• TABLE OF CONTENTS
HIDE
 Front Cover
 Copyright
 Title Page
 Front Matter
 Table of Contents
 Main
 Program in medical sciences
 Jacksonville hospitals educational...
 Index
 Back Matter
 Back Cover














Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00605
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: May 1972
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
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Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00605
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

Table of Contents
    Front Cover
        Front Cover
    Copyright
        Copyright
    Title Page
        Page 1
        Page 2
    Front Matter
        Page 3
        Page 4
    Table of Contents
        Page 5
        Page 6
    Main
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
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        Page 93
        Page 94
        Page 95
        Page 96
    Program in medical sciences
        Page 97
        Page 98
        Page 99
        Page 100
        Page 101
        Page 102
        Page 103
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        Page 122
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    Jacksonville hospitals educational program
        Page 129
        Page 130
        Page 131
        Page 132
        Page 133
        Page 134
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        Page 148
    Index
        Page 149
        Page 150
        Page 151
        Page 152
        Page 153
        Page 154
    Back Matter
        Page 155
        Page 156
        Page 157
    Back Cover
        Page 158
Full Text













































































'C.
















LIBI~S


1T7NIVEISITY


S.>


of TLOIDA


University Archives
George A. Smathers Libraries
University of Florida


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1972-1973



THE UNIVERSITY RECORD
J. HILLIS MILLER HEALTH CENTER
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA, GAINESVILLE


COLLEGE


OF


MEDICINE


CATALOG


















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ACADEMIC


ALL CLASSES
Registration
Homecoming


CALENDAR


Tuesday, September


Friday


1972-1973


1972


Noon, November 17,


Saturday, November 18, 1972


Thanksgiving


Wednesday, 6:30 p.m.,
to Monday, November


November


1972


FIRST YEAR (Class of 1976)
Phase A
1st Quarter
Orientation


Friday


and Saturday,


ptember 15-16,


1972


Classes


Begin


Quarter Ends
2nd Quarter


Monday, September 18, 1972
Friday, December 15, 1972


Classes
Quarter


Begin
Ends


Wednesday,


January 3,


1973


Friday, March


3rd Quarter


Classes
Quarter


Begin
Ends


Monday
Friday,


, March
June 8,


26, 1973
1973


SECOND YEAR (Class of 1975)
Phase B


Classes


Begin


Monday,


August


1972


Clinical Rotations


Sunday, November


1972


THIRD YEAR (Class of 1974)
Phase B (continued)


Saturday,


Clinical Rotations End
Pharmacology Course


November 18,


1972


Monday, November 20 to December 16, 1972


Phase C
Classes


Begin


Wednesday,


January


1973


FOURTH YEAR (Class of 1973)
Phase C (continued)


Classes End


Commencement


Friday,
Sunday,


June 8,


June 10,


1973


1973



















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TABLE OF CONTENTS


GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS

9 Facilities
10 Program in Medical Sciences (PIMS)
10 Jacksonville Hospitals Educational Program (JHEP)
10 Educational Concerns
11 Students
11 Faculty
11 Research

ACADEMIC CONSIDERATIONS

15 The Continuum of Medical Education
16 Flexibility of Programs
18 The Art and Science of Medicine
20 Comprehensive and Community-Oriented Medicine
20 Preprofessional Education
20 The Applicant Pool
21 Basic Science Requirements
23 Medical College Admission Test
23 Application and Acceptance Procedures
24 Professional Education Leading to the M.D. Degree
24 Phase A
26 Phase B
27 Phase C
28 Evaluation
30 Class of 1975 and Subsequent Classes
30 Graduate and Postgraduate Programs
30 Graduate Education in the Medical Sciences
30 Program Leading to the Ph.D. Degree
31 Medical Scientist Training Program (Combined M.D.-Ph.D. Degree)
32 Graduate Medical Education
33 (Internships, Residencies, and Fellowships)
33 Licensure
34 Continuing Education

(Continued)










STUDENT INFORMATION

37 Financial Considerations
37 Tuition and Fees
37 Scholarships
39 Scholastic Awards
40 Loan Funds
41 Fellowships
42 Living Accommodations

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

45 Phase A
46 Phase B
47 Phase C
47 Graduate Courses in the Medical Sciences
49 Biochemistry
51 Immunology and Medical Microbiology
54 Neuroscience
56 Pathology
58 Pharmacology and Therapeutics
59 Physiology
61 Radiology

ACADEMIC PERSONNEL

64 Dean's Staff
66 Departmental Chairmen
68 Faculty
84 Postdoctoral Fellows, Residents, and Housestaff
91 Medical Students
94 Graduate Students

97 PROGRAM IN MEDICAL SCIENCES (FSU-FAMU) Gold Section

129 JACKSONVILLE HOSPITALS EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM
(JHEP) Green Section

149 FACULTY INDEX












































This volume is dedicated to Dean Emanuel Suter by his
students and colleagues with affection and respect. His
leadership has exemplified the precious attributes of academic
strength and scholarship applied to administration. He has
given us a quiet and effective revolution in curricular and
collegiate organization. He will be remembered for these, as
for his warmth and personal insight, humor and patience.




































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GENERAL


CONSIDERATIONS


The College of Medicine, a component college of the J. Hillis Miller Health Center
of the University of Florida, opened its doors to medical students in September,
1956. The various programs rapidly expanded to include a curriculum leading
to the M.D. degree, a Ph.D. program in the basic medical sciences, internships and
residency programs in the various specialties and subspecialties of medicine, and
numerous special fellowship programs of clinical or scientific orientation.
The College of Medicine aspires to serve as an academic center of scientific and
educational leadership in medicine and allied health fields, and highly specialized
medical care services to patients referred by practicing physicians. The faculty is
dedicated to programs of research, education, and patient care, while providing
the student educational experiences of the highest quality. Located in north


central Florida


, the College of Medicine is engaged in extramural programs involving


neighboring communities as well as a network of educational services in Daytona
Beach, Jacksonville, Tallahassee, Pensacola, and other Florida cities.
Situated at the southeast corner of the 2000-acre campus of the University of
Florida, the College of Medicine enjoys the benefit of strong ties with other


programs within the University. The relationships to engineering, biological


social sciences, education,


sciences,


psychology, and other disciplines are of particular


importance.


FACIAL


TIES


Most programs and faculty are housed in the J.


Hillis Miller Health Center. The


Health Center's


facilities


include the Medical Sciences Building, the Library, the


Colleges of Health Related Professions, Nursing, and Pharmacy, and the Shands
Teaching Hospital and Clinics which has a capacity of 405 beds.


The Clinics


are visited by over 100,000 patients a year. Additional clinical and


research sources are provided by the Veterans Administration Hospital, which is
across the street from the Health Center and has a capacity of 450 beds. Both
institutions offer ample opportunity for hospital-based bedside and ambulatory
teaching. Formal educational affiliations have been established in Tallahassee and


Jacksonville
resources.


as well, thus providing additional basic science and clinical science








The construction program is actively underway in Gainesville and will double the
facilities of the Health Center. A major feature will be the Communicore, a learning
center for the medical and dental students. It will house lecture and seminar rooms,
multidisciplinary teaching laboratories, study areas, library facilities, and a center for
development and utilization of audiovisual and automated learning aids. While
each student presently is assigned a study cubicle, it is expected that after
construction of the Communicore, the students will have far greater resources for
individual study and development.


PROGRAM IN MEDICAL SCIENCES (PIMS)
In response to the need for more physicians in our evolving health care delivery
system, Florida State (FSU) and Florida A & M (FAMU) Universities have developed
an innovative, inter-institutional plan for medical education which integrates the
first year of the medical school curriculum with the undergraduate degree programs
of FSU and FAMU. Students receiving secured status from the FSU-FAMU Program
in Medical Sciences are guaranteed entry into the clinical phase of the medical
curriculum. (For a more detailed description of the Program in Medical Sciences,
please check the gold section of the Catalog.)

JACKSONVILLE HOSPITALS EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM (JHEP)
The Jacksonville Hospitals Educational Program (JHEP) of Jacksonville combines
the resources of eight participating Jacksonville hospitals in an educational program
with the University of Florida spanning from undergraduate to graduate and
continuing medical education. (The JHEP program is described in the green portion
of the Catalog.)


EDUCATIONAL


The educati
counseling,
residency, a
phase of thi


CONCERNS


onal concerns of the College of Medicine begin with preprofessional
and include the program leading to the M.D. degree, the internship,
nd continuing medical education for the practicing physician. Each
s educational continuum has particular emphasis and significance.


Educational offerings for the student of medicine must draw on the humanities,
natural and biological sciences, and on technology to provide a well-balanced
educational experience. The graduates of the program must have an appreciation
both for the breadth of the arts and skills of medicine and the highly specialized
and fundamental nature of scientific medicine. The graduates of the M.D. degree
program must have sufficient experience to be able to choose from the many
career opportunities in medicine. Also, they must have acquired an attitude of

10








continuing self-education and must have learned to adhere to the highest scientific
and ethical standards of the medical profession.
The College of Medicine and its programs received full national accreditation first in
1960 and again in 1970 by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education of the
Association of American Medical Colleges and the American Medical Association.
The residency programs are accredited individually by the respective
Specialty Boards.

STUDENTS
The College aspires to attract into the various programs students of the highest
caliber. High standards of scholastic achievement, moral character, and motivation
are demanded of the student. The highly personal relationship between patient
and physician places the latter in a position of trust, which demands maturity,
integrity, intellectual honesty, and a sense of responsibility. Because of the vast area
of science which must be mastered by the physician, the student of medicine must
possess a high basic aptitude supplemented by academic preparation of the highest
order. Through an active recruitment program, a broader representation of the
ethnic mixture of the state is sought in the student body. The College adheres
strictly to the principle of ethnic, racial, religious, sex and social equality among
its student body and faculty.

FACUI TY
The student is accepted into a fellowship of learning that should mark the beginning
of an educational and personal relationship of long duration. To meet the
requirements of modern medical education, the faculty must be representative of
a wide area of academic experience. In addition to the demand for highest
competence in a chosen field of specialization, the faculty must be interested in
education and in students. It must attempt to develop and maintain close
faculty-student relationships through personal, professional, and social contacts.
The nature of investigative and clinical training demands close interaction
between faculty, students, and the problem at hand, be it the patient or the object
of scientific study.

RESEARCH
Individual and cooperative investigations constitute an important aspect of the
activities of faculty and students. Facilities and equipment are made available
through state, private, and federal funds. In addition to the research laboratories

11








and animal facilities in the J. Hillis Miller Health Center and the Veterans
Administration Hospital, there are animal research facilities at the Health Center
Animal Research Farm.


Research projects of the faculty of
molecular and cellular biology to a
investigations including behavioral
disciplines. Collaborative projects
engineering, biology, nuclear scien
and many other disciplines.


the College of Medicine range from problems of
11 phases of basic and applied clinical
sciences, epidemiology, and many other
are in process with veterinary science,
ces, psychology, sociology, education,


In view of the nature of modern biomedical investigation, it is natural that many
interdepartmental efforts have evolved. Most of these involve faculties from the
basic and clinical sciences, and frequently from other colleges in the University.
In general, these groups are organized along categorical lines such as the Center
for Neurobiological Sciences, the Cardiovascular Group, the Divisions of
Infectious Diseases, Metabolism and Endocrinology, and Gastroenterology, to
mention a few. These groups serve a specific research need for the faculty and
comprise very strong educational units in the new curriculum. The Clinical
Research Center in the Shands Teaching Hospital and Clinics is a focus for
clinical investigation. Very active collaboration in both research and education
is developing between faculties of the College of Medicine and the College of
Engineering. Educational opportunities in biomedical engineering are available
at all levels: pre-bachelor, graduate, and postgraduate.







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ACADEMIC CONSIDERATIONS
Medicine as a profession deeply rooted in the culture of the society it serves must
be responsive to social needs and demands. Deficiencies in the medical system
developed slowly in recent decades and assumed critical proportions in the last
few years. Both the consumer and the provider of medical care now are expecting
major changes in the practice of medicine and its capacity to serve all elements of
our population. Medical education, although somewhat isolated from the day-to-day
problem of medical care, has been drawn into the mainstream of crisis and change.
In response to this challenge, the faculty of the College of Medicine has been
deeply concerned with the adaptation of the educational programs to the needs
of today and tomorrow.

THE CONTINUUM OF
IVIEDICAL EDUCATION
The curriculum of the College of Medicine has several basic objectives. First,
it is designed to instill in the medical student early in his first year the attitude
of a physician. By presenting the student with a clinical problem and sufficient
basic science data to understand the organic malfunction, it is hoped the learning
process will assume a meaningful significance for him. Second, the curriculum
is designed to acquaint the student with the different facets of medicine in such
a fashion as to permit him to make an early choice from the many career offerings
in medicine. Third, the study plan permits the student to assume the responsibility
for developing an educational program relevant to his particular needs a program
which will permit him to derive maximum benefit from the learning process.
The present medical curriculum is the product of a trend over the last 50 years in
which the medical school and its mother university have established close
academic ties. This trend has had a great impact on the quality and character
of medical education. It has facilitated the emergence of scientific medicine
and increased sophistication of patient care (including preventive medicine). The
price paid for these advances has been a rising cost of medical education and
medical care, as well as an alienation of medical schools and their faculties from
organized medicine and the practitioner. As our society approaches an important
juncture in the development of health and medical care systems, the conflict
between education and practice is becoming the cause of increasing concern for
involved parties. Medical school faculties now are studying carefully the long-range
aspects of their educational endeavors, as well as their position as proponents or
intermediaries between opposite points of view. As a result of this review
process, significant proposals for far-reaching change are being made, which will
have a long-lasting impact on medical education and medical schools.

15









At the University of Florida, three major components of a new program were
initiated with the entering class of medical students in September, 1969. They are:
flexibility of programs, the art and the science of medicine, and comprehensive
and community-oriented medicine.

FLEXIBILITY OF PROGRAMS
For many years, medical faculties attempted to adhere to a principle of completeness
in spite of the increased volume of knowledge in the basic medical and clinical
sciences. They added new courses and condensed old ones until the deluge of
factual material over-extended the student's capacity for retention, as well as his
facility for mental integration. In addition, the assumption was made that a single
standard program of instruction would be adequate for all students accepted
into the medical program. Experience at the University of Florida has since
prompted consideration of the varying backgrounds of medical students and an
elastic curriculum which will be relevant to the individual's needs and will
permit incorporation of further developments in medical education. Consequently,
the new program at the University of Florida differs from the previous curriculum
in the following ways:
1.) The basic or core program no longer is designed to transmit the total knowledge
presumed necessary for the practice of medicine. The emphasis has changed
from presentation of content to the transmission of an educational process,
whereby the student largely is required to seek out for himself the necessary
content. Admittedly, the student will have wide gaps in his knowledge of basic
sciences and the practice of medicine, but he should have sufficient information
to make a rational and well-informed decision regarding his further education.
2.) Although students in a medical school all share the desire to become physicians,
their backgrounds and specific goals vary greatly. By permitting greater
individualization the new curriculum will enable the student to adapt his personal
program to his previous educational experience, his individual learning speed,
and to his career plans for the future. In providing for this flexibility, the medical
curriculum will become an educational continuum beginning with preprofessional
education and culminating with continuing medical education for the practicing
physician.
3.) The new medical program will endeavor to free the student from the classroom
and provide him with the opportunity to pursue his studies in the library or
laboratory. While the regular course load for the first year of the medical student
previously consisted of 34 to 36 hours per week, it has been reduced to 25 hours
in the new program. The student with more time to devote to individual studies
will require greater support also through guidance, counseling, teaching
aids such as computer assisted instruction, and others.

16
























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4.) It is anticipated that the length of study in the medical program can be
adapted naturally to the needs of the individual student. In some instances first
year courses may be used to fulfill undergraduate degree requirements. In others,
a student may embark on an early residency program or pursue a combined
M.D.-Ph.D. degree program. The prime emphasis of the new curriculum will be
on providing a program which has the elasticity to encompass individual
needs and interests.


THE ART AND SCIENCE OF MEDICINE

The scientific basis of medicine universally is accepted as a prerequisite for


medical
confron
science;
the futu
medical
about th


practice


- at least on an intellectual level. Too often, however, we are


ed with the idea th
and furthermore,


re physician insens
students complain
te expected change


removed from the art of m
satisfaction or gratification
attitude may emerge toward
loss of motivation toward
student to achieve a high q
him to render optimal medi


at the practice of medicine is an art rather than a
that too much science in medical education renders
itive to the human needs of his patients. Frequently
that entrance into medical school really does not bring
in fulfillment of their motivational desires. Often they feel
medicine to the point where they cannot experience
of their emotional needs. As a result, a cynical
d medical and patient problems, with a subsequent
learning. The educational experience must help the
quality blend of humanism and science, which will enable
ical care to his patients. The faculty hopes some of


the new programs will provide a blending of the art and the science of medicine.
Through careful planning an effort will be made to use the fundamental knowledge
of the basic sciences in a meaningful relation to career goals in medicine. While
during Phase A (first year) the emphasis will be on sciences, it will focus on
clinical medicine during Phase B (second year and first half of the third year].
The opportunity to advance in both fields in a correlated fashion then will be
offered in Phase C. It is hoped this program will contribute toward a resolution
of the ambivalence between science and the practice of medicine.
The effect will be enhanced by an earlier beginning of clinical rotations by the
student (second quarter of the second year), thus eliminating prolonged frustration.

These two features are of special significance for modern medicine, since there
is widespread recognition that delay between scientific discovery and its clinical
application is too long and must be shortened. We expect the graduates of our
new program to have less difficulty in retaining a true feeling for a close relationship
between science and practice.


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COMPREHENSIVE AND COMMUNITY-ORIENTED MEDICINE

The development of the University's teaching hospital has played an important
part in accelerating the emergence of scientific medicine by providing ideal


conditions for certain aspects o
teaching hospital is confronted
which in the outside world are
insight into the day-to-day prob
the community. For this reason
will work in community-oriente


f clinical teaching
with highly select
exceptions rather
lems of minor and
programs have be
d service facilities


. However, the student in the
ed types of patient problems,
than the rule. He gains little
major illnesses as they occur in
en initiated in which the student
experiencing different kinds


of health care problems. Thus the student will have a more balanced view of the
practice of medicine and will be able to make his career choice accordingly.


PREPROFESSIONAL
In the continuum of the education and tra
college years are uniquely important. The
as well as the quality of the health care h
his liberal education as much as it does th
is difficult to overstate the importance to t
in the social-cultural areas of study as inc


EDUCATION


ining of
role of
e delive
e depth
he future
reasing


a physician,
the physician
rs, will reflec
of his profes
e physician o
recognition ii


the undergraduate
Sin his community,
t the breadth of
sional education. It
f a strong background
s paid to the


environmental and behavioral aspects of disease and the continuity of health
care within the community.
This does not imply that the student's knowledge of physical and biological
sciences is of less importance; on the contrary, the scientific basis of our
understanding of disease processes is rapidly expanding. Rather, it emphasizes the
desirability of a carefully selected program in liberal education with a strong
core of understanding of the principles of physical and biological science.


The preprofessional s
activities, should leaa
efficient study habits,
development, added t
cultural, and natural
arts for the education


student's educational program, as well as his selection of
d to the development of intellectual maturity and judgment,
and effective powers of reasoning. These goals of personal
o the importance of basic knowledge obtained in the social,
science areas of study, emphasize the significance of the liberal
of a physician.


THE APPLICANT POOL

Generally, students applying for admission should plan to complete the requirements
for a bachelor's degree. However, a limited number of well qualified students may
be accepted without fulfilling the degree requirements, provided they show
evidence of sufficient preparation for the study of medicine.

20








Personal qualities of a high order, a genuine concern for human welfare, and
superior intellectual achievement are the primary requirements for admission.
Such intellectual achievement is indicated in part by performance in undergraduate
courses. Applicants with an overall "B" average as a minimum will receive strongest
consideration for admission to the College of Medicine.
The College of Medicine admits both men and women to its entering classes;
members of minority groups are strongly encouraged to apply. A limited number
of out-of-state students, in proportion to the number in the University as a whole,
may be admitted. Applicants over the age of thirty rarely will be given strong
consideration.
Applications from students presently enrolled in another medical school will be
considered provided (1) the student is eligible to continue in his present medical
school, and (2) the school he is now attending is accredited by the Association of
American Medical Colleges.
Special programs of study leading to graduate degrees in the basic medical
sciences and admission requirements for these programs are outlined on page 30
of this Catalog.

BASIC SCIENCE REQUIREMENTS

The minimum science admission requirements include basic introductory courses
and laboratories in the following subjects:
Biology 8 semester hours (12 quarter hours)
General (Inorganic) Chemistry 8 semester hours (12 quarter hours)
Organic Chemistry 8 semester hours (12 quarter hours)
Physics 8 semester hours (12 quarter hours)
Although additional science courses beyond the minimum will not enhance the
chances for an applicant's acceptance, many students desire an additional
background in science. For this purpose courses in physiology, biochemistry,
embryology, physical chemistry, microbiology and genetics should be considered.
It is not necessary to choose one of the sciences as a college major.
No specific requirement is set in the area of mathematics, since at most colleges
some mathematics is prerequisite to physics and chemistry. In general, some college
level work in calculus is strongly recommended. Familiarity with the principles
of statistics and their application to the analysis of data is an important asset for
any medical student. A knowledge of computers and computer programming would
be valuable for the application of these tools in medical education and in all forms
of the delivery of health care.

21








Consideration should be given by the student to participation in honors courses,
independent study and scientific research. These activities present opportunities for
unstructured learning experiences and explorations of certain areas in
considerable depth.
Electives: The remainder of the college work should be distributed throughout the
humanities and social, biological, and behavioral sciences. The student should select
subjects which stimulate him intellectually, challenge him to a maximum
performance and contribute to his overall development and maturation. The
courses may aim toward a thorough study of a single area with a general background
in many areas, or may group in several related areas in the sciences or humanities.
The discriminate selection by the student of elective courses will not only increase
his store of knowledge, but will help him form attitudes basic to a professional career
in medicine. Development of certain skills will place the student at ease in a
professional school.
Extracurricular Activities: Extracurricular activities and employment both during
the academic year and the summers can make important contributions to an
individual's development. Experience in medical and paramedical areas often
contributes toward an understanding of health care delivery problems and helps to
solidify the basis of the student's motivation toward a career in medicine.
Discipline in study is essential. Efficient skill in accurate, rapid, interpretive reading
should be mastered. Methods of observation and collection of data, evaluation
deduction, and interpretation of findings are taught in psychology, physics, and
other sciences. The analysis and organization of a set of observations into its
simple components and the synthesis of many fragments of data into a working
hypothesis on which a plan of action can be based are taught in many courses.
The student should keep these objectives in mind throughout his
preprofessional training.
A high degree of skill in the use of spoken and written language should be developed
accurately to extract a story, systematically to record facts for the use of others,
and precisely to transmit instructions. These techniques are taught in courses
in English literature and composition. The study of foreign languages also
illustrates the exact meaning of words and the use of subtle differences in shading.
Communication through symbols is taught in chemistry, physics, and mathematics.
Proficiency in typing increases the speed and accuracy of communication and
will aid the student in his professional work.
Medicine deals with individuals who react to their physical, social, and cultural
environment. Functional derangement induced by the interplay of emotional
factors in the individual or by external influences from the environment can be
detected by subtle methods. The study of emotional factors is taught in philosophy,

22








religion, psychology, and the fine arts, while the study of social forces is considered
in history, literature, economics, sociology, and law. Since all of these factors may
induce reactions during physical illness which exceed that produced by the
disease itself, the study of principles in these areas is most important to the
education of a physician.

MEDICAL COLLEGE ADMISSION TEST
Every applicant must take the Medical College Admission Test, preferably in
the spring preceding the submission of his application. The test is given twice yearly
in many colleges and universities. For further information about the test, write
to The Psychology Corporation, 304 East 45th Street, New York, New York 10017.

APPLICATION AND ACCEPTANCE PROCEDURES

Admission to the College of Medicine is highly competitive and the applicant is
appraised on the basis of information gained from previous academic records, scores
on the Medical College Admission Test, recommendations by premedical advisors
and teachers, and personal interviews. The College of Medicine endeavors to select
those students who appear by present standards the most qualified for a career
in medicine. Similarly, the student is expected to make a careful choice of that
institution which offers an environment and program most suited to his interests
and personality. A personal visit to the school of his choice should be most helpful.
1.) The College of Medicine is a participating institution in the American Medical
College Application Service (AMCAS). The AMCAS application form may be
obtained after June 1 from any of the participating institutions or from the Office
of the Registrar, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32601.
2.) After careful screening of the initial applications by the Medical Selection
Committee, promising applicants will be sent an additional formal application
requesting information not included on the AMCAS application. The completed
form should be returned directly to the University of Florida and arrangements
made for submission of a preprofessional committee evaluation or letters of
recommendation. This second phase requires an application fee of $15 from all
students not previously enrolled in the University of Florida. This fee is not
refundable. All materials should be submitted as early as possible, but no later than
December 1 of each year.
3.) Following committee review of all of the application materials, interviews
with members of the Medical Selection Committee will be arranged for competitive
applicants. These interviews are usually held on Saturdays at the University of
Florida College of Medicine campus in Gainesville.








4.) After receipt of an acceptance, a written reply to the College of Medicine is
expected within two weeks. There is wide variety in acceptance dates of different
medical schools and therefore some students may wish to reconsider after filing a
declaration of intent. This is a perfectly acceptable procedure, provided the student
promptly sends written notification to every school holding a place for him.
5.) No deposit is required from accepted applicants, but if they accept the offer
of a place they have an obligation to matriculate unless they are released by the
school. Such release is granted automatically upon request by the student.
The above procedures are approved by the Association of American
Medical Colleges.


PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION
LEADING TO THE M.D. DEGREE
Once a decision has been reached by both the medical school and the applicant,
the student enters the professional portion of the educational continuum. From
this point on, the student will pursue his educational endeavors from the vantage
point of a physician striving to achieve well-rounded capacities as a physician-
humanist and scientist in his profession and community.

PHASE A
Phase A will occupy the entire first year, followed by vacation in the summer
quarter. Teaching will be of an interdisciplinary, interdepartmental nature, with
teaching teams drawn from both the basic and clinical departments. The course
schedule may be broken down in the following manner.
The Introduction to Medical Sciences consists of discussions of metabolism and the
control of metabolism in man. Presentations have a clinical orientation and are
followed by in-depth coverage of biochemical mechanisms. The course will cover
such topics as nutrition, body composition, intermediary metabolism, and
bioenergetics.
Cell Biology will emphasize cellular functions in health and disease, the structure
and molecular biology of the mammalian cell, cell-cell interactions, and reactions
to microbes and to viruses. The course work will consist of lectures, discussions,
and tutorial sessions.
Human Systems I concerns the functions of differentiated tissue types. Beginning
with an introduction to the tissues of the human body, the course will include a
detailed study of the neurobehavioral, musculoskeletal, respiratory, and
cardiovascular systems. In order to provide the student with a reasonable idea of








structure and vocabulary, each system will begin with a study of gross and
microscopic anatomy. This will be followed by physiological or functional aspects
of the system, and will conclude with the effects of specific chemical agents upon
the system. Representative pathologic phenomena also will be considered.



YEAR I



INTRO. CELL HUMAN SYS. I HUMAN SYS. II
TO BIOLOGY (MED 545) (MED 546)
MEMEDMED 540) Neurobehavioral Gastrointestinal
SCI (MED 541) Musculoskeletal Hematologic
Respiratory Renal
(MED Cardiovascular Endocrine
539) Reproductive
INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN BEHAVIOR
(MED 542) (MED 543) (MED 544)
TUTORIAL TUTORIAL TUTORIAL
(MED 547) (MED 548) (MED 549)


Human Systems II will consider the gastrointestinal, hematologic, renal, endocrine,
and reproductive systems. Again the approach will be through examination of
the anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, microbiology, and pharmacology of the
systems, including representative pathologic phenomena.
Introduction to Human Behavior will be offered one afternoon a week and will deal
with interpersonal interactions and personal reactions to a variety of situations.
Individual students or groups of students will interview patients under the
supervision of the psychiatry and.general medical-surgical faculty.
The scheduling of Phase A also allows time for the student to participate in elective
programs. During the entire first year, the College of Health Related Professions
offers special electives to medical students in the fields of physical therapy,
occupational therapy, clinical psychology, speech therapy, and hospital
administration. Electives also are available in laboratory medicine. In addition, the
first year student has the option to perform investigative work with a member of
the faculty.

25









PHASE B
Phase B is designed to give a broad experience in clinical medicine. It will occupy
all of the second year and approximately half of the third. Diagrammatically,
it may be represented as follows:

YEAR II YEAR III



SYS. PATH. SPECIALTY SEMINARS: SEMINARS:
(MED 562) CPC'S CLINICAL CPC & CBS
BASIC CORRELATION- CORRELATION
SCIENCE CLIN.
PHYS. DIAG. ----- PHARM.
(MED 580) (MED 566)
CLERKSHIP ROTATIONS CLERKSHIP
ROTATIONS
DISORDERS
(MED 572)


Initial course work will consist of Systematic Pathology, Physical Diagnosis,
and Laboratory Diagnosis. Systemic Pathology will emphasize the effects of disease
on the human organism and the correlation of disease with symptoms, signs, and
the course of illness. Physical Diagnosis will be interpreted and will utilize
anatomical and radiologic demonstrations or presentations. Experience in patient
interview (psychiatry) will be provided. Laboratory Diagnosis will be taught
concomitantly and will familiarize the student with clinical laboratory procedures
and their interpretations.
The major portion of Phase B will be devoted to the clinical clerkships, in which
groups of students will rotate among the major clinical services receiving direct
patient contact. During the clerkships, the student will become an integral member
of the medical team and will be responsible for his patient during all hours of
the day or night.
In addition to ward rounds, two hours each week will be reserved for Clinical
Pathology Conferences and for Clinical-Basic Science Seminars. These sessions
will be multidisciplinary in scope and will aid the student in correlating clinical
and basic science information.
A four-week Clinical Pharmacology course will be taught at the conclusion of
Phase B. This will be taught as a combined lecture and laboratory course and will









occupy the full-time attention of the student.
multidisciplinary laboratories at this time.


The student will return to the


PHASE C

Phase C occupies the last 18 months of the curriculum and consists of elective
experiences. The principal requirement placed on the student is that he devote at
least one-third of this period to significant basic science study and one-third
to clinical study.


YEAR IV


* S
* *
* m


ELECTED TOPICS OF AT LEAST
1/3 BASIC SCIENCE STUDY AND
1/3 CLINICAL SCIENCE STUDY
(MED 588)(MED 589)(MED 596)

m gem............ t M... ..... R II.... .. .
OPTIONAL


ELECTED TOPICS OF AT LEAST
1/3 BASIC SCIENCE STUDY AND
1/3 CLINICAL SCIENCE STUDY
(MED 597)(MED 598) (MED 599)

S.l J u...sOPT IIN sa L.* i t..m*m5smm Uw SE
OPTIONAL


The student thus will be able to design an experience which could permit a full
year in a clinical or basic science area, an early experience related to his career
choice, or an exploration of his interests among several career choices. Considerable
freedom will be permitted the student in designing his program, but the choices
must be made carefully, in conjunction with the student's faculty advisors.
The science requirement can be met by several different methods: (1) by registration
in formal courses in the basic science departments, (2) by engaging in a research
laboratory project with a member of the faculty, and (3) by engaging in a group


project supervised by the faculty.


The student also may elect to satisfy the


science requirement in one of the other colleges, provided he receives prior approval
from his advisors and the dean.
Clinical assignments are available in all of the major disciplines of medicine.
The student may work as an advanced clerk, assuming greater responsibilities
than in Phase B, or in special cases he may qualify for internship at an earlier time.

27


YEAR III









EVALUATION

Students entering the program of the College of Medicine are highly motivated and
are considered graduate students in a program of professional education. They
are preparing themselves for a career requiring excellence of scholastic endeavor,
moral integrity, sound judgment, intellectual curiosity and above all, a drive to
continue their education vigorously after graduation. It is hoped that the system of
evaluation will assist in attaining their objectives.

Since the evaluation of the student must provide information on both the student
and the educational program, new policies for evaluation were instituted at the
same time the new curriculum was implemented.

There are three major components of the evaluation system, namely project tests


given by the various teaching
Examinations Parts I and II to


C and prog
each phase
education c
knowledge
the student
the tutorial
motivation,


ress reports prepare
of the curriculum.
)f the medical stude
to clinical significa
in preparing his prn
groups will be res]
judgment, study h


units throughout the program, National Board
be administered during the first six months of Phase
ed by the members of tutorial groups appointed for
The purpose of the tutorial program is to improve the
int by assisting him to relate scientific factual
tnce and experience and vice versa. It will also guide
ogram during Phase C. In addition, the faculty of
ponsible for the evaluation of the student in terms of
abits, attitude and effectiveness of learning.


Grades submitted by the faculty of the various curricular units, comments made
by the tutorial faculty, and the scores of the National Board Examinations will be the
information used by the Academic Status Committee in preparing recommendations
regarding promotion, graduation, and general ranking of students.

Students may, at their request, receive grades as submitted to the Office of
Student Affairs. Grades submitted to the registrar will consist of "P" (pass)
or "U" (unsatisfactory).

At the end of each quarter, the Committee on Academic Status will review each
student's performance on the basis of his grades and the comments by the faculty
and recommend to the Dean a suitable course of action. Students who receive
U's in two major courses in one quarter will be dropped automatically. Appeals
concerning grades or decisions by the Committee on Academic Status may be made
through the Dean to the Executive Committee of the faculty of the College of
Medicine. The Executive Committee's decision will be final. The Committee on
Academic Status will prepare a ranking of the students to be used for recommen-
dations for internship applications and for Alpha Omega Alpha membership.

28









Ff
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The Committee on Academic Status will recommend to the Dean those students who
have satisfactorily met its requirements and are eligible for graduation. Superior
students may be recommended for graduation with honors. Nomination and
selection of students will be made by the faculty. Excellence of different types in
varied fields will be considered, such as superior academic work, outstanding
student research and thesis, and other special achievements.

Class of 1975 and Subsequent Classes
The student must assume responsibility for some program of individual study
during his tenure as a medical student. The investigative project will be such that
the student will be required to submit a brief summary and title of the proposed
project to the chairman of the department which will sponsor the individual study.
This summary description must be submitted to the involved departmental
chairman prior to the beginning of the student's final year in medical school.

GRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE
PROGRAM IS
GRADUATE EDUCATION IN THE MEDICAL SCIENCES
Program Leading to the Ph.D. Degree
The educational continuum of the medical sciences is designed to provide
flexibility in terms of the type of degree which may be earned as well as the
type of subject matter which may be included in the individual curriculum.
Programs leading to the Ph.D. degree in Medical Sciences are offered by the College
of Medicine through the Graduate School of the University. The programs offered
by the Departments of Biochemistry, Immunology and Medical Microbiology,
Neuroscience, Pathology, Pharmacology and Therapeutics and Physiology are
intended to give talented individuals an opportunity to engage in a career of research
and teaching in the basic scientific medical disciplines. Additionally, a program
leading to a master's degree is available in radiation biophysics through the
Department of Radiology.
The prime requirements for admission to these programs are personal integrity,
motivation, and general scholastic achievement. Candidates must satisfy the general
requirements for admission to the Graduate School and produce a satisfactory
score on the Graduate Record Examination. A reading knowledge of a foreign
language is required. Candidates should have an undergraduate major in a biological
or physical science, but other undergraduate areas of concentration appropriate for
study in the basic medical sciences are engineering, mathematics, and physics.
In order to remedy deficiencies in their backgrounds, some candidates may find

30








it necessary to take occasional undergraduate courses even though they hold the
A.B. or B.S. degree required for Graduate School admission.
The completion of a satisfactory dissertation based on original research is the
most important single requirement of the Ph.D. program. Most of the work involved
in the dissertation ordinarily will be done in the last year of residency, but candidates


will be encouraged to begin their research
toward the end of their first year. Graduate
is planned from an interdisciplinary point
biochemistry, immunology and medical mi
pharmacology and therapeutics or physiol
elected in any scientific discipline approve


in a preliminary exploratory fashion
e education in the basic medical science
of view, but with a major in the fields o:
crobiology, neuroscience, pathology,
ogy. A minor is not required but may be
d for graduate study in the University.


Graduate students have the opportunity of assisting in the teaching of medical and
undergraduate course work and most students are advised to do this as a part of
their training. Teaching assistantships and nonresident tuition scholarships are
available to a limited number of students.
Individuals interested in graduate study should write directly to the appropriate
departmental chairman, who will give further details regarding the program,
fellowships, assistantships, and scholarships.

Medical Scientist Training Program (Combined M.D.-Ph.D. Degree)

The Medical Scientist Training Program is designed for highly qualified students who
are strongly motivated toward a career in the medical sciences. This is a five to
seven year program, which attempts to provide for a limited number of students an
in-depth education in a basic science discipline as well as an in-breadth experience in
human biology. Successful completion of this program will enable the student to
enter a career of teaching and research in a basic medical science department or
pursue an internship and residency program leading to a research and teaching
career in clinical medicine. It is hoped students in this program may "bridge" the gap
between basic science and clinically-oriented careers in the medical sciences.
Candidates for this program must satisfy admission requirements of both the
College of Medicine and the Graduate School. These include satisfactory scores
on both the Graduate Record Examination and the Medical College Admission Test,
personal qualities of high order, and superior intellectual achievement. A strong
undergraduate background in the physical and chemical sciences as well as
mathematics is desirable. A genuine interest in human welfare is essential.
The selection of candidates will be based on the recommendations of three separate
committees: the Medical Admissions Committee for admission to the medical
program, the departmental Graduate Selection Committee for admission to the

31









graduate program and the Basic Science
Training Program. The Basic Science Bo
departments. Ph.D. programs are availab
Immunology and Medical Microbiology,
and Therapeutics and Physiology.


Board for admission to the Medical Scientist
ard consists of the heads of all basic science
le in the Departments of Biochemistry,
Neuroscience, Pathology, Pharmacology


The student will enroll in all courses for the M.D. degree. In addition, special graduate
courses and seminars will be required, as determined by the student's Graduate
Advisory Committee. The Graduate Advisory Committee also will assist the student
in planning his curriculum, determining his progress, and guiding his research.


In most i
initiating
16-18 me
continue
devote o
research
graduate
opting tc


C


;ases


the student will complete the first year of medical school while


a research experience. During


)nth clerkship program, the
a research project. In some i
ne year of the last year and a
. The fifth and sixth year (if
courses and research. Howe


I


stui
nstF
ha
nec
ver


the summer quarter
dent will take gradui
ances it will be possi
If of medical school
essary) will be devo
, a student may vary


before beginning a
ate courses and
bible for the student to
to graduate study and
ted to completion of
this schedule by


complete his research prior to obtaining clinical experience.


Students will be
Ph.D. programs.
evaluate the stu
awarding of the
with the basic s


degree, will


evaluated by examinations similar to those in the separate M.D. and
The Committee on Academic Status of the College of Medicine will
dent's performance and recommend promotion to the next class or
M.D. degree. The Graduate Advisory Committee, in conjunction
science department from which the student will receive the Ph.D.


assess his graduate performance.


Applications for this program are coordinated through the Dean's Office of the
College of Medicine. Candidates should specify the basic science department to
which admission is sought.


GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION (INTERNSHIPS, RESIDENCIES,
AND FELLOWSHIPS)

All programs of internship and residency training offered in the Shands Teaching
Hospital and Clinics and the VA Hospital are fully accredited and approved by the
American Medical Association's Council on Medical Education and Hospitals, and
are listed in the Directory of Approved Internships and Residencies. In addition, the
Senate of the University formally recognized these programs as academic non-degree
programs of the College of Medicine at its meeting of June 26, 1969. The Hospitals
hold maximum certification from the Joint Commission on Accreditation of
Hospitals. Each of the various residency and fellowship specialty training programs
has been accredited by the respective Specialty Board under the Joint Commission.

32








Internships: Straight internships, each 12 months in duration, are offered annually,
beginning July 1, in the services of Medicine, Pathology, Pediatrics, and Surgery.
Residencies: Residencies vary in length with each of the services (between two and
four years). Formal residencies are offered in aniesthesiology, medicine (internal
medicine, neurology), obstetrics and gynecology, ophthalmology, pathology,
pediatrics, psychiatry, radiology and its subspecialties, and surgery (general, plastic,
orthopedic, thoracic, neurosurgery, otolaryngology, and urology).
Stipends accompany each internship and residency. Housing at moderate cost is
adjacent to the Health Center and is described on page 42.
Fellowships: A limited number of clinical fellowships are available in the various
subspecialties of anesthesiology, medicine, pathology, pediatrics, psychiatry,
radiology, and surgery to qualified applicants with some previous residency training
and/or research pursuit. There are some traineeships which are at a slightly more
advanced level pointing toward basic training for academic careers in clinical
disciplines and the basic medical sciences. A postgraduate training program in
laboratory animal medicine is also available.
Applications: Detailed program information and applications for these programs may
be obtained by writing the appropriate departmental chairman, chief of service,
or the Office of the Dean, College of Medicine.

LICENSURE
Licensure to practice medicine and surgery in Florida can be obtained by
endorsement if the applicant has been certified by licensure examination of the
Federation of State Medical Boards of the United States, Inc. (FLEX) or is certified
by the National Board of Medical Examiners as having completed its examination;
provided that said examination required shall have been so certified within
the eight years immediately preceding the filing of the application for licensure.
Such a license is good only if the recipient engages actively in medical practice in
the state within three years after the date of issuance and continues his practice for
a minimum of one year. Graduates of approved medical schools in the United States
and Canada are eligible for this endorsement. In addition, graduates of foreign
medical schools who otherwise are qualified and whose credentials have been
evaluated by the Educational Council for Foreign Medical Graduates (ECFMG), and
who have passed the American medical qualification examination for foreign medical
graduates may be considered for endorsement. The applicant must have completed
at least one year of approved internship or five years in private practice in the
United States, its territories or Canada. He also must be a citizen of the
United States or legally have declared intention to become a citizen and have been
a resident of the United States for a minimum of one year.

33








Since various state laws differ in regard to licensure requirements, it is the
responsibility of the medical student to become familiar with the qualifications for
licensure in the state or states which he or she might consider as potential locations
for the practice of medicine.

CONTINUING EDUCATION

The physician's proficiency in the practice of medicine depends on his continuing
education. The College of Medicine recognizes its role in assisting with this aspect
of education and has designated to a member of the academic staff the responsibility
for inaugurating an effective means of strengthening the educational continuum
through postgraduate medical education. To facilitate such a program, a Division of
Postgraduate Education has been created with office space and secretarial assistance
in the Lakeshore Towers.
The Division of Postgraduate Education has surveyed the needs of the practicing


physician and formed a Continuing Education Council
continuing education for the practicing physician. The
and a series of two-day workshops have been designed
the practicing physician at the community hospital lev
University, along with a practicing physician, coordin
both academic and practical benefits to the practicing
national seminars based on current relevant topics are


to establish priorities in
se priorities have been defined
to meet the specific needs of
el. A physician from the
ate these programs to bring
physician. In addition,
conducted with national


speakers, University personnel, and practicing physicians. The interest of the
practicing physician in this program has been most encouraging, and is a tribute to
the desire of the medical profession to keep abreast of the current trends in medicine.


Physicians are encouraged to participate
Program which is designed to meet the ne
perceives them. The practicing physician,
preceptor, designs a program to meet his i:
is available to assist in his selection of an
as both teacher and student in the school'
practicing physician usually spends one
a small tuition is charged.


in the Postgraduate In-Service Education
!eds of the practicing physician as he
in conjunction with the University
individual needs. Pre-programmed material
area for concentration. In this role, he acts
s medical education program. The
to two weeks in this program, for which


Postgraduate Education personnel are available for consultation in program design
to educational techniques, chart audit, and peer review as they relate to educational
objectives of an individual hospital. Other programs in continuing medical
education are conducted in cooperation with the Florida Board of Regents, the
Florida Medical Association, the Florida Academy of General Practice, and a variety
of medical specialty groups.

34
















































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STUDENT
INFORMATION

FINANCIAL CONSIDERATIONS
For enrollment in the M.D. program of the College of Medicine, registration and
course fees are $1,050 per year for Florida residents and $2,250 for nonresidents. This
amount is payable in three installments in accordance with University regulations.
The Registration Fee includes a Student Health Fee and a Student Activity Fee for
each of the quarters. Most of the service and facilities of the Student Health
Services are available to students without charge. A group insurance program
sponsored by the Student Government is available at a very reasonable cost. The
Activity Fee covers the student's attendance at a wide variety of social, athletic,
and cultural events which are offered by the University.
Registration dates for each class in the College of Medicine are set by the Registrar's
Office and the students are notified when their group is expected to complete
registration. These fees must be paid in accordance with dates published in these
instructions or they are increased by $25.
Students who are interested in doing work toward an advanced degree in the
medical sciences should consult the Bulletin of the Graduate School for information
concerning tuition and fees.
Textbooks and instruments needed by a first-year student will require an expenditure
of about $400-$600. Purchase of a microscope will not be required as the College
of Medicine through a special fund has established a microscope bank and provides
each entering student with a microscope on a loan basis. If desired, a student may
purchase a used microscope from an upperclassman or a new one through the
Medical Book Store, a branch of the University Book Store, at a cost of
approximately $725.
The minimal annual cost for a single Florida resident is $3,050.

SCHOLARSHIPS

Avalon Foundation Scholarship Fund: This fund, made possible by grants from
the Avalon Foundation, is available for a few non-refundable grants to outstanding
medical students, and to outstanding candidates for medical school who have
been accepted for admission. These grants are usually made in the form of
tuition scholarships.



37









Blythewood & Baker Memorial Scholarship for Women Medical Students: This
endowed fund, established in 1968 by Miss Martha Isabel Mays, is to be used
to provide financial assistance to selected women medical students.
Faculty Scholarship Fund: Members of the faculty of the College of Medicine
make individual yearly contributions toward the funding of this scholarship.
The recipient may be selected from the accepted applicants to the College and
from medical students nominated by faculty members on the basis of truly
outstanding performance.
Health Professions Scholarship Program: Scholarships to enable talented students
from low-income families to undertake the course of study required to become
physicians are provided under the Health Professions Educational Amendments
of 1965 (Public Law 89-290). These scholarships are available only to such
students who without this financial assistance would not be able to pursue the
required studies.
Genevra Todd and Henry E. Meleney Memorial Award, established originally
by Dr. Henry E. Meleney in memory of his wife, is to be given to a medical student
for outstanding achievement during the first year of medical study.
Avonelle C. Noah Scholarship Fund: An endowment fund was established in
1968 under the terms of the will of Mrs. Avonelle C. Noah. The income from this
fund is to be used to assist worthy students in the College of Medicine.
Pfizer Scholarship: A non-refundable grant in the amount of $1,000 is available
under the Pfizer Laboratories Medical Scholarship Program. This sum will be
awarded to a student who, at the end of his first, second, or third year, is judged
to be outstanding in his class with regard to both scholastic record and other
aspects of his medical training. Financial need will be taken into account, but will
not be the primary consideration.
William A. and Catherine Shands Scholarship Award: An annual scholarship
award given to an outstanding medical student on the basis of scholastic record
and achievements. The award is given at the discretion of the faculty and the
Scholarship and Awards Committee.
Wheat Medical Scholarship Fund: An endowment fund was established in 1967
under the terms of the will of Mrs. Eva H. Wheat. The income from this fund is to
be used to assist worthy male medical students (who are selected by the College
of Medicine) to continue their education.
Joseph and Lee Wolfe Medical Scholarship: Established in 1968, this annual
scholarship award is to be given at the discretion of the faculty to assist worthy
students in the College of Medicine.

38









SCHOLASTIC AWARDS

Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society: The Beta Chapter of Florida was
installed at the University of Florida College of Medicine on May 9, 1960. A small
number of students of the junior and senior classes are eligible for membership.
Selection is based upon high academic standing, personal and professional
character, and promise for future contributions to medicine.
The John Gorrie Award, donated by Dr. Theodore F. Hahn, Jr., is presented
each year to the graduating medical student who, in the opinion of the faculty
of the College of Medicine, is the best all-around student showing promise of
becoming a practitioner of the highest type.
The William C. Thomas, Sr. Award is given each year to an outstanding student
with an interest in obstetrics and gynecology. The award is made by the Florida
Obstetrical and Gynecological Society.
The Faculty Award for Research is given to the graduating medical student who
has made the most outstanding contribution through research during the course
of medical school.
The Luther W. Holloway Award was established by the Florida Pediatric Society
in honor of Dr. Luther W. Holloway to be awarded to the medical student showing
the greatest proficiency in child health.
The Hugh and Cornelia Carithers Award, an endowed award established by
Drs. Hugh and Cornelia Carithers of Jacksonville, is presented each year to a
graduating student on the basis of over-all accomplishments and aptitudes in
child health and human development.
The University Medical Guild Scholarship Awards are presented each year by
the University Medical Guild to a medical student who, at the end of his third
year, is judged to be outstanding scholastically and to an entering student on the
basis of need and scholastic merit.
The Watson Clinic Award is to be presented each year by the Watson Clinic of
Lakeland to the medical student chosen by the faculty for productive effort and
scientific contribution.
The Dean Mitchell Baker Award, established by Dr. and Mrs. Roy M. Baker of
Jacksonville in memory of their son, is awarded each year to the graduating
medical student for excellence in the field of pediatric cardiology.
The Roche Award is awarded each year to an outstanding medical student in the
second-year class, based on scholarship and general performance.

39









Book Awards consisting of presentations each year to outstanding members of the
four classes in the College of Medicine are made by Lange Medical Publications,
Merck & Company, and C. V. Mosby Company.
Roger G. Schnell Neurology Book Award, established by Dr. Roger G. Schnell
of Ft. Lauderdale, is to be given to a medical student who has shown excellence in
the field of clinical neurology.

LOAN FUNDS

College of Medicine Loan Funds: Loans from these funds are available to students


enrolled in the College of Medicine who are
completed one quarter of academic work, an
financial need. Long-term loans are limited to
per cent) begins at graduation and continues
Repayment ordinarily begins two years after
arranged if further medical training is planni


in good academic standing, have
d can show sufficient evidence of
$1,000 per year. Interest (at four
until repayment is completed.
graduation, but deferment can be
ed. Short-term loans are available


for emergencies, but must be repaid within the school year. Equipment loans can
be made to spread over a period of four years.
These funds have been made possible by grants from the Avalon Foundation, the
W. K. Kellogg Foundation, the Selby Foundation, the Patrick J. O'Shaughnessy
Memorial Fund, the John J. Tigert Memorial Fund, the Frederick F. Kumm, M.D.,
Memorial Loan Fund, the Helen Stargardt Memorial Loan Fund, the George M.
Green, M.D., Memorial Loan Fund, and by gifts from several organizations and
individuals within the State of Florida. Loans are administered by the College of
Medicine's faculty-comprised Loan Committee.
AMA-ERF Medical Education Loan Guarantee Program: The goal of the American
Medical Association Education and Research Foundation is to help eliminate the


financial barrier to medicine for all who a
training institution. It is designed to provi
portion of the cost of a medical education
acceptably in the first year of medical stud
students, interns, and residents is the resu
medicine and private enterprise. As much
These loans are repayable, with interest, a


re qualified and accepted by an approved
de a means of financing a substantial
for students who have performed
y. The Loan Program for medical
It of a cooperative effort by American
as $1,500 may be borrowed annually.
after medical training is completed.


Health Professions Educational Assistance Act: The Health Professions Educational


Assistance Act of 1963 provides
academic year. The loans are ba,
ten years after graduation. This
to pursue a full-time course of s
specified by the Secretary of the


student loans up to a
sed on financial need,
period begins three ye
tudy at a school of me
Treasury during June


maximum of $3,500 in one
and are repayable within
ars after the student ceases
dicine. Interest rates,
of each year, are three per









cent per annum, or the designated federal rate at the time the loan is made,
whichever rate is the greater.
Florida Medical Foundation Loan Guarantee Plan: Established in 1965 to provide
readily available financial aid to Florida medical students, interns, and residents,
the Plan is designed to permit maximum flexibility for the borrower's needs, and
simplified administration for the lender. To be eligible, borrowers must be citizens
of Florida and have completed their first year in an approved medical school. A
maximum of $2,000 per year for three years may be borrowed with repayment to
begin the fifth month after completion of internship or residency. A seven per cent
simple interest rate prevails on all loans under the Plan.
Bernard J. Wagner Loan Fund: Established in 1968 this trust fund is for the purpose
of assisting students of accredited medical schools to continue with their education.
Preference shall be given to those who have completed the most years in medical
school. Loans are repayable with interest at a rate never to exceed that prevailing
rate at the time the loan is made on student loans enacted by Congress.
United Student Aid Funds: Participation in this loan fund is made possible through
the use of the Ronald A. Julian Memorial Fund. USA Funds is a private, nonprofit
corporation which endorses low-cost loans made by hometown banks to needy
college students. Graduate students may borrow up to $2,000 per year up to a
combined total of $4,000 with repayments beginning the fifth month after
completion of graduate education. No notes under this plan may bear more than
seven per cent simple interest. This interest starts when the loan is made.
Hugh and Mable Wilford Scholarship Fund: This trust fund was established in
1970 for the purpose of making loans available to assist worthy and needy students
to attend the University of Florida College of Medicine. This loan fund will be
administered in accordance with procedures established for the Health Professions
Student Loan Program.
Other Sources: Many students have received financial support from local sources.
These may be discovered by inquiries addressed to voluntary health agencies,
medical organizations, service clubs, church organizations, or trust departments
of banks.

FELLOWSHIPS

Student Research Fellowships: These fellowships are made possible by grants from
voluntary health agencies in Florida, pharmaceutical firms, the National Institutes
of Health, and other agencies. The purpose of the fellowships is to encourage
research pursuits by medical students and to enable them to undertake experimental
investigations during the summer, under the guidance of a faculty member. Such

41









studies are helpful
to place on certain j
intellectual techniqi
awarded to permit
studies, or to allow
working toward a s
fellowships are ava
for those students v


to the student in determining the degree of emphasis he wishes


pursuits, and provide o
ues of analysis and sy


full-tin
reseal
speciall
ilable
who wi


ne research for
rch as a full-tim
ized or advance
for the summer
sh to continue r


experimental work at the earliest moment.
by a faculty committee after the student ha
written research proposal.


opportunity for a
nthesis. Special
a period of one
e resident after
d degree or not.
preceding matri
research already


additional training in the
fellowships may be
year between medical
graduation, whether
A limited number of
culation in the first year
begun, or to begin


Selection for these fellowships is made


obtained a


sponsor and submitted a


LIVING


ACCOMMODATIONS


Housing on campus should be arranged through the Office of the Director of
Housing, University of Florida, Museum Road at S.W. 13th Street, Gainesvill
Florida (392-2181). Beaty Towers have been reserved for upper division and
graduate students with suites at $175 per quarter per student. For married s


le,

students,


1 Villages are available. These
containing one, two, and
. The 104 units comprising


apartments in Corry, Diamond,
are modern two-story buildings
a few three-bedroom apartment
Schucht Village are adjacent to
priority is given, when possible,
have clinical responsibilities rei
favorable consideration, applical


and Schuc
of brick c
ts ($65-$80


ht Memorial
construction
per month)


the Shands Teaching Hospital and Clinics and
to housestaff and upperclass medical students who
quiring immediacy to the Health Center. To secure
tion for on-campus housing should be made


immediately upon acceptance to the College of Medicine.


Private homes and privately operated rooming houses and apartments provide
many accommodations for students. The University's Division of Housing also
offers a referral service through the Off-Campus Housing Section where current
listings are available. These listings are not compiled for mailing since they are
subject to constant change, and mutually satisfactory rental arrangements can be
made normally only by the student after a personal inspection of facilities and a
conference with the landlord. Initial contacts should be made at least thirty days
before school begins.








42


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COURSE
DESCRIPTIONS

PHASE A

The following courses comprise the basic medical science background (Phase A)
of the curriculum for the M.D. degree, and are offered to medical and dental students
during the first year. Many are available to graduate students in the University,
although the number of students who can be accepted is limited by
laboratory facilities.

MED 539 INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL SCIENCES
4 credits. Patient care presentations dealing primarily with problems relating to metabolic diseases
in man, followed by in-depth discussions of the basic phenomena designed to help students
understand the pathophysiology of the diseases.
MED 540 CELL BIOLOGY
11 credits. Lectures, discussion, and tutorial sessions to increase the student's basic knowledge of
cellular functions in health and disease. The structure and molecular biology of the mammalian cell
are stressed, including such things as virus-cell interaction, inborn errors of metabolism, and
bacterial growth.
MED 541 CELL BIOLOGY LABORATORY
1 to 6 credits. Corequisite: MED 540. Course is project oriented to allow individual or small group
work with a faculty member. Registration by permission only.
MED 542 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN BEHAVIOR I
2 credits. Patients' interactions with disease, treatment, family, and community are explored.
Interviews with patients to develop skills in communication along with appreciation of subjective
experiences of both patients and doctors. Community program developments and selected
behavioral science contributions to health care are included. Creative collaboration between
students and faculty encouraged to meet the increasingly urgent psychosocial concerns of medicine.
MED 543 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN BEHAVIOR II
3 credits. Continuation of MED 542.
MED 544 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN BEHAVIOR III
3 credits. Continuation of MED 543.
MED 545 HUMAN SYSTEMS I
15 credits. Introduction to tissues of the human body; detailed study of systems, including
neuro-behavioral, musculoskeletal, respiratory, and cardiovascular. The anatomy, physiology,
biochemistry, and pharmacology of these systems, including representative pathologic phenomena.
MED 546 HUMAN SYSTEMS II
15 credits. Prerequisite: MED 545. The anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, and pharmacology of the
gastrointestinal, hematologic, renal, endocrinologic, and reproductive systems, including
representative pathologic phenomena.
MED 547 TUTORIAL
2 credits. A student will meet regularly with a faculty member to discuss curriculum problems,
career choices, developments in medicine, etc. Primary purpose is to develop a meaningful
relationship between a given student and faculty member and thereby to maximize the educational
experience of the student.


45









MED 548 TUTORIAL
2 credits. A continuation of MED 547.
MED 549 TUTORIAL
2 credits. A continuation of MED 548.


PHASE B
Most of the following courses involve detailed day-to-day care of patients in the
Shands Teaching Hospital and Clinics. They require highly specialized professional
preparation as well as large amounts of time which must, of necessity, be somewhat
irregularly scheduled as particular patients are available. These courses, therefore,
are limited to candidates for the M.D. degree. The individual clinical courses offered
are integral parts of the teaching program in the Phase B portion of the curriculum.
With the exception of MED 562, 572, and 580, these courses are offered to parts of
the class in rotation for periods of approximately two months.

MED 562 SYSTEMIC PATHOLOGY
3 hours lecture and conference, and 8 hours laboratory. 11 credits. Prerequisites: MED 561 and
completion of first year of medical school. Functional and anatomical pathologic changes are
correlated with etiology, pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of human disease. Participation
in the autopsy program is required.
MED 566 ADVANCED PHARMACOLOGY
One month. 6 credits. Lectures, conferences and laboratory. Fundamentals of drug action are studied
with emphasis on cardiovascular, neurological, and endocrine systems. Joint teaching in basic
aspects of appropriate clinical areas (e.g., anesthesia, ophthalmology) will be conducted.
MED 572 DISORDERS OF THINKING, EMOTION AND BEHAVIOR
4 credits. This course enables second year medical students to improve interviewing techniques to
learn symptomatic psychopathology, to conduct comprehensive examinations and interrelate
symptoms and to become familiar with descriptive and dynamic aspects of common clinical
syndromes and diagnostic categories. Small group teaching is devoted to lecture-demonstrations
and clinical work.
MED 580 BASIC CLINICAL CLERKSHIP
Two months. 7 credits. With the participation of all clinical departments the student is introduced
to the common and basic components of physical and laboratory examinations, techniques of
interview and history taking, and care of the patient in all fields of medicine.
MED 583 COMMUNITY HEALTH CLERKSHIP
8 credits. This is a five week clinical rotation in which students participate in health care in various
community settings. Experiences in rural areas, big city ghettos, or preceptorships with practicing
physicians will be individually arranged. Whenever possible the student will live in the community
he serves so he can see first hand medical and health problems as they exist in different
communities as well as the success and shortcomings of present day care in meeting them. The
community health clerkship will be coordinated with the medicine and pediatric clerkship.
MED 585 PSYCHIATRIC CLERKSHIP
Two months. 12 credits. Observation and treatment of psychiatric patients in the Teaching Hospital
and Outpatient Clinic. Experience and instruction is given in the application of this material to
the practice of medicine.
MED 586 OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL CLERKSHIP
Two months. 12 credits. Participation in obstetric and gynecologic management of women in the









Shands Teaching Hospital and Clinics provides a learning experience with an appropriate degree
of responsibility. The student focuses attention on the subject of biology and reproduction.


MED 591


MEDICAL CLERKSHIP


Two months. 12 credits. Active participation under supervision in ward and clinic care of patients.
Close tutorial relationship with staff in lectures, conferences and teaching rounds. A program in


clinical therapeutics


MED 592


is conducted jointly with the Department of Pharmacology and Therapeutics.


PEDIATRIC CLERKSHIP


Two months. 12 credits. Participation in medical and surgical management of infants and children in


the Teaching Hospital, Ambulant Wing, Emergency Room, and Pediatric Clinic provides


a learning


experience with an appropriate degree of responsibility. The student focuses attention on the
role of biological and emotional growth in the expression of illness in children.


MED 593


SURGICAL CLERKSHIP


Two months. 12 credits. Experience in the care of surgical patients in the ward and in the operating


room. Instruction in surgical biology


is provided by a


series


of daily seminars


and lectures.


PHASE


Within the general framework of Phase C, a student will register for


20 credit hours


of which 4-20 hours are chosen from Elected Topics and the balance from other
offerings in the College of Medicine and the University. The total curricular
program must be approved by the College of Medicine prior to registration.


MED 588


ELECTED TOPICS I


4-20 credits. Offered by all medical science and clinical departments of the College


as an


opportunity for concentrated work in a field of particular interest to the student. Individual
research, a preceptorship, or clinical clerkship in the College or in another medical center in this
country or abroad may be elected.


MED 589


ELECTED TOPICS II


4-20 credits. Same


MED 596


as MED 588.


ELECTED TOPICS III


4-20 credits.


Same


as MED 588.


MED 597


ELECTED TOPICS IV


4-20 credits.


Same


as MED 588.


MED 598


ELECTED TOPICS V


4-20 credits. Same


MED 599


as MED 588.


ELECTED TOPICS VI


4-20 credits. Same


as MED 588.


GRADUATE


MEDICAL SCIE

Programs leading to the M.S.


COURSES


-NCES


THE


in Radiation Biophysics and the Ph.D. in Medical


Sciences (with a major in biochemistry, immunology & medical microbiology,
neuroscience, pathology, pharmacology & therapeutics, or physiology) are offered
by the College of Medicine. Training in these scientific disciplines is planned to










give experience in research and teaching, rather than in clinical practice for which
the M.D. degree program is designed.

Although no graduate major may be completed without adequate course work at
the 600 level or higher, these 500 level courses also are available for graduate credit
as part of the candidate's major.


MED 501 GROSS ANATOMY
6 credits. The basic structure and mechanics of the human body are taught primarily in the
laboratory but supplemented with lectures, conferences, and demonstrations, as needed.
MED 502 APPLIED GROSS ANATOMY
7 credits. A continuation in depth of MED 501 with emphasis on applied and correlative aspects.
MED 503 MICROSCOPIC ANATOMY
6 credits. The microscopic structure of the cells, tissues, and organs of the human body is taught.
Correlation of the structure and function is strongly emphasized. Fresh tissues are used when
profitable and each student is issued a loan collection of prepared slides. Recent advances in
knowledge of cellular structure, acquired by the use of the phase and electron microscopes,
are included.
MED 504 NEUROHUMORS IN THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM
3 credits. Identical with PSY 533. Prerequisite: PSY 416 or equivalent. Synthesis, action, and
metabolism of putative neural transmitters; pharmacological means of altering these; physiological
or behavioral functions attributed to putative neural transmitters.
MED 508 FUNDAMENTALS OF RADIATION PROTECTION
4 credits. Identical with EGC 508. Prerequisite: An undergraduate major in one of the sciences or
engineering and consent of instructor. Survey of radiation sources, uses, and effects on humans;
examination of radiation protection literature and philosophy; practical radiation protection
methods and techniques; review of radiation exposure standards, regulations, and legislation.
BCH 511 BIOCHEMISTRY
4 credits. Prerequisite: Organic chemistry. The first half of 511-512. Lectures, structure, function and
metabolism of cellular constituents. Topics considered will include structure, biosynthesis and
function of macromolecules; bioenergetics; enzyme mechanisms; intermediary metabolism;
transport processes; biological control mechanisms.
BCH 512 BIOCHEMISTRY
4 credits. The second half of 511-512.
MED 518 PHYSIOLOGY OF VISION
4 credits. Identical with PSY 518. Prerequisite: PSY 416 or ZY 475 or equivalent with consent of
instructor. The visual process and supporting systems approached from the orientation of
human vision.
MED 520 PHYSIOLOGICAL MECHANISMS
5 credits. Prerequisites: General chemistry, physics, and biology. Basic mechanisms of mammalian
physiological processes; circulatory and respiratory mechanics; transport, distribution and storage
of substances in spaces and compartments of the body; excitability of tissues; muscular
contraction; sensory mechanisms; reflex activity.
MED 521 METHODS AND TECHNIQUES OF PHYSIOLOGY
2 credits. Techniques and exercises in experimental physiology; measurements of circulatory,
respiratory, renal, endocrine, nervous, and muscle function.
MED 534 NEUROSCIENCE
(Offered jointly by Department of Neuroscience and Department of Physiology) 6 hours lecture and

48










conference, and 7 hours laboratory. 6 credits. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Principles of
nervous system structure and function are taught, followed by in-depth study of timely nervous


system topics. Special reference


is made to the human brain. Correlation of physiology, behavior,


metabolism and anatomy of the brain, spinal cord,


nerves


and special


sense


organs


is emphasized.


MED 554


MEDICAL PARASITOLOGY


2 credits. Introduction to the major groups of animal parasites infecting man with special emphasis


on life history, epidemiology, and laboratory diag


BCH 578


nosis.


CHEMISTRY OF BIOLOGICAL MOLECULES


4 credits. Prerequisites: Organic chemistry (CY 373 or CY 579), physical chemistry (CH 453 or
CY 342, or consent of instructor). Mechanistic organic biochemistry. Emphasis on model systems,
enzyme active sites, and physical and organic chemistry or biomacromolecules.

The following courses are offered by each participating department. Most of
these courses, as well as others listed below, are also available to qualified
graduate students from other divisions of the University.


MED 630


RESEARCH IN MEDICAL SCIENCES


1 to 15 credits. May be repeated for credit. Supervised


research other than that toward fulfillment


of the thesis or dissertation research in Departments of Biochemistry, Immunology and Medical


Microbiology, Neuroscience, Pathology, Pharmacology
Radiation Biophysics.


& Therapeutics,


Physiology and


MED 697
1 to 15 cre
MED 698


SUPERVISED RESEARCH
dits. Credit not applicable toward degrees. May be repeated.
SUPERVISED TEACHING


1 to 5 credits. Credit not applicable toward degrees. May be repeated.


MED 699


MASTER'S RESEARCH: BIOCHEMISTRY, IMMUNOLOGY AND MEDICAL


MICROBIOLOGY, NEUROSCIENCE, PATHOLOGY, PHARMACOLOGY & THERAPEUTICS,
PHYSIOLOGY, AND RADIATION BIOPHYSICS
0 to 15 credits.


MED 799


DOCTORAL RESEARCH: BIOCHEMISTRY, IMMUNOLOGY AND MEDICAL


MICROBIOLOGY, NEUROSCIENCE, PATHOLOGY, PHARMACOLOGY & THERAPEUTICS,
AND PHYSIOLOGY
1 to 15 credits.


BIOCHEMISTRY


The Department offers


programs leading to the Ph.D. in medical


sciences


with a


major in biochemistry, and to the Ph.D. in biochemistry. Ordinarily, candidates
for the M.S. degree alone will not be accepted.


Prerequisites:


Since biochemistry is a multi-disciplinary field, the undergraduate


major may be in related biological and physical sciences. Required courses include
general, organic, quantitative and physical chemistry and at least 8 credits in physics
and in biology. Calculus is recommended. Pre-baccalaureate courses in biochemistry
are not accredited for the graduate program. Any deficiency in the prerequisites
must be satisfied as soon as possible after entering Graduate School. Doctoral
candidates are required to take a core of biochemistry courses which include

49










BCH 601, BCH 602, BCH 603, MED 615, MED 616, MED 617. Depending upon the
interests and background of the student additional courses are recommended from
the following list: BCH 578, BCH 605, BCH 612, MED 613, MED 614, MED 618,
and MED 619.

The course of graduate study for doctoral candidates also includes advanced
organic and physical chemistry, physiology, microbiology and genetics.

MED Courses Available for Graduate Major Credit in Biochemistry:

MED 614 BIOENERGETICS AND ENZYME MECHANISMS
4 credits. Prerequisites: BCH 601, BCH 602, BCH 603, and physical chemistry. Current aspects of
the mechanisms of enzyme action and the energy transformations occurring in biological systems.
MED 615 RESEARCH METHODS IN BIOCHEMISTRY
2 to 6 credits. Corequisites: BCH 601, BCH 602, BCH 603. Only by special arrangement. Biochemical
research in which the student refines his research techniques in physical biochemistry,
intermediary metabolism, radioisotopes, etc. under supervision of a staff member. May be repeated
with change of content up to a maximum of 12 credits.
MED 616 BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR
1 credit. Required of graduate students in biochemistry; open to others by special arrangement.
Research reports and discussions of current research literature are given by the departmental staff,
invited speakers, and graduate students.
MED 617 SPECIAL TOPICS IN BIOCHEMISTRY
2 credits. Required of graduate students in biochemistry; open to others by special arrangement.
Supervised study in journals, treatises, and monographs in various subject areas of biochemistry
with informal weekly conferences and reports. May be repeated with change of content up to a
maximum of 6 credits.


The following courses are being offered as part of the Program in Molecular Biology
(See Graduate Catalog).

MED 613 MOLECULAR BIOLOGY 1
4 credits. Prerequisites: General course in biochemistry and consent of instructor. Chemical and
physicochemical characteristics of the molecules concerned with heredity, gene replication, and
mutation, and of their biosynthesis and function.
MED 618 MOLECULAR BIOLOGY 2
4 credits. Prerequisites: General course in biochemistry and consent of instructor. Biochemistry of
nuclei, ribosomes, mitochondria, chloroplasts, Golgi bodies, lysosomes, cell walls and
membranes; compartmentation and integrated cellular function.
MED 619 MOLECULAR BIOLOGY 3
4 credits. Prerequisites: General course in biochemistry and consent of instructor. The relationship
between cell structure and function: 1) organization of chromosomes, RNA synthesis, and
translation of the genetic code into functional entities; 2) organization of cellular membranes;
3) ultrastructure, function, and biosynthesis of subcellular organelles; 4) regulatory mechanisms of
the cell; correlation of in vitro and in vivo experiments.

MED courses numbered 613 through 619 are identical with BCH courses of the
same number.

50









BCH Courses Available for Graduate Major Credit in Biochemistry:
BCH 601 BIOCHEMISTRY 1
3 credits. Prerequisite: Organic chemistry; corequisite: Physical chemistry. Structure, function and
metabolism of cellular constituents. Topics considered will include: structure, biosynthesis and
function of macromolecules; bioenergetics; enzyme mechanisms; intermediary metabolism;
transport processes; biological control mechanisms.
BCH 602 BIOCHEMISTRY 2
3 credits. Continuation of BCH 601.
BGH 603 BIOCHEMISTRY 3
3 credits. Continuation of BCH 602.
BCH 605 LABORATORY METHODS OF BIOCHEMISTRY 1
2 credits. Corequisite: BCH 601. Introduction to laboratory methods including colorimetry,
spectrophotometry, chromatography, cellular fractionation and techniques of enzymology.
Experiments in intermediary metabolism and introduction to isotopic methods.
BCH 612 PHYSICAL BIOCHEMISTRY
4 credits. Prerequisites: General course in biochemistry (BCH 601 or BCH 511) and either physical
chemistry or consent of instructor. Physical chemistry and molecular structures of proteins,
enzymes, and nucleic acids. Fundamentals of physical biochemistry techniques.

IMMUNOLOGY AND MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY

The Department offers a program leading to the Master of Science and Doctor of
Philosophy degrees in immunology and medical microbiology, including the fields
of parasitology and virology. Through individual planning of course work, research
and teaching, the graduate student is offered an educational atmosphere to help
him develop certain skills and gain intellectual independence and initiative. The
program is in close collaboration with the Department of Microbiology in the College
of Arts and Sciences.
The undergraduate preparation for graduate study in immunology and medical
microbiology should be wide in scope and should include general biology, physics,
chemistry (2 to 3 years including organic and quantitative analysis), and preferably
statistics, calculus, physical chemistry, genetics, and bacteriology. A bachelor's
degree in bacteriology or microbiology is not required. In Graduate School the student
will at first obtain a general background in microbiology as preparation for research
and teaching. The remaining course work should be arranged according to the
student's interest and competence. Emphasis is placed in the following areas:
virology, immunology, immunochemistry, infectious diseases, microbial genetics
and parasitology.

MED 650 PUBLIC HEALTH MICROBIOLOGY
1 to 6 credits. Maximum 18 credits. Identical with MCY 650. Prerequisites: Permission of chairman
of department and director of laboratories. References study and laboratory practice of diagnostic
techniques in the Microbiology Diagnostic Laboratories of the Shands Teaching Hospital, University
of Florida J. Hillis Miller Health Center, or in residence at the Bureau of Laboratories, State
Department of Health, Jacksonville.

51

















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MED 651


SPECIAL TOPICS IN MICROBIOLOGY


1 to 6 credits. Identical with MCY 651. Prerequisite: 6 credits in graduate major courses. Organized
study of contemporary research in a particular aspect of general microbiology. May be repeated
with change of content.


MED 652


VIROLOGY


5 credits. Identical with MCY


MED 653


652. Nature of viruses and mechanisms of viral replication.


VIROLOGY LABORATORY


3 credits. Identical with MCY 653. Prerequisite or corequisite: MED


652. Selected laboratory


experiments on the nature of viruses and mechanisms of viral replication, as well as other
consequences of viral infections.


MED 654


RESEARCH PLANNING


5 credits. Identical with MCY 654. Prerequisite: 20 credits in progressive study of microbiology. An
outline of the processes involved in scientific research, including initiating a problem, experimental
techniques, analysis and evaluation of data, and reporting, illustrated by bacteriological examples.


MED 655


EXPERIMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY


2 to 5 credits. Identical with MCY


655. Prerequisites: 12 credits in microbiology and consent of


instructor. Application of physical, chemical and biological techniques to experimental problems
in microbiology. Individual laboratory study under supervision. May be repeated with change
of content up to a maximum of 8 credits.


MED 656


THE LITERATURE OF MICROBIOLOGY


3 credits. Identical with MCY 656. Prerequisites: 12 credits of microbiology and consent of


instructor. Bibliographic method in searching the literature. The literature of specified
the discipline.


MED 657


areas


MICROBIAL METABOLISM


5 credits. Identical with MCY


657. Prerequisite: BCH 603. The intermediary metabolism of


microorganisms; emphasizes those metabolic pathways that are unique or characteristic
primarily of microorganisms.


MED 658


MICROBIAL PHYSIOLOGY


5 credits. Identical with MCY 658. Prerequisite: MED 657 or consent of instructor. The structural
and functional elements of microorganisms and the mechanics of their regulatory system.
Mechanisms of control of microbial DNA replication, cell division, ribosome and cell-wall
formation; kinetic studies of normal and abnormal growth.


MED 659


PRINCIPLES OF IMMUNOLOGY


5 credits. Identical with MCY 659. Prerequisite: MCY 505 or MED 551. Biological and biochemical
aspects of host resistance and immunity, with special emphasis on the chemical and
physicochemical properties of the proteins of immune reactions.


MED 660


IMMUNOLOGY LABORATORY


3 credits. Identical with MCY 660. Corequisite: MED 659. Consent of staff is required for
registration.
MED 661 BIOLOGY OF UNCOMMON MICROORGANISMS
5 credits. Identical with MCY 661. Prerequisites: MCY 305, and consent of instructor. Natural
distribution, metabolic activities, isolation and culture of selected groups of microorganisms.


MED 662


MICROBIAL GENETICS


5 credits. Identical with MCY


662. Prerequisites: MCY 520, MCY 521, general genetics. Microbial


genetics, including mutation, selection, transformation, transduction, conjugation and episomal
factors, molecular structure and function of genes.


MED 663


PARASITIC DISEASES OF THE TROPICS AND SUBTROPICS


5 credits. Identical with MCY 663, ZY 663, and VY 663. A course in animal parasitology covering
the mechanisms of parasitic infections, the physiology of parasites and the immune responses of the
host; public health, veterinary and general aspects of various parasites affecting man and animals.









Laboratory work includes experiments showing the effects of nutrition on parasites; immune
responses, factors and modes of transmission; life cycles; morphology.
MED 644 VIRAL DISEASES
3 credits. Identical with MCY 664. Prerequisite: MED (MCY) 652. Pathogenesis of viral disease
including cytopathic and oncogenic viruses. Diagnostic and preventive measures.
MED 665 MICROBIAL INFECTIONS
5 credits. The pathogenesis of selected bacterial and fungal diseases emphasizing the clinical and
pathological aspects of human infection.
MED 666 MICROBIOLOGY 1
6 credits. Identical with MCY 666. Intensive review of principles of immunity, physiology and
genetics of bacteria, virology, infection, and ecology (see also MED 667).
MED 667 MICROBIOLOGY 2
3 credits. Identical with MCY 667. Continuation of MED 666.
MED 668 REGULATION IN BIOLOGICAL SYSTEMS
5 credits. Identical with MCY 668. Prerequisites: MCY 520, 521; MED 657; BCH 601, 602. Control
of enzyme activity: kinetic control (allosteric and non-allosteric), control at the energy level,
permeases. Control of enzyme synthesis: positive and negative; repression, induction, catabolic
repression, cyclic AMP. Regulation in higher organisms; hormonal control.
MED 699 SEMINAR
1 credit. Identical with MCY 669. Attendance is required of all graduate majors at one research
presentation and one graduate report each week as scheduled. May be repeated with change
of content.
MED 750 JOURNAL COLLOQUY
1 credit. Identical with MCY 750. Critical presentations and discussion of recent original articles in
the microbiological literature. May be repeated with change of content.
MED 751 RESEARCH CONFERENCE
1 credit. Identical with MCY 751. Critical discussion and appraisal of research programs of the
faculty and students of the department. May be repeated with change of content.


NEUROSCIENCE

The Department offers a program leading to the Doctor of Philosophy degree in the
basic neuroscience. Undergraduate preparation should include credits in biological
chemistry, physics, mathematics, and behavioral sciences. Deficiencies may be
remedied by taking undergraduate courses, individual work, or special examinations
during the first year of graduate training. Required courses for most graduate students
will include MED 534, MED 600, MED 633, and MED 676 unless equivalent studies
have been taken elsewhere. The remainder of the graduate program will consist of
laboratory research, courses, and seminars in this and other departments which
have been selected jointly by the student and his advisory committee.

MED 600 HISTORY OF THE NEUROSCIENCE
3 credits. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. History of the discoveries, concepts, and technical
advances in the nervous system disciplines from ancient to modern times. The emergence of the
several neuroscience as experimental disciplines that provide a foundation for rational
medical applications.










MED 601


SEMINAR: SOMESTHESIS AND PAIN


4 credits. Current research on central nervous system coding and information transfer, using
somesthesis as a model with particular emphasis on pain.


MED 603


COMPARATIVE NEUROLOGY


4 credits. Prerequisite: MED 534 or equivalent. The phylogenetic development of the central
nervous system of vertebrate animals considered from the behavioral, anatomical, and
physiological points of view.


MED 622


PHYSIOLOGY OF THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM


3 credits. Special and current problems in brain and spinal cord function covered in seminars.


MED 623


NEUROPHYSIOLOGY


3 credits. Physiology of nerve and muscle, central nervous system, and the special
MED 633 NEUROBIOLOGY


senses.


5 credits. Prerequisite: Background in biological or behavioral sciences. Structure and physiology
of the nervous system as it pertains to control of behavior.


MED 635


NEUROENDOCRINOLOGY


4 to 6 credits. Prerequisites: Permission of instructor. Neural regulation of endocrine systems in
vertebrate animals. Correlative study of neuroanatomical, neurophysiological and neurochemical
aspects of endocrine control.


MED 676


NEUROHISTOLOGY


4 credits. Prerequisites: MED 534 and consent of instructor. Histological approaches


and techniques


for the study of the neuronal, neuroglial, and mesenchymal cellular components of the central
and peripheral nervous system.


MED 677


NERVE AS A TISSUE


2 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Seminar on current research problems in the
area of cellular interactions in the nervous system. Readings and discussion from articles in the
fields contributing to the physiology, chemistry and anatomy of the nervous system.


MED 711


NEURAL-BEHAVIORAL-ENDOCRINE INTERACTIONS


4 credits. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Interrelationships of endocrine hormones, nervous
system activity, and behavior. Sample topics include the role of hormones in sexual behavior,


aggression,
MED 712


stress, parental behavior, learning and memory, mood, and target organ physiology.
NEUROBEHAVIORAL RELATIONS


4 credits. Identical with PSY


712. Prerequisite: MED 534 or consent of instructor. Theories and


data on the central nervous system basis for higher order function. Emphasis will be on arousal,
purposeful behavior, and learning.


MED 713


INFORMATION STORAGE: A NEUROBIOLOGICAL APPROACH


4 credits. Identical with PSY 606. Prerequisite: MED 534 or consent of instructor. Consideration
of data dealing with basic issues concerning the nature and behavioral plasticity and information
storage and their central nervous system foundations. Particular emphasis will be paid to memory
disruption and facilitation as an experimental tool in the study of memory processes.


MED 714


DEVELOPMENTAL NEURAL-BEHAVIORAL-ENDOCRINE INTERACTIONS


4 credits. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor. Interrelationships and roles of endocrine hormones,


behavior, and nervous system activity during the perinatal period on the development o
patterns of neuroendocrine activity and behavior.


MED 715


adult


NEURAL MECHANISMS OF INGESTION AND ENERGY REGULATION


2 to 4 credits. Identical with PSY 715. Neuroanatomical, neurobehavioral, and
neuroendocrinological mechanisms involved in the regulation of food and water consumption
and regulation of body weight.


MED 716


COLLOQUIUM IN NEUROBIOLOGY


1 to 2 credits. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Current theoretical issues that relate to the









neurophysiological, physiological, chemical and behavioral approaches to the study of the
nervous system. May be repeated with change of content up to a maximum of 16 credits.
MED 717 PHYSIOLOGICAL BASIS OF BRAIN RHYTHMS
3 credits. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. An analysis of the structural, physiological and
pharmacological substrates for electrical activity of the central nervous system as manifested in
the normal electroencephalogram including the development and relationship to evoked potentials.
MED 718 NEUROSCIENCE SEMINAR
1 to 2 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Readings and discussion of current topics in
neuroscience. May be repeated with change of content up to a maximum of 16 credits.
MED 719 SPECIAL TOPICS IN NEUROSCIENCE
1 to 6 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Intensive reading and lectures in specialized
fields of neuroscience and allied disciplines. May be repeated with change of content up to a
maximum of 16 credits.
MED 720 RESEARCH METHODS IN NEUROSCIENCE
1 to 10 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Research techniques in neurohistory,
neurophysiology, neuroendocrinology, neurochemistry, neuropharmacology, neurobehavioral
science, experimental neurology, neuroscience instrumentation, or electron microscopy under
supervision of a staff member. May be repeated with change of content up to a maximum of
16 credits.


PATHOLOGY

Prerequisites: Students entering this program will be required to have the following
undergraduate courses: general chemistry, organic chemistry, general physics,
general biology, and two or more advanced courses in the area of physiological,
developmental or cellular biology or, in the case of students in clinical chemistry,
courses in analytical, inorganic, and physical chemistry. Students may find it
necessary to remedy deficiencies in their background by taking some undergraduate
courses after admission to the Graduate School.

Courses in the major program will be determined by the graduate student's advisory
committee. The minor may be taken in any appropriate area.

Thesis: Satisfactory completion of a thesis based on research is a requirement for
a graduate degree.

MED 604 ADVANCES IN SUBMICROSCOPIC ANATOMY
4 credits. Prerequisites: Histology or cytology; approval of the staff. Ultrastructure in cells and
tissues of vertebrate forms. Current research trends and functional connotations where pertinent.
MED 605 RESEARCH METHODS IN ANATOMY
1 to 6 credits. Research techniques of histochemistry, radiation biology, experimental embryology,
teratology, endocrinology, or electron microscopy under supervision of a staff member. May be
repeated with change of content up to a maximum of 12 credits.
MED 606 ANATOMY SEMINAR
1 to 3 credits. Research reports and discussions of current research literature by departmental
staff and graduate students. May be repeated with change of content up to a maximum of 12 hours.

56










MED 608


SPECIAL TOPICS IN ANATOMY


1 to 6 credits. Readings in the recent literature of anatomy and allied disciplines. May be
repeated with change of content up to a maximum of 15 credits.


MED 609


EMBRYOLOGY AND ORGANOGENESIS


4 credits. Prerequisite: ZY 309 or MED 501. Human and higher mammalian development, with
emphasis on maldevelopment. Physiological and clinical considerations stressed where pertinent.
MED 610 MECHANISMS OF DISEASE


5 credits. General principles of pathology and the mechanisms responsible for disease p
May be taken by advanced undergraduates with consent of staff.


MED 611


processes.


SYSTEMIC PATHOLOGY


6 credits. Prerequisites: MED 610 and consent of staff. Pathological processes affecting each
organ or organ system.


MED 632


TECHNIQUES IN ELECTRON MICROSCOPY


3 to 5 credits: Prerequisites: Histology and cytology. Proficiency acquired in techniques of
specimen preparation and analysis for ultrastructure investigation and in use of the
ultramicrotome, high vacuum evaporator, and electron microscope.


MED 640


CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND TOXICOLOGY


3 credits. Chemical techniques undertaken for the diagnosis of dis


ease.


Methods of toxicology.


MED 641


SPECIAL CYTOLOGY


5 credits. Types of cells such as nerve, secretary, bone, muscle, connective tissue, blood,
and lymphoid.


MED 643


CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND TOXICOLOGY ROTATION I


10 credits. Participation in all phases of practical clinical chemistry and toxicology. Chemical
methodology, clinical interpretation, and significance of laboratory measurements for the
diagnosis of the sick. Individual investigative project in clinical chemistry and toxicology.
Students specializing in clinical chemistry must spend three terms on this rotation.


MED 644


CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND TOXICOLOGY ROTATION II


10 credits. Prerequisite: MED 643. Continuation of MED 643.


MED 645


CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND TOXICOLOGY ROTATION III


10 credits. Prerequisite: MED 644. Continuation of MED 644.


MED 646 SPECIAL TOPICS IN PATHOLOGY
1 to 6 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of department. Supervised conferences and laboratory
work. Topics selected to meet each student's needs. May be repeated with change of content
up to a maximum of 18 credits.


MED 647


SEMINAR IN PATHOLOGY


1 credit. Required of graduate students in pathology; open to others by permission of the
department. Current research literature and research reports by graduate students, department
staff, and invited speakers.


MED 648


COMPARATIVE PATHOLOGY


4 credits. Prerequisites: MED 561, MED 511. The diseases of various organ systems of domestic
and laboratory animals compared and contrasted with spontaneous diseases of man.


MED 649


NUTRITIONAL AND BIOCHEMICAL PATHOLOGY


4 credits. Prerequisites: MED 561, MED 511. The relationships between biochemical alterations
and microscopic lesions in spontaneous and experimentally induced diseases having a defined
nutritional or biochemical etiology.


MED 678


ADVANCED MICROSCOPIC ANATOMY


4 to 6 credits. Prerequisites: MED 503 or ZY 521; consent of instructor. Histological approaches
and techniques relevant to selected research areas. Lectures, microscopic study, and laboratory
project relating structural and functional aspects of a problem.









MED 679 ADVANCED GROSS ANATOMY
3 to 6 credits. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Regional and specialized anatomy of the
human body taught by laboratory dissection, conferences, and demonstrations. May be repeated
with change of content up to a maximum of 9 credits.
MED 690 TUMOR BIOLOGY
4 credits. Pathobiology, biochemistry, and molecular biology of neoplasia; viral and chemical
carcinogenesis; immunology and therapy of cancer in man and animals.
MED 691 IMMUNOPATHOLOGY
3 credits. Abnormalities and diseases with immunological basis or component. Clinical and
experimental specimens for analysis by modern immunological techniques.
MED 692 EXPERIMENTAL TUMOR BIOLOGY
3 credits. Prerequisite: MED 690 or consent of staff. The development of laboratory skills and
fundamental techniques in the study of various phenomena in tumor biology. Students will work
in direct association with members of the MED 690 staff.
MED 693 IMMUNOBIOLOGY
5 credits. Biological aspects of the defense systems, specific and nonspecific, cellular and humoral,
amplification systems involving immune interactions; normal and abnormal conditions and
sequellae, pathologic aspects of immunologic phenomena; phylogenetic and developmental aspects
of immunity.
MED 694 IMMUNOBIOLOGY LABORATORY
3 credits. Prerequisite: Consent of staff. Corequisite: MED 693. Project oriented. Laboratory skills
and techniques in immunobiology. Each student or small group of students will work in close
association with a faculty member.
MED 695 ADVANCES IN CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY I
2 credits. Identical with BLY 602. The relationships between cell structure and function:
1) organization of chromosomes, RNA synthesis, and translation of the genetic code into functional
entities; 2) organization of cellular membranes; 3) ultrastructure, function and biosynthesis of
sub-cellular organelles; 4) regulatory mechanisms of the cell; correlation of in vitro and in vivo
experiments.
MED 696 ADVANCES IN CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR BIOLOGY H
2 credits. Identical with BLY 603. Prerequisite: MED 695. The relationship between cell structure
and function: 1) organization of chromosomes, RNA synthesis, and translation of the genetic
code into functional entities; 2) organization of cellular membranes; 3) ultrastructure, function and
biosynthesis of sub-cellular organelles; 4) regulatory mechanisms of the cell; correlation of
in vitro and in vivo experiments.


PHARMACOLOGY & THERAPEUTICS

Students entering the course of study for the degree of Ph.D. in Medical Sciences
with a major in Pharmacology & Therapeutics should present undergraduate course
credits in chemistry, including quantitative analytical, organic and physical
chemistry; elementary physics and biology, and mathematics through the calculus.
Otherwise well-qualified students with certain deficiencies in preparation may be
allowed to make these up during the first year of graduate study. In addition to
elementary and advanced study in pharmacology, candidates will pursue courses in
biochemistry, physiology, and other medical sciences as determined by consultation
with their advisory committees.

58









MED 670


INTRODUCTION TO PHARMACOLOGY


5 credits. Prerequisites: elementary courses in biochemistry and physiology. An overview of the
entire field of pharmacology as the study of the interactions between living systems and foreign
chemicals. Intended to prepare majors for advanced courses or to familiarize non-majors
with the area.
MED 671 THEORETICAL PHARMACOLOGY
5 credits. Prerequisites: CY 342. Physical, physiochemical, and mathematical aspects of
pharmacology, including the theory of drug-receptor complexes, transport and distribution
kinetics and equilibria, and the kinetics of enzyme inhibition by drugs.
MED 672 CHEMICAL PHARMACOLOGY
5 credits. Chemical aspects of several special areas of modern pharmacology, such as metabolism
of foreign compounds, structure-activity relationships, the biochemistry of drug activity, etc.
MED 673 RECENT ADVANCES IN PHARMACOLOGY
5 credits. Advanced study of several special areas of modern pharmacology in which recent
significant advances have been made.
MED 674 SEMINAR IN PHARMACOLOGY
1 credit. Research reports and discussions of current literature by graduate students, by faculty,
and invited speakers.
MED 701 RESEARCH METHODS IN PHARMACOLOGY I
1 credit. Readings, discussions, and practical experience with modern research methods, both
instrumental and biological, used in pharmacology.
MED 702 RESEARCH METHODS IN PHARMACOLOGY II
1 credit. Continuation of MED 701.
MED 703 TOPICS IN PHARMACOLOGY
0 to 4 credits. Seminars, informal conferences, and/or laboratory work in the use of drugs in
biochemical and physiological investigations. May be repeated with change of content up to a
maximum of 12 credits.


PHYSIOLOGY

Prerequisites: Undergraduate majors that are appropriate foundations for the study
of physiology are: biology, chemistry, engineering, mathematics, or physics. The
following courses are especially useful as background for the study of physiology:
general biology, vertebrate biology, general chemistry, analytical chemistry, organic
chemistry, physical chemistry, general physics, calculus, and statistics. Students
usually find it necessary to remedy deficiencies in their backgrounds by taking a
few undergraduate courses after admission to Graduate School.

Course requirements: Most students will be advised to take the following, unless
equivalent courses have been taken elsewhere: MED 503, 520, 521, 534, BCH 601,
602, 603, and 605. Additional courses will be elected from those listed below and
from those offered by other departments. A minor field of study is not required
but may be elected in another department of the College of Medicine such as
Neuroscience or Immunology and Medical Microbiology, or elsewhere in the
University in such departments as Biochemistry, Physics, Psychology, or Zoology.

59










Dissertation: Research for the dissertation may be carried out in any of a number
of areas of physiology including neurophysiology, endocrinology, respiration,
circulation, physiology of muscle, environmental physiology, comparative
physiology, and neonatal physiology.


MED 619
3 credits.


PHYSIOLOGY OF RESPIRATION


Gas exchange in lungs


tissues.


Ventilat


ory mechanics. Respiratory functions of


bodily fluids. Physiological regulations. Comparative physiology of respiratory mechanisms.


MED 620


PHYSIOLOGY OF THE CIRCULATION OF BLOOD


3 credits. Physiology of the component parts of the circulation relation of structures and function
emphasis on control mechanisms.


MED 621


RENAL PHYSIOLOGY


3 credits. Comparative physiological aspects of renal structure and function


seminars.
MED 622


are covered in


PHYSIOLOGY OF THE CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM


3 credits. Special and current problems in brain and spinal cord function will be covered


seminars.


MED 623


NEUROPHYSIOLOGY


3 credits. Physiology of nerve and muscle, central nervous
Comparative aspects of the subject will be emphasized.


systems,


and the special


senses:


MED 625


BODY TEMPERATURE REGULATION


3 credits. Neural and endocrine aspects of temperature
adaption to cold and heat, and hibernation will be cove
temperature regulations will be stressed.


regulation, hypo- and hyperthermia,


red. Comparative


physiology of


MED 626


RECENT ADVANCES IN PHYSIOLOGY


3 credits. Content


varies


from year to year but covers recent advances in physiology. May be


repeated with change of content up to


a maximum of 15


credits.


RESEARCH METHODS IN PHYSIOLOGY


2 to 6 credits. Maximum 9 credits. The special needs of
and laboratory work.


MED 628
1 credit.
MED. 629


each student will be met by conferences


SEMINAR IN PHYSIOLOGY


NEONATAL PHYSIOLOGY


3 credits. Physiological regulations in newborn mammals.


MED 636


A SURVEY OF SENSORY SYSTEMS


4 credits. Identical with PSY 623. Prerequisite: MED 623 or PSY 600. Theories and data on human


sensory reception and encoding. Audition, vision, and chemical and cutaneous


MED 637


senses.


SEMINAR ON VISION


4 credits. Identical with PSY 629. Prerequisite: MED
and theory in visual function.


MED 638


623 or PSY 600. Selected current research


PHYSIOLOGY OF THE MAMMALIAN THYROID GLAND


3 credits. Production, secretion, control and function of the thyroid hormones will be covered;
interaction with other hormones will be stressed.


MED 627









RADIOLOGY

The Department offers a program leading to the M.S. degree in radiation biophysics
(Radiological Sciences). Prerequisites: The basic requirement for admission to the
graduate program is a bachelor's degree in an approved program in mathematics,
engineering, or the physical or biological sciences. The following courses are
considered especially useful as background for the study in the Radiological
Sciences: general chemistry, general and modern physics, statistics, general
biology, and organic chemistry. Calculus is highly recommended. If the student has
not already taken PS 460, BLY 565, NES 540, or MED or EGC 508, he will be
expected to take these courses early in his program.

Course requirements: In addition to those listed above, most students will be
required to take MED 680, MED 682, MED 684, and MED 689. MED 699 is required
for all students majoring in radiation biophysics.

Thesis: Satisfactory completion of a thesis based on research is required for an
M.S. degree in radiation biophysics.

MED 680 RADIOLOGICAL PHYSICS
4 credits. X-ray generators including high-energy electron accelerators and interaction of
electromagnetic radiation with matter relative to medical radiology.
MED 681 HEALTH PHYSICS
4 credits. Prerequisites: MED 508 and NES 540 or consent of instructor. Techniques of hazard
evaluation and radiation control; monitoring methods; survey techniques; biological sampling;
instrument calibration; exposure standards and radiation protection regulation; and on-site
radiation safety surveys and evaluation.
MED 682 INSTRUMENT AND DOSIMETRY IN RADIOLOGY
4 credits. The electronics of diagnostic and therapeutic X-ray units; image amplifying tubes;
video equipment in diagnostic radiology; dosimetry instrumentation including ionization
chambers, semi-conductors, and luminescent devices; measurement in terms of roentgens;
measurement of absorbed radiation energy; and calculation of internal dose from implanted
sources and radiation beams.
MED 683 RADIOACTIVE TRACER INSTRUMENTATION AND METHODOLOGY
4 credits. Prerequisite: BLY 565. Analytical use of radioisotopes and activation analysis;
preamplifiers, linear amplifiers, scalers, single and multichannel analyzers in gamma ray
spectrometry; beta and gamma ray liquid scintillation detectors; tracer experiments, sample
preparation, data analysis and efficiency calculations.
MED 684 RADIATION EFFECTS ON HUMANS
4 credits. Prerequisite: MED 680. Somatic and genetic radiation effects; acute and chronic
radiation exposure; pathology; psychological and epidemiological aspects; fundamentals of the
application of radiation and treatment of disease.
MED 685 COMPUTER APPLICATIONS IN MEDICINE
4 credits. Corequisite: FORTRAN programming course. Review of programming fundamentals
(including use of computer at the Computing Center, and remote terminal usage) medical
problems, data preparation and representation, simulation, information retrieval, problems in
radiation biophysics with special emphasis on radiation treatment planning.

61









MED 686


NUCLEAR MEDICINE PROCEDURES


4 credits. Prerequisite: MED 688 and consent of instructor. Application of radioactive materials
for diagnosis in medicine; in vitro and in vive procedures such as hematological procedures,
thyroid function tests, organ imaging, and dynamic function studies; internal dosimetry;
radiopharmaceutical techniques.
MED 687 PROBLEMS IN RADIATION BIOPHYSICS
1-3 credits. Selected topics dealing with radiation physics and radiation biology. May be repeated
with change of content up to a maximum of 6 credits.
MED 688 NUCLEAR MEDICINE INSTRUMENTATION
4 credits. Prerequisite: NES 540 and consent of instructor. Review of basic detection systems;
theory and evaluation of instruments used in nuclear medicine; includes scintillation probes,
scanners, imaging cameras, whole body counters, collimators, and data handling devices.
MED 689 SEMINAR IN RADIOLOGICAL SCIENCES
0-1 credit. Required of graduate students in radiation biophysics; open to others by permission
of the department. Discussion in radiological health administration, radiation epidemiology, and
research. May be repeated with change of content up to a maximum of 4 credits.







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HERBERT E. KAUFMAN, M.D.
Acting Dean


JOSEPH E. JOHNSON, M.D.
Associate Dean for Academic Studies


DEAN'S


STAFF

























LAMAR CREVASSE, M.D.
Assistant Dean for Regional
Medical Programs and
Continuing Medical Education


HUGH M. HILL, M.D.
Assistant Dean for Student
Affairs


JAMES A. DEYRUP, Ph.D.
Assistant Dean for
Preprofessional Education


GEORGE H. MILLER, M.D.
Assistant Dean for VA
Hospital Relations


MELVIN J. FREGLY, Ph.D.
Assistant Dean for Graduate
Medical Education


RICHARD REYNOLDS,M.D.
Assistant Dean,Community
Health (Family Practice)


IRA H. GESSNER, M.D.
Chairman, Medical Selection
Committee


GEORGE SINGLETON, M.D.
Assistant Dean for Clinical
Affairs


*.
i *'. i i'


*'9 v


PAUL R.
Director
Medical


ELLIOTT, Ph.D.
of Program In
Sciences


MAX MICHAEL, JR., M.D.
Assistant Dean for
Jacksonville Programs


JAMES P. McLEAN
Assistant Dean for
Administration







































DEPARTMENTAL CHAIRMEN

First Row
MODELL, JEROME H., M.D.
Chairman, Department of Anesthesiology
CERUTTI, PETER A., M.D., Ph.D.
Chairman, Department of Biochemistry
REYNOLDS, RICHARD C., M.D.
Chairman, Department of Community
Health and Family Medicine
SMALL, PARKER A., JR., M.D.
Chairman, Department of Immunology
and Medical Microbiology
CLUFF, LEIGHTON E., M.D.
Chairman, Department of Medicine


Second Row
KING, FREDERICK A., Ph.D.
Chairman, Department of Neuroscience
PRYSTOWSKY, HARRY, M.D.
Chairman, Department of Obstetrics
and Gynecology
KAUFMAN, HERBERT E., M.D.
Chairman, Department of Ophthalmology


SMITH, RICHARD T., M.D.
Chairman, Department of Pathology
SCHIEBLER, GEROLD L., M.D.
Chairman, Department of Pediatrics


Third Row
MAREN, THOMAS H., M.D.
Chairman, Department of Pharmacology
and Therapeutics
OTIS, ARTHUR B., Ph.D.
Chairman, Department of Physiology
WILLIAMS, ROBERT L., M.D.
Chairman, Department of Psychiatry
WILLIAMS, CLYDE M., M.D.
Chairman, Department of Radiology
WOODWARD, EDWARD R., M.D.
Chairman, Department of Surgery


















































College of Medicine Executive Committee, February 25, 1972.
Left to Right: Dr. Owen Rennert, Dr. Clyde Williams, Dr. Robert Williams, Dr. Edward Woodward,
Dr. Emanuel Suter, Dr. Joseph Johnson, Mr. James McLean, Dr. Leighton Cluff, Dr. Arthur Otis,
Dr. Frederick King, Dr. Parker Small, Dr. Harry Prystowsky, Dr. Thomas Maren, Dr. Richard Reyn-
olds, Dr. Peter Cerutti, Dr. Gerold Schiebler, Dr. Herbert Kaufman, Dr. Richard Smith, and Dr.
Jerome Modell.










FACULTY

ANESTHESIOLOGY

ANDERSEN, THORKILD W., M.D., (Copenhagen)
Professor
BRUMBELOW, CONCEPCION, M.D.,
(Univ. of Santo Tomas)
Instructor
CALDERWOOD, HUGH W., V.M.D., (Univ. of Penn.)
Associate in Anesthesiology
DE PADUA, CONSTANT B., M.D., (Philippines)
Assistant Professor
GRAVES, SHIRLEY A., M.D., (Univ. of Miami)
Assistant Professor and
Assistant Professor in Pediatrics


KLEIN, ELMER F., JR., M.D., (Univ.
Assistant Professor
MODELL, JEROME H., M.D., (Univ.
Professor and Chairman
MUNSON, EDWIN S., M.D., (Univ.
Professor


PHILLIPS, DARWIN D., M.D., (San Marcos Univ.)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
RICHARDS, CHARLES C., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Clinical Assistant Professor/St. Petersburg
RILEY, JOSEPH L., M.D., (Loma Linda Univ.)
Clinical Instructor/Orlando
SANCHEZ-SALAZAR, ANIBAL, M.D., (San Marcos U.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
SKORA, IRENE A., M.D., (Jagiellonski Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
STAGE, JOHN T., M.D., (Ohio State Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
TETLOW, ALAN G., M.D., (Univ. of Manchester)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
YOST, WILLIAM F., M.D., (Univ. of Tennessee)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville


of Missouri)


of Minnesota)

of Tennessee)


PERKINS, HAVEN M., M.D., (Univ. of Louisville)
Associate Professor
RAVIN, MARK B., M.D., (New York University)
Associate Professor
SCHETTINI, ALFONSO, M.D., (Univ. of Naples)
Assistant Professor
SHAH, DINESH O., Ph.D., (Columbia University)
Assistant Professor and
Assistant Professor in Chemical Engineering
TUAZON, JAIME, M.D., (Univ. of Santo Tomas)
Assistant Professor

Volunteer Faculty

ADEEB, ALLAN J., M.D., (Univ. of Tennessee)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
DeMIRANDA, EDWARD, M.D., (Univ. of Havana)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
HODES, RICHARD S., M.D., (Tulane University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Tampa
JANIS, KENNETH M., M.D., (New York Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Sarasota
KIRBY, ROBERT R., M.D., (U. of Cal., San Francisco)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Biloxi, Miss.
KRUSE, JOHN C., M.D., (Geo. Wash. University)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MILES, GEORGE G., M.D., (SUNY Downstate)
Clinical Instructor/Orlando


BIOCHEMISTRY


ALLEN, CHARLES, Ph.D., (Brandeis University) >
Assistant Professor
BOYCE, RICHARD P., Ph.D., (Yale University)
Professor
CERUTTI, PETER A., M.D., Ph.D., (Univ. of Zurich)
Professor and Chairman
CHUN, PAUL W., Ph.D., (University of Missouri) i


Associate Professor
COHEN, ROBERT JAY,
Assistant Professor
FRIED, MELVIN, Ph.D.,
Professor
GABBAY, EDMOND J.,


Ph.D., (Yale University)

(Yale University)

Ph.D., (Columbia Univ.)


Associate Professor and
Associate Professor in Chemistry
GURIN, SAMUEL, Ph.D., (Columbia University)
Professor and Professor in Biological Sciences
HARIHARAN, P. V., Ph.D., (University of Toronto)
Instructor
O'BRIEN, THOMAS W., Ph.D., (Marquette Univ.) (
Assistant Professor and
Assistant Professor in Biological Sciences :
REMSEN, JOYCE, Ph.D., (Rutgers University) C i
Instructor
ROBERTS, MICHAEL, Ph.D., (Oxford University)
Assistant Professor
SANDER, EUGENE G., Ph.D., (Cornell University)
Associate Professor
TSIBRIS, JOHN, Ph.D., (Cornell University)
Assistant Professor and Assistant
Professor in Biological Sciences










COMMUNITY HEALTH AND
FAMILY MEDICINE

BANKS, SAMUEL A., JR., Ph.D., (Univ. of Chicago)
Assistant Professor and
Assistant Professor in Religion
BUTLER, NEIL A., M.N., (University of Florida)
Instructor
CLARK, EWEN M., M.D., (Univ. of St. Andrews)
Assistant Professor and
Director of Multiphasic Screening Center
GRIFFITH, H. WINTER, M.D., (Emory Univ.)
Assistant Professor and Director of
Medical Education/Tallahassee Memorial Hospital
HENRY, RICHARD A., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Assistant Professor and
Assistant Professor in Medicine
MASTERS, LEONARD E., M.D., (Univ. of Miami)
Assistant Professor and JHEP Chairman/JHEP
McLEAN, JAMES P., M.B.A., (Univ. of Florida)
Instructor and Assistant Dean
for Administration
REYNOLDS, RICHARD C., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Professor and Chairman, Assistant Dean for
Community Medicine, Professor in Medicine
VON MERING, O. OTTO, Ph. D., (Harvard)
nd PessorandProfessor in
Anthropology and Urban Studies

Volunteer Faculty*

APPEN, RAYMOND C., M.D., (Duke University)
Preceptor/Cocoa
BARRY, ANDREW J., M.D., (Tulane University)
Preceptor/Starke
BERMAN, DONALD A., M.D., (Tulane University)
Preceptor/Hollywood
BORLAND, JAMES L., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Preceptor/Jacksonville
BRASHEAR, BILLY, M.D., (Univ. of Louisville)
Preceptor/Gainesville
BRICKLER, ALEXANDER D., M.D., (Meharry)
Preceptor/Tallahassee
CAMPBELL, ROY E., M.D., (Emory University)
Preceptor/Palatka
CARDUCCI, ALEXANDER T., M.D., (Wayne State U.)
Preceptor/Orlando
COLE, BEN M., M.D., (Med. Col. of S. C.)
Preceptor/Orlando
DAILEY, JAMES O., M.D., (Univ. of Miami)
Preceptor/Williston


DE VITO, JAMES J., M.D., (Col. of Phys. & Surgeons)
Preceptor/St. Augustine
EVANS, WILLIAM C., JR., M.D., (Duke Univ.)
Preceptor/Gainesville
FAIN, NORMAN F., JR., M.D., (Med. Col. of Alabama:
Preceptor/Eau Gallie
HANDWERKER, JOHN V., JR., M.D., (Univ. of Tenn.)
Preceptor/Key Biscayne
HARRELL, H. L., M.D., (Vanderbilt Univ.)
Preceptor/Ocala
HAVRON, JAMES B., M.D., (Univ. of Tennessee)
Preceptor/South Pittsburg, Tennessee
HENDRIX, JOSEPH P., M.D., (Emory University)
Preceptor/Port St. Joe
HILLEBOE, HERMAN E., M.D., (Univ. of Minnesota)
Clinical Professor/Tampa
KIEHL, KENNETH C., M.D., (Univ. of Miami)
Preceptor/Sarasota
KNOTTS, BEN F., JR., M.D., (Univ. of Maryland)
Preceptor/Cocoa Beach
MARLOWE, JAMES M., M.D., (University of Miami)
Preceptor/New Port Richey
McNAUGHTON, THOMAS M., M.D., (Indiana Univ.)
Preceptor/Lakeland
METZGER, CLYDE, M.D., (Univ. of Penn.)
Preceptor/Steubenville, Ohio
MORGAN, MICHAEL G., M.D., (Univ. of Tenn.)
Preceptor/Lehigh Acres
NIKOLAUS, DONALD, M.D., (Ohio State Univ.)
Preceptor/Dunedin
O'BRIEN, KEVIN, M.D., (Tulane University)
Preceptor/Riviera Beach
OPER, ARNOLD, M.D., (SUNY Downstate)
Preceptor/Opa Locka
OTT, FRANKLIN B., M.D., (Loyola University)
Preceptor/Pompano Beach
PORTELA, RAUL, M.D., (University of Havana)
Preceptor/Hialeah
PRINCE, JOHN T., M.D., (Ohio State Univ.)
Preceptor/Jupiter
QUEHL, THOMAS M., M.D., (Tulane University)
Preceptor/St. Petersburg
RICHMAN, WILLIAM, M.D., (Temple University)
Preceptor/Hollywood
ROBINSON, NEAL A., M.D., (Univ. of Arkansas)
Preceptor/Eustis
SALTZMAN, EDWARD J., M.D., (Jefferson Univ.)
Preceptor/Hollywood
*These preceptors provide students an exposure to
private practice within the community.










SHINNER, JOHN J., M.D., (Univ. of Rochester)
Preceptor/St. Petersburg
SKINNER, RICHARD G., JR., M.D., (Emory Univ.)
Preceptor/Jacksonville
SMEDLEY, J. T., M.D., (Univ. of Tennessee)
Preceptor/Coconut Grove
SNODGRASS, RICHARD W., M.D., (U. of Rochester)
Preceptor/Daytona Beach
SOURBEER, JOHN N., M.D., (Jefferson Univ.)
Preceptor/Largo
STEELE, HUGH G., M.D., (Tulane University)
Preceptor/Ft. Lauderdale


THORNTON, FRANK J.,


M.D., [Emory Univ.)


MEDICINE


General Medicine and
Community Programs

CARANASOS, GEORGE J., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Assistant Professor
COGGINS, WILMER J., M.D., (Duke Univ.)
Associate Professor and
Director of Student Health Services
*PAWLINGER, DAVID F., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant Professor and Chief


Preceptor/Haines City
TRUMP, RICHARD C., M.D., (Ohio State Univ.)
Preceptor/Madeira Beach
ULSETH, ROBERT N., M.D., (Univ. of Illinois)
Preceptor/West Palm Beach
VON THRON, JOSEPH C., M.D., (Ohio State Univ
Preceptor/Cocoa Beach


WEAVER, THOMAS, M.D., (Med. Col. of


Georgia]


Preceptor/Clermont
WILLIAMS, WARREN L., M.D., (Univ. of Colorado
Preceptor/Englewood, Colorado


IMMUNOLOGY AND
MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY
BAER, HERMAN, M.D., (Univ. of Basel)
Associate Professor and
Director Clinical Microbiology Laboratory
CLEM, L. WILLIAM, Ph.D., (Univ. of Miami)
Professor
CRANDALL, RICHARD B., Ph.D., (Purdue Univ.)
Associate Professor
CUSUMANO, CHARLES, M.D., (Georgetown Univ.)
Assistant Professor and
Assistant Professor in Medicine
GIFFORD, GEORGE E., Ph.D., (Univ. of Minnesota)
Professor
MOSCOVICI, CARLO, Ph.D., (Univ. of Rome)
Associate Professor and Associate Professor in
Ophthalmology, Chief of Virus Laboratory/VA
ROSEN, IRA G., Ph.D., (Polytechnic Inst., Brooklyn)
Assistant Professor
SENTERFITT, VERNON, M.S., (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant in Immunology and Medical Microbiology
SHANDS, JOSEPH W., JR., M.D., (Duke Univ.)
Professor and Professor of Medicine
SMALL, PARKER A., JR., M.D., (Univ. of Cincinnati)
Professor and Chairman


SCHIENEMAN, BRUCE O., M.D.,
Chief Resident and Instructor


(Ohio State Univ.)


Volunteer Faculty


ANDERSON, RICHARD M., M.D., (Emory Univ.)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
BRASHEAR, BILLY, M.D., (Univ. of Louisville)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
CRAGO, JOHN A., M.D., (Cornell University)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
DAWKINS, WILBERT D., SR., M.D., (Meharry)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
DOFF, SIMON, M.D., (Long Island Col. of Med.)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
EBBINGHOUSE, JOE C., M.D., (Indiana Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
EMMEL, LEONARD G., M.D., (Univ. of Penn.)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
FERRARA, JOHN T., M.D., (Yale University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MONSOUR, FARIS, M.D., (Georgetown Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
ST. JOHN, J. HAROLD, M.D., (Duke University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
STRACHAN, JAMES B., M.D., (Washington Univ.)
Clinical Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
WEIGEL, WALTER W., M.D., (Emory Univ.)
Clinical Instructor/Palatka


Cardiology

CREVASSE, LAMAR E., JR., M.D., (Duke Univ.)
Professor, Assistant Dean for Regional Medical
Programs and Continuing Medical Education










ELIOT, ROBERT S., M.D., (Univ. of Colorado)
Professor and Chief/VA
GREEN, J. RUSSELL, JR., M.D., (Univ. of Va.)
Associate Professor
HOLSINGER, JAMES W., M.D., (Duke Univ.)


Assistant Professor/VA and
Assistant Professor in Physiology
JACOBS, DANIEL M., M.D., (Duke
Assistant Professor/JHEP
MISCIA, VINCENT F., M.D., (New
Assistant Professor/VA
RAMSEY, HOWARD W., M.D., (Ui
Assistant Professor/VA
*TAYLOR, W. JAPE, M.D., (Harvarc
Professor and Chief


Comparative Medicine

HESSLER, JACK R., D.V.M., (Univ. of Miss.)
Assistant Professor
*MORELAND, ALVIN E., D.V.M., (Univ. of Georgia)
Associate Professor and Director, Animal Dept.
OLSON, GERALD A., D.V.M., (Auburn University)
Assistant Professor


University)


Jersey Col. of Med.)


niv. of Florida)

1 University)


Dermatology

CULLEN, STANLEY I., M.D., (University of Miami)
Associate Professor


de la TORRE, ANGEL, M.D., (Univ. of Havana
Assistant Professor/JHEP


Volunteer Faculty


ANDERSON, GEORGE A., M.D., (Bowman Gray)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
ANDREWS, JOHN W., M.D., (Emory Univ.)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
BAKER, ROY, M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
BARROW, MARK V., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
DACE, MELVIN C., M.D., (Washington Univ.)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
FARIS, WILLIAM E., M.D., (Tulane Univ.)
Clinical Assistant ProfesSor/JHEP/Jacksonville
GROOVER, MARSHALL E., M.D., (Univ. of Georgia)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
HANSON, KARL B., M.D., (Univ. of Chicago]
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
IRA, GORDON, JR., M.D., (Duke University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MONTGOMERY, JAMES A., M.D., (Tulane Univ.)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
PEELER, ROBERT G., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
SCHNEIDER, IRVIN, M.D., (Tulane University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
SOLER, RAUL, M.D., (University of Havana)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
VAN CLEVE, ROBERT, M.D., (Columbia Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
YOFFEE, HARRY F., M.D., (Tulane University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
*Division Chiefs


Volunteer Faculty


SOMPAYRAS, LAUREN M., M.D., (Univ. of Penn.)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
SNYDER, CHARLES, M.D., (Indiana University)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
WILKERSON, RUTH, M.D., (Med. Col. of Va.)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville


Endocrinology and Metabolism

FISHER, WALDO R., M.D., (Univ. of Penn.)
Associate Professor
FREUND, GERHARD, M.D., (Goethe University)
Associate Professor/VA
*KNIZLEY, HOMER, M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant Professor and Chief
LONDONO, JAVIER H., M.D., [Emory Univ.)
Assistant Professor
THOMAS, WILLIAM C., JR., M.D., (Cornell Univ.)
Professor, Chief of Medical Services/VA

Volunteer Faculty

BURKE, HERBERT, JR., M.D., (Vanderbilt Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
GOMEZ, RAFAEL E., JR., M.D., (Univ. of Havana)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
LOWENTHAL, JOSEPH J., M.D., (Univ. of Penn.)
Clinical Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
McCOLLOUGH, ROBERT H., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
SCHWALBE, FRANK C., JR., M.D., (Emory Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville

71










Gastroenterology

CERDA, JAMES J., M.D., (Univ. of Maryland)
Associate Professor
CORNELIUS, CHARLES E., D.V.M., Ph.D.,
(University of California)
Professor and Dean, Col. of Veterinary Medicine
*McGUIGAN, JAMES E., M.D., (St. Louis Sch. of Med.)
Professor and Chief


TRUDEAU, WALTER L., M.D.,
Assistant Professor/VA


(Oxford University


Volunteer Faculty


BORLAND, JAMES, M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
DONELAN, RICHARD T., M.D., (Tufts Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
HANCOCK, ROY, M.D., (Med. Col. of Georgia)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MORRIS, WALTER E., JR., M.D., (Med. Col. of Ala.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville


Hematology

ABRAMSON, NEIL, M.D.,
(Albert Einstein College of Medicine)
Assistant Professor/JHEP
KEENE, WILLIS R., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Professor and JHEP Chairman
KEITT, ALAN S., M.D., (Harvard University)
Assistant Professor
NEWCOMB, THOMAS F., M.D., (Univ. of Pittsburgh)
Professor/VA and Associate Chief of Staff/VA
*NOYES, WARD D., M.D., (Univ. of Rochester)
Professor and Chief
STREIFF, RICHARD R., M.D., (Univ. of Basel)
Associate Professor/VA


Infectious Diseases, Allergy,
Rheumatology (Clinical Immunology)

CALDWELL, JACQUES R., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Assistant Professor
CLUFF, LEIGHTON E., M.D., (George Wash. Univ.)
Professor and Chairman
DEAL, WILLIAM B., M.D., (Univ. of N. C.)
Assistant Professor
*JOHNSON, JOSEPH E., III, M.D., (Vanderbilt)
Professor and Chief,
Associate Dean College of Medicine
MICHAEL, MAX, JR., M.D., (Harvard Univ.)
Professor and Assistant Dean/JHEP
SANDERS, W. EUGENE, M.D., (Cornell Univ.)
Associate Professor and Associate Professor in
Immunology and Medical Microbiology
VANDEVELDE, ALEXANDER G., M.D., (U. of Louvain)
Assistant Professor/JHEP
WALDMAN, ROBERT H., M.D., (Washington Univ.)
Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor in
Immunology and Medical Microbiology


Volunteer Faculty


GARTEN, LEONARD, M.D., (Med. Col. of Georgia)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MAUCERI, ARTHUR A., M.D., Georgetown Univ.)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
NEWMAN, MELVIN, M.D., (Boston University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
RATHER, E. CHARLTON, M.D., (Bowman Gray)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
SALES, LOUIS M., M.D., (Boston University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
STEIN, GERALD H., M.D., (Univ. of Penn.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
STORCH, SIDNEY, M.D., (Univ. of Brussels)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville


Volunteer Faculty


MOOMAW, DAVID, M.D., (Northwestern Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
ROSS, JOHN B., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
TROTTER, GEORGE S., M.D., (Univ. of Maryland)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville


Neurology

GONYEA, EDWARD F., M.D., (Georgetown Univ.)
Assistant Professor/VA
*GREER, MELVIN, M.D., (New York Univ.)
Professor and Chief










HEILMAN, KENNETH M., M.D., (Univ. of Va.)
Assistant Professor
VROOM, FREDERIC Q., M.D., (Univ. of Alabama)
Assistant Professor
WILDER, B. JOE, M.D., (Duke University)
Associate Professor/VA


Volunteer Faculty

CUNNINGHAM, RICHARD W., M.D., (Univ. of Fla.)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
GIPSON, AMOS C., M.D., (Vanderbilt Univ.)
Clinical Instructor/Tampa
HARRISON, THOMAS H., M.D., (Duke University)
Clinical Instructor/Tampa
HUDGINS, ROBERT L., M.D., (Med. Col. of Va.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
LYNDE, ROBERT, M.D., (Med. Col. of Virginia)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
QUICK, DONALD T., M.D., (Case Western Reserve)
Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville


Pulmonary Disease


Renal

*CADE, J. ROBERT, M.D., (University of Texas)
Professor and Chief
SCHLEIN, EDWARD, M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant Professor


Volunteer Faculty

GREGORY, LOUIS F., M.D., (Univ. of Miss.)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
HAYES, CHARLES P., M.D., (Duke University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville


NEUROSCIENCE

BERNSTEIN, JERALD J., Ph.D., (Univ. of Mich.)
Associate Professor and
Associate Professor in Ophthalmology
ISAACSON, ROBERT L., Ph.D., (Univ. of Michigan)
Professor and Professor in Psychology
KING, FREDERICK A., Ph.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Professor and Chairman, Professor in Psychology
KING, ROBERT L., Ph.D., (Johns Hopkins)


BLOCK, A. JAY, M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Assistant Professor/VA
*SWENSON, EDWARD W.; M.D., (Univ. of Nebraska)
Associate Professor and Chief
TUCKER, WILLIAM B., M.D., (Univ. of Chicago)
Professor/VA
ZAUNER, CHRISTIAN W., Ph.D., (Southern Ill.)
Associate Professor and
Associate Professor of Physical Education


Volunteer Faculty

ANDERSON, AUGUSTUS E., M.D., (Tulane Univ.)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
ARMSTRONG, ALLAN L., M.D., (Univ. of Virginia)
Clinical Instructor/Tampa
AZCUY, ARNOLD, M.D., (Univ. of Havana)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
HENDERSON, FRANK W., M.D., (Jefferson)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Lake City
MORERA, JULIO E., M.D., (University of Miami)
Clinical Instructor/Lake City
NEDER, GEORGE A., JR., M.D., (Emory Univ.)
Clinical Instructor/Orlando


Assistant
LARKIN,
Assistant
LUTTGE,
Assistant
MAHAN.


Professor
ANN R. S., Ph.D., (Univ. of Colorado)
Professor/VA
WILLIAM G., Ph.D., (Univ. of Cal., Ir
Professor
PARKER E., D.D.S., Ph.D.,


vine)


(Emory, University of Rochester)
Professor, and Professor and
Chairman, Department of Dental Sciences
MUNSON, JOHN B., Ph.D., (Univ. of Rochester]
Assistant Professor
SUZUKI, HOWARD K., Ph.D., (Tulane University)
Professor, and Professor and Acting Dean,
College of Health Related Professions
VAN HARTESVELDT, CAROL J., Ph.D.,
(University of Rochester)
Assistant Professor and
Assistant Professor in Psychology
VIERCK, CHARLES J., JR., Ph.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant Professor and
Assistant Professor in Psychology
WALKER, DON W., Ph.D., (Texas Christian Univ.)
Assistant Professor and Research Psychologist/VA
ZORNETZER, STEVEN F., Ph.D., (Univ. of Cal., Irvine)
Assistant Professor










OBSTETRICS AND GYNECOLOGY

ABRAMS, ROBERT M., Ph.D., D.D.S., (Univ. of Penn.)
Assistant Professor
BARD, DAVID S., M.D., (Col. Physicians, Surgeons)
Assistant Professor


BARRON, DONALD H., Ph.D.,
Professor


(Yale University)


BURGESS, PAUL, L.Th., M.S.P.H., (Univ. of N.C.)
Assistant Professor
CATON, DONALD, M.D., (Columbia Univ.)
Assistant Professor and
Assistant Professor in Anesthesiology
COTTER, JULIAN R., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Assistant Professor
CRISS, WAYNE, Ph.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant Professor
DALY, JAMES W., M.D., (Loyola University)
Associate Professor
FONTANA, JOHN. JR., M.D., (Georgetown Univ.)
Chief Resident and Instructor
GILIBERT, JOSE E., M.D., (Nat. Univ. Mexico City)
Assistant Professor
HARDMAN, ALVIN A., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Chief Resident and Instructor
HELD, BEREL, M.D., (Tulane University)
Assistant Professor
HILL, HUGH M., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Professor and Assistant Dean for
Student Affairs


KALRA,


S. P., Ph.D., (University of Delhi)


Assistant Professor


McKERNS, KENNETH W., Ph.D., (McGill Univ.)
Professor
MENDENHALL, HIRAM, M.D., (Univ. of Cal.)
Associate Professor
MOJADIDI, QUDRATULLAH, M.D., (Kabul Univ.)
Assistant Professor/JHEP
MONIF, GILLES R. G., M.D., (Boston Univ.)
Associate Professor
PRYSTOWSKY, HARRY, M.D., (Med. Col. of S.C.)
Professor and Chairman
SORENBERG, RICHARD, M.D., (Duke Univ.)
Chief Resident and Instructor
THOMPSON, ROBERT J., M.D., (Wayne State Univ.)
Associate Professor and JHEP Chairman
WEEKS, JOHN W., M.D., (Duke University)
Assistant Professor


Volunteer Faculty

ALLGOOD, JACKSON L., JR., M.D., (Med. Col. of Ga.)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
BANCROFT, JOE W., JR., M.D., (Univ. of Miami)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
CARSON, DORIS M., M.D., (Ohio State Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
DENHAM, SAM WESLEY, M.D., (Emory Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
DUCKETT, HOWARD C., JR., M.D., (Duke Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
GOSS, ALBERT S., JR., M.D., (Emory Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
HAGEL, DONALD R., M.D., (Univ. of Nebraska)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
HARRELL, JAMES E., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Associate/Stuart
JONAS, A. GARLAND, JR., M.D., (Vanderbilt Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
LONG, FRANK G., M.D., (Temple University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MANTOOTH, MURRAY K., M.D., (Univ. of Tenn.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
McCRANIE, PETER A., M.D., (Emory Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
McCURDY, CHARLES M., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Associate Professor/St. Petersburg
McDOWELL, RICHARD W., M.D., (Univ. of Penn.)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
McNEIL, JAMES P., M.D., (Univ. of Virginia)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
McNEILL, H. WYATT, M.D., (Univ. of Miami)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MEIN, ROBERT M., M.D., (Univ. of Louisville)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville


MENZIES, DONALD


S., JR., M.D., (Univ. of N. C.)


Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville
MESSER, HENRY H., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Associate Professor/Tallahassee
MORRISON, SIDNEY E., M.D., (Duke Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/Hollywood
MULLEE, ROBERT G., M.D., (SUNY Upstate]
Clinical Associate Professor/Gainesville
OBERDORFER, PAUL W., M.D., (Tulane Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
PHELAN, WILLIAM J., M.D., (Georgetown Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
ROSIN, ALEXANDER P., M.D., (Tulane University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville










SUTER, MAX, M.D., (Tulane University)
Clinical Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
TURNER, LEONIDAS M., JR., M.D., (Univ. of Miami)
Clinical Associate Professor/Bradenton
ZEIGLER, VERNON P., M.D., (Univ. of Miami)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville


OPHTHALMOLOGY

ADAMS, CALVIN K., Ph.D., (Kansas State Univ.)
Assistant Professor and
Assistant Professor in Psychology
CENTIFANTO, YSOLINA M., Ph.D., (Univ. of Fla.)
Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor in
Immunology and Medical Microbiology
DAWSON, WILLIAM W., Ph.D., (Fla. State Univ.)
Professor and Professor in
Psychology and Physiology
FERRER, JORGE A., M.D., (Montevideo Col. of Med.)
Assistant Professor and
Assistant Professor in Pediatrics
FITZGERALD, CONSTANCE K., M.D., (Wash. Univ.)
Assistant Professor
GASSET, ANTONIO R., M.D., (Boston Univ.)
Assistant Professor
KAUFMAN, HERBERT E., M.D., (Duke University)
Professor and Chairman and Acting Dean
POLACK, FRANK M., M.D., (San Marcos Univ.)
Associate Professor
RAMER, RICHARD, Ph.D., (Stevens Inst. of Tech.)
Assistant Professor and
Assistant Professor in Biochemistry
RUBIN, MELVIN L., M.D., (Univ. of Cal.)
Professor
WORTHEN, DAVID M., M.D., (Univ. of Minnesota)
Assistant Professor and
Chief of Ophthalmology/VA


Volunteer Faculty


ANDERSON, WILLIAM H., M.D., (Univ. of Chicago)
Clinical Associate/Ocala
BOYD, CHARLES W., M.D., (Tulane University)
Clinical Associate/Jacksonville
CASEY, ERNEST R., M.D., (George Wash. Univ.)
Clinical Associate/Gainesville
CLOWER, JAMES W., M.D., (Univ. of Georgia)
Clinical Associate/Daytona Beach
EDWARDS, THOMAS S., M.D., (Tulane Univ.)
Clinical Associate/Jacksonville


GIBSON, WILLIAM J., M.D., (Univ. of Chicago)


Clinical
GILLS, I
Clinical
HOUSTI
Clinical
LUCAS,
Clinical


Associate/St. Augustine
AMES P., M.D., (Duke University)
Associate/Tarpon Springs


McCRORY,
Clinical Ass
PINKOSON


WILLIAM H., M.D., (Univ. of Georg
ociate/Jacksonville
WARD C., M.D., (Cornell Univ.)
ociate/Winter Haven
CHARLES F., M.D., (Univ. of Tenn.)
ociate/Gainesville
, CHARLES, M.D., (Tulane Universi


Clinical Associate/ Gainesville
ROBBINS, JAMES E., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Associate/Gainesville
VAN ARNAM, CARL E., M.D., (Univ. of Oregonr
Clinical Associate/Gainesville
ZUBERO, JOSEPH L., M.D., (Univ. of Zaragoza)
Clinical Associate/Jacksonville


;ia)


ty)


1)


PATHOLOGY

ADAMS, W. ROBERT, M.D., (Yale University)
Professor
BYVOET, PAUL, M.D., Ph.D., (University of Leiden)
Associate Professor


COLLINS, GEORGE H., M.D., (Univ. of Vermi
Professor
CRANDALL, CATHERINE A., Ph.D., (Purdue
Associate in Pathology and Instructor
DONNELLY, WILLIAM HENRY, M.D., (U. of
Assistant Professor


ont)


Univ.)


Ottawa)


ECHEVARRIA, RENE, M.D., (Havana Univ.)
Associate Professor
FELDHERR, CARL, Ph.D., (Univ. of Penn.)
Associate Professor
FISCHLSCHWEIGER, WERNER, Ph.D., (Univ. of Graz)
Associate Professor,
Department of Basic Dental Sciences
GEBHARDT, BRYAN M., Ph.D., (Tulane Univ.)
Assistant Professor
HACKETT, RAYMOND L., M.D., (Univ. of Vermont)
Associate Professor
HOOD, C. IAN, M.B., Ch.D., (Liverpool)
Associate Professor
KALLENBACH, ERNST A., Ph.D., (McGill Univ.)
Assistant Professor


KLEIN, PAUL A., Ph.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant Professor
LAITE, MELVILLE B., M.S., (Univ. of Tenn.)
Associate in Pathology and Instructor










LARKIN, LYNN H., Ph.D., (Univ. of Colorado)
Assistant Professor
NORMANN, SIGURD J., M.D., Ph.D., (Univ. of Wash.)
Assistant Professor
PIERSON, K. KENDALL, M.D., (N.Y. State Univ.)
Professor
POTTER, JAMES M., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant Professor
ROSS, MICHAEL H., Ph.D., [New York Univ.)
Professor
SANDERS, WILLIE J., B.S., (Univ. of Florida)
Instructor


SAVORY, JOHN, Ph.D.,
Associate Professor


(Univ. of Durham)


SCHIMPFF, ROBERT, M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Research Instructor
SHAW, LYNN FLORY, Ph.D., (Cambridge Univ.)
Assistant Professor
SMITH, RICHARD T., M.D., (Tulane University)
Professor and Chairman
STANLEY, HAROLD R., D.D.S.,
(Baltimore Col., Dental Surgery)
Professor and Chairman, Division of Oral Pathology
TEAGUE, PERRY O., Ph.D., (Univ. of Oklahoma)
Assistant Professor


WOODARD, JAMES C., D.V.M., Ph.D.,
Associate Professor


(Univ. of Ill.)


FRIAS, JAIME L., M.D., (Univ. of Concepcion)
Assistant Professor
GESSNER, IRA H., M.D., (Univ. of Vermont)
Professor and Chairman,
Medical Selection Committee
JULIUS, RICHARD L., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Instructor
LEVIN, SIDNEY, M.D., (Baylor University)
Professor/JHEP Chairman
MILLER, BILLIE LYNN, M.D., (Univ. of Chicago)
Assistant Professor
MILLER, ROBERT, M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant Professor/JHEP


PEREZ, GUILLERMO J.,


M.D., (Univ. of Paris)


University Physician and
Assistant Professor in Pediatrics


RENNERT, OWEN M., M.D., (Univ. of Chicago)
Professor and Professor in
Biochemistry and Professor in Neurosciences
RICHARD, GEORGE A., M.D., (Univ. of Pittsburgh)
Assistant Professor
ROSENBLOOM, ARLAN L., M.D., (Univ. of Wis.)
Associate Professor
ROSS, JOHN J., M.D., (Harvard University)
Associate Professor


ROTH,


S. S., M.D., (Case Western Reserve)


Instructor, Pediatric Clinic
RUSHTON, F. EDWARDS, M.D., (Univ. of Virginia)
Assistant Professor


SCHIEBLER, GEROLD L., M.D., Ph.D., (Harvard Univ.)
Volunteer Faculty Professor and Chairman


AREAN, V. M., M.D., (Central Univ. of Spain)
Clinical Professor/St. Petersburg
RHATIGAN, RONALD M., M.D., (Univ. of Iowa
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville


PEDIATRICS


ALTEMEIER, WILLIAM A., M.D., (Vanderbilt)
Assistant Professor and Assistant Professor in
Immunology and Medical Microbiology
AYOUB, ELIA M., M.D., (American Univ. of Beirut)
Professor
BLOOM, GERALD E., M.D., (Univ. of Maryland)
Associate Professor
DEBUSK, FRANKLIN L., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Associate Professor and
Director of Pediatric Clinic
EITZMAN, DONALD V., M.D., (Univ. of Iowa)
Professor


SCHULKIND, MARTIN L., M.D., (Univ. of Chicago)
Assistant Professor
SEASHORE, MARGRETTA, M.D., (Yale University)
Assistant Professor
SOLER, GLADYS P., M.D., (Univ. of Havana)
Instructor/JHEP


VAN MIEROP, L. H.


S., M.D., (State Univ. of Leiden)


Professor and Professor in Pathology
VICTORICA, BENJAMIN E., M.D., (Univ. of Argentina)
Assistant Professor
WEISS, CHARLES F., M.D., (Vanderbilt Univ.)
Associate Professor and Assistant Professor in
Pharmacology and Associate Professor in Pharmacy
WITTIG, HEINZ, M.D., (University of Munich)
Associate Professor


Volunteer Faculty


BAKER, ROY M., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville










BEAM, LEWIS R., JR., M.D., (Vanderbilt Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Winter Park
BELL, WILLIAM R., M.D., (Duke University)
Clinical Associate Professor/Pensacola
BOOTHBY, RICHARD J., M.D., (State Univ. of N.Y.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
BOWERS, JOHN ALFRED, M.D., (Med. Col. of Ga.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
BRILL, THOMAS M., M.D., (Univ. of Michigan)


Clinical Ass
BUTCHER
Clinical Ass
CARITHER
Clinical Ass
CARITHERE
Clinical Ass
CIMINO, LC
Clinical Ass:
CLEMENT,


Clinical
CRANE,
Clinical
DAVID,
Clinical
DELL, G
Clinical


ociate Professor/Gainesville
, WILLIAM C., M.D., (Jefferson Med. Cc
instant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
S, CORNELIA M., M.D., (Cornell Univ.)
istant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
S, HUGH A., M.D., (Emory University)
ociate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
)UIS E., M.D., (St. Louis Univ.)
instant Professor/Tampa


STEPHEN P.,


Assistant Professa
JAMES D., M.D.,
Assistant Profess4
JOSEPH K., M.D.,
Associate Profess


EORGE A.,


M.D., (Harvard Univ.)
or/Sarasota
(Duke University)
or/JHEP/Jacksonville
(Duke Univ.)
or/JHEP/Jacksonville


M.D., (St. Louis Univ.)


Associate Professor/Gainesville


EISEN, SAUL, M.D., (Emory
Clinical Assistant Professor
FLEET, JOEL, M.D., (Tulane
Clinical Assistant Professor
FRAME, EUGENE M., M.D.,
Clinical Assistant Professor
FRASER, DONALD J., M.D.,


LANE, JOHN G., JR., M.D.,
Clinical Assistant Profess
LANIER, JAMES C., M.D.,
Clinical Assistant Profess
LaSPADA, ANTHONY, M
Clinical Assistant Profess
McCAIN, JAMES R., M.D.
Clinical Assistant Profess
McINTOSH, CHARLES B.


Clinical Assistant
MARRIOTT, HEN
Clinical Professor
MOORE, MARCU
Clinical Assistant
MORGAN, WILL
Clinical Assistant
MOSS, JAMES K.,
Clinical Associate


PARKHURST, ROBERT
Clinical Associate Profe
PERLMAN, MORTON A
Clinical Assistant Profe,
PRICE, MORRIS A., M.E
Clinical Assistant Profe5


RITROSKY,


Clinical


University)
/JHEP/Jacksonville
University)
/JHEP/Jacksonville
(Temple University)
/JHEP/Jacksonville
(Hahnemann Med. Col.)


JOHN,


Assistant


SANDERS, SANDY
Clinical Assistant Pr
SCHAFER, WALTET
Clinical Assistant Pr
SHASHY, ROBERT
Clinical Assistant Pr
SKINNER, RICHARI


, (George Wash. Univ.'
or/JHEP/Jacksonville
(Vanderbilt Univ.)
or/JHEP/Jacksonville
.D., (Univ. of Bologna)
or/JHEP/Jacksonville
, (Univ. of Tenn.)
or/JHEP/Jacksonville
, M.D., [Meharry Med.


Professor/JHEP/Jacksonv
RY J., M.D., (Oxford Univ.)
/St. Petersburg
S M., M.D., (Duke Universi
Professor/Ft. Myers
AM C., M.D., (Univ. of Flor
Professor/Sarasota
M.D., (Med. Col. of Georgi
Professor/JHEP/Jacksonv


Col.)


ille


ty


ida)


a)
ille


D., M.D., (Univ. of Mich.)
ssor/Valdosta, Georgia
., M.D., (Univ. of Miami)
;sor/JHEP/Jacksonville
I., (Emory University)
isor/JHEP/Jacksonville


R., M.D.,
*ofessor/
K., M.D.,
'ofessor/
R L., M.D
*ofessor/
4., M.D.,
'ofessor/
3 G., JR.,


(SUNY Upstate)
Ft. Myers
(Univ. of Florida)
Gainesville
., (Ohio State Univ.)
St. Petersburg
(Med. Col. of S.C.)
JHEP/Jacksonville
M.D., (Emory Univ.)


Clinical Associate Professor/Orlando
GINTER, MYRNA B., M.D., (Univ. of Havana)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
GYLAND, STEPHEN P., M.D., (Vanderbilt Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
HADLEY, WILLIAM P., M.D., (Duke University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
HANSBERRY, WILLIAM E., M.D., (Univ. of Miami)


Clinical Assistant Professo
IVEY, JOHN F., M.D., (Bayl
Clinical Assistant Professo
KELLY, WALTER C., M.D.,
Clinical Assistant Professo
KINGSLEY, MOSS J., M.D.,
Clinical Assistant Professo
KOKOMOOR, MARVIN L.,


r/JHEP/Jacksonville
or University)
r/JHEP/Jacksonville
(Temple Univ.)
r/JHEP/Jacksonville
(Med. Col. of Georgia)
r/Jacksonville
M.D., (Univ. of Michigan)


Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville


Clinical Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
SIERS, MARY R., M.D., (Vanderbilt Univ.)
Clinical Instructor/Ocala
THRELKEL, ROBERT, M.D., (Duke University)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
TOWNSEND, JAMES J., M.D., (Duke Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
WALKER, JAMES W., M.D., (Univ. of Tenn.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
WEIL, NATHAN, JR., M.D., (Tulane Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
WHITWORTH, JAY M., M.D., (Indiana Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
WOLFSON, SORRELL L., M.D., (Vanderbilt Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Tampa
WUBBENA, PAUL F., JR., M.D., (Emory Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville


I










PHARMACOLOGY & THERAPEUTICS

CHIOU, GEORGE C., Ph.D., (Vanderbilt Univ.)
Assistant Professor
CRAMER, JOHN W., Ph.D., (Univ. of Wisconsin)
Associate Professor
FOX, LAURETTA E., Ph.D., (Univ. of Ill.)
Associate Professor
GARG, LAL C., Ph.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Instructor
KEM, WILLIAM R., Ph.D., (Univ. of Ill.)
Assistant Professor
LEIBMAN, KENNETH C., Ph.D., (New York Univ.)
Professor
MAREN, THOMAS H., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Professor and Chairman
MUTHER, THOMAS F., Ph.D., (Univ. of Leeds)
Assistant Professor
OPPELT, W. WALTER, M.D., (Harvard Univ.)
Professor, Director of Clinical
Research Center and Professor in Medicine
ROLF, LESTER L., JR., Ph.D., (Texas A&M Univ.)
Instructor
SILVERMAN, DAVID N., Ph.D., (Columbia Univ.)
Assistant Professor
TRAVIS, DAVID M., M.D., (Vanderbilt Univ.)
Professor and Professor in Medicine
VOGH, BETTY P., Ph.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant Professor


WEINSTEIN, IRA, Ph.D.,
Associate Professor


(George Wash. Univ.)


PSYCHIATRY

ADAMS, PAUL L., M.D., (Columbia Univ.)
Professor in Psychiatry and
Professor in Pediatrics
AVERY, BYLLYE Y., M.Ed., (Univ. of Florida)
Associate in Psychiatry and
Instructor in Personnel Services
BARINGER, GEORGE R., M.D., (Univ. of Miss.)
Assistant Professor
BARNARD, GEORGE W., M.D., (Univ. of N.C.)
Associate Professor
CAHOON, STUART N., M.D., (Temple University)
Associate Professor
CARRERA, FRANK, M.D., (Emory University)
Associate Professor
CHUDNOVSKY, NATALIO, M.D., (U. of Buenos Aires
Assistant Professor
COLLINS, DOROTHY E., M.A., (Univ. of Chicago)
Assistant Professor of Social Work in Psychiatry
CRIST, JOAN L., M.S.W., (Florida State Univ.)
Instructor of Social Work in Psychiatry
DANOFF, JASCHA, M.D., (Univ. of Toronto)
Assistant Professor in Psychiatry and
Assistant Professor in Pediatrics
FABRIC, ARTHUR L., M.S.W., (Univ. of N. C.]
Associate Psychiatric Social Worker
GAGLIANO, THEODORE, M.D., (Columbia Univ.)
Assistant Professor
GERVAIS, ROBERT H., M.D., (SUNY Downstate)
Assistant Professor
GORDON, RICHARD E., M.D., Ph.D., (Univ. of Mich.)
Associate Professor
GOULD, SHARON LEE, M.S.W., (Florida State Univ.)
Instructor of Social Work in Psychiatry


GROSS, SARA, M.S.S.. (Bryn Mawr)
Associate in Psychiatry (Social Work)


PHYSIOLOGY


HAMPTON, ARCHIBALD
Assistant Professor


S., M.D., (Emory Univ.)


CASSIN, SIDNEY, Ph.D., (Univ. of Texas)
Professor
FREGLY, MELVIN J., Ph.D., (Rochester Univ.)
Professor
JAEGER, MARC J., M.D., (University of Bern)
Associate Professor and
Associate Professor of Dentistry
OTIS, ARTHUR B., Ph.D., (Brown University)
Professor and Chairman
STAINSBY, WENDELL N., Sc.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Professor


HO, NANCY L., M.S.W., (McGill Univ.)
Instructor of Social Work in Psychiatry
HURSCH, CAROLYN J., Ph.D., (Univ. of Colorado)
Assistant Professor
JOFFE, SARETTA H., M.S., (Columbia Univ.)
Instructor of Social Work in Psychiatry
KARACAN, ISMET, M.D., D.Sc., (Univ. of Istanbul)
Professor
KEHOE, MICHAEL J., M.D., (St. Bartholomew's U.)
Professor and Professor in Medicine
KRAMER, SOL, Ph.D., (Univ. of Illinois)
Professor of Biological Sciences in Psychiatry









LANGEE, HARVEY R., M.D., (Stanford University)
Assistant Professor
LAZARUS, SHIELA J., M.S.W., (West Va. Univ.)
Instructor of Social Work in Psychiatry
LEVY, JUDITH M., Ph.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant Professor and
Assistant Professor in Clinical Psychology
LUND, DONALD A., Ph.D., (Yale University)
Assistant Professor
LYONS, HENRY R., M.D., (Georgetown Univ.)
Associate Professor/VA and
Chief of Psychiatric Service/VA
MASKIN, MEYER H., M.D., (Wayne University)
Professor
McDONALD, NANCY F., M.S.W., (Univ. of N. C.)
Associate Professor of Social Work in Psychiatry
MOST, BERTHA M., M.D., (Univ. of Pittsburgh)
Assistant Professor/VA
MUNIZ, CARLOS, M.D., (Univ. of Havana)
Assistant Professor
NEWMAN, E. GUSTAVE, M.D., (Duke University)
Associate Professor
NUERNBERGER, LOUIS G., M.D., (Univ. of Okla.)
Assistant Professor
O'CONNELL, VINCENT F., Ph.D., (Adelphi Univ.)
Associate Professor of Psychology in Psychiatry
OGBURN, BENJAMIN R., M.D., (Univ. of Virginia)
Assistant Professor
PLUTZKY, MAXIMO, M.D., (Univ. of Havana)
Associate Professor
RICE, WARREN J., M.D., (Case Western Reserve)
Assistant Professor and
Assistant Professor in Clinical Psychology
RUFFIN, WILLIAM C., JR., M.D., (Univ. of N. C.)
Professor
SCHWAB, JOHN J., M.D., (Univ. of Louisville)
Professor and Professor in Medicine
SCHWARZ, GEORGE C., M.D., (Duke Univ.)
Assistant Professor and
Associate Professor in Pediatrics
SMITH, JACK R., Ph.D., (Univ. of Southern Cal.)
Professor of Biomedical Engineering in Psychiatry
STEIN, JOEL M., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant Professor and
Assistant Professor in Pediatrics
STEPHENSON, F. DOUG, A.M., (Univ. of Chicago)
Intructor of Social Work in Psychiatry
de la TORRE, JOSE I., M.D., (Univ. of Honduras)
University Psychiatrist and
Assistant Professor in Psychiatry


WARHEIT, GEORGE J., Ph.D., (Ohio State Univ.
Assistant Professor of Sociology in Psychiatry
WILLIAMS, ROBERT L., M.D., (Univ. of Albany)
Professor and Chairman


Volunteer Faculty

ADAIR, CLARK, M.D., (Dalhousie University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Arcadia
BELL, ROBERT E., JR., M.D., (Bowman Gray)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Columbia, S. C.
BERNSTEIN, STUART, M.D., (George Wash. Univ.)
Clinical Instructor/Orlando
BLANK, HENRY S., M.D., J.D., (Geo. Wash., U. of Fla.
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
BLOOD, ARTHUR, M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Instructor/Orlando
BURKE, FENTON, M.D., (National Univ. of Ireland)
Clinical Associate Professor/Macclenney
CAMPBELL, LINDSEY, M.D., (Bowman Gray)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
CATANZARO, RONALD, M.D., (Washington Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/West Palm Beach
COGGINS, DEBORAH R., M.D., (Duke Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
DAVIS, JOSH D., M.D., (Vanderbilt Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
DEAN, STANLEY, M.D., (Univ. of Michigan)
Clinical Professor/Miami
EMERSON, RICHARD P., M.D., (Harvard Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Coral Gables
ESTES, MARION, M.D., (Med. Col. of Georgia)
Clinical Instructor/Daytona Beach
FORIZS, LORANT, M.D., (Univ. of Szeged)
Clinical Associate Professor/Tarpon Springs
HENDERSON, BROOKS, M.D., (Univ. of Penn.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Ocala
HIBBS, SAMUEL G., M.D., (Univ. of Pittsburgh)
Clinical Professor/Tampa
HOLTZMAN, SAUL, M.D., (Boston University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/St. Petersburg
JARRETT, PAUL S., M.D., (Indiana Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/Coral Gables
KING, R. TAYLOR, M.D., (Vanderbilt Univ.)
Child Psychiatrist/Jacksonville
KOENIG, ALFRED D., M.D., (Univ. of Lausanne)
Clinical Assistant Professor/St. Petersburg
KOLIN, IRV, M.D., (SUNY, Buffalo)
Clinical Instructor/Orlando










LARSON, ARTHUR, M.D., (Northwestern)
Clinical Professor/Tallahassee
MEADOWS, RICHARD L., M.D., (Univ. of Penn.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Tarpon Springs
MILLER, ERNEST C., M.D., (Tulane University)
Clinical Instructor/Jacksonville
NELSON, JOHN F., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
REED, PHILIP B., M.D., (Indiana University)
Clinical Associate Professor/St. Petersburg
RIPPY, WILSON C., JR., M.D., (Emory Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Tampa
STEELE, ROBERT G., M.D., (Albany Med. College)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Sarasota
STIEFEL, JOHN R., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
TINGLE, DAVID, M.D., (Univ. of Sheffield)
Clinical Instructor/Ft. Pierce
WARSON, SAMUEL, M.D., (McGill University)
Clinical Professor/Tampa
WELLBORN, WALTER H., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Tarpon Springs
WHITEHURST, W. LANEY, M.D., (Univ. of Tenn.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Jacksonville
WILDER, LLOYD, M.D., (Loma Linda Univ.)
Clinical Instructor/Orlando
ZEITLER, ROBERT G., M.D., (Washington Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Tarpon Springs


RADIOLOGY


AGEE, O. FRANK, M.D., (Louisiana State Univ.)
Professor, Diagnostic Radiology
BILLEN, DANIEL, Ph.D., (Univ. of Tennessee)
Research Professor, Radiation Biology
BROOKEMAN, VALERIE A., Ph.D., (U. of St. Andrews)
Assistant Professor, Radiation Physics
BRUNO, FREDERICK P., M.S., (Univ. of Florida)
Research Instructor, Radiation Physics
CLORE, FORREST C., M.D., (Univ. of Michigan)
Assistant Professor and
Chief of Diagnostic Radiology
COLLETT, WILLIAM K., D.D.S., Sc.D., (U. of Pittsburgh)
Professor and Chairman of
Division of Radiology, College of Dentistry
COUCH, MARGARET W., Ph.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Research Assistant Professor, Chemistry


CROMROY, HARVEY L., Ph.D., (N.C. State)
Associate Professor,
Radiation Biology and Entomology
DELAND, FRANK H., M.D., (Univ. of Louisville)
Professor and Chief of Nuclear Medicine
DUNAVANT, BILLY G., Ph.D., (Purdue Univ.)
Associate Professor, Chief of Radiological Sciences
and Professor and Director of Nuclear Sciences Div.
DUNCAN, JAMES H., Ph.D., (Univ. of Colorado)
Assistant Professor and
Assistant Professor in Pharmacology
ELLIOTT, LARRY P., M.D., (Univ. of Tenn.)
Professor, Cardiovascular Radiology
FELMAN, ALVIN H., M.D., (Univ. of Cincinnati)
Associate Professor, Pediatric Radiology
GANO, OVID R., B.E.E., (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant Professor, Radiation Engineering
HAWKINS, IRVIN F., JR., M.D., (Univ. of Maryland)
Assistant Professor, Cardiovascular Radiology
HODGES, PAUL C., M.D., Ph.D., (Wash. U., U. of Wis.)
Visiting Professor, Diagnostic Radiology
KAUDE, JURI V., M.D., (University of Kiel)
Professor, Cardiovascular Radiology
KAVANAUGH, HOWARD V., M.S., (Univ. of Fla.)
Instructor, Radiation Physics
LORENZ, ERHARD, M.S., (Univ. of Rostock)
Instructor, Radiation Physics
MANS, RUSTY J., Ph.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Professor, Radiation Biology
MAUDERLI, WALTER, D.Sc., (Univ. of Zurich)
Professor, Radiation Physics
MILLION, RODNEY R., M.D., (Indiana Univ.)
Professor, Radiation Therapy
NORTHROP, MEAD F., M.D., (SUNY Upstate)
Assistant Professor, Radiation Therapy
ROESSLER, CHARLES E., Ph.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Assistant Professor, Radiological Sciences
SCOTT, KATHERINE N., Ph.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Research Assistant Professor, (Chemistry)/VA
TAYLOR, THOMAS L., M.D., (Cornell University)
Assistant Professor, Diagnostic Radiology
WILLIAMS, CLYDE M., M.D., Ph.D.,
(Baylor University, University of Oxford)
Professor and Chairman


Volunteer Faculty


WALKLETT, WILLIAM D., M.D., (Emory Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville










SURGERY

General Surgery


COOPER, PHILIP, M.D., (Harvard University)
Professor
DRAGSTEDT, L. R., M.D., Ph.D., (Rush & U. of Chicago)
Research Professor and Professor in Physiology
FREEMAN, ELEANOR, R.N., (St. Vincent's Hosp.)
Instructor, Operating Room
LANDOR, JOHN H., M.D., (Univ. of Chicago)
Professor/VA
MACGREGOR, ALEXANDER, M.D.,
(University of St. Andrews)
Assistant Professor
PFAFF, WILLIAM W., M.D., (Buffalo Univ.)
Professor
STEPHENSON, SAM E., JR., M.D., (Vanderbilt)
Professor and JHEP Chairman
WEINSHELBAUM, EDWARD J., M.D., (U. of Chicago)
Assistant Professor and Chief of Surgery/VA
*WOODWARD, EDWARD R., M.D., (Univ. of Chicago)
Professor and Chairman, Chief of General Surgery


Volunteer Faculty

ATKINSON, SAMUEL C., M.D., (Tulane Univ.)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
BABERS, HENRY, JR., M.D., (Cornell Univ.)
Clinical Professor/Gainesville
BEGGS, JOHN H., M.D., (Univ. of Minn.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Lake City
BENSON, J. ROBERT, M.D., (Washington Univ.)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
BLACK, BRUCE A., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
BOND, JAMES W., M.D., (Indiana Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
COLLINS, CLYDE M., M.D., (Med. Col. of Georgia)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
DAY, SAMUEL M., M.D., (Washington Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
FECHTEL, ALBERT T., M.D., (Tulane University)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
FERGUSON, EMMET F., JR., M.D., (Med. Col. of Ga.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
HURLBUT, H. JOSEPH, M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville


MOORE, WILLIAM R., M.D., (Emory Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Lake City
MOSELEY, THAD M., M.D., (Vanderbilt Univ.)
Clinical Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
PHILLIPS, CURTIS M., M.D., (Med. Col. of Georgia)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
REINSTINE, HARRY W., JR., M.D., (Univ. of Va.)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
ROESCH, C. BURLING, M.D., (Cornell University)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
STILL, ROBERT H., M.D., (Med. Col. of Georgia)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
STUBBS, GEORGE M., M.D., (Duke University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
SUMNER, WILBUR C., M.D., (Med. Col. of Georgia)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
WILLIAMS, ROGER D., M.D., (Duke University)
Clinical Professor/Ft. Lauderdale


Neurological Surgery


*CAUTHEN, JOSEPH, M.D., (Duke University
Assistant Professor and Acting Chief
GARCIA-BENGOCHEA, FRANCISCO, M.D.,
Professor
WHITE, LOWELL E., JR., M.D., (Univ. of Was
Professor


(Tulane]


;hington)


Volunteer Faculty


FREEMAN, JAMES V., M.D., (Univ. of Tenn.)
Clinical Assistant Pro fessor/Gainesville
FURLOW, LEONARD R., SR., M.D., (Emory Univ.)
Clinical Professor/Crystal River
HUDSON, CALVIN H., M.D., (Univ. of Tennessee)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MAULDIN, RONALD L., M.D., (Univ. of N.C.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
MUSELLA, ROSARIO, M.D., (University of Naples)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Bay Pines


Orthopedics

ALLEN, WILLIAM C., M.D., (Univ. of Chicago)
Associate Professor
DEDO, RICHARD G., M.D., (Northwestern)
Assistant Professor and JHEP Chairman

81









*ENNEKING, WILLIAM F., M.D., (Univ. of Wisconsin)
Professor and Chief
HOGSHEAD, HOWARD P., M.D., (Univ. of Iowa)
Associate Professor
PASCHALL, HOMER A., M.D., (Bowman Gray)
Assistant Professor
PIOTROWSKI, GEORGE, Ph.D., (Case West. Reserve)
Assistant Professor and
Assistant Professor in Mechanical Engineering


Volunteer Faculty


ALEXANDER, LEON H., M.D.,
Clinical Instructor/Lake City


(Med. Col. of Va.)


BRADY, LOUIS P., M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Orlando
CROFT, CARL L., M.D., (Duke University)
Clinical Instructor/Winter Park
FRY, RICHARD M., M.D., (Temple University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
GILMAN, STEVE H., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Instructor/Ocala
HOCKER, JOHN T., M.D., (Univ. of Kansas)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
HOOVER, ROY, M.D., (Univ. of Virginia)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Tallahassee
McCONNELL, BRIGHT, JR., M.D., (Med. Col. of Ga.)
Clinical Instructor/Winter Park
MEAD, CHARLES A., JR., M.D., (Geo. Wash. Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MOORE, THOMAS H., JR., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Instructor/Gainesville
NIXON, JOSEPH J., M.D., (Med. Col. of Georgia)
Clinical Instructor/Winter Park
SPIVEY, JAMES N., M.D., (Med. Col. of S.C.)
Clinical Instructor/Orlando
STANFORD, THOMAS A., M.D., (Loma Linda Univ.)
Clinical Instructor/Orlando
WALLACE, PAUL, M.D., (Univ. of Chicago]
Clinical Assistant Professor/St. Petersburg


Otolaryngology


ATTIA, ELHAMY L., M.D., (Univ. of Alexandria)
Instructor
BLACK, FRANKLIN O., M.D., (Univ. of Missouri)
Associate Professor


KONISHI, TERUZO, M.D., Ph.D., (Kyoto Univ.)
Associate Research Professor and
Associate Research Professor in Physiology
*SINGLETON, GEORGE T., M.D., (Baylor Univ.)
Professor and Chief, Chief of Staff/Shands


SMITH, RAYMOND 0.,
Assistant Professor


M.D., (Oklahoma Univ.)


Volunteer Faculty


BITZER, WEST, M.D., (Univ. of Virginia)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Ocala
FARRIOR, RICHARD T., M.D., (Duke Univ.)
Clinical Professor/Tampa
GARLINGTON, JAMES C., M.D., (Yale Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/Gainesville
TAYLOR, G. DEKLE, M.D., (Univ. of Michigan)
Clinical Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville


Pediatric Surgery


SEASHORE, JOHN H., M.D., (Yale
Instructor


TALBERT, JAMES L., M.D.,


University)


(Vanderbilt Univ.)


*Professor and Chief, Professor in Pediatrics


Volunteer Faculty

SACHS, BARRY F., M.D., (New York Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
WEBB, H. WARNER, M.D., (Emory University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
WILKINSON, ALBERT H., JR., M.D., (Jefferson Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville


Plastic and
Reconstructive Surgery


ACKELL, EDMUND F., D.M.D., M.D., (U. of Chicago)
Vice President for Health Affairs and
Professor of Oral Surgery
*BINGHAM, HAL G., M.D., (University of Kansas)
Professor and Chief
FURLOW, LEONARD T., M.D., (Washington Univ.)
Associate Professor
McCRAW, JOHN B., M.D., (Univ. of Missouri)
Instructor









Volunteer Faculty


COKER, JOHN L., M.D., (Univ. of Penn.)
Clinical Assistant Professor of
Dental Surgery (Plastic)/Gainesville
DUSHOFF, IRA M., M.D., (Univ. of Penn.)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
MORGAN, BERNARD L., M.D., (London Univ.)
Clinical Assistant Professor and
JHEP Chairman/JHEP/Jacksonville


ACKERMAN, EDWARD, M.D., (Wayne State Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/Winter Park
JABLONSKI, DONALD V., M.D., (Wayne State Univ.)
Clinical Associate Professor/Winter Park
VAN NORTWICK, WILLIAM A., M.D., (Vanderbilt)
Clinical Professor and
JHEP Chairman/JHEP/Jacksonville


Thoracic and
Cardiovascular Surgery


BORUCHOW, IRWIN C., M.D., (Georgetown Univ.)
Assistant Professor
*DAICOFF, GEORGE R., M.D., (Univ. of Indiana)
Professor and Chief
GOFF, DALEY, M.D., (University of N.C.)
Assistant Professor/JHEP
RAYL, JOHN E., M.D., (Univ. of Louisville)
Associate Professor/LCVA


Volunteer Faculty


COUSAR, JAMES, M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
DAVIS, JAMES, M.D., (Harvard University)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville
SNYDER, HAROLD E., M.D., (Vanderbilt Univ.)
Clinical Instructor/JHEP/Jacksonville
VONTZ, FREDERICK K., M.D.,
(Medical Academy of Dusseldorf)
Clinical Assistant Professor/JHEP/Jacksonville


Urology

*DRYLIE, DAVID M., M.D., (Bowman Gray)
Associate Professor and Chief
FINLAYSON, BIRDWELL, M.D., (Univ. of Chicago)
Associate Professor
MILLER, GEORGE H., M.D., (Penn. State Univ.)
Professor and Chief of Staff/VA
WALKER, R. DIXON, III, M.D., (Univ. of Miami)
Assistant Professor


*Division Chiefs


Volunteer Faculty










POSTDOCTORAL
RESIDENTS, AND


ANESTHESIOLOGY


AUSINSCH, BAIBA, M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Intern
BEEBE, RICHARD J., M.D., (Ohio State Univ.)
First Year Resident
CHAPMAN, ROY L., JR., M.D., (Univ. of Tenn.)
Second Year Resident
DOWNS, JOHN B., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Research Trainee
DRURY, WILEY L., M.D., (Med. Col. of Georgia)
First Year Resident
FESSENDEN, STEPHEN F., M.D., (Univ. of Fla.)
Intern
HAMILTON, SANDRA D., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
First Year Resident
HARDY, CHARLES A., M.D., (Univ. of Missouri)
Research Fellow
KNIPPEL, THOMAS C., M.D., (Univ. of Miami)
Second Year Resident
LOBER, DAVID A., M.D., (SUNY Downstate)
First Year Resident
LORA, PEDRO M., M.D., (Univ. of Havana)
Second Year Resident
McGINN, LARRY D., M.D., (Kansas University)
First Year Resident
MORALES, MICHAEL R., M.D., (Univ. of Havana)
First Year Resident
RACKSTEIN, ANDREW D., M.D., (Univ. of Chicago)
Second Year Resident
SAGA, SEGUNDINA A., M.D., (U. of Philippines)
Clinical and Research Fellow
SEAGER, ORIN A., M.D., (Univ. of Penn.)
First Year Resident
STILL, JAMES A., JR., M.D., (Univ. of Miami)
First Year Resident
THAM, MIN KWAN, Ph.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Postdoctoral Fellow
TUCKER, WILLIAM K., M.D., (Duke University)
First Year Resident

BIOCHEMISTRY


BAIG, MANSOOR, Ph.D.,
Postdoctoral Fellow


(SUNY)


DUNLAP, BRIAN E., Ph.D., (Michigan State)
Postdoctoral Associate


FELLOWSVV,
HOUSESTAFF

JERNIGAN, HOWARD M., Ph.D., (Univ. of N.C.)
Postdoctoral Fellow


JOHNS, PHILIP T., Ph.D., (Univ. of North Dakota)
Postdoctoral Fellow
McMACKEN, ROGER L., JR., Ph.D., (Univ. of Wis.)
Postdoctoral Fellow
ROTI ROTI, JOSEPH L., Ph.D., (Univ. of Rochester)
Postdoctoral Associate
SEDOR, FRANK A., Ph.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Postdoctoral Fellow


IMMUNOLOGY AND MEDICAL
MICROBIOLOGY


BEASLEY, WILLIAM A., Ph.D., (Univ. of Georgia
Postdoctoral Fellow
DODGE, WILLIAM H., Ph.D., (Univ. of Miss.)
Postdoctoral Fellow
GORMUS, BOBBY JOE, Ph.D., (Duke University)
Postdoctoral Fellow
KOZEK, WIESLAW, Ph.D., (Tulane University)
Postdoctoral Fellow
SCALES, ROY W., Ph.D., (Univ. of Mississippi]
Postdoctoral Fellow


MEDICINE

BEHRINGER, FREDERICK R., JR., M.D., (Duke)
Intern
BLUTH, STEVEN A., M.D., (Chicago Med. School)
Intern
BRAUNINGER, ANDREA L., M.D., (Univ. of S. Cal.)
Intern
BRODIE, BRUCE R., M.D., (Washington Univ.)
First Year Resident
BUFFINGTON, GARY K., M.D., (Jefferson Med. Col.)
Intern
CASTLE, JAMES R., M.D., (Univ. of Virginia)
Second Year Resident










CHAFETZ, NEIL I., M.D., (University of N.C.)
Intern
CHERRY, WILLIAM C., JR., M.D., (Emory)
Clinical Fellow in Cardiology
COHEN, KENNETH L., M.D., (Univ. of Illinois)
Intern
COYLE, JOHN M., M.D., (Yale University)


Third Year Resident
CURRY, RUPERT C., JR., M.D., (Univ.
Second Year Resident
DAVIES, BERNARD F., M.D., (Univ. o
Intern
DEAN, ROBERT C., M.D., (University
Intern


of Florida)

f Florida)

of Florida)


DEFORD, JAMES W., M.D., (University of Florida)
Clinical Fellow in Gastroenterology
DOBBINS, PATRICK K., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Fellow in Pulmonary Diseases
ETTINGER, MARK P., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Intern
FEUSSNER, GEORGE G., M.D., (Univ. of Pittsburgh)
First Year Resident
FINLAYSON, GORDON C., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Second Year Resident
FISKE, ROBERT A., D.V.M., (Texas A&M)
Clinical Fellow in Comparative Medicine
FOSCUE, HENRY A., M.D., (Duke University)
Clinical Fellow in Pulmonary Diseases
FULLER, EARL W., JR., M.D., (Med. Col. of Va.)
Clinical Fellow in Cardiology
GRACIAA, GUIDO F., M.D., (A.A.A. Balli, Havana)
First Year Resident
GRAYBEAL, ROBERT T., M.D., (Harvard Univ.)
Second Year Resident
GREENBERG, ROBERT A., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Second Year Resident
GREENFIELD, DREW S., M.D., (University of Miami)
Intern
GUY, CLIFFORD R., M.D., (N.J. Col. of Med.)
Clinical Fellow in Cardiology
HINKES, CHARLES, M.D., (Univ. of Pittsburgh)
Clinical Fellow in Hematology
HOWLETT, STEPHEN A., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Second Year Resident
JACOBSON, JAY A., M.D., (University of Florida)
Intern
KOLTS, BYRON E., M.D., (Univ. of Rochester)
Clinical Fellow in Gastroenterology
KRAMER, DEAN C., M.D., (Univ. of Missouri)
Clinical Fellow in Gastroenterology


LAHAM, MICHEL M., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Intern
LONGLEY, SELDEN, III, M.D., (Vanderbilt)
Clinical Fellow in Infectious Diseases
McMAHAN, THOMAS K., M.D., (Washington Univ.)
First Year Resident
MADRY, ROBERT W., M.D., (University of N.C.)
Second Year Resident
MAEDER, MICHAEL C., M.D., (Ohio State Univ.)
Intern
MAHONEY, JAMES J., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Intern
MALZONE, WILLIAM F., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Third Year Resident
MANDELL, VALERIE S., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Intern
MATHERS, DANIEL H., JR., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Fellow in Cardiology
MAUCERI, ARTHUR A., M.D., (Georgetown Univ.)
Clinical Fellow in Infectious Diseases
MENGEL, MARVIN C., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Second Year Resident
MIALE, THOMAS D., M.D., (Univ. of Pittsburgh)
Clinical Fellow in Hematology
MOUAT, WILLIAM D., JR., M.D., (U. of Pittsburgh)


Intern
NEGIN, HARLEY B.,
Intern
NELSON, EDWARD
Third Year Resident
OLSEN, GERALD N.
Clinical Fellow in Pu
PARKER, JAMES L.,


M.D., (Ohio State Univ.)

W., JR., M.D., (Tulane Univ.)


, M.D., (Univ. of Miss.)
ilmonary Disease
M.D., (Univ. of Miss.)


Intern
POLLICINA, FEDERICO, M.D., (Univ. de los Andes)
Clinical Fellow in Cardiology
POWNER, DAVID J., M.D., (University of Florida)
First Year Resident
PUCKETT, THOMAS G., M.D., (Univ. of Miss.)
Intern
RUBEN, STUART J., M.D., (Ohio State Univ.)
Intern
SCHERER, GEORGE F., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Intern
SCHIMP, ROBERT G., D.V.M., (Auburn Univ.)
Clinical Fellow in Comparative Medicine
SERRANO, EARNEST E., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
First Year Resident
SIEGER, BARRY E., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Clinical Fellow in Infectious Diseases










SLATON, ROBERT C., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
First Year Resident
SNYDER, GREGORY K., Ph.D., (UCLA)
Clinical Fellow in Cardiology
STONE, MELVIN, M.D., (Ohio State Univ.)
First Year Resident
SURRATT, JOHN P., M.D., (University of N.C.)
Intern
THOMAS, BERNARD S., JR., M.D., (Duke University]
Intern
THORNTON, ROBERT S., M.D., (Med. Col. of Ga.)
First Year Resident
TRITEL, HARVEY, M.D., (Hahnemann Med. Col.)
Clinical Fellow in Cardiology
TUCEK, PAUL C., D.V.M., (Univ. of Illinois)
Clinical Fellow in Comparative Medicine
VON MAUR, RICHARD K., M.D., (Ohio State Univ.)
Second Year Resident
WARD, JONATHAN M., M.D., (Duke University)
Intern
WATSON, ROBERT T., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Second Year Resident
WEISS, CHARLES J., M.D., (Chicago Med. School)
First Year Resident
WILCOXEN, JOSEPH K., M.D., (Univ. of Illinois)
Third Year Resident
WOODWARD, ROGER S., M.D., (Geo. Wash. Univ.)
Intern
WYNNE, JAMES W., M.D., (Cornell University)
Second Year Resident
ZELLNER, STEPHEN R., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Second Year Resident


NEUROSCIENCE

LINEBERRY, CHARLES G., Ph.D., (Univ. of Delaware)
Postdoctoral Fellow
CHRONISTER, ROBERT B., Ph.D., (Univ. of Vermont)
Postdoctoral Fellow


OBSTETRICS & GYNECOLOGY


CARNEY, FRANCIS E., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Second Year Resident
FERRELL, ROBERT E., JR., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Second Year Resident
HALL, DOUGLAS C., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Second Year Resident


HUDDLESTON, JOHN F., M.D., (Duke Univer
Third Year Resident
LEACH, WILLIAM W., M.D., (Univ. of Florid,
First Year Resident
MESSINA, ANTHONY M., M.D., (Univ. of Flo
First Year Resident
PRADHAN, TAPAS, Ph.D., (Univ. of Calcutta
Postdoctoral Associate
SCHOENFELD, ORENE V., M.D., (Univ. of Fl
Third Year Resident
SHEVACH, ALLEN B., M.D., (SUNY Upstate)
Third Year Resident
WENTZ, PETER, Ph.D., (University of Florid:
Postdoctoral Associate
WILLISON, FRANCES C., M.D., (Med. Col. o0
First Year Resident


rsity)

a)

)rida)

L]


orida)


a)


f Ga.)


OPHTHALMOLOGY


BIRNDORF, LAWRENCE A., M.D., (Univ. of Mich.)
Second Year Resident
BRAUNINGER, GORDON E., M.D., (Columbia Univ.)
Second Year Resident
BRENNAN, ELAINE F., M.D., (Med. Col. of Ala.)
First Year Resident
BRIGHTBILL, FREDERICK S., M.D., (Univ. of Illinois
Clinical Fellow
BUNN, JACK C., M.D., (Harvard University)
Third Year Resident
COBB, WILLIAM T., M.D., (Univ. of Florida]
Third Year Resident
COX, CHARLES E., M.D., (University of Florida)
First Year Resident
FINE, STUART L., M.D., (University of Maryland)
Third Year Resident
FRASER, LEWIS K., M.D., (Johns Hopkins)
Second Year Resident
GRINBERG, MARC A., M.D., (Cornell Univ.)
Second Year Resident
HORWITZ, JEFFREY A., M.D., (Univ. of Cincinnati)
Third Year Resident
KARLSBERG, ROBERT C., M.D., (Univ. of Michigan)
Fourth Year Resident
LEVENSON, JEREMY E., M.D., (U. of Cal., San Fran.)
Corneal Fellow
PATROWICZ, TULLY C., M.D., (University of Miami)
Third Year Resident
RIEGEL, BYRON W., M.D., (Cornell University)
Fourth Year Resident


I










SHAW, EDWARD L., M.D., (University of Bologna)
First Year Resident
WIND, CHIEL A., M.D., (Univ. of Jerusalem)
Fourth Year Resident


ZIMMERMAN, THOMAS J., M.D.,
First Year Resident


(Univ. of Illinois)


PATHOLOGY


BARD, EVA S., M.D., (Univ.


of Erlangen


First Year Resident
BURCHARDT, HANS, M.S., (Univ. of Florida)
Predoctoral Fellow
DEIN, ROBERT, M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Intern
DEMIAN, SABA, M.D., (Cairo University)
First Year Resident
FORBES, JAMES T., Ph.D., (Univ. of the South)
Postdoctoral Fellow
GUDAT, J. C., Ph.D., (Cornell University)
Postdoctoral Fellow
HARRISON, CHANTAL R., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Intern
KILLINGSWORTH, LAWRENCE M., B.S., (Emory)
Predoctoral Fellow
KUFER, GABRIELLE E., M.D., (Univ. of Erlangen)
First Year Resident
McGEE, JAMES H., D.V.M., (Oklahoma State Univ.)
Postdoctoral Fellow
OVERFIELD, J. C., Ph.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Postdoctoral Fellow
PACHCIARZ, JUDITH, Ph.D., (St. Louis Univ.)
Postdoctoral Fellow
SAFFOS, ROSILIE S., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Chief Resident
SCHIMPFF, ROBERT, M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Postdoctoral Fellow
SPANIER, SUZANNE S., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Third Year Resident
TURNER, BENJAMIN, M.D., (Med. Col. of Ga.)
Intern


PEDIATRICS

AYUT, D., M.D., (Chulalongkorn Med. School)
Clinical Fellow
BLOOM, FREDERICK L., M.D., (Med. Col. of Wis.)
Intern


BURTON, EDWARD M., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Intern
COHEN, DENNIS A., M.D., (Ohio State Univ.)
First Year Resident
COOK, TERRANCE J., M.D., (Loyola Univ.)
Clinical Fellow
CORDELL, G. DYKES, M.D., (Vanderbilt)
First Year Resident
DAVIS, JEFFREY P., M.D., (Univ. of Chicago)
Intern
DELLINGER, CHARLES T., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Intern
DUNCAN, RAYMOND L., M.D., (Univ. of Minn.)
First Year Resident
FISER, PAUL M., M.D., (Univ. of Arkansas)
Intern
GARRISON, ROBERT D., M.D., (University of N.C.)
Clinical Fellow
JACKSON, ROBERT, M.D., (Univ. of Penn.)
Clinical Fellow
KIRKPATRICK, BARRY, M.D., (Med. Col. of Va.)
Clinical Fellow
KOHLER, WILLIAM C., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Fellow
LEIFER, KENT N., M.D., (Univ. of Illinois)
Intern
MacQUEEN, DONALD M., M.D., (Univ. of N.C.)
Clinical Fellow
McLAUGHLIN, EDWARD T., M.D., (Univ. of Fla.)
Intern
McWILLIAMS, NEIL E., M.D., (Univ. of Fla.)
Second Year Resident
MEADOR, PHILIP D., JR., M.D., (Univ. of N.C.)
Intern
MORGAN, JOHN R., M.D., (Vanderbilt Univ.)
Clinical Fellow
NETZLOFF, MICHAEL L., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Fellow
O'CONNER, SUSAN M., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
First Year Resident
PASCOE, JOHN M., M.D., (Univ. of Michigan)
Intern
PEELE, THOMAS C., JR., M.D., (Med. Col. of S.C.)
Second Year Resident
PENROD, JAMES C., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
First Year Resident
POWERS, DAVID W., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Fellow
RHOADES, ROBERT B., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
First Year Resident

87










SHULMAN, STANFORD T., M.D., (Univ. of Chicago)
Clinical Fellow
ST. PETERY, JULIA R., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Second Year Resident


ST. PETER, LOUIS B.,
Clinical Fellow


JR., M.D., (Univ. of Fla.)


TIWARY, C. M., M.D., (King George Med. Col.)
Clinical Fellow
WILLIAMS, ROBERT L., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Intern
ZAVELSON, THOMAS M., M.D., (Duke Univ.)
Chief Resident


HAYNES, KEITH E., M.D. (Indiana Univ.)
Second Year Resident
HENRY, BRUCE G., M.D., [Med. Col. of Va.)
First Year Resident
JENKINS, NEWELL D., M.D., (Univ. of Tenn.)
First Year Resident
MASCO, HOWARD L., M.D., (Univ. of Pittsburgh)
First Year Resident
MILLER, LLOYD R., M.D., (Univ. of Tenn.)
First Year Resident
MILNER, GILBERT C., M.D., (Univ. of Texas]
Third Year Resident
MOORE, ARDEAN C., M.D., (Univ. of Kentucky)
First Year Resident


PHARMACOLOGY


& THERAPEUTICS


MYINT, MURIEL M. M., M.D.,
First Year Resident


(Inst. of Med., Burma)


GUY, CLIFFORD R., M.D.,
Postdoctoral Fellow


(N.J. Col. of Med.)


McCULLOUGH, JERRY L., Ph.D.,
Postdoctoral Fellow


NIMS, PETER E., M.D., (Ohio State Univ.)
Third Year Resident


(Yale Univ.)


SPRINGER, PHILIP K., M.D.,
Second Year Resident


(Univ. of Miss.)


PHYSIOLOGY


LUTHERER, LORENZ 0.,
Postdoctoral Fellow
POSNER, PHILIP, Ph.D., {
Postdoctoral Fellow


Ph.D.


, (Univ. of Florida)


New York Univ.)


PSYCHIATRY


ATWOOD, SUE C.,]
Third Year Resident


THAN, TIN MYO, M.D., (Inst. of Med., Burma)
First Year Resident
TWENTE, GEORGE E., M.D., (Univ. of Miss.)
First Year Resident
VALENTINE, EUGENE R., M.D., (Temple Univ.)
Fourth Year Resident
VERGARA, ALEJANDRO F., M.D., (Univ. of Madrid)
Third Year Resident
WAGEMAKER, HERBERT, M.D., (Hahnemann)
Third Year Resident
WHITE, ROWENA R., M.D., (Univ. of Miss.)
Second Year Resident


M.D., (Univ. of Tenn.)


BRANCIFORTE, ROBERTO, M.D., (Univ. of Cuyo)
Fifth Year Resident
CAMPBELL, DONALD R., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Third Year Resident
COURINGTON, FRED W., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
First Year Resident
EVANS, HENRY C., M.D., (Vanderbilt Univ.)
Second Year Resident
FANNIN, WILLIAM R., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Third Year Resident
FLEMING, ARTHUR R., M.D., (Temple Univ.)
Third Year Resident
GILBERT, JAMES M., M.D., (Univ. of Okla.)
First Year Resident
GRAHAM, WILLIAM D., M.D., (Univ. of Miss.)
First Year Resident


RADIOLOGY


ANDREWS, EDSON


M.D., (Univ. of Florida)


Clinical Fellow
ATWOOD, J. WESLEY, M.D., (Univ. of Tenn.)
Third Year Resident
COLE, DAVID O., M.D., (Univ. of Miss.)
Third Year Resident
DEAL, PAMELA C., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Clinical Fellow
GOODNIGHT, THOMAS M., M.D., (Indiana Univ.)
First Year Resident
HERBERT, MARSHALL L., M.D., (Harvard Univ.)
First Year Resident
HOBGOOD, SHANNON R., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
First Year Resident










HUDSON, TERRY M., M.D., (Duke University)
First Year Resident
JOSE, LEOPOLD C., M.D., (Univ. of Philippines)
First Year Resident
KELLEY, MICHAEL K., M.D., (Washington Univ.
Second Year Resident
McCORD, DALE L., M.D., (Med. Col. of Georgia)
Second Year Resident
McNEELY, GWYN F., M.D., (University of N.C.I
First Year Resident


MAYO, MARVIN G.,
Third Year Resident


M.D., (Washington Univ.)


MELICHAR, FRANK A., M.D., (Univ. of Michigan)
First Year Resident


BAREFOOT, SHERWOOD W., JR., M.D.,
(George Washington University)
First Year Resident in General Surgery
BEGELMAN, KENNETH M., M.D., (Univ. of Chicago]
Intern in General Surgery
BROWN, ROBERT G., M.D., (Duke University)
Third Year Resident in General Surgery
BUSHKIN, FREDERICK L., M.D., (Howard Univ.)
Second Year Resident in General Surgery
CUNNINGHAM, CALHOUN D., M.D.,
(Medical College of South Carolina)
First Year Resident in General Surgery
DEAL, THOMAS E., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Second Year Resident in General Surgery


MORRIS, LEN W., M.D.,
Second Year Resident


(Washington Univ.)


DEARDOURFF, STEPHEN L., M.D., (Ohio
Second Year Resident in Urology


State Univ.)


PARSONS, ROBERT G., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Second Year Resident
PHILLIPS, THOMAS W., M.D., (Med. Col. of Ga.
Second Year Resident


PICKENS, WILLIAM i
Second Year Resident


S., M.D., (Univ. of Arkansas)


PORTER, ALLEN H., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Intern
PURCELL, DENT W., M.D., (Med. Col. of Ga.)
Third Year Resident
SCHNEIDERMAN, M. H., Ph.D., (Colorado State U.)
Postdoctoral Fellow in Radiation Biology
TONKIN, ALLEN K., M.D., (Univ. of Louisville)
First Year Resident
TONKIN, INA L., M.D., (Univ. of Louisville)
First Year Resident
VENTERS, DAVID B., M.D., (Univ. of Alberta)
Third Year Resident
WALBROEL, CHARLES E., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Third Year Resident


WEINSHELBAUM, ARLENE M., M.D.,
Second Year Resident


WEST, BARBOUR D., M.D.,
Second Year Resident


(U. of Chica


(Univ. of Kentuck


DETURE, FRANCIS A., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
First Year Resident in General Surgery
DIAZ, CLAUDIO J., M.D., (Univ. of Salamanca)
Second Year Resident in Neurosurgery
DIXON, JIMMY L., M.D., (Med. Col. of Ga.)
Second Year Resident in General Surgery
DOBSON, DEAN M., M.D., (Bowman Gray)
Third Year Resident in Urology
ESCOBAR, NELSON, M.D., (Univ. of Salamanca)
Third Year Resident in Neurosurgery
FAITH, MARK E., M.D., (Univ. of Chicago)
Second Year Resident in General Surgery
FRIST, JOHN C., M.D., (Washington University)
Third Year Resident in General Surgery
FROMANG, DAVID L., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Intern in General Surgery
GIRARDET, ROLAND E., M.D., (Univ. of Lausanne)
Clinical Fellow;
Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
GRIGGS, THOMAS M., M.D., (Univ. of Va.)
Third Year Resident in Otolaryngology
GURUCHARRI, VINCENT P., M.D., (Univ. of Chicago)
Intern in General Surgery


GYGI, ANDREW


C., JR., M.D., (Univ. of N.C.)


First Year Resident in Orthopaedics


SURGERY


ABNEY, HOWARD T., M.D., (Med. Col. of Ga.)
Third Year Resident in General Surgery
ASHLEY, ROBERT G., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Intern in General Surgery
BALISON, JEFFREY R., M.D., (Univ. of Chicago
Second Year Resident in General Surgery


HARMON, CHARLES K., M.D., (Washington Univ.
Third Year Resident in General Surgery
HESS, PHILIP J., M.D., (Ohio State Univ.)
Chief Resident in General Surgery
HILL, HENRY L., JR., M.D., (Emory University)
Intern in General Surgery
JENKINS, D. ORVIN, M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Third Year Resident in General Surgery


89










JONES, DAVID T., M.D., (Ohio State Univ.)
Administrative Chief Resident in General Surgery
JONES, JEFFREY S., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
First Year Resident in General Surgery
JORDAN, WILLIAM R., M.D., (Univ. of N.C.)
First Year Resident in General Surgery
LACEY, J. ALLEN, M.D., (Univ. of Georgia)
Third Year Resident in Orthopaedics
MacMILLAN, DAVID M., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Third Year Resident in Neurosurgery
MacNAUGHTON, ROBERT J., JR., M.D., (Univ. of N.C.)
Second Year Resident in General Surgery
MANDELL, JAMES, M.D., (University of Florida)
First Year Resident in General Surgery
MANISCALCO, JACK E., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
First Year Resident in Neurosurgery
MANN, CHARLES H., M.D., (West Va. Sch. of Med.)
Second Year Resident in Otolaryngology
MARSH, BURTON W., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Chief Resident in Orthopaedics
MAYL, NATHAN, M.D., (Stanford University)
Chief Resident in General Surgery
MERRITT, WYNDELL H., M.D., (Univ. of N.C.)
Third Year Resident in General Surgery
MILIAN, MIGUEL, M.D., (University of Havana)
Clinical Fellow;
Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
MORRIS, JOSEPH L., M.D., (Yale University)
Chief Resident in Orthopaedics
NELSON, ROBERT P., M.D., (Univ. of Florida]
Intern in General Surgery
O'LEARY, JAMES P., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Administrative Chief Resident in General Surgery
PICKENS, NORMAN E., M.D., (Univ. of Chicago)
Second Year Resident in General Surgery
POWELL, STEPHEN G., M.D., (Indiana Univ.)
Intern in General Surgery
PRICE, CHARLES T., M.D., (Baylor University)
Intern in General Surgery
PUHL, JAMES J., M.D., (Univ. of Iowa)
Third Year Resident in Orthopaedics
RENN, WADE H., M.D., (Univ. of Florida)
Second Year Resident in Neurosurgery
RIESENBERG, DANIEL M., M.D., (Univ. of Miami)
Intern in General Surgery
ROLLINS, RALEIGH W., M.D., (Med. Col. of Ga.)
Third Year Resident in Urology
ROOKS, JOHN J., M.D., (University of Miami)
First Year Resident in General Surgery


ROTH, ROBERT A., M.D., (Case Western Reserve)
Third Year Resident in Urology
ROWE, CHARLES E., M.D., (Univ. of Virginia)
Chief Resident in Urology
ROY, ROBERT I., M.D., (Yale University]
First Year Resident in Orthopaedics


SCHNEIDER, WILLIAM J.,


M.D., (Vanderbilt)


First Year Resident in General Surgery
SMITH, CURRAN J., M.D., (Univ. of Missouri)
Third Year Resident in Otolaryngology
STEWART, KEITH C., M.D., (University of Iowa)
Second Year Resident in Otolaryngology
TEACHEY, WILLIAM S., M.D., (Univ. of N.C.)
Third Year Resident in Otolaryngology
TELFORD, GORDON L., M.D., (Univ. of Chicago)
Intern in General Surgery
TEMES, GERALD D., M.D., (SUNY Upstate)
Clinical Fellow;
Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
THOMAS, HENRY F., JR., M.D., (Univ. of N.C.)
Third Year Resident in General Surgery
TOBIAS, JOEL A., M.D., (Univ. of Penn.)
Clinical Fellow;
Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
WEEKS, JAMES B., M.D., (Univ. of Illinois)
Intern in General Surgery
WHANG, CHOONG J., M.D., (Seoul National Univ.)
Third Year Resident in Neurosurgery
YAMOKOSKI, ROBERT P., M.D., (Ohio State Univ.)
First Year Resident in General Surgery










STUDENTS


CLASS OF 1972
Name/Hometown/Internship


ARNOLD, JOHN PAUL/St. Petersburg, Fla.
Baptist Memorial Hospital, Memphis, Tenn.
BAIR, FREDERICK HIGH, III/Auburndale, Fla.
Baptist Memorial Hospital, Memphis, Tenn.
BLOOMFIELD, STEPHEN HAROLD/St. Pete, Fla.
Medical College of Virginia, Richmond, Va.
BOUCEK, FRANCIS CHARLES/Coral Gables, Fla.
Shands Teaching Hospital, Gainesville, Fla.
BRESTEL, ERIC PAUL/Fort Lauderdale, Fla.
Methodist Hospital, Dallas, Tex.
BRODMAN, RICHARD FERRIS/Scarsdale, N. Y.
Montefiore Hospital, New York, N. Y.
BURDETTE, MARVIN G., JR./Winter Haven, Fla.
Good Samaritan Hospital, Phoenix, Ariz.
CALDWELL, ROY LEE, Ill/Lake Wales, Fla.
Huntington Memorial Hospital, Pasadena, Calif.
CARR, JOHN PAUL/West Palm Beach, Fla.
Riverside Hospital, Newport News, Va.
CARROLL, ROBERT RUSSELL/Dunedin, Fla.
Shands Teaching Hospital, Gainesville, Fla.
COATES, MICHAEL ROBERT/St. Petersburg, Fla.
Los Angeles County Harbor General Hosp., L.A., Calif.
COPE, WINSTON THOMAS/St. Petersburg, Fla.
Univ. of Miami Affiliated Hospitals, Miami, Fla.
COURINGTON, CLEO JANE/Cambridge, Mass.
U. of F. Affiliated Hospitals, Gainesville, Fla.
CREBO, ALAN RICHARD/Gainesville, Fla.
Univ. of Ariz. Affiliated Hospitals, Tucson, Ariz.
DINGEMAN, ROBERT DENISON/Alexandria, Va.
Fitzsimmons Army Medical Hospital, Denver, Colo.
EISENACH, ROBERT JEFFREY/Ft. Myers Beach, Fla.
Univ. of Arkansas Hospital, Little Rock, Ark.
ERICKSON, ROBERT ALAN/Arlington, Va.
Shands Teaching Hospital, Gainesville, Fla.
FRANZ, KARL SINCLAIR/Chipley, Fla.
Charlotte Memorial Hospital, Charlotte, N. C.
FRIEDEMAN, ELLIOT MICHAEL/Cape Coral, Fla.
Cincinnati General Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio
FRUCHTMAN, MARC HENRY/Hollywood, Fla.
U. of F. Affiliated Hospitals, Gainesville, Fla.
GOERSS, RONALD ARTHUR/Sanford, Fla.
Mary Imogene Bassett Hospital, Cooperstown, N. Y.


HARTLEY, HENRY HIBBARD, JR./Winter Haven, Fla.
Shands Teaching Hospital, Gainesville, Fla.
HENDERSON, DONALD RAFAEL/Jacksonville, Fla.
Beth Israel Hospital, Boston, Mass.
HERNDON, WILLIAM ALFRED/USNS Mayport, Fla.
U. S. Navy Hospital, Bethesda, Maryland


JONES, LISTON STEPHEN, JR./Pensacola, Fla.
Mobile General Hospital, Mobile, Ala.
KAGAN, ABBOTT, II/Ft. Myers, Fla.
Shands Teaching Hospital, Gainesville, Fla.
KAPLAN, RAY/Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
Shands Teaching Hospital, Gainesville, Fla.
LiMARZI, GARY IRVING/Key Biscayne, Fla.
U. S. Navy Hospital, Jacksonville, Fla.
LLOYD, THOMAS MARK/Melbourne, Fla.
Shands Teaching Hospital, Gainesville, Fla.
McARTHUR, CLAIRE L., III/Denver, Colo.
L. A. County-U. of So. Cal. Med. Center, L. A., Calif
McCONE, JONATHAN, JR./Jacksonville, Fla.
Univ. of Penn. Hospital, Philadelphia, Penn.
MANDEL, JEFFREY ARTHUR/Atlanta, Ga.
Highland Hospital of Rochester, Rochester, N. Y.
MAULDIN, JACK LEMUEL/Fountain, Fla.
Baptist Medical Centers, Birmingham, Ala.
MIZRAHI, EDWARD ALAN/Jacksonville, Fla.
Med. College of Georgia Hospitals, Augusta, Ga.
NDIFORCHU, CASSANDRA MAREA/Orlando, Fla.
Shands Teaching Hospital, Gainesville, Fla.
NOLTING, SARA FRANCES/Gainesville, Fla.
Emory University Hospital, Atlanta, Ga.
O'DONNELL, JAMES ALLEN/Daytona Beach, Fla.
Good Samaritan Hospital, Phoenix, Ariz.
PARSONS, JAMES BAKER/Indian Harbour, Fla.
Methodist Hospital, Houston, Tex.
PAYNE, HARLAN ADNER/Plantation, Fla.
Methodist Hospital, Dallas, Tex.
PRESS, JAY/North Miami Beach, Fla.
New England Med. Center Hospitals, Boston, Mass.


RAYBURN, ROBERT LOUIS/Lynn Haven, Fla.
Baylor College Affiliated Hospitals, Houston, Tex.
ROSS, DAVID SCOTT/Orlando, Fla.
Univ. of Miami Affiliated Hospitals, Miami, Fla.
SAFER, MICHAEL LOUIS/Jacksonville, Fla.
Shands Teaching Hospital, Gainesville, Fla.
SCALES, JOHN FAIRLEY/Weirsdale, Fla.
Georgia Baptist Hospital, Atlanta, Ga.
SCHWENZFEIER, CARL WILLY/Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
L. A. County Harbor General Hosp., L. A., Calif.
SHAKULA, JOHN ROBERT/Tampa, Fla.
Univ. of Utah Affiliated Hosps., Salt Lake City, Utah


MEDICAL


.










SHAPIRO, ROBERT PAUL/Brooklyn, New York
Univ. of N. C. School of Med., Chapel Hill, N. C.
SHRADER, DAVID LOWE/Eau Gallie, Fla.
Univ. of Wash. Affiliated Hospitals, Seattle, Wash.
SHUMATE, JACK BURTRAM, JR./St. Petersburg, Fla.
Shands Teaching Hospital, Gainesville, Fla.
SIEGEL, PHILIP SAMUEL/Green Cove Springs, Fla.
Milwaukee Children's Hospital, Milwaukee, Wis.
SONNTAG, ARCH CHRISTIAN/Salt Lake City, Utah
University Hospitals, Madison, Wis.
SPEARMAN, DAN ROLAND/Jacksonville, Fla.
Shands Teaching Hospital, Gainesville, Fla.
SPLINTER, RAYMOND JOSEPH/Jacksonville, Fla.
Charlotte Memorial Hospital, Charlotte, N. C.
SWANSON, GEORGE CHARLES/Gn. Cove Sprs., Fla.
U. S. Navy Hospital, Oakland, Calif.
TALLEY, RICHARD WALTER/Winter Park, Fla.
Baylor College Affiliated Hospitals, Houston, Tex.
THOMAS, FRANK ADKINS/Geneva, Fla.
U. S. Navy Hospital, Bethesda, Md.
TSACRIOS, NICKY MIKE, JR./Live Oak, Fla.
Charity Hospital of Louisiana, New Orleans, La.
WELLIVER, ROBERT CHARLES/Crystal Beach, Fla.
Univ. of Calif. Hospitals, Los Angeles, Calif.
WESTFALL, DAVID NOEL/Gainesville, Fla.
Riverside Hospital, Newport News, Va.
WIGLEY, FREDRICK MARTIN/Largo, Fla.
The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Baltimore, Md.
WINTERS, PAUL REGAN/Miami, Fla.
Yale-New Haven Med. Center, New Haven, Conn.
YOUNG, WALTER CLARK/Canal Point, Fla.
Riverside Hospital, Newport News, Va.
ZELLER, WILLIAM VINCENT/Eustis, Fla.
Charlotte Memorial Hospital, Charlotte, N. C.


Class of 1973

AUERBACH, DAVID/Largo, Fla.
BEECHAM, JAMES E./W. Palm Beach, Fla.
BENSON, ANDRE W./St. Petersburg, Fla.
BIANCHI, RAYMOND FRANCIS/Tampa, Fla.
BLUMER, DAVID CHARLES/Lake Worth, Fla.
BOX, PATRICK/Jacksonville, Fla.
CAMPBELL, WAYNE ENZOR/Laurel Hill, Fla.
COPE, LOUISE ANN/Largo, Fla.
EDGERTON, NORMAN BRUCE, JR./Tampa, Fla.
EDWARDS, JAMES RANDALL/Oak Ridge, Tenn.


ELSNER, WILLIAM/Steubenville, Ohio
ENZOR, MARY CHIPLEY/Crestview, Fla.
GLASER, ARTHUR LEWIS/Lake Park, Fla.
GROSS, DAVID A./Jackson Heights, N.Y.
HAAS, GEORGE JAMES/Winter Haven, Fla.
HAUSER, MARK JAY/Miami, Fla.
HOLAHAN, JOSEPH R./Ft. Pierce, Fla.
HOLLAN, CAROL B./St. Petersburg, Fla.
HOLLER, WILLIAM E., III/DeLand, Fla.
JACKSON, THOMAS A./Vero Beach, Fla.
JACOBSEN, DAVID CLARK/Miami, Fla.
KAIDEN, JEFFREY SAMUEL/Miami, Fla.
KANTZLER, GARRICK B./Miami Beach, Fla.
KLAPPER, MITCHELL/Miami, Fla.
KNUDSON, EDWARD CHRISTOPHER/Largo, Fla.
KOVALESKI, CHARLES R./Tallahassee, Fla.
LUTHERER, BERTA DEL CARMEN/Elizabeth, N.J.
McCUNE, BRUCE ROBERT/N. Miami, Fla.
McPHAIL, JOHN F./Niagara Falls, N.Y.
MILLER, BAYARD DODGE/Gainesville, Fla.
NEUSTEIN, CHARLES LEWIS/Miami, Fla.
NORDT, JOHN CHARLES, III/Miami, Fla.
OTT, RICHARD F./Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
PAULK, HARVEY T., JR./Blountstown, Fla.
PAYNE, JON MICHAEL/Christiansburg, Va.
PERSOFF, NATHAN S./West Palm Beach, Fla.
PETERSON, JOHN CRAIG/Jacksonville, Fla.
PHILLIPS, THOMAS W., IV/Ormond Beach, Fla.
ROCK, JOHN HENRY, JR./Plantation, Fla.
ROSS, WARREN EDWARD/Tampa, Fla.
SCHIEBEL, LEONARD WILLIAM/Lombard, Ill.
SCHWARTZ, HARVEY DAVID/Hollywood, Fla.
SHERRINGTON, BRIAN THOMAS/Cocoa, Fla.
SKLENICKA, RUSSELL CHARLES/Berwyn, Ill.
SMITH, CALDWELL WITHERS/Orlando, Fla.
SOLER-BAILLO, JOSE ANTONIO/Miami, Fla.
STRAIT, WALTER RICHARD/Zephyrhills, Fla.
STRATOS, MILTON S./St. Petersburg, Fla.
SYFERT, DALE FRANK/Blandinsville, Ill.
SZNURKOWSKI, RICHARD-LECH G./Miami, Fla.
TANNER, GUY EDWARD/Tampa, Fla.
THACKER, ROBERT KELLER/Savannah, Ga.
THOMAS, EDGAR LEE/Jacksonville, Fla.
TUTTON, JAMES E., III/Daytona Beach, Fla.
WILLIAMS, GREGORY DAVID/Tampa, Fla.
WILLIS, WAYNE SHELTON/Pensacola, Fla.
WING, MARY BETH/St. Petersburg, Fla.
WOLF, JOHN STUART, JR./Lake City, Fla.
WOOD, JOHN LAWRENCE/Gulfport, Fla.
ZIMMERMAN, DALE F./Andalusia, Penn.










Class of 1974


ALLEN, STEPHEN CLEMENTS/Maitland, Fla.
ANTINORI, JAMES VINCENT/Tampa, Fla.
ARMSTRONG, DONALD/Miami, Fla.
BALLINGER, WILLIAM EDWARD/Melbourne, Fla.
BARWICK, KENNETH WAYNE/Mulberry, Fla.
BAUM, CARL IRA/Gainesville, Fla.
BOTTOMS, SIDNEY FRANKLIN/Pensacola, Fla.
BUCHHOLZ, ROBERT ALAN/Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
CAIL, WAYNE STEPHEN/Miami Springs, Fla.
CAVENDER, ROBERT COLLINS/Vero Beach, Fla.
CHIN, FRANK TUIN WONG, JR./Miami, Fla.
COLEMAN, JAMES MICHAEL/Maitland, Fla.
CUMMINGS, NANCY PAIGE/Jacksonville, Fla.
CURRY, SUSAN LINDA/Gainesville, Fla.
DAVIS, JOSH DANIEL, JR./Gainesville, Fla.
DeKOSKY, STEVEN TRENT/Gainesville, Fla.
DELANEY, ALLEN G./Gainesville, Fla.
DENNIS, KENNETH MICHAEL/Pensacola, Fla.
EVANS, HARRY LAUNIUS/Mobile, Ala.
FOX, LAWRENCE STEVEN/Sarasota, Fla.
FRANCIS, GARY LEE/Jacksonville, Fla.
GRANADE, MARY ETHEL/Gainesville, Fla.
HADLEY, PHILLIP, SR./Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
HALL, HAL VAN/Palatka, Fla.
HASLAM, ERNEST GEORGE/N. Hollywood, Fla.
HAWKINS, RONNEE ZOE/St. Petersburg, Fla.
HESTER, ROZALYN LENORA/Atlanta, Georgia
HIGGS, PHILIP EDWARD/Orlando. Fla.
HIMOT, EDWARD DAVID/N. Miami Beach, Fla.
LAUTERIA, SIDNEY FRANK/Orlando, Fla.
LAWYER, ALICE IRENE/West Palm Beach, Fla.
LEAL, JORGE JOSE/Miami, Fla.
LEXOW, STEPHEN STEWART/Sarasota, Fla.
LITHMAN, JERRY RICHARD/N. Miami, Fla.
LUDWIG, MARK EDWARD/Clearwater, Fla.
MAHER, JAMES WILLIAM/Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
MAHONEY, JOHN PATRICK/Orlando, Fla.
MALMBORG, JOHN CHRISTMAN/Jacksonville, Fla.
McDONALD, ANTHONY P./Walnut Creek, Calif.
MOORE, JOHN CLIFTON, III/Lakeland, Fla.
MOYER, ROBBIE S./McComb, Miss.
NDIFORCHU, ABRAHAM FOMBE/Cameroon, W. Af
OBER, KARL PATRICK/Seffner, Fla.
PERAZA, JOEL CARY/Far Rockaway, New York
POWLEDGE,.DARRELL FRANKLIN/Marianna, Fla.
ROGERS, CHARLES LAWSON/Lakeland, Fla.
SAPP, LARRY EDWIN/Gainesville, Fla.


SCHWARTZER, JOSEPH SIMON/Miami, Fla.
SIMMONS, CURTIS TIMOTHY/Jacksonville, Fla.
SIMMONS, ETHEL SULTANA/Chesapeake, Va.
SLATKOFF, MARC LESTER/Plantation, Fla.
SMALL, ALAN JON/Sarasota, Fla.
SMITH, LAMAR HENRY/Tampa, Fla.
SMUCYGZ, DONALD WALKER/Jacksonville, Fla.
SODEN, KEVIN JOSEPH/Richmond, Va.
STENGER, JO ANNE SARAH/Coral Gables, Fla.
SUHRER, JULIAN STEPHEN/Jacksonville, Fla.
TIDWELL, PAT THOMAS/Orlando, Fla.
TUCHMAN, MICHAEL MOISES/Miami Beach, Fla.
WALKER, ROBERT BRUCE/Temple Terrace, Fla.
WASE, RAYMOND EDWARD, JR./Cape Coral, Fla.
WEST, STEPHEN EUGENE/Jacksonville, Fla.
WHIBBS, WILLIAM JOSEPH/Pensacola, Fla.
WILBERS, LAWRENCE LEE/DeLand, Fla.
WILEY, HENRY ERNEST, III/Tampa, Fla.
WILLIAMS, BYRON ROBINSON, JR./Honea Path, S.C.
WILSON, DAVID LEON, III/Jacksonville, Fla.
WRAY, WALTER HARRILL, JR./Tallahassee, Fla.
ZARITZKY, DAVID RON/Hollywood, Fla.

Class of 1975

ANDERSON, FRANCYNE OLIVIA/Petersburg, Va.
BAUSHER, JUDITH ANN/Hamburg, N.Y.
BENEDETTO, DOMINICK ANTHONY/Woodbury, N.J.
BUCKLEY, ROBERT/Gainesville, Fla.
BURDETTE, DAVID CHAMBERS/Winter Haven, Fla.
BYLER, PHILIP RAY/Blountstown, Fla.
CAMPBELL, DAVID MAXWELL/Laurel Hill, Fla.
CARRELL, ROBERT LEE/Ft. Myers, Fla.
COHEN, JOEL/Maitland, Fla.
COLVIN, DONALD BERNARD/Tice, Fla.
CRAWLEY, GARY LEE/Jacksonville. Fla.
CRUMLEY, LEON ALBERT/Savannah, Ga.
DeMARCO, FRANK JOHN, JR./Gainesville, Fla.
DEROVANESIAN, JACK/Opa Locka, Fla.
EADDY, LIVINGSTON LEE, JR./Lake City, Fla.
EBERLY, DONALD ALAN/Sarasota, Fla.
ELLIS, GERRY FRANCIS/Crestview, Fla.
FIDDELKE, LAURA M./E. Palatka, Fla.
FISHER, WILLIAM FREDERICK/Winter Park, Fla.
FITTS, JERE JONATHAN/Vero Beach, Fla.
FRIEDBERG, HOWARD/Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
GARRETT, LESLIE WAYNE/Palatka, Fla.
GEFTER, JEFFREY WILLIAM/Jacksonville, Fla.
GOLD, MARK STEPHEN/Hollywood, Fla.
GREEN, DAVID JUSTICE/Haines City, Fla.










HALDEMAN, LARRY WILLIAM/Temple Terrace, Fla.
HAMILTON, JACK ELLIS/Tracyton, Wash.
HARRIS, WILLIE GEORGE/Williston, Fla.
HARTWIG, BRUCE ALLAN/St. Petersburg, Fla.
HASEMAN, MICHAEL/Lakeland, Fla.
HENDERSON, ROBERT CONNAR/Tampa, Fla.
HENDRICKSON, JOHN M., JR./Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
HUDSON, BRUCE WYETH/Fort Myers, Fla.
IACONA, MARIA ANN/Daytona Beach, Fla.
KING, LAWRENCE PAUL/Denver, Colo.
KRAMER, HOWARD LEIGH/Hollywood, Fla.
LASSITER, WILLIAM BUCHANAN/Huntsville, Ala.
LONG, WILLIAM GROVES, JR./Madeira Beach, Fla.
LOTTENBERG, RICHARD/N. Miami Bch., Fla.
LUKAS, GARRON MICHAEL/Merritt Island, Fla.
McCLURE, SAMUEL SIDNEY/Melbourne, Fla.
McDADE, EDWARD DONALD, JR./Orlando, Fla.
MANNIS, MARK JOEL/Jacksonville, Fla.
MARCUS, ROBERT BROWN, JR./Gainesville, Fla.
MASON, WILLIAM GRAY/Clearwater, Fla.
MEYER, ANTHONY SHELLEY/Winter Park, Fla.
MILLER, RICHARD/N. Miami Beach, Fla.
MORRISON, LEON MACMILLAN, SR./Sebring, Fla.
MORSE, KENNETH HAZEN/Baldwin, N. Y.
MOTT, MARY SUSAN/Lake Wales, Fla.
NEWMARK, ZEPHRON GABREIL/Miami, Fla.
PARARO, LUTHER LEONARD, III/Tallahassee, Fla.
PERKINS, ARTHUR FRANK/Pinellas Park, Fla.
PERRY, JAMES McLEOD/Orlando, Fla.
SADLER, RICHARD BONNELL/Jacksonville, Fla.
SAKAS, EDWARD LAWRENCE/Alexandria, Va.
SANCHEZ, ALEXANDER FRANCIS/Plant City, Fla.
SCHIAVONE, DANIEL CHARLES, JR./Orlando, Fla.
SHORT, DOUGLAS JEFFERSON/Wilmington, Del.
SLATTERY, JAMES BRIAN/Pompano Beach, Fla.
SLEVINSKI, RICHARD STEPHEN/Tallahassee, Fla.
SPALDING, DAVID MURL/Winter Park, Fla.
SPENCER, JAMES CRAIG/Ft. Lauderdale, Fla.
STEINBERG, NORMAN IRWIN/Lowell, Mass.
STEPP, JOSEPH THOMAS/Jacksonville, Fla.
SVENSON, ERIC WOLFGANG/Taylor, Mich.
SWARTZENDRUBER, FREDERICK D./Sarasota, Fla.
SWILLEY, SYLVIA SERENA/Marianna, Fla.
TUCKER, DANIEL McKENDREE/Gainesville, Fla.
VARLEY, ARTHUR JOSEPH/San Diego, Calif.
WATERS, JOHN STEPHEN/Jacksonville, Fla.
WEYERS, BARBARA ANN/Maitland, Fla.
WILLIAMS, CHARLES ALFRED/Orlando, Fla.
WILLIAMS, DENNIS EUGENE/Miami, Fla.
ZARZOUR, ROBERT JOSEPH/Miami, Fla.


GRADUATE STUDENTS

Biochemistry
BUNDE, TERRY/Orlando, Fla.
DANOFF, NANCY/Quebec, Canada
DENSLOW, NANCY M./Falls Church, Va.
GREEN, WILLIAM E./New York, N. Y.
HALL, ELIZABETH R./Corpus Christi, Texas
HAMMOND, JOHN/Valparaiso, Fla.
HSIUNG, MON-LI/Taipei, Taiwan
MARTIN, GREG/Wayne, Michigan
MATTER, MICHAEL/Palmerton. Pa.
MOERCK, HESTER/Hartford, Conn.
RAO, KATIKININI M. K./Durham, N. H.
SHORT, NEAL/Shelby, Iowa
SPRINKLE, TERRY J./Gainesville, Fla.
SWINEHART, JANET/Danville, Pa.
THRALL, CARY/Union City, Indiana
WELCH, DANIEL W./Nova, Ohio


Immunology & Medical Microbiology

BENSON, ROBERT H./Hialeah, Fla.
BLALOCK, JAMES E./Madison, Fla.
*COHEN, MICHAEL A./New York, N. Y.
CROWE, CHRISTINE/Gainesville, Fla.
CUCHENS, MARVIN/Pensacola, Fla.
*DAMATO, JAMES/Gainesville, Fla.
*FRANCO, JORGE A./Gainesville, Fla.
*GADOL, NANCY/Washington, D. C.
*GIORDANO, GERALDINE/Philadelphia, Pa.
HUFF, NORMAN/Spencer Co., Ind.
JIMENEZ, HUMBERTO/Havana, Cuba
JONES, FRANCES F./Rock Hill, S. C.
*KNITTLE, MARY A./Atlanta, Ga.
McCUMBER, LARRY/Mullins, S. C.
*PEARCE, DAVID/Columbus, Ohio
PEAVY, DUANE/Dayton, Ohio
SENTERFITT, VERNON/Pensacola, Fla.
*SHIMP, ROBERT/Jacksonville, Fla.
SILVA, ROBERT/Louisville, Ky.
TULLISH, JOHN/Weymouth, Mass.
WASHINGTON, LOUIS/New Orleans, La.
WOOD, SCOTT H./Chipley, Fla.
YOCUM, DAVID/Rochelle, Ill.









*TUCKER, CHRISTINE/Greensboro, N. C.
TYLER, THOM/Richmond, Va.


BAISDEN, RONALD H./Pensacola, Fla.
GELDERD, JOHN B./Clearwater, Fla.
GOULD, WILLIAM/Ft. Pierce, Fla.


Pathology


BURCHARDT, HANS/Igadan, Nigeria
*FISKE, ROBERT (DVM)/Elsinore, Calif.
KILLINGSWORTH, LAWRENCE/Edison, Ga.
*LEITNER, SHARON/Miami, Fla.
McGEE, JAMES H./Gainesville, Fla.
OLIVER, RICHARD/Salt Lake City, Utah
*SHIPE, JAMES/Louisville, Ky.


Radiation Biophysics


*FISCHLER, LOIS/Quincy, Mass.
*FORSYTHE, RONALD/Denver, Colo.
*IZZO, PAUL G./Newton, Mass.
*McVEY, JAMES T./Gainesville, Fla.
*MORIN, RICHARD/Miami, Fla.
*PARR, LAURENCE/Indiatlantic, Fla.
*SCHULTZ, DAVID/Cleveland, Ohio
*WILSON, JAMES ROLAND/Pensacola, Fla.


*Students pursuing M.S. degrees


Pharmacology & Therapeutics


ACKERMAN, DENNIS M./Baltimore, Md.
BOTTOMS, GLENDA/Marianna, Fla.
DUNLAP, CLAUD EVANS, III/Camp Atterbury, Ind.
DVORCHIK, BARRY/Bridgeport, Conn.
LIDDELL, NORMAN/Menlo Park, Calif.
MALAGODI, MARJORIE H./Annandale, Va.
ROWELL, PETER P./St. Petersburg, Fla.
SILVERSTRI, RAUL/Vignola (Modena) Italy
WECKER, LYNN/Oceanside. N. Y.


Physiology

ALLEN, PAUL D./Gainesville, Fla.
BURNS, ALASTAIR/Kalispell, Mont.
*CHIOCCA, MARIE ANNE/ New York, N. Y.
DODDINGTON, HAROLD/Hallendale, Fla.
ELLIS, CLYDE (JIM) A./Live Oak, Fla.
*EVANS, JOHN NEWTON/Worcester, Mass.
*GROSSFELD, SERIL/Carona, N. Y.
*HURD, RUSSELL W./Gainesville, Fla.
HUNT, RAYMOND D. /Melrose Park, Ill.
NELSON, ELDON L./Greenville, N. C.
*NEWSOME, DEBORAH G./Atlanta, Ga.
NOEL, STEPHEN/Pensacola, Fla.
PEREZ, JOSE M./Miami Beach, Fla.
*PUGLIESE, LINDA/New York, N. Y.
SPRAY, DAVID C./Oak Ridge, Tenn.
THRASHER, TERRY N./Leavenworth, Kan.
*TUCEK, PAUL/Berwyn, Ill.


Neuroscience







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