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Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00587
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: March 1941
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00587
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

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Full Text






The University Record

of the

University of Florida


Bulletin of


%'he Unieversity Summer Session

1941
First Term--June 16 to July 25
Second Term-July 28 to August 29


IMPORTANT
It is possible to avoid the tedious waiting in long lines
on registration day if you carefully read this bulletin and
follow the directions for registration by mail as given on
page 14.5.


Vol. XXXVI, Series I


No. 3


March 1, 1941


Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida
Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter,
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912
Ofice of Publication, Gainesville, Florida


















The Record comprises:


The Reports of the President to the Board of Control, the bulletins of
information, announcements of special courses of instruction, and reports of
the University Officers.

These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply for them. The appli-
cant should specifically state which bulletin or what information is desired. Address

THE REGISTRAR, University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida



Research Publications.-Research publications contain results of research work. Papers
are published as separate monographs numbered in several series.

There is no free mailing list of these publications. Exchanges with institutions are
arranged by the University Library. Correspondence concerning such exchanges should
be addressed to the University Librarian, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. The
issue and sale of all these publications is under the control of the Committee on Publications.
Requests for individual copies, or for any other copies not included in institutional ex-
changes, should be addressed to
TIE COMMITTEE ON UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS
University of Florida
Gainesville, Florida


[78]





__________________ ___________________ IJ ~ ~


No. BUILDING
1 Administration Building
2 Law Building
3 Language Hall
4 Library
5 Peabody Hall
6 Engineering Building
7 Benton Hall and Shops


No. BUILDING
8 Auditorium
9 Horticultural Building
10 Campus Post Office
11 Agricultural Building
12 Chemistry Building
13 Science Hall
14 Fletcher Hall


No. BUILDING
15 Buckman Hall
16 Florida Union
17 Experiment Station
18 Storage Building
19 Barracks
20 Cafeteria
21 Sledd Hall


No. BUILDING
22 Thomas Hall
23 Murphree Hall
24 Basketball Court
25 Infirmary
26 Gymnasium
27 "F" Club
28 Swimming Pool








TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE
Map of the Campus ......... ... 79
Summer Session Calendar ... ... 82
Officers of Administration ........... ........... 83
F aculty .......................... ... ..... ... 84
Adm mission .................... .... .. 88
General Inform ation ... ......... ...... .... .. 90
Placement Bureau ........................ .... 91
Laboratory School ................................ 91
Reading Laboratory and Clinic -....-..-...... ... 94
Extension of Certificates and Certification . 95
Expenses ................................. ..... ..---.... -- -. -97
Rooming Facilities ...... .......... ...... 98
G general R regulations .. ..... ..... .... .. ................ . .... ....... .. 101
Colleges and Schools .................................... ....... ... ... . 102
Gradate School .......-...... ........ 102
College of Agriculture ...................... ...... 103
College of Arts and Sciences ........... ..... .... 103
College of Business Administration 105
College of Education .. .................. . ............... 107
General College .......... ...... ........ ... 110
College of Law ................. ....... 11
School of Pharmacy ......... 111
Advisory Service ...........--.....- ... ...... .. .................. ... ...... 112
Departments of Instruction ..... ..... ............... ......... 113
General College Courses 113, 133
Agricultural Economics .. ...... 115
Agricultural Engineering ........ .. .. ........ 115
Agronomy ........................ .. 115
Animal Industry ........ .. .. ....... 115
Bacteriology .............. .... .. . ........ 115
Bible ................................ ... ............. 115
Biology .......................... .... .. 116, 134
Business Education .... .. ..... ...... .... 116, 134
Chemistry .............................................. ....... ..... 116, 134
Civil Engineering ........................................ .. ........... 117
Economics and Business Administration .. .............. 117, 135
E education ....... ... .. ......... ............. ................... 119, 137
English ..................... ..... ...... ...... .... ...... 122, 137
French ......................... ...... .. 124, 138
General Science -.. ...~......... ......... .... ... ........................ 124, 138
G geography ........ ... .... .... ............................... 124
G eology ..................... ....................... ............. ... 138
Health and Physical Education ......... 125, 139
H history ......................... ...................... ... ..... ........ 125, 139
Industrial Engineering ........ .. ... ........ .......... 126
Journalism .................. ........... 126
L aw ....................... .............................. 127
M them atics ........ .. ................ ...... 128, 140
Music .................... ................... 129, 140
Pharmacology ........ ................................. 129
Pharm acy .......... .................................. 129
Philosophy ......... ......... 129
Physics ..................... 129, 140
Political Science .. ............... 129, 140
Poultry Husbandry .................................. 130
P sychology ............. .. ..... .................... 130, 141
School Art ..... .......... ... ..... 131, 141
Social Studies ................... 131, 141
Sociology ................. ......................... 131, 141
Spanish ..................... .. ........ ............... ..... 132, 142
S speech .......................... .. ..................................... ........... 132, 142
Questions and A nsw ers ......... ................. ............... ......................... .... ... ........ 143
M ail R registration ...................... ........................ .. .... ................... .......... .... ............ 145
Residence A application Blanks .... .......... ................ ........................ ......................... 147, 149
A application B lank ......... ........... .. ................ ........ ............................... ................ ... 151
[80]











IMPORTANT NOTICE TO SUMMER SESSION STUDENTS

SAVE TIME-Each student who expects to attend the 1941
Summer Session must fill out the Application Blank on page
151. Previous attendance at the University of Florida does
NOT waive this requirement. Fill out the Blank and send it
to the Office of the Registrar if there is any possibility of your
attending the 1941 Summer Session. Sending in the Blank
involves no obligation on your part, but it will considerably
reduce the time it takes to register, if you do decide to come.
If the Blank is received before June 1 the Registrar will mail
forms which will permit registration by mail, completely elim-
inating the necessity of standing in long lines on Registration
Day.

Upon request, additional blanks will be supplied by the
Registrar.

READ QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ON PAGES 143-144.




IMPORTANT INFORMATION
After arriving at the University:
1. If dormitory room assignment has been made, women students will secure keys from
Murphree Hall Office, located at the southeast corner of that hall; men students and
married couples will secure keys from the Office of the Director of Residence, Fletcher
Hall, Section F, adjoining Fletcher Lounge. If you have not yet made a reservation
but wish to do so, women students should call at Murphree Hall Office, men students
and married couples at Fletcher Hall Office.
2. For off-campus rooming accommodations, see Dean of Students, 105 Language Hall.
3. Cafeteria meal tickets may be purchased from the Cashier, 102 Language Hall, or at
the cigar counter, Cafeteria.
4. For information concerning social activities among women students, or on any matter of
interest to women, see the Dean of Women, 105 Language Hall, or Murphree Hall Office.


[81 ]








SUMMER SESSION CALENDAR
1941 FIRST SUMMER TERM
June 9-June 14 .................................. Registration for First Summer Term.
June 14, Saturday. 1 p.m. ................ Placement Tests, Room 208, Science Hall.
June 16, Monday. 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m..... Registration for First Summer Term. Late registration
fee of $5 for registering after 3:30 p.m. on this date.
June 17, Tuesday, 7 a.m. .................... Classes begin.
June 18, Wednesday, 4 p.m ............ Last day for registration for the First Summer Term.
and for adding courses.
June 23-July 12 ............. ................... Short course for Agricultural Extension Workers.
June 28, Saturday, noon .................... Last day for making application for a degree that is
to be awarded at the end of the First Summer Term.
June 28, Saturday .............................. Last day for students to apply to the Dean to be desig-
nated as Honor Students.
July 4, Friday ...................................... Holiday.
July 7, Monday .................................... Last day for graduate students, graduating at the end
of the term, to submit theses to the Dean.
July 12, Saturday ............................. Last day for students expecting to receive degrees at
end of term to complete correspondence courses.
July 16. Wednesday ........................... Last day for filing application for extension of cer-
tificate.
Last day for dropping courses without receiving grade
of E and being assessed failure fee.
July 21-July 24 ................................ Registration for Second Summer Term.
July 23, Wednesday, noon ................. Grades for all students expecting to receive degrees at
end of term are due in the Office of the Registrar.
July 24, Thursday .............................. Faculty meetings to pass upon candidates for degrees.
July 25, Friday, noon ................... First Summer Term ends. All grades are due in the
Office of the Registrar by 4 p.m.
July 26, Saturday, 10 a.m. .............. Conferring of degrees.
SECOND SUMMER TERM
July 26, Saturday, 1 p.m. .................... Placement Tests, Room 208, Science Hall.
July 28, Monday, 8 a.m.-12 noon ...... Registration for Second Summer Term. Late registra-
tion fee of $5 for registering after noon on this date.
July 29, Tuesday, 7 a.m ................... Classes begin.
July 30, Wednesday, 4 p.m. ................ Last day for registration for the Second Summer Term,
and for adding courses.
August 1, Friday, 4 p.m. .................... Last day for applications to take Comprehensive Ex-
aminations in August.
August 2, Saturday, noon .................. Last day for making application for a degree that is to
be awarded at the end of the Second Summer Term.
August 7, Thursday ............................ Last day for students to apply to the Dean to be desig-
nated as Honor Students.
August 9, Saturday .............................. Last day for graduate students, graduating at the end
of the term, to submit theses to the Dean.
August 14. Thursday .......................... Last day for students expecting to receive degrees at
end of term to complete correspondence courses.
August 20, Wednesday, 4 p.m. .......... Last day for filing application for extension of certifi-
cate. Last day for dropping courses without receiv-
ing grade of E and being assessed failure fee.
August 27, Wednesday, noon ............ Grades for all students expecting to receive degrees at
end of term are due in the Office of the Registrar.
August 28, Thursday .......................... Faculty meetings to pass upon candidates for degrees.
August 29, Friday, noon .................... Second Summer Term ends. All grades are due in the
Office of the Registrar by 4 p.m.
August 30, Saturday, 10 a.m............. Commencement Convocation.
[82]







OFFICERS OF 11) 111 WSIRT1110N


OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION

JOHN J. TICERT, M.A. (Oxon), LL.D.. Ed.D., D.C.L., D.Litt., L.H.D., President of the
University
JAMES WILLI.AM NORMAN, PIh.l)., Di-rector of the Suinner Sesion; Actilng D)ean f the Grad-
uate School, Second Term
ROIERT COLDER IBEATY, M.A., Dcan of Students, Second Term
HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S., Dean of the University
ROLAND BYERLY EUTSLER, Ph.D., Acting Dean of the College of Bnsiness Administration,
Second Term
KLEIN HARRISON GRAHAM, Business Manager
H. HAROLD HUME, D.Sc., Dean of the College of Agriculture
ELIZABETH SKINNER JACKSON, B.A., Dean of Women, First Term
RICHARD SADI.ER JOHNSON, B S.P., Registrar
WINSTON WOODARD LITTLE, M.A., Dean of the General College
WALTER JEFFRIES MIATHERLY, M.A., Dean of the College of Busiuein \ilninistration First
Term
ZENA MORIELL, Dean of Women, Second Term
JOSEPH EDWIN PRICE, B.A.E., Acting Dean of Students. First Term
GLENN BALLARD SIIMONS, Ph.D., Acting Dean of the College of Education
THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School, First Term
GEORGE CLARENCE TILLMAN, M.D., F.A.C.S., University Physician
HARRY RAYMOND TRUSLER, M.A., LL.D., Dean of the College of Law
JOSEPH WEIL, M.S., Dean of the College of Engineering
WILLIAM HAROLD W'ILSON. Ph.D., Acting Dean of the College of Arts and 'Siiince,

ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION

LEWIS F. BLALOCK, M.A., Director of Admissions
JOHN BROWARD CULPEPPER, M.A.E., Acting Principal, P. K. Yonge Lalbratory School
J. B. GOODSON, Cashier
ROSA GRIMES, R.N., Head Nurse
JOHN VREDENRURG MCQUITTY, Ph.D., University Examiner
DONALD RAY MIATTHEWS, B.A., Director of Florida Union
CLAUDE LEON 3IURPHREE, B.A., F.A.G.O., University Organist
BURTON J. OTTE, M.S., Curator, Chemistry Department
IRENE ERSKINE PERRY, B.S., Administrative Assistant, Office of the Summer Session
EDITH PATTI PITTS, Administrative Assistant to the President
THOMAS JAMES PRICE, Auditor
HAROLD CLARK RIKER, M.A.. Acting Director of Residence
NORMA HAWES WARREN, B.S., Assistant to Dean of Women
HOMER D. WINGATE, B.S.B.A., Auditor, Custodian Funds

UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

NANCY KAIRlnES BIRD, B.A., B.S. in L.S.. Periodicals and Binding Librarian
SunDI E. CIRES, Order Librarian
SAIIH GRACE DICKINSON, B.A., B.S. in L.S., Librarian. P. K. Yonge Laboinratior School
EFFIE DAVIS FLANAGAN, B.S., B.A. in L.S., Assistant in Circulation
JESSIE D. HENDERSIOT, B.A., B.A. in L.S., Assistant in Circulation
WALTEIl BARNARD HILL, B.A. in L.S., M.A., Librarian








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMAllER SESSION


ELIZABETH THORNE JERNIGAN, B.A., Head of Catalog Department
EUNICE ELIZABETH KEEN, B.A., B.A. in L.S., Assistant Cataloger
MARY FRANCES HAWKINS, B.A., B.A. in L.S., Assistant in Catalog and Reference Department
D. GWENDOLYN LLOYD, B.A., B.S. in L.S., Head of Reference Department
CHARLOTTE NEWTON, B.A., M.A. in L.S., Head of Circulation Department
IVAN E. ODLE, B.S., LL.B., Assistant Librarian, College of Law
I.A ROUNTREE PRIDGEN, Librarian, College of Iaw

FACULTY 1941 SUMMER SESSION

MABEi. F. \LTSTETTER. Ph.D.. Social Studies
MONTGCOMERY DRUMMOND ANDERSON. Ph.D., Economics
ERNEST GEORGE ATKIN, Ph.D., French
ROLLIN SALISBURY ATWOOD, Ph.D., Geography: Education
GEORGE FECHTIG BAUGHMAN, B.S.B.A., LL.B., Economics and Business Administration
TOMPSIE BAXTER, M.A., Education
DAVI MIIERS BEIGHTS, Ph.D., C.P.A., Business Administration
GEORGE ROBERT BENTLEY, M.A., Comprehensive Course C-1, Man and the Social World;
History
TRUMAN C. BIHAM, Ph.D., Economics
JACK BOHANNON, M.A., School Art
MARGARET WHITE BOUTELLE, M.A., Education
NORMA SMITH BRISTOW, M.A., Education
JOSEPH BRUNET, Ph.D., French
CHARLES FRANCIS BYERS, Ph.D., Education; General Science
ARCHIE FAIRLY CARR, Ph.D., Comprehensive Course C-6, Man and the Biological World
CLEVA JOSEPHINE CARSON, M.S., School Music
WILLIAM RICHARD CARROLL, Ph.D., Bacteriology
WILLIAM STANMORE CAWTHON, M.A., Political Science
STELLA STEWART CENTER, M.A., Litt.D., Education
FREDERICK WILLIAM CONNER, M.A., Comprehensive Course C-5, The Humanities; English
HENRY PHILIP CONSTANT, LMA., Speech
EUNICE KATHERINE CRABTREE, Ph.D., Education
ALFRED CRAGO, Ph.D., Education
JOHN BROWARD CULPEPPER, M.A., Education
MANNING JULIAN DAUER, Ph.D., Comprehensive Course C-l, Man and the Social World;
Political Science
JAMES WESTBAY DAY, M.A., J.D., Law
SIGISMOND DERUDESHEIM DIETTRICH, Ph.D., Economics
HOWARD BURROWS DOLBEARE, B.A., Economics and Business Administration
CHARLES HAROLD DONOVAN, Ph.D., Economics and Business Administration
ELSIE MARGARET DOUTHETT, M.A., Health and Physical Education
ANITA SHEMWELL DOWELL, Ph.D., Education
VERA DUMAS, M.A., Education
CHARLOTTE DUNN, M.A., Education
CHARLES LIVINGSTON DURRANCE, JR., M.A.E., Education
PAUL EDDY, M.A., Education
RICHARD ARCHER EDWARDS, Ph.D., Comprehensive Course C-2. Man and the Physical World
WILLIAM THOMAS EDWARDS, Ph.D., Education
WINSTON WALLACE EHRMANN, Ph.D., Sociology







FACULTY


NORMAN ELLSWORTH ELIASON, Ph.D., English
JOHN GRADY ELDRIDGE, M.A., Economics
ELMER JACOB EMIG, M.A., Journalism
ROLAND BYERLY EUTSLER, Ph.D., Economics
LESTER COLLINS FARRIS, M.A., English
PERRY ALBERT FOOTE, Ph.D., Pharmacy and Pharmacology
PAUL BRECK FOREMAN, Ph.D., Sociology
GEORGE GILLISPIE Fox, Ph.D., Comprehensive Course C-5, The IHlmanities; Philosopli
LEONARD WILLIAM GADDUM, Ph.D., Comprehensive Course C-2, Man and the Social World
EDWARD WALTER GARRIS, Ph.D., Education
PAUL ERNEST GEISENHIIOF, M.A., Speech
Huco GIDUz, B.A., Education
JAMEs DAVID GLUNT, Ph.D., History
WILLIAM Louis GOETTE, M.A.E., Education; General Science
ELEANOR KUHLMAN GREEN, B.A.E., Education
SIDNEY BARTLETT HALL, Ed.D., Education
PAUL LAMONT HANNA, Ph.D., Comprehensive Course C-5, The Humanities: Hitor.
MAURICE HALPERIN, Docteur de L'Universitd de Paris, Spanish
OLIVER HOWARD HAUPTIANN, Ph.D., Spanish
JAMES DOUGLAS HAYGOOD, Docteur de L'Universit6 de Paris, Education
FRED HARVEY HEATH, Ph.D., Chemistry
RAY LORENZO HEFFNER, Ph.D., English
LEON NESBITT HENDERSON, M.A.E., Education
ELMER DUMOND HINCKLEY, Ph.D., Psychology
CHARLES F. HOBAN, JR., Ph.D., Education
HORTON HOLCOMBE HOBBS, M.S., Comprehensive Course C-6, \lan and the Biological World
ARTHUR ARIEL HOPKINS, M.A., Comprehensive Course C-3. Heading. Speaking and Writing;
Speech
LILLIAN PAGE HOUGH, M.A., Education
THEODORE HUNTINGTON HUBBELL, Ph.D., Biology
HUBER CHRISTIAN HURST, M.A., LL.B., Business Administration
RICHARD ELKINS HYDE, Ph.D., Education
VESTS TWIGGS JACKSON, Ph.D., Chemistry
JOHN EVANDER JOHNSON, B.D., M.A., Bible
KATHLEEN TENILLE KING, I.A., Education
HAROLD LORAINE KNOWLES, Ph.D., Physics
FRANKLIN WESLEY KOKOMOOR, Ph.D., Mathematics
JOSEPH HARRISON KUSNER, Ph.D., Mathematics; Education
AGcu. McKENZIE LAIRD, M.A., Comprehensive Course C-1. \lan and the Social World;
Political Science
GLADIS O'NEAL LAIRD, M.A.E., Education
GEORGE LEIGHTON LAFUZE, Ph.D., History
LILLIAN MAGDALEN LAWRENCE, B.M.E., School Music
JAMLS MILLER LAKE, Ph.D., History
WINSTON WOODARD LITTLE, M.A., Comprehensive Coure C-41, Man and His Thinking:
Education
CLIFFORD PIERSON LYONS, Ph.D., English
SAMUEL JOSEPH MCALLISTER, B.A., Health and Physical Education
JOHN BERRY MCFERRIN, Ph.D., Economics
SAM W. MCINNIS, M.A., Mathematics








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


IDA RUTH MCLENDON, MI.A.E., Social Studies
WILLIAM ALLEN _McRAE, JR., B.A., B.Litt., Juris (Oxon.). J.1).
JOHN MILLER IACLACHLAN, Ph D., Sociology; Education
WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY. M.A.. Economics
ARTHUR RAYMOND MEAD. Ph.D.. Education
HELEN E. MELLISH, Ph.D., Education
INGORIE VAUSE IIKELL, B.M., Education
RUSSELL ELLIOTT MILLER. M.A.. Comprehensive Cournse C-1. Mlan and the Social World;
History
JOHN IAYNES M1ORMaAN, M.A., Business Education
EDGAR L. IORPHET, Ph.D., Education
ALTON CHESTER MORRIS. Ph.D.. Comprehensive Course C-3. Reading, Speaking and Writing:
English
CHARLES ISAAC MOSIER, Ph.D., Psychology
CHARLES EUGENE -MOUNTs. I.A.. Comprehensive Ciirse C-3. Heading. Speaking and Writ-
ing: English
ROBERT RAY MULLIGAN, M.S.. Comprehensive Course C-2. Man and the Physical World
CLAUDE LEON \IURPHREE, B.A., F.A.G O., Comprehensive Course C-5. The Humanities
JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D., Education
HAZEN EDWARD NUTTER, M.A., Education
AUDREY PACKHAM, M.A., Education
MARY PALMER, B.S., School Art
REMIBERT WALLACE PATRICK, Ph.D., History: Edurcaliin
ANCIL NEWTON PAYNE, Ph.D., History
RUTH BEATRICE PEELER, M.A., Education
WILLIAM SANFORD PERRY, M.S., Physics
CECIL GLENN PHIPPS, Ph.D., Mathematics
EUNICE JEAN PIEPER, M.A.E., Education
ZAREH MECUERDITCH PIRENIAN, M.S., Mathematics
CASH BLAIR POLLARD, Ph.D., Chemistry
EARL PATRICK POWERs, B.S.B.A.. Business Administration
EDWARD SCHAUMBERC QUADE, Ph.D., Mathematics
JULIAN WAYNE REITZ, M.S., Agricultural Economics
CHARLES ARCHIBALD ROBERTSON, M.A., English
FRAZIER ROGERS, M.S.A., Agricultural Engineering
JAMES SPEED ROGERS, Ph.D., Biology; Geology
ELLIS BENTON SALT, Ed.D., Health and Physical Education
IARLEY BAKWEL SHERMAN, Ph.D., Comprehensive Course C-6, Man and the Biological
World; Biology
JAMES FLETCHER SHIVLER, M.S. in Engr., Civil Engineering
GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS, Ph.D., Education
THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D., Mathematics
KENNETH GORDON SKAGGS. M.A.. Comprehensive Course C-3, Reading. Speaking and Writ-
ing; English
DEAN SLAGLE, M.A., LL.B., Law
EULAH MAE SNIDER, B.A., B.S. in L.S., Education
HERMAN EVERETTE SPIVEY, Ph.D., English; Education
OSWALD C. R. STACEBERC, B.S. in Arch., Comprehensive Course C-5, The Humanities
IRENE MILLER STEELE, M.A., Education
BILLIE KNAPP STEVENS, M.A., Health and Physical Education







FACULTY


GRACE ADAMS STEVENS, M.A., Social Studies: Education
\lODt L. STONE, Al.A., Education
THOMAS B. STnou', Ph.D.. English
DANIEL CRAMER SWANSON, I'l.I)., General Sciences: Education
CLAREIhCE JOHN TESELLE, A.B.. LL.I1., Law
ROY IEDWARDS TEW, B.A.E., Speech
CECIL WILFORD THOMASSON, Ph.D., Education
HARRY RAYMOND TRUSLER, 1..\., LL.1I., Lav
FRANK WALDO TUTTLE, Ph.D., Economics
\LBERT CLARENCE V'aN I)USE', .A.. Psychology
T. GEORGE 'AAI.KER, MI..., Education
HlowARIu KEEFER WALLACE. Ph.D.. Comprehensive Course C-6, Man and the Biological World
FRANCIS DUDLEY WILLIAMS, Ph.D., Comprehensive Course C-2, Man and the Physical World
OSBORNE WILLIAIS, Ph.D., Psychology
JAMES LARRYMORE WILSON, M.A.. English
WILLIAM HAROLD WILSON, Ph.D.. Comprehensive Course C-41, MAan and His Thinking;
Education
JACOB HOOPER WISE, Ph.D., Education
DEAN AMORY WORCESTER, Ph.D., Education

GRADUATE AND STUDENT ASSISTANTS

RuBY IRENE ADAMS, B.A., Education
GEOHGE THOMSON ARMSTRONG, B.S., Chenlistla
JOHN HERBERT BEACH, JR., B.A., English
LEwis BERNER, M.S., Biology
EDMOND DARRELL CASHWELL, lathemnatics
LA.RENCE CADE DAVIS, Education
JAMES ROUSSEAU DICKINSON, B.A., English
JOSIUA CLIFTON DICKINSON, JR., B.S., Biology
GRAYSON IHARTER ENSIGN, Education
CHARLES SHELBY FORD, Education
GEORGE MILLS HARPER, B.A., English
PAUL REVERE HITCHCOCK, B.A.E., lBusiness Education
JAMES AQUILA MARTIN, B.F.A., School \rt
WILLIAM JAMES MILLER. B.A., Education
WALTER ELMER MILLETT, I.S., Physics
tATIIUR WILLIAM NL\VETT, J.R., Education
BESSIE AMIANDA NORTON, \1.A.E., School Art
HARRY BENTON PILLANS, B.A.E., Education
OWEN ORLANDO PILLANS, B.A.E., Education
GEORGE HENRY POURNELLE, B.S., Biology
JAMES BEVERLY REDD. B.S., Chemistry
FRANCEs SAWYER SLuJH, School Music
EDWARD ALMOND STEPHENSON, Bl.A., English
\VIRGIL EARL STRICKLAND, B.A.E., Education
\L.AN PATTERSON STUCKEY, B.S., English
JOIN VINCENT VILKAITIS, Education
JOHN DURHAM WING, JR., B.A., English
JAMES NATIIANIEL YOUNG, Education







BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ADMISSION

Students who give evidence of being able to profit by college work will be admitted
to the University of Florida Summer Session. It should be noted, however, that NO
CREDIT will be allowed unless our specific admission requirements are satisfied. These
requirements are:

1. For students who are entering college for the first time.
See Admission to the General College.

2. For students who are transferring from another institution and who expect
to receive a degree from the University of Florida.
Official transcripts sent directly to the Registrar from all institutions
previously attended. (Teachers' certificates or transcripts presented
hy students will not suffice.)

3. For students who regularly attend another college or university and who
are attending the University of Florida Summer Session only for the purpose
of securing credits to be transferred to the institution regularly attended.
A statement of Honorable Dismissal from the institution last at-
tended. (Blanks for this purpose may be secured from the Office
of the Registrar, 110 Language Hall.)

4. For students who wish to enter the College of Law.
See Admission to the College of Law.

.S. For students who wish to enter the Graduate School.
See Admission to the Graduate School.

It is the student's responsibility to supply the proper credentials as outlined in num-
bers 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 above. NO TRANSCRIPTS FOR COLLEGE CREDIT WILL BE
ISSUED FOR ANY PERSON FAILING TO COMPLY WITH THE ABOVE.
Students who have previously attended the University of Florida may continue in
the college in which they were registered. Transfer students with at least 64 acceptable
semester hours credit of advanced standing may be admitted to one of the colleges or
professional schools of the University.
All other students register regularly in the General College.

ADMISSION TO THE GENERAL COLLEGE

The following items will be considered in the admission of students to the General
College:

1. Graduation from high school. Graduation from high school is required, although
no specific high school units are required.
2. Consistency of the high school record.
3. Achievement in high school.
4. Personal qualities.








ADMISSION


5. Recommendation of high school principal.
6. Standing on Placement Tests.

All applicants should submit the Application Blank at the back of this bulletin, and
in addition should have an Application for Admission blank sent to the Registrar. The
latter may be secured from high school principals of the State. Applicants for admission
from other states may secure an Application for Admission blank by writing the Registrar.
The Placement Tests will be given at 1 P. M., Saturday, June 14. in 208 Science Hall.
All applicants for admission to the General College are required to take thles- tests before
registration.
ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE OF LAW

Applicants for admission to the College of Law must be eighteen years of age and
must have received a bachelor's degree in a college or university of approved standing,
or must have fully satisfied the academic requirements for a degree in a combined course
in the University of Florida. The College of Arts and Sciences and the College of
Business Administration offer such a course. Evidence of this work must be presented
to the Registrar of the University on or before the date on which the applicant wishes
to register.
During the summer session, students in good standing in any member school of the
Association of American Law Schools will be admitted as students but not as candidates
for degrees unless our entrance requirements are met.

ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

To be admitted to the Graduate School an applicant must be a graduate of a standard
college or university and have a foundation in the major subject sufficient in quantity and
quality to be satisfactory to the department in which the student proposes to major.
A complete transcript of all undergraduate and graduate work must be transmitted to
the Office of the Registrar before the date of registration.

THE COLLEGE IN WHICH YOU SHOULD REGISTER

1. Persons who have less than two years college work will register in the General
College.

2. Persons with more than two years of college work but who have not yet received
the Bachelor's degree will register in one of the Colleges of the Upper Iivision.
See pages 103 to 111.

3. Persons who have received the Bachelor's degree and who wish graduate credit
(credit that may apply on the master's or doctor's degree either at the University
of Florida or elsewhere) must register in the Graduate School.
All persons who have the Bachelor's degree need not register in the Graduate
School, hut no graduate credit can ever be given for work completed while registered
in another college of the University.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SEiSSIOA


GENERAL INFORMATION

ENTERTAINMENTS AND PLAYS
Adequate facilities for entertainments and plays are provided in the University Audi
torium, which has a seating capacity of approximately 1800. In addition to the main
University Auditorium, the auditoriums in Florida Union and in the P. K. Yonge Laboratory
School will be available. Stress is placed upon performances by the students in plays
and musical entertainments being produced from time to time by the staffs of the depart-
ments of Speech and Music.

RELIGIOUS AND SOCIAL LIFE
The moral and religious atmosphere of the Summer Session is wholesome. The leading
religious denominations have attractive places of worship, and students are welcomed at
every service. Transportation to and from church is provided for students who will
attend. Frequent devotional services are held in the University Auditorium in connection
with the Student Assembly.

THE FLORIDA UNION BUILDING
The Florida Union is operated as an official social center for the campus. Reading.
recreation, and lounging rooms will supply adequate facilities for social activities and for
comfortable relaxation.
THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY
All students and faculty members are expected to attend the General Assembly, which
will be held in the University Auditorium at hours scheduled below. Important announce-
ments will be made at the General Assembly, for the observance of which students will
be held responsible.
8:30 A. M. Wednesday, June 18
10:00 A. MI. Wednesday. July 2
8:30 A. M. Wednesday, July 30
10:00 A. M. Wednesday, August 13

SWIMMING POOL
The facilities of the swimming pool will he available, without charge to students reg-
istered in the Summer Session. Those interested should see Mr. Genovar. Gymnasium. The
pool will be open daily, except Monday, from 1:00 to 6:00 P.M.

SOCIETIES AND CLUBS

PHI KAPPA PHI
A chapter of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi was established at the University in
1912. To be eligible for membership, a student must previously have earned at the Uni-
versity at least thirty semester hours credit, must have been guilty of no serious breaches of
discipline, and must stand among the upper tenth of all candidates for degrees. Candidates
for election to Phi Kappa Phi must have attained an honor point average of at least 3.00
(B) on all scholastic work. If a student comes within the quota for his college, an average
of 3.00 assures his eligibility, but if he does not come within the quota. it is necessary that
he have an average of 3.30 or higher.







GENERAL INFORMATION


KAPPA DELTA PI

Kappa Delta Pi is an honorary education fraternity, in which only juniors and seniors
in the College of Education are eligible for membership.

PIII BETA KAPPA

Phi Beta Kappa was established on the campus of the University of Florida in 1938.
It is the oldest national fraternity, being founded in 1776. In conformity with the national
objectives of the society, the University of Florida chapter restricts election to the College
of Arts and Sciences. Not more than 10% of the senior class graduating in each semester,
including both graduating classes of summer session, is eligible for election.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Important announcements will be made on the bulletin boards in Florida Union, Peabody
Hall and Language Hall. Students should read these daily. Students are responsible for
all announcements made in the General Assembly, on the official bulletin boards, and in
the Orange and Blue Bulletin.

ORANGE AND BLUE BULLETIN

An official mimeographed bulletin is published every other day during the Summer
Session. It appears on all bulletin boards and carries notices of changes in schedule,
meetings, lost and found articles, etc. Students and faculty members are responsible for
observance of all official notices published in the Bulletin.

THE PLACEMENT BUREAU

The Placement Bureau of the College of Education attempts to render a public service.
This is not mere mechanical routine of finding teaching positions for graduates; the Bureau
considers the welfare of the school concerned, and tries to get the right person in the right
teaching position.
There is no service fee for University graduates. Students who wish the help of the
Bureau may arrange an interview with the Director and submit complete credentials. On
request, this information is sent to school officials of the State.
Many specific requests are received from district trustees and county school boards.
Every effort is made to furnish these officials with information that will enable them to
select the teachers most likely to succeed in the schools concerned.
Communications in regard to teaching positions should be addressed to the Director of
the Teachers' Placement Bureau, College of Education, University of Florida, Gainesville.

LABORATORY SCHOOL

The P. K. Yonge Laboratory School will conduct demonstration classes in the Kinder-
garten, Elementary and Secondary School Grades during the first term of the Summer
Session from 8:30 A. M. to 11:20 A. M. Provision will be made for seven groups: Kinder-
garten, combined first and second grades, combined third and fourth grades, combined fifth








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


and sixth grades, combined seventh and eighth grades, combined ninth and tenth grades.
combined eleventh and twelfth grades.
Application for enrollment should be made to the Director of the Laboratory School
as soon as possible since the number who may be accommodated is limited.
Pupils will register on Monday, June 16, in Room 120, Yonge Building, from 8:30 to
11:30 and from 1:30 to 4:00. There are no registration fees for the demonstration school.
Classes will begin Tuesday, June 17. at 8:30 A. M.

P. K. YONGE SCHOOL LIBRARY

The P. K. Yonge Laboratory School Library will be open for use of teachers attending
the Summer Session. This library contains about 5000 books for boys and girls from the
kindergarten through the twelfth grade. These books are available for use in the library
only and may not be checked out.
The library will be open during the following hours: 8:30 A. M. to 12:00 noon and
1:30 P. M. to 5:00 P.M.; Saturdays: 9:00 A.M. to 12:00 noon.
The librarian will post hours when she will be available for conference on individual
library problems. Teachers and principals are invited to ask for whatever help they
may need.
FLORIDA CURRICULUM LABORATORY

The Florida Curriculum Laboratory is located on the third floor of the P. K. Yonge
Building. This Laboratory is made possible by the cooperation of the Florida State Depart-
ment of Education, the College of Education, and the Laboratory School of the University
of Florida. Books and other curriculum materials used in the Florida Program for the
Improvement of Instruction are available here.

DOE MUSEUM

The Doe Museum connected with the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School, is located on the
third floor of the P. K. Yonge Building. The Museum will be open from 9:00 A. M. to
4:00 P.M. daily, except Saturday, and from 9:00 A.M. to 12:00 noon on Saturday, from
June 10 through July 31. This Museum houses a unique collection prepared by the Curator.
Charles E. Doe.
THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES

Four libraries on the campus make up the University Library system-the Main Library,
the libraries of the Experiment Station, the Law College, and the P. K. Yonge School.
The Main Library building houses over 150,000 books. It has two large reading rooms.
Those books assigned for reading in the General College and for Upper-Division students
are in the Reading Room on the ground floor. In the Reading Room on the second floor
are the current magazines, the books of reference, and the card catalog. In the book stack
there are forty-eight carrels for the use of graduate students in their research work.

STUDENTS' DEPOSITORY

For the convenience and protection of students while in residence at the University, funds
may he deposited with the Cashier. A service charge of twenty-five cents is made on each
account, per term.








GEA ERAL VFORM.IA TIO.


LOAN FUNDS

The Summer Session is able to make small loans to a limited number of women students
through the establishment of certain loan funds-the Florida State Scholarship Fund, the
College Girls' Club Scholarship Loan Fund, the Elizabeth Skinner Jackson Loan Fund, the
R. A. Gray Loan Fund, the Doyle E. Carlton Loan Fund, the W. M. Sheats Memorial Loan
Fund, and the Harold Colee Loan Fund. Loans are governed by the following regulations.

(1) Applicant must be a teacher in the State of Florida.
(2) Applicant must have a position for the succeeding term of school.
(3) Applicant must be in need of aid.
(4) Applicant must apply for loan at least two weeks before opening of a Summer Term.
(5) Application must be made directly to the Director of the Summer Session.
(6) Applicant must be recommended by two school officials of the county in which she is
teaching at the time of application.
(7) Loans are to be used for attendance at the University of Florida Summer Session.
(8) Loans are made for a period not to exceed nine months.
(9) Loans bear interest at the rate of 6%, which is added to the principal fund.

Upon application to the Director of the Summer Session, blank forms for application
for a scholarship loan will be furnished.


TIE FLORIDA PROGRAM FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF SCHOOLS

The State Department of Education in cooperation with all the educational agencies of
the State has initiated and is carrying forward a many-sided program designed to improve
the learning experiences of Florida boys and girls. In developing this program, the State
Department has employed two methods: the preparation of materials and intensive work
with cooperating schools seeking to improve their school situations.
The Workshop, an educational medium used extensively and successfully by both the
Progressive Education Association and the Southern Association, as well as other institu-
tions, is utilized for the preparation of both the materials and the plans for improvement.
A Workshop is unique only in that it provides opportunities for individuals or whole school
faculties to work on particular problems of significance to them. All subject-matter fields
are called upon, much material is furnished, a special staff is provided and full-time work
on the problems at hand are some of the outstanding characteristics of this means of in-
struction.

THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA WORKSHOP

The University of Florida Workshop is a cooperative project of the University of Florida
and the State Department of Education. The primary purpose is to work with in-service
teachers and principals toward the solution of problems significant to them and toward the
improvement of total school programs. In carrying out the main purpose various groups








BULLETIN OF THE I/II ERSIT1 SII,1111ER SESSION


of school people have worked on different problems during the past two summers. Again.
for the summer of 1941, facilities and personnel of the University and the State Department
of Education will be made available to interested teachers and principals.
There will be available opportunities for total school faculties, who are working with
the State Department of Education and the University as Cooperating Schools, to consider
total school and individual teacher problems. Smaller numbers or individuals, in some cases.
from other schools, who seek to make plans for whole faculty consideration of the improve-
ment of the school program, may undertake such planning with the School Planning Group.
Members of the faculties of second and third year Cooperating Schools, as well as other
interested teachers and principals, will find available a variety of new courses offered in
each of the major subject fields: English. Mathematics, Science. and Social Studies. Teach-
ers of mathematics and science, who are interested in more preparation for the use of the
national defense materials, will he given opportunity to survey the technological practices
of industry. Finally, groups will le organized for the preparation of materials in the field
of audio-visual aids, social studies, and classroom reading materials.
This summer the Workshop will be organized with the cooperation of the College of
Education, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the College of Engineering. The staff of
instruction of the Workshop will have representatives of elementary, secondary, and admin-
istration fields and within the secondary field, representatives of each of the major subject
fields. As in the past, the Florida Curriculum Laboratory of the University will be available
as a work-center and a source of materials.


BOOK FAIR

During the week of June 27-July 3 the University Summer Session will sponsor a Book
Fair designed to present the best in books-those of popular literary merit, those of scholar-
ship, and those prepared primarily for textual use. Books about Florida and books written
by Floridians will be exhibited. There will be a daily program in connection with the Fair.
each program centering around some type of book or around the literature of some section
or region of immediate interest to Floridians. Creative writers-producers of well-known
literary reputation-and authorities on books and literature will appear on the program.
The Book Fair and the Reading Laboratory and Clinic will supplement one the other.


READING LABORATORY AND CLINIC

The University Summer Session will conduct a Reading Laboratory and Clinic during
the period of June 23-July 3. The purpose of the Laboratory will be to give instruction
in methods of teaching silent reading on all school levels, elementary, secondary, and college.
The subject will be presented by means of lectures, discussions, and laboratory practice.
The aim is two-fold: to outline a developmental program of reading for normal and superior
pupils and to present methods of teaching remedial reading. The program will include
instrumentation and other procedures practiced in outstanding school clinics. Dr. Stella S.
Center, Director of the New York University Reading Clinic, author of several texts, and
a nationally recognized authority on reading, will direct the work of the Institute.
Summer school registrants may enroll for the work of the Laboratory (Education 490)
as a part of their regular course work. Those who wish to register for this course only.







GENERAL I VFORMA TION


will follow the regular registration pricudime butt will be permitted a reduced registration
fee of $10.00. All who satisfactorily complete the work will receive two semester hours
credit.
Living accommodations--ooms in one of the University's new dormitories and meal, at
the University Cafeteria-may be secured at reasonable rates. For further information
about the Laboratory and Clinic or the Book Fair. write J. Hooper Wise, Language Hall,
University of Florida, Gainesville.


REGULATIONS GOVERNING EXTENSION OF CERTIFICATES

The following more important items govern the granting of extension certificates:

1. The certificate must be valid at the close of the Summer Term attended
and at the time formal application for extension is made.

2. The applicant must pass at least six semester hours in which no grade i-
below a "C".

3. No student will be granted an extension of certificate who does not apply for
the same. In case the student fails to apply on the Registration Card at
time of registration, request may be made to the Registrar, Room 110, Lan-
guage Hall, to have his application for extension properly recorded. A list
of those who have applied will be posted on the bulletin boards in Language
Hall and Peabody Hall not later than July 1 for the First Term and August
10 for the Second Term. In case of error in this list, students should report
to the Registrar. No student will he recommended for extension, whose
name does not appear on this list by July 10 for the First Term or August
14 for the Second Term. Students should indicate exactly the name that
appears on the certificate which they wish to have extended.

4. Certificates to be extended must he sent by registered mail to Colin English,
State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Tallahassee, Florida, within a
year after the close of the Summer Term. Otherwise extension will not be
granted.
CERTIFICATION OF TEACHERS

Persons desiring information concerning the certification of teachers are advised to write
the State Department of Education, Tallahassee, Florida, requesting Bulletin A on Cer-
tification of Teachers. This booklet gives all requirements for Graduate and Undergraduate
Certificates in the various fields as well as instructions concerning applications for cer-
tificates.
As a matter of information to students (and with emphasis on the point that certificates
are granted by the State Department of Education, not by the University) some of the
requirements listed in the Certificate Bulletin A, February, 1941, of the State Department
of Education are repeated below with the numbers of the courses offered by the University
which are designed to meet these requirements.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


REQUIREMENTS

For All Certificates:
Constitution

General Preparation
Health Education
Physical Education

For Elementary Certificates:
General Psychology
Educational Psychology
Child and Adolescent Psychology
History and Principles or Introduction
to Education
Elementary School Curriculum or
Methods of Teaching in the
Elementary School
Principles and Methods of Teaching
Reading
Children's Literature
Methods of Teaching Science in
Elementary School
Methods in Arithmetic
Methods in Social Studies
Geography
Observation and Practice Teaching
Public School Music
Public School Art
Health Education in Elementary Grades
Physical Education in Elementary
Grades
Penmanship

For Secondary Certificates:
English
Mathematics
Physical Education
Science:
Physical Sciences
Biological Sciences
Conservation

Social Studies:
History
Political Science
Economics
Sociology
Geography
Conservation
General


*UNIVERSITY COURSES MEETING THE
REQUIREMENTS


Two of the following: Hy. 301, 302, 303. 304,
331, 332; CP1. 13; Pcl. 313, 314
C-1 and C-3 and C-2 or C-6
En. 387 (or En. 103)
HP1. 363, 364, 373


C-41 or CPs. 43 (or Psy. 201)
En. 385 (or En. 207)
En. 386 (or En. 203 or 319)

CEn. 13 (or En. 101 or 102)


En. 471 (or En. 308)

En. 471 (or En. 209 or 221)
Eh. 391

Gl. 301 (or En. 209 or 222)
En. 471 (or En. 124)
Scl. 301 or 302
C-2 or Courses in Gpy.
En. 405 or En. 421-2 (or En. 253)
Msc. courses
Pc. courses
HP1. 373

HPI. 373
BEn. 97 (or Hg. 101)


C-3 and courses in CEh. and Eh.
C-42 and courses in CMs. and Ms.
Courses in HPI.

C-2, G1. 317, Courses in Ps. and Cy.
C-6, G1. 318, Courses in Bly. and Bty.
C-1 or C-2 or C-6 or Gpy. 385 or Gpy. 387
or Es. 381 or Es. 382

Courses in CHy. and Hy.
Courses in CP1. and Pcl.
Courses in CEs. and Es.
Courses in CSy. and Sy.
Courses in Gpy. and Es. 381, 385
See Science
C-1 will be counted as 8 of the total hours
required but will not reduce the specific
requirements.


*Based upon present offerings. Discontinued courses which will meet the requirements are
shown in parentheses.







EXPENSES


COUISE. IN TIAI)E AND INDUSTRIAL AND DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION
DAYTONA BEACH, FLORIDA

Under the joint sponsorship of the University of Florida and Florida State Department
of Education, a group of undergraduate ant graduate courses leading to a major in Trade
and Industrial and Distributive Education will be offered, as an integral part of the Summer
Session, at the Seabreeze High School, Daytona Beach, Florida.
These courses will be conducted in three terms of three weeks each: June 11 to July 3.
July 3 to July 24 and July 24 to August 14. Classes will meet six days a week two hours
a day. Tile maximum load a student will be permitted to carry is four semester hours.
This service is offered primarily for Trade and Industrial and Distributive Education
teachers and only the following classes of students will be admitted:

1. Those actually engaged in teaching Trade and Industrial and Distributive Educa-
tion or vocational courses subsidized from Smith-Hughes or George-Deen funds;
2. Novice or apprentice teachers meeting all requirements of the State Plan for
Trade and Industrial and Distributive teachers with the exception of the required
amount of teacher training;
3. County superintendents or school administrators exercising control over a sub-
sidized vocational program;
4. Directors, supervisors, and coordinators of vocational programs subsidized from
Smith-Hughes and George-Deen funds.

No courses other than those technical subjects of value to Trade and Industrial and
Distributive Education teachers will be offered and persons not falling in one of the above
groups will not be admitted.
To receive credit for these courses the regular admission requirements of the University
must be met and the approval of the State Supervisor of Trades and Industrial Education
secured.
Persons interested should request the Bulletin of the School of Trade and Industrial
Education.


EXPENSES

GENERAL FEES
Tuition .............................................................. ............ ..................... .................... ........ N one
Registration Fees (Florida Students, load of six credits or less) ......... ....... ......$18.00
Registration Fees (Non-Florida Students, load of six credits or less) ........................... 28.00
Registration Fees, College of Law (load of six credits ............................ ..28.00
-load of less than five credits $6.00 per credit and $3.00)
Late Registration Fee ....................... ............................. ...... ..... ....... .......... .. 5.00
Breakage Fee for Biology and Chemistry (unused portion refunded > ....... ................ 5.00
Extra Hour Fee- for each credit carried above six .............................................................. 1.00
Failure Fee, per credit hour (for General College students see paragraph below) ........ 2.50
(For any course failed since last time registration fees were paid)
Diploma Fee ................ ........... ......... .. ... ... .. ............ ...................... .. 5.00








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


FAILURE FEES AND EXAMINATION FEES FOR GENERAL COLLEGE STUDENTS
In lieu of a reexamination fee, a failure fee is charged for each failing grade a General
College student has received since he last paid registration fees. This fee is assessed
according to the following schedule and must be paid before the student is permitted to
continue in the University:
Each failing grade in C-l, C-2, C-3, C-41, C-42, C-5, or C-6 .............. 5.00
Each semester hour failed in all other courses ...................................... 2.50
A non-refundable fee of $1, payable on the day of application, is charged for each
application for a comprehensive examination. Applications are necessary only in case
the student is not currently registered in the course concerned.
These fees were assessed for the first time beginning with the 1937 Summer Session
and will be assessed at all subsequent registrations.

REFUND OF FEES
Fees paid in advance for room reservations will be refunded up to and including, but
not after June 1, for first term reservations, or July 14 for second term reservations.
If by Wednesday of the first week of each term students for any reason wish to with-
draw from the University, the fees paid, less a flat fee of $3, will be refunded. No refunds
will be made after this date.



ROOMING FACILITIES FOR MEN AND WOMEN

UNIVERSITY DORMITORIES FOR MEN AND WOMEN

All correspondence concerning dormitory reservations, as well as all dormitory reserva-
tion fees, should be sent to the Director of Residence, University of Florida, Gainesville.
All rooms in those dormitories open for the summer session are modern, of fire-proof
construction, and especially designed to give maximum comfort and accommodations to the
student. Each room or suite has a lavatory and built-in chifforobes. A bathroom, with
hot and cold showers and lavatories, is located on each floor of each section. Room furnish-
ings consist of single beds and mattresses, individual study tables, chairs, and wastebaskets.
Students must furnish linen, pillows and other things they may require for their own special
convenience. Easy chairs may be secured for a rental charge of fifty cents per term, and
electrical appliances, such as radio, iron, fan, etc.. may he used for a fee of twenty-five
cents each per term.
The dormitories are under the administration of the Director of Residence and the
Dean of Women. The University officials, with the assistance of the monitors or pre-
ceptresses assigned to each section, function to create in the dormitories an environment
most conducive for each student's obtaining maximum advantage from college life. Ade-
quate hot water, janitorial service, modern equipment and the superior construction of the
new dormitories insure exceptional comfort and accommodations for each dormitory student.

RESERVATIONS

Rooms may be reserved by application to the Director of Residence. (See page 147 for
application form.) All applications should be made as early as possible and must be
accompanied by the room reservation fee of $5.00 per person. This fee is not a payment








ROOMING FACILITIES


on room rent and may he refunded at the end of the residence period less any breakage
or miscellaneous charges. If room assignment has been made, no refund will le granted
on cancellations after June 1 for the first term, and after July 14 for the second term.
Rooms are rented for one or both terms of the Summer Session, and rent is due and
payable in advance at the beginning of each term. The dormitories will be open from
Saturday, June 14, to Saturday, August 30.
Women students will check in at the Murphree Hall Office, located at the southeast
corner of Murphree Hall. The men students and married couples will check in at the
Fletcher Hall Office, located in Section F, adjoining Fletcher Lounge.
Students not assigned a room will be given a refund on request. Students signing con-
tracts and being assigned rooms will not be granted a refund if they withdraw from the
dormitories during the period stipulated in the contract. Contracts for the dormitory rooms
are for the term, unless otherwise arranged.
Both men and women students will he accommodated in the University dormitories dur-
ing the Summer Session. Fletcher Hall, one of the two new dormitories, completed in
September, 1939, will be reserved for men; and Mlurphree Hall, the other new dormitory,
will be reserved for women. Sections A, B, and C of Sledd Hall (formerly New Dormitory)
will be reserved for married couples. Children will not be permitted to room in the dormi-
tories. No other dormitories will be open. unless the demand for rooms exceeds the capacity
of the halls listed above.
RATES

----- PER STUDENT -- PER COUPLE
Hal .. . ............ ...... Fletcher (Men) Murphree (Women) Sledd (Couples)
1st Term 2nd Term 1st Term 2nd Term 1st Term 2nd Term
Type 6 wks. 5 wks. 6 wks. 5 wks. 6 wks. 5 wks.
$13.50 $11.25 $13.50 $11.25 $24.00 $20.00
2 Room Suite for two ........ and and and and and and
9.00 7.50 9.00 7.50 15.00 12.50
$12.00 $10.00 $ 9.00 $ 7.50
Large Room for two ............... and and (4th floor (4th floor None None
9.00 7.50 only) only)
$15.00 $12.50
Single Rooms ................. and and None None None None
12.00 10.00

In all cases where two prices are stated for a given type of room, the lower price is
for rooms on the fourth floor.
Sections G and H of Murphree Hall will be reserved for women students under twenty-
one years of age.
The Office of the Director of Residence is located in Fletcher Hall, Section F, adjoining
Fletcher Lounge. The Office of the Dean of Women is located in 3lurphree Hall. Section
H, adjoining Murphrec Lounge.
REGULATIONS

In general, dormitory regulations are based on those principles of individual conduct
necessary to obtain maximum benefit and comfort for all dormitory residents. A copy of
specific dormitory regulations is posted in each room.
Specific attention is called to the following:
All students with less than one year of college work shall be required to room in the
dormitories on the University campus so long as rooms are available for allotment to them.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


All women students will live in the dormitories, with the exceptions that graduate stu-
dents and others over 21 years of age who have been self-supporting may be permitted to
live in approved rooming houses after making proper arrangements with the Dean of
Students.* (See page 149 for application for permission to live off campus.)
No student may remove from a room in the dormitory or dormitories to other quarters
without the consent of the University Committee on Residence. Furthermore, the student
is responsible for the rent of the dormitory room until the end of the then current term,
unless lie supplies another occupant who is satisfactory to the Committee on Residence.

OFF CAMPUS ROOMING ACCOMMODATIONS

1. In order to complete registration, all women students must have a place of residence
approved by the Dean of Students.

2. All women students will live in the dormitories, with the exceptions that graduate
students and others over 21 years of age who have been self-supporting may be permitted
to live in approved rooming houses after making proper arrangements with the Dean
of Students.

3. Request to live off-campus should he made to the Dean of Students, on forms provided
by that office. See page 149. This form contains the following information: age, record
of employment for the past year, address of rooming house in which student wishes to
reside, and the reasons why rooming off-campus will be of advantage to the student.

4. A list of approved rooming houses will be available at the Office of the Dean of Students.
In order to avoid inconvenience and possible unpleasantness, students should consult this
list before making any definite arrangements for a place of residence off-campus.

5. Approved rooming houses will not be allowed to house both men and women except in
the case of married couples, and for these a special list of approved places will be made.

UNIVERSITY CAFETERIA

The Cafeteria is under the direction of a graduate dietitian, and offers to Summer
Session students high quality food at reasonable prices. The meals are carefully planned,
offering a pleasing variety of foods attractively served.
Many innovations have been made in equipment and methods, resulting in a service
as complete and modem as that found in any school cafeteria in the south.
All service is cafeteria style, affording individual selections. The policy is to furnish
well prepared food at actual cost. Coupon books containing tickets with a monetary value
will be sold at a discount sufficient to warrant their purchase.
Meals may be obtained at the University Cafeteria at the following rates:

$15.00 monetary value coupon ticket ........................................$14.25
5.00 monetary value coupon ticket ....................................... 4.75

*Note: No student whose parents are residents of the City of Gainesville, Florida, or the
adjacent territory to said University which is within daily walking or driving distance from the
University shall be subject to the foregoing regulation.








GENERAL REGULATIONS


GENERAL REGULATIONS

The student is advised to procure a copy of Student Regulations, Part I, and acquaint
himself with all general regulations. Particular attention is invited to the following items:

CREDITS
The term credit as used in this bulletin in reference to courses is equal to one semester
hour.
RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS
1. The minimum residence requirement for the baccalaureate degree is two regular
terms, or one regular term and three summer terms, or five summer terms. New students
offering advanced standing must meet this requirement after entrance to the University.
Students who break their residence at the University by attending another institution for
credit toward the degree must meet this requirement after re-entering the University.
2. For the master's degree two regular terms or six summer terms are necessary to
satisfy the residence requirements.
3. Students are required to complete the last thirty credit hours (28 in the College of
Law) applied towards the baccalaureate degree during regular residence in the college from
which the student is to he graduated. Exception to this regulation may he made only upon
written petition approved by the faculty of the college concerned, but in no case may the
amount of extension work permitted exceed more than twelve of the last thirty-six hours
required for a baccalaureate degree.

AMOUNT OF EXTENSION WORK PERMITTED
No person will be allowed to take more than one-fourth of the credits toward a degree
by correspondence study and extension class work. No person will be allowed to take
more than 12 of the last 36 credits necessary for a bachelor's degree by correspondence
study or extension class work. No person will be allowed to take more than 9 credits by
correspondence during the summer vacation period. While in residence, a student will
not be allowed to take work by correspondence without the consent of the dean of the
college concerned. This will be granted only in exceptional cases. In the College of Arts
and Sciences no extension work is permitted in the last thirty hours, except by special
permission.
MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOAD
A. The maximum load for students attending the University of Florida for the first
time is six hours, or two courses not to exceed seven hours.
B. The maximum load for students who have previously attended the University of
Florida is:
1. For those students who made an honor point average below 3.00 (B) during
their last term in residence at the University, a maximum of six hours, or
two courses not to exceed seven hours.
2. For those students who made an honor point average of 3.00 (B) or higher
during their last term in residence at the University, a maximum of eight
hours, or three courses not to exceed nine hours.
C. The maximum load for students in the Graduate School is 6 hours.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY
Each student must assume full responsibility for registering for the proper courses and
for fulfilling all requirements for his degree. Students should confer with the dean of their
college, regarding choice of courses several days before registration; in addition to this,
juniors and seniors should confer with the head of the department in which they expect
to earn a major. Seniors must file, in the Office of the Registrar, formal application for a
degree and must pay the diploma fee very early in the term in which they expect to receive
the degree; the official calendar shows the latest day on which this can be done.
Each student is responsible for every course for which he registers. Courses can be
dropped or changed only with the approval of the dean of the college in which the student
is registered and by presentation of the cards authorizing the change at the office of the
Registrar.
GRADUATION WITH HONORS
For regulations in the various colleges covering graduation with Honors, see the
Bulletin of Information for the Upper Division.


COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL

The major courses are regularly numbered above 500 and the minors between 300 and
500, but there is no objection to counting a course above 500 in one department as a minor
in another. On the other hand, there are courses numbered 300 and 400 which are not
acceptable as minors.
A number of courses have already been arranged that may count as majors. Efforts
will be made to arrange still others upon request. If the major work desired is not listed,
requests for it should be made at an early date.
Passing grades for students registered in the Graduate School are A and B. All other
grades are failing.
For requirements for the Ph.D. degree and other information in regard to graduate work
see the Bulletin of the Graduate School.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE

A candidate for the master's degree must he in residence for at least one scholastic year,
devoting his entire time during this period to study and research. The Summer Session of
eleven weeks will count as one-third of a year. One-half of this term will be one-sixth
of a year.
Work Required.-The work for the master's degree shall be a unified program with a
definite objective, consisting of twenty-four semester hours or the equivalent, at least half
of which shall be in a single field of study and the remainder in related subject matter as
determined by the student's Supervisory Committee. The principal part of the course
work for the master's degree shall be designated strictly for graduates. However, in the
case of related subject matter, courses numbered 300 and above may be offered upon the
approval of the Supervisory Committee.
In all departments a general examination, either oral or written or both, covering the
whole of the field of study of the candidate, or any part of it, is required. This may em-
brace not only the thesis and the courses taken but also any questions that a student major-
ing in that department may reasonably be expected to answer.








COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS


A thesis is required of all candidates. This thesis should be closely allied to the major
subject. The title of the thesis should be submitted by the end of the first summer. The
thesis itself should be completed and submitted in time to allow an interval of three
full weeks between the day of submittal and the graduation day of the summer term.
The requirement of a reading knowledge of a foreign language is left to the discretion
of the student's Supervisory Committee.
The work for the master's degree must be completed within seven years from the time
of first registering for graduate work. For summer session students this means seven
summers.
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

In the College of Agriculture during regular semesters, courses in Agricultural Chenistry,
Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Education, Agricultural Engineering, Agronomy, Ani-
mal Industry (divisions of Animal Production. Dairy Husbandry, Dairy Manufactures and
Poultry Husbandry), Botany (divisions of Botany, Bacteriology and Plant Pathology),
Entomology, Horticulture and Soils and Forestry (School of Forestry), are given. From
year to year courses in these Departments are rotated in the Summer School since it is
not possible to give work in all Departments. For the Summer Sessions 1941, courses in
Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Engineering, Agronomy, Animal Industry. Bacteriology,
and courses for County and Home Demonstration Agents are offered. Non-agricultural sub-
jects required for tie degree of liachelor of Science in Agriculture may be taken in Depart-
ments of other colleges.

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

Bible. biology, chemistry, English, French. geology, German, Greek, history, journalism,
Latin, mathematics, pharmacy, philosophy, physics, political science, psychology, sociology,
Spanish and speech are the subject matter fields of the College of Arts and Sciences. The
College operates in each term. Most of the departments offer basic courses in the Summer
Session, and many of them offer advanced courses. In addition to work in the fields named
above, students enrolled in the College may study courses in bacteriology, botany, eco-
nomics and education.
Inasmuch as most of the subjects taught in the public schools are continued on the
college level by departments in the College of Arts and Sciences, this college is of particular
service to teachers of the State. Others who profit particularly by the operation of the
College of Arts and Sciences in the Summer Session are students of the College who wish
either to make up deficiencies or to hasten graduation, students of other collegiate institu-
tions and of other colleges of tho University who wish to complete basic arts and sciences
requirements or electives, and men and women who spend their vacations in attendance
at the University for the purpose of securing new points of view and renewed intellectual
vigor.
Students who do not intend to earn degrees in this college may enroll subject to the
University Admission Regulations (p. 88). Every effort will he made to cooperate with
such students in arranging programs of study which will be of greatest advantage and
help to them.
CURRICULA IN ARTS AND SCIENCES
The College of Arts and Sciences offers curricula leading to the degrees of Bachelor
of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, and Bachelor of Science in








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Pharmacy. The curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy
is administered by the Director of the School of Pharmacy. (See School of Pharmacy
below.) The other curricula are administered by the Dean of the College of Arts and
Sciences. Only students who have completed the General College or its equivalent (as
determined by the Board of Examiners and approved by the Dean of the College) are
eligible to enter the curricula and become candidates for degrees.

MAJORS
The College offers two kinds of majors in the curricula leading to the degrees of
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science. All majors include the requirement of a read-
ing knowledge of a foreign language or 6 semester credit hours in a foreign language in
courses numbered above 100.
One of the two kinds of majors is called a Departmental Major. A departmental
major includes a concentration of not less than 24 and not more than 32 semester credit
hours in one subject-matter field.* It also includes such subsidiary courses from other
subject-matter fields as are essential to thoroughness and comprehension.
The other type of major is called a Group Major. A group major includes, in
addition to the foreign language, courses from related subject-matter fields with at least
4 semesters of creditable work in one of the fields and not more than 6 semesters in any
single field.
The student's major now includes the essential related subjects, and he is not required
to earn separate minors.

THE DECREES OF BACHELOR OF ARTS AND BACHELOR OF SCIENCE
Every student who wishes to be a candidate for one of these degrees should read
carefully the description of requirements on pages 340-341 of the Bulletin of Information
for the Upper Division 1940-41.
The degree of Bachelor of Arts will be conferred upon those who fulfill the specified
requirements and whose majors center in one or more of the fields of ancient languages
bible, English, French, German, history, journalism, philosophy, political science, sociol-
ogy, Spanish and speech. Similarly, the degree of Bachelor of Science will be conferred
upon those who fulfill the specified requirements and whose majors center in one or more
of the fields of biology, botany, chemistry and physics. Some students who major in
mathematics or in psychology receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts while others receive
the degree of Bachelor of Science, the degree being determined by the direction of the
student's interests and accomplishments in his major work.

THE PRE-LAW COURSE
In cooperation with the College of Law, the College of Arts and Sciences offers tle
pre-law course. This course leads to the degree of Bachelor of Arts or to the degree
of Bachelor of Science upon completion of the first full year of the law course (28 semester
credit hours and 56 honor points), and to the degree of Bachelor of Laws upon completion
of the law course. For students who make adequate scholastic progress it is possible to
earn the academic and law degrees in six years, of which two years are spent in the
General College, one in the College of Arts and Sciences, and three in the College of Law.

*No courses will be counted toward fulfillment of this requirement in which the grade earned
is below C.








COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS


PRE-MEDICAL AND PRE-DENTAL COURSES
Students who upon graduation from the General College have not completed require-
nents for admission to the medical and dental schools may continue and complete their
pre-professional training in the College of Arts and Sciences. The student should select
courses in accordance with requirements for admission to the particular school he wishes
to enter, and should correspond with the dean of that school for information and advice.

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

The College of Business Administration operates during the Summer Session as during
the regular terms. The courses offered appeal to students attending the regular terms
who wish to return during the Summer Session, and to teachers and others who wish to
take courses to prepare for teaching commercial subjects in high schools or to prepare
for teaching social sciences.

MAXIMUM CREDIT LOADS OF STUDENTS
The maximum credit load of all students registered for the curriculum in Public
Administration as well as for the curriculum in Business Administration proper during
each of their first two semesters (first year) shall be 15 academic semester hours (6 in
summer session) to which advanced military science may be added. However, these stu-
dents may increase their credit loads to 18 academic semester hours during their first
semester, to which advanced military science may he added, provided they have graduated
from the General College with honors; likewise, they may increase their credit loads to
18 academic semester hours (9 in summer session) during their second semester, to which
military science may he added, provided they have attained an honor point average of 3 (B)
or more in the preceding semester. The maximum credit load of all students after their
first two semesters is limited to 18 academic semester hours to which military science may
be added. The minimum requirement for graduation from the College of Business Ad-
ministration is 66 semester hours on which the student must earn 132 honor points. To
graduate With Honors, a student must have graduated from the General College with honors
and completed 66 semester hours on which he has earned 198 honor points, or in lieu of
graduation from the General College with honors, have completed 66 semester hours on
which he has earned 231 honor points. To graduate With High Honors, a student must
meet the following requirements:
1. Attain a scholastic average in all academic courses of 3.4 or better.
2. Secure the recommendation of a Faculty Committee.
A copy of detailed regulations governing graduation with high honors may be obtained
from the Office of the Dean.
Of the 66 semester credit hours required for graduation, not more than six semester
credit hours may be earned by correspondence or extension study. Such credit hours,
furthermore, must be approved for each individual student in advance by the Committee
on Curricular Adjustments.
DEGCEES AND CURRICULA
The College of Business Administration offers two degrees: The Bachelor of Science in
Business Administration and tie Bachelor of Science in Public Administration. To secure
the first degree students must complete either the Curriculum in Business Administration
Proper or the Curriculum in Combination with Law. To secure the second degree they
must complete the Curriculum in Public Administration.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ADMISSION TO CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PROPER AND TO CURRICULUM IN
COMBINATION WITH LAW
To enter the College of Business Administration and to register for the Curriculum in
Business Administration Proper, or the Curriculum in Combination with Law, students are
required to present a certificate of graduation from the General College and to have com-
pleted the following courses:
CEs. 13.-Economic Foundations of Modern Life
CBs. 14.-Elementary Accounting
CEs. 15.-Elementary Statistics
One additional half-year elective course in the General College.
These courses may be taken for C-7, C-8, and C-9 electives in the General College during
the second year.
CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PROPER

Junior Year
Courses First Semester Credits Courses Second Semester Credits
Bs. 311 -Accounting Principles ............ 3 Es. 322 -Financial Organization of
Es. 321 -Financial Organization of Society .................................... 3
Society .................................... 3 Es. 335 -Economics of Marketing ........ 3
Es. 327 -Public Finance ........................ 3 Es. 351 -Transportation Prin. .............. 3
Bs. 401 -Business Law ....................... 3 Bs. 402 -Business Law ......................... 3
*Electives .................................... 3 *Electives ....................... ........... 3
15 15
Senior Year
Es. 407 -Economic Principles and Es. 408 -Economic Principles and
Problems ............................... 3 Problems .......................-.... 3
*Electives .................................... 15 *Electives ...................................... 15
18 18

CURRICULUM IN COMBINATION WITH LAW
The College of Business Administration combines with the General College and the
College of Law in offering a six-year program of study to students who desire ultimately
to enter the College of Law. Students register during the first two years in the General
College and the third year in the College of Business Administration. When they have
fully satisfied the academic requirements of the College of Business Administration, they
are eligible to register in the College of Law and may during their last three years com-
plete the course in the College of Law. When students have, after entering the College
of Law, completed one year's work in law (28 semester hours and 56 honor points), they
may offer this year's work as a substitute for the fourth year in the College of Business
Administration and receive the degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration.
The maximum credit load for all students registered for the curriculum in combination
with law is 18 academic semester hours, to which may be added advanced military science.
To graduate With Honors, a student must have graduated from the General College with
honors and completed 70 semester hours on which he has earned 210 honor points, or in
lieu of graduation from the General College with honors, complete 70 semester hours on
which he has earned 245 honor points.
The curriculum in business administration in combination with law consists of 30
semester hours of required courses and 12 hours of elective courses. The requirements
are as follows:

*Six semester hours of electives may be taken in advanced military science or in approved
free electives. The remaining hours are limited to courses in economics and business administration.









COLLEGES A.\D SCHOOLS 107

Courses Credits
Bs. 311 Accounting Principles ............................ ............................ 3
Es. 321-322 Financial Organization of Society ..................................... 6
Es. 327 Public Finance ......................................... ............................ 3
Es. 335 Economics of Marketing .............................. ...... ......... 3
Es. 351 Transportation Principles .................................... ............ 3
Es. 404 Government Control of Business ........................... ............... 3
Es. 407-408 -Economic Principles and Problems ...................................... 6
Es. 454 -Principles of Public Utility Economics .............................. 3
*E lectives ............................................. ..... ................................... 12
42

ADMISSION TO THE CURIIICULI M IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

To enter the College of Business Administration and to register for tlle Curriculum in
Public Adminislration students are required to present a certificate of graduation fritm the
General College and to have completed the following courses:

CPI. 13.-Political Foundations of Modern Life
CEs. 13.-Economic Foundations of Modern Life
CBs. 14.-Elementary Accounling
CEs. 15.-Elementary Statistics

These courses may be taken for C-7, C-8, and C-9. electives in the General College during
the second year.
THE CURRICULUM IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION

Junior Year
Courses First Semester Credits Courses Second Semester Credits
Pcl. 313 -American Government Pcl. 314 --American Government
and Politics ........................ 3 and Politics ................ 3
Bs. 311 -Accounting Principles .......... 3 Es. 327 -Public Finance ............... 3
Es. 407 -Economic Principles Es 408 -Economic Principles
and Problems .................. 3 and Problems ........... .. 3
Hy. 331 -Survey of American History 3 Hy. 332 Survey of American History 3
**Electives .................................. 3 **Electives .. ........... ........ 3
15 1;

Senior Year
Pcl. 411 -Public Administration ........ 3 Pel. 412 -Public Administration .. 3
Es. 454 -Principles of Public Utility Es. 404 -Government Control of
Economics ................ . 3 Business ...... 3
**Electives .......... ... ..... .... 12 "* Electives ... ... .... 12
1S Is

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION

For admission to the College of Education all students will be required to present a
certificate of graduation from the General College, or its equivalent, and have the approval
of the Admissions Committee of the College of Education.

GRADUATION WITH HONORS

Students successfully completing the work of the Upper Division will, according to the
character of their work, receive diplomas of graduation, of graduation With Honors, or of

*Electives are limited to courses in business administration and six semester hours in advanced
military science.
**Six semester hours of electives may be taken in advanced military science or in approved
free electives. The remaining hours, subject to the approval of the Dean, are limited primarily
to courses in the following Departments: Economics and Business Administration: History anti
Political Science; and Sociology.








108 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

graduation With High Honors. For detailed regulations concerning graduation with honors,
the student should consult the Dean of the College.

DEGREES AND CURRICULA

Only two degrees are offered in the College of Education-Bachelor of Arts in Education
and Bachelor of Science in Education. For either degree the student is required to com-
plete 60 semester hours, with an average of "C" or higher, after graduation from the
General College.

CURRICULA IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS
IN EDUCATION OR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION

I. For those beginning college work at the University of Florida or transferring from other
institutions with less than the equivalent of two years' college credit.

Graduation from the General College.
Professionalized Subject Matter: Credits
Children's Social Studies ......................................... .............................. ......... 3
Children's Science ............................................................................ 2
C children's Literature .................................................................................................. 3
H health and Physical Education ................................................................................ 2
P public School A rt .................. ...... ....................................................................... 4
Public School M music ...................... ...... ................. ................... ............ ...... 4
H andw writing ................................................................................................................. 0
Education:
CEn. 13-Introduction to Education
En. 385-Pre-Adolescent Child
En. 386-Adolescent Child
En. 387-Health Education
En. 405-Student Teaching
En. 406-Elementary School Administration
En. 471-Problems of Instruction (Elementary School I
*E n glish ........................................................... ....................................... ........................... 15 credits

Total of at least 60 credits in the Upper Division.

II. For those transferring from other institutions with the equivalent of two or more years'
college credit.
General Background: Credits
C -1 .................... .................... ............................................ .................................. 8
C -2 or C -6 ..................................-..................................................................................
C -3 ...................... ..... ....... ....... .......... ...... ........................ ............... 8
C-41 ..................................-........-............-................. .............. 4
Professionalized Subject Matter: Credits
Children's Social Studies ..-...............---------- ...........---- ............-......--- 3
C children's Science ......................... ........ .. ............................................... 2
C children's L literature ................................................................................................ 3
H health and Physical Education .............................................................................. 2
P public School A rt ................................ .......................................................... ....... 4
P public School M music .................................................................................................. 4
H andw writing ........................................................... .................................................. 0

*By permission of the Dean of the College of Education, these hours may be completed in
other areas.







COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 109

Education:
CEn. 13-Introduction to Education
En. 385-Pre-AdoleEcent Child
En. 386-Adolescent Child
En. 387-Health Education
En. 405-Student Teaching
En. 406-Elementary School Administration
En. 471-Problems of Instruction (Elementary School
*English ..... ................ ......... .... ....... 15 credits
*Social Studies .... ... ... .. .................................... ... ......... .... 15 credits
Enough electives to make a total of ................................................ 32 credits

CURRICULA IN SECONDARY EDUCATION LEADING TO THE )DEGU;R OF BACHELOR OF AHTS OH
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION

I. For those beginning college work at the University of Florida or transferring from other
institutions with less than the equivalent of two years' college credit.

Graduation from the General College.
Health and Physical Education ......... 2 credit,
Education:
CEn. 13-Introduction to Education
En. 385-Pre-Adolescent Child
En. 386-Adolescent Child
En. 387-Health Education
En. 401-School Administration
En. 405-Student Teaching
En. 471-Problems of Instruction (Secondary School)
Complete certification requirements in two fields. (See page 95.)
Electives, if needed, to make a total of 60 semester hours completed in the Upper Division.

II. For those transferring from other institutions with the equivalent of two or more years
college credit.
General Background: Credits
C -1 ................................. ......................... ................... ................................... 8
C -2 or C -6 ........................................... ....... ..... ................. ....... .................. 8
C -3 ................................... ........................................... ............... .................... 8
C-41 .................................................. ................................................................... 4
Speech ................................................................................................................ 3 or 4
Health and Physical Education ........................... ....... ................. 2
Education:
CEn. 13-Introduction to Education
En. 385-Pre-Adolescent Child
En. 386-Adolescent Child
En. 387-Iealth Education
En. 401-School Administration
En, 405-Student Teaching
En. 471-Problems of Instruction (Secondary School)
Complete certification requirements in two fields. (See page 95.)
Electives. if needed, to make a total of ............ ......... ...... .. .... 132 credits

*By permission of the Dean of the College of Education, these hours may be completed in
other areas.








BULLETIN OF TIE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


THE GENERAL COLLEGE

The General College has been organized to administer the work of the freshman and
sophomore years in the University of Florida. All beginning students will register in
this College.
The average student will be able to complete the work of the General College in two
years, while superior students may finish the curriculum in a shorter time, and others
may find it necessary to remain in the General College for a longer period.
A program of general education is worked out for all students. In this program the
University recognizes that broad basic training is needed by all students. To this founda-
tion that has meaning and significance to the student, he may add the special training of
the colleges and professional schools of the Upper Division, or drop out of the University
with something definite and helpful as he begins his adult life as a citizen. The purposes
of the General College are as follows:

1. To offer an opportunity for general education and to provide the guidance
needed by all students. Thus the choice of professional work is postponed
until the student is better acquainted with his capacity and disposition to
undertake work that will be profitable to himself and society.
2. To broaden the base of education for students who are preparing for
advanced study in the colleges and professional schools of the Upper Division,
thereby avoiding the handicap of narrow specialization.
3. To satisfy the needs of those who have only a limited time to give to
college training, and consequently should concern themselves with general
viewpoints and major understandings, instead of with introductions to special
subject matter which they may never enter.
4. To provide for the constant adjustments required in higher general
education incident to the changing conditions of modern life. The subject
matter of the various courses and the methods of presentation are to be con-
stantly varied in order to awaken the interest of the student, to stimulate his
intellectual curiosity, to encourage independent study, and to cultivate the
attitudes necessary for enlightened citizenship.
5. Guidance. Every part of the General College program is designed to
guide students. It was felt that too much of the freshman and sophomore
work of former years had little meaning and significance to the vast majority.
The material studied was preparatory and foundational, and became mean-
ingful only when the student pursued additional courses in the junior and
senior years. The material of the comprehensive courses is selected and
tested with guidance as a primary function. While, of necessity, we must
look forward to distant goals, the General College is trying to present
materials that are directly related to life experiences and will immediately
become a part of the student's thinking and guide him in making correct
"next steps". Thus the whole program-placement tests, progress reports,
vocational aptitude tests, selected material in the comprehensive courses,
student conferences, provisions for superior students, adjustment for individual
differences, election privileges, and comprehensive examinations-are all parts
of a plan designed to guide students.
Thus guidance is not attempted at one office by one individual with a
small staff. The whole drive of the General College program is one of direct-







COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS


ing the thinking of the student. While the necessary correlation and unifica-
tion is attempted at the General College Office, throughout the General College
period students consult upper division deans and department heads to discuss
future work. During the last month of each school year these informal con-
ferences are concluded by a scheduled formal conference, at which each
student fills out a pre-registration card for the coming year.

COLLEGE OF LAW

The purpose of the College of Law is to impart a thorough scientific and practical
knowledge of law and thus to equip students to take advantage of the opportunities in
this field. Since 1927 the College has operated during the Summer Session. Courses
offered during the regular terms are rotated. Some courses not given during the regular
terms are offered in the Summer Session. The variety of courses is sufficient to enable
students of different types to carry a full load, and appeal to a wide range of students.

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY

Professional courses are offered occasionally by the School of Pharmacy in the summer
session. It is intended that these may be so rotated that courses of major interest are
offered during the course of several summers.
A few professional courses will be offered during the summer of 1941 and foundation
courses required for admission to the pharmacy curriculum and related courses such as
bacteriology, biology and chemistry may he taken during the summer session.
Graduate students may find courses available in minor fields such as biology, bacteri-
ology and chemistry. Consult the Director of the School of Pharmacy for further
information.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ADVISORY SERVICE FOR TEACHERS AND A GUIDE

TO COURSES LISTED IN THIS CATALOGUE

During the past several years the University of Florida has been attempting to provide
a better summer program for Florida teachers-a program directed toward the improvement
of Florida schools. This year, particularly, the summer school program has been studied
intensely by a large committee representing a variety of subject-matter areas, professional
interests, and accomplishments. Partly as a result of the work of this committee, the 1941
summer session will reveal significant changes from previous years. Among these changes
are revisions of some fundamental courses so as to adapt them more closely to teacher-
needs, the creation of new courses representing a coalescence of subject-matter and profes-
sional interests, and the establishment of an improved pre-registration advisory service.
Teachers are urged to read carefully the course descriptions for all courses offered in
the fields in which they are interested and to correspond with instructors or department
heads for advice as to which of the offerings are best suited to their particular needs.
Some members of the faculty have been designated to act as advisors for persons leach-
ing or interested in certain fields. All teachers who so desire are invited to seek advice
from these staff members:
For teachers of English-Dr. H. E. Spivey, Language Hall
For teachers of Mathematics-Dr. J. H. Kusner, Peabody Hall
For teachers of the Physical Sciences-Dr. D. C. Swanson, Benton Hall
For teachers of the Biological Sciences-Dr. C. F. Byers, Science Hall
For teachers of the Social Studies--Dr. M. J. Dauer, Peabody Hall
Some of the certification requirements listed in the literature of the State Department
may not be represented by the same titles in this catalogue. To facilitate finding the
proper course descriptions for such fields, the following guide is provided:

Elementary Teachers
General Preparation-the basic comprehensive courses of the General College (C-l, C-2,
C-3, C-41, C-42, C-5, and C-6)
Elementary Science listed tnder General Science (GI. 301)
General Psychology C-41 listed under General College courses and CPs. 43 listed under
Psychology
Child and Adolescent Psychology-listed under Education (En. 385, En. 386)
Children's Literature-listed under English (Eh. 391)
Social Studies in Elementary Grades-listed under Social Studies (Scl. 301 and Scl. 302)
Handwriting-listed under Business Education (BEn. 97)
Health Education--listed under Education (En. 387)

Secondary Teachers
Commercial Subjects-listed under Business Education and under Economics and Busi-
ness Administration
English-C-3 and courses listed under English, Speech, and Journalism
Mathematics-C-42 and courses listed under Mathematics
Science-C-2, C-6, and courses listed under Chemistry, Biology, Geology, Physics, Gen-
eral Science, and Industrial Engineering
Social Studies-C-1 and courses listed under Geography, Geology, History, Political
Science, Economics, Social Studies, and Sociology
Conservation requirement may be met with any of the following courses: C-1, C-2,
C-6 (listed under General College courses), Gpy. 385 or Gpy. 387 (not offered 1941
summer session), or Es. 382 (listed under Economics).







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM


DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

AND SCHEDULE OF COURSES

First Term

All classes ordinarily meet for one hour and twenty minutes. Classes scheduled to
meet daily meet Monday through Friday.
Some courses are indicated as being offered by the seminar method. Students taking
these courses till do independent work under the supervision of the instructor, with no
regular class meetings unless time of meeting is listed in the schedule.
Students not registered in the Graduate School will not be permitted to register foa
graduate courses unless they secure written approval from the Dean of the Graduate School
and the instructor concerned.

GENERAL COLLEGE COURSES

Comprehensive examinations for General College students in C-l, C-2, C-3, C-5, and
C-6 will be given and will cover the work of both terms. Students should consult official
announcements of the Board of University Examiners for details. Credits are indicated
for the benefit of Upper Division students who elect these courses.

C-11.--Man and the Social World. 4 credits.
Lecture Section 1: 8:30 M. W. F. Ch-Aud. STAFF.
Discussion Sections: 10 8:30 T. Th. and 1:00 W. Pe-101. DAUER.
11 8:30 T. Th. and 1:00 W. Sc-213. MILLER.
12 8:30 T. Th. and 1:00 W. Sc-205. BENTLEY.
13 8:30 T. Th. and 4:00 W. La-311. LAIRD.
Designed to develop and stimulate the ability to interpret the interrelated problems of the
modern social world. The unequal rates of change in economic life, in government, in education,
in science, and in religion are analyzed and interpreted to show the need for a more effective
coordination of the factors of our evolving social organization of today. Careful scrutiny is made
of the changing functions of social organizations as joint interdependent activities so that a
consciousness of the significant relationships between the individual and social institutions may
be developed, from which consciousness a greater degree of social adjustment may be achieved.

C-21.-Man and the Physical World. 4 credits.
Lecture Section 1: 10:00 1M. W. F. Ch-Aud. STAFF.
Discussion Sections: 10 7:00 M. W. F. Bn-205. WILLIAMS.
11 1:00 M. W. F. Bn-201. MULLIGAN.
12 11:30 T. Th. F. Bn-205. MULLIGAN.
An attempt to survey the phenomena of the physical universe with particular reference to
man's immediate environment; to show how these phenomena are investigated; to explain the
more important principles and relations which have been found to aid in the understanding of
them; and to review the present status of man's dependence upon the ability to utilize physical
materials, forces, and relations. The concepts are taken mainly from the fields of physics, chemistry,
astronomy, geology, and geography, and they are so integrated as to demonstrate their essential
unity. The practical and cultural significance of the physical sciences is emphasized.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


C-31.-Reading, Speaking and Writing. 4 credits.
Lecture Section 1: 11:30 M. W. F. Ch-Aud. STAFF.
Discussion Sections: 10 10:00 Daily. La-203. MORRIS.
11 2:30 Daily. La-203. HOPKINS.
12 7:00 Daily. La-203. HOPKINS.
Writing Laboratory: 101 7:00 M. W. F. La-209. J. L. WILSON.
102 10:00 M. W. F. La-209. J. L. WILSON.
Designed to furnish the training in reading, speaking, and writing necessary for the student's
work in college and for his life thereafter. This training will be provided through practice and
counsel in oral reading, in silent reading, in logical thinking, in fundamentals of form and style,
in extension of vocabulary, and in control of the body and voice in speaking. Students will be
encouraged to read widely as a means of broadening their interests and increasing their apprecia-
tion of literature.
CEh. 33.-Effective Writing. 3 credits. 8:30 daily. La-209. SKAGGS. Pre-
requisite: C-3, or permission of C-3 Course Chairman. Open to Upper Division
students.
Designed to aid the student to present his ideas in writing which is not only accurate and
clear but pleasing and attractive to the reader. Students are encouraged to do creative work.
C-41.-Man and His Thinking. 3 credits. 8:30 daily. La-201. LITTLE.
Both in private life and vocational life man is faced with the necessity of making decisions
and of solving problems. The principal aims are (1) to develop ability to think with greater
accuracy and thoroughness, and (2) to develop ability to evaluate the thinking of others. The
material used applies to actual living and working conditions. The case method is used to insure
practice, and numerous exercises are assigned.
C-42.-General Mathematics. 3 credits. Pe-102. 10:00 daily. KOKOMOOR.
Designed to acquaint the student with the general nature of mathematics, the manner in which
the mathematical mode of thought is used in the world of today, and the role it has occupied in
the development of the world. A survey of some of the fundamental principles and methods of
procedure in the main branches of elementary mathematics, with considerable attention being given
to the utilitarian and cultural importance of the subject and its relations to other branches of
knowledge.
C-51.-The Humanities. 4 credits.
Lecture Section 1: 11:30 M. W. F. Auditorium. STAFF.
Discussion Sections: 10 1:00 M.W.F. La-212. CONNER.
11 1:00 T. Th. and 4:00 W. La-212. Fox.
An attempt is made to help the student lay a broad foundation for cultured living. While
it is impossible to provide an adequate survey of the broad field, immediate help is given in attain-
ing desirable understandings, attitudes, and dispositions. Students react every day to all culture;
material is therefore presented from this and past civilizations to condition this reaction. Even
though culture is thought of as timeless, ageless, and not belonging to any particular nation or
people, the course concerns itself largely with the culture of the Western World.
C-61.-Man and the Biological World. 4 credits.
Lecture Sections: 1 7:00 M. T. Th. F. Sc-101. SHERMAN.
2 10:00 T. W. Th. F. Sc-101. WALLACE, HOBBS.
Discussion Sections: 10 1:00 M. W. Sc-111. WALLACE.
11 2:30 T. Th. Sc-101. HOBBS.
20 7:00 M. W. Sc-205. WALLACE.
21 11:30 T. Th. Sc-111. HOBBS.
Designed to give the student a general knowledge and appreciation of the world of living
things. The biological problems and principles that are associated with the organism's role as:
(1) a living individual, (2) a member of the race, (3) a product of evolutionary processes,
and (4) a member of a socially and economically interrelated complex of living organisms, supplies
the main sequence and material of the course. Especial attention is given to man's place in the
organic world and to human qualities that have a biological basis.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM


AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS

As. 409.-Cooperative Marketing. 7:00 daily. Ht-215. 3 credits. REITZ.
Cooperative buying and selling organizations, their successes and failures: methods of organiza-
tion, financing, and business management.
As. 413.-Agricultural Policy. 10:00 daily. Ht-215. 3 credits. REITZ.
A history of farmer attempts and accomplishments through organization and legislation to
improve the economic and social status of agriculture. Evaluation of present legislative programs
and policies affecting the farmer.

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING

Ag. 301.-Drainage and Irrigation. 8:30 M. T. W. Th. Ag-210. Laboratory
1-4 T. Th. Ag-210. 3 credits. F. ROGERS.
The drainage and irrigation of lands with treatment of the necessity for such in the produc-
tion of field, fruit and vegetable crops. The cost, design, operation and upkeep of drainage and
irrigation systems. Field work in laying out systems.

AGRONOMY

Ay. 401.-Organization and Conduct of 4-H Club Work. 8:30 M. T. NX. Th.
and 1-4 W. Ag-208. 2 credits. JOY. (June 23 to July 12.)
A course to cover the purpose, organization and handling of 4-H Club work.

ANIMAL INDUSTRY

GRADUATE COURSE

Al. 509.-Problems in Animal Nutrition. 10:00 M. T. W. Th. and 1-4 T.
Ag-208. 2 credits. BECKER, ARNOLD and SIIEALY. (June 23 to July 12.)
Studies in nutritional deficiencies of farm animals, mineral supplements, animal physiology,
feed utilization.
BACTERIOLOGY

Bcy. 301.-General Bacteriology. 7:00 M. T. W. Th. Sc-111. Laboratory 1-4
M. T. Th. F. Sc-104. 4 credits. CARROLL. Prerequisites: C-6, or equivalent;
Cy. 101-102, or Acy. 125-126.
Morphology, physiology and cultivation of bacteria and related micro-organisms. Tanner,
Bacteriology.
Bey. 304.-Pathogenic Bacteriology. 10:00 T. W. Th. F. Sc-111. Laboratory
1-4 M. T. W. F. Sc-104. 4 credits. CARROLL. Prerequisite: Bcy. 301.
Recognition, culture, and special laboratory technique of handling pathogens and viruses:
theories and principles of immunity and infection. Stitt, Practical Dacteriology, Parasitology. and
Blood Work.
GRADUATE COURSE

Bey. 507.-Problems in Water Bacteriology. To arrange. 3 or 4 credits.
CARROLL. Prerequisite: Bey. 301 or its equivalent.

BIBLE

Be. 406.-Life of Jesus. 8:30 daily. Sc-206. 3 credits. JOHNSON.
An introduction to the main facts in the life of Jesus and to a general knowledge of the
Gospel literature.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


BIOLOGY

Bly. 61.-Laboratory in General Biology. 1-5 daily. Sc-10. 2 credits. HUB-
BELL.
Elective for students who are taking or have taken C-6 in the General College. Satisfactory
completion of Bly. 61 together with a final standing in the upper half of C-6 will be accepted as
a satisfactory prerequisite for second year courses in Biology.
Bly. 133.-Common Animals and Plants of Florida. 8:30 daily. Sc-101. 3
credits. HUBBELL.
Designed to provide a recognition of and an acquaintance with some of the more common
animals and plants of Florida. Especially planned to prepare teachers to answer the question,
"What animal-or what plant-is this ?". Individual work in the field and the making of personal
reference collections of plants and animals are encouraged.
Bly. 209.-Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. 8:30 M. T. W. Th. Sc-111.
Laboratory 1-5 M. T. W. Th. Sc-107. 4 credits. SHERMAN. Prerequisite: Bly.
61 or Bly. 101.
The morphology and classification of chordate animals.

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Courses in Business Administration are listed under Economics and are marked Bs.


BUSINESS EDUCATION

BEn. 81.-Elementary Typewriting. 8:30 daily. Laboratory to be arranged.
Yn-305. 2 credits. MOORMAN.
Introduction to touch typewriting; practice upon personal and business problems.
BEn. 91.-Elementary Shorthand. 10:00 daily. Yn-306. 2 credits. MOOR-
MAN.
Introduction to Gregg shorthand by the functional method.
BEn. 97.-Handwriting. 1 credit. MOORMAN.
Section 1. 7:00 A.M. M. T. W. Yn-306.
Section 2. 7:00 P.M. M. T. W. Yn-306.

CHEMISTRY

Cy. 101.-General Chemistry. 10:00 daily. Ch-212. Laboratory 1-4 M. W. F.
Ch-130. 4 credits. JACKSON. The first half of the course Cy. 101-102.
Fundamental laws and theories of chemistry, and preparation and properties of the common
non-metallic elements and their compounds.
Cy. 201.-Analytical Chemistry. 8:30 M. T. W. F. Ch-212. Laboratory 1-5
M. W. F. and 1-4 T. Th. Ch-230. 4 credits. JACKSON.
Theoretical principles and laboratory technique involved in the qualitative detection of the
common metals and acid radicals.
*Cy. 262.-Organic Chemistry. 8:30 daily. Ch-l10. Laboratory 1-5 M. W. F.
and 1-4 T. Th. Ch-230. 5 credits. POLLARD.
The more important aliphatic and aromatic compounds, chiefly for students in applied biologi-
cal fields. Suitable for premedical students who desire only five hours of organic chemistry.
*Cy. 301.-Organic Chemistry. 8:30 daily. Ch-110. Laboratory 1-5 M. W. F.
Ch-230. 4 credits. POLLARD. The first half of the course Cy. 301-302.
Preparation and properties of the various aliphatic compounds.

*That one of these courses will be offered for which there is the greater demand.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM


GRADUATE COURSES

tCy. 505.-Organic Nitrogen Compounds. 10:00 daily. Ch-110. 3 credits.
POLLARD.
Special lectures and collateral reading relative to the electronic and other theoretical concep-
tions of organic compounds containing nitrogen. Explosives, pseudo-acids, certain dyes, alkaloids,
proteins, etc.

tCy. 506.-Special Chapters in Organic Chemistry. 10:00 daily. Ch-110. 3
credits. POLLARD.
Lectures and collateral reading. In general, topics to be studied will be chosen from the
following list: stereochemistry, tautomerism, acetoacetic ester syntheses, malonic ester syntheses,
the Grignard reaction, benzene theories, diazo compounds, and indicators.
tCy. 517.-Advanced Organic Chemistry. 10:00 M. T. W. F. Ch-110. Labora-
tory 1-4 M. W. F. Ch-230. 3 credits. POLLARD.
Typical reactions which are utilized in the synthesis and proof of structure of organic com-
pounds; quantitative determination of carbon and hydrogen in simple organic compounds and the
determination of various characteristic groups.

CIVIL ENGINEERING

Cl. 329.-Higher Surveying. 8-9 M. W. F. H1-302. Laboratory 9-12 and 1-5
M. W. F., 8-12 and 1-5 T. Th. 111-301. 5 credits. SHIVLER. Prerequisite:
Cl. 226.
Field astronomy and hydrographic surveying. Field work: the making of a complete topo-
graphical survey; tests and adjustments of instruments; precise leveling; base line work;
determination of time, latitude, and azimuth; triangulation and traverse; hydrographic surveying
and stream gauging. Drawing room work on balancing surveys, reducing field notes, map
drawing, triangulation, and computation. Students registering for this course may not register
for any other course.


ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Note: Courses designated by the letters Es. are Economics courses, those designated by
the letters Bs. are Business Administration courses.

*CEs. 131.-Economic Foundations of Modern Life. 10:00 daily. Pe-206. 3
credits. ELDRIDGE. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.
Emphasis on the functioning of the economic system. Economic organization and institutions
as parts of the economic order in their functional capacities. The understanding of economic
principles and processes, especially those relating to value, price, cost, rent, wages, profits, and
interest, insofar as such knowledge is necessary in understanding the economic situation of the
present day. The evaluation of economic forces and processes in terms of their contribution to
social well being. Prerequisite for advanced standing in Economics and Business Administration.

*CBs. 141.-Elementary Accounting. 8:30 daily. Sc-202. 3 credits. POWERS.
Designed to provide the basic training in business practice and in accounting. A study of
business papers and records; recording transactions; preparation of financial statements and re-
ports. Prerequisite for advanced standing in Economics and Business Administration.

*This course is a unit. To complete it both terms of the summer session are required. Students
may take the second term without having had the first term only with consent of the instructor.
When the course is completed in the summer session by students in the Upper Division they may
secure six semester hours credit.
tThat one of these courses will be offered for which there is the greater demand.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


CEs. 15.-Elementary Statistics. 11:30 daily. La-204. 3 credits. ANDERSON.
The statistical method as a tool for examining and interpreting data; acquaintance with
such fundamental techniques as find application in business, economics, biology, agriculture,
psychology, sociology, etc.; basic preparation for more extensive work in the field of statistics.
Prerequisite for advanced standing in Economics and Business Administration.
Bs. 311.-Accounting Principles. 11:30 daily. Sc-202. 3 credits. POWERS.
Prerequisite: CBs. 14.
A study of the mechanical and statistical aspects of accounting; books of record; accounts;
fiscal period and adjustments: working papers; form and preparation of financial statements;
followed by an intensive and critical study of the problems of valuation as they affect the
preparation of the balance sheet and income statements.
Es. 321.-Financial Organization of Society. 7:00 daily. Pe-206. 3 credits.
DOLBEARE. Prerequisite: CEs. 13.
The field of finance; the institutions providing monetary, banking and other financial services;
interrelationships and interdependence of financial institutions; central banking: government
control of finance: significance of financial organization to the economic system as a whole.
Es. 351.-Transportation Principles. 8:30 daily. Pe-208. 3 credits. BIGHAM.
Prerequisite: CEs. 13.
The economics of transportation, including railroads, inland waterways, highways, airways,
and pipe lines, specifically with reference to the development of facilities and service; contribu-
tion to social welfare; economic characteristics; regulation; rate principles and structures;
valuation and fair return; discrimination; service; coordination.
Bs. 361.-Property Insurance. Seminar method. 3 credits. BAUGHMAN.
Fire and Marine Insurance.
Es. 372.-Labor Economics. 11:30 daily. Ag-109. 3 credits. BAUGHMAN.
Prerequisite: CEs. 13.
Labor problems; insecurity, wages and income, hours, sub-standard workers, industrial con-
flict; attempts to solve labor problems by employees; unionism in its structural and functional
aspects; attempts to solve labor problems by employers; personnel management, employee repre-
sentation, employers' associations; attempts to solve labor problems by state; protective labor
legislation, laws relating to settlement of industrial disputes.
Es. 382.-Utilization of Our Resources. 7:00 daily. La-204. 3 credits. DIET-
TRICH.
A comprehensive review of the natural and human resources of the United States followed
by an intensive study of the wise and wasteful practices of exploitation and utilization of these
resources. A study of the human and economic significance of the principles of conservation
with special reference to Florida.
Bs. 401.-Business Law. 10:00 daily. Ag-109. 3 credits. BAUGHMAN.
Contracts and agency; rights and obligations of the agent, principal, and third party; termina-
tion of the relationship of agency.
Es. 407.-Economic Principles and Problems. 8:30 daily. Pe-206. 3 credits.
ELDRIDGE.
Advanced economic theory with special emphasis on the causes of economic maladjustments
arising from the operation of economic forces.
Bs. 422.-Investments. 11:30 daily. Pe-208. 3 credits. DOLBEARE. Pre-
requisite: Es. 321-322.
The nature of investments; investment policies and types of securities; analysis of securities;
the mechanics and mathematics of security purchases; factors influencing general movements of
security prices.
Bs. 426.-Banking Systems. Seminar method. 3 credits. DOLBEARE. Pre-
requisite: Es. 321-322.
A study of the development of central banking and its functions; the relationships existing
between central banks and (1) the government, (2) other banks; and an analysis of the banking
systems of the United States, England, France, Germany and Canada in the light of central
banking functions.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM


Es. 446.-The Consumption of Wealth. 10:00 daily. La-204. 3 credits.
MATHERLY.
An economic analysis of the problems involved in determining the extent and trends of
consumer demand and in the adjustments of productive processes to that demand.
Es. 454.-Principles of Public Utility Economics. 7:00 daily. Pe-208. 3
credits. BIGHAM. Prerequisite: CEs. 13.
The nature, place and development of public service corporations; types of public control,
valuation and rate making; regulation of service, accounts, reports, and securities; combinations;
public relations; public ownership.
Es. 469.-Business Forecasting. 8:30 daily. La-203. 3 credits. ANDERSON.
Prerequisite: CEs. 15.
A survey of the problem of the reduction of business risk by forecasting general business con-
ditions; statistical methods used by leading commercial agencies in forecasting.

GRADUATE COURSES

Es. 501.-Seminar in Economic Principles and Problems. Seminar Method.
3 credits. MlATHERLY. Prerequisite: Es. 407-408 (Economic Principles and
Problems), or equivalent.
Bs. 513.-Seminar in Accounting Principles and Problems. Seminar method.
3 credits. POWERS. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
Designed for those students who desire to continue their advanced work in the following fields:
auditing; state and federal taxation; cost accounting; and governmental accounting.
Es. 528.-Problems in Money and Banking. Seminar method. 3 credits.
DOLBEARE. Prerequisite: Es. 321-322 (Financial Organization of Society), or
equivalent.
Critical analysis of monetary standards and central banking control of credit, especially as
they are related to price and business fluctuations.
Es. 556.-Problems in Public Service Industries. Seminar method. 3 credits.
BIGHAM. Prerequisite: Es. 351 (Transportation Principles), or equivalent.
An intensive study of the more important problems raised in the introductory courses in
transportation and public utilities.
Es. 569.-Problems in Statistics and Business Forecasting. Seminar method.
3 credits. ANDERSON. Prerequisite: Es. 469-470 (Business Forecasting), or
equivalent.
Critical study of special problems in statistics and business forecasting.

EDUCATION

CEn. 13.-Introduction to Education. 3 credits.
Section 1. (Elementary Education) 10:00 M. W. F. Sc-208. NORMAN.
10:00 T. Th. Sc-213. BAXTER.
Section 2. (Secondary Education) 10:00 M. W. F. Sc-208. NORMAN.
10:00 T. Th. Sc-202. HYDE.
Principles upon which present day education is based.
En. 329.-Cooperating Schools Planning Course-First Year. 8:30 daily.
Yn-315. 3 or 6 credits. MEAD and others.
The Florida Workshop first course for undergraduates. Limited to members of the faculties
of first year Cooperating Schools who have not received the bachelor's degree. Permission to
register for three credits must be obtained in advance from the Workshop Committee. Participants
will be concerned with total school problems and individual teacher problems of instruction.








120


BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


En. 385.-The Pre-Adolescent Child. 11:30 daily. Ag-104. 3 credits. BAXTER.
The Individual and Education. The physical and mental growth of the child from infancy
to adolescence.
En. 386.-The Adolescent Child. 11:30 daily. Sc-208. 3 credits. W. H.
WILSON.
The Individual and Education. A study will be made of the physical, emotional, social, and
mental growth of the adolescent. Achievement will be considered in terms of growth.
En. 387.-Health Education. Yn-138. 3 credits.
Section 1. 7:00 daily. SALT.
Section 2. 1:00 daily. DOUTHETT.
The role of the classroom teacher in health instruction in elementary schools; who shall teach
health in the secondary school; the relationship of health examination, the follow-up program, and
the hygiene of school plants to health instruction the organization of materials for instructional
purposes; criteria for evaluation of health materials and methods; cooperation of parents and the
local board of health; the role of local, state, and national non-official organizations in health
teaching programs.
En. 405.-Student Teaching. 6 credits. Yn. Auditorium. Conferences to be
arranged.
For Elementary Teachers
Section 1. 10:00- 1:00 daily. KING and STAFF.
Section 2. 7:00-10:00 daily. STEELE and STAFF.
Designed to give the student experience in developing and using the various activities of
the teaching process. Some time is spent in directed observation and student teaching, supple-
mented by conferences.
For Secondary Teachers
Section 3. 8:30-11:30 daily. GIDUZ and STAFF.
An opportunity is given to the teachers for developing tentative plans for classroom experi-
ences. Three high school groups will afford a means for directed observation and student teaching,
supplemented by conferences. The work will include intensive study of the literature of teaching
in one field.
En. 471.-Problems of Instruction. 6 credits.
For Elementary Teachers
Lecture: Section 1. 7:00 daily. Yn-209. MELLISH.
Discussion: Section 10. 2:30-4:30 daily. Yn-105. HOUGH.
Section 11. 2:30-4:30 daily. Yn-209. DUMAS.
An opportunity will be given the teacher for studying curriculum practices and developing
tentative plans for classroom experiences in the community of the particular teacher. Evaluation
in various fields will be studied. Problems in teaching reading and the language arts will be
stressed.
En. 490.-Reading Laboratory and Clinic. 2:30 daily. Conferences to be
arranged. Sc-208. 2 credits. CENTER. (June 23 to July 3.)
A survey of the field of reading instruction through lectures, discussions, and clinical demon-
strations. Diagnostic testing, class organization, selection and organization of materials, methods
of teaching silent reading, the use of instruments in diagnosis and remedial instruction, the relation
of the course in reading to the English course of study and the curriculum, and final testing for
mastery will be discussed. Laboratory practices and clinical procedures will be demonstrated.

GRADUATE COURSES

All graduate students majoring in Educalion must register through the General Direct-
ing Committee of the College of Education. This Committee will assist such students,
beginning and advanced, in matters pertaining to their graduate work. Communications
should be addressed to Dr. J. Douglas Haygood, Chairman of General Directing Committee,
College of Education, University of Florida.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM


Note: The program for all students majoring in Education and beginning their graduate
work in the summer of 1911 must include the following courses: En. 508 and En. 510,
plus six hours from one of the following courses, En. 524, En. 525, En. 529, En. 551,
or six hours of Agricultural Education.

En. 508.-Democracy and Education. 8:30 daily. Sc-215. 3 credits. NORMAN.
The nature of experience, the nature of institutions, the social inheritance, the individual,
society, socialization, social control, dynamic and static societies, education its own end.

En. 510.-Foundations of Modern Education. 10:00 daily. La-201. 3 credits.
W. W. LITTLE.
An attempt to evaluate present day education by tracing its dominant factors-teacher, student,
curriculum, and educational plant, control and support-back to their beginnings; and to point
out present tendencies and possible developments.
En. 524.-Major Sequence in Secondary Education. 8:30-11:30 and 1:00-4:00
daily. Yn-134. 6 credits.
Designed to give a thorough overview of: (1) the needs of adolescents in our present social
order, (2) changes in the high school program, designed to meet these needs, (3) values on the
basis of which present high school curricula may be judged.
En. 525.-Major Sequence in Childhood Education. 8:30-11:30 and 1:00-4:00
daily. Yn-323. 6 credits. G. A. STEVENS and DOWELL.
Designed to give a unified and thorough discussion of: (1) the needs of children between
infancy and adolescence, (2) changes in the elementary school program designed to meet these
needs, and (3) ways and means whereby efforts at curriculum reconstruction may be evaluated in
the light of sound social and psychological bases.
En. 529.-Cooperating Schools Planning Course-First Year. 8:30 daily. Yn-
315. 6 credits. MEAD and others.
The Florida Workshop first course for graduates. Limited to members of the faculties of first
year Cooperating Schools who have received the bachelor's degree. Participants will be concerned
with total school problems and individual teacher problems of instruction.
En. 551.-School Planning Group. 8:30 daily. Yn-140. 6 credits. HALL,
BRISTOW and EDWARDS.
A course designed to help principals and teachers in the planning of a school improvement
program. Problems in administration and instruction.
En. 555.-Preparation of Materials Group. To arrange. Yn-. 6 credits.
MEAD and others.
Group A.-Audio-Visual Instructional Aids.
Group B.-Source Units in the Social Studies.
Group C.-Classroom Reading Materials.
Group D.-Assisting Schools of the Sloan Project. 8:30 daily. Yn-311.
HENDERSON.
This group is limited to the faculty members and principals of the schools of the Sloan Project.
En. 557.-Work-Conference on School Administrative Problems. 8:30 daily.
6 credits. MORPHET and others.
Committees will study special problems in school organization and administration for Florida.
Reports will be prepared in the nature of recommended handbooks or manuals.
Graduate Seminar for Beginners. 4:00 M. W. F. Pe-101. No credit. HAY-
GOOD and CRABTREE. Required of all graduate students majoring in Education.
Graduate Seminar for Advanced Students. 4:00 M. W. F. Pe-102. No credit.
GARRIS and HYDE. Required of all graduate students majoring in Education.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


ENGLISH

The courses in English, advanced as well as introductory, have one common purpose:
to enrich the student's experience by intimate association with those writings in our
language, past and present, which contribute most to meaningful living. The central aim
is to help persons of all vocations acquire some appreciation of our literary heritage.
essential to a cultivated outlook on life, and to help persons of all vocations acquire greater
facility in the knowledge and use of our language. The aim is thus twofold: education
for enlightened leisure and for enlightened labor.
Suggestions to Teachers: The Department recommends as the best possible preparation
for the teaching of English the following fundamental courses, or their equivalents, and
urges all who have not had equivalent courses to take them at the earliest opportunity:
CEh. 37-38 or CEh. 313-314, Eh. 301-302, Eh. 305, Eh. 399 (Section 1, if possible), Eh.
401-402, and, for those who are certified in English and who have had some teaching
experience. Eh. 380. In all courses intended primarily for teachers, special consideration
will be g;ven to appropriate topics and problems relating to the teaching of English in
public schools. (See the course descriptions below.)
For elementary school teachers the Department suggests Eh. 391 (offered both terms
this summer), at least one semester of CEh. 37-38 or CEh. 313-314, Eh. 305, Eh. 399, and
one semester of Eh. 401-402.
In addition to these basic courses other Departmental offerings may he selected by both
secondary and clenmentary school teachers according to personal preference.

CEh. 38.-Literary Masters of England. (Formerly Eh. 202.) 10:00 daily.
La-212. 3 credits. ROBERTSON.
The most intere.ning and significant English writers from Wordsworth to the present are read
and discussed, primarily for an appreciation of their art and outlook on life. Teachers of English
will be invited to confer with the instructor concerning any individual teaching problem appro-
priate to the materials within the scope of the course. In class discussions special consideration
will be given to those aspects of the teaching of English which seem general needs.

CEh. 313.-Masterpieces of World Literature. (Formerly Eh. 103.) 11:30
daily. La-212. 3 credits. ROBERTSON.
A lecture and reading course designed to acquaint the student with some of the greatest books
in the world, books which every educated person, layman or teacher, should know. As in CEh. 38
Isee above), special consideration will be given to appropriate topics pertaining to the teaching
of English.
Eh. 301.-Shakespeare. 11:30 daily. 3 credits. La-210. HEFFNER.
The primary design is to increase the student's enjoyment and appreciation of the plays.
Devoted chiefly to the romantic comedies and the history plays, including A Midsummer Night's
Dream. The Merchant of Venice, Much Ado, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Richard the Third,
and Henry the Fourth. As an aid to the reading of Shakespeare, some of the most interesting
features of the Elizabethan stage and drama are treated briefly.

Eh. 305.-Introduction to the Study of the English Language. 7 daily. La-212.
3 credits. ELIASON.
Designed to meet the needs of three types of students: (a) For the general student it offers
a means of improving his written and spoken English by showing him what "good English" is.
(b) For the English teacher in the secondary school it provides an adequate minimum knowledge
of the English Language. (c) For the English major and beginning graduate student it serves
as an introduction to further linguistic study. Primary emphasis is placed, not upon grammatical
rules, but rather upon the most interesting features of our language as written and spoken.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM


Eh. 380.-English in the Secondary Schools. 8:30 daily. 3 credits. Yn-228.
SPIVEY. Prerequisite: Certification in English.
This course is designed to help teachers of English (1) determine the ordinary human needs
which they as English teachers may minister to, (2) analyze and partially compensate for their
own deficiencies of knowledge and insight, (3) decide what materials and methods are most help-
ful in their teaching, (4) consider a more effective inter-relationship between the various phases
of English construction and also between their subject and others in the curriculum, aud (5) make
some progress toward solving individual problems pertaining to the improvement of their high
school program in English and what they do with it.
Eh. 391.-Children's Literature. 1:00 daily. Sc-208. 3 credits. MORRIS.
Designed to arouse and satisfy a genuine interest in children's books apart from school
textbooks, to aid the student to obtain a better working knowledge of this literature, and to make
him more aware of degrees of excellence in content and form.
Eh. 399.-Introduction to the Study of Literature. 3 credits. LYONS.
Section 1. 8:30 daily. La-210.
Section 2. 10:00 daily. La-210.
A consideration of the nature of literature, its types, forms, content and values. Designed
to develop greater skill in reading and to provide the student with a better critical understanding
of literary art. Lectures, conferences, and discussions. Although neither section is restricted,
it is suggested, if possible, that teachers of English register for Section 1.
Eh. 401.-American Literature. 10:00 daily. La-311. 3 credits. CONNER.
A survey, with the stress on major American writers, literary movements, and literary forms
from Franklin to Whitman. Special consideration will be given to appropriate topics pertaining
to the teaching of American literature in the public schools.
Eh. 407.-Contemporary Literature: Fiction. 7:00 daily. La-201. 3 credits.
SKAGGS.
A consideration of the most important English and American writers of prose fiction from
Thomas Hardy to the present, with major emphasis upon recent novelists.
Eh. 409.-Chaucer. 8:30 daily. 3 credits. La-314. ELIASON.
Designed to help the student appreciate Chaucer as a story teller, as a wise, humorous, and
penetrating observer of human life, and as a great poet.
Eh. 417.-Spenser. 10:00 daily. La-314. 3 credits. HEFFNER.
The purpose is to lead the student to a large familiarity with the text of Spenser to deal
with some of the problems of allusion, structure and style, and to suggest the poet's relationship
to his predecessors and contemporaries.
Eh. 443.-The English Romantic Period. 11:30 daily. La-307. 3 credits.
J. L. WILSON.
Reading and discussion. Chief emphasis on the work of Burns, Blake, Coleridge and Words-
worth.
GRADUATE COURSES

Eh. 501.-American Literature. 10:00 daily. La-311. 3 credits. CONNER.
The same as Eh. 401, with special assignments for graduate majors in English.
Eh. 509.-Chaucer. 8:30 daily. La-314. 3 credits. ELIASON.
The same as Eh. 409, with special assignments for graduate majors in English.
Eh. 517.-Spenser. 10:00 daily. La-314. 3 credits. HEFFNER.
The same as Eh. 417, with special assignments for graduate majors in English.
Eh. 543.-The English Romantic Movement. 11:30 daily. La-307. 3 credits.
J. L. WILSON.
The same as Eh. 443, with special assignments for graduate majors in English.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


FRENCH

CFh. 33.-Reading of French. 7:00 daily. La-307. 3 credits. ATKIN.
A beginning course, basic for further study. The main objective is reading ability; grammar
and pronunciation are subordinated. Reading of easy texts is begun at once.
Fh. 201.-Second-year French. 8:30 daily. La-307. 3 credits. Prerequisite:
CFh. 33-34, or the equivalent (one year of college French or two years of high
school French). ATKIN.
Reading; oral and written practice.
Fh. 430.-Individual Work. To arrange. 3 credits. ATKIN.
An opportunity to study, for credit, certain phases of French literature, language, and civiliza-
tion for which there are no special course offerings. Through this means a student can complete
an undergraduate major or graduate minor. Fh. 430 may be elected for additional credit in sub-
sequent sessions. Students will be helped to plan a definite program, and will meet the instructor
for frequent conferences.
Fh. 530.-Individual Work. To arrange. 3 credits. ATKIN.
The provision for graduate students is similar to that for undergraduates (see Fh. 430) and
will enable them to fulfill the requirements of a graduate major.


GENERAL SCIENCE

GI. 301.-Children's Science. 7:00 M. T. W. Th. Yn-142. 2 credits. GOETTE.
The content of elementary science together with its organization for use both in the integrated
program and in the departmentalized school.
Gl. 317.-Physical Sciences in the Secondary Schools. 8:30 daily. Bn-203.
3 credits. SWANSON. Prerequisite: C-2 or equivalent.
Designed for teachers of General Science, Physics, and Chemistry in the secondary schools. A
topical survey of the field of the physical sciences, and examination of the fundamental principles
involved, their effects on our environment, and how they govern the conservation of our natural
resources. The selection of materials illustrating these principles in action that are suitable for
the needs, interests, abilities, and level of maturity of secondary school students, and the study of
methods of presentation of such materials.
Gl. 318.-Biology in the Secondary Schools. 11:30 daily. Sc-101. 3 credits.
BYERS. Prerequisites: C-6 or its equivalent and one approved course in Biology.
A study program designed to aid teachers of the life sciences in constructing and administer-
ing a stimulating course of biological studies. Treats the building of the course and methods of
presentation. Recommended for all teachers of Biology in the secondary schools and for those
handling phases of biology, such as nature study, conservation, general science, etc., in the elemen-
tary school and junior high school.

GEOGRAPHY

Gpy. 305.-Geography of Florida. 7:00 daily. La-204. 3 credits. ATWOOD.
A study of the geographic conditions and human adjustments in the major regions of Florida.
The distribution of population, routes of communication, industries, resources, and stategic location
in the Western Hemisphere will be considered in their geographical and historical aspects. Atten-
tion is given to the explanation and interpretation of major natural phenomena such as weather
and climate, geologic structure and land forms, surface and underground drainage, shoreline char-
acteristics, natural vegetation, soil types and animal life. Optional field trips.
NOTB: For other courses in geography see Economics.


HANDWRITING

See Business Education.


124








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM


HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION

HP1. 261.-Football. 1:00 daily. Bn-209. 3 credits. MCALLISTER. (Open
only to men.)
Football from the viewpoint of the interscholastic soccer, presenting fundamentals in blocking,
tackling, kicking, passing, individual position play, appropriate offensive formations and plays,
and various defensive formations.
HPI. 263.-Basketball. 2:30 daily. Bn-209. 3 credits. MCALLISTER. (Open
only to men.)
Fundamentals of basketball for men; dealing with the techniques of shooting, passing, dribbling,
stops, and guarding. A consideration of offensive team play, defensive team play, signals, scouting,
team strategy, training, practice sessions, selection and placing of players, and other essentials of
the modern court game.
HPI. 363.-Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary School. 2:30 daily.
Yn-138. 3 credits. DOUTHETT.
The program of physical education activities for the secondary school involving team games,
rhythms, gymnastics activities, individual and dual sports; together with appropriate procedures
and methods for conducting such a program.
HPI. 373.-Methods and Materials in Physical Education. 3 credits. B. K.
STEVENS.
Section 1. For first, second, and third grade teachers. 8:30 daily.
Yn-150.
Section 2. For fourth, fifth, and sixth grade teachers. 2:30 daily.
Yn-150.
The program of physical education activities for the elementary school including small group
play, large group play, directed play, team game units; together with appropriate procedures
and methods for conducting such a program.

GRADUATE COURSE
HPI. 533.-Problems of Physical Education. 8:30 daily. Yn-138. 3 credits.
SALT.
Designed to give the student an understanding of the contemporary problems in physical educa-
tion. It forms the basis for the organization of research projects together with an analysis of
the techniques used in problem solving.

HISTORY

The prerequisites for all Upper Division courses in History, except for Hy. 331-332
and 335-336, are:
(1) For students whose Freshman and Sophomore work is taken under the curriculum
of the General College, satisfactory completion of C-l.-Man and the Social World,
followed by CHy. 13.-History of the Modern World.
(2) For students who have not completed the above, Hy. 313-314. (Formerly Hy.
101-102.) Europe During the Middle Ages.
Desirable prerequisite for Hy. 331-332 and Hy. 335-336 is C-1.-Man and the Social
World.
Students who have had two or more semesters of Advanced American History, Ily. 301,
302, 303 or 304 may not receive credit for the survey course.
CHy. 131.-History of the Modern World. 11:30 daily. Sc-213. 3 credits.
MILLER. Not open to students who have completed Hy. 201-202 or Hy. 219-220.
The modern world from 1815 to 1870.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Hy. 301.-American History 1492 to 1776. 8:30 daily. Pe-112. 3 credits.
LEAKE.
A thorough and detailed study of the American Colonies to the Revolution with special em-
phasis on the South.

Hy. 313.-Europe During the Middle Ages. (Formerly Hy. 101.) 11:30 daily.
Sc-205. 3 credits. BENTLEY.
A study of Europe from 476 to the First Crusade.

Hy. 331.-Survey of American History. 8:30 daily. La-212. 3 credits. GLUNT.
The first half of a six-credit survey of the entire period of American History, covering the
period up to 1850.

Hy. 335.-History of Western Civilization. 11:30 daily. La-201. 3 credits.
PATRICK.
The first half of a survey course treating the development of Western Civilization.

Hy. 361.-English History to 1688. 7:00 daily. Pe-112. 3 credits. HANNA.
A survey of English History from the Anglo-Saxon settlements to the Glorious Revolution.

IIy. 363.-Latin American History to 1850. 10:00 daily. La-306. 3 credits.
GLUNT.
A survey course treating the colonization and development of Hispanic America.

GRADUATE COURSE

Hy. 509.-Seminar. To arrange. 3 credits. LEAKE.


INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING

Ig. 301.-Survey of the Technological Practices of Industry. 1:00 M. W.
Laboratory 1-5 T. Th. F. Eg-202. 3 credits.
Open only to secondary school teachers of science or mathematics. An opportunity for teachers
of mathematics and the physical sciences to develop an acquaintance with the manner in which
their fields are applied in industry today. These applications are of particular importance in the
present national defense emergency. Topics discussed will include shop mechanics, internal com-
bustion engines, aeronautics, radio, and photography. Work will include films, demonstrations,
shop and laboratory work, and field trips to airports, radio stations, foundries, machine shops,
ship-building yards, etc. Aid will be given in building lists of references, sources of free and
inexpensive materials, methods of correlating technology with other fields, and teaching plans.


JOURNALISM

*Jm. 213.-Propaganda. 8:30 daily. Ag-108. 3 credits. EMIG.
A study of newspapers, magazines, the radio, and movies designed to develop a clear under-
standing of the forces that create and control propaganda and public action. Observance of
history in the making, the management and moulding of public thought, the attitudinizing of
people, the strategy of propagandists and symbol-makers and their use of such idea-transmitting
agencies as the newspaper, magazine, radio, movies, home, school, church, political parties, groups,
recreation, etc. An inquiry into the influence of propaganda on government, law-making, business,
education, morality, war, and peace.

*Jm. 314.-Magazine Article Writing. 8:30 daily. Ag-108. 3 credits. EMIG.
Analysis of technique in preparing articles for publication. Practice in writing articles follows
the study of principles and technique. Emphasis on attempt to market articles.

*That one of these courses will be offered for which there is the greater demand.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM


**Jm. 401.-School Publications. 10:00 daily. Ag-108. 3 credits. EMIG.
Supervision of school publications; organization of the editorial, advertising, and circulation
departments of school newspapers, magazines, and yearbooks. Methods of teaching journalistic
style and writing. Effective use of newspapers and magazines in classroom instruction.
**Jm. 408.-Advanced Public Opinion. 10:00 daily. Ag-108. 3 credits. EMIG.
The power and influence of public opinion in modern life. The technique and strategy of
directing public opinion; methods of measuring public opinion; current trends in public opinion.

LAW

The Law Summer Session extends through Ihe first lerm, six weeks, from June 16 to
July 25. Each period is one hour and fifleen minutes long.

Lw. 311.-School Law. 9:05-10:20 M. W. Th. S. Law-204. 2 credits.
TRUSLER.
Authority and responsibility of teachers; rights and duties of students; rules and regulations;
incidental fees; contracts of teachers; pensions; private schools; illegal expenditures of school
money; illegal uses of school property; school contracts and torts; diplomas and degrees; exemption
of school property from taxation. Trusler, Essentials of School Law.
Lw. 320.-Workmen's Compensation. 9:05-10:20 T. F. Law-204. 1 credit.
TRUSLER.
Scope, construction, beneficiaries, injuries compensated, defenses, and proceedings for adjust-
ment of compensation, with special reference to the Florida statute. Workmen's Compensation
Acts in Ruling Case Law and the Florida Act.
Lw. 407.-Use of Law Books. 3:00-5:00 M. Th. Law-204. 1 credit. ODLE.
The classes of law books; the location and use of decisions and statutes; the trial brief; the
brief on appeal. Brandt, How to Find the Law, 3rd edition.

Lw. 408.-Legal Ethics. 10:25-11:40 W. S. Law-204. 1 credit. MCRAE.
Organization of the bar; attorneys and professional conduct. Arant, Cases on Legal Ethics.
Lw. 430.-Bailments. 1:00-2:15 M. Th. Law-204. 1 credit. SLAGLE.
Mandates; deposits; pledges; custody and use; delivery and redelivery; rights and duties of
parties; termination of relation. Elliott on Bailments, 2nd edition.
Lw. 506.-Negotiable Instruments. 7:45-9:00 daily. Law-204. 3 credits. DAY.
Law merchant; definitions and general doctrines; contracts of the maker, acceptor, etc.;
proceedings before and after dishonor of negotiable instruments; absolute defenses; equities; pay-
ments; conflict of laws. Britton, Cases on Bills and Notes, 2nd edition.
Lw. 515.-Mortgages. 10:25-11:40 M. T. Th. F. Law-204. 2 credits. IMcRAE.
Nature; elements; discharge; assignment; redemption; foreclosure; injunction and account;
extent of the lien; priority between mortgage liens and competing claims; equity of redemption.
Campbell, Cases on Mortgages, 1940 edition.
Lw. 530.-Administrative Law. 1:00-2:15 T. W. F. S. Law-204. 2 credits.
SLAGLE.
Creation of administrative tribunals; legislative functions; judicial functions; administrative
functions; doctrine of separation of powers; limits upon discretion; securing information; notice
and hearing; enforcement of rules and orders; control of action judicial relief. Stason, Cases
and Materials on Administrative Tribunals.
Lw. 536.-Federal Rules. 9:05-10:20 T. Th. Law-202. 1 credit. TESELLE.
Federal Rules of Civil Procedure adopted in 1938. New Federal Rules.
Lw. 537.-Bankruptcy. 9:05-10:20 M. W. Th. S. Law-202. 2 credits. TESELI.E.
Remedies of the unsecured creditor; fraudulent conveyances; Chandler Act; bankruptcy-
individual; corporation; corporate reorganization; wage earner extension. Holbrook and Aigler,
4th edition.

**That one of these courses will be offered for which there is the greater demand.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIV ERSITY SUMMER SESSION


MATHEMATICS

Before registering for any course, the student should ascertain the prerequisites.
Students desiring courses other than those listed below should write to the Department
of Mathematics, or make inquiry immediately upon arrival at the University.
C-42.-General Mathmetics. (See General College Courses.)

CMs. 23.-Basic Mathematics. 8:30 daily. Pe-102. 3 credits. SIMPSON.
In place of the traditional college algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry in succession,
this course offers a completely new sequence of topics including the above plus a liberal amount
of calculus. Teachers of high school mathematics who wish to advance in technical command
of the subject matter should elect both CMs. 23 and CMAs. 24. This is also designed for those
who plan to major in mathematics or to elect courses above the freshman level. Milne and Davis,
Introductory College Mathematics.
Ms. 226.-Algebra for Teachers. 8:30 daily. Pe-2. 3 credits. PIRENIAN.
The materials of first and second year high school algebra. A study of the State adopted text
with supplementary and illustrative material. Methods of presentation. Functional relationships.
Construction and interpretation of graphs.
Ms. 326.-Advanced General Mathematics. 10:00 daily. Pe-1. 3 credits.
PIRENIAN.
Designed for high school teachers. Selected topics having a direct and significant bearing upon
the teaching of mathematics in high school. Consideration of the subject matter itself and its
relation to adequate reorganization programs, both in the light of general modern objectives and
experience obtained in the teaching of mathematics in the General College. Ms. 325 is concerned
with the teaching of general (practical) mathematics and algebra in high schools. Ms. 326 deals
with the teaching of geometry and trigonometry. Either course may be taken first.
Ms. 340.-Mathematics in the Secondary School. 7:00 daily. Yn-232. 3
credits. KUSNER. Prerequisites: Open only to teachers of secondary mathe-
matics with adequate mathematical backgrounds (to be determined by the in-
structor).
The role of mathematics in modern life; its place in general education in light of needs,
interests, abilities and maturity of pupils; its organization in the secondary school program;
methods and procedures of instruction, with emphasis on pupil participation through projects, field
work, reports, etc.; correlation of mathematics with other fields; mathematics in the integrated
program. Opportunity will be offered for extensive study of applications of mathematics. Work
will be conducted with the whole group, with committees, and on an individual basis, in order that
each teacher may develop instructional plans adapted to the situation in his community.
Ms. 353.-Differential and Integral Calculus. 7:00 daily. Pe-1. 3 credits.
PHIPPS.
Beginning calculus course. Differentiation, one of the most important and practical fields
of mathematics, is treated in the main, but a beginning is made in integration, the inverse
operation of differentiation. Smith, Salkover, and Justice, Calculus.

GRADUATE COURSES

Ms. 500.-Graduate Seminar. 8:30 daily. Pe-1. 3 credits. PHIPPS.
Students who wish training on a graduate level may register for Ms. 500. Topics studied
will depend upon preparation and needs.
Ms. 568.-History of Elementary Mathematics. 11:30 daily. Pe-102. 3 credits.
KOKOMOOR.
A survey of the development of mathematics through the calculus, with special emphasis on
the changes of the processes of operations and methods of teaching. No specific text is followed,
hut numerous works are used as references.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST' TERMl


MUSIC

Msc. 103.-Materials and Methods for Grades One, Two, and Three. 10:00
daily. Auditorium. 3 credits. Laboratory to be arranged. CARSON.
The child voice; rote songs; development of rhythm; sight-singing from rote to note; develop-
ment of skills necessary for teaching primary music.
Msc. 104.-Materials and Methods for Grades Four, Five, and Six. 2:30 daily.
Auditorium. Laboratory to be arranged. 3 credits. CARSON.
Development of sight-singing; study of problems pertaining to intermediate grades; part sing-
ing; song repertoire; appreciation work suitable for intermediate grades.

PHARMACOLOGY

*Ply. 455.-New Remedies. 8:30 M. T. W. Th. Ch-316. Quiz and Laboratory
1-4 M. T. Ch-316. 3 credits. FOOTE. The first half of the course Ply. 455-456.
Ply. 455-456. A study of the most important nonofficial remedies currently found in modern
prescription practice and over-the-counter sales. More than twelve hundred remedies are available
for study.
*Ply. 456.-New Remedies. 8:30 M. T. W. Th. Ch-316. Quiz and Laboratory
1-4 M. T. Ch-316. 3 credits. FOOTE. The second half of the course Ply. 455-456.

PHARMACY

GRADUATE COURSE

Phy. 554.-Advanced Pharmacy. To be arranged. 2 credits. FOOTE.
Lectures and assigned reading on the pharmacy and chemistry of vegetable drugs.

PHILOSOPHY

**Ppy. 303.-Introduction to Philosophy. 8:30 daily. Bn-205. 3 credits. FOX.
An introduction to the fundamental problems of philosophy with special emphasis on ethics
and aesthetics.
**Ppy. 410.-History of Modern Philosophy. 8:30 daily. Bn-205. 3 credits. Fox
Readings from original sources, papers on special topics, group discussions.

PHYSICS

Students in the College of Engineering desiring to earn credit in Physics may enroll
in the courses outlined below. Additional problem work and subject matter will he
assigned, and substitution will be allowed if a grade of C or higher is made.
Ps. 101.-Elementary Physics. 10:00 daily. Bn-203. 3 credits. PERRY.
Prerequisite: C-2 or consent of instructor.
Ps. 103.-Laboratory for Ps. 101. 1-4 M. W. F. Bn-306. 2 credits. PERRY
in charge. Corequisite: Ps. 101.

POLITICAL SCIENCE

The prerequisites for the Upper Division courses in Political Science are: C-1 and
CP1. 13; or Pcl. 313-314. (Formerly Pcl. 101-102.)

*That one of these courses will be offered for which there is the greater demand.
**That one of these courses will be offered for which there is the greater demand.









BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


CPI. 13.-Political Foundations of Modern Life. 1:00 daily. Pe-112. 3 credits.
LAIRD.
The principles and practices of political institutions; how government functions in the United
States; and what information can be drawn from the practices of other countries.
Pcl. 309.-International Relations. 10:00 daily. Pe-101. 3 credits. DAUER.
First half of the year course on International Relations. World politics and the policies of
the great powers. Underlying factors in international affairs: economic problems, nationalism,
imperialism. The causes of the present war. The conduct of international affairs and diplomacy.
World organization and peace movements.
Pcl. 313.-American Government and Politics. (Formerly Pel. 101.) 7:00
daily. Pe-209. 3 credits. CAWTHON.
The Federal Government, its philosophy, organization and functions.
Pcl. 405.-History of Political Theory. 8:30 daily. Pe-209. 3 credits. CAW-
THON.
History of ancient, medieval, and modern political theories.


POULTRY HUSBANDRY

Py. 301.-Poultry Production. 10:00 M. T. W. Th. and 1-4 Th. Ag-209. 2
credits. MEHRHOF. (June 23 to July 12.)
A study of breeds, principles of production, hatching, brooding management with special
emphasis on farm flock.

PSYCHOLOGY

CPs. 43.-Psychological Foundations of Modern Life. 3 credits.
Section 1. 8:30 daily. Pe-11. VAN DUSEN.
Section 2. 10:00 daily. Pe-11. MOSIER.
The social and personal implications of psychology to every day living. An understanding
of human motivation and one's own personality. How the individual acquires and organizes
sensory experiences and how these are used in the guidance of effective thinking and behavior.

Psy. 301.-Advanced General Psychology. 11:30 daily. Pe-11. 3 credits.
MOSIER.
An advanced critical and constructive consideration of the major topics in the field of general
psychology; methods, systems, mind-body relationships, consciousness, intelligence, nervous struc-
ture, nervous behavior, mental processes, affection, emotion, volition, learning, self.
Psy. 309.-Personality Development. 8:30 daily. Pe-114. 3 credits. HINCKLEY.
The mechanism of personality formation, with special emphasis upon the varieties of human
adjustment. Particular attention is given to the personality development of the school child
and the ways by means of which proper adjustment can be guided by the teacher.
Psy. 310.-Abnormal Psychology. 10:00 daily. Pe-209. 3 credits. HINCKLEY.
The abnormal phases of mental life, and the ways by means of which the individual develops
abnormal habits of thinking and acting. The signs of beginning maladjustment in the school
child and procedures which the teacher should follow to correct these tendencies. Special sugges-
tions are given for the prevention and treatment of mental disease.

GRADUATE COURSE

Psy. 510.-Social Psychiatry. 10:00 daily. Pe-114. 3 credits. VAN DUSEN.
Lectures and readings on the various forms of mental disease, with attention to causes.
diagnosis, symptoms, and treatment. Psychiatric information for social workers and school
psychologists.








I)EPARIl'. 1i':t, I'S OF I \S7'R1 CTI(l)\ SE(f,() V) 'IR 11


SCHOOL ART

Pc. 251.-Art for the Primary Grades. 1:00 daily. Yn-Shop Annex. 2 credits.
BOHANNON.
Activities for the kindergarten, first, second, and third grades that interpret the underlying
philosophy and the skills in art that are basic as a means of expression in large unit teaching.
Pc. 252.-Art for the Elementary Grades. 4:00 daily. Yn-Shop Annex. 2
credits. BOHANNON.
Activities for the fourth, fifth, and sixth grades that interpret the underlying philosophy and
the skills in art that are basic as a means of expression in large unit teaching.
Pc. 253.-Principles of Art. 10:00 daily. Yn-Shop Annex. 2 credits. BO-
HANNON.
Opportunity will be given for teachers to evaluate children's work and to learn the funda-
mentals of art with opportunity for expression.

SOCIAL STUDIES

S'l. 301.-Children's Social Studies. 8:30 daily. Eg-202. 3 credits. AL-
STETTER and MCLENDON.
An opportunity will be given to study content material in the social studies field with implica-
tions for the activity program.
Scl. 302.-Children's Social Studies. 11:30 daily. Eg-202. 3 credits. AL-
STETTER and MCLENDON.
A continuation of Scl. 301.
Scl. 303.-Social Studies in the Secondary Schools. 10:00 daily. Yn-236. 3
credits. ATWOOD, MACLACHLAN, PATRICK.
A course designed to fit the needs of teachers in the Florida Schools. The work will consist
of three parts: (1) the need for integration in the social sciences, (2) the program of social
studies in the Florida junior and senior high schools, (3) work with groups of teachers on the
particular problems of materials for different grade levels. This course is for advanced under-
graduates in the social studies and for graduate students.

SOCIOLOGY

CSy. 13.-Sociological Foundations of Modern Life. 8:30 daily. Pe-4. 3
credits. MACLACHLAN. Prerequisite: C-1 or consent of instructor.
The basic forces in human society. Sociology in creative dependence upon the other sciences.
Social resources and complexities in modern America. The metropolitan environment and the social
institutions. The American regions as social environments and as challenges to citizenship.
Sy. 322.-The Child in American Society. 11:30 daily. Pe-4. 3 credits.
FOREMAN.
The challenge of adjustment of children to a changing modern society is reviewed in the light
of recent sociological studies. Some attention is devoted to abnormal and delinquent children as
adjustment problems. Special consideration is given to sociological pressures upon the American
school, but the course is designed to supplement rather than to duplicate courses such as approach
the child from the viewpoint of Education.
Sy. 344.-Marriage and the Family. 7:00 daily. Ag-104. 3 credits. EHR-
MANN.
The nature and development of domestic institutions, marriage and the family. Problems of
adjustment to modern conditions. Changes in marital and domestic relations with particular em-
phasis on preparation for marriage. The status of women and laws pertaining to marriage in
Florida. Divorce, family disorganization, child training.
Sy. 490.-The South Today. 10:00 daily. Pe-4. 3 credits. FOREMAN.
Regional resources and culture. The social resources and challenges of the modern South.
Measures of southern culture. The place of the South in the nation. Programs and plans for the
region reviewed and contrasted. A broad view of the foundations of southern life.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIt ERSITY SUMMER SESSION


GRADUATE COURSES

Sy. 522.-The Child in American Society. 11:30 daily. Pe-4. 3 credits.
FOREMAN.
The same as Sy. 322, with extra work for graduate students.
Sy. 542.-Applied Sociology. To arrange. 3 credits. MACLACHLAN.
Special problems in advanced sociology.
Sy. 544.-Marriage and the Family. 7:00 daily. Ag-104. 3 credits. EHR-
MANN,
The same as Sy. 344, with extra work for graduate students.
Sy. 590.-The South Today. 10:00 daily. Pe-4. 3 credits. FOREMAN.
The same as Sy. 490, with extra work for graduate students.

SPANISH

CSh. 33.-Reading of Spanish. 8:30 daily. La-306. 3 credits. HAUPTMANN.
First half of course CSh. 33-34. Open to those students who have had no previous work in
Spanish. Introduction to materials involved in the reading and speaking of Spanish, with special
reference to Latin America.
Sh. 201.-Second-year Spanish. 11:30 daily. La-306. 3 credits. HAUPT-
MANN.
The first half of course Sh. 201-202. Prerequisite: CSh. 33-34 or equivalent. Readings in
representative Spanish and Latin-American prose of moderate difficulty. Practice in conversation.

GRADUATE COURSE

Sh. 530.-Individual Work. To arrange. 3 credits. HAUPTMANN. Pre-
requisite: Permission of instructor.
Readings and reports in field chosen by individual student. Mainly designed for graduate
students who wish to gain special information on certain genres, movements or authors. This
course may be repeated without duplication or credit.

SPEECH

All students taking work in the Department of Speech must have completed C-3 or
Eh. 101.
CSc. 33.-Effective Speaking. 4 credits.
Section 1. 7:00 daily. 1:00 T. Th. Pe-205. TEW.
Section 2. 8:30 daily. 1:00 T. Th. Pe-205. CONSTANS.
Designed to aid the student through lecture, reading, demonstration, and practice to talk
effectively to a group. Individual needs of the student given attention.
Sch. 404.-Dramatic Production. 10:00 daily. Pe-205. 3 credits. GEISENHOF
and CONSTANS. Prerequisite or corequisite: CSc. 33.
Consideration of the choice of the play, casting the characters, working out the action, direct-
ing the rehearsals. Meeting the problem of stage equipment, costuming, lighting, and make-up.
Observation and participation in the presentation of plays.
Sch. 416.-Correction of Speech Defects. 10:00 daily. Pe-208. 3 credits.
TEW and CONSTANS. Prerequisite: CSc. 33 or teaching experience.
This is a beginning course in the recognition and correction of common speech defects and
is especially designed for all teachers in the public schools. The problems of individual language
difficulties will be presented and the actual corrective procedure demonstrated. Correction of
lisping, indistinct enunciation, foreign accent, stuttering, and delayed speech will also be con-
sidered.
Speech Clinic. 1:00 M. W. F. Pe-211. No credit. STAFF.
The Speech Clinic offers without charge individual assistance to students desiring aid in
overcoming their speech defects, Applicants for this service should report as soon as possible
to Peabody 211 at one o'clock on Monday. Wednesday. or Friday.







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION SECOND TERM


DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

AND SCHEDULE OF COURSES

Second Term

All classes ordinarily meet for one hour and twenty minutes. Classes scheduled to
meet daily meet Monday through Saturday. Course descriptions are not given if the same
course was offered the first term. See appropriate section of the first term schedule for
this information.
Some courses are indicated as being offered by the seminar method. Students taking
these courses will do independent work under the supervision of the instructor, with no
regular class meetings unless time of meeting is listed in the schedule.
Students not registered in the Graduate School will not be permitted to register for
graduate courses unless they secure written approval from the Dean of the Graduate School
and the instructor concerned.

GENERAL COLLEGE COURSES

Students should consult official announcements by the Board of University Examiners
for details concerning comprehensive examinations. Credits are indicated for the benefit
of Upper Division students who elect these courses.

C-12.-Man and the Social World. 4 credits.
Lecture Section 1: 8:30 M. W. F. Ch-Aud. STAFF.
Discussion Sections: 10 8:30 T. Th. S. and 1:00 Th. Sc-213. BENTLEY.
11 8:30 T. Th. S. and 4:00 Th. La-204. LAIRD.
12 8:30 T. Th. S. and 1:00 Th. Sc-205.

C-22.-Man and the Physical World. 4 credits.
Lecture Section 1: 10:00 T. Th. S. Ch-Aud. STAFF.
Discussion Sections: 10 7:00 M. W. F. S. Bn-205. GADDUM.
11 8:30 T. W. Th. S. Bn-205. EDWARDS.
12 7:00 M. W. F. S. Bn-201. EDWARDS.

C-32.-Reading, Speaking and Writing. 4 credits.
Lecture Section 1: 11:30 M. W. F. Ch-Aud. STAFF.
Discussion Sections: 10 10:00 daily. La-203. MORRIS.
11 2:30 daily. La-203. MOUNTS.
Writing Laboratory 101 7:00 M. W. F. La-200. SKAGGS.
102 7:00 T. Th. S. La-209. SKAGGS.

CEh. 34.-Reading for Leisure. 8:30 daily. La-210. 3 credits. SKAGGS.
Prerequisite: C-3 or permission of C-3 Course Chairman. Open to Upper Division
students.
Designed to aid the student in planning for himself a well-rounded leisure-reading program.
which will serve to keep him abreast of the best in contemporary thought and literature.

C-41.-Man and His Thinking. 8:30 daily. La-203. 3 credits. W. H. WILSON.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


C-52.-The Humanities. 4 credits.
Lecture Section 1: 11:30 M. W. F. Aud. STAFF.
Discussion Sections: 10 8:30 M. T. W. F. Sc-201. HANNA,
11 1:00 M. T. W. F. Sc-201. HANNA.
C-62.-Man and the Biological World. 4 credits.
Lecture Sections: 1 7:00 M. T. Th. F. S. Sc-101. BYERS.
2 10:00 M. T. W. Th. F. Sc-101. BYERS.
Discussion Sections: 10 1:00 M. W. Sc-111. CARR.
11 2:30 T. Th. Sc-101. CARR.
20 8:30 M. W. Sc-111. CARR.
21 11:30 M. W. Sc-111. CARR.

BIOLOGY

Bly. 134.-Life of Inland and Coastal Waters of Florida. 8:30 daily. Sc-101.
3 credits. J. S. ROGERS.
A companion course to Bly. 33, devoted to the aquatic life of the state. Special attention is
devoted to the aquatic vertebrates, the more interesting invertebrates, and the more conspicuous
aquatic plants. The lectures are supplemented with demonstrations, and one or more field trips
may be arranged.
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Courses inl Business Administration arq listed under Economics and are marked Bs.

BUSINESS EDUCATION

BEn. 94.-Stenography. 8:30-11:30 and 2:30-4:00 daily. Yn-305 and Yn-306.
4 credits. MOORMAN. Prerequisites: BEn. 81 and BEn. 91 or permission of the
instructor.
Advanced course in shorthand and typewriting. Designed for those who desire more instruc-
tion than is given in the elementary or introductory courses in shorthand and typewriting for
personal use, as well as for those who desire certification in the commercial subjects.
BEn. 97.-Handwriting. 1 credit. MOORMAN.
Section 1. 7:00 A.M. M. T. W. Yn-306.
Section 2. 7:00 P.M. M. T. W. Yn-306.

CHEMISTRY
Cy. 102.-General Chemistry. 10:00 daily. Ch-212. Laboratory 1-5 M. W.,
1-4 F. Ch-130. 4 credits. HEATH. The second half of the course Cy. 101-102.
Metallic elements and their compounds.
Cy. 202.-Analytical Chemistry. 8:30 M. T. W. Th. F. Ch-110. Laboratory
1-5 M. T. W. Th. F. Ch-114. 4 credits. JACKSON.
Theoretical principles and laboratory technique involved in the quantitative determination of
the common metals and acid radicals.
GRADUATE COURSES
*Cy. 515.-Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. 8:30 daily. Ch-212. 3 credits.
HEATH.
Discussion of Crystallography, Fire-Assay, the Goniometer, Radioactivity, Atomic Structure,
Isotopes, and Isobars. The less common compounds of Phosphorus, Sulfur, Nitrogen and Silicon.
*Cy. 516.-Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. 8:30 daily. Ch-212. 3 credits.
HEATH.
A systematic discussion of the Rarer Elements, considered by Periodic Group relations to each
other and to the common elements. Uses of the Rarer Elements and their compounds.
*That one of these courses will be offered for which there is the greater demand.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION SECOND TERM


ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Note: Courses designated by the letters Es. are Economics courses, those designated by
the letters Bs. are Business Administration courses.

*(Es. 132.-Economic Foundations of Modern Life. 10:00 daily. Pe-206. 3
credits. TUTTLE.

*CBs. 142.-Elementary Accounting. 8:30 daily. Sc-202. 3 credits. BEIGHTS.
Bs. 312.-Accounting Principles. 7:00 daily. Sc-202. 3 credits. BEIGHTS.
Consideration is given to the legal aspects of accounting and related problems resulting from
the legal organization form used by businesses: liabilities; proprietorship; partnerships; corpora-
tions; capital stock; surplus; followed by a study of the financial aspects of accounting as disclosed
by an analysis and interpretation of financial statements: financial ratios and standards, their
preparation, meaning and use.

Es. 322.-Financial Organization of Society. 7:00 daily. Pe-206. 3 credits.
TUTTLE. Prerequisite: Es. 321.
An introduction to the field of finance; a study of the institutions providing monetary,
banking and other financial services; interrelationships and interdependence of financial institu-
tions; central banking; government control of finance; significance of financial organization to
the economic system as a whole.

Es. 327.-Public Finance. 11:30 daily. La-314. 3 credits. DONOVAN.
Principles governing expenditures of modern government; sources of revenue; public credit;
principles and methods of taxation and of financial administration as revealed in the fiscal
systems of leading countries.

Es. 335.-Economics of Marketing. 8:30 daily. La-201. 3 credits. EUTSLER.
The nature of exchange and the economic principles underlying trade, with particular attention
given to interregional trade. The significance of comparative costs, comparative advantages, and
comparative disadvantages. The institutions and methods developed by society for carrying on
trading operations; retail and wholesale agencies; elements of marketing efficiency; the cost of
marketing; price maintenance; unfair competition; the relation of the government to marketing.

Es. 381.-Economic Geography of North America. 10:00 daily. La-204. 3
credits. DIETTRICH.
A geographical survey of the continent of North America with special reference to the natural
conditions of the United States; involving the analysis of the major regions of the United States
from the standpoint of their relation to their natural environment.

Es. 385.-Economic Geography of South America. 11:30 daily. La-204. 3
credits. DIETTRICH.
A geographical survey of the continent of South America, organized around the growth of
trade, exports and imports, trade by countries, and general business trends; the economic condi-
tions that influence commercial advance or decline; the major geographic regions; their importance
in supplying export products and in consuming import commodities.

Bs. 402.-Business Law. '10:00 daily. Pe-208. 3 credits. HURST.
A continuation of Bs. 401.

*This course is a unit. To complete it both terms of the summer session are required. Students
may take the second term without having had the first term only with the consent of the Instructor.
When the course is completed in the summer session by students in the Upper Division they may
secure six semester hours credit








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION


Es. 404.-Government Control of Business. 11:30 daily. Pe-208. 3 credits.
HURST.
The control between government and business; history, theory, purposes, extent, policy and
legality of government control, services and agencies which modern governments undertake to
provide for business enterprises.

Es. 408.-Economic Principles and Problems. 7:00 daily. Sc-215. 3 credits.
McFERRIN.
Advanced economic theory with special emphasis on the causes of economic maladjustments
arising from the operation of economic forces.

Bs. 427.-Principles of Business Finance. 8:30 daily. Sc-215. 3 credits.
MCFERRIN.
Lectures, discussions, and problems. A study of the economic and legal forms of business
enterprise; the instruments of business finance; financial problems as they relate to the ordinary
operations of the business involving working capital, income, dividend policy, current borrowing,
credit extension, and the business cycle. Considerable attention will be devoted to the firs..iji
problems of individuals, and to small and average size businesses.

Es. 430.-Problems in Taxation. 8:30 daily. La-314. 3 credits. DONOV.\N
Prerequisite: Es. 327.
An intensive study of the problems of taxation primarily related to the following tE,-.
general, property, income, business, inheritance, and commodity.

Bs. 461.-Life Insurance. Seminar method. 3 credits. EUTSLER.
The functions of life insurance; the science of life insurance and the computation of pren..r..:
types of life companies; life insurance law; the selling of life insurance.

Es. 463.-Problems in Social Security. 10:00 daily. La-201. 3 cr-lIitz.
EUTSLER.
The meaning and nature of social security, especially as related to economic security.. I
distinctions between social and private insurance; the hazards of low income groups and
evaluation of projects and methods for eliminating, reducing or indemnifying these hazard r...
problems of social security in the United States, especially concerning experiences with relief
measures, the development of legislation, the problems of financing and administering s- urn;
programs, and the relationship between economic planning and security.

GRADUATE COURSES

Es. 502.-Seminar in Economic Principles and Problems. Seminar meth,..l
credits. EUTSLER. Prerequisite: Es. 407-408 (Economic Principles and Pr'.b-
lems), or equivalent.

Bs. 514.-Seminar in Accounting Principles and Problems. Seminar method
3 credits. BEIGHTS. The second half of the course Bs. 513-514. Prereqiii;r>.:
Bs. 513.

Es. 524.-Corporation Finance and Investments. Seminar method. 3 c t lir-
MCFERRIN. Prerequisite: Es. 321-322 (Financial Organization of Society,. .r
equivalent.

Es. 530.-Problems in Taxation. Seminar method. 3 credits. DONit \'.
Prerequisite: Es. 327 (Public Finance), or equivalent.
An intensive study of the problems of taxation primarily related to the following I's,-
general property, incomes, business, inheritance, and commodity.

Es. 565.-Problems in Sbcial Security. Seminar method. 3 credits. EUTSLEI:.
Prerequisite: Es. 407-408 (Economic Principles and Problems), or equivalent







DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION' SECOND TERM


EDUCATION

CEn. 13.-Introduction to Education. 8:30 daily. Sc-206. 3 credits. WOR-
CESTER.
En. 385.-The Pre-Adolescent Child. 10:00 daily. Sc-20G. 3 credits. WOR-
CESTER.
En. 386.-The Adolescent Child. 11:30 daily. Sc-208. : credits. CRAGO.
En. 387.-Health Education. 7:00 daily. Yn-134. 3 credits. SALT.
En. 406.-Elementary School Administration. 11:30 daily. Sc-202. 3 credits.
DOWELL.
Relationship of the teachers to the problems in school administration.
En. 471.-Problems of Instruction. 6 credits.
(Elementary School)
Section 1. 7:00 daily and conference to arrange. Yn-209. MELLISH
and HOUGH.
(Secondary School)
Section 2. 7:00 daily and conference to arrange. Yn-226. CULPEPPER.

GRADUATE COURSES

En. 508.-Democracy and Education. 8:30 daily. Yn-134. 3 credits. NOR-
MAN.
The nature of experience, the nature of institutions, the social inheritance, the individual,
society, socialization, social control, dynamic and static societies, education its own end.
En. 536.-Elementary Supervision. 10:00 M. T. W. Th. F. Sc-202. 2 credits.
DOWELL.
The objectives, procedures, and means of evaluation of supervision in elementary schools; the
preparation of teachers.
En. 562.-Guidance and Counseling. 8:30 daily. Pe-206. 3 credits. HALL.
Study of guidance and counseling of high school students. Educational and vocational guidance
and problems of personality adjustment. Offered only in the summer session.
En. 605.-Public School Administration. 11:30 daily. Pe-20G. 3 credits.
HALL.
Graduate Seminar for Beginners. 4:00 M. W. F. Pe-101. No credit. HAY-
GOOD and CRABTREE. Required of all graduate students majoring in Education.
Graduate Seminar for Advanced Students. 4:00 M. W. F. Pe-102. No credit.
CRAGO and HYDE. Required of all graduate students majoring in Education.

ENGLISH

See notes preceding offerings for the first term.
CEh. 37.-Literary Masters of England. 10:00 daily. La-210. 3 credits.
MOCiUNTS
Th.- m.:.st interesting and significant English writers are read and discussed, primarily for an
. ipr'~,at.:n of their art and outlook on life. Teachers of English will be invited to confer with
tr. Ir.;l.j,'ror concerning any individual teaching problem appropriate to the materials within
ir, '.. .r *-f the course. In class discussions special consideration will be given to those aspects
.4- ~, r -,.:hing of English which seem general needs.
Eh. 30l2.-Shakespeare. 11:30 daily. La-212. 3 credits. ROBERTSON.
Th- great tragedies will be studied, notably Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, and Antony
..I .lI. patra. Eh. 301 and 302 may be taken in reverse order.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUAMMlER SESSION


Eh. 354.-Browning. 7:00 daily. La-311. 3 credits. FARRIS.
Intensive study of the poems of Browning.
Eh. 391.-Children's Literature. 2:30 daily. Sc-208. 3 credits. MORRIS.

Eh. 402.-American Literature. 10:00 daily. La-311. 3 credits. SPIVEY.
A general survey of American literature (of all types and all regions) from Whitman to the
present, with the major emphasis upon such writers as Whitman, Howells, James, Twain, Lanier,
the local colorists, Wharton, Gather, Glasgow, Lewis, Robinson, Frost and O'Neill. Special con-
sideration will be given to appropriate topics pertaining to the teaching of American literature
in the public schools.
Eh. 404.-The Novel. 8:30 daily. La-311. 3 credits. FARRIS.
A study of the modern English and American novel from Hardy to the present, stressing the
art, objectives, and types of the novel during this period, together with its relation to the life
of today.
Eh. 405.-Drama of the Restoration and Eighteenth Century. 10:00 daily.
La-212. 3 credits. ROBERTSON.
A survey of the English stage from Dryden to Sheridan, with emphasis upon principal plays,
playwrights, and dramatic tendencies.
Eh. 418.-The Literature of the South. 8:30 daily. La-212. 3 credits. SPIVEY.
Restricted to a study of the most important contemporary fiction dealing with the South-
novels by Ellen Glasgow, Thomas Wolfe, Erskine Caldwell, William Faulkner, Mrs. Rawlings. etc.

GRADUATE COURSES

Eh. 502.-American Literature. 10:00 daily. La-311. 3 credits. SPIVEY.
Eh. 505.-Drama of the Restoration and Eighteenth Century. 10:00 daily.
La-212. 3 credits. ROBERTSON.

FRENCH

CFh. 34.-Reading of French. 7:00 daily. La-307. 3 credits. BRUNET.
A continuation of CFh. 33, which is prerequisite.
Fh. 202.-Second-year French. 8:30 daily. La-307. 3 credits. BRUNET.
A continuation of Fh. 201, which is prerequisite.
Fh. 430.-Individual Work. To arrange. 3 credits. BRUNET.
Fh. 530.-Individual Work. To arrange. 3 credits. BRUNET.


GENERAL SCIENCE

Gl. 301.-Children's Science. Yn-142. 2 credits. GOETTE.
Section 1. 7:00 M. T. W. Th. F.
Section 2. 8:30 M. T. W. Th. F.


GEOLOGY

Gy. 101.-Land Forms and Climate of Florida. 11:30 daily. Sc-101. 3 credits.
J. S. ROGERS.
A comprehensive survey of the physical geography, rocks, fossils, minerals, soils and climate
of Florida. Designed to provide a background for the cultural appreciation of the scenery and
geology of the state, for an understanding of certain phases of conservation, and for comprehen-
sion of the factors governing the distribution of the plants and animals of Florida. The lectures
are supplemented by demonstrations, and one or more field trips may be arranged.








DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION SECOND TEl.RM 139

I HANDWRIITING
See Business Education.

HEALTH AN) PHYSICAL FI)UCATION

HPI. 361.-Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary School. 2:30 daily.
Yn-138. 3 credits. SALT.
A continuation of HPI. 363. (Satisfies certification requirements in physical education for
those who expect to teach in the secondary school.)
HPI. 373.-Methods and Materials in Physical Education. 3 credits. B. K.
STEVENS.
Section 1. 8:30 daily. Yn-150.
Section 2. 10:00 daily. Yn-150.
Hill. 534.-Problems of Physical Education. 8:30 daily. Yn-138. 3 credits.
SALT. The second half of the course HP1. 533-534.

HISTORY

For prerequisites see note preceding offerings during the first term.

CHy. 132.-History of the Modern World. 11:30 daily. Sc-213. 3 credits.
PATRICK.
The modern world from 1870 to 1941.
Hy. 302.-American History, 1776 to 1830. 8:30 daily. Pe-112. 3 credits.
LAFUZE.
The Revolutionary War and the early constitutional period.
Hy. 314.-Europe During the Middle Ages. (Formerly Hy. 102.) 11:30 daily.
Sc-205. 3 credits. BENTLEY.
Europe from the First Crusade to the Reformation.
Hy. 332.-Survey of American History. 8:30 daily. Pe-208. 3 credits.
PAYNE.
The second half of a six-credit survey of American History; this half covers the period from
1850 to 1941.
Hy. 336.-History of Western Civilization. 10:00 daily. Sc-213. 3 credits.
PATRICK.
The second half of a survey course treating the developments of Western Civilization.
Hy. 362.-English History, 1688 to Present. 7:00 daily. Pe-112. 3 credits.
PAYNE.
The second half of a survey course of English History. This half covers the period from the
Glorious Revolution to 1941.
Hy. 364.-Latin American History 1850 to Present. 10:00 daily. Pe-11. 3
credits. LAFUZE.
A survey course covering the period from 1850 to the present.

CIADUATE COURSE

Hy. 510.-Seminar. To arrange. 3 credits.








BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMAIER SESSION


MATHEMATICS

CMs. 24.-Basic Mathematics. 8:30 daily. Pe-102. 3 credits. MCINNIS.
A continuation of CMs. 23.
Ms. 225.-Arithmetic for Teachers. 11:30 daily. Pe-1. 3 credits. QUADE.
Meaning and cultural values of arithmetic. Principles, fundamentals, processes, checks and
short cuts. Study of fractions, approximations, percentages, projects and activity programs; and
many other topics so treated as to give the student a connected idea of the subject matter of
arithmetic. Also, treatment of certain advanced notions of arithmetic to throw light upon begin-
ning processes, which many teachers never have the opportunities to investigate. Designed not
only for teachers of arithmetic, but also for teachers of any science in which familiarity with
number processes is desirable. Glazier, Arithmetic for Teachers.
Ms. 325.-Advanced General Mathematics. 7:00 daily. Pe-102. 3 credits.
QUADE.
Ms. 354.-Differential and Integral Calculus. 7:00 daily. Pe-1. 3 credits.
MCINNIS.
Integration, the inverse operation of differentiation, is used in the calculation of areas,
volumes, moments of inertia, and many other problems.

GRADUATE COURSE
Ms. 500.-Graduate Seminar. 8:30 daily. Pe-104. 3 credits. QUADE.
Students who wish training on a graduate level may register for Ms. 500. Topics studied will
depend upon preparation and needs.

MUSIC

Msc. 103.-Materials and Methods for Grades One, Two, and Three. 2:30 daily.
Auditorium. Laboratory to be arranged. 3 credits. LAWRENCE.
Msc. 104.-Materials and Methods for Grades Four, Five, and Six. 10:00 daily.
Auditorium. Laboratory to be arranged. 3 credits. LAWRENCE. Prerequisite:
Msc. 103.
PHYSICS

Ps. 102.-Elementary Physics. 10:00 daily. Bn-203. 3 credits. KNOWLES.
Prerequisite: Ps. 101-103.
Ps. 104.-Laboratory for Ps. 102. 1-4 M. W. F. Bn-306. 2 credits. KNOWLES.
Corequisite: Ps. 102.
POLITICAL SCIENCE

The prerequisites for the Upper Division courses in Political Science are C-1, and
CPI. 13; or Pel. 313-314. (Formerly Pcl. 101-102.)

CPI. 13.-Political Foundations of Modern Life. 1:00 daily. Pe-101. 3 credits.
LAIRD.
Pcl. 310.-International Relations. 10:00 daily. Pe-101. 3 credits. MILLER.
Second half of the course on the nature of international relations.
Pcl. 314.-American Government and Politics. (Formerly Pcl. 102.) 7:00
daily. Pe-101. 3 credits. CAWTHON.
State, local and municipal government in the United States.
Pel. 406.-History of Political Theory. 8:30 daily. Pe-101. 3 credits. CAW-
THON.








IDEI'AITMENTS OF INSTRUCTION SECO.\1 TE'R 1l


PSYCHOLOGY

Psy. 301.-Advanced General Psychology. 11:30 daily. Pe-11. 3 credits.
VAN DUSEN.
Psy. 305.-Social Psychology. 10:00 daily. Pe-114. 3 credits. WILLIAMS.
Influence of the social environment upon the behavior of the individual and vice versa. Gen-
eral orientation, typical and atypical forms of behavior, social stimulations and responses, social
attitudes, social adjustments, language development, personality development, and social change.
Psy. 312.-Psychology of Problem Children. 8:30 daily. Pe-114. 3 credits.
WILLIAMS.
Individual differences, intelligence, feeble-mindedness, dull and backward children, superior
and gifted children, speech and motor defects, sensory and neurological disorders, conduct
problems, social and emotional maladjustments, and other types of exceptional and mentally
peculiar children.
GRADUATE COURSES

Psy. 512.-Psychology of Problem Children. 8:30 daily. Pe-114. 3 credits.
WILLIAMS.
To be taken with Psy. 312, with extra readings and reports for graduate credit.
Psy. 515.-Social Psychology. 10:00 daily. Pe-11. 3 credits. VAN DUSEN.

SCHOOL ART

P'. 251.-Art for the Primary Grades. 1:00 daily. Yn-Shop Annex. 2 credits.
PALMER.
Pc. 252.-Art for the Elementary Grades. 4:00 daily. Yn-Shop Annex. 2
credits. PALMER.
Pc. 253.-Principles of Art. 10:00 daily. Yn-Shop Annex. 2 credits. PALMEIR.

SOCIAL STUDIES

Scl. 301.-Children's Social Studies. 8:30 daily. Eg-202. 3 credits. AL-
STETTER and GRACE A. STEVENS.
Scl. 302.-Children's Social Studies. 11:30 daily. Eg-202. 3 credits. AL-
STETTER and GRACE A. STEVENS.

SOCIOLOGY

Sy. 337.-Social Anthropology. 7:00 daily. Ch-212. 3 credits. EHRMANN.
Physical anthropology: physical characteristics of prehistoric and modern man; race distinc-
tion; distribution of races; a critical analysis of racial theories-Aryanism, Nordicism, Nazism.
Archaeology. Cultural anthropology: the development of culture; a comparative study of repre-
sentative cultures. The American Indian. The Timucua and Seminole Indians of Florida.
Sy. 344.-Marriage and the Family. 10:00 daily. Ch-112. 3 credits. EHR-
MANN.
While following the general outline of the regular course, special stress will be given to those
aspects of the family and home life of most value to teachers of the social studies.
Sy. 426.-The City in American Life. 11:30 daily. Pe-4. 3 credits. FOREMAN.
A study of the rising cities in their effects upon individuals and social institutions. Cultural
change in American life is related to the sweep of invention and the dominance of the metro-
politan region. The cities of 1940 are examined as centers of social change and of challenge to
education, government, and other group realities. The principles of city and regional planning
are reviewed via case studies of cities, and criticized in relation to their demands upon citizenship.








142 IBULLETI1 OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

Sy. 452.-American Culture Today. 8:30 daily. Pe-4. 3 credits. FOREMAN.
A survey of the greater cultural challenges facing the American people in 1941, and of the
chief resources available. Particular attention is paid to the changing resources of and challenges
to the professions, and to the outlook for the social institutions in the world crisis.

GRADUATE COURSES

Sy. 526.-The City in American Life. 11:30 daily. Pe-4. 3 credits. FOREMAN.
The same as Sy. 426, with extra work for graduate students.
Sy. 544.-Marriage and the Family. 10:00 daily. Ch-112. 3 credits. EHR-
MANN.
The same as Sy. 344, with extra work for graduate students.
Sy. 552.-American Culture Today. 8:30 daily. Pe-4. 3 credits. FOREMAN.
The same as Sy. 452, with extra work for graduate students.
Sy. 560.-Special Topics. To arrange. 3 credits. EHRMANN or FOREMAN.
Special topics in Sociology by arrangement with the instructor.

SPANISH

CSh. 34.-Reading of Spanish. 8:30 daily. La-306. 3 credits. HALPERIN.
Prerequisite: CSh. 33.
Continuation of CSh. 33.
Sh. 407.-South American Literature. 10:00 daily. La-306. 3 credits. HAL-
PERIN. Prerequisite: Sh. 202 or permission of the instructor.
Study of the leading dramatists and prose writers of Spanish-speaking Latin-America.

GRADUATE COURSE

Sh. 530.-Advanced Readings. Conference. 3 credits. HALPERIN. Prere-
quisite: Permission of instructor.
Readings and reports in field chosen by individual student. Mainly designed for graduate
students who wish to gain special information on certain genres, movements or authors.

SPEECH

All students taking work in the Department of Speech must have completed Eh. 101
or C-3.
CSc. 33.-Effective Speaking. 4 credits.
Section 1. 7:00 daily and 1 T. Th. Pe-205. HOPKINS.
Section 2. 8:30 daily and 1 T. Th. Pe-205. TEW.
Sch. 314.-Types of Public Discussion. 10:00 daily. Pe-209. 3 credits. HOP-
KINS. Prerequisite or corequisite: CSc. 33.
Designed particularly to aid the individual who is called upon to direct or participate in
group discussion. The latest trends in handling various types of group discussion, such as round
table, panel, symposium, forum, and others. The function of the leader and the participant in
public meetings, faculty meetings, and PTA meetings. A brief review of the practical essentials
of parliamentary procedure.
Sch. 420.-Teaching of Functional Speech. 11:30 daily. Pe-209. 3 credits.
TEW and HOPKINS. Prerequisite: CSc. 33 or teaching experience.
A course designed primarily for teachers. The place of speech education in the secondary
school; organization of materials and activities; methods of presentation; analysis of state-
adopted text-book; discussion of specific problems that arise in the teaching of public speaking,
debate, auditorium programs, oral reading, and dramatics.
Speech Clinic. 1:00 M. W. F. Pe-209. No credit. STAFF.
The Speech Clinic offers without charge individual assistance to students desiring aid in over-
coming their speech defects. Applicants for this service should report as soon as possible to
Peabody 211 at one o'clock on Monday, Wednesday, or Friday.







)I ESTIONS AIVD AASl11"ERS


QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

1. Will there he a late registration fee charged to students registering after
3:30 P. M. June 16 for first termt or 12 noon July 28 for second term?
Answer: Yes. A late registration fee of $5 will lie charged. Note that
registration closes at 3:30 I'. M. on June 16 and noon on July 28.

2. What is the last day on which a person may register by paying the late
registration fee?
Answer: First Terim: June 18. 4:00 P. IM.
Second Term: July 30. 4:00 IP. M.

3. What is the maxinimum load a student may carry?
Anssaer: This depends on previous record and courses selected. See page
101.

4. How many semester hours of credit may be earned during the summer by
attendance at both terms?
Answer: 12 to 18. depending upon the student's honor point average and
courses selected.
12 in Graduate School.

5. May students who expect to receive degrees at the end of either term of the
Summer Session be given permission to carry more hours than provided for
in No. 3 above?
Answer: No. Exceptions will not be made under any circumstances.

6. May a student complete a correspondence course while attending the Summer
Session?
Answer: Yes, but the hours carried will count in the regular load.

7. a. Who will submlit the grades for students not registered in the General
College who lake comprehensive courses?
Answer: In such cases the grades will be submitted by the instructors
concerned and not by the Board of Examiners.
b. In such cases how much credit will a student be allowed for thie :con-
prehensive course?
Answer: The student will be allowed the credit assigned to such a course.
c. May students registered in the Upper Division apply to take compre-
hensive examinations in courses for which the student is not currently
registered?
Answer: No. General College students only are permitted to take com-
prehensive examinations by application.

8. Is there a graduation at the end of the first term?
Answer: Yes.








144 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION

9. May one visit the classes in the laboratory school?
Answer: Yes. Application should be made to the Principal, 120 Yonge
Building.

10. To whom should application be made for part-time work?
Answer: Dean of Students.

11. To whom should application be made for Summer Session loans?
Answer: Director of the Summer Session.

12. To whom should application be made for approved room lists?
Answer: Dean of Students.

13. To whom should application be made for a room reservation in the
dormitories?
Answer: The Director of Residence. (See page 147 for application blank.)

14. Must one rooming in the dormitories eat in the cafeteria?
Answer: No.

15. May children live in the dormitories when mother is a regularly registered
student of the Summer Session?
Answer: No.

16. Will there be Saturday classes?
Answer: First Term: No. (Except in the College of Law.)
Second Term: Yes.

17. May one comply with the requirements for extension of certificate during
either term?
Answer: Yes.

18. May one get two extensions on a certificate by attending both terms of the
Summer Session?
Answer: No. Only one extension is given.

19. How can information regarding registration procedure be secured?
Answer: By consulting the bulletin boards in the various buildings on the
morning of registration day. Also see page 145.

20. Will any of the dormitories be open to men? women? married couples?
Answer: Fletcher Hall will be reserved for men, Murphree Hall for women
and some sections of Sledd Hall for married couples.

21. How does one make application fo a room reservation in the dormitory?
Answer: Send application (page 147) with room reservation fee of $5.00 to
the Director of Residence, who will give you a room assignment.

22. Must application for room reservation be accompanied by room reservation
fee of $5.00?
Answer: Yes. (See page 98.)








SPECIAL DIRECTIONS FOR MAIL REGISTRATION


SPECIAL DIRECTIONS FOR MAIL REGISTRATION

Note: If these directions arc carefully followed out will be able to complete most of
your registration by mail an]d aoid the inconvenience of standing in long lines on registra-
tion day.

1. Fill out the Application Blank found on the last page of this bulletin and mail it
promptly to the Office of the Registrar. If this form is received before June 1 (July 10,
if you expect to attend the second term only) registration blanks will be mailed to you.
These will include your registration permit and fee card. NO REGISTRATION
BLANKS WILL BE MAILED AFTER JUNE 1. Persons not filing the application
before that time will have to register in the usual manner.

2. The registration forms should be carefully and COMPLETELY filled in. All requested
information is SIGNIFICANT.

3. Do not register for more than the maximum load as indicated on the top of your
registration blank.

4. Be sure to fill out the fee card as directed and send a check or money order for the
amount of your fees. To determine what your fees are follow this scale:*
If you are carrying six credits or less your registration fee is .. $18.00
If you are carrying seven credits your registration fee is $19.00
If you are carrying eight credits your registration fee is ... $20.00
If you are carrying nine credits your registration fee is ...... $21.00

To the amount of your registration fee add the failure fee that is indicated on YOUR
registration permit, and send remittance to cover the total. If you have not actually
lived in Florida for the entire twelve months preceding June 1, 1941, you must add
another $10.00. NO REGISTRATION WILL BE ACCEPTED UNLESS ACCOM-
PANIED BY FULL REMITTANCE FOR ALL FEES DUE.

5. DO NOT SEND MONEY FOR ROOM RENT 01; MEAL TICKETS WITH REGIS-
TRATION FEES.

THERE IS NO OBLIGATION TO ATTEND THE SUMMER SESSION AFTER
THIS PRELIMINARY REGISTRATION HAS BEEN MADE, AND A FULL REFUND
OF FEES WILL BE MADE IF PRELIMINARY REGISTRATION IS CANCELLED
BY FRIDAY. JUNE 13.


*For Fees for College of Law see page 91.













APPLICATION FOR ROOM RESERVATION IN UNIVERSITY
DORMITORIES

To be filled out by each student who is planning to live in the dormitories for the 1941
Summer Session-and mailed to the Director of Residence, University of Florida, Gaines-
ville, with check or money order for the Room Reservation Fee of $5.00 per person.

Date...

Mr.
M iss ............................. ......... ........................................ ......... ............................. A ge ................
Mrs. (last name) (first name in full)

A address ...... ......... ............................................... ... ... ............
(street & number) (city) (county) (state)

(FOR RATES IN THE DORMITORIES SEE PAGES 98 AND 99.)

Please state below (a) what terms you shall attend, (b) your preferences, if any, as to
room-mate, (c) room-exposure desired, and (d, e, & f) your choice of rooms.

a. I shall attend: 1st Term 2nd Term Both Terms

1). I w would like to room w ith ......................................... ....... ........................ .............
(Note. Room-mate must file separate application and pay room reservation fee also.)

c. I would like a room with ................................................................................ exposure in

d. FLETCHER HALL (Reserved for MEN STUDENTS ONLY)

Type or
No. of Room Section Floor


1st Choice

2nd Choice

3rd Choice

e. MURPHREE HALL

1st Choice

2nd Choice

3rd Choice

f. SLEDD HALL (Sectii

1st Choice

2nd Choice


(Reserved for WOMEN STUDENTS







ons A. B. C.-Reserved for MARRIED


ONLY)







COUPLES ONLY)


3rd C choice ........................... ................

Important: This application cannot be accepted unless accompanied
tion Fee of $5.00 per person.
[ 147]


by the Room Reserva-












REQUEST FOR PERMISSION TO LIVE OFF CAMPUS



To the Office of the Dean of Students:

I hereby request permission to be allowed to live off campus during first term, second
term, both terms, of the 1941 Summer Session. (Underscore terms desired.)

In support of this request, the following considerations are offered:

1. I am .................... years of age or over.

2. I have already received a ................................................... degree and am now taking
graduate work.

3. I have been self-supporting during the past year through the following employment:





4. If granted permission to live off campus, I will live in the house appearing on the
Approved Rooming House List at the address below:


(address) (householder)

5. I desire to room off campus for the following reason: .......... .........












(S signed) ........... ..............................................................................

A address .. ...................... ..............................................................



D ate ........................... ..........................................


Approved : ............................ ..........................................

Disapproved: ......................... .........................................

[149]














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Home Address -......- .................. --- ....... -
St. & No., Box No., or Rural Rt. City County State

I wish to register for the term beginning June 16 July 28 (encircle one)

ADMISSION-Check college or school in which you wish to register (see page 89)
A. Persons with bachelor's degrees: ........Graduate School ........College of Law
B. Persons with more than two years college credit;
........College of Agriculture ........College of Arts and Sciences ........College of Education ........School of Forestry
........School of Architecture ........College of Business Administration ........College of Engineering ........School of Pharmacy
C. Persons with less than two years college credit: ........General College

Do you plan to continue your work at the University of Florida until you receive a degree ... .....-..---

Have you attended the University of Florida before?............. Give date of last session you attended here .................................... Have you
(yes or no)
earned any credit through the General Extension Division of the University of Florida? ................... Have ou attended any college or
(yes or no)
University other than the University of Florida? .............. .. If the answer is yes, list the institutions attended in chronological order:
S(yes or no) D
Institution location Dates of Attendance


Place Religious Are You a
Date of birth ...... ............ of birth ..................................... Race ...... Preference ..... .. ..... .. Member? .
Month Day Yearyes or no)
Father's Occupation (if retired or deceased give occupation while living and active) ..............................
YOUR Occupation last year (Check ONE) ........College Student .......11. S. Student ........Elem. Teacher ........Jr. H. S. Teacher ........H. S.
Teacher ........School Superintendent ........Principal ........College Teacher. If some other occupation, please name: ................... .............
*Married women will please use their own first and middle names. If you have been registered at the University of Florida under any other
names please list on back.


,L.:r N r.,,. 1


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Blanks Out 1st





Blanks In 1st




Sched. Mailed




Blanks Out 2nd




Blnnks In 2nd


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