5302L Pediatrics III. F,


2 to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic with
departmental approval. Continuation of PAS 5300.


PAS 5305L Pediatrics, Genetics and Metabolism. F,


agement of the neurosurgical patient.


The student


gains experience in the operating room and further
gains in working knowledge of the diagnostic tech-
niques utilized.


2 to 5 credits; May repeated with change of topic with


departmental approval.


During this clinical rotation,


the student is exposed to pediatric patients with


either genetic or metabolic disorders.


PAS 5270L Urology. F,


2 to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic wit h


departmental approval.


The urologic rotation deals


with both inpatient and outpatient care. Emphasis
is placed on the indications as well as side effects of
the various diagnostic and therapeutic procedures


The student is


required to complete PAS 5300, General Pediatrics,


prior to this rotation.


The student gains expertise in


following the genetic lines of a pediatric patient.
The student also is exposed to the common metabolic
problems seen most often on the service.


unique to the urologic service.


The student is also


PAS 5400L Family Practice I. F,


provided exposure to the pre- and post-operative
care of the urologic patient.


PAS 5280L Otorhinolaryngology. F,


to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic with


departmental approval.


The student is introduced to


the otorhinolaryngology clinic and the kinds of
patients most commonly seen in that clinic.
Emphasis is placed on the common ear, nose and


throat problems.


The student receives careful


2 to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic up
to a maximum of 9 credits with departmental approval.
This clinical rotation is designed to introduce the
student to the family practice setting and the inter-
personal relationships developed in that setting.
The student is exposed to the family practice type
patient and other members of the family unit. The
student is exposed to the common diseases treated
by the primary-care practitioner and further
exposed to other members of the health-care team.


instructions in the proper use of the appropriate
instruments.


PAS 5300L Pediatrics I. F,


2 to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic with
departmental approval. This general pediatric rotation
is designed to introduce the student to the child-
hood illnesses and normal variations of growth and


development.


The student is encouraged to seek


out third-party histories and perform pediatric


physical examinations.


The student is further intro-


PAS 5401L Family Practice II. F,


2 to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic
with departmental approval. Continuation of PAS
5400L.


PAS 5402L Family Practice III. F, S, SS.
2 to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic
with departmental approval. Continuation of PAS
5400L.


1 1 .1 1 11 I-










sure to a clinical setting. The student will perform
history and physical examinations and will have a
further opportunity to be exposed to the illnesses
and injuries common to university students.


PAS 5405L Public Health. F,


to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic with


appropriate history and physical examinations on


the acutely ill patient.


Emphasis is placed on man-


agement and support measures in situations which
are life-threatening.


PAS 5601L Emergency Medicine II. F, S,


2 to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic with


departmental approval.


The student will rotate in a


departmental approval.


Continuation of PAS 5600.


public health department where he/she will be
exposed to and participate in a wide variety of com-


mon public health problems.


The student will learn


PAS 5700L Intensive Care Medicine. F,


S. SS.


how a public health department works and what


services are generally available.


The PA student


will participate in nutrition counseling, family plan-
ning, environmental health studies, S.T.D. screen-
ing and reporting of communicable diseases. The
emphasis of this rotation will be to expose the stu-
dent to the practice of medicine in a public health
department.


PAS 5420L Preceptorship. F,


2 to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic with
departmental approval. A clinical rotation primarily
in a community-based private practitioner's office.
It is designed to introduce the student to the com-


3 to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic up
to a maximum of 9 credits with departmental approval.
This clinical rotation introduces the student to prin-
ciples and practices of providing medical care in the
intensive care setting. Emphasis is provided in
developing skills in differential diagnosis, special-
ized management and advanced clinical procedures.


PAS 5905 Directed Readings/Independent Study
1 to 4 credits; Prereq: Permission of program. May
be repeated with a change of content up to a maximum of


8 credits.


This course will provide individualized


study in various topics involved in physician assis-


tant education.


The course content will be devel-


The student will make rounds with


the physician and assist in his or her office practice.
Preferably, this preceptorship would be in a rural
setting with a physician who is seeking to employ a
physician assistant.


PAS 5500L Obstetrics and Gynecology. F, S, SS.
2 to 5 credits; May be repeated with change of topic with


oped on an individual basis and will be monitored
by a member of the physician assistant faculty.


PAS 5910 Directed Independent Research
1 to 4 credits; Prereq: Permission of program. May
be repeated with change of content up to a maximum of 8
credits. Students will develop with a physician assis-
tant faculty member appropriate topics for indepen-


departmental approval.


This clinical rotation is


dent research.


The research will be monitored and


designed to introduce the student to the obstetrical
service and the management of pregnancy, labor
and delivery. It is further designed to introduce the
student to pre- and post-natal complications. The
rotation is also designed to introduce the student to
the common gynecological problems and manage-
ment of common female abnormalities.


evaluated by the physician assistant faculty member.


PAS 5930L Special Topics/Seminars.
1 to 4 credits; Prereq: Permission of program. May
be repeated with a change of content up to a maximum of
12 credits. This course will be used to explore special
topics using a seminar format for physician assistant
education.


PAS 5600L Emergency Medicine I. F,


I tn I 4 I-c. Ai Ai.. **' tin .jftnn n t I-, ^'t,^ n i# rln n tfl flit n 1


munity setting.


_










FACULTY


ANATOMY & CELL BIOLOGY

* ARIS,JOHN P, PHD, (Stanford University)
AST PROFESSOR
* BENNETT, GUDRUN S, PHD, (Rockefeller University)
RESEARCH PROF
* DUNN JR, WILLIAM A, PHD, (Penn State University)
ASO PROFESSOR
* FELDH ERR, CARL M, PHD, (University of Pennsylvania)
PROFESSOR
* HOLLINGER, THOMAS G, PHD, (Purdue University)
ASO PROFESSOR
* LARKIN,LYNN H, PHD, (Univ of Colorado)
PROFESSOR EMERITUS
* LINSER,PAUL J, PHD, (University of Cincinnati)
ASO PROFESSOR
* RAREY,KYLE E, PHD, (Indiana University)
PROF & PRG DIR
* ROMRELL,LYNN J, PHD, (Utah State University)
PROF & ASO DN
* ROSS,MICHAEL H, PHD, (New York University)
PROFESSOR
* SELMAN,KAY E, PHD, (Harvard University)
ASO PROFESSOR
* SUGRUE, STEPHEN P, PHD, (Univ of Cincinnati)
ASO PROF & CHR
* WALLACE, ROBIN A, PHD, (Columbia Univ)
PROFESSOR EMERITUS
* WEST, CHRISTOPHER M, PHD, (California Inst of Tech)
ASO PROFESSOR


ANESTHESIOLOGY

AKHNOUKH,MINA FAWAZ, MD, (Alexandria University -
Egypt)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHCSJ
ALBUSCHAT,OTTO R, MD, (Univ of Illinois)
CLIN AST PROF
BANNER,MICHAEL J, PHD, (University of Florida)
ASO PROFESSOR
BENNETT,NEIL T, MD, (University of Miami)
AST PROFESSOR
BERGER,JERRY J, MD, (Duke University)
ASO PROFESSOR
BERMAN,LAWRENCE S, MD, (Jefferson Medical College)
ASO PROFESSOR
BJORAKER, DAVID G, MD, (University of Minnesota)
ASO PROFESSOR
BLACK, SUSAN, MD, (University of Alabama)


ASO PRO & CHIEF
BLAS,MARK LOUIS, MD, (University of Washington)
CLIN AST PROF
CAR21 TCfl AARWRI C T ?1Aff (1 inisrorci- r nf flnridal


PROFESSOR
DAVIES,LAURIE K, MD, (University of Florida)
ASO PRO & CHIEF
DAVIS, DAVID SCOTT, MD, (Univ Texas-Southwestern)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHCSJ
DE PADUA, CONSTANTE B, MD, (University of Philippines)
ASO PROFESSOR
DE SOTO, HERNANDO, MD, (Univ Nacional Pedro Hurena)
CLASOPF&AASO CHR/UFHSCJ
* DENNIS, DONN M, MD, (University of Michigan)
ASO PROFESSOR
DICKISON, ANNE E, MD, (University of Michigan)
CLIN ASO PROF
DUNCAN, EDDY NEIL, MD, (University of South Alabama)
AST PROFESSOR
ENNEKING, FRANCESCA K, MD, (University of Florida)
ASO PRO & CHIEF
EULIANO, TAMMY Y, MD, (University of Florida)
AST PROFESSOR
FREEDMAN,JILL I, MD, (Suny-Syracuse)
CLIN AST PROF
FROLICH,MICHAEL A, MD, (University of Vienna)
AST PROFESSOR
GABRIELLI, ANDREA, MD(MBBS), (Univ of Rome)
AST PROFESSOR
GALLAGHER, THOMAS J, MD, (Univ of Kentucky)
PROF & CHIEF
GARCIA,LORENZO M, MD, (Univ of Santo Tomas -
Philippines)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHCSJ
GIBBY, GORDON L, MD, (Emory University)
ASO PROFESSOR
GOOD,MICHAEL L, MD, (University of Michigan)
ASO PROF&ASO DN
GOODWIN, S R, MD, (Univ of Kentucky)
PROFESSOR
GORCHESKY,MARK S, MD, (Ross University)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
GRAVENSTEIN, DIETRICH, MD, (University of Florida)
AST PROFESSOR
GRAVENSTEIN,JOACHIM S, MD, (Harvard University)
GRAD RES PROF EMER
GRAVENSTEIN,NIKOLAUS, MD, (University of Florida)
PROF & CHR
GRAVES, SHIRLEY A, MD, (University of Miami)
PROF & CHIEF
KIRBY, ROBERT R, MD, (Univ of California San Francisco)
PROF & CHIEF
KIRKLAND,PILAR LIZARBE, MD, (Cayetano Heredia Univ -
Peru)
CLIN INSTRUCTOR/UFHSCJ
LAMPOTANG, SAMSUN, PHD, (University of Florida)
AST PROFESSOR
LANGEVIN,PAUL B, MD, (University of Missouri)
A rCl- flfrxrrcann



















































































X
ix











LOBATO, EMILIO B, MD, (Universidad Nacional Autonoma


De Mexico)


ASO PRO & CHIEF
MAHLA,MICHAEL E, MD, (Jefferson Medical College)
ASO PROF&ASO CHR
MARTYNYUK, ANATOLY E, DSC,PHD, (Bogomoletz Inst of
Physiology-Ukraine)
RSRH AST PROF
MELKER, RICHARD J, MD,PHD, (Albert Einstein College)
PROFESSOR
MITCHELL, HELEN, MD, (University of Miami)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
MITCHELL,MARTHA E, MD, (University of Virginia)
CLIN AST PROF
MODELL,JEROME H, MD, (University of Minnesota)
ASO VP & PROF
MONK, TERRI G, MD, (University of Nebraska)
PROFESSOR
MOREY, TIMOTHY E, MD, (University of Florida)
AST PROFESSOR
MURPHY,MAHIN R, MD, (National Univ of Iran)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
MYERS,MONICA L, MD, (University of Florida)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
* PAULUS, DAVID A, MD, (University of Vermont)
PROFESSOR
REDFERN, ROBERT EARLE, MD, (Medical College of Georgia)
CLIN ASO PROF/UFHSCJ
ROGERS, RICHARD J, MD, (University of Massachusetts)
INSTRUCTOR


SAGA-RUMLEY, SEGUNDINA A,


Philippines)
ASO PROFESSOR
SHAH,NAYANTARA


MD, (University of


S., MD(MBBS), (Grant Med College -


BUNGERT,JORG, PHD, (Philipps Univ Germany)
AST PROFESSOR
* CAIN, BRIAN D, PHD, (Univ of Illinois)
ASO PROFESSOR
* CHUN,PAUL W, PHD, (University of Missouri)
PROFESSOR
* COHEN, ROBERT J, PHD, (Yale University)
ASO PROFESSOR
* DUNN, BEN M, PHD, (Univ of Cal Santa Barbara)
DIS PROFESSOR
* EDISON, ARTHUR S, PHD, (University of Wisconsin)
AST PROFESSOR
* FLANEGAN,JAMES B, PHD, (University of Michigan)
PROF & ACT CHR
* FROST, SUSAN C, PHD, (University of Arizona)
ASO PROFESSOR
* KILBERG,MICHAEL S, PHD, (Univ of South Dakota)
PROFESSOR
* KOROLY,MARY J, PHD, (Bryn Mawr College)
ASO SCI & DIR
* LAIPIS,PHILIP J, PHD, (Stanford University)
PROF & ASO CHR
* MARECI, THOMAS H, PHD, (Oxford Univ)
ASO PROFESSOR
* MCGUIRE,PETER M, PHD, (U of N Carolina Chapel Hill)
AST PROFESSOR
* OBRIEN, THOMAS W, PHD, (Marquette University)
PROFESSOR
* PURICH, DANIEL L, PHD, (Iowa State University)
PROFESSOR
* SCHUSTER, SHELDON M, PHD, (University of Arizona)
PROF & PRG DIR
* YANG, THOMAS P, PHD, (Univ of California Irvine)


ASO PRG DR&ASO PRF


Bombay)
CLIN ASO PROF/UFHSCJ
SIDI, AVNER, MD, (Hebrew Univ Israel)
ASO PROFESSOR
SKORA,IRENA ANTONINA, MD, (Jagiellonski Univ
ASO PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ


COMMUNITY HEALTH AND


-Poland)


SPALDING, H KENNETH, MD, (University of Maryland)
AST PROFESSOR
SULEK, CHERI A, MD, (Univ of Texas Houston)
AST PROFESSOR
TRANKINA,MARK F, MD, (Chicago Medical School)
CLIN AST PROF
* VAN OOSTROM,JOHANNES H, PHD, (Eindhoven Univ of
Technology)
AST PROFESSOR
WELDON, BRUCE C, MD, (St Louis University)
AST PROFESSOR
WHITE, SNO E, MD, (Jefferson Medical College)
CLIN AST PROF


BIOCHEMISTRY AND
MOLECULAR BIOLOGY


ABERNETHY III,JOHN H, MD, (University of Florida)
CLIN AST PROF
ADKINS, CAROL B, MSURG, (University of Florida)
CLIN INSTRUCTOR/UFHSCJ
ALLEN, WILLIAM L, JD, (University of Florida)
AST PROFESSOR
ALVAREZ, EDGAR R, MD(MBBS), (National Univ of
Colombia Bogota)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
ARRAY, SAMIR Y, MD, (Univ Autonoma De Centra America
- San Jose)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
BAILEY, DAVID WHITNEY, MD, (Mcgill Univ-Canada)
CLIN ASO PROF/UFHSCJ
BOZEMAN, ELIZABETH RIBADENEYRA, MD, (University
of South Carolina)
CLIN INSTRUCTOR/UFHSCJ
BROWN, ROBERT LEWIS, MD, (University of Florida)
flYT TT A CrIT Tnnnr? /T TCILICC T


FAMILY MEDICINE











COLASANTE,ONA M, MD, (Temple University)
CLIN AST PROF
CORPUS,LORENZO M, MD, (Univ of Santo Tomas -
Philippines)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
CURRY JR, ROBERT W, MD, (Duke University)
PROF & CHR
DAY, CHARLES M, MD, (University of Miami)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
DEBRUNO, CYNTHIA K, MD, (Universidad Nacional De
Cordoba Argentina)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
DEWAR,MARVIN A, MD,JD, (University of South Florida)
ASO PROFESSOR
DIAZ, GLENN TAN, MD(MBBS), (Univ of Santo Tomas -
Philippines)
CLIN INSTRUCTOR/UFHSCJ
DOUGLAS, HERSCHEL L, MD, (University of Oklahoma)
PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ
DUERSON,MARGARET C, PHD, (University of Florida)
ASO PROFESSOR
FEAGEANS,MARY ELIZABETH, MD, (University of Florida)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
FELLER, DAVID B, MD, (University of Florida)
AST PROFESSOR
FUNDERBURK,MARCIA WAYNE, MD, (University of Iowa)
CLN ASO PRF&PRDIR/UFHSCJ
GARG, HARDESH KUMAR, MD, (M.a.m. Medical College -
India)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ


MARTIN, CALVIN WALLACE, MD, (University of Florida)
CLIN AST PROF
MCCAULIE,JOHN R, MD, (George Washington University)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
MCLAMB,JAMES N, MD, (University of North Carolina)
ASO PROF&ASTCHR/UFHSCJ
MCTIERNAN,MICHAEL JOSEPH, MD, (University of Florida)
CLIN AST PROF
MEIRES,JAN, MSN, (Wichita State University)
CLIN INSTRUCTOR/UFHSCJ
MOJICAR,LUIS A, MD, (Intec-Dominican Republic)
CLNASTPRF&PRGDR/UFHSCJ
MONTRICHARD,MAY E, MD, (George Washington University)
CLIN AST PROF
MOSELEY, RAY E, PHD, (Georgetown University)
ASO PRO & CHIEF
MUNIPALLI, BALA S, MD, (University of Florida)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
OBER JR, VINCENT H, MD, (Medical College of Virginia)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
PRICE,J AMES W, MD, (Utesa School of Med Dominican
Republic)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
PULWERS,PATRICIA J, MD, (Eastern Virginia Medical Sch)
CLIN INSTRUCTOR/UFHSCJ
QUILLEN, DAVID M, MD, (U of N Carolina-Chapel Hill)
AST PROFESSOR
RATHE, RICHARD J, MD, (University of Minnesota)
ASO PROF&ASO DN
REEDER, HAROLD B, MD, (University of Tennessee)


GAVIN, SHARON L,
CLIN AST PROF
GRAHAM,MARION
CLIN ASSISTANT IN
GRAUER,KENNETH
PROFESSOR


MD, (University of Florida)

C, MS, (Pace University New York)
I/UFHSCJ
A, MD, (Suny-Upstate)


CLN ASO PRF&PRDIR/UFHSCJ
REGISTRE,LOUIS J, MD, (Univ Autonoma Mexico)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
ROBINSON,MARY KELLOGG, MD, (University of S
Florida)
CLIN ASO PROF/UFHSCJ


GRISNIK JR,JOHN A, MD, (University of Pittsburgh)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
HADDAD, CHARLES J, MD, (Universidad Mundial)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
HADDAD-LACLE, JUDELLA EDWINA M, MD, (Intec-
Dominican Republic)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
HALL,KAREN L, MD, (Eastern Virginia Medical Sch)
ASO PROF& PRDIR
HATCH, ROBERT L, MD,MPH, (UCLA)
ASO PROFESSOR
HEIMER, AXEL H, MD, (University of Cincinnati)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
HUSSAIN,MAHRUKH, MD(MBBS), (Dow Med College -
Pakistan)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
KANE, ANDREW JOHN, MD, (Suny-Buffalo)
CLAST PRF&CHF/UFHSCJ
KANTROWITZ,MICKI A, MD, (Tufts University)
CLIN AST PROF
KELLETT, BOYD A, MD, (Mcgill Univ-Canada)
CLNASTPRF&PRGDR
* KOSCH, SHARON G, PHD, (University of Florida)


ROOKS,LARRY G, MD, (University of Florida)
CLIN ASO PROF
SAMRAJ, GEORGE P, MD(MBBS), (Madras Medical College -
India)
AST PROFESSOR
SCHMIDT, SIEGFRIED O, MD,PHD, (Univ of Cologne -
Germany)
CLIN AST PROF
SOLOMON JR, WILLIAM CURTIS, MD, (University of South
Alabama)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
STEWART, ERIC BLANE, MD, (University of Iowa)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
SWARTZ, VIRGINIA JEANNE, DSW, (University of
Pennsylvania)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
TIOMICO,MARIA GINA, MD(MBBS), (Univ of Santo Tomas -
Philippines)
CLNAST&PF&PRGDR/UFHSCJ
TRAN, TAN D, MD(MBBS), (Univ of Saigon)
CLIN AST PROF
WILSON III, GEORGE RICE, MD, (University of Mississippi)
ASO PROF&ASO CHR/UFHSCJ


*outh











COMMUNITY HEALTH & FAMILY


MEDICINE


- NORTH BROWARD


HOSPITAL DISTRICT

HAMAWY, DORIS A, MD, (University of Miami)
CLIN AST PROF


SILVA, BRIDGET MARIE, MD, (Universit


of Florida)


CLASTPRF&APRGDR


COMMUNITY HEALTH & FAMILY
MEDICINE STUDENT HEALTH
CARE CENTER

BERRY, RONALD L, MD, (University of South Florida)
CLIN AST PROF
COLLANTE, ERLINDA Y, MD, (Far Eastern Univ -
Philippines)
CLIN AST PROF
EDDLETON, CYNTHIA L, MD, (University of Florida)
CLIN AST PROF
GROOMS, ANN M, MD, (University of Tennessee)
CLIN AST PROF
HUEY,MICHAEL J, MD, (UCLA)
CLN ASO PROF&DIR
JENNETT, GARY L, MD, (University of Iowa)
CLIN AST PROF


MAUN, ALICIA R, MD, (Far Eastern Univ


- Philippines)


CLIN AST PROF
NICOLETTE, GUY W, MD, (Univ Texas-San Antonio)
CLIN AST PROF


EMERGENCY MEDICINE


BIRENBAUM, DALE S, MD, (Jefferson Medical College)
AST PROFESSOR
BOZEMAN, WILLIAM PYLE, MD, (Medicat Univ of South
Carolina)
AST PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ
CARO, DAVID ALAN, MD, (University of South Florida)
CLIN INSTRUCTOR/UFHSCJ
DAVIS, GEORGE M, MD, (Univ of Texas Houston)
CLIN INSTRUCTOR/UFHSCJ
GODWIN, STEVEN A, MD, (Medical Univ of South Carolina)
INSTRUCTOR/UFHSCJ
GOLDFEDER, BRUCE W, MD, (New York Medical College)
CLIN AST PROF
GRAY-EUROM,KELLY, MD, (University of Vermont)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
HARWOOD-NUSS, ANN L, MD, (University of Iowa)
PROF & AST DN/UFHSCJ
IDRIS, AHAMED H, MD, (Rush Medical College)
PROFESSOR
JOSEPH,MADELINE MATAR, MD, (Tychreen Univ Syria)


LUETKE, CHARLES W, MD, (University of Wisconsin)
CLIN AST PROF
LUSKO,MICHAEL WALTER, DO, (Kansas City Col of
Osteopathic Med)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
LUTEN, ROBERT C., MD, (Univ of Barcelona-Spain)
PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ
MACMATH, TERRY LEE, MD, (Suny-Upstate)
CLIN ASO PROF/UFHSCJ
MEURER, DAVID A, MD, (University of Florida)
CLIN AST PROF
NASCA JR,LEONARDO S, MD, (Gannon College)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
PERRY, SHAWNA J, MD, (Case Western Reserve University)
AST PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ
PETERS, CARL W, MD, (University of Florida)
CLIN ASO PROF
RIOS JR,LUIS ERNESTO, MD, (University Med/Dent-New
Jersey Med Sch)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
ROHLWING, HARVEY G JR, MD, (University of Florida)
CLIN AST PROF
ROSS, DAVID SCOTT, MD, (University of Florida)
CLIN ASO PROF/UFHSCJ
SEABERG, DAVID C, MD, (University of Minnesota)
ASO PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ
STAIR, RICHARD W, MD, (Univ of Maryland)
AST PROFESSOR
STENKLYFT,PHYLLIS H, MD, (Louisiana State University)
ASO PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ
VUKICH, DAVID J, MD, (University of Colorado)
ASO PRO & INT CHAIR/UFHSCJ
WEARS, ROBERT L, MD, (Johns Hopkins University)
PROFESSOR / UFHSCJ
WOOD, STEPHANIE KAREN, MD, (Univ of Navarra Spain)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ


HEALTH POLICY
AND EPIDEMIOLOGY

CLARKE,LESLIE L, PHD, (University of Florida)
RSRH AST PROF
CUDDEBACK,JOHN K, MD,PHD, (Indiana University)
RSRH ASO PROF
FLOCKS,JOAN D, JD, (University of Florida)
RSRH AST PROF
* MILLER,MICHAEL K, PHD, (Penn State University)
PROF & CHR
MULDOON, SUSAN B, PHD, (University of Pittsburgh)
RSRH AST PROF
POLLOCK, BRADLEY H, PHD, (UCLA)
ASO PROF& PRDIR





























































MEDICINE


* SCHIFFENBAUER,JOEL, MD, (Albert Einstein College)
ASO PROFESSOR
* SOBEL, ERIC S, MD,PHD, (Case Western Reserve University)
ASO PROFESSOR


Allergy, Rheumatology and
Clinical Immunology

* BUBB,MICHAEL R, MD, (John Hopkins University)
AST PROFESSOR
CHRISTIAN, CHARLES L, MD, (Case Western Reserve
University)


STAUD, ROLAND, MD, (Freie Universitat


- Berlin)


ASO PROFESSOR

Cardiology

ARANDA-AMADOR,JUAN M, MD, (Univ of Puerto Rico)
AST PROFESSOR
fl^ & flC*' "-nt tsrrr r'f lr'. A1- r-^ Nn tni*-vj F I n -^ r T t











CONETTA, DONALD ANTHONY, MD, (Duke University)
ASO PROF& PRDIR/UFHSCJ
CONTI, C R, MD, (John Hopkins University)
EMINENT SCHOLAR


CONTI,JAMIE B, MD, (University of Florida)
AST PROFESSOR
COOPER, GARY R, MD, (Tulane University)


Computer Sciences

* ARIET, MARIO, PHD, (University of Florida)
PROF & CHIEF


Critical Care


CLIN ASO PROF
CREVASSE,LAMAR E, MD, (Duke University)
PROFESSOR
CURTIS, ANNE B, MD, (Columbia University)
PROFESSOR
* GEISER, EDWARD A, MD, (University of Cincinnati)
PROF & ASO DIR
GILMORE,PAUL STEPHEN, MD, (Creighton University)
ASO PROFESSOR / UFHSCJ
GOLDMAN, DANIEL S, MD, (University of Mississippi)
ASO PROFESSOR / UFHSCJ
GONZALEZ,MARIO D, MD, (National Univ of Rosario-
Argentina)
ASO PROFESSOR
HANDBERG-THURMOND, EILEEN M, PHD, (University of
Florida)


AST PROFESSOR


HILL,JAMES A, MD, (University of Maryland)
PROFESSOR


KERENSKY, RICHARD A, MD, (University of Florida)
ASO PROFESSOR
LEWIS,JANNET F, MD, (Louisiana State University)
ASO PROFESSOR
* LIMACHER,MARIAN, MD, (St Louis University)
PROFESSOR
LIN,LANG, MD(MBBS), (Shanghai Medical Univ China)
INSTRUCTOR
MARTIN,LILLA GAYLE, MD, (University of Mississippi)
CLIN ASO PROF/UFHSCJ
* MEHTA,JAWAHAR L, MD,PHD, (Panjab Univ India)
PROFESSOR
MILLER, ALAN B, MD, (University of Pittsburgh)
PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ
* NICHOLS, WILMER W, PHD, (University of Alabama)
ASO PROFESSOR
OKEN,KEITH ROBINSON, MD, (University of Virginia)
AST PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ
PAULY, DANIEL F, MD,PHD, (University of Alabama)
AST PROFESSOR


* PEPINE, CARL J, MD, (New Jersey


Medical School)


PROFESSOR
PERCY, ROBERT, MD, (University of Mississippi)
ASO PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ


SCHOFIELD, RICHARD S,


MD, (University of Florida)


AST PROFESSOR
SHRYOCK III,JOHN C, PHD, (Thomas Jefferson Univ)
ASO SCIENTIST
SMITH, KAREN M, MD, (Bowman Gray)
AST PROFESSOR


SONG, YEJIA, MD, (Shanghai 2nd Med


Coll -China)


AST SCIENTIST
7UCN1TT IT NA A DTINr NA \AfT (T 1n4,nrcmmf, (S Cbir;-ln


KOCH, KATHERINE A,


MD, (Johns Hopkins University)


ASO PRO & CHIEF/UFHSCJ

Dermatology

FLOWERS, FRANKLIN P, MD, (University of Florida)
PROF & CHIEF
NOTRICA, MARC ALAN, MD, (East Carolina University)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ


RAMOS CARO, FRANCISCO


A, MD, (Univ of Puerto Rico)


ASO PROFESSOR


SKIDMORE, ROBERT A


JR, MD, (University of Florida)


AST PROFESSOR


Endocrinology and Metabolism

BAUER,JULIE A, MD, (Tufts University)
AST PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ
* GRANT,MARIA A, MD, (University of Florida)
ASO PRO & CHIEF


HENDERSON, GEORGE N, PHD, (Indian Inst


of Tech India)


RSRH AST PROF
KENNEDY,LAURENCE, MD(MBBCH), (Queens Univ)
ASO PROFESSOR
* STACPOOLE,PETER W, MD,PHD, (Vanderbilt University)
PROF & PRG DIR
TARNUZZER, ROY W, PHD, (University of Florida)
RSRH AST PROF
VESELY,JOSEF JAMES KARL, MD, (Univ of Bologna Italy)
AST PROFESSOR

Gastroenterology, Hepatology
and Nutrition

ABDELMALEK,MANAL F, MD, (University of Missouri)
AST PROFESSOR
AMANN, STEPHEN T, MD, (Creighton Univ)
AST PROFESSOR
BASS JR, ROBERT TERRELL, MD, (Medical College of Georgia)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
BHUTANIMANOOP, MD, (Wright State University)
ASO PROFESSOR
* CAMPBELL-THOMPSON, MARTHA, PHD, DVM, (University
of Florida)
RSRH AST PROF
* CERDA,JAMES J, MD, (University of Maryland)
PROFESSOR
DAVIS, GARY L, MD, (University of Minnesota)
PROF & PRG DIR
FORSMARK, CHRISTOPHER E, MD, (Johns Hopkins











MCGUIGAN,JAMES E, MD, (St Louis University)
PROFESSOR
MISHRA, GIRISH, MD, (University of Missouri)
AST PROFESSOR
NELSON, DAVID R, MD, (Suny-Syracuse)
AST PROFESSOR
* SNINSKY, CHARLES A, MD, (Temple University)
PROFESSOR
SOLDEVILA PICO, CONSUELO, MD, (Univ of Puerto Rico)
AST PROFESSOR
TOSKES,PHILLIP P, MD, (University of Maryland)


* SOUTHWICK, FREDERICK, FREDERICK S, MD, (Columbia University)
PROF & ASO CHR
TENNENBERG, ALAN MYER, MD, (University of
Pennsylvania)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
TOOMEY,JAMES M, MD, (Northwestern University)
AST PRO & PRDIR/UFHSCJ


VANDEVELDE, ALEXANDER
Belgium)
ASO PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ


MD, (Univ


of Louvain -


& CHR


VALENTINE,JOHN F, MD, (Univ of Texas Houston)
ASO PROFESSOR


VERNE, G NICHOLAS,
AST PROFESSOR


MD, (Suny-


Hematology/Oncology

AGALIOTIS, DIMITRIOS P, MD, (Univ
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
CARROLL, ROBERT R, MD, (Universit


Syracuse)


of Athens


Internal Medicine

BABCOCK CARNES, ELIZABETH ANN, MD, (Medical
College of Virginia)
CLIN AST PROF
BHUTANI, ANJALI, MD, (Wright State University)
AST PROFESSOR
BISCHOF JR, EDWARD F, MD, (University of South Florida)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ


Greece)


CAMPBELL, ALICIA D, MD, (North
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ


of Florida)


eastern Ohio University)


CLIN AST PROF


GUTHRIE, TROY HANCIL, MD, (Medical College of


Georgia)


PROF & CHIEF/UFHSCJ
KITCHENS, CRAIG, MD, (University of Florida)
PROF & CHIEF
* LOTTENBERG, RICHARD, MD, (University of Florida)
PROF & CHIEF
LYNCH JR,JAMES W, MD, (Eastern Virginia Medical Sch)
ASO PROFESSOR
MAINWARING,MARK, MD,PHD, (Wayne State University)
V AST PROFESSOR
MARSH, ROBERT D, MD(MBBCH), (Univ of Cape Town -
South Africa)


ASO PROFESSOR


MCCARLEY, DEAN, MD, (Duke University)


CARANASOS, GEORGE J, MD, (Johns Hopkins University)
PROFESSOR
DAVIDSON, RICHARD A, MD, (Vanderbilt University)
ASO PROFESSOR
EDWARDS,LINDA ROBERTSON, MD, (East Carolina
University)
ASO PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ
FOSTER,MALCOLM T, MD, (Bowman Gray)
PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ


GOEL, ARCHANA, MD, (Gsvm Medical


College


India)


CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ


GRECO, SUSAN NEIMS, MD, (Johns Hopkins University)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
HARRELL, HEATHER E, MD, (University of Florida)
CLIN AST PROF


ASO PROFESSOR
MOREB,JAN S, MD, (Hebrew Univ
ASO PROFESSOR


HOFFMANN-KESTLER, SUSAN LEE, MD, (Eastern
Medical Sch)


- Israel)


Virginia


CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ


S, MBBS,PHD, (Madras Medical College -


AST PROFESSOR


* STREIFF, RICHARD R, MD, (Univ of Basel Switzerland)
PROFESSOR
WINGARDJOHN R, MD, (John Hopkins University)
PROF & PRG D1R
* ZUCALI,JAMES R, PHD, (New York University)
PROFESSOR


Infectious Diseases


ARORA, SHWANI K, PHD, (East Carolina University
AST SCIENTIST


* BENDER, BRADLEY


S, MD, (University of Maryland)


PROFESSOR
HTAY, ZAW, MD(MBBS), (Inst of Medicine-Burma)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ


HUBER,KATHERINE N, MD, (Michigan State Univ)
CLIN AST PROF
JABLONSKI, CHRISTINE TAWA, MD, (University of Florida)
CLIN AST PROF
JOHNSON-BENNETT,LINDA PENELOPE, MD, (Meharry
Medical College)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
KAYE,KIMBERLY ANN, MD, (University of Florida)


CLIN AST PROF


KING, SHERRY A, MD, (East Tennessee State University)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
* LOWENTHAL, DAVID T, MD,PHD, (Temple University)
PROF & PRG DIR
MASRI, GHANIA, MD, (Syria-Damascus U Med Coll)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
MEULEMAN,JOHN R, MD, (Washington University -
St Louis)
ASO PROF&ASO CHR


fl- t Ar l rr-. C'A ft T ,^^- I/I It '.fl.........'A.........


PROF


REDDY, VIJAY
India)











SMITH,J AMES M, MD, (University of Florida)
CLIN AST PROF
SOTTILE, ELISA, MD, (Temple University)
AST PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ
STEVENS, AMY O, MD, (University of Florida)
CLIN AST PROF
VEGA, AIDA C, MD, (Boston University)
ASO PROFESSOR
WEEKS III, THOMAS LOUIS, MD, (Medical Univ of South
Carolina)
CLIN AST PROF
WILSON,MAX W, MD, (University of Rochester)
CLIN AST PROF


Internal Medicine


- Melborne


LAMBERT JR, CHARLES R, MD,PHD, (University of Florida)
PROFESSOR


Nephrology


ABRAHAM,KOSHY O, MD, (University of Texas
CLIN INSTRUCTOR


- Houston)


Physician Assistant Program

BOTTOM, WAYNE D, MPH, (University of Alabama)
ASO PROF & PRD1R
BREITINGER,PETAR A, MPAS, (University of Nebraska)
CLIN AST PROF
CURREY, CHARLES J, MHA, (Chicago Medical School)
AST PROFESSOR
EVANS, HARVEY A, MS, (Trinity Univ)
CLASTPR & ASOPRDR
LEE,NANCY, MMSc, (Emory University)
CLIN AST PROF
MULTAK,NINA L, MPAS, (University of Nebraska)
CLIN AST PROF
PHILPOT, ROBERT J JR, MPAS, (Emory University)
CLIN AST PROF


Pulmonary Medicine

BAZ,MAHER A, MD, (American Univ
AST PROFESSOR


- Lebanan)


BLOCK, EDWARD R, MD, (Johns Hopkins University)
PROFESSOR


AGARWAL, ANUPAM, MD(MBBS), (Kasturba Med College -
India)
AST PROFESSOR
ARORA,NEERU, MD(MBBS), (All India Inst of Med Science -
India)
CLIN ASO PROF/UFHSCJ
* CADE,JAMES R, MD, (University of Texas SW)
PROFESSOR
GADALLAH,MERRIT FAWZI-FAHIM, MBBS, (Univ of
Garyounis-Libya)
ASO PRO & CHIEF/UFHSCJ
LUCK, STEPHEN L, MD, (UCLA)


PROF


& CHIEF


HOLLIDAY,LEXIE S, PHD, (Florida State University)
RSRH AST PROF
* MADSEN,KIRSTEN M, MD, (Aarhus -Denmark)
ASO PROFESSOR
MARS, RONALD L, MD, (St Louis University)
ASO PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ
* MILLER, R TYLER, MD, (Case Western Reserve University)
ASO PROFESSOR
NICHOLSON, TANA M, PHD, (University of Florida)
VIS AST SCNTIST
RAMDEEN, GARFIELD DONOVAN, MBBS, (China Medical
University)
AST PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ
* REED,JILL V, DVM, (Louisiana State University)
AST SCIENTIST
ROSS, EDWARD A, MD, (Boston University)
ASO PROF&ASO CHR
SCHWALBE, RUTH ANN, PHD, (University of Minnesota)


BRANTLY,MARK L, MD
PROFESSOR


CICALE,MICHAEL J,


, (University of Florida)


MD, (Georgetown University


ASO PROF& PRDIR
FOSTER, RUNI AREPALLY, MD, (Medical College of
Georgia)
CLIN AST PROF


* GONZALEZ-ROTHI, RICARDO J, MD, (New York
University)
PROFESSOR
HARMAN, ELOISE M, MD, (Johns Hopkins University)
PROF & CHIEF
* HARRIS,JAMES O, MD, (University of Mississippi)
PROF & ASO DN
JARIKOV, SERGUEI I, MD,PHD, (Moscow Medical Inst)
AST SCIENTIST
PATEL,J M, PHD, (Marathawanda Univ India)
RESEARCH PROF
RYERSON, EUGENE G, MD, (New Jersey Medical School)
PROFESSOR
ZHANG,JIANLIANG, PHD, (Uk-U Nottingham Med Sch)
RSRH AST PROF


Pulmonary/Critical Care


CURY,JAMES DAVIS, MD, (University of Miami)
ASO PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ
LAOS,LUIS FERNANDO, MD, (University of Peru)
AST PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ


AST SCIENTIST


SILKENSEN,JOHN R, MD, (University of Arkansas)
AST PROFESSOR
* TTqISR CI-ARI 4F F MD (Waiqhincro tnn lnivprgitvM


MOLECULAR GENETICS











* BRANNAN, CAMILYNN I, PHD, (Princeton University)
AST PROFESSOR
* CHANG,LUNG-JI, PHD, (University of Iowa)
ASO PROFESSOR
* CONDIT, RICHARD, PHD, (Yale University)
PROFESSOR
* DUCKWORTH, DONNA H, PHD, (Johns Hopkins University)
PROFESSOR
* GULIG,PAUL A, PHD, (University of Texas)
ASO PROFESSOR
* LEWIN, ALFRED S, PHD, (University of Chicago)
PROF & PRG DIR
* MOYER, RICHARD W, PHD, (UCLA)
PROF & CHR
* MOYER, SUE A, PHD, (Columbia University)
PROFESSOR
* MUZYCZKA,NICHOLAS, PHD, (Johns Hopkins University)
EMINENT SCHOLAR
* RESNICK,JAMES L, PHD, (Univ of Pittsburgh)
AST PROFESSOR
* SWANSON,MAURICE S, PHD, (Univ of California-Berkeley)
ASO PROFESSOR
TURNER,PETER C, PHD, (Cambridge)
RSRH AST PROF
YOUNG, DAVID M, MD, (Duke University)
PROFESSOR
ZOLOTUKHIN, SERGE, PHD, (Inst of Molecular Bio &
Genetics Kiev)


RSRH AST PROF


EISENCHENK, STEPHAN, MD, (University of Florida)
AST PROFESSOR
* GILMORE, ROBIN L, MD, (Ohio State University)
PROFESSOR
* GONZALEZ-ROTHI,LESLIE J, PHD, (University of Florida)
ASO PROFESSOR
GREER,MELVIN, MD, (New York University)
PROF & CHR


* HEILMAN,KENNETH M, MD, (University of
DIS PRF&PRG DIR


MOTT,MARY


CLIN AST PROF


S, MD, (Univers


Virginia)


itv of Florida)


* NADEAU, STEPHEN E, MD, (University of Florida)
PROFESSOR
OCHOA,JUAN GONZALO, MD, (Colombia-Fac Med U
Javeriana)
AST PROFESSOR! UFHSCJ
PULLEY,MICHAEL T, MD, (University of Maryland)
AST PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ
RAY, WALTER F, MD, (University of Florida)
AST PROFESSOR/ UFHSCJ
RUSSO JR,LOUIS S, MD, (New York University)


PROF &


ASO DN/UFHSCJ


* SACKELLARES,JAMES C, MD, (Medical College
PROFESSOR


of Georgia)


SILLIMAN, SCOTT L, MD, (Albany Medical College)
AST PROFESSOR / UFHSCJ
TRIGGS, WILLIAM J, MD, (University of Florida)
ASO PROFESSOR
UTHMAN, BASIM M, MD, (Amer Univ- Beirut)
ASO PROFESSOR


NEUROLOGICAL SURGERY


* VALENSTEIN, EDWARD, MD, (Albert Einstein


College)


PROF & CHIEF


ARCE, CARLOS A, MD, (Cayetano Heredia Univ Peru)
ASO PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ
* BOVA, FRANK J, PHD, (University of Florida)
PROFESSOR
DAY, ARTHUR L, MD, (Louisiana State University


EMINTSCH&ASO CHR


FAILLACE, WALTER, MD, (Univ Di Roma Italy)
ASO PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ
FESSLER, RICK G, MD,PHD, (University of Chicago)
PROFESSOR
* FRIEDMAN, WILLIAM A, MD, (Ohio State University)
PROF & CHR
JACOB, RAYMOND P, MD, (University of Florida)
CLASTPRF&CHF
MICKLE,JOHN P, MD, (Vanderbilt University)
PROFESSOR
NGUYEN, TAI QUYEN, MD, (Univ of Saigon)
ASO PROF&ASO CHR/UFHSCJ
* REIER,PAUL J, PHD, (Case Western Reserve Univ)
EMINENT SCHOLAR
RHOTON, ALBERT L, MD, (Washington University)
PROFESSOR
ROPER, STEVEN N, MD, (Univ Texas-Galveston)
ASO PROFESSOR


WATSON, ROBERT T, MD, (Universit
PROF & SR ASO DN


of Florida)


NEUROSCIENCE


* ANDERSON, DOUGLAS, PHD, (Michigan State Univ)
EM SCH & CHR
* BATTELLE, BARBARA-ANNE, PHD, (Syracuse)
PROFESSOR
BEDENBAUGH,PURVIS H III, PHD, (University of


Pennsylvania)
AST PROFESSOR


BLACKBAND, STEPHEN J, PHD, (Nottingham Univ)
ASO PROFESSOR
* HEATON,MARIETA B, PHD, (N Carolina St University -
Raleigh)
PROFESSOR
* HOWLAND, DENA R, PHD, (Medical Coll of Pennsylvania)
RSRH AST PROF
INGLIS, BENJAMIN A, PHD, (Queen Mary And Westfield
College London)
AST SCIENTIST
* KALRA, SATYA P, PHD, (Univ of Delhi India)


PROFESSOR











* NICK, HARRY S, PHD, (University of Pennsylvania)
PROFESSOR
* RITZ,LOUIS A, PHD, (University of Florida)
ASO PROFESSOR
SCHRIMSHER, GREGORY W, PHD, (University of Florida)


AST SCIENTIST


* SEMPLE-ROWLAND, SUSAN L, PHD, (University of Florida)


ASO PROFESSOR


* SHAW, GERARD P J, PHD, (Univ of London)
PROFESSOR


* STREIT, WOLFGANG J, PHD, (Medical Univ of South Carolina)
ASO PROFESSOR
* THOMPSON, FLOYD J, PHD, (Indiana University)
ASO PROFESSOR


* VIERCK JR, CHARLES J,


PHD, (University of Florida)


PROFESSOR
* WALKER, DON W, PHD, (Texas Christian Univ)
PROFESSOR
WEBB, BARBARA, PHD, (University of Florida)
AST SCIENTIST
* WIRTH, EDWARD D III, MD,PHD, (University of Florida)
RSRH AST PROF


RICHARDS, DOUGLAS S, MD, (University of Utah)
ASO PROFESSOR
RIPLEY, DAYLENE L, MD, (Chicago Medical School)
AST PROFESSOR


* SCHULTZ, GREGORY
PROFESSOR


S, PHD, (Oklahoma State Univ)


SIMMS-CENDAN,JUDITH S, MD, (University of Florida)
CLIN AST PROF
STONE,I KEITH, MD, (University of Virginia)
PROF & CHR
WILLIAMS, R STANFORD, MD, (U of N Carolina-Chapel Hill)
PROFESSOR


GYN Oncology


BENRUBI, GUY IESHUA, MD, (Suny- Stony
PROF & ASO CHR/UFHSCJ
NDUBISI, BONIFACE U, MD, (Texas Tech)
ASO PROF& PRDIR/UFHSCJ


NUSS, ROBERT C, MD, (Jefferson Medical
PROF & ASO DN/UFHSCJ

Maternal/Fetal Medicine


Brook)


College)


* ABRAMS, ROBERT M, PHD, DDS, (University of
Pennsylvania)
PROFESSOR
BENNETT, BARBARA B, MD, (University of Miami)
ASO PROFESSOR
* BUHI, WILLIAM C, PHD, (University of Florida)
PROFESSOR


* CHEGINI,NASER, PHD, (Univ of South Hampton
PROFESSOR


- England)


DELKE,ISAAC, MD, (Haile Sellassie I Medical School)
ASO PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ
GAUDIER, FRANCISCO L, MD, (Ponce School of Medicine)
ASO PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ
HUDDLESTONJOHN F, MD, (Duke University)
PROF & PRG DIR/UFHSCJ
SANCHEZ-RAMOS,LUIS, MD, (Universidad Autonoma -
Santo Domingo)
PROFESSOR / UFHSCJ


Obstetrics & Gynecology


- Pensacola


CLARK,PENELOPE R, PHD, (University of Florida)
RSRH AST PROF


- Philippines)


CRUZ, AMELIA C, MD,MBA, (Far Eastern Univ


PROF & PRG DIR


DAVIS,JOHN D, MD, (Bowman Gray)
AST PROFESSOR
* DUFF,PATRICK, MD,MAPA, (Georgetown University)
PROFESSOR
HILL, HUGH M, MD, (Johns Hopkins Univ)
PROFESSOR EMERITUS
JOHNSON JR,JOHN W, MD, (University of Virginia)
PROFESSOR
JONES,JAMES L, MD, (University of Miami)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
KAUNITZ, ANDREW MOSS, MD, (Columbia University)
PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ
KELLNER,KENNETH R, MD,PHD, (Suny- Downstate)
PROFESSOR
KIPERSZTOK, SIMON, MD, (Tufts University)
ASO PROFESSOR
LYON, DEBORAH SUE, MD, (Uniformed Svcs U of H1 Sciences)
A Cfl nn 7rFr'ccfln /i T I rrn'C


DECESARE, STEVEN L, MD, (Coll of Med/Dent-NJ-Nwrk)
CLIN AST PROF


DORR, CLYDE H II, MD, (University


of Oklahoma)


CLIN PROFESSOR
HELFGOTT, ANDREW W, MD, (Univ Autonoma Mexico
(Guadalajara))
CLIN ASO PROF
IZQUIERDO ENCARNACION,LUIS, MD, (Univ Central Del
Caribe Sch Med De
CLIN ASO PROF
RIPPS, BARRY A, MD, (University of Alabama)
CLIN AST PROF
SAVOIA-MCH UGH,JOHN J, DO, (Texas College)
CLIN AST PROF
SONTAG, BRIAN L, DO, (Nova Southeastern Univ)
CLIN AST PROF
STALNAKER, BENJAMIN L, MD, (University of Florida)
CLIN PROFESSOR
STALNAKER, TODD DANIEL, DO, (Southeastern Univ of
Health Sciences)
r 1NM A=T PRlPF


OBSTETRICS AND


GYNECOLOGY












Reproductive Endocrinology/Fertility

ILLIONS, EDWARD HARRIS, MD, (Jefferson Medical College)
ASO PRO & CHIEF/UFHSCJ


OPHTHALMOLOGY


APTSIAOURI,NATO, PHD,MD, (Moscow Medical Inst)
AST SCIENTIST
ARENDT, ANATOL, DSC,PHD, (Technical Univ of Gdansk -
Poland)
ASO SCIENTIST
BHATTI,MUHAMMAD T, MD, (New York Medical College)
AST PROFESSOR
* DAWSON, WILLIAM W, PHD, (Florida State University)
PROFESSOR
DOYLEJAMES W, MD,PHD, (University of Florida)
ASO PROFESSOR
DRIEBE, WILLIAM T, MD, (University of Virginia)
PROFESSOR
GOLDSTEIN,MICHAEL H, MD, (Northwestern University)
AST PROFESSOR


GUY,JOHN, MD, (University of Miami)
ASO PROFESSOR


* HARGRAVE,PAUL


EMINENT SCHOLAR


A, PHD, (University of Minnesota)


* HAUSWIRTH, WILLIAM W, PHD, (Oregon State University)
EMINENT SCHOLAR
HOPE, GEORGE M, PHD, (University of Florida)
ASO SCIENTIST
KIM, DAVID DAEHYUNG, MD, (University of Washington)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
LAM BROU JR, FRED H, MD, (Emory University)
VST CL AST PROF/UFHSCJ
LESSNER, ALAN M, MD, (Albany Medical College)
CLIN AST PROF


LEVINE,LAWRENCE M, MD, (Indiana University)


AST PROFESSOR


MCCARTYJULIE L, MD, (University of Miami)
CLASTPRF&AASOCH / UFHSCJ
MCDOWELL,JAMES H, PHD, (Florida State University)
ASO SCIENTIST
QI, XIAOPING, MD, (Shanghai 2nd Med College China)
AST SCIENTIST
SHERWOOD,MARK B, MD(MBBCH), (Manchester Univ -
England)
PROF & CHR
SMITH,M. FRAN, MD, (Northwestern University)
ASO PROFESSOR
* SMITH, WESLEY CLAY, PHD, (Yale University)
AST SCIENTIST
STEWART,MICHAEL W, MD, (Mcgill Univ-Canada)
VST CL AST PROF/UFHSCJ


TABANDEH, HOMAYOUN, MBBS, (St


George's


- London)


AST PROFESSOR
TIERNEY,JOHN, OD, (New England College of Optometry)


ORTHOPAEDICS & REHABILITATION

AGNEW, SAMUEL G, MD, (Tulane University)
ACTASOCHRASOPRF/UFHSCJ
ATCHISON,JAMES W, DO, (Ohio University)
ASO PROFESSOR
BEARD,JOELLA P, MD, (Univ Texas-San Antonio)
AST PROFESSOR
BERREY JR, B HUDSON, MD, (Univ Texas Med Br-Galveston)
PROF & CHR
CHIDGEY,LARRY K, MD, (University of South Florida)
ASO PROFESSOR
DELL,PAUL C, MD, (University of Florida)
PROFESSOR
ERO, SUNDAY U, MD, (Howard University)
AST PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ
FRANCO, ROBERT STEPHEN, MD, (Meharry Medical
College)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
GEAREN,PETER F, MD, (Loyola University)
ASO PROF


* INDELICATO,PETER
PROF & CHIEF


A, MD, (New York Medical


College)


KOPACH,KATHLEEN, MD, (Penn State University)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
MEISTER,KEITH, MD, (Boston University)
ASO PROFESSOR
MYERS, SCOTT L, MD, (University of Iowa)
CLIN AST PROF
PERRY,JAMES MCLEOD, MD, (University of Florida)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
PROCTOR, CHARLES L II, PHD, (Purdue University)
RSRH ASO PROF
SCARBOROUGH,MARK T, MD, (University of Florida)
ASO PROFESSOR


VANDER GRIEND, ROBERT


A, MD, (University of Florida)


ASO PROFESSOR


VLASAK, RICHARD, MD, (University of Florida)
AST PROFESSOR
WHEELER, DONNA L, PHD, (University of Florida)
AST PROFESSOR
WOO, RAYMUND, MD, (Wayne State University)
AST PROFESSOR
WRIGHT JR, THOMAS W, MD, (University of Florida)
ASO PROFESSOR


OTOLARYNGOLOGY


ANTONELLI,PATRICK


MD, (University of Minnesota)


ASO PROFESSOR
* CASSISI,NICHOLAS J, MD, DDS, (University of Miami)
PROF CHR & SR ASO DN
GIANNONI, CARLA, MD, (Baylor)
AST PROFESSOR
ISAACS JR,JOHN H, MD, (University of Illinois)
ASO PROF&ASO CHR/UFHSCJ


K1RfIRFRTC I ORT I PHI (Mpdiccal


C(nlleP of Vircrinia)











STRINGER, SCOTT P, MD, (University of Texas-Southwestern)
PROFESSOR
TERKONDA, RAJ P, MD, (University of Missouri)
AST PROFESSOR


PATHOLOGY, IMMUNOLOGY AND
LABORATORY MEDICINE

* ATKINSON,MARK A, PHD, (University of Florida)
ASO PROF& PRDIR
BAER, HERMAN, MD, (Univ Basle)
PROFESSOR EMERITUS
* BERTHOLF, ROGER LLOYD, PHD, (University of Virginia)
ASO PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ
* BRAYLAN, RAUL C, MD, (Buenos Aires Medical School -
Argentia)
PROFESSOR
BUI, YUANXIN MA, MD,PHD, (Capital Institute of Med -
China)
CLIN INSTRUCTOR/UFHSCJ
CHIAO,JOSEPH, MD(MBBS), (Ross University-Bahamas)
AST PROFESSOR / UFHSCJ
* CLAPP III, WILLIAM L, MD, (University of Tennessee)
CLIN AST PROF
CRANDALL, CATHERINE, PHD, (Purdue University)
PROFESSOR EMERITUS
CRAWFORD, JAMES M, MD,PHD, (Duke University)
PROF & CHAIR
* CROKER JR, BYRON P, MD,PHD, (Duke University)
PROFESSOR
* DONNELLY JR, WILLIAM H, MD, (Univ of Ottawa-Canada)
PROFESSOR
DREW,PETER A, MD, (Eastern Virginia Medical Sch)
CLASTPR&ASOPRDR
ELLIS, TAMIR M, PHD, (Univ of Cal Riverside)
AST SCIENTIST
ESKIN, THOMAS A, MD, (University of Michigan)
PROF & CHIEF
FURMANJAIME, MD(MBBS), (Colombia-Fac Med U
Javeriana)
CLIN AST PROF
* GOLDBERGER, BRUCE A, PHD, (University of Maryland)
AST PROFESSOR
* GOODENOW,MAUREEN M, PHD, (Albert Einstein College)
ASO PROFESSOR
* GRAMS, RALPH R, MD, (University of Minnesota)
PROF & PRG DIR
HACKETT, RAYMOND L., MD, (Univ of Vermont State)
PROFESSOR EMERITUS
* HAMMETT-STABLER, CATHERINE, PHD, (University of
Alabama)
ASTPRO&ASO DIR


* KLEIN,PAUL A, PHD, (University of Florida)
PROFESSOR
LAUWERS, GREGORY Y, MD, (Univ of Paris Faculte De
Medecine)
ASO PRG DR&ASO PRF
MASOOD, SHAHLA, MD, (Shiraz Univ School of Med Iran)
PROF & ASO CHR/UFHSCJ
* MCCORMACK, WAYNE T, PHD, (Florida State University)
ASO PRG DR&ASO PRF
MONTEIRO, CARMELA B., MD, (Univ Do Estado Da
Guanabara)
CLIN ASO PROF/UFHSCJ
MOREL,LAURENCE M, PHD, (France-Fac Med U Aix-France)
AST PROFESSOR
* MUIR, ANDREW B, MD, (Univ of Toronto)
CLIN AST PROF
MURPHY, WILLIAM M, MD, (Harvard University)
PROFESSOR
* NORMANN, SIGURD J, MD,PHD, (University of Washington)
PROF & CHIEF
* PECK, AMMON B, PHD, (University of Wisconsin)
PROFESSOR
PIERSON,K KENDALL, MD, (New York Univ)
PROFESSOR EMERITUS
POWELL, SUZANNE ZEIN-ELDIN, MD, (West Virginia
University)
AST PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ
* RAND,KENNETH H, MD, (Stanford University)
PROFESSOR
REITH,JOHN D, MD, (Northeastern Ohio University)
CLIN AST PROF


RHATIGAN, RONALD M, MD, (University of Io
PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ
RIMSZA,LISA M, MD, (University of Arizona)
AST PROFESSOR


* SALZLER,MICHAEL


MD, (Suny-Buffalo)


ASO PROFESSOR
* SCORNIKJUAN C, MD, (Univ of La Plata Argentia)
PROF & CHIEF
SCOTT, GREGORY V, MD, (University of Florida)
CLIN AST PROF
* SHE,JIN XIONG, PHD, (Academic De Montpelier France)
ASO PROFESSOR
* SMALL JR,PARKER A, MD, (University of Cincinnati)
PROFESSOR
* SMITH, RICHARD T, MD, (Tulane University)
PROFESSOR EMERITUS
SPANIER, SUZANNE S, MD, (University of Florida)
ASO PROFESSOR
THAMILSELVAN, SIVAGNANAM, PHD, (Univ of Madras -
India)


AST SCIENTIST
TUTTLE, DANIEL L, PHD, (University of Florida)
AST SCIENTIST


HARDT,NANCY


S, MD, (Loyola University)


ASO PROF&AST DN


HARDY,NED MCMURRY, MD, (University of Florida)
ASO PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ


VILLAS, BRUCE H, MD, (Rutgers)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
WANG, CONG YI, MD, (Tongji Medical Univ


- China)


AST SCIENTIST











ZANDER, DANI S, MD, (University of Florida)
ASO PROFESSOR



PEDIATRICS

Behavioral

BELKIN,MARY HALSTEAD, PHD, (University of Florida)
CLIN INSTRUCTOR/UFHSCJ
FISCHER, ELIZABETH A, PHD, (Southern Illinois Univ)
CLIN INSTRUCTOR/ UFHSCJ
TAYLOR, EDWARD C, PHD, (University of Florida)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
WHARTON,PAUL W, PHD, (University of Florida)
CLIN ASO PROF/UFHSCJ


Cardiology


ARMSTRONG JR, GEORGE F, MD, (Duke University)
CLIN ASO PROF/UFHSCJ


Critical Care

DENICOLA,LUCIAN KENNETH, MD, (Columbia University)
PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ
GAYLE,MICHAEL OLIVER, MD(MBBS), (Jamaica-u West
Indies Fac Med)
ASO PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ
KISSOON,NIRANJAN, MD(MBBS), (Univ of West Indies)
PROF & CHIEF/UFHSCJ

Endocrinology

ROSENBLOOM, ARLAN L, MD, (University of Wisconsin)
DIS SERV PROF EMERITUS
SCHATZ, DESMOND A, MD(MBBCH), (Univ of
Witwatersrand South Africa)
ASO PROFESSOR
* SILVERSTEIN,JANET H, MD, (University of Pennsylvania)
PROF & CHIEF


Gastroenterology


BAYNE, EDWARD JOHN, MD, (Medical Coil of Vil
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
BRYANT, RANDALL MELVIN, MD, (Duke Univer:
AST PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ
BYRNE, BARRY J, MD,PHD, (University of Illinois)
AST PROFESSOR
FRICKER, FREDERICK J, MD, (Loyola University)
PROF & CHIEF
GESSNER,IRA H, MD, (University of Vermont)
EMINENT SCHOLAR
HOYER,MARK H, MD, (Ohio State University)
AST PROFESSOR
MARANGI, DONALD, MD, (Far Eastern Univ Phi
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
MARVIN JR, WILLIAM J, MD, (University of Iowa)
ASO PRO & CHIEF/UFHSCJ


rginia)


sity)


GONZALEZ, REGINO P, MD, (Univ Central Del Est-Dom
Republic)
AST PROFESSOR
JOLLEY, CHRISTOPHER D, MD, (University Texas- Galveston)
CLIN AST PROF
NOVAK, DONALD A, MD, (University of South Florida)
ASO PRO & CHIEF


General Pediatrics


lippines)


MILLER, ROBERT H, MD, (University of Florida)
PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ
SCHIEBLER, GEROLD L, MD, (University of Minnesota)
DIS SERVE PRO&ASO VP
SCHOWENGERDT,KENNETH JR, MD, (St Louis University)
AST PROFESSOR
SKIMMING,JEFFREY W, MD, (University of Missouri)
AST PROFESSOR
VICTORICA, BENJAMIN, MD, (Univ of Cuyo Argentina)
PROFESSOR

Child Abuse

WHITWORTH, JAY M, MD, (Indiana University)
PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ

Child Health Policy
FRFFMTn ANI CTFIIPMVIT A P-O 1" (r nrrlad Qat Inivpri Tm cHf


ALFINO,MYRA W, MD, (Temple University)
CLIN AST PROF
ALMULLA, ZAID S, MD(MBBCH), (Kuwait Univ)
CLIN AST PROF
ARRAY, VICTORIA C, MD, (Univ of Central America Canal
Zone)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
CARTER, CAROLYN G, MD, (University of Florida)
CLIN AST PROF
CEDRES, CARMELO, MD, (Univ Central Del Caribe Sch Med
De Cayey)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
COOPER, AMY ADAMS, MD, (University of Virginia)
CLIN INSTRUCTOR
DAVID JR,JOSEPH KALIL, MD, (Duke University)
CLIN PROFESSOR/UFHSCJ
DELAHUNTY, CAROL M, MD, (University of Virginia)
CLIN AST PROF
DUMONT-DRISCOLL,MARILYN C, MD,PHD, (Albany
Medical College)
ASO PROFESSOR
FILLIPPS, DONALD J, MD, (Cetec Univ Dominican Republic)
CLIN AST PROF
FINUCANE, CHARITY MUTHONI, MD, (Temple University)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ











GOUDARZI, TAJVAR, MD, (Tehran Medical School Iran)


CLIN


ASO PROF/UFHSCJ


JOHNSON,L1NDSEY ALAN, MD, (Universidade Federal Do
Rio De Taneeiro -
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ


KAYS,MAUREEN


A, MD, (Northwestern University)


CLIN AST PROF
KHAYAT, ABEER DAOUD, MD(MBBS), (Syria-Damascus U
Med Coll)
CLIN INSTRUCTOR/UFHSCJ
LAVINA, ZENAIDA LOPEZ, MD, (Univ of Santo Tomas -
Philippines)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
MAULDIN JR,OLIN BEVERLY, MD, (University of Mississippi)
CLIN AST PROF/ UFHSCJ
MORALES-MATOS, SANDRA D, MD, (University of Puerto
Rico)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
NACKASHI,JOHN A, MD,PHD, (University of Florida)
ASO PRO & CHIEF
PARKER, DONNA M, MD, (University of Florida)
CL AST PF&AST DN
PRUDENCIO,MARIA CONCEPTION M, MD, (De La Salle
Univ Philippines)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
RAVAGO,LESLIE CHUA, MD(MBBS), (Univ of The East -
Philippines)
CLIN INSTRUCTOR/ UFHSCJ
ROGERS, HOWARD L, MD, (University of Florida)
CLNASTPRF&PRGDR


SINDER, ANDREW F, MD, (Alban


y Medical College)


CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
SWANGER,LILLIAN WASHINGTON, MD, (University of
Florida)
CLIN AST PROF
TOKER,KAREN H, MD, (Yale University)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ


WEI, FUSHENG, MBBS, (Beijing University
VIS AST SCNTIST


- China)


Immunology, Infectious Diseases
and Allergy


AYOUB, ELIA M, MD, (American Univ


- Beirut)


DSP & CHIEF
* BARRETT, DOUGLAS J, MD, (University of South Florida)


EM SCH


& CHR


HUANG, SHIH-WEN, MD, (Natl Taiwan Univ)
PROFESSOR
LEW,JUDY F, MD, (Univ of Texas Houston)
AST PROFESSOR
SKODA-SMITH, SUZANNE, MD, (University of Miami)
AST PROFESSOR
* SLEASMANJOHN W, MD, (University of Tennessee)
ASO PRO & CHIEF

Infectious Disease


DINERMAN,LINDA M., MD,


(University of Florida)


CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
JUBA,PAMELA LYNN, MD, (Eastern Virginia Medical Sch)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ


RATHORE,MOBEEN H, MD(MBBS), (Kin


Edward -


Pakistan)
ASO PRO & CHIEF/UFHSCJ

Neonatology

* BEHNKE,MARYLOU, MD, (University of Florida)
ASO PROFESSOR
BUCCIARELLI, RICHARD L, MD, (University of Michigian)
PROF & ASO CHR
* BURCHFIELD, DAVID J, MD, (University of South Florida)
PROFESSOR
CALHOUN, DARLENE ANNE, DO, (Ohio University)
AST PROFESSOR
CHIU, THOMAS TAK WAI, MD, (Univ of Hong Kong)


PROF


ZENNI, ELISA ALTER, MD, (Tufts University)
CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ


& ASO CHR/UFHSCJ


CHRISTENSEN, BOB D, MD, (Columbia University)
PROF & CHIEF


CUEVAS, DANILO C, MD, (Far Eastern Univ


Genetics


* DRISCOLL, DANIEL J, MD,PHD,


(Alban


Medical


College)


ASO PROFESSOR
* WALLACE,MARGARET R, PHD, (Indiana University)
ASO PROFESSOR
WILLIAMS, CHARLES A, MD, (University of Florida)
PROF & CHIEF


* ZORI, ROBERTO T, MD, (Odense


Univ Denmark)


ASO PROFESSOR


CLIN AST PROF/ UFHSCJ
CUEVAS,LILY LIM, MD, (Far Eastern Univ -


- Philippines)


Philippines)


CLIN AST PROF/UFHSCJ
DEMARCO, VINCENT G, PHD, (University of Florida)
AST SCIENTIST
* DRUMMOND, WILLA H, MD, (University of Pennsylvania)
PROFESSOR


DU, YAN, MD(MBBS), (Chong Qing Univ of Med
China)


Sciences -


AST SCIENTIST


Hematology/Oncology

* GRAHAMPOLE,JOHN, MD(MBBS), (Bartholomews Hosp -
London)


PROIF a


A fO DlIR


EITZMAN, DONALD V, MD, (University of Iowa)
VIS PROFESSOR
* EYLER, FONDA D, PHD, (University of Florida)
ASO PROFESSOR
GARRISON, ROBERT DONALD, MD, (University of North
Cnrnlna&l


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