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 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: April 1929
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00552
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

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Table of Contents
    Title Page
        Page 1
    Main
        Page 2
        Page 3
        Page 4
        Page 5
        Page 6
        Page 7
        Page 8
        Page 9
        Page 10
        Page 11
        Page 12
        Page 13
        Page 14
        Page 15
        Page 16
        Page 17
        Page 18
        Page 19
        Page 20
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        Page 22
        Page 23
        Page 24
        Page 25
        Page 26
        Page 27
        Page 28
        Page 29
        Page 30
        Page 31
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        Page 33
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        Page 37
        Page 38
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        Page 78
        Page 79
        Page 80
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    Index
        Page 85
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Full Text
XT 1"?*fl


f--I


. t


University of Florida
GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA


University


Summer


School


Co-Educational


June


10 to August 3, 1929


Announcement


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SUMMER SCHOOL


BOARD


CONTROL


YONGE


, Chairman. ...... .......


............... Pensacola


FRANK J


. WIDEMAN ... ...............


West


Palm


Beach


L ANE........... ........-- ..-..........


GENERAL A.


JUDGE


I. BLENDING ...
DAVIS-.................


- ............. -- - -
.. .. . .. .. .. .. - ....


................. acksonville
...m................-.. Tampa
..............-. ...-....... .. Perry


DIAMOND


Secre


tary to the


Board ......-...... .........-.....


.......... Tallahassee


OFFICERS OF


ADMINISTRATION


JOHN


JAMES


TIGERT


A.M.


(OXON)


D.Ed.


Ph.D


LL.D.


President


JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN


Ph.D.


Director of

JAMES NESBITT


summer


school


ANDERSON


Ph.D.


Dean of College of


Arts and


Sciences


and Chairman


of Graduate Committee


WILBUR LEONIDA


FLOYD


assistant


ean College


Agriculture


HARRY RAYMOND TRUSLER


A.M


LL.B.


Dean of College


of Law


BENJAMIN


ARTHUR


TOLBERT


A.B.E.


A acting


Dean of


Teachers


WALTER JEFFRIE


MATHERLY


A.M.


Dean of College
0 -


Commerce and Journalism


- ~ F a r .


WILBERT ALVA LITTLE


A.M.


Director of Review Courses


and Teachers


Certification







SUMMER SCHOOL

HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S.
Registrar

J. B. GOODSON
Cashier

GARLAND HIATT
Auditor

JOHN EVANDER JOHNSON, A.M., B.D.


Y. M. C. A.


Secretary


CORA MILTIMORE, B.S.
Librarian

W. L. GOETTE, A.B.E.
Director of Employment Bureau

ELIZABETH ROUNTREE YEATS, B.S.


Secretary


to T


each.ers


College


JANE A. CRAIG, A.B.,


B.L.


Acting Head Catalog Department

MARGARET H. JOHNSON, A.B.
Head Circulation Department

HENRIE MAY EDDY, A.B.


Head


Reference


Department


JANICE PARHAM, A.B., B.S.
Assistant Catalog Department


CLAUDE LEONIDA


MURPHREE


A.B.


University


Organist


G. C. TILLMAN, M.D.
Resident Physician

IRORA (~RTM1R R PM







UNIVERSITY OF


FLORIDA


FACULTY

CLARENCE E. ACKLEY, M.A.
Education

MRS. MABEL F. ALTSTETTER
Primary Education

M. L. ALTSTETTER, A.M.
Elementary Education

JAMES NESBITT ANDERSON, Ph.D.
Latin

ERNEST GEORGE ATKIN, Ph.D.
French

CHARLES W. BACHMAN, LL.B.
Athletic Coaching

MARTHA JANE BALLARD, A.B.
Drawing and Industrial Arts

WALTER HERMAN BEISLER, M.S., D.Sc.
Chemistry

ALVIN PERCY BLACK, A.B.
Chemistry

MRS. ADELIA JOHNSON BLACKLOCK


Teaching


Fellow in Geography


ARTHUR AARON BLESS, M.S.,


Ph.D.


Physics

EDWARD THORPE BOARDMAN
Nature Study

MRS. ANNABELLE ABNEY BRANNING, A.B.E.
Education

T TT'TTTQ ITC\g TfV TIH T rPflT. Wh fl






SUMMER SCHOOL 7

OMER CARMICHAEL, M.A.
Education

ROBERT SPRATT COCKRELL, M.A., B.L.
Law

MAXIE COLLINS


Glee


RACHEL F.


Club


CROZIER,


Teaching Fellow in English

ANN D. ENGLAND, A.M.
English

HASSE OCTAVIUS ENWALL, Ph.D.
Philosophy

ROBERT M. EVANS, A.M.
Education

JAMES MARION FARR, Ph.D.
English

ANNA L. GETTING, R.N.


Home


Nursing


LILLIAN FOULKS
Kindergarten

JOSEPH RICHARD FULK, Ph.D.
Education

EDWARD WALTER GARRIS, Ph.D.
Agricultural Education

ALMA GAULT, R.N.


Nursing


LENORE G]


RAHAM


Educa







UNIVERSITY


FLORIDA


LYMAN


GEORGE


HASKELL


M.D.


Phys


Edu


cation


WILLIAM


BYRON


HATHAWAY


A.M.


Spanish


ALFRED


Athletic


NASH HIGGINS


ching


MURPHY


ROY


HINSON


A.M.


Education


VESTUS


HAMPTON


TWIGGS


JACKSON


McNEELY


Ph.D.


JARRELL


M.A.


English


EMILY


JONES


A.B.


in Mathematics


KELLY


ography


FRANKLIN


WESLEY


KOKOMOOR


A.M.


Ph.D.


ematics


JAMES MILLER LEAKE


History and Political


Ph.D.


Science


WILBERT


ALVA LITTLE


A.M.


Arithm


WALTER


LONG,


B.F.A.


Fine A


MRS.


ANNIE BATES LORD


Prima


Education


EARLL


LESLIE


LORD


A.B.


Teaching


teaching


Fellow

BIRDIE
Fellow


Math







SUMMER


SCHOOL


WALTER


JEFFRIES


MATHERLY


, A.M.


Economics


Business


Administration


GEORGE HIRAM MEARS, A.B.E.


Fellow in Education

A. MERCIER, B.S.E


Science


Teaching

MILDRED


Library


MRS.


WILLIE B.


METCALFE


Psychology


CHARLES


EUGENE


MOUNTS,


A.M.


English


JAMES


WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D.


Education


NORA


NORTON


Primary Education


and Measurements


MRS.


CLARA


McD.


OLSON, A.B.


Teaching


Fellow in Education


SARAH


PAYNE
Speech


A.M.


RUTH


PEELER


Demonstration


School


CECIL GLENN


PHIPPS


Ph.D.


Mathematics


MARGUERITE


1


A T,TCE1


STRATFORD


public Sch

RE(TNA


*


PORTER, B.S., Mus.
Music


'ORTNER. R


L -







UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


MRS. IRMA J. ROBISON
Primary Education

JAMES SPEED ROGERS, A.M.
Biology


NATHAN WILLARD SANBORN, M.D.
Poultry Husbandry

FANNIE B. SHAW
Health Education

HARLEY BAKEWELL SHERMAN, M.S.
Biology

GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS, A.M.
Education

THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D.
Mathematics


DEAN


SLAGLE, A.M., LL.B.


Law

VERNON STEEN, B.S.


Teaching


Fellow


Mathematics


ANNIE BELLE STEWART, A.B.E.


Teach


Fellow


in Mathematics


DORA A.


TAYLOR


Visiting Teacher


CLARENCE J.


TESELLE, A.M., LL.B.


Law

LAUDIOUS LAWRENCE THOMPSON, A.B.E.
Teaching Fellow in English


- -r - r -







SUMMER SCHOOL


WARREN ELLIS


TROTTMAN


Teaching


Fellow


Civics


HARRY RAYMOND TRUSLER, A.M.,


LL.B.


Law


ERNEST


POMEROY


TURNER,


A.B.E.


teaching


Fellow in


RUTH


NEWELL


UPSON


Demonstration School


FRED


CURTIS


WARD


.A.B.


A accounting


RUDOLPH


WEAVER,
Architecture


B.S.,


A.I.A.


JOSEPH


WEIL,


B.S.E.E


Physics


C. M.


WILLIAMS


JOSEPH


EDWARD


WILLIAMS, A.B.E.


History


WILLIAMS


Ph.D.


Psychology


WILLIAM


HAROLD


WILSON


Ph.D.


Education


JACOB


HOOPER


WISE


English


NORA


WOODARD, A.M.


Demonstration


MRS. ALBERTA MURPHREE WORTH
Voice


Teaching


Fellow in Mathematics


Fellow


Teaching

OSBORNE






12 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA





HISTORICAL NOTE

The University of Florida Summer School is now a part of
our educational program so well established as to be taken for


granted.
stages, t


It may not be wise, however,


pioneer work from


which


forget the early


came our present fa-


vored condition.
The enactment of a uniform examination and certification
law in 1893 forced teachers and aspirants to prepare them-


selves for the examinations.


At first principals in the larger


places held private schools with courses to the purpose.


Nec-


essarily the fees were low, the term short, the method intensive
cramming, the venture precarious.
During this period, the number of public schools increased


rapidly,


courses


were enlarged,


standards


raised.


meet


this situation the State began to employ the more able teachers
to conduct summer schools at centers most suitable, the terms


being


from


four to


weeks,


depending


upon


attendance.


The private


"teacher-training"


schools continued, some even


flourished for a season.


Standards continued to


raised,


however, and needs increased so rapidly that the State began
to support more liberally summer schools, no longer conducted
here and there, but at Tallahassee and Gainesville.
A steady growth of the University Summer School has re-
sulted naturally from this putting of the training of teachers


upon a more dignified and


dependable


basis.


From an en-


rollment of
last summer.


1913,


attendance


increased


1,686


There has been, of course, corresponding expan-


sion in every phase and feature of the Summer School, as may
be seen by a perusal of this Bulletin.






SUMMER SCHOOL 13

GENERAL STATEMENT


The twentieth annual


session


of the


Summer


School


University


Florida


will


open


Monday,


June


and


close Friday, August


, the session lasting eight weeks.


Summer study is growing in popularity all over the United


States.


Each year a greater majority of teachers are seeing


the importance


summer


study.


What is more, the Summer School, generally speaking, has
come to be recognized as an annual event of real and increas-
ing importance to higher education, and the University Sum-


mer


School


has


accordingly,


become


established


feature


of the


work


University


of Florida.


The cordial


ception and generous commendations of the


work


of previ-


ous summer sessions encourages us to put forth still greater
efforts to make the session of 1929 an improvement over all
those that have preceded it.


THE


UNIVERSITY CITY.-There are many features of the


Summer School


other than


classroom


work that will


prove


to be conducive to that larger life which should permeate all


citizens,


especially


that of teachers.


The


advantages


that


Gainesville presents as the seat of the Summer School are nu-


merous.


It is centrally located and easy of access.


It has well-


paved, lighted and shaded streets, an exceptionally pure water


supply, and a good sewerage system.
getic, progressive, and hospitable.


The citizens are ener-


BUILDINGS
University


AND


EQUIPMENT.-The


service


entire
faculty


equipment


and


students.


The buildings are for the most part magnificent three-story
brick and stone structures. They are modern in every respect
as to equipment and arrangements. They contain the kind of
lecture rooms, laboratories and libraries that a modern college
needs. Below under "Rooming Facilities" and "Expenses," at-
tention is called to the accommodations in the dormitories and






UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


the extension


certificates.


More specifically,


the courses in


the summer session are designed to meet the needs of the fol-
lowing persons:


Teachers


revise and


who


extend


wish
their


increase their professional skill,


knowledge of a chosen


field,


or to


qualify in new subjects, preparing to meet special demands in


profession


teaching.


other


School
officers.


superintendents,


Teachers


and


principals,


supervisors


supervisors,
F agricultural


and


ucation


, drawing


and


art,


music,


nursing


education,


physical


education and


coaching,


and the usual academic subjects,


will


find


work


especially suited


their needs.


Teachers and prospective teachers who desire to secure


a high grade teacher's certificate.


Extensive opportunities are


offered


for the


review


subjects


required


state


teacher
4.


S'


examinations.


Graduate students, especially in the field of Education,


though graduate students may major in other departments of


University.


Undergraduate students,


and


especially those


register-


and


spring


semesters


students may use to advantage a


University.


portion


of the vacation


Such
per-


iod to take up studies which they are unable to include in their


regular


programs,


or to


make


deficiencies,


or to


shorten


their


courses.


High


regular


school


university


graduates


courses


and


who


who


about


desire


enter


broaden


upon
their


preparation for university work.


. High school students who are not graduates.


Such stu-


dents
high
they


sometimes


school
must


work.
make


able


make


should


arrangements


deficiencies


understood,


with


their


however,


high


their
that


school


-~~~ -






SUMMER SCHOOL


THE


LIBRARY.-The


University


Library


contains


about


60,000 volumes.


Many new titles have been added during the


" past year. The Pedagogical library will be of especial interest
to the Summer School students for it contains many books on


educational theory,


general and


special


methods,


history


education, psychology and philosophy. All books are classified


according to the


Dewey


Decimal


Classification.


The catalog


is a dictionary catalog of authors, subjects and titles in one
alphabetical arrangement.
The library receives 420 general and technical periodicals,
the current numbers of which are to be found in the reading


room.


The files of bound periodicals are particularly valuable


for use in reference work. Many of the daily and weekly state
papers are donated by the publishers.
The Library now occupies the first part of the first unit


of the Library


Building.


The main


reading room is


on the


second floor and has a seating capacity of 336.


The lighting


is semi-indirect with approximately ten foot candle


on the


reading tables. The room is completely equipped with electric
fans to make it more comfortable in warm weather.
Attention is called to the courses in Library Science for


benefit of those teachers who


wish


to equip


themselves


better for managing the libraries of their own schools.


The Library will be open


week days from 7:50


A.M.


10:00 P.M., except that on Saturday it will close for the day


at 5:00 P


THE


AUDITORIUM.-This


magnificent


building is


consid-


ered by many to be the most commodious structure of its kind


any


campus


South.


The


Anderson


Memorial


pipe organ is installed in this building.


It is hoped that


tensive


may


made


organ


during


Sum-


mer School.


addition


the organ,


a Steinway


concert


grand piano has been placed in the auditorium.


All of this








IIlF


CAST OF "PIRATES OF PENZANCE"-COMIC OPERA PRESENTED BY SUMMER SCHOOL OF 1928






SUMMER SCHOOL


is being arranged. At least one entertainment of this charac-
ter is planned for each week. At the close of the session, the


Department of Music, featuring the pupils in


Voice, the Glee


Club and


Orchestra,


will


put


on a production


some


popular light opera.


It is hoped that a large number of good


voices, both male and female will try out for this production.
A feature of the Summer School of 1928 was the produc-


tion


Gilbert


Sullivan's


comic


opera,


"The


Pirates


Penzance," by students in the


Voice Department and the Glee


Club.


The opera


was produced


under the able direction


Mrs. Alberta M.


Worth, Head of the


the assistance of the Glee Club.


Voice Department,


It was


elaborately


with


staged,


decorations


and


advertising


being


made


Handwork


classes and the classes in Art.


The entire cast and chorus of


fifty


persons


was


beautifully


costumed


Van


Horn


and


Company of Philadelphia.


No production has even been given


in the University


Auditorium


which surpassed that of 1928


in beauty of detail and artistic presentation.
RELIGIOUS AND SOCIAL LIFE.-The moral and religious at-


mosphere at the Summer School is wholesome.


The leading


religious denominations have attractive places of worship and


students


welcome


every


service.


provided for those students who will attend.
a devotional service is held in connection


Transportation is
Twice each week


with


the Student


Assembly.
THE Y.M.-W.C.A.-In connection with the regular student
council a program of service will be carried on under the name


of the "Y".
organization.


The entire student body is served through this
Offices are in the "Y" Building and the secre-


taries in charge may be found there.
The principal points in the program are:


Operating the


"Y" building as a home or club including piano, Edison, read-
inc mtr -ar innlndincr thit ha't rimlipq snd msOifnlyl7.mps- .nnminit-






UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


effort


will


made


serve


many


visitors


who


come


"-y,"


campus


throughout


summer.


Report


and ask for your friend.


Hikes


, picnics


and


other


socials


promoted


during the


session.


THE HONOR SYSTEM.-All


class


work at the


University is


on the honor basis.


No espionage is practiced by teachers, and


students will unanimously condemn and punish cheating.


COOPERATIVE


GOVERNMENT.-Government


student


life


on the


campus


is cooperative


between


students


and


faculty


Cooperative government for the past few summers has proven


successful


because


faculty and students.


splendid


spirit


existing


Representatives elected from


between
each sec-


tion


of the dormitories, and from


larger


boarding


houses


together


with


a faculty


committee


meet


weekly


plan


con-


structively for the


benefit of


student life, and


University


terests.


Suggestions from any member of the student body or


faculty are welcomed at all times.


FACULTY


ADVISERS


Members of the Summer School faculty will give every pos-
sible aid to students in helping them select their courses wisely.


wide


variety


courses is offered so that each teacher may


find


that


gladly


which


advise


needs


with


most.


Any


students,


member


certain


ones


faculty
desig-


nated


help


certain


classes


students.


Professor


Tolbert,


Acting


Dean


Teachers


Col-


lege,


will


advise


with


and


register


teachers


who


wish


pursue courses


in the


Teachers


College


college


credit.


Professor


Little


will


register for review courses and


advise


with


for extension


students w
certificate.


Dean


Sciences


and


SAnderson,
Chairman of


Dean


Graduate


College


Committee


Arts
. will


and






SUMMER SCHOOL


Dean Walter J. Matherly will advise with all students pur-
suing courses in the College of Commerce and Journalism.


Major W


L. Floyd will advise with all students who de-


sire credit for work done in the Agricultural College during
the summer.
The heads of departments of the college should be consulted


about


matters


concerning the


work


their


respective


divisions.
The Dean of Women and the Dean of Men will gladly ad-
vise with any students who desire their services regarding any
other matters concerning their comfort and welfare.


STUDENT


HEALTH


AND


MEDICAL


ADVICE.-The


Summer


School makes diligent effort to conserve the health of its stu-


dents.


The services of a resident physician assisted by


suiting physicians of Gainesville


have


con-


been secured for the


Summer School of 1929.


These eminent physicians will make


free physical examinations and prescribe means for remedy-
ing physical defects. It is urged that early in the session all


students apply at the infirmary for a


thorough physical


amination. Especially does this apply to those who must pre-


sent


health


certificates


when


they


apply


permission


take the state teachers'


examinations. Heretofore many stu-


dents have deferred this examination until so late in the


ses-


sion of the Summer School that much overcrowding has re-


suited.


This should


be attended


in the first two or three


weeks of Summer School.


The


University maintains


a well


equipped


infirmary


and


has


professional


nurses


constantly


in attendance for those who may be ill


during the Summer


Session.


Opportunity


offered


individual


and


private


conference with the University Physician or assistants.


Courses


Health


Education


listed


below


under


"Courses of Instruction."


ATHLETICS.-The gymnasium, basketball court,


base-


ball


grounds


and


tennis


courts


disposition


_ ____






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Tuesday and Fridays at 10:00 o'clock.


The Auditorium will


seat about 1,800, and is near enough to the main lecture halls
to make it easily accessible to all students.
Many important announcements will be made at the Gen-


eral


Assembly,


observance


which


students


will


be held responsible, even though they may not be in attend-
ance at the time.


SOCIETIES


AND


CLUBS.


- The


Peabody


Literary


Society


meets weekly in the auditorium. Delightful and instructive
programs are rendered at each meeting. All students of the
Summer School are eligible for membership.
PHI KAPPA PHI.-A chapter of the Honor Society of Phi
Kappa Phi was established at the University during the spring


of 1912.


To be eligible for membership a student must have


been in attendance at the University for at least one year, or
three summer sessions, have been guilty of no serious breaches
of discipline, have had at least three years of collegiate train-
ing, be within one year of finishing a course leading to a de-
gree, and stand among the first tenth of the senior class of


the University.


The numerical grade which must be attained


is based


on all


college


work,


wherever done,


for which the


student receives credit towards a degree.
KAPPA DELTA PI.-Kappa Delta Pi is an


honorary fra-


ternity, similar to


Phi Kappa Phi, except that only


Juniors


and Seniors in the Teachers College are eligible for member-


ship.


This fraternity plays an important part in the life of


the Summer School.


Clubs


formed


each


summer


from


each


county,


and


many


interesting


and


delightful


associations


formed


among the students and the members of the faculty.


UNIVERSITY


CLUB.-The


University


Club,


opposite


Lan-


guage Hall, is open to faculty and graduate students.


A social


program is arranged for every week end.
THE SUMMER SCHOOL NEWS.-The Summer School News







SUMMER SCHOOL


DEMONSTRATION


SCHOOL.-As in


past three


years


is planned to include a Demonstration School in the program


of the


University Summer School.


This summer it will con-


sist of four grades as follows


a kindergarten,


a combined


first and second grade, a combined third and


fourth grade,


and a fifth and sixth grade.
The very best teachers in the state for this work will be


employed, in


order that the children may


be given


best


instruction possible. A busy child is a happy child, and it is


our plan


that these children have three hours each morning


delightful


employment


music,


organized


play,


stimu-


mating handwork, as well as splendid work in reading, history,
arithmetic, geography and other school subjects.


The children


who attended last year were delighted with


the work.


The fifth grade children


were taught how to use


the library for reference; they organized a club among them-
selves, carried on their own meetings and worked out a play


which they presented at the close of the term.


The smaller


children


delighted


their mothers at the close


with a


puppet


show.
We can take care of only a limited number of children, and
if you wish to enroll your child this should be attended to at


once.


The term lasts for six weeks, beginning Monday, June


18. Daily sessions extend from 8:30 to 11:30. A fee of $6.00


will be charged each child,


which fee will cover only the ac-


tual materials used.


THE


EMPLOYMENT


BUREAU.-As


Teachers


College


and


every


Summer


possible


School


way,


wish


Teachers'


serve


whole


Employment


state


Bureau


was


established several years ago. It is open throughout the year,
except the vacation period immediately following the Summer
School. Its duties are to assist students and graduates of the


University to obtain


positions


teaching


profession.


m a1 1 -V. a an a a 1. n T--







UNIVERSITY


FLORIDA


lege-trained men or women are eligible.


for services,


No charges are made


though students are required to pay for all tele-


grams and telephone


calls


made


their


behalf.


The aggregate


yearly salaries of


teachers


who secured


positions through the Bureau in a recent summer was in excess


of $324,675.00.


Had the same positions been obtained through


professional agencies, fees in ex
been collected from the teachers.


made


no charges whatever,


it is


cess of $16,233.75


As the
readily


would have


Employment Bureau


seen


that


small


amount was saved the teachers of the state.


Communications


addressed


regard


Dean


teaching


Norman,


positions


University


should
Florida,


Gainesville,


Florida.


THE


BULLETIN


BOARDS.-Read


bulletin


boards


daily.


Students and


faculty members


will


responsible


tices


appearing


Bulletin


Boards


and


Daily


Summer


School


Bulletin Sheet.


REDUCED


RAILROAD


RATES.


-The


Southeastern


Passenger


Association


identification


has


authorized


plan from


reduced
stations


and


rates


except


railways.


on the


stations


The


round


trip


on N
rates


based


on fare


excursion


fare


and


one-half


being


one


for the


dollar.


round
Round


trip,
trip


the ]
ticket


minimum


will


sold


students


and


members


their


families


only


upon


pre-


sentation


identification


certificates


ticket agent at time


of purchase


of tickets.


The


identification


certificates will


furnished


by the


Dean


Summer


School


on application.


Ticket


will


be sold from June 6th


and the final limit of all tickets will


to June


12th,


be August 8th.


inclusive,
All round


trip


reduced


ticket agent at


rate


tickets


Gainesville


must


validated


before


return


journey


regular
is corn-


menced.


order


that


nearest


railroad


ticket


agent


may


have


4


JI I* 1 I 1 "


*


a n a e. - a a 1- a 4- .1. nI -- .J a n. nI ar - U *J a1 -. a~ a w% .l a. n


. W


* 1 *


*







SUMMER SCHOOL


an identification


certificate or carefully preserving the one


which will be enclosed in


the letters written to


prospective


students.
COURSES IN ATHLETIC COACHING
The department of athletic coaching established as a part
of the University Summer School, has proved one of the most
successful departments in the session and has met a felt need


among the teachers in the State.


The chief purpose of the


department is to meet a widespread demand for high school
teachers who combine a knowledge of athletic coaching with


their scholastic training.


The department this year will be


under the direction of Mr. C.


W. Bachman


Coach of the Uni-


versity of Florida,


with the assistance of Mr. A. N. Higgins,


also of the University coaching staff.


University gymnasium


and equipment will be at the disposal of the students who reg-


ister for this work.


LIBRARY


SCIENCE


Libraries are


more and


more


being regarded


as educa-


tional institutions.


Perhaps the most remarkable development


in the field of modern secondary education is the rapid growth


of the high school library in recent years.


The administrative


department and the library are the only two agencies in the


high school that come in contact with all of the pupils.


The


school library is not, as many people think, a separate and


independent organization in the school.


It is a definite part


of the school system and has something to contribute to all
of the departments of the school.
The new Library Standards for Secondary Schools accred-
ited by the Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools of


the Southern States were adopted December


4, 1927.


These


Standards


become


effective


beginning


- -l -r r -






UNIVERSITY


FLORIDA


credit


as the


established


library


schools


those


taking


courses are to qualify for position


For this reason
in an accredited


the entrance


college


or the


under the


new


requirements must


Standards.
two years


equivalent.


The


cost


books


will


probably


exceed


$5.00.


of $1.50 will
Selection I.


be charged


These


Cataloging


fees will


and


$1.5


Book


used to help cover the expense


supplies and mimeographing.


MUSIC DEPARTMENT


The


Department


Music


has


been


much


broadened


this


summer


Besides


work


Public


School


Music


and


Glee Club,


we are offering special opportunity for private les-


sons


in voice,


piano and


organ


under most excellent teachers.


As a culmination


work


of the


Department, at the close


Summer


School


a presentation


some


popular


light


opera


will


be given.


is especially


desired


that


good


voices,


both


male


and


female,


will


beginning


session


for parts


in thi


opera.


Mrs.


Voice


Alberta


Department


Murphree
. Mrs. V


Worth


Vorth


will


received


have
I her


charge
musical


ing at the Peabody Conservatory of Music in Baltimore,


train-
where


held


studying


a scholarship


with


eminent


in voice
teachers


under


this


Baron


country


Berthold,


and


later


abroad.


She studied for two seasons with Conrad Murphree,


of Tampa,


Florida


who


is one


most


prominent


voice


teachers


the south.


Mrs.


Worth has had wide success


as a teacher and


concert artist,


and


University


is fortunate


having


this
two


year


scholarships


fifth


summer.


voice


this


The


summer


Department


one


full


will


offer


scholarship


paying tuition for two lessons per week for eight weeks,


value


$25.00, and


one


partial scholarship


paying tuition for one les-






SUMMER


SCHOOL


COURSES


For


past


three


NURSING


summers


EDUCATION
e University


has


offered


courses


Nursing


Education.


These


have


proved


very


suC-


cessful, and


we are


planning this summer to expand the


work


still


more.


Miss


Alma


Gault,


Illinois


Training


School


Nurses,


Chicago,


will


return


this


summer


offer


work.


The courses


are designed


train


graduate


nurses


administrative


work


is a comparatively


hospital


new


line


and


work,


training


and


school


gaining


Thi


pres-


tige


over the


United


States.


EXPENSES
The cost of attending the Summer School is very moderate


when compared with that at many other institutions.


no charge


tuition


and


fees


very


low.


The


There is
combined


cost


a room


on the campus and


meals


Commons


only $40.00 for the session.


The cost of meals alone is $32.00


for the session.


For


laundry, incidentals


and


books


, expendi-


tures vary, but necessary expenditures are not very


high.


The


estimate of the cost to a student living on the campus follows


High


Low


Tuition


..... $0 0oo.oo00


$00.00


Registration fee,


Registration


residents


non-residents


Florida.-.................


Florida.......


15.00
17.50


15.00
17.50


Board and Lodging in Dormitory:
In advance for the half term ....
In advance for the term .............


. .. -.- .. .... --- ..-. -.
a* -. ..- ... -. -. ... -


Board in Dormitory without lodging:
In advance for the term ..................................
In advance for the half term. ................. .......


21.00
40.00


17.00


21.00
40.00


32.00
17.00


Board for children under eight:


In advance for the term ..................................
In advance for the half term..........................


16.00
9.00


16.00
9.00


Fees


and Special Tuition:


Fine


Arts


Courses per


semester


hour ..................


Biology


laboratory fee


fl S


A . .....


C


ni -<^ Cl

_1 _1_






UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


Library
Book S


Physical
Physics
Primary


Science:
election


Cataloging


fee....


Education
laboratory


Handwork fee


Coaching fee--...---...........


(for materials


used) ...


Tests


Measurements fee


Voice tuition per term
Voice tuition per term


(2 lessons per week)


(1 lesson


per week)........


25.00
16.00


25.00
16.00


Personal expenses:


Books


Incidentals
Laundry .


8.00
16.00
12.00


3.00
8.00
4.00


For students living off the campus,


the estimated expense


same


except


that


room


and


board


will


somewhat


higher.
obtained


However,


from


good rooms adjacent to


$6.00


$12.00


a month


the campus can


per


student,


and


board
82-84.


off the campus will cost about $7.00 a


week.


(See pp.


Only
children


students
may take


will


meals


admitted


with


dormitories,


their parents


but


Commons


at the rates given in


the above list.


All accounts are payable


in advance.


MONEY.-1.
Auditor of the


Students


may


deposit


their


money


with


University and draw it out as needed.


The


$5.00


registration fee.


sent


It is


reserve


dormitory


held as a breakage


fee,


room
and v


is not


vill


turned at close of term if no damage


by student has


been re-


ported from


3.
LacL


law i


of the


without


work


dormitory.


The registration fee is paid at the time of registration


o College F
the same a
Summer Si


College


extra


must not


7ees


.-The


registration


that paid by


school
Law


charge
exceed


who
will


nine


meet


other
;s the


students.
entrance


permitted 1
i combined


semester


take


those
Any


taking
student


requirements


law


academic


courses


and


law


hours.


REFUND


FEES.-1.


Fees


paid


advance


room


I.1 01 nI -I -. .. S






SUMMER SCHOOL


A refund on the amount paid for room in the dormi-


stories and board in the University Dining Hall,


will be made


on even


weeks, and then


only when


cashier


commons


notified of date of departure.
tions or parts of the week.


No refund will be made on frac-


WHAT TO


BRING.-All


dormitory


rooms


are comfortably


furnished


with


single


iron


bedsteads


and


mattresses,


chif-


fonier or bureau, a table,


washstand and chairs.


All students


are required


provide for themselves a


pillow,


bed


linen,


towels, and other things as they may want for their own spe-


cial comfort and convenience.


Dormitory rooms may


served at any time, and the deposit of


$5.00 is


payable


each


student


reserving


dormitory


space.


This


must


hand before May 1st, or reservations made prior to that time
will be cancelled and given to later applicants.
Students who prefer to room off the campus, may secure


good rooms and board at a reasonable rate.
dents may be admitted to the dormitories.


Only women stu-


Married


couples


will not be permitted to room on the campus.


TEXTBOOKS.-The


University maintains a depository for


the convenience of students where all necessary books may be


had at list prices.


Students may well bring English diction-


aries and


other useful


books of


reference.


Those studying


courses for intermediate or grammar grade teachers should
bring copies of the State-adopted supplementary texts in the


subjects to be studied.


All teachers should be supplied with


copies of the Florida State Course of Study.


These may be


secured from


the Pepper


Printing Co.,


Gainesville, Florida.


Students in Education courses should bring with them pro-
fessional books and textbooks related to the courses they plan
to take.


SCHOLARSHIPS.-County


and


Senatorial


Scholarships.--


At the meeting of the Legislature in 1923, a scholarship law
was nassid nrnvidino- fnr t.wn s.chnlarshins from P ch cnunt.v






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


and


carries a stipend


$200.00 per year.


These


scholar-


ships may be applied for Summer School, paying $50.00 per
summer to regularly enrolled Teachers College students. Ex-
aminations are held in each county on the first Thursday in
June and third Thursday in September under the supervision
of the county superintendent. A student to be considered as


an applicant for


a scholarship


must


present sixteen


college


entrance units. These scholarships are awarded upon competi-
tive examinations to persons satisfying the entrance require-


ments of th
College for


e


University of Florida and of the Florida State


Women. A student who desires to be considered


as an applicant for a scholarship


should


make


desire


known to his county superintendent before the first of May
of each year. He should also write to the State Superintendent
of Public Instruction at Tallahassee, telling him of his appli-
cation for the scholarship.


VOICE SCHOLARSHIPS.-Two scholarships in


offered by competitive examination.


Voice will be


See Music Department,


p. 24.


LOAN FUNDS.-On June 27,


1927, the "Florida State Schol-


arship


Fund"


was approved and established by the


Student


Council of the University of Florida Summer School, and on


August 2,


1927


"College


Girls


Club


Scholarship


Loan


Fund" was approved and established by the College Girls Club
of the University of Florida Summer School. In order to be
eligible to share in these funds, the following regulations must
be adhered to:
(1) Applicant must be a teacher in the State of Florida.
(2) Applicant must have a position for succeeding term


of school.


(3) Applicant must be in need of aid.
(4) Applicant must apply for Scholarship Loan at least
two weeks before opening of the Summer School.


Application


must


be made direct to


Dean


of Sum-






SUMMER SCHOOL


Loan will be for a period not to exceed nine months


from the date on which Summer School begins.
(9) Loan is to bear interest at the rate of


8%,


which


will be added to the main fund.
Blank form for application for a scholarship loan will be


furnished


upon


application


Director


Summer


School.


ADMISSION


SUMMER


SCHOOL.-Graduates


Senior


High Schools who can offer sixteen entrance units,


including


three (3) of English, two (2) of mathematics, one (1) of his-


tory and one


of Science, are admitted to the Freshman


year of the Collegiate course.


Students under 21


years of age who


register for college


courses must present their high school credits to the Entrance
Committee at time of registration.
Students are urged to pursue courses leading to a degree
and to have themselves classified when they register. To facili-
tate proper classification, all students are requested to bring
with them a certified transcript of the work they have com-


pleted in high school


or in


other


colleges.


Blanks


conven-


iently arranged for this data will be sent to prospective stu-
dents upon application.
Persons twenty-one or more years of age who cannot sat-
isfy the entrance requirements, but who give evidence of abil-
ity to profit by the courses they may take, may be admitted
as "adult specials."
No one under sixteen years of age will be admitted unless
he is a graduate of a senior high school.


There


academic


requirements


admission


those


who


register merely for review


courses.


ADMISSION TO LAW COLLEGE.-Students already admitted


to the College of Law and those presenting sixty-eight


(68)


semester hours of academic college work acceptable for a de-


agree, are eligible


to attend.


Those taking law for the


first






30 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

enter the Freshman class, but yet are mature enough to profit


by regular college work,


entrance examinations


will


ranged.


All students should file with the Dean of the Summer


School not later than May 20th petitions for examinations in
each subject in which they wish to be examined.
ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING.-Office hours will be
held daily by the Committee on Advanced Standing in Room
105E, Language Hall, to evaluate the credits of those students


who


have attended


other colleges and


universities and


who


wish to receive advanced standing at the University of Flor-


ida.


This office


will, however,


not be open after Saturday,


July 27, as this Committee will have other duties during the


last


week


Summer


School.


Students


are,


therefore,


cautioned


delay


attention


this


important


matter


later than this date.


DEGREES


IN TEACHERS


COLLEGE


DEGREES.-Courses are offered in Teachers College leading
to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts in Education, Bachelor of
Science in Education, and Bachelor of Science in Agricultural


Education.


In addition to these degrees, the Normal Diploma,


sometimes called the L. I. degree, is granted to those students


who have finished the second year's


work in Teachers College.


There is considerable agitation in the United States at present
to make two years of training beyond the high school a mini-
mum requirement for teaching even in the elementary schools.


All students are


therefore


urged


means


to complete


the requirements which are necessary to receive the Normal


Diploma.


Students who expect to teach in high school should


possess a Bachelor's


Degree.


CURRICULA.-On December


14, 1927, the Teachers College


Faculty adopted four curricula for students in


the Summer


School,


leading to the


Normal


Diploma


and


bachelor's


degrees.






SUMMER SCHOOL


A curriculum leading


Normal


Diploma


and


bachelor's degree for those who expect to teach in the Jun-


ior High School.


(See p. 34 for detailed curriculum.)


curriculum


leading


Normal


Diploma


and


bachelor's degree for those who expect to teach in the Senior


High School.


(See p. 35 for detailed curriculum.)


On May 7,


1928, an alternate curriculum leading to


Bachelor of Science in Education was adopted.


lum is particularly


designed for those


This curricu-


who are specializing


in Physical Education and Coaching.


for detailed curriculum.)
GROUP REQUIREMENTS.-Each


(See General


student


Catalog


Freshman


year must select two of the six groups of studies as given on


p. 36.


In order to receive the Bachelor of Science in Education,


the student must select and complete the required courses in


Group


It is recommended that


Group


(Mathematics)


be selected by these students for their second group.


REQUIREMENTS FOR


THE BACHELOR


DEGREES.-The


fol-


lowing curriculum has been designed to meet the requirements
for the degrees of Bachelor of Arts in Education and Bach-


elor of Science in Education.


(For the requirements for the


Bachelor


Science


Agricultural


Education


degree,


General Catalog of the University.)






UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


CURRICULA
Curriculum Leading to Normal Diploma and Bachelor's Degree for Those
Who Expect to Teach in the Primary Grades


FRESHMAN


*Physical
tMilitary
English 1(
:General
::General
Education
Education
Begin one


Education
Science 1
01-102 .....
Natural S
Social S
101 ...........
122 .........
Group (s<


YEAR


JUNIOR


101-102
01-102....

,cience....
science ....


Education
Education
Continue
(See p.
Electives


308
317
two
36)


YEAR


Groups
Groups


p. 36)


SENIOR


YEAR


SOPHOMORE


*Physical
ffMilitary
English 20
Education
Education
Education
**Philosop
Courses in
(See p.


YEAR


Educati
Educati
Finish t
(See
Elective


Educ. 201-202........
Science 201-202..
1-202 ......................
121 ......................
207 ........................
207
203 .....................
ihy 201 .................
two Groups..........
36)


on 403 ......
on 405 ......
;wo Groups
p. 36)
S ...... .


.....ww. .e...m....


Wor:


*Instead of i
k (Education


Physica
103),


1 Education, w
which includes


'omen
plays


students


may


games.


take


Health


tWomen
Drawing anc
101-102.


students r
Industrial


nust tf
Arts,


ake


an equal


or Education


number o
123, for


credit
Military


hours in
Science


tfWomen students
School Music.


must


take an equal number


hours


Public


**Students who expect to take the Normal Diploma must take Edu-
cation 405 instead of Philosophy 201, in which case they must take
Philosophy 201 in Junior Year.


$Students who elect Group
ural Science.


$$Students who elect Group
Science.


E are not required to take General Nat-


F are not required to take General So-


3e








SUMMER


SCHOOL


Curriculum Leading to Normal Diploma and Bachelor's
Who Expect to Teach in the Intermediate


Degree for Those
Grades


* Physical
tMilitary
English 1
SGeneral
::General
Education
Education
Begin one
(See p.


FRESHMAN


Education
Science 1
01-102 ..-..
Natural c
Social Sc
101 .........
122 ........


grou
36)


YEAR


101-102
01-102. ....

cience....
*ience......


JUNIOR


Education
Education
Complete
(See p.
Electives


YEAR


Groups .......


- -. - ... ..


p ---...........--------------..--


SENIOR


SOPHOMORE
*Physical Education
ttMilitary Science
English 201-202 .....
Education 203 ....
Education 207 -..-..-..
**Philosophy 201 ...
Two Groups (see p.
Education 121 .......


YEAR


201-202
201-202..


Education
Education
Complete
(See p.
Electives


403
405
two
36)


Groups ..


36) ........


Wor.


*Instead of Physical Education, we
k, which includes plays and games.


)men


students


may


take


Health


tWomen
Drawing and
101-102.
ttWomen
School Music.


students must
Industrial Art


students


must


take an equal
s, or Education


take


number o
123, for


an equal number


credit
Military


of hours


hours in
Science


Public


**Students who expect to take the Normal Diploma must take Edu-
cation 405 instead of Philosophy 201, in which case they must take
Philosophy 201 in Junior Year.
tStudents who elect Group E are not required to take General Nat-
ural Science.


$$Students who elect Group
cial Science.


F are not required to take General So-


YEAR








UNIVERSITY


FLORIDA


Curriculum Leading to Normal Diploma and Bachelor's


Degree for Those


Who Ex

FRESHMAN


:pect to


Teach in the Junior


YEAR


High School


JUNIOR


YEAR


Physical
Military
Education
English
$General
ttGenera
Begin on


Education
Science 1
n 101-102
101-102 ...
Natural
1 Social S
e Group (:


101-102.. 1
01-102...... 2
................ 3
-me m-w-. ...._. 3
Science.... 4
,cience...... 2
see p. 36) 3


Education 3
Education 4
Two Groups
Electives ....


(see p. ..36)........
( sep 3 6) ...... .


SENIOR


YEAR


YEAR


Physical Education 201-202..
Military Science 201-202......
Education 203 .... ........... ......


Philosophy 201
Education 207 .
English 201-202
Education (this
if student exp
Diploma) -....
Continue Group


Education 40O
Education 40E
Education 401
Complete two
(See p. 36)
Electives .......


........................ 3
....o...... .......... 0
..- .... .......... .. . 3
Groups .......... 6


must be 405
lects Normal

elected 1st


year ... .. ......
Begin second Group
(See p. 36)


...............
--------------....


ural


tStudents
Science.


who elect Group


E are not required to take General Nat-


flStudents who elect Group
cial Science.


F are not required to take General So-


NOTE:
take


Students
Education


who
308.


expect


recommended


as principals


must


SOPHOMORE


q







SUMMER


SCHOOL


Curriculum Leading to Normal Diploma and Bachelor's


Degree for Those


Who


Expect


FRESHMAN


YEAR


Teach


Senior


High


JUNIOR


School
YEAR


Physical 1
Military S
:General
$$General
English 1(
Education
Begin one
(See p.


Education
sciencee 1C
Natural
Social S
)1-102 ....
101-102
Group ..
36)


101-102


11-102


Science.... 4
cience...... 2
................. 3
................ 3
.......... ....... 3


Education 3'
Education 4
Two Groups
Electives ....


........................


(see p.


SENIOR


36)........


YEAR


SOPHOMORE


Physical
Military
Education
Philosoph
Education


Educa
Science
i 203
y 201
i 207


Education
English 201.
Two Groups


ttion


YEAR


201-202


Education 4'
Education 4'
Education 4
Two Groups
Electives ..


5 .......-.... ...... -- -.
(see p. 36)........


e 201-202......

...... .... .... ..... .****


-202 ......-....-
(see p. 36)


$Students who elect Group E are not required to take General Nat-
ural Science.
$tStudents who elect Group F are not required to take General So-
cial Science.


NOTE


Students who expect to be recommended as principals must take


Education 308.


.... 2


*:- -\ :







UNIVERSITY


FLORIDA


GROUPS


Each


student must


select


two


following


groups


studies and complete the required courses in those two groups.


For


Bachelor


Science


Education


degree,


Group


must


be selected and


completed.


A-Ancient


Latin 101-1021
Latin 201-202
Latin 203-204J


Languages


18
sem.
hrs.


B-Modern


Fr. 21-22
Fr. 101-102
Fr. 201-202
or
Span. 21-22
Span. 101-102
Span. 201-202J


Germ.
Germ.
Germ.


Languages


sem.
hrs.


21-22 l
101-102
201-202


C-English


Eng.
Eng.
Eng.
Eng.


101-102
103-104
201-202
301-302


Foreign Lang.,
6 sem. hrs.
Eng. or For-
eign Lang.,


1 22




J hrs.
hrs.


sem.


D-Mathematics


Math.
Math.
Math.
Math.


101-1021
331 ) 18
251-252 sem.
568 hrs.


E-Natural


Science


Biol. 101
Bot. 101-102
Biol. 106
Chem. 101-102
Phys. 203-204


32
sem.
hrs.


F-Social


Hist.
Hist.
Hist.


101-102
301-302
303-304


Sociology,


Econ. 201-202


Science


sem.
hrs.


G--Commercia
Education


Econ.
Bus.


101-102


Bus. Ad.


103-


Bus. Ad. 21
212
Bus. Ad. 4'
402
English 355


29
sem.


REGULATIONS


total


of 132 semester-hours


required for


gradua-


tion.


j






SUMMER SCHOOL


the L. I. Degree), except that Education 405


before completing this


must be taken


work.


DEGREES FROM OTHER COLLEGES
For a description of the courses leading to degrees in all
the other colleges on the campus, see the General Catalog of
the University, or write to the Dean of the College in which
you are interested.


OPPORTUNITIES


FOR GRADUATE


STUDY


As stated above, any course that is numbered above 300
may be counted as a minor subject. Any course that is num-
bered above 500 may be counted as a major. As a usual thing,


undergraduate


students


permitted


register


courses that are numbered above 500.
A number of courses have already been arranged that may


count as majors.


Efforts will be made to arrange still others


upon request.


If the major


work


wished


listed,


quests for it should be made at an early date.
REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE.
1. A candidate for the Master's Degree must be in resi-
dence for at least one scholastic year, or four summer terms,
devoting his entire time during this period to study and re-
search.


addition


registration


courses


which


graduate student wishes to take, he must have an application


blank properly filled


out and


presented to the Chairman


Graduate


Committee


later


than


July


10th.


These


blanks may be secured at the time of registration from Dean


J. N. Anderson, Chairman


Committee


Graduate


Studies.
3. He must complete one major and two minors. A major


is a


twelve semester-hour course


rank above


Senior


_ _


___ _


_






UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


17th


receive


summer
degree.


session


which


student


expects


All students who


hold the bachelor's


degree are


urged


to register for


Education 527.


Passing


grade


graduate


students


RESIDENCE


REQUIREMENT.-In


order


receive


a degree,


spent


summer


residence),


Diploma,


least


schools


and


may
must


from


one


scholastic
considered


have


completed


College,


in residence


equivalent


thirty


must
(three


a year


(30)


semester


hours of


college


Normal


work in
Diploma


residence.


twenty-seven


case


(27)


candidates


semester


hours


residence


will


satisfy


this


requirement.


These


hours


residence, except in one condition, must be the last which one


takes


case


immediately


prior


) graduation.
their degrees


The


exception


attendance


Summer


School


which


case


twelve


but


never


more,


semester-hours of work by correspondence may


be taken


dur-


ing the ten


(10)


months


just prior to the Summer Session in


which


have


degree


completed


is received.


thirty


every


case,


semester-hours


students


work


must
resi-


dence and must have been in attendance at the summer session


or scholastic term immediately prior to the reception


gree.


AMOUNT


dents are


CORRESPONDENCE


not permitted to complete


WORK
more


PERMITTED.-Stu-


than fifty per


of the work toward a degree by correspondence.


Correspondence


study


courses


may


any


time


offered to satisfy the residence requirements.
Students will not be permitted to take work by correspond-


ence


while


they


in residence


without


consent


Dean of Teachers College.


nFl n -


Normal


have


Teachers


year


students


students who take


a de-


cent







SUMMER


SCHOOL


No high school credit is given, but students taking work of


pre-college


rank


may


arrange


entrance


examination


these subject


if they wish to enter the


University


MAXIMUM


AND


MINIMUM


HOURS


FOR


COLLEGE


STUDENTS.-Without


special


permission


Teachers


courses


College


aggregating


Faculty,


as many


as 7


college


students


semester


hour


must
s, but


take
not


more than 9 semester hours credit.


Under some circumstances,


students


may petition


faculty to


waive


above


regula-


tion.


The


following regulation governs such


cases:


Students


must first petition


Teachers


College


Fac-


ulty for permission to register for more than the usual amount


of work,
School.


presenting this petition


to the


Dean


of the Summer


mester


Before
hours


being
credit,


allowed


student


register


must


for more


show


that


than


has


trained an average of B


the term


or Summer School


imme-


diately preceding,


semester


hours


which case


credit.


like


he may


permitted


manner,


student


take
must


show
much
right
hours


an average of A
as 12 semester


reduce


even


before


hours


amount


subjects


will


credit.


permitted


The


credit


should


faculty


received


passed,


take


reserves


9 semester


unless


same


high averages,


respectively,


maintained.


Those


who


wish


more


than


required


amount


work must have a thorough


physical examination


by the


Uni-


versity physician.


Students


will


permitted


register


more


than the usual number of hours until their petitions have been
granted.
5. On account of the large number of regularly registered


J 1_ J -


J _


1 -


1


1


It _


fl-u. r nH~ wH r . % f n rn fn~nn nn U' H in .t .. it .H .~ S4 E1 fl n Cr r El ~r 7 n r


.1--


_____Y___I__






40 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

First Grade Certificate may register for Advanced Algebra,


General Biology, Elementary


Psychology, Rhetoric and Gen-


eral History, an aggregate of 25 hours.
Students preparing for the Second Grade Certificate may
register for Elementary Agriculture, Civics, First Year Alge-
bra, Arithmetic, Elementary United States History, and seven
hours of electives, an aggregate of 25 hours.
Students preparing for the Third Grade Certificate may
register for Spelling, Constitution of the United States, Arith-
metic, Grammar, Composition, Geography, Elementary United
States History and Education 101, an aggregate of 27 hours.

CERTIFICATES
GRADUATE STATE CERTIFICATES.-Graduates of the Teach-


ers College are


granted


Graduate State Certificates without


further


examination,


provided


that


one-fifth


their work


has been devoted to professional training and provided that


they


have the


recommendation


of the


Teachers


College fac-


ulty. It is well for the student to note that a Graduate State
Certificate permits him to teach only those subjects that are


listed


on such


certificate,


and


that only those


subjects


will


be placed on his certificate in which he has specialized in his


college course.


This will ordinarily mean that a subject must


have been pursued at least two years in college before a cer-
tificate to teach that subject will be granted. Applicants for


Graduate


State


Certificate


must


apply


Supt.


. S.


Cawthon,


Tallahassee, for application blanks.


Graduate
Certificates


State


Certificates


"presenting


may


satisfactory


converted
evidence


into


Life


of having


taught successfully for a period of twenty-four months under
a Graduate State Certificate, and presenting endorsement of
three holders of Life State, Life Graduate State, or Life Pro-


fessional


Certificates."






SUMMER SCHOOL


Applicants for Second Grade Certificates will be examined
in the subjects prescribed for the Third Grade Certificate, and
in Agriculture, Civil Government, and Algebra to Quadratics.
"Applicants for Second Grade Certificates who submit unex-
pired Third Grade Certificates as parts of their examinations
may be exempt from tests on Orthography, reading and physi-
ology."
In addition to the subjects prescribed for the Second Grade


Certificate,


applicants


First


Grade


Certificates must


examined in Algebra,


quadratics and beyond, Biology,


Psy-


chology, General History and Rhetoric, and by submitting an
unexpired Second Grade Certificate may be exempt from all


subjects covered by that certificate,


provided the grades at-


trained on the Second Grade Certificate are equal to those re-
quired for the First Grade Certificate.

REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE EXTENSION OF
CERTIFICATES


When


credit for the


extension


certificate


desired,


regulations in addition to those mentioned under the heading
"Maximum and. Minimum Hours" must be observed.


Every


applicant


extension


must take


least


four-hour


course


Education


(but


Pedagogy)


Psychology, in order to satisfy the professional requirements
for extension of certificate.
2. The repetition of courses in Education or Psychology


previously


taken


will


not


satisfy


professional


require-


ment for extension.


3. Students who desire an extension of a third grade cer-
tificate may not register for orthography, arithmetic, English
grammar, English composition, geography, United States his-
tory, and physiology.


Students who desire an


extension


of a second grade


certificate mav not register in the subjects enumerated in the






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


applicant


extension


shall


take


less


than


hours per week without special permission, and at


least 10


hours of this amount shall be in courses not covered by the
certificate held, or by courses previously taken.
7. No student will be granted an extension of certificate
who does not apply for the same on the student REGISTRA-


TION CARD.


A list of those who have applied will be posted


on the Bulletin Board in Peabody Hall not later than July 1
for correction, and no student will be recommended for ex-
tension of certificate whose name does not appear on this list


August


Students


should


register


under


exactly


same name that appears on the certificate which they wish
to have extended.


extra fee of


one


dollar will


be charged for


any


change of registration after Friday of the first week.


granted


extension,


students


must


recom-


mended for diligence and accomplishment.


Usually a passing


grade is required.


mail


Certificates to be extended must be sent by Registered


W. S.


Cawthon, State Superintendent of Public In-


struction, at Tallahassee, Florida, immediately after the Sum-


mer Session.


Those who expect to take the state examinations


immediately after the Summer School, however, should retain


their


certificates


until


they


have adjusted


their exemptions


with the county superintendent
certificates as directed above.


. They should then se&d their
This must be done as soon as


possible, as


there is a


time


limit and


delay may


cause


student to lose the extension.
The Summer School faculty will not recommend students
for extension of certificate for repeating courses which they


have taken in


previous summer sessions,


or those


who are


not pursuing courses in order to raise the grade of certificate


already held.


At the end of the term the faculty will recom-


mend for extension those that meet the above conditions.






SUMMER SCHOOL


Get your registration right the first time.


Remember


the proverb,


"Haste makes waste."


More than 500 students


every year find it necessary to re-register.


accurate.


Don't hurry.


Make up your mind to take not less than one nor


more than three hours in registering.
2. Study the registration blanks.


Fill


out the


REGISTRATION


CARDS


and III


complete detail DOWN TO the word
every question if possible.


Study the


Bulletin and


"COURSES."


the daily program


Answer


until


you


know or at least think you know,


study.
5.


what subjects you desire to


See that there are no conflicts in your class hours.
Consult freely with members of the faculty about your


schedule.


6. Students who are taking courses that require observa-


tion in


the Demonstration School should reserve some time


for this purpose between 8:30 and 11:30 A. M.


7. After you have decided


take, list them on REGISTRATION


which subjects you


CARD


No. I


expect to
under the


words "TRIAL COURSES."


Do not register for more than


9 semester hours col-


lege credit.


Have


this


trial


study


approved


by the


Dean


the college in which you are registering-Teachers, Arts and


Science,


Commerce and Journalism, Agriculture, etc.


You


now


ready


INSTRUCTOR'


COURSE CARDS.
ject you are taking.


Make out one of these cards for each sub-
For instance, if you are taking three sub-


jects, you will need three Course Cards, four subjects, four
cards, etc.
11. Secure the signature on your REGISTRATION CARD
of each of your instructors and leave with him the INSTRUC-
TOR'S COURSE CARD made out for the subject which he
teaches.
19 Pa auraV iTfrlhl bonTn niir raa cifr+nrn oa murf ixrTa nt. iT fn






44 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

ping a course, adding a course, or exchanging one course for
another, each constitutes a change.
15. Graduate students register with the Chairman of the


Graduate Committee in Language Hall.


WHEN


AND


WHERE


REGISTER.-Stu dents


who


live


or near Gainesville should register on


Friday


or Saturday,


June


and


8th,


Dean


office


Peabody


Hall.


Those


who can reach


Gainesville


on the morning trains on


Monday, June 10th, should register on that day to relieve the
congestion on Tuesday, June llth. All others should register


Tuesday,


June


11th.


effort


will


made


meet


trains or to transfer trunks on Sunday.


In fact, students are


urged not to arrive on Sunday, as the dormitory rooms will not
be open until Monday.





June......................... ........


UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA SUMMER SCHOOL
REGISTRATION CARD


1929. This card for Male Students only

Mr.
Last name First name Middle Name

Home Address: P. 0. County State

Your Age? Are You Married? What college degree do you hold? Do you intend to teach?

Total number of months already taught What Certificate do you hold? Do you desire extension of Certificate?

In case of illness or accident, whom shall we notify?

Address of this person Is this person your parent or guardian?

Where should telegrams be delivered, i. e. In which Co'lege are
Your rooming address while in Gainesville. you registered?

What church do you care to attend? (See back of this card for further instructions.))

COURSES


Subject

1.................

2 ...................

3 ...................

4 ...................


Course
No. Sec. I Time


Class Ir
Room lInstructor Grade


Subject


CourseI I
No. Sec.


5 .................................................

6 ........................ .........................

7 .................... ................. ...

8 ........................ .............. ............
I


i Class
I Time Room




.......... ................


Instructor Grade


----------------------------------
..................................

..................

.................. I ................













INSTRUCTOR'S COURSE CARD
This card for Male Students only
Surname First Name Middle Name
N A M E OF STU DEN T ........... ............. .. ... .......... ........................................................................................
June... ............................................ 1929.
SUBJECT Course No. Sec. Hr. of Rec'n CLASSROOM INSTRUCTOR


Students fill in only above and to right of heavy line___

--2 3 4 1 5_ 6 7 8 Do you desire Extension of
Monday ..... .................................. .............. ....... ................. . Certificate ? ...................
Tuesday ............ ..................... .. ...
Wednesday .. .......................................... ................. ....... In which College are you
Thursday .... ............ ............ ........................ ......... .......... .. .... .. registered? ......... .............
Friday ........ ........... ............................................... ......... .. .... ...... ...................................
Saturday .................. ............................................... ...... ..... ...... ...

Final r ............................... Days Present......................

................................................... ..............................................Instructor
Note: The registration cards for women are exactly the same as those for men
except in color.





SUMMER SCHOOL

COURSE'S OF INSTRUCTION


The following abbreviations used in connection


with the


courses, indicate the buildings in which the courses are held,
and the numbers after such abbreviations indicate rooms in


which they are held, for instance P


112 means Peabody


112.


A-Agricultural Building; S-Science; P-Peabody; E-


Engineering; L--Language


G-Gymnasium; C-Chemistry


H-Horticulture.
AGRICULTURE
ELEMENTARY AGRICULTURE.-A general course in agricul-


ture.-This will introduce the student to the study


of soils,


plants, common diseases of plants, insects, farm crops, domes-


tic animals and the like.


Methods of teaching agriculture in


rural schools will be stressed.


Review.


Extension credit only.


M. Th. 10:00 A. 106


(13).


Mr. Ritchey.


AGRONOMY 301.-Soils.-The nature and properties of the


soil as related to fertility and crop production.


(Prerequisite


Chemistry


Lab. M.


101-102.)
1:00-5.00.


5 semester


A. 106


hours credit.


(13).


Daily


11:00;


Mr. Ritchey.


ANIMAL


HUSBANDRY


305.


- Animal


Nutrition.


- Feeds,


feeding and management of farm live stock.


(Prerequisites


Animal Husbandry


101, 201.)


2 semester


hours credit.


Th. F


9:00.


103


(17)


. Mr. Martin.


DAIRYING 305.-Advanced Dairy


Farming.-Testing milk


products,


butter,


cream,


and


cheese


making;


selection


feeding and management of a dairy herd


herd and advanced


registry testing.


3 semester hours credit. M.


Th. S. 10:00


Lab.


T. Th. 1:00-3:00.


A. 103


(17).


Mr. Martin.


HORTICULTURE


305.-Citrus


Culture.-The


citrus


grove


site


and


soil


selection ;


preparation,


planting


and


manage-


ment; selection of varieties and stocks, and the use of cover


crops.


(Prerequisite


Horticulture


202.


semester


hours


I


_






UNIVERSITY OF


FLORIDA


(Prerequisites:


Horticulture


101,


102.)


semester


hours credit.


Th. F


. 9:00.


Lab. Th. 1:00-5:00.


A. 205.


Mr. Lord.


POULTRY


HUSBANDRY 202.-Farm Poultry.-Poultry as a


modest sideline on


the farm.


Breeds and varieties; location


and construction of buildings, feeding and management; in-
cubation, breeding, rearing, care of adult birds on the farm.


11/ semester hours credit.


12:00.


Lab. F


. 1:00-3:00.


H. 205.


Mr. Sanborn.


POULTRY


HUSBANDRY


302.


- Commercial


Poultry


Keep-


ing.-Incubation, breeding, rearing, spring and summer work,


culling, farm grown feeds and pastures, marketing.


3 semes-


ter hours credit.


Th. S. 10:00.


Lab. T. Th. 1:00-3:00.


H. 205.


Mr. Sanborn.


BIOLOGY
GENERAL BIOLOGY.-General introduction to the structure
and classification with special reference to the flowering plants,


the insects and vertebrates.


Designed to prepare for state ex-


aminations.
per week.


Three recitations and


three laboratory periods


No credit but arrangements may be made for a


college entrance examination.


Th. 10:00.


S. 111.


Lab-


oratory M. T. F


3:00-5:00.


Mr. Sherman.


BIOLOGY 101.-Principles


Animal Biology.-An


duction to the subject matter and principles of zoology.


intro-
5 se-


mester


hours


credit.


Daily 8:00 S.


101.


Laboratory to


arranged.


Mr. Rogers.


BIOLOGY


104.-Comparative


Vertebrate


Anatomy. A


comparative study of the structure of the main classes of ver-


tebrates.


5 semester hours credit.


Daily 9:00 S. 111.


Labora-


tory to be arranged.


Mr. Sherman.


73 rrvT a-n I f* .- -. -1 2 T7 l_- _--J-_ A --


__.L- 1-- -- ---





SUMMER SCHOOL 49

CHEMISTRY


CHEMISTRY


101-102.-General


Chemistry.--A


course


signed for those who wish to prepare for science teaching in
the high school. This course can be taken by those who have


never taken chemistry,


or by those


who


have had a course


before and wish to review it.


There will be two courses in


General


Chemistry,


one embracing non-metals and


one em-


bracing metals.


The former is a


prerequisite to the latter.


CHEMISTRY


101.-First


Semester.


study


non-


metals. 5 semester hours credit. Daily 9:00.


212. Lab.


Th. F


2:00-4:00.


Mr. Beisler.


CHEMISTRY 102.-Second Semester. A study of the metals.


5 semester hours credit. Daily 11:00. C.


2:00-4:00.


110. Lab. M. T. Th. F


Mr. Jackson.


CHEMISTRY 201.-Qualitative Analysis.-Lectures and lab-
oratory course in this subject offered to those who have had


general chemistry. 3 semester


hours credit.


Th. 2:00.


110. Lab. M.


Th. F


2:00-5:00.


Mr. Jackson.


CHEMISTRY 251.-Organic Chemistry.-This course is de-
signed to present the fundamentals of chemistry of the com-


pounds of carbon.


The work in the classroom is presented by


means of lectures, quizzes, and oral and written recitations.


5 semester hours credit. Daily 11:00. C. 212.


Laboratory 2:00-


6:00.


Days to be arranged.


Mr. Beisler.


CHEMISTRY


301.


- Volumetric


Analysis.


- A


laboratory


course offered to those who have had qualitative analysis. 3
semester hours credit. Laboratory 2:00-5:00, days to be ar-


ranged.


12 hours per week.


Mr. Jackson.


CHEMISTRY


302.-Gravimetric


Analysis.--A


laboratory


course offered to those who have had qualitative analysis. 3


semester hours credit. Laboratory 2:00-5:00, days to


be ar-






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


CHEMISTRY


551.- Chemical


Research.


- Organic


Chem-


istry; Inorganic Chemistry; Physical Chemistry, and Agricul-


tural Chemistry. 5 to


be arranged.


10 semester hours. Hours and place to


Messrs. Beisler and Jackson.


CIVICS
CIvics.-Designed to prepare students for the state teach-
ers examination on the Constitution of the United States and
for the examination in Civil Government in the Second Grade


Certificate.


Special attention will be given to school laws of


Florida and to local, town, city, and county governments. Re-


view.
cate.


No credit except for extension


of third grade certifi-


Three sections:


Section 1.
Section 2.


M. Th. 8:00.


F. 12:00.


Section 3. M.


10:00.


L. 307.
L. 307.
L. 307.


Mr. Turner.
Mr. Turner.


Mr.


Trottman.


ATHLETIC COACHING
COACHING 101-102.--Football.-Theory and Practice.-The


course


will


include


theories


fundamentals,


their


velopment and relation


to team play,


with special emphasis


laid upon drills to perfect fundamentals.


The several styles


offense and


strength


ing,


Special


and


conditioning


emphasis


defense,


weakness;


and
will


with


consideration


generalship


player's


given


and


equipment


of their
strategy;


will


special
train-


discussed.


forward-pass attack and


its defense.


The practical work will include punting, place-


kicking, drop-kicking, kick-off and forward passing; tackling
dummy and charging sled; special drill for linemen, ends and
backs; interference and team work; fundamental plays, break


plays, and signal systems.


Textbook,


4 semester hours credit. M. T.


4:00-6:00.


"Coaching," by Rockne.


Th. F


Basketball Court.


. 8:00. Laboratory M.


Mr. Bachman.


NOTE


Students


in this


course are


required


furnish


4^M inn t4nWr r..T 4 -Pa n Ce 1a tie 4nL^ Luur a Jv nn Jt-r 4-LnH It aH Sn. 4 in a A 41,1 a 4-l a





SUMMER SCHOOL


shooting; the defense, of the individual, of the. team, the five


man defense showing the different types employed and


phasizing the most successful.


em-


The offense, as applied to the


individual, team offense, different types employed, special at-
tention given to the types of offense to break through a five


man defense.


Practices to employ in developing a strong of-


fense.


Textbook,


"My Basketball Bible," by Forrest C.


Allen.


4 semester hours credit.


. Th. F.


9:00.


Laboratory


F. 2:00-4:00.


Basketball Court.


Mr. Higgins.


NOTE:


Students in this


course


may


furnish


their


own


equipment or rent it from the Athletic Department for $3.00.
When it is returned, $2.00 of this amount will be refunded.


COACHING 113-114 (formerly 105) .-Basketball


(women).


--The


fundamentals


game;


passing,


receiving,


pivots, shooting; the defense, of the individual guards; cen-


tres; team work on defense.


The offense


, individual play, of-


fense on team work, guards, centres and forwards.


Practices


employed


develop


a strong


offense.


Given


coaches of girls'


teams.


1 semester


hour credit.


.Th.


S. 10:00.


Basketball court.


Mr. Higgins.


COACHING


theory


starting4


(formerly
finishing,


103) .-Track and
sprinting, dista


Field.-The
.nce-running,


hurdling, high and broad jumping, pole vaulting, shot putting,


discus and javelin throwing.


Demonstrations will be given in


connection


with lectures.


Textbooks,


"Spalding


Athletic


brary,
506B."


6:00.


Buff


Series,


500B,


Price 50c each.


Basketball Court.


501B,


502B,


503B,


504B,


2 semester hours credit.


505B,
4:00-


Mr. Higgins.


COACHING


(formerly


102) .-Baseball.-The


funda-


mental of the game as applied to the individual; the defensive
game, the battery; the basemen; the outfielders; the defensive
team as a unit with emphasis upon the finer points of "inside"


defense;


offensive


game;


batsman,


runner,


base coaches; types of offense to be used in particular stages


*P 41..,, a L, ra ,,,, a, -1a -a a a aa 1 aa- ..


mr -__






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Department.


ment.


A charge of $5.00 will be made for such equip-


When this is returned $3.00 of this amount will be re-


funded.

DRAWING, CONSTRUCTIVE WORK AND INDUSTRIAL ART
DRAWING 101.-Grades I-III, inclusive. Application of Art
to everyday studies; construction work and design; paper cut-
ting, illustration; free-hand drawing; nature study in colors.


1 semester hour credit.


Two sections:


Section 1.


W. Th.


10:00.


.302.


Miss Ballard.


Section


M. T.


Th. F.


3:00.


P. 302.


Miss Ballard.


DRAWING 102.-Grades IV-VII


, inclusive. Design and ap-


plied


design


line and shade; theory


color and study


water colors


nature study and still life in color; notebooks


kept up to date each week. 1 semester hour credit. M.


Th.


2:00. P


302.


Miss Ballard.


DRAWING 201.-A course in craft and design embodying
a thorough course in color and design applied to articles con-


structed


forms


wood,


craft


tin,


work


etc.;


dying,


suitable


block-printing and


junior


and


senior


other
high


schools.


1 semester hour credit.


Th. F


9:00.


302.


Miss Ballard.

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION


ECONOMICS 101


(BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 101E) .-Eco-


nomic History (
the evolution of


of England.-A survey


economic history


capitalistic economy in England


the origin


and development of the wage system; the Industrial Revolu-


tion; the growth of British trade; the relation


development to political policy;
trial progress on the United St


economic


the effect of England's Indus-
ites. 3 semester hours credit.


Daily 8:00.


ECONOMICS


L. 204.


102


Mr. Myers.
(BUSINESS


ADMINISTRATION


102E).


Economic History of the United States.-The industrial devel-





SUMMER SCHOOL


ECONOMICS 103 (BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 103E).-Eco-


nomic


Geography.-This course


deals with


the adjustments


to natural environment which man makes in his effort to


cure a living.


The subject-matter consists of


climate,


soils,


products of land and sea, natural divisions of the world, trade


routes,


and


commercial


centers.


semester


hours


credit.


Daily 8:00.


L. 202.


Mr. Matherly.


ECONOMICS


201


(BUSINESS


ADMINISTRATION


201E).


Principles of Economics.-The


purpose of this course


is to


give the student a general understanding of present day eco-


nomic organization.


A brief analysis is made of production,


distribution and consumption.


Chief consideration is given to


functions


credit.


Daily 9:00.


economic


L. 204.


institutions.
Mr. Myers.


semester


hours


ECONOMICS


202


(BUSINESS


ADMINISTRATION


202E).


Principles
nomics 201.


Economics.-This


continuation


Eco-


Attention is devoted chiefly to the principles gov-


earning value and market price.


With the permission of the


instructor,
nomics 201


students


may take


. 3 semester


this


hours credit.


course


Daily


along


with


11:00.


Eco-
202.


Mr. Matherly.


ECONOMICS 302


(BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 302E).-Ele-


ments of Statistics.-An introduction to statistics; brief con-


sideration of statistical theory; collection, classification,


sentation


economic


data;


construction


graphs


pre-
and


charts; study


of index numbers; problems of


statistical re-


search.


Each


student


required


to complete


one


or more


projects in statistical investigation.


3 semester hours credit.


Daily 11:00.


L. 201.


Mr. Myers.


BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 81.-Office Management.-Of-
fice organization; office functions; duties of office manager;


the modern secretary


in relation


to office operation.


Profi-


ciency in the use of the typewriter will be required.


Typing






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


methods of filing.


The student will be required to attain pro-


ficiency in shorthand.
ture and 4 laboratory


(Laboratory fee to be arranged.)
hours. 1 semester hour credit.


1 lec-


L. 201.


BUSINESS


ADMINISTRATION


211-212.-Principles


Ac-


counting.-Lectures,


problems, and laboratory practice.


introductory study of the underlying principles of double en-


try records; basic types of records and reports;


accounting


procedure and technique; the outstanding features of partner-
ships and corporations; the form and content of the balance


sheet and the statement of profit and loss.


This course will


meet two hours a day.


Business Administration 211


will be


completed the first four weeks and Business Administration


212 the second four.


Laboratory fee $1.00 per semester hour.


6 semester hours credit.


Daily 8:00 to


10:00.


L. 201.


Mr.


Ward.


EDUCATION


Any 4 or 6 hour course in Education or


Psychology will


meet the professional requirement for the extension of certifi-
cates. Students in Education courses should bring with them
professional books and textbooks related to the courses they
plan to take.
EDUCATION 101.-Students who have not taken any course


in Education should begin with this one.


The purpose of the


course is to give an introduction


to the study


classroom


teaching.


What makes a


good


teacher,


improvement of


personality, how to study,


the art of


questioning,


reflective


thinking, elimination of waste in classroom management, the
importance of education, such questions as these will be cov-
ered by the course. 3 semester hours credit. Eight sections;


Section 1.
Section 2.
Section 3.
Section 4.


Daily 8:00.
Daily 9:00.


Daily


Daily


11:00.


12:00.


L. 5. Mr. Altstetter.
H. 207. Mr. Ackley.


Mrs. Altstetter.,


H. 215.


Mrs. Branning.


1 ' **





SUMMER SCHOOL


EDUCATION 102.-History and Principles of Education.-A


study of the historical background of


education, and


of the


fundamental


principles


which should guide educational


pro-


cedure
today.


and


give


3 semester


appreciation


hours


credit.


educational


Daily


12:00.


conditions


209.


Mr.


EDUCATION


103.-Health


Education.


- Conditions


and


forces that affect the physical and mental vigor of children,
youth and teachers, and relate the school to the health of the


home


and


community;


teacher's


health;


sanitation


school buildings; hygienic equipment; common


physical defects
munity hygiene


diseases and


mental hygiene; play and recreation; corn-
teaching of health education in elementary


and


high schools


Florida


health


program.


semester


hours credit.
Section 1.


Three sections:
For teachers in primary and middle elementary


grades.


Daily 9:00.


A. 303.


Miss Shaw.


Section


Same as Section 1.


Daily


11:00.


A. 303.


Miss


Shaw.


Section


For principals and teachers not included in Sec-


tions 1 and


Daily


12:00. A. 303.


Miss Shaw.


EDUCATION


guage,


121.-Primary


Methods.-Arithmetic,


Writing and Spelling in the first three grades.


Lan-
Pre-


requisites or parallel courses: Education 101, Education 207,


or any methods course.


3 semester hours credit.


Three sec-


tions:


Section


For teachers of


First


Grade.


Daily 9:00.


H. 205.


Mrs. Lord.


Section


For teachers


of the first three


grades.


Daily


11:00.


H. 205.


Mrs. Lord.


Section


The same as Section


Daily 8:00.


H. 205.


Mrs.


Lord.


EDUCATION 122.


- The Teaching of Reading and Litera-


-. a-






UNIVERSITY OF


FLORIDA


requisite or parallel


courses


Education


or Education


207. 3 semester hours credit.


Three sections:


Section


This


section


will


be confined largely to


teaching of the mechanics of reading as a tool study. Daily


9:00.


Mrs. Robison.


Section


The same as Section 1.


Daily 11:00. H. 207. Mrs.


Robison.


Section 3.


This section is designed for those teachers who


will teach in the middle elementary grades. Daily


207.


12:00. H.


Mrs. Robison.


EDUCATION


123.


- Hand-work for


Elementary Grades.-


The purpose of this course is to develop the real function of


handwork in


the elementary


grades.


The various types of


hand work will be discussed, paper cutting, free hand draw-


ing, clay modeling, etc.


A constructive project for each grade


will be developed during the course. T
four-hour course toward the extension


mester hours credit.


Section 1.


his course counts as a


certificates. 2


Three sections


Designed for teachers of the primary and early


elementary grades.


M. T.


Th. F


. 2:00. A. 206.


Miss Nor-


ton.


Section


The same as Section 1.


M. T.


W. Th. F. 11:00.


A. 206. Miss Norton.


Section


Designed for teachers of the upper elementary


grades.


Th. F.


3:00. A. 206. Miss Norton.


EDUCATION


201.-The


Social


Studies


Elementary


School.-A course in methods of teaching geography, history


and civics from the standpoint of human relationships.


This


includes lesson planning and criticism and observation in the


Demonstration School.


3 semester


hours credit. Daily


8:00.


Mrs. Altstetter.


EDUCATION 203.-Child and Adolescent Psychology.-The


a .d-.r. u n- n n t 4. Jl anfrjul A' A4 a14 a I^ a^Lrll^ aa 4 nI14 an4


1," 4-U 4.^





SUMMER SCHOOL


Child


Study


on the


practices


elementary


and


secondary


education. 3 semester hours credit.


Three sections:


Section 1.
Section 2.


Daily 11 :00. P. 205.


Daily


12:00. P. 112.


Mr.
Mr.


Section 3. Daily 8:00. A. 303.


Mrs. Metcalfe.


EDUCATION


207.-Educational


Psychology.


- Psychology


applied to Education, the learning process, acquisition of skill,


etc.


3 semester hours credit.


Three sections:


Section 1.
Section 2.


Section


Daily


11:00. P. 102.


Daily 9:00. P. 205.
Daily 9:00. P. 101.


Mr.


Mr.
Mr.


Wilson.


Tolbert.
.- .-I -. *.-- -.--.--. ---- k.


EDUCATION


301.-High


School


is designed for the consideration


Curriculum.-This


high


school


course
curri-


culum.


Standards for the selection and organization of the


curriculum


will be considered


with much


detail. 3


semester


hours credit.


Daily


11:00. P


201.


Mr.


Carmichael.


EDUCATION


308.-The


Elementary


School


Curriculum.-


The curriculum as a group of related problems and projects


of vital interest to children.


An attempt to formulate a cur-


riculum based on social conditions and social needs. 3 semes-


ter hours credit.


Daily


11:00.


L. 209.


Mr. Altstetter.


EDUCATION 317.-Tests and Measurements.-An element-
ary course confined mainly to achievement tests. 3 semester


hours credit.


Daily


11:00.


L. 204.


Mr. Evans.


EDUCATION 361.---Teaching of Mathematics.-See Mathe-
matics 361.

EDUCATION 401.-Public School Administration.-Stresses
in a practical way problems peculiar to Florida schools; the


supervising


principal,


relation


superintendent,


boards,


teachers


and


community;


consolidation


and


transportation;


adapting the school


extra-curricular


activities;


child's
school


needs,


finance;


promotions,


records


tests,


and


I a nB I an anf Jr


m m


IU


II





58 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

the classroom as a preparation for democracy in life. 3 semes-


ter hours credit. Daily 8:00. P. 205.


Mr. Norman.


EDUCATION


405.-Supervised


Teaching.-This


course


planned to give the student practice in conducting recitations


under close supervision.


A study will be made of the develop-


ment of courses, and the present status of the subject taught.
Lesson plans will be required for all recitations, and the man-


ner of teaching will be subject to criticism.


Teaching 4 hours


a week; conferences 2 hours a week. 3 semester hours credit.
Three sections:
Section 1. Designed for those who expect to teach in the


primary grades.


Daily


12:00. P.


Miss Peeler.


Section


Designed for those who expect to teach in the


third and fourth grades.


Daily


12:00.


P. 11.


Miss


Woodard.


Section 3. Designed for those who expect to teach in the


fifth and sixth grades.


Daily


12:00.


Miss


Upson.


Section 4. Designed for those who expect to teach in the


high school.


Daily


12:00.


201


. Mr. Simmons.


EDUCATION 406.-The Elementary School Principal.-The
problems that usually confront the elementary school princi-


pal will be stressed in this course.


Daily 8:00. L. 209.


Mr.


Evans.


EDUCATION


408.-High


School


Administration.-This


course is designed to study the practical management and ad-


ministration


modern


high


school.


(Junior


students


may choose between Education 408 and Education 402.) 3 se-


mester hours credit.


Daily 8:00.


P. 101.


Mr. Hinson.


GRADUATE COURSES IN EDUCATION


EDUCATION


502.-The


Elementary


School


Curriculum.-


An intensive study of the development, and present content of
the elementary school curriculum, including kindergarten; the


selection and


evaluation


of material ;


importance of the


classroom


teacher.


This


course


will


especially


beneficial





SUMMER SCHOOL


national tests.


A thorough and systematic study is made of


all the chief tests in both fields with laboratory material for
class use so as to familiarize the student with the process of
actually handling tests. It is recommended that Education 517
be taken before this course. 2 semester hours credit. M. W. Th.
S. 10:00. L. 209.


EDUCATION


505.-The


Organization


and


Administration


Extra


Curricular


Activities


Junior


and


Senior


High


Schools.-An attempt will be made in this course to work out
constructive school policies having to do with the developing
of the pupil's initiative, leadership, cooperation, etc. 2 semes-


ter hours credit. M.


Th. S. 10:00. P


. 112. Mr. Carmichael.


EDUCATION 506.-Methods of Teaching Farm Shop


Work.


-The selection and organization of subject matter or jobs in
farm shop work to be included in a course given in the high


school


vocational


agricultural


students,


and


methods


to be used in the teaching of these jobs. The course is designed
for those who are teaching vocational agriculture or for those


preparing for this field.


Education


303-304 or their equiva-


lents are required as prerequisites to this course.


2 semester


hours credit. ]
EDUCATION


Th. 11:00. P. 208.


509.-Problems


Mr. Garris.


Administration


School


System.-Seminar.-Open


graduate


students


who


are qualified by


experience and training to pursue advanced


study on selected problems in administration.


As far as pos-


sible problems will be selected to meet individual needs.


Each


student selects some problem for special study and presents


results of his study in


form


a thesis.


Students


may work on chosen problems either singly or in small groups.


3 semester hours credit.


Daily 8:00.


EDUCATION 511.-Methods


and


P. 201.


Materials


Mr. Fulk.


Vocational


Agriculture.-The organization of subject matter for a long
time teaching program; the analysis and teaching layout of
a farm job; the selection of teaching devices; the organiza-





UNIVERSITY


FLORIDA


EDUCATION


517.-The chief purpose of this course


is to


acquaint students with statistical methods as applied to edu-


cation.


The chief topics to


be discussed are:


advantages of


statistical


methods;


methods


collecting


educational


data,


and tabulations; the calculation of median, mode, mean; the


mean


and standard


deviations ;


variabilities;


correlations ;


regressions; probabilities; reliabilities; graphs and


the like.


knowledge


above


topics


will


enable


one


read


educational


literature more


intelligently.


It is


recommended


that this course


hours credit.


taken before Education
Th. S. 10:00. H. 207. M


503. 2 semester


r. Ackley.


EDUCATION 519.-The purpose of this course is to give a


comprehensive


view


basic


principles


curriculum


construction;


compare


curricula


various secondary


schools;


terminologists;


tendencies


curriculum


making;


constants; electives, and the like.


This course should enable


both principals and teachers to understand better the objec-


tives of secondary education.


3 semester hours credit. Daily


12 :00.


. 101


Mr. Hinson.


EDUCATION


527.-Research


Education.-Seminar


and


Individual Conferences.-A course designed primarily to give
individual guidance to graduate students majoring in Educa-
tion, selection and definition of problems suitable for master's


theses; collection, analysis and organization of data


the me-


chanics


Education


thesis
should


construction.


enroll


this


Every


course.


student


Open


majoring in


other


graduate students.


Sections


No college credit.


(Students choose one)


Seminar (for all)


10:00.


201.


Section 1.
Section 2.
Section 3.


T. Th. 9:00.


2:00.


Th. 2:00.


P. 203.
P. 201.


201.


Mr. Fulk.


EDUCATION 528.-A graduate course in the Supervision of





SUMMER SCHOOL


education,


trade


and


industrial


education,


and


commercial


education as provided for by the National Vocational Educa-


tion Act of Congress.


2 semester hours credit.


9:00.


208.


Mr. Garris.


ENGLISH


ENGLISH


GRAMMAR.-This


course is designed


those


who a're preparing for the examinations for third and second


grade certificates.


Texts


Kingsley,


Mason and


Rogers,


Brief Review of English Grammar with Supplementary


Ex-


ercises ;" Sharp's


"English Exercises Book


V.",


Review.


extension


credit.


Section 1.


Section


Two sections:
V. Th. 10:00. E.


Th. F


203.


12:00. E. 203.


Miss England.
Miss England.


SCOMrPOSITION.-This course is designed for those who are
preparing for the teachers examinations for third and second


grade certificates.


The work is so arranged that there will be


no duplication of the material covered in the Grammar course.


Texts:
School,


Lewis
Sharp'


and


Hosic'


"Practical


"English Exercises,


Book


English


V."


High


Review.


extension credit.


Two sections:


Section 1.


Section


Th. 3:00.
Th. 8:00.


P. 112.


203.


Miss Graham.
Miss England.


RHETORIC.-Designed


prepare


teachers


for the exam-


nation for first grade certificate
course should take Composition.


.No one enrolling for this
A rapid review of narration,


description,


exposition, argument,


drama and


other


literary


forms; poetry, diction, punctuation and figures of speech will


given.


Sharp's


Texts:


"English


Brooks'


Exercises,


"English


Book


Book


V."


(Revised) ?"


Review.


Extension


credit for second and third grade certificates.


No high school


credit, but arrangements may be made to take entrance exam-


nations.


Three sections


ci-. 1


*' IA


rul. 11 .1


\I\ T' flno


I





UNIVERSITY OF


FLORIDA


credit, but arrangements may be made for a college entrance


examination. M. T.


Th. 11:00. L. 5. Mr. Hait.


ENGLISH LITERATURE.-The history of English Literature


as outlined in Metcalf's "English Literature"


will be given.


No credit, but arrangements may be made for a college en-


trance examination.


Th. F


. 2:00.


L. 209.


Mr.


Thomp-


son.


SPELLING.-A


thorough review


of prefixes, suffixes, ab-


breviations, syllabication, diacritical marks, and rules of spell-


ing will be given.


In every class period there will be spelling


exercises and drills in the meaning and use of synonyms, anto-


nyms, and homonyms.


There will be a study of how to make


the spelling period most interesting and helpful.


At the close


of the summer school a spelling tournament, open to all ambi-


tious spellers,


will be held.


A copy of Webster's "Blue-Back


Speller," suitably autographed and inscribed,


will be given to


the winner of the tournament.


Hours to be arranged.


Mr.


Little.


COLLEGE


ENGLISH


ENGLISH 1
train students


.01.-Rhetoric
in methods of


mnd


Composition.-Designed


clear and forceful


expression.


Instruction is carried on simultaneously in formal rhetoric, in
rhetorical analysis, and in theme writing, the constant corre-
lation of the three as methods of approach to the desired goal


being kept in view.


In addition, a reading course is assigned


each student.


Textbook,


Genung's


"Working


Principles


Rhetoric," first half.


3 semester hours credit. Four sections


Section 1.


Daily 8:00.


L. 203.


Mr. Mounts.


Section
Section


Daily 9:00. L. 211.


Daily


Section 4. Daily


11:00. L. 211.
12:00. L. 203.


Mr.
Mr.


Wise.
Wise.


Mr. Mounts.


ENGLISH


102.-A continuation


of English 101.


The sec-


ond half of the rhetoric,


"Invention," will be completed. 3 se-


J 1 ,"tI rrl .





SUMMER SCHOOL


the Renaissance. 2 semester hours credit. Daily


12:00.


111.


Jarrell.


ENGLISH 201.-History of Literature.-An outline course


in the historical


development of the


English


literature


and


language. Selections from important prose writers and poets;
lectures on the history of the language and literature; a man-
ual for reference; frequent reports from the individual stu-


dents;


constant


University


library. 3 semester


hours credit.


Daily


11:00.


111.


Mr. Jarrell.


ENGLISH 206.-Historical


Lounsbury's


Grammar.-A course based on


English Language designed to give the student


some knowledge of the historical development of the English
language, with a view especially of giving insight into modern


English grammar.


3 semester


hours credit.


Daily 9:00.


210.


Mr. Farr.


ENGLISH 301.-Shakespeare.-The life and earlier work,
including the history plays, romantic comedies and non-dra-


matic poetry.


Three


plays


will


read


class.


Written


reviews on


plays read


outside


the class will alternate with


essays from the students and lectures by the instructor.


This


course


is open


those


who


have


had


English


201-202


equivalent work in English literature. 3 semester hours credit.


Daily


11:00.


L. 210. Mr. Farr.


ENGLISH


408.-Contemporary


Poetry.-The


influence


Whitman; contemporary


English and American poets.


3 se-


mester hours credit.


Daily 11:00.


L. 212.


Mr. Robertson.


ENGLISH


409.


- Chaucer.


- Extensive


reading


"Canterbury Tales," "Troilus," and minor works.


3 semester


hours credit.


Daily 8:00.


L. 212.


Mr. Robertson.


ENGLISH


501.


- Anglo-Saxon.


- Anglo-Saxon


grammar,


reading


Alfredian


prose,


"Beowolf,"


and


other


Anglo-


Saxon literature.


semester


hours


credit.


Daily


8:00.


210.


Mr. Farr and Mr. Robertson.






64 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Students may take the following courses without college
credit in which case the University registration fee is not re-
quired.
ARCHITECTURE

Special arrangement can be made for students desiring to
take Architectural Design. Architecture 101 is the beginning
course in Architectural Design and consists of small problems
in plan and elevation employing only wall, roof, beam and pier
as structural elements, with mouldings and simple belt courses


as decorative elements.


Make arrangements for this course


with the Director of the School of Architecture. Mr.


Weaver.


PAINTING


ART 121.-Freehand Drawing.-An


introduction


per-


spective with outdoor sketching in pencil.


third.


The remaining two-thirds is given


ing from casts and


from still life


groups.


Occupies the first
to charcoal draw-
Teachers taking


this course are given, in addition to the above,


of teaching Freehand Drawing.


the methods


2 semester hours credit.


Th. 8:00-10:00.


. 301.


Mr. Long.


ART 226.-Water Color Painting.-Color theory and vari-


methods


applying


water


color.


Still


painting.


Landscape painting from nature. Methods of teaching water
color will be given to teachers taking this course. 2 semester


hours credit.


1:00-5 :00.


. 301.


Mr. Long.


ART


M-211.-Oil


Painting.-Theory


pigment


color.


Still life studies in full color.


A major part of this course will


be given over to landscape painting from nature.


This course


will allow for individual development by creative and imagi-


native effort on the part of the student.


Especially valuable


for teachers who wish to strengthen their work.


2 semester


hours credit.


Th. 1:00-5:00.


P. 306.


Mr. Long.


COMMERCIAL ART





SUMMER SCHOOL


ART M-115.-Poster


Design.-Analysis


essentials


a good


poster.


Methods


of handling


tempera


color


and


other


mediums.


Poster


lettering.


Practical


designing


posters for all uses.


Teachers will find this course valuable in


that it meets the constant demand for posters in the school.


A method of teaching poster design


will also be covered.


semester hours credit.


W. Th. 10:00-12:00. P. 306.


Mr.


Long.


FRENCH


FRENCH
year; gramn


21.-Elementary F
nar, pronunciation,


"rench,


first semester


dictation,


easy


first


conversation,


oral and aural


practice, reading.


semester


hours


credit.


Daily 8:00.


L. 207.


Mr.


Atkin.


FRENCH 22.-Elementary French, second semester of first


year; continuation of French


semester


hours


credit.


Daily


11:00.


L. 207.


Mr. Atkin.


FRENCH


101.-Third


semester


French;


prerequisites:


French 21


and


French


3 semester


hours


credit.


Daily


9:00.


L. 207.


Mr. Atkin.


GENERAL NATURAL SCIENCE
We are living in a scientific age and some knowledge of
the principles of science and their application to everyday life


become an


essential


part


a well


rounded


education.


But the field of science has become so broad and far reaching,


and it has been so sub-divided,
gether impossible for students


that it is almost if not alto-


majoring


other


fields


take even


beginning


course


in all


branches.


There


would seem to be need, then, for a broad, general course which
would present an outline of our knowledge of the physical and
biological world and show the position of man in the universe
in which he lives. Such a course would not only give the stu-


dent something of the fundamentals of all


the sciences,


but


would serve the


further purpose of


weaving them


together






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


the origin of the earth


its early stages; geological processes


and earth history; the laws of physics with special emphasis
on energy; the nature of chemical processes; the nature and


origin


of life; the


bacteria and


other micro-organisms; the


plant kingdom; interaction between plants and their environ-


ment.


4 semester hours credit.


Daily 8:00.


C. 110.


Labora-


tory and conference hours to be arranged.


Mr. Black.


GENERAL


SCIENCE


102.-A


continuation


General


Sci-


ence 101.-The invertebrates; the vertebrates; human physi-
ology; the dynamics of living processes; digestion, food, and
nutrition; the vitamins; the nervous system and conscious-


ness; elementary psychology.


4 semester hours credit.


Daily


9:00.


110.


Laboratory


and


conference


hours


ranged.


Mr. Black.


GEOGRAPHY
POLITICAL GEOGRAPHY.-Special attention will be given to


Florida and its relation to other states.


A thoro review of the


geography of the United States and the world.


Instruction


will be given in the use of textbooks, maps, globes, industrial
products as a help and guide for the teaching of the subject.


Review and extension credit only.


Section 1.


Two sections:


. Th. 9:00. L. 5. Mrs. Blacklock.


Section 2. M.


Th. 10:00.


L. 201.


Mrs. Kelly.


HISTORY


Elementary


United


States


and


Florida


History.


Three


sections,


each


covering thoro


review


state


adopted


text


book.


Review and extension credit only.


Section 1.


Section 2. M.


Th. F.
Th. S.


11:00. A. 204.


10:00.


A. 204.


Two sections:
Mr. Buchholz.


Mr. Buchholz.


HISTORY.-General.-This


course


designed


prepare


for the teachers examination for first grade.


No credit, but


I __





SUMMER SCHOOL


HISTORY.-American.-A detailed study of American his-
tory from the period of discovery and colonization to Jackson's


administration.


No credit,


but arrangements may


be made


for a college entrance examination. M. T.


. 12:00. A. 205.


Mr. Buchholz.
COLLEGE HISTORY
HISTORY 101.-Europe During the Middle Ages.-A gen-
eral course in the history of Western Europe from the Teu-


tonic migrations to the close of the Seven


Years' War. 3 se-


mester hours credit.


Daily 8:00. A. 104.


Mr. Tribolet.


HISTORY 102.-Europe During the Middle Ages.-A con-


tinuation of History


101.


semester


hours


credit.


Daily


12:00. L. 202.


Mr. Haseltine.


HISTORY


302.-American


History Close of Revolution


1830.-A


continuation


History


301.


semester


hours


credit.


Daily 9:00.


L. 109.


Mr. Leake.


HISTORY


304.-American


History


1876


Present.-A


continuation of History 303.


3 semester hours credit.


Daily


8:00.


L. 109.


Mr. Leake.


HISTORY 308.-Renaissance and the Reformation.-Study


of the causes,


development and results of


lectual and religious movements.


307.
ton.


3 semester hours credit.


these great intel-


A continuation


Daily 11:00.


L. 311.


of History
Mr. Carle-


GRADUATE SEMINAR IN HISTORY.-2


Hours to be arranged.


semester. hours credit.


Mr. Leake.


LATIN


LATIN


101.-Selections


from


Ovid.-First


semester


Freshman Latin.


Prerequisite:


Three years of High School


Latin.


semester


hniuri


crPdit


Dahilv


111


Mr


- - - a a w. a - . a a a t V t %, S a - a


Qnn00






UNIVERSITY OF


FLORIDA


LAW


The


following


courses


offered


and


carry


credit


wards a law degree as indicated:


ADMINISTRATIVE


LAW.-3


semester


hours


credit.


Daily..


Hours to be arranged. Mr. Slagle.


LAW


308.-Common


Law


Pleading.-3


semester


hours


credit.


Daily.


Hours to be arranged.


Mr.


Cockrell.


LAW


405.-Equity


Pleading.--3


semester


hours


credit.


Daily.


Hours to be arranged.


Mr.


TeSelle.


LAW


402S.-Evidence.-3


semester


hours credit.


Daily.


Hours to be arranged.


Mr.


TeSelle.


LAW


412.


- Florida


Civil


Practice.-3


semester


hours


credit.


Daily.


Hours to be arranged.


Mr.


Cockrell.


SCHOOL LAW.-2 semester
per week. Hours to be arranged


hours credit. Four recitations
d. Mr. Trusler.


LAW 301S.-Torts.-4 semester


hours credit.


Daily


(70-


minute periods.)


Hours to be arranged.


Mr.


Trusler.


TRADE


REGULATIONS.-3


semester


hours


credit.


Daily


Hours to be arranged. Mr. Slagle.


LIBRARY


SCIENCE


LIBRARY


SCIENCE


101.-Cataloging


I.-A


study


principles and methods of the simpler forms


cataloging.


Two hours supervised practice work will follow each lecture.
The cards will be revised and form a sample catalog for the


use of the student.


Three semester hours credit.


Daily 8:00.


. Laboratory hours to be arranged.


Miss Mercier.


LIBRARY SCIENCE 102.-Classification I.-The Dewey Deci-


mal system is used as the basis of the instruction.


The study


of book numbers


is included.


Problems


will


given


with


U


__





SUMMER SCHOOL


aration and


care of books and


the checking


periodicals.


Simple charging systems and various circulation records will


be studied.


Two semester hours credit.


Th. F


. 11:00.


P. 1.


Miss Timmerman.


LIBRARY SCIENCE 104.-Book Selection I.-This course in-
cludes lectures covering the general principles of book selec-
tion, with the needs of the high school library particularly in
view, the examination and discussion of selected books in the


various


fields


of literature and


writing


annotations.


Problems involving the use of standard guides to book selec-


tion and reading lists will bexequired of each student.


As a


final project the class will make up a list of books for a school


library.


Three semester hours credit.


Daily 9:00.


P.1.


Miss


Timmerman.
MATHEMATICS
ARITHMETIC.-A thoro review of Arithmetic is made, that


the student may view it from both the teacher


point of
numbers,


view.


Common and


percentage and


decimal fractions,


other


subjects


and child's
denominate


covered


textbooks adopted


by the state.


Principles


and


methods


teaching Arithmetic are thoroly covered.


Review.


Extension


credit only


. Three sections


Section 1.


M. T.


Th. F


12:00.


101.


Mr. C.


Wil-


liams.


Section


Section 3.


M. T.
M. T.


Th. F.
Th. F


8:00.


P. 206.


. 9:00.


206.


Mr. Little.
Mr. Little.


ALGEBRA B.-Review


of first year


Algebra.


No one ad-


mitted who does not have a rather thoro knowledge of first


semester first year Algebra.


Review.


Extension credit only.


M. T.


Th. F


. 12:00.


210.


Mr. Stone.


ALGEBRA


C.-Advanced


Algebra.-Involution,


Evolution,


Quadratic Equations, Progressions, Ratio and Proportion. No
one admitted who has not a rather thoro knowledge of first


vear Aliebra.


No credit. but arrangement may be made for





UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


PLANE GEOMETRY


I.-Books I and II.


No credit, but ar-


rangements may


be made for college entrance examination.


Daily 8:00


. L. 314.


Miss Stewart.


PLANE GEOMETRY II.-Books III


Those desiring to


review all of Plane Geometry should either take both Geom-


etry I and Geometry II, or Geometry II.


ometry II is Geometry I.


Prerequisite to Ge-


No credit but arrangements may be


made for college entrance examination.


Daily


11:00.


208.


Mr. Phipps.


COLLEGE MATHEMATICS


MATHEMATICS


credit.


Daily 12 :00.


83.-Solid


208.


Geometry.-3
Mr. Phipps.


semester


hours


MATHEMATICS


85.-Plane


Trigonometry.-3


semester


hours credit.


Daily 9:00.


P. 102.


Mr. Simpson.


MATHEMATICS


101.-College Algebra.-A continuation of


high school Algebra together with a study of Functions and


Graphs, Inequalities,


Theory of Equations, Permutations and


Combinations,
hours credit.


Probability
Daily 8:00.


and


P. 102.


Determinants.
Mr. Simpson.


semester


MATHEMATICS


Roberts and Colpitt's


102.-Plane


Analytic


"Analytic Geometry"


Geometry.-Text,
(Second edition),


John


Wiley and Sons.


3 semester hours credit.


Daily 9:00.


210.


Mr. Kokomoor.


MATHEMATICS


251.-Elementary


Calculus.-3


semester


hours credit.


Daily 8:00.


210.


Mr. Kokomoor.


MATHEMATICS 252.-Calculus.-A


continuation


course


251, by which it must be preceded.


3 semester hours credit.


Daily 9:00.


208.


Mr. Phipps.


MATHEMATICS 361.-The Teaching of Mathematics.-The
teaching of mathematics with particular attention to the con-


tent of


secondary


school mathematics.


This course


may





SUMMER SCHOOL


etry, Trigonometry and the beginnings of Analytic Geometry


and Calculus,


with special emphasis upon the changes of pro-


cesses of


operations and methods of teaching.


Valuable for


teachers and


prospective


teachers.


Open


to students


taking


or having had Mathematics 251, or by special permission of


instructor.


Daily


11:00.


210.


Mr. Kokomoor.


MATHEMATICS


575.-Fundamental


Concepts


Modern


Mathematics.-An introduction to such topics as the Number
System of Algebra, Sets of Points, Group Theory, Theories of
Integration, Postulational Systems and Non-Euclidean Geom-


etry.


Prerequisites:


course


Calculus


and


certain


amount of mathematical maturity to be determined by the in-


structor.


3 semester hours credit.


Hours to be arranged. P


102.


Mr. Simpson.


MUSIC
Music 101.-Note singing; sight singing; child voice; art


and


rhythmic


songs;


Dalcroze


Eurythmics.


Designed


Grades I-IV


. 1 semester hour credit.


Three sections :


Section 1.


Section
Section


M. T. Th. F
M. T. Th. F.


Th. F.


9:00.
10:00.
4:00.


112.
112.


C. 112.


Miss Porter.
Miss Porter.
Miss Porter.


MUSIC 102.-Development of sight singing; ear training;


part


singing;


changing


voice.


Designed


Grades


V-XII.


1 semester


hour credit.


. 11:00.


112.


Miss


Porter.
Music 201.-Appreciation and History of Music. Designed


for all grades.


1 semester hour credit.


Th. 3:00.


C. 112.


Miss Porter.
MUSIC 202.-Harmony.-Beginning Harmony. 1 semester


hour credit.


3:00.


112.


Miss Porter.


Music


203.-Supervised


Teaching


Music.


Class


those who are especially interested in teaching and supervis-


1 _ __ I__ _






UNIVERSITY


FLORIDA


music.


1 semester hour credit.


Auditorium.


Mr.


Th. F. 5:00.


Stage of


Collins.


VOICE.-Private lessons in


voice.


Hours to


be arranged


with the instructor.


(see p. 28)


Two scholarships in voice will be given


Two lessons per week unless otherwise arranged.


Course I.-Theory of Voice Building, breathing, tone plac-


ing, simple songs.


1 semester


hour credit.


Stage of Audito-


rium. Mrs.


Worth.


Course


II.-For


advanced


students.


continuation


Course I, and coaching in songs.


Students registering in this


course will be expected to appear in the opera at the close of
the term. 1 semester hour credit. Stage of Auditorium. Mrs.
Worth.


ORGAN.-Private lessons


pipe organ


will


be given


special arrangement. 1 semester hour credit. Auditorium. Mr.
Murphree.


NATURE


STUDY


A course for teachers wishing to prepare themselves bet-


ter for teaching nature study.


A study of the classification


of plants, and the study of insects and small animals.


Bird


protection


will


be a special


feature.


Three


recitations and


three laboratory periods per week.


. Th. 8:00.


S. 111.


Laboratory


4:00-6 :00.


Mr. Boardman.


NURSING EDUCATION
ADMINISTRATION IN SCHOOLS OF NURSING.-The course in-
cludes a brief history of the origin and development of schools
of nursing; organization and management of schools of nurs-
ing; budgets; catalogs; libraries; affiliation; student activi-
ties; publicity; university schools of nursing; group and hourly


nursing; present day problems and tendencies, etc.


2 semester


hours credit.


Th. S. 10:00.


A. 304.


Miss Gault.


- -


* T ..- -+ U* --- - - rxU S - U -. U


- -





a





SUMMER SCHOOL


PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING.-In this course the aim is two-


fold


first, to make a brief survey of the field of Public Health


Nursing; second,


to study the problems,


present status and


tendencies in this field. 3 semester hours credit. Daily


A. 304.


11:00.


Miss Gault.


HOME NURSING.-Home Hygiene and Care of the Sick.-
A standard Red Cross Training course. About 24 lectures and


demonstrations
Summer School.


given


during the


second


four weeks


of the


This course is not for nurses, but is designed


for people who have had no hospital training.


1 semester hour


credit.


Th. F


2:00.


A. 304.


Miss Fetting.


PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY


ELEMENTARY


PSYCHOLOGY.-A beginner's course in


psy-


chology with applications to teaching.


No credit, but arrange-


ments may be made for a college entrance examination. Three
sections:


Section 1.


M. T. Th. F. 12:00. A. 204. Mrs. Metcalfe.


Th. F


Section
Section


Th. S.


. 11:00. A. 205. Mrs. Metcalfe.


10:00. A. 205.


Mrs. Metcalfe.


PHILOSOPHY 201.-General Psychology.-Facts and


ries current in general


psychological discussion:


theo-
sensa-


tions, the sense organs, and the functions of the brain


higher
feeling,


mental


emotion,


course satisfies


functions-attention,


volition,


the self,


professional


perception,


and


like


requirement


memory,


topics.
for the


This


exten-


sion of certificates.


3 semester hours credit.


Section 1. Daily 8:00. P. 112.


Mr. Osborne


iree sections:
Williams.


Section


Daily 11:00. P. 112.


Mr. Osborne Williams.


PHILOSOPHY 301.-Ethics.-Principles of Ethics: Study of
such topics as goodness, happiness, virtue, duty, freedom, civi-


lization, and progress. 3 semester


hours credit. Daily


11:00.


P. 114. Mr. Enwall.





UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


PHILOSOPHY


312.-Psychology


Abnormal


Children.-


This course deals with. psychopathic, retarded, and mentally


defective children; causes,


types,


characteristics


and


treat-


ment.
liams.


3 semester hours credit.


Daily 9:00.


P. 112.


Mr.


Wil-


PHILOSOPHY


507.-The


Philosophic


Conceptions


Great


English


Poets.- (Prerequisite:


English


103-104, 201-


202.) 3 semester hours credit. Seminar. Hours to be arranged.
Mr. Enwall.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION
The courses in this department are designed to meet the
needs of teachers, who, even though not graduates of Physical
Education, are nevertheless expected to have a practical know-
ledge of physical training, gymnastics, plays and games, and


are expected to teach them in the public schools.


All teachers


preparing to qualify under the new State law regarding Physi-


Education


will


find


these


courses


particularly


their


needs.


Local problems of the members of the classes will be


met as far as possible. Plans will be formulated whereby un-
healthy physical conditions may be eradicated from the en-
vironment of the schools and physical defects found among


school children properly handled.


The aim of the department


is to have in every community as many trained leaders in play-
ground and school athletic activities as possible. All students
registering for courses in Physical Education will be required
to furnish gymnasium suits and shoes.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 101.-Elementary Gymnastics.-This
class is for beginners and consists mainly of marching, calis-


thenics and simple apparatus work.


Exercises applicable for


schoolroom will be given in graduated scale leading up to the
more advanced form of exercise. 1 semester hour credit. Two
sections:


Section


For women.


. Th. F


4:00 Gymnasium.


Mr.


Haskell.





SUMMER SCHOOL


for correction through exercise.


Action, use and relation of


Different organs of body and exercise to stimulate and nor-


xnalize them.


General laws governing the body


1 semester hour credit. M.


and health.


Th. F. 2:00 Gymnasium.


Mr.


IHaskell.
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 103.-Plays and Games for the Early


Elementary Grades.-A course giving Story


Plays, Rythmic


Plays, Folk Dancing, Mimetic Plays and the theory and prac-


tice of


outlining exercises for the early


elementary


grades.


1 semester hour credit. M.


Th. 11:00 Gymnasium. Mr.


Haskell.


PHYSICAL


EDUCATION


104.-Minor


Sports.-This


course


will include interpretation of rules, organization,


promotion,


.and competition in the following: playground ball, volley ball,
playground games, indoor games, tennis, swimming, and mass


play games.


The importance of mass play in the school and


playground curriculum. 1 semester hour credit. M.


Th. F.


.3:00. Gymnasium. Mr. Haskell.


PHYSICAL EDUCATION 201.-Advanced


Gymnastics.--This


class is especially designed for those who have had elementary
gymnastics and consists mainly of conducting the elementary
*classes and advanced calisthenics and gymnastics. 1 semester


hour credit.


Section 1


Two sections:
. For women.


Th. F


4:00. Gymnasium.


Mr. Haskell.


Section


For men.


Th. S.


10:00.


Gymnasium.


Mr. Haskell.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 204.-Minor Sports.-This course is
for those who have completed an elementary course and will
consist mainly of the finer points of the games, and practical


work


coaching


elementary


classes.


semester


hour


credit. M.


Th. F


3:00. Gymnasium. Mr. Haskell.


DTTTYCsTr A T T nrTTf 1 A rnITTfT


001 000


/A'--- .T., fi n st \ 1 11I7\






UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


PHYSICS
*HIGH SCHOOL PHYSICS.-A general course, such as is usu-
ally given in standard secondary schools-lectures, recitations,
demonstrations, and a limited amount of individual laboratory


work.


No credit, but arrangements may be made for a col-


lege


entrance


Laboratory W


examination.
. F. 2:00-4:00.


10:00.


303.


303.


Mr. Bless.


GENERAL PHYSICS.-The courses described below fall into


two groups:


Physics 203-204


total


of 10 semester hours


credit)


is a general course in Physics; Physics 105-106, 107-


108, 209
courses ii
oughness


(a total of 13 semester hours credit)


1n


which the subject is taken


and


detail.


Those


who


plan


are a group of


up with greater thor-


teach


physics


are


advised to take this group.


It should be noted, however, that


a course in high school physics is a prerequisite for the latter.


PHYSICS 203.-Mechanics and


Heat. -5


semester


hours


credit.
ranged.


Daily


Mr.


11:00.
Weil.


303.


Lab. 8 hours, schedule to be ar-


PHYSICS 204.-Sound, Light and Electricity.-5 semester


hours credit.


Daily 9:00.


303.


Laboratory 8 hours, sched-


ule to be arranged.


Mr.


Weil.


LONGER COURSE IN GENERAL PHYSICS.-A course designed
for students prepared to do more advanced work than in Phy-
sics 203-204, and desiring to spend more time on the subject.


knowledge


high


through trigonometry, is


school


physics,


and


presupposed, and is a


mathematics
prerequisite


for admission


longer course.


The course


is given in


three parts, called Physics 105-6, 107-8, 209-10.


*PHYSICS


105.


- Mechanics.


-3


semester


hours


credit.


Daily.


E. 303.


Mr.


Weil.


* PHYSICS


106.


--- Heat,


Sound,


and


Light.--3


semester


hours credit.


Daily.


209.


Mr.


Weil.





SUMMER SCHOOL


PHYSICS 108.-General Laboratory


Physics 106. 2
to be arranged.


semester hours credit.


Mr.


Physics to accompany
Lab. 8 hours, schedule


Weil and Mr. Bless.


GRADUATE COURSES IN PHYSICS.-A college course in phy-


sics


necessary


prerequisite


any


following


courses.


* PHYSICS


Textbook


301.-Meteorology.-A


Milham's


Meteorology.


brief


semester


general


hours


course.
credit.


Hours to be arranged.


Mr.


Weil.


*PHYSICS


302.-Astronomy.-A


brief


general


course


descriptive astronomy.


Textbook: Fath'


Elements of Astron-


omy.
Bless.


3 semester hours credit.


Hours to


be arranged.


Mr.


*PHYSICS


303-304.-Advanced


Experimental


Physics.-


Experiments


more


advanced


type


than


those


Physics


203-204, 207-208, or 209, together with study of the theory of


the experiments and assigned reading.


The particular experi-


ments assigned vary with the needs and interests of the indi-


vidual student.


3 semester


hours


credit.


Hours


ranged.


Mr.


Weil and Mr. Bless.


*PHYSICS


and


306.-Electrical


Measurements.


- The


theory


practice of methods of measurement of resistance, cur-


rent,


electromotive


force,


power


and


energy.


Planned


pri-


marily for advanced students in physics, chemistry, and elec-


trical engineering.


Laboratory work will be adjusted to meet


the needs and interests of the individual student. 3 semester


hours credit.


*PHYSICS


Hours to be arranged.


315.-Demonstrational


signed primarily for teachers of


Mr.


Weil.


Physics.--A


science


in the


course


high school.


Problems from every day life will be selected and the laws of


physics pertaining to them will be applied.


Many lecture dem-


onstrations will accompany the course, many of which can be
used in the teaching of Physics in the high school to create






UNIVERSITY


FLORIDA


*PHYSICS 317.-Modern


Theories


Physics.-The aim


of this course is to acquaint the student with the extraordi-


nary


advances


made


in physics


during the


last


few years.


X-Rays, radioactivity


and


theories


atomic structure


will
will


taken


in this course.


supplemented


The


demonstrations


classroom


wherever


discussions


possible.


3 semester hours credit.


Hours to be arranged.


Mr. Bless.


POLITICAL SCIENCE
POLITICAL SCIENCE 101.-American Government and Poli-
tics.-A study of the structure and functions of our national


and


state


governments.


Throughout


course


present-day


political problems of national and local interest will be made


subjects of


class


discussion.


3 semester


hours credit.


Daily


9:00.


A. 104.


Mr. Tribolet.


POLITICAL


SCIENCE


102.-State


and


Municipal


Govern-


ment.-An outline of the growth of American municipalities
and a study of the organs and functional mechanism of mod-
ern cities of the United States and Europe. Emphasis is laid
upon the newer tendencies in municipal government, includ-
ing the commission form and city-manager plan. 3 semester


hours credit.


Daily


12:00.


210.


Mr.


Tribolet.


SOCIOLOGY


AND SOCIAL ADMINISTRATION


SOCIOLOGY


111S.-General


Social


Science.-Designed


help students to understand themselves and to give some in-


sight


into


problems


of human


living together.


non-


technical, genetic approach, and an extensive study of the in-


dividual


and


social


relations.


Required


Freshmen


Teachers College who do not elect the Social Science Group.


2 semester hours credit.


Two sections:


Section 1.
Section 2.


Th. F


8:00.


Th. F. 12:00.


L. 211.
L. 212.


Mr. Carleton.
Mr. Carleton.






SUMMER SCHOOL


S79
J


SOCIOLOGY


231.-Community


Recreation.-A


course


practical training in community leadership; evaluation of in-
door and outdoor recreational programs; various games and
stunts; methods of organizing and promoting social entertain-


ments for all occasions.


1 semester hour credit.


M. Th. 9:00.


Gymnasium.
SOCIOLOGY


Teacher


Miss Hill.


259.-The


Movement


with


Visiting


special


Teacher.-The


emphasis


Visiting
problem


child.


1 semester hour credit. First two weeks of session. M.


.Th. F


. 2:00-4:00.


L. 109.


Miss Taylor.


SOCIOLOGY


311.-Problems


Child


Welfare.-Conserva-


tion of life; health and physique; training and education in-


eluding
quency
credit.


industrial
problems


. Th. S.


and


moral;


dependent


10:00.


child


labor ;


children.


109.


juvenile
semester


delin-
hours


Mr. Bristol.


SOCIOLOGY 313.-Florida Laws Affecting Child Welfare.-


A study


laws of Florida affecting child


welfare and


needed


changes.


Classes


during


second


two


weeks


Summer School.


1 semester hour credit.


Th. F


2:00-


4:00.


L. 109.


Mr. Bristol.


SOCIOLOGY


441.-Principles of Sociology.--A


brief


study


of the principles of social evolution, social organization, social


control and social progress.


3 semester


hours credit.


Daily


9:00.


L. 203.


Mr. Bristol.


SOCIOLOGY


442.-Applied


Sociology.-The


principles


efficient living together in society developed in the preceding
course will be applied to concrete problems in the interest of


social progress.


Special consideration will be given to increas-


ing the span of productive life, to increasing the production
and diffusion of the social income and to the diffusion of effi-


cient socialized education.


Prerequisite:


Consent of instruc-


-I -1 a. -. -e - -- -


J,





UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


SPANISH


SPANISH


21 .-This


first


semester


beginners'


Spanish, and will cover such matters as pronunciation, forms,
elementary syntax, vocabulary, diction, and written exercises.


Textbook: M
(Gill and Co.,


arder


and


Atlanta)


Tarr,


First


Spanish


3 semester hours credit.


. Grammar"
Daily 11:00.


209.


Mr. Hathaway.


SPANISH


22.-Second


semester


beginners'


Spanish;


continues course above described, using the same grammar as


Spanish 21.


Adds as a reader,


"Cuentos


Contados"


(Heath


and Co., New York)


. Prerequisite:


Spanish 21, or its equiva-


lent.


3 semester hours credit.


Daily 9:00.


. 209.


Mr. Hath-


away.
SPANISH 102.-This is the second semester of second year
Spanish; like the first in matters covered, except that the sec-
ond year requires more in the quantity and the quality of the


work.


Textbooks


Galland


and


Brenes-Meser'


"Spanish


Grammar Review"


(Allyn and Bacon, Atlanta)


. For reading


and


study


Aventurero"
Spanish 21,


class


(Heath


Owen's


and


edition


Co.,


New


Baroja
York).


22 and 101, or their equivalent.


"Zalocain


Prerequisites:


3 semester hours


credit.


Daily 8:00.


209.


Mr. Hathaway.


SPEECH


332.-The


SPEECH
Speaking


Voice.-The


aim


this


course is to enable students to acquire for themselves attrac-


tive voices and to equip teachers to develop


their pupils


pleasing


and


attractive


voices.


Affords


much


practice


speaking and in oral reading under careful, constructive criti-


cism.


2 semester hours credit.


. Th. F. 12:00.


P. 205.


Miss Payne.


SPEECH 333.-Story-Telling.-The


telling


stories


aloud


to children.


The


principles are carefully


studied and


I _ _ __ _






SUMMER SCHOOL


school conditions.


One long play and several short plays are


actually produced, in public performance, by the class.


Ele-


ments of the technique of coaching and of staging; lighting,


backgrounds;


inexpensive


furnishings


and


costumes.


mester hours credit.


M.W


Th. S.


10:00.


P. 205.


Miss Payne.





LIST OF APPROVED BOARDING AND ROOMING HOUSES
Below are given some of the names and addresses of persons who will take students to board during the Summer
School. Roomers are expected to provide themselves with the necessary bed clothes, towels, etc. The houses listed be-
low have been inspected by the University authorities, and the rooms are clean, well ventilated and convenient to bath.
Each house where women students are taken will be provided with a responsible woman as preceptress. In making reser-
vation, a deposit of $5.00, advance payment on room, is usually required. When a room is engaged it is understood that
it is for the entire term of eight weeks, unless there is an agreement to the contrary. In case the list below is not sat-
isfactory for the prospective students' needs, we shall be glad to give assistance if desired.


Note: Persons listed below for both men and
women are in charge of separate houses for
each or they wish men and women for table
board only.


Adkins, Mrs. C. J., 449 Roux St..............................
Anderson, Mrs. F. M., 200 Washington St........ .............
Angle, Mrs. O. J., 139 S. Seventh St. ....................................
Atkinson, Mrs. H. L., 1719 W. Court St............... ..
Bashaw, Mrs. P. P., 2023 W. Leon St..... ............ .........
Bell, Mrs. C. E., 324 University Terrace..... .............
Bridges, Mrs. Allen, 1431 W. Union St...............................
Bridges, Mrs. F. E., 1227 W. University Ave....... ........-.....
*Bryant, Mrs. E. W., 326 Washington St..................... .......
Cobb, Mrs. S. E., 1720 W. University Ave..... .............
Cragin, Mrs. F. W., 408 Washington St.......................
Culpepper, J. B., Theta Chi House.......................... ----
Davis, Mrs. M. R., 344 Washington St................ ....................
Fennell, Mrs. J. M., 1257 W. Union St...............................
Gilrie, Mrs. 0., 1321 W. University Ave..........................
Golden, Mrs. L., 1846 W Leon St...................... .................
Gunn, Mrs. Annie, 1411 W. Union ............................... .. ....
Gunz, Mrs. W. H., 1956 Hernando St............ .............
Hardee, Mrs. E. R., 1234 W. Uniion St .............................
Hayes, Mrs. Clara, 232 Lafayette St... ....................
Hazen, Mrs. Ruby, 224 Lafayette St ............... .....
-iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiii I A i i


0

0
a <
r^


..... 10..
12


10
2

10
8
14


6
16


81
9
......12
14..


Price




a)
.5


of room per


1 4.50 ......
...... ......... 4.00
7 3.50 6.00
2 ............ 5.00
..... .... ... 3.00
2 -........ 6.00
10 ........... 5.00
............ 3.00 6.00
------------ ---------- --- --.--
20 2.50 4.00
18 .... ........
20 ...... ............
............ .. .- 3.50
............ ....... 6.00
12 ............ 6.00
11 2.50 5.00
... .......... 5.00
............ 2.00 4.00
........... ..... 4.00
22 ............ 5.00
............ ............ 5.00


week





0 o
0 0
P4 PQ


a)


oa)
-~)a)
.0q
cbk


--- ... .. ... ...... .
......... --- $6.00

..... .... ... 6.00
...... .... 5.00

............ ..............

------ 7.50 .......
6.00 ............ 6.00
... ........... ........... .
. .......... 8.00 ..



........ ... ........ 6.00


3.50 _........ 6.00
............ ............ 6.00
............ ---- --- .. ... ..... .. .




McQuarrie, Miss Nellie, 1052 W. Masonic St. 8 ....
Martin, Mrs. Roe, 1962 Hernando St. ............ ...... ... .. ...... 12
Mitchell, Mrs. W. K., 354 Colson St.-- ....................... 2
Mixson, Mrs. C. G., 1053 W. Union St............... .... ........ ....... 2
*Mizelle, Mrs. C. F., 214 Washington St......... -- ..................... ......... 18
Nelson, Mrs. C. E., 1122 W. University Ave...................... ... 8............
Nolder, Mrs. C. F., 1822 W. Leon St.............. ........ .. ......... 8 8
Norton, Miss Nora, 1420 W. University Ave. .... ..... .............. 8
*Offutt, Mrs. Mary S., 334 N. Pleasant St .... .......10 ............
*Peel, Mrs. Maud, 1804 Hernando St........... .............. 25
Perry, Mrs. W. S., 215 Roux St.-................................... 1
Platt, Mrs. Wm., 2006 W. University Ave............. 5 ............
Potts, Mrs. E. A., 1423 W. Court St......... ............... .... ....... 5
Price, Mrs. Melvin, 958 E. University Ave..................... 5
*Rabb, Mrs. E. G., 1438 W. Court St. ... -.. 12
Rabb, Mrs. Ethel, 1538 W. Court St........-.- .............. ...... 10 .........
Race, Mrs. J. L., 1110 W. University Ave. ......................... 14
Robertson, Mrs. J., 325 College Park Ave. .................. ...... 8
Rogers, Mrs. S. H., 223 N. 9th St........................ ................ 12
'Sanders, Mrs. J. W., 1664 W. Court St. ................................. 12
Saunders, Mrs. O. N., 1168 W. Union St ................. 12...........
Scott, Mrs. J. M., 1110 W. Masonic St...-................. 1
*Senn, Mrs. M. E., 1832 W. Court St............................- ........ 24
Sheffield, Mrs. L. 0., 1653 W. Mechanic.... .. ...... .........-....I 3 .....
Stanly, R. L., 1906 W. University Ave...............-..... ...... ... 25 14
Steen, Mrs. A. M., 336 Roux St....... ..... .............. ...... 10 ............
Stribling, Mrs. J. N., 1656 W. University.... .... -....... .............................
Tench, Mrs. J. D. L., 1245 W. University Ave....-. ..---... ... ........... 2
Traxler, Mrs. L. W., 129 College Park Ave.. ...... ............... 14
Waits, Mrs. H. W., 1254 W. Union St................. ---- ..... 10
Walker, Mrs. Bryan, 1306 W. Union St..-..-..--. 6 ..................... 6
Watson, Mrs. J. R., 1236 W. Masonic St...... ................................... 2
W est, Mrs. E., 335 University Terrace .............. ......... ..... ..... 2 .......
Williams, J. D., 1857 Hernando St.........-....-- ..-- ............. 15
Winston, Mrs. F. H., 1111 W. Mason:c St......- ............... 4
Wood, Mrs. Cora G., 1432 W. Masonic St.. .. ..................... 8
Woodward,. Mrs. T. G., 1815 Leon St............................. ... 12
*136 N. Lafayette St. ................................. .. ............ 12
Indicates can accommodate children.


- ONMw


3.00





2.00

4.00

3.00

2.50
2.00

............


4.00


4.00

2.00
4.00
4.50




4.00




3.50
2.00


5.00
5.00
4.00
5.00
3.50

3.50
5.00
5.00


5.00
4.50
4.00
5.00
5.00
6.00
3.50
5.00
4.00
4.00

3.00
4.00
4.00
5.00

6.00
4.00
5.00
5.00
5.00
5.00

6.00
4.50
3.50
4.00


....... ....
. ...... ....



10.00


6.00
6.00

7.50






6.00
- - i- -


5.00
5.00
6.00
..... . .


-----. 6.00

- --------. --- ......--- .--


.I.............



- ------ 6.2:


6.00
6.00







6.00


7.50



6.00
.. 50

... ..... 6.00
.. 6.00


7.50


6.00
.... ........


------------
- --------- I ............
............
------------
















APARTMENTS


AND


HOUSES


FOR


HOUSEKEEPING


NAME


ADDRESS


No.
Rooms


Garage


Furnished


Linen


Silver


Angle,

Bell, I


Mrs.


139 S.


VIrs.


*Bristol, Dr. L. M.,
(3 apartments)


*Offutt


*Rabb


Mrs.

Mrs.


Thrasher,


Seventh.


University Terrace........


234 Roux


334 N


1538


Mrs.


Pleasant


Court


Roux


St..........

St. .............

S .----------------, .--


: ....::....








SUMMER


SCHOOL


INDEX


Page


Accounting
Admission


Advanced


- ,. .. -... . .. .. .. ... .. .. .-- - --.-..--. .-. -. -. .--.. S


Standing


A agriculture ........................ .........................--- - ... ...-.-- - --- - - - .--
A groom y . .. .... - -.......... .... .. .- - - -.. - -....
A n g l o S a x o n .......... .... ........ . . ... ... . . . . . . .


Husbandry


Announcemer
Apartments
Architecture


its


---....-..... ..- - -. ....... -


- .. S. -.- ...- ..-..- --..- -- -....--- - - .


- S ---- S S S -- ---.-.. ......-- -- --.-.-- --
- S -- - .- - - ------.--- ... ---- - *- -S- ---- - S - .--- --


Arts


Fine


- S -. . .. . .. ..S. .. . S S.. . S - - - ... S -- - S -- - - --- -- 5- - -


Art, Public School


Athletic C
Athletics
Auditorium


coaching


-..-...._~. --.....- .- --.- --" -2 3 ,


m .....,....... .. .. ..-.. ...-.. - ,.. -. --*-- --..... ----*----'-*------------- *---" "--- ------------- -------
- S S S S S S S - -
*1 - S -. S - 5S5-55


Bachelor's
Baseball .


Degrees,


Requirements


S S . .- S. --- -- -- -- -


Basketball


Biology


Board


Boarding


Houses


-.......-.... ...... 82-83


Books


Buildings
Bulletin
Business
Calculus
Campus,


and
Boards


Equipment ..-..... .....-..--------.-----------------
- ......-.. .-_-_ -- .-- .1 '------- -- - - --- -- ---- ---------- ---------


Administration


Courses


.......52-54


Plan


Certificates
Chaucer ...
Chemistry


...... ... ... .... 49-50


Child
City,
Civics
Clubs


S t u d y .............................. ........ ........ ....................... ....... ..... .... .... .............
University -.---...........................------................................-------------------------- --------

-nivers---- ---- ...--...-.-..-- -.------------------------------------ ---- ------------


Coaching
CommerciL


al Art ......


.............................------------ -2-.-.-.--------- ----------------. ---------------- -- 2 3


Correspondence


Courses


Work Permitted


--------------- ----------------------------------------------------------------- -------..- 4 7 -8


Animal


....50-51






UNIVERSITY


FLORIDA


Page


Dramatics


------------------------.....-80-81


Drawing ....................................--.... ......... ......................... ......................... ..
Economy ics ......................................-- .......................... .................................. 52
Education .--.......~.------..-..----------------------------------5 -61


Employment


English
Entrance


Bureau


......---------------.-....-6....... ......6163


Entrance E
Equipment,
Evaluation
Expenses .
Extension c


Faculty
Faculty


examinations


......29-30


Buildings


Credits


Certificates


Advisers


Fees
First


Grade


Certificate


Football
French
General
General
General
General


Assembly ...........
Natural Science
Social Science


Statement


Geography


Glee


Club


66
71


Government,


Cooperative


Graduate
Graduate
Graduate


Courses
State C


, Education
certificatee ..


Study


Group


Requirements


....31-38


Handwork
Harmony


Health
Health


, Primary


Education


High School
Historical N
History ...
Home Nurs:
Honor SystO
Horticulture
Infirmary ..


Kappa


Medical
Credit


Advice


....14, 39


!ote


66-67


ing
em


---------------------------------------------------------------------.
--. -- -- -- -.--------------------------------------------------------------------------- --


Delta







SUMMER


Literature ..............................
ELoan Fund ............... ----.... ...
Master's Degree, Requirements
1Mathiematics--------
Maximum and Minimum Hours
Medical Advice -------..... ---------
Minor Sports ...............................------
Mioney .................................------...


SCHOOL


......-----............--------- --- ---------- 6


P2,


..... 6 9.....- --- ----

..,..........,........-- -. -- -- -- -- -- -- ---- -- -- -- -- -- -
- -- - -- .------------ --------------

-- - - - --- - - - - -- - - - - - -


age
63
28
37
-71
39
19
75
26


Music ..------------------------------------------------24,
Nature Study .----.-...--..---------- ----------
NormaIl aDiploma ...--...........---..............--.........--------------.. ------------- 30-
Nursing Education ..------.....-----------------------225, 72-
Office M anagem ent ....-............ .................... ..........................................---------
Officers of Administration ...-.............--.- ---.----------------
Organ ................-- ...........----------------------------24,
Painting ..................... ........
lP ilo soph y .............................. .............................. ... ...--......... ...- ---------- --- -------7
Phi appa Phi .......................................--------- ----..................... ...----............ ...--....
Physical Education ........................... ~ .............................--...........---- -- 74
Physics ...-....-........-....-. .. .------------- 76-
Pirates of Penzance .....---------- ---------16, 6
Placement Bureau --..........................................--------------..........................................
Play Production .--. -------- ..80--
Political Science ..... ............---...... .................-

Project M ethod.............................................. ............................................
Psychology .....-----------..-..-- --......... 56, 57,
Railroad Rates .----......... ... ........................--- ;
Refund of Fees .------...............-.......................----..- ....--...........


Registration
Registration


Fee .................................. ~ . ................ 25
--------------------------------4......2-4


Religious and Social Life ............................ ................. 17
Requirements for Admission .-.........---............---...........---.-.... 29
Reservation of Room .................................................. ..............2......... .. 27
Residence Requirement -......---..-..--............-- ..-...--...-.. 38
Rooming Houses ..........................--..................----......................................82-8
Second Grade Certificate ......--........................................... 41
Scholarships -.-----.............24,- 27-28
Shakespeare ................ .. .. ..... ..............-..............---........ .... 63
Shop, Farm ............. .........-..-......--..-.......-............................... 59
C~l^A^J-l^^,-ro r ir P






UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


Page


Textbooks


.. .............. ..... .--....... 2 7


Third


Grade


Certificate


Track
Typing


University


.. .................................................................................................. 53-54


Club


Voice


W C. A ........................... - ......- -- -..-- ..-- -- -. .............................. ........




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