Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00593
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: September 1930
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00593
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

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'Bulletrin of the


Fol1. SXXV, Series 1


Extrac No. 12


Sep't. 17th1, 1930


Entered in thec post ofice il Gain~esviliec as secondc class m~atter,


The University Record































TAB:LE OF CONTE'NTS


Regular Army Personnel


General Information .



Cadet Organization .



Clothing and Equipment



Courses of Instruction:


Infantry . .


Artillery . .


. . . . 4



. . . 5



. . . 7



. . . 9





. . . 11


. . 14


















The University Record of the University of Florida is issued once every month
except June, when it is issued ix times.
The Record comprises:
The Reports of the President and the linard of Control, the Bulletin of
General Information, the annual announcements of the individual colleges of
the University, announcements of special courses of instruction, and reports
of the University Officers.
These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply for them. The
applicant should specifically state which bulletin or what information is desired.

Address THE REGISTRAR,
University of Florida,
Gainesville, Florida.

Research Publications.-Research publications will contain results of research
work. Papers are published as separate monographs numbered in several series.
There is no free mailing list of these publications. Exchanges with institutions
are arranged by the University Library. Correspondence concerning such exchanges
should he addressed to the University Librarian, University of Florida, Gainesville.
Florida. The issue and sale of all these publications is under the control of the Com-
mittee on Publications. Requests for individual copies, or for any other copies not
included in institutional exchanges, should be addressed to the University Bookstore,
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida.

The Committee on University Publications,
University of Florida,
Cainesville, Florida.







FACULTY OF THE DIVISION OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS.

JA1\IES A. VAN FLEET, 10ajor, Infantry, ?.11.5. & T. (Commandant).
H'ILLIA31 C. MOORE, Major, Infantry, (Director Infantry Battalion).

CLYDE C. ALEXANDER, Captain. Field Artillery, (Director Artillery Battalion).
GILMER Al. BELL, Captain, Infantry, Asst. P.1\1.S. & T.
EnxEst T. BARCO, Captain, Field Artillery. Asst. P.M.S. & T.

JOHN F. HEPlan, Captain, Field Artillery, Asst. P.11.S. & T.-Supply Officer.
FRANK F. DECKER, Captain, Infantry. Asst. P.M.S. & T.

JAlliES 11. MORRIS, Caplain, Infantry, ASSt. F.AI.S. & T.-Adjutant.
JaEPH P. DONNOVIN, Captain, FIdol Artillery, Asst. P.11.S. & T.
Don IIAZELHillosT, 151 Delit, infillitry, Asst. P.M.S. & T.
WILuAll D. KLINEPETER, Technical Sergeant, infanfry, Chief Clerk.

CHARLES 11. BELL, Stall Sergeant, Infantry, Range Sergeant.
DALLAS, B. HONI)LE1, Staff Sergeant, Infantry, lufantry Supply Sergeant.

As v \. Yrrime, Sergeant, infantry, Infantry Clerk.
JosEris C. lia mo clair, Sergeant, Fiehl Artillery, Stable Sergeant.
FRAAK T. Oasnouve, Sergeant. Field Artillery. Artillery Supply Sergeant.

CHARLEN 31cKemis, Bergeant, Field Artillery, Artillery Clerk.

Jul.ux F. AYEns, Private 1 cl, Field Artillery.
Joux W. Boom, Private 1 cl, Field Artillery.
McKINLEY CHIRWELL, Private 1 cl, Field Artillery, Horseshoer.

JOHN A. DUKE, Fritate I of, Field Artillery, Saddler.
DAVID FI, liHal)ES, Private 1 CI, Filli Artiller).

SA a EE W. Berica. Private. Field Artillery, Mechanic.
SAllAll CHA1E, Privale, Field Artillery.
LEONARD ROLLEY, Private. Field Artillery.
GEORGE LAFLECR, Private. Field Artillery.
DEwEY H. LEDFORD, PriVale, Field Artifiery.

HILTON 8. 11COUARRIE, Private, Field Artillery.
HENRY T. 1101UNG, Private field Artillery.
BANK E. PAutan, Private, Field Artillery.

Eowano V. PRICE, Private, Field Artillery.
llAHHis S. THOMAs, Private, Fic]d Artillery.
HENRY E. THROWER, JR., Private, Field Artillery.








GENERAL INFORMATION
RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS.
AUTHORITY.
Under the terms of the Land Crant Act of 1862 the State received certain grants
Federal lands, the income of which must be devoted to the maintenance of
Ileges of agricult'ure and mechanical arts, including a course in military training.
le National Defense Act of June 3, 1916, as amended by the Art of June 4, 1920,
abolished the Reserve Officers" Training Corps and authorized the Secretary of
ar to provide the necessary in tructors and equipment and to prescribe a standard
urse of instruction. The War Department has established at the Unilersity of
orida both an infantry aml a field urlillery unit.

OfUFCTIVE.
These units are authorized by Congress for the purpose of providing a corps of
serve officers of the U. S. Army, which, in case of a major emergency, will constitute
e officer personnel of our civilian Army. It is a part of the approved military policy
the United States to maintain a small regular army. When, however, the nation
threatened with war, and large additional armed forces are raised, it will be
cessary that this force he provided immediately with trained officers. Future
irs will be so sudden that the long period that we had before entering the Workl
ar, in which to secure officers from training camps, will not be available. A study
our military history shows that many lives have been sacrificed in the early stages
our wars solely because of the scarcity of trained officers capable of leading our
en in combat. Therefore, our Government is attempting to rectify this condition
providing an officers' personnel in advance, from college graduates, so that in
se of emergency they may immediately step into positions of leadership and acquit
emselves creditably.
EQUIPMENT.
The War Department maintains at the University of Florida a personnel of thirty-
ree members of the regular army and equipment valued at nearly $400,000. In-
aded in this equipment is a complete battery of 75nun. horse-drawn field artillery,
nothing and equipment for a battalion of infantry, and clothing and partial equip-
ent for a battalion of field artillery. The University of Florida has provided offices,
assrooms, ample storage space, and excellent drill and maneuver groumls. A
odern stable has recently been completed for the fiebl artillery, and work is under
my for the improvement of drill and parade grounds, and for the constiuction of
polo field.
ADMISSION.
The Reserve Officers' Training Corps course of instruction envers four years, the
-st two of which are compulsory. Students who regi ter as freshmen as sophommes
the colleges of Agriculture, Engineering, Pharmacy, Teachers. and in the course
ading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts in the College of Arts and Sciences are
signed to the field artillery unit. Students who register us fredulen or sophomores
I the colleges of Architecture, Commerce aml Journalism. in the course leading to





the degree of Bachelor of Science in the College of Arts and Sciences, and all
irregular students, are assigned to the infantry unit.

BASIC COURSE.
The Basic Course in both the field artillery and the infantry covers the first two
years, and is usually pursued during the fredunan aid sophomore years. Satisfac-
tory completion of it is required of all students unless they are exempt on reasons
ghen under Exemptions. The object of the liasic Course is to qualify the student to
perform the duties of a non-conunissioned oilker. The first year of the course is
designed to qualify him for the duties of a private.

THE ADVANCED COL RSE.
Students who complete the Basic Course and are selected by the Professor of
Military Science and Tactics and the President of the University may elect the
Advanced Course, which course may lead to a commission in the Officers' Reserve
Corps of the U. S. Army. Students registered in this course are required to carry it
to completion, and during the period are paid $9.00 per month by the War Depart-
ment. An advanced course summer-camp is compedsory, usually between the junior
and senior years. The War Department pays all expenses for the camp, including
mileage, rations, medical attendance, clothing, and laundry service, and in addition
the pay of the seventh grade, United States Army.

EXEMPTIONS.
Exemption from military training at the University of Florida is granted in the
following cases:
(1) Students who are twenty-one lears of age at the time of first entering upon
their college work at the University of Florida.
(2) Students unable to drill by reason of physical disability, as certified to h>
the University Physician.
(3) Students whose military work elsewhere is accepted by the Professor of
Military Science aml Tactics as fulfilling the requirements.
(4) Students admitted to the University of Florida holding a commission in the
Officers' Reserve Corps of the United States Army.
(5) Students who enter the University with advanced standing from other
accredited institutions. Students who enter with one year of college work are re-
quired to take only one year of the Basic Course, while students who have had two
years or more of college work are exempt from Military Science.
(6) Students taking courses of one year's duration, or less.
(7) Students who are citizens of foreign countries.
Students exempt from Military Science for any reason whatever must, in order
to receive a degree, offer an equal number of hours of other course work in lieu
of Military Science. Choice of these courses must in all cases be approved by the
dean of the college in which the student is registered.









CADET ORGANIZATION.
RECIMENT.
The R. O. T. C. at the University of Florida is organized into a endet regiment
of two hattalions, one made up of infantry students and the other of artillers mindents.
The practical instruction conducted in the open is carried on through this organiza-
tion. l\luch of the actual instruction is done by upper classmen. therelo affording
them opportunities in the art of command and leadership. The Regimental Head-
quarters consist of a Cadet Regimental Colonel and Stall. Each battalion is com-
manded by a Cadet Lieutenant Colonel with appropriate Staff.

INFANTRY BATTALION.
The infantry battalion is organized into three companies, A, B, and C, of fresh-
men, and one company, D, of upper classmen. The outstanding cadet leaders are
assigned as the officers of these organizations. The freshmen companies cover close
and extended order drill, tent-pitching, scouting and patrolling, and combat prin-
ciples to include the platoon. To Company D are assigned all upper classmen not
assigned to the other companies, and those freshmen who have had some prior
military training. The company reviews close and extended order drill and cere-
monies, aml specializes in the use of the infantry weapons. The course covers
machine guns, automatic rifle and howitzer company weapons, wanting and patroll-
ing, inusketry and combat principles.

ARTILLERY BATTALION.
The field artillery battalion is organized into four hatteries, A, B. C, and D. The
instruction is uniform for each battery. Upper classmen are assigned as leaders, the
same as for the infantry. The work is so arranged within each battery that the pro-
gram of instruction is progressive throughout the four years, as follows:
Freshmen: Subjects pertaining to battery equipment and material, and covering
in general the duties of cannoneers.
Sophomores: Subjects pertaining to ballery transport (animal) and covering in
general the duties of drivers. In addition, instruction in communications, fire-control
instruments, and the general duties of members of the battery detail.
Juniors: Artillery technique-gunnery, preparation of fire, conduct of fire, and
the use of the battery detail in the reconnaissance, selection, and occupation of a
position. This year's course will prepare the student to coneluct the fire of a battery
at service practice during the Advanced Camp.
Seniors: The tactical employment of field artillery and training in leadership
and command.
UNIVERSITY HAND.
The R. O. T. C. takes special pride in the eighty-piece University Band. This
hand is supervised in the Director of Music, and receives exery encouragement from
the R. O. T. C. in the matter of uniforms, in trument arol hours for practice.
Alembers of the R. O. T. C. who are selected la the Director of Mu ie for assign-
ment to the hand are excused from the deniounteel drills in had the infantry and
artillery battalions





SCABBARD AND BL\DE.
There is organized at the University of Florida, Company II, Second Regiment,
of the national honorary fraternity of Scabbard and lilade. The membership of this
fraternity is made up of the cadet commissioned oiicers of the R. O. T. C. It renders
valuable services in the encouragement of ellicient cadet leadership.

AWARDS AND PRIZES.
The it. O. T. C. Regiment is recognized as one of the outstanding units in the
entire country. The University of Florkla has been ruled as a distinguished college
by the War Department, for many years. At 1he present time the R. O. T. C. enjoys
the highest rating for eBiciency, in hath inlantry and field artillery, granted by the
War Department.
The State Board of Edneation of Florida has recognized the e.Ririency and val-
uable training given to the young men of Florida, and recently passed a resolution
praising the high standard of elliciency of the it. O. T. C.
Alany organizations thinghout the State of Florida annually award prizes for
meritorious service and leadership in the various cadet activities. Two of these are
lovely silver trophies presented by the OBicers' Reserve Corps, Department of Florida,
to be competed for annually by the companies of the infantry battalion and the bat-
teries of the artillery battalion.

CADET ACTIVITIES AND COMPETITIONS.
Annually in the spring a series of competitions in the various phases of drill and
leadership are conducted to determine the outstanding individuals asul organize
tions within each buttalion of cadets. These military meets have aroused keen
interest in the competition for leading honors. In 1930-31 it is expected to inaugu-
rate the First Annual l\lilitary Fiekl Meet usal Horse Show. It is further expected
during 1930-31 to start the game of polo on the campus. organizing, as soon as the
mounts and students can be trained, an infantry and an artillery tease with the view
of extending it beyond the campus within the next few wars.

ABSENCES.
In order to make drill and dress parade a success, students are expected to attend
all formations. It is obvious that when any large number is absent, the depleted
ranks materially interfere with eRicient instruction, and it so happens that those
present are the ones most penalized. Therefore, all absences are required to be made
up before the close of each semester. Should any student be absent six times during
a semester, without approval from proper authority, he will be placed on probation,
and so notified. If he is absent thereafter, he will be reported to the Registrar and
will be notified by him that he has been dropped from the thniversity. Any student
so dropped may bove his case leviewed by the Committee on Military Affairs, but
must make application for such leviest in person within forty-eight hours (not includ-
ing Saturdays, Sundals, and holidays) from Are on which he was dropped.
Absences from military class exercises are regulated the same as absences from
all other class exercises.









CLOTHING AND EQUIPllENT.
GENERAL.
1. Each member of the R. O. T. C. will he held responsible for all articles of
clothing and equipment issued to him. He will he required to return all such prop-
erty at the proper time in good condition.
2. Whenever a student for any reason fails to return any article as directed. he
will be required to pay for the same at the Business 11anager's alike. Failure to
return property or pay for shortages will necessitate grades being willibeld and
refusal by the University untholities to aveept the student concerned for later regis-
tration at the institution.
3. The uniform must be kept clean, neat, well-fitted, aml pressed at all times.
The student will pay for all cleaning, alterations, and repairs, making his own
arrangements for the same. At no time will the uniform he used roughly or abused.
4. The uniform will be worn at all drill and parade formations, and upon such
special occasions as the P. M. S. & T. may direct. It will not normally be worn to
classes. It may be worn to classes, however, when there is insuHicient time to change
between class and drill formation. Whenever it is worn, it will be worn complete.
5. Articles of equipment, such as rifles, rifle and pistol belts, sabers, whistles,
spurs, etc.. will be issued to certain individuals for their personal use. Such articles
will be signed for by the student and returned to the Militan Supply Room when
directed.
6. Certain articles of equipment used for training purposes, such as field equip-
ment, platals, sketching equipment, etc., will from time to time he issued by instrue-
tors to the student. Such equipment will be signed for by the student to the instrue-
tor aml returned to him in good condition at the end of the training perial or class
period, as directed.
7. No part of these regulations will be construed as permitting a student, when
directed to turn in any article, to keep and pay for the same. This is not authorized
by the Government.
CLOTHINC-BASIC COURSE.
8. The Government furnishes each student enrolled in the liasic Cour R. O. T. C. with a complete uniform, less shoes. This consists of one overseas cap,
one coat, one pair of trousers for infantry students, one pair of breeches ainl leggings
for artillery sIndents, one waist-bell, one black tie, one set of it. O. T. C. insignia,
and one olive-drab wool shirt.
9. Each student enrolled in the Basic Course of the it. O. T. C. is required to
purchase from upproved stores one paii of standard regulation anny shoes. No
other shoe may be worn with the arm unifonn. The student is also required to
purchase one "Gator" patch insignia, to be worn on the left shoubles of the arm coat.
10. Each student eniolled in the liasic Course of the it. O. T. C. is required to pay
at the time 01 registration the sum of one dollar. This fund, known as the Military
Incidental Fund, is used to cover unavoidable losses, breakage, repairs, and replace-
nients. It will not he applied on breakages or losses for which responsibility can
he determined.




11. The uniform referred to in Paragraph 8 must last the student two years. Near
the end of the second semester, the student will be required to tag the uniform
and turn the same in to the Military Supply Room. During the summer, this uni-
form will be cleaned and renovated, and issued to the same student at the beginning
of the next college year.
CLOTHENG- -ADYANCED COURSE.
12. A Jistinctiw uniform and related equipment have been selected by the
University for all members of the Advanced Course of the R. O. T. C. These articles
are standard and allieial, and none others will be used. The University otheials have
made arrangements for the supply of these articles from the William C. Rowland
Tailoring Company, the L. & L. Alen's Clothing Store, and the Unhersity Book Store.
13. This uniform will consist of one coat, one pair of breeches, one shirt, one
overseas cap, one black tie, one waist-belt, one pair hoots for artillery students, one
pair of officers'shoes and puttees for infantry students, one set of R. O. T. C. insignia,
one pair of chevrons, and one "Cator" shoulder insignia. This is supplemented in
the month of May of the junior year with one oilicer's cap, and one Sam Browne belt.
14. The cost of this uniform is approximately sixty-five dollars. The University
is responsible to the firms mentioned in Paragraph 12 for the payment of all articles
received and issued to students. Payments in turn will be made to the University
as follows: from the Government in lieu of the uniform in kind, a commutation-
value amounting to twenty dollars for each year of the two-year Advanced Course.
To offset the inital expenditure, each student will pay to the University the first check
received for conunutation of rations.
13. The I\lilitary Property Custodian, in conjunction with the Auditor of the
University, will maintain an individual clothing and equipment account for each
stoolent enrolled in the advanced Course. Each student will he credited with
the anmunt of conunutation of uniform received from the Government, and such
other finds, such as commutation of rations and cash deposits, as made by the
student. Each student will be charged on this account with the articles issued
to him by the three firms mentioned above. A final settlement will be effected
with each student whenever he terminates his work in the R. O. T. C.
16. Upon successful completion of the Advanced Course, the entire uniform
alul equipment mentioned in Paragraph 13, will become the property of the
student. If, however, the student fails to complete the two-year course, he will
be required to return the complete uniform and equipment to the University or
make a settlement with the Military Property Custodian for such articles as he
may wish to retain.
17. Students desiring to purchase additional new uniforms and equipment
may do so by depositing the cost thereof at the Business Alanager's office. Students
desiring to purchase additional second-hand uniforms and equipment may do
so individually, provided the articles are approved by the P. 1\l. S. & T.










COURSES OF INSTRUCTION
INFANTRY

FRESHMAN

Aly 101-102.-Freshmen Infantry, compulsory. Basic) 2 hours lbeory and 3
hours' practice. 4 credits. Captain Becker and lst Lieutenam Hallehurst.
Text: ROTC Manual.

THE NATIONAL DEFENSE ACT AND THE ROTC.
Orientation of the student in the provisions of the National Defense Act and the mission of
the ROTC in the military system provided for in the Act. General outline of the organization of
the ROTC and of the objectives of the ROTC courses; institutional regulations governing the con-
duct of the unit. To be given at an early period of the year. Thre given to topic, two in-
structional hours,
MILITARY COURTESY AND DISCIPLINE
To inculcate respect for, and loyalty to constituted authority; instruction in selected extracts
from the regulations, and lectures, demonstrations and practical application, lustruction to be
extended in connection with the course in drill and command. Time given to topic, three in-
structional hours,
1111LITARY HYGIENE AND FIRST AID
Instruction in personal hygIcne, hrst aid, prevention of disease, and coup sanitation. Thur
given to topic, ten instructional hours.
DRILL AND COMMAND
Theoretical and practical instruction covering organization, close order drill, extended order
drill, ceremonies, tent-pitching, individual equipment and ennahat principles. This to qualify the
student to participate as a private in close and extended order drill, physical drills and ceremonies;
and to inenicate precision, soldierly appearance and bearing, and the spirit of discipline. Time
given topic, ninety-eight instructional hours.

RIFLE MARKSMANSHIP
Practical instruction and training in the principles of TR 110-3 with a view to founing proper
shooting habits and methods in the student preliminary to and during gallery-firing; nomenclature,
care and cleaning of the rifle. Time given to topic, twenty-live instructional hours.

SCOUTING AND PATROLLING
Theoretical and practical instruction in the duties of a urember of a patrol and a scout in
small tactical exercises. Time given to topic, twenty-two instructional hours.

SOPHOMORE

My 201-202.-- Sophomore Infantry, colupulsory. (Basic) 2 hours' theory and; 3
hours' practice. 4 credits. Captain Bell.
Text: ROTL Manual.

DRILL AND CONIMAND
Heview of the first year conne. Additional theoretical and practical instruction to qualify the
student to perform the duties of a squad-leader in close and extended order, drill and cerernonics.
Time given to, topic, seventy-four instructional hours.

AllJSKETRY
Theoretical instruction covering the reference listed. Practical instruction by small probbins
and exercises in neusketry amg sandtable, landscape targets, and terrain with a view to training
the student in conducting the fire of a squad. Time given to tople, seventeen instructional hours.

AUTOMATIC RIFLE
Practical instruelion in mechanical functioning, positions, and combat use of the automatic
rifle. Time given to topic, twenty-one instructonal hours.

11




SCOUTING AND PATROLLING
Theoretical and practical instruction covering the reference listed. Especial attention to the
conduct of patrols and the duties of patrol leaders and scouts. Applicatory exercises using maps,
sandrable and terrain with a view to the practical training of the student in the duties of a patrol-
leader. Time given to topic, twenty-four instructional hours.

COMBAT PRINCIPLES (RIFLE SQUAD)
Theoretical instruction covering the reference listed. Practical instruction on valued ground
with a view to training the student to lead a squal in narack and defense and on security missions.
Time given to topic, twenty-four instructional hours.

JUNIOR
My 301-302.-Junior Infantry, elective. (Advanced) 3 hours' theory and 3 hours
practice. 4 credits. Captain Morris.
Text : ROTL Manual.

11AP READING AND MILITARY SKETCHING (32)
Theoretical instruction necessary to qualify the students to read military maps with facility
and prepare them for practical work in detching. Applicatory exercises in map reading, viability
of points and areas; practice in making simple road and position sketches. Time given to topic,
twenty-two instructional hours.
DRILL AND COhillAND
A review of the previous drill and command courses and additional theoretical and practical
instruction to qualify the student to perform the duties of a sergeant of all grades in close and
extended order drills, ceremonies and physical drill, and to act as an instructor of basic students
at practical drill. Time given to topic, sixty-four instructional hours.

MACHINE GUN
Theoretical knowledge of the reference listed. Practical application with a view to the pre-
paration of the student for machine-gun firing at camp and to training him to act as a squad and
section leader in drill and combat. Instruction to cover determination of fire data and methods and
means of fire control in direct laying; stripping and assembling the gun; commands; going into
and out oI position on varied ground; and so much ol indirect laying as will acquaint student with
the methods of obtaining firing data for guns controlled singly. Time given to topic, forty-two in-
stouctional hours.
37 MM GUN AND 3" TRENCH MORTAR
Theoretical knowledge of the reference listed. Practical application with a view to preparation
of student for firing at camp and to training hire to act as a number of a squad and a squad-leader
in drill and combat. Instruction to cover the determination of fire-data, owthods and means of
Gre-control, fire-orders, field stripping and assembling, going into action and out of action. Time
given to topic, twenty-two instructional hours.

COMBAT PRINCIPLES-(Rifle Section and Platoon)
Theoretical instruction covering the reference listed. Application of principles taught to
lactical situations by means of map problems, sandtable or relief inap exercises and exercises on
varied ground witle a view to twining the student in duties of several grades of rifle company N. C. O.'s
in combat and the service of security. Time given to ropic, thirty-lwo instructional hours.

SENIOR
My 401-402---Senior infantry, elective. (Advanced) 3 hours' theory and 3 hours
practice. 4 credits. Alajor Moore.
Text: ROTC Manual.

MILITARY LAW AND OFFICERS' RESEHVE CORPS REGULATIONS
To give the student a general knowledge oi the ploredure of courts-martial and of the military
law 10 which he will be subject when called into active service as a reserve officer. To nequaint the
studer wills the conditions of wavice in the Organized liewerve. Time given to topic, filteen in-
structiorial hours.
MILITARY HISTORY AND POLICY
lieference study of available publications on the outline of the history of the wars of the
Anwrican liepublic and illustrative campaigns and haules; evolunon of the military policy of the
United States. Time given to tople, twouiv instruerianal hours.

12








ADMINISTRATION
To acquaint the student with the administrative problems of a company commander and the
regulations governing company administration. Conferences and practical work on the following:
morning report, sick report, duty rosler, tsoop fund, military correspondence, orders, troop discipline,
property, messing, troop sanitation and the care of the men. Time given to topic, eight instructional
hours.
FIELD ENGINEERING
Elements of field engineering, to include standard types of field works; organization of working
parties and tasks; selection of location of trenches: conceahnent and camouflage applied to infantry
stream-crossing expedients. This course may be combined with Combat Principle (see below). Time
given to topic, ten instructional hours.
DRILL AND COMMAND
A review of the previous drill and command course and additional practical instruction to qualify
the student to perform the duties of platoon and company commanders and instrnetors of hasic
students in close and extended order drills, ceremonies, and physical drills; espe the development of leadership qualities and methods of instructing and handling men. linw given tu
topic, sixty-four instructional hours.
COMBAT PRINCIPLES (Rifle and niachine-gun company, and howitzer-conspany and platoon).
Theoretical instruction covering the reference listed. The rille and machine-gun company and
the howitzer-company platoon as part of an infantry battalion. Applicatory exercises on neap, sand-
table on relief map, and terrain. I;1ementary instruction in infantry signal casurnunication. Time
given 10 topic, seventy-five instructional hours.











FIELD ARTILLERY

FRESHMAN
My 103-101,-Freshmen Field Artillery, compulsory. (Basic) 2 hours' theory and
3 hours' practice. 4 credits. Captain Hepner and Donnovin.
Text: Wilson, Field Artillery Manual.

THE NATIONAL DEFENSE ACT AND THE ROTC
Orientaton of the student in the provisions of the National Defense Act and the mission of the
ROTC in the military systern provided for in the Act. General outline of the organization of the
ROTC course; institutional regulations governing the con period of the year. Time given to topic. two instructional hours.
MILITARY COURTESY AND DISCIPLINE
To inculcalc respect for, and loyalty to constituted authority: instruction in selected extracts
from the regulations, and lectures, demonstrations and practical application. Instruction to be ex-
tended in connection with the course in disurounted drills. Time given to topic, three instructional
hours.
AllLITARY HYGIENE AND FIRST AID
instruction in personal hygiene, first aid, and prevention of disease. Time given to topic six
instructional hours.
DISMOUI\TED DRILLS
Theoretical and practical instruction covering close order drill, ceremonies, organization of the
battery and individual equipment. This to quahfy the student to participate as a private in close-
order drill and ceremonies; and to inculcate predsion, soldierly appearance and hearing, and the
spirit of discipline. Knowledge of the essential elements of the battery organization. To qualify
students in the packing and making of individual equipment rolls. Time given to topic, fifty-three
instructional hours,
FIELD ARTILLERY INSTRUCTION
Ordnance and Material.-To give the student a good working knowledge of the types of battery
material and equipment now in use; a short sketch of field artillery material; important features
of design and construction; types under development.
Field Artillery Ammunition.-The use, care, handling and essential characteristics of projectiles,
fuses, primers and powder charges.
Elementary Gunnery.-Simple definitions, the elentents of the trajectory, and such elementary
principles of ballistics as the student should know in order to understand how the gun is laid and
the projectile moves during its flight.
Service of the Piece.--To qualify students in the duties of the gunner and the cannoneer in the
service of the piece.
Firing Battery.-To qualify students in the drills of the gun-squad and firing battery.
Gunners" Examination.-This examination is given at the close of the year to test the students
in particular phases of their field artillery instruction. Those who qualify will be given the ap-
propriate gunne.'s badge. Upon completion of the examination, a report will be rendered showing
the number of freshmen enrolled at the date of examination, and the number of first and second
class gunners found qualified.
Pistol.-The manual of the pistol, safety-precautions, nomenclature, operation, and preliminary
instruction for range-firing. Tirne given to entire topic, ninety-sit institutional hours.

SOPHOMORE
11y 203-204.-Sophomore Field Artillery, compulsory. (Basic) 2 hours' theory and
3 hours' practice. 4 credits, Captain Barco.
Text: 11ilson, Field Artillery IIIanual.

DISMOUNTED DRILL AND CEREMONIES
Continuation of the curse of the first year. Time given topic, thirty-four instructional hours.





FIELD ARTILLERY INSTRUCTION DISMOUNTED
Fire Control Instructions. To give the students a practical knowledge of the use of fire-control
instruments and duties of the instribuent operators of the battery detail.
Battery Cornmunications.-To qualify the students in the duties of the various members of the
communications personnel of the hattery detail, in laying, operating and maintaining battery com-
munications. To include a thorough knowledge of telephone.
Care of Animals.-Foods, feeding, watering, conditioning, care of animals in the field, prevention
of sore backs and sore shoulders; first aid treatment of the cornrnon diseases aml injuries; regious
of the horse, and conformation; duties of the stable-sergeant and stathle-management. Time given
to topic, fifty-four instructional hours.

FIELD ARTILLERY INSTRUCTION MOUNTED
Equitation.-To qualify the student to ride easily and confidently at all gaits, and effectively
control his horse. This course will prepare the student to take up the subject of the field artillery
driver.
Reconnaissance and Occupation of Position.--To qualify the indents in the general duties and
functions of the battery-detail. This course to include the solution of tactical problems on the
ground with students completely equipped; mounted and organized, as nearly as possible, like a
complete battery-detail.
The Field drtillery Driver.-To qualify the student to a reasonable degree in performing the
duties of a field artillery driver; nomenclature and disposition of harness; harnessing and unhaknessing;
cleaning and care of harness and horse equipment; preliminary mounted instruction; management of
the pair; principles of draft; application of draft.
Maneuvers Limbered.-A continuation of the preceding course Ithe Field Artillery Driver) to
include the simple maneuvers of a battery mounted at reduced gaits. Time given to entire topic,
seventy-two instructional hours.
JUNIOR
11y 303-304.-Junior Field Artillery, elective. (Advanced) 3 hours' theory and
3 hours' practice. 4 credits. Captain Alexander.
Text: Wilson, Field Artillery Manual.

MAP READING AND MILITARY SKETCHING
Theoretical and practical instruction necessary to qualify students to orient, read and use
military maps with facility. This course should lay the foundation and prepare the student for
topographical operations incident to the preparation of fire given to the first-year advanced students.
Time given to topic, eighteen instructional hours. (Not offered in 1930-31).

CO1111UNICATIONS FOR FIELD ARTILLERY AND LIAISON
To familiarize the student with the duties of an artillery communication officer, to include
establishment of message centers and all communications within the artillery brigade; a general
knowledge of the communication nets of supported infantry units; duties and functions of liaison
officers and detachments. Time given to topic, ten instructional hours.

PISTOL MARKSMANSHIP
Pietol marksmanship. dismounted to include firing the qualification combe. Time given to ropic,
twelve instructional hours.
DIS110UNTED DRILLS
To instruct the student in the art of command and prepare him for the work of the camp and
for the command and instruction of student batteriew during the 2nd year Advanced Course. To
include close-order drill. ceremonies, service of the piece, firing battery, commands and arm signals;
especial attention to practice in voice-tr-aining; students to be rotated a drill-instructors of the
group. Time given to topic, forty instructional hours.

EQUITATION AND HORSEMANSHIP
Progressive continuation of the basic equitation course to include nore advanced work; jumping
and cross-country riding over varied ground. Time given to topic, rwenty-six instructional hours.

FIELD ARTILLERY FIRING
Gunnery.-To give the student a good grounding in the important principles of gunnery; use
of firing tables; elementary principles of hallistics. Corrections; applicatory problems.
Preparation of Fire.-To qualify the student in the preparation of bre-deliberate and rapid.

15




Practical work with instruments onldoors 10 familiarize the student with the application of topographic
methods to the deliberate preparation of fire; continuation of the basic course on map-reading and
military sketching. Use and interpictation of aerial photographs.
Terrestrial Observation and Conduct of Fire.-To familiarize the student with the technical
handling of field artillery lire, and prepare him to conduct service hring problems at camp; organize.
tion of the firing battery: duties of ofEccrs and non-cornmissioned oflicers; establishment of piece in
position; commands and firing data; methods of fire; conduct of fire by blackboards, terrain board,
and smokepuff. Time given to entire topic, cighty-six instructional hours.

SENIOR
My 403404.-Senior Field Artillery, elective (Advanced) 3 hours' theory and 3
hours' practice. 4 credits. Captain Alexander.
Te : Wilson, Field Artillery Manual.
(Not a 930-31).
AllLITARY LAW AND OFFICERS' RESERVE CORPS RECITLATIONS
To give the student a general knowledge of the procedure of courts-marrial and of the military
law. In which he will he subject when called into active service as a reserve officer. To acquaint
the studenr with the conditions of service in Ibe Organized Reserves. Time given to topic, fifteen
instructional hours.
AlltlTARY IllSTORY AND POLICY
Reference study of available publications on the outline of the history of the wars of the
American Republic and illustrative campaigns and battles: evolution of the military policy of the
United States; lectures. Time given to topic, swenty instanctional hours.

EQUITATION AND HORSEMANSHIP
Continuntion of fist year Advance Course. Time given to topic, sixteen instructional hours.

t)HGANIZATION, TACTICS, AND TACTICAL EMPLOYMENT OF FIELD ARTILLERY
To give the student a thorough understanding of the tactical employment of light artillery in
support of other arms, and a general knowledge of the organization and tactics of other types of
field artillery. Milicient in traction in IIre composition and the oftensive and defensive action of
the infantry dimison and infatry units to give the student an understanding of the role of field artillery
in the combat of the combmed arms. Apphcatory exercises involving the battery and the battalion
of division artillery. Time given to topic, forty-live instructional hours.

CO1klMAND
To develop qualities of leadership in the students and train them in the methods of instructing
and handling men; command and instrnction of student batteries under the active supervision of
Regular Army officers at practical drill and exercises, including the following: dismounted drills
and ceremonies; ervice of the piece; firing battery: exercises in the reconnaxesance, selection and
occupation of po ition and conduct of 12re. 11anenvers, limbered; equitation. Time ghen to topic,
sixty-four instructional hours.
FIELD ENGINEERING
To teach smelents the construction and camouflage of various types of battery entplacements
and shelters. Time given to topic, ten instructional hours.

BATTERY ADMINISTRATION AND SUPPLY
To acquaint the student with the administrative problems of a hattery commander and the
regulations governing battery administration. Conferences and practical work on the following:
morning report, sick report, duty roster, battery fund. military correspondence, orders, battery discipline,
property, supply, messing, battery sanisation and the care of men. Time given to topic, eight in-
structional hours.




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