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Title: University record
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Permanent Link: http://ufdc.ufl.edu/UF00075594/00549
 Material Information
Title: University record
Uniform Title: University record (Gainesville, Fla.)
Physical Description: v. : ; 24 cm.
Language: English
Creator: University of the State of Florida
University of Florida
Publisher: University of the State of Florida,
University of the State of Florida
Place of Publication: Lake city Fla
Publication Date: May 1915
Frequency: quarterly
regular
 Subjects
Subject: College publications -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Universities and colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Agricultural education -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
University extension -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Teachers colleges -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Law schools -- Periodicals -- Florida -- Gainesville   ( lcsh )
Genre: government publication (state, provincial, terriorial, dependent)   ( marcgt )
 Notes
Dates or Sequential Designation: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Feb. 1906)-
Numbering Peculiarities: Issue for Vol. 2, no. 1 (Feb. 1907) is misnumbered as Vol. 1, no. 1.
General Note: Title from cover.
General Note: Imprint varies: <vol. 1, no. 2-v.4, no. 2> Gainesville, Fla. : University of the State of Florida, ; <vol. 4, no. 4-> Gainesville, Fla. : University of Florida.
General Note: Issues also have individual titles.
 Record Information
Bibliographic ID: UF00075594
Volume ID: VID00549
Source Institution: University of Florida
Holding Location: University of Florida
Rights Management: All rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier: ltuf - AEM7602
oclc - 01390268
alephbibnum - 000917307
lccn - 2003229026
lccn - 2003229026

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Full Text






















































COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


-:-.- .I:.
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cLL;F;.7I
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EXPERIMENT STATION


~




(N N J.UUU ~b


3'


university


rida


Gainesville


Eleventh Annual Announcement
OF THE


College of


Agriculture


K,


.4





















UNIVERSITY


OF


FLORIDA


MEMBER
OF


THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF STATE


UNIVERSITIES.


THE ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGES AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS
OF THE SOUTHERN STATES.


THE


AMERICAN


ASSOCIATION


AGRICULTURAL


COL-


LEGES AND


EXPERIMENT STATIONS.


THE LAND-GRANT COLLEGE


ENGINEERING


ASSOCIATION.


THE


SOUTHERN


INTERCOLLEGIATE


ATHLETIC


ASSOCIA-


TION.


THE NATIONAL RIFLE ASSOCIATION OF


AMERICA.














BOARD


CONTROL


P. K. YONGE, Chairman----------........... .....---..-.... - ......... ---.....
.....--...President, Southern States Land and Lumber Co., Pensacola
T. B. KING..............------...... President, First National Bank, Arcadia
E. L. WARTMANN.........__ _____.--___. .Planter and Stock Raiser, Citra
W. D. FINLAYSON..-.. Planter and President, Old Town Bank, Old Town
F. E. JENNINGS -. ---......------.. ..--... .- ....--- Lawyer, Jacksonville
J. G. KELLUM, Secretary to the Board .....---...---...........----......
.........Clerk of the House and Business Manager, State College
for Women, Tallahassee.


STATE


BOARD


EDUCATION


PARK M. TRAMMELL, President .. .. _. .............. ..... ..Governor
H. CLAY CRAWFORD --....- .--... ..-- ...... .. .-... -Secretary of State
J. C. LUNING ..------. .-...-----------------.......... State Treasurer
T. F. WEST ------- .- -------a ----- -------.......... Attorney-General
W. N. SHEATS, Secretary -........State Superintendent of Public Instruction


UNIVERSITY


COUNCIL


ALBERT A. MURPHREE, LL.D. ........... -....President of the University
JAS. M. FARR, Ph.D. -......._.-...-....-- Vice-President of the University
P. H. ROLFS, M.S. ..........Director of the Agricultural Experiment Station
and Dean of the College of Agriculture.
JAS. N. ANDERSON, Ph.D. ..-.....Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences
J. R. BENTON, Ph.D. --.........._......Dean of the College of Engineering
H. R. TRUSLER, A.M., LL.B. ........._.. ......Dean of the College of Law
JOHN A. THACKSTON, Ph.D. __...... ......Dean of the Teachers' College








UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


UNIVERSITY


OF


FLORIDA


GAINESVILLE



ORGANIZATION


THE GRADUATE SCHOOL.
THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES:
(a) A Curriculum leading to the A.B. de
(b) A Curriculum leading to the B.S. der
THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE:
Instructional Division.
(a) A Curriculum leading to the B.S. de
(b) A Curriculum leading to the title Gr
(c) A One-year Course.
(d) A Four-months Course.
Experiment Station Division.
Extension Division:
(a) Farmers' Cooperative Demonstration
(b) Farmers' Institutes.
(c) Boys' and Girls' Clubs.
(d) Correspondence Courses.
(e) Publications.


igree.
gree.


gree in Agriculture.
aduate in Farming.




Work.


THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING:
(a) A Curriculum leading to the B.S. degree in Civil Engineering.
(b) A Curriculum leading to the B.S. degree in Electrical Engi-
neering.
(c) A Curriculum leading to the B.S. degree in Mechanical Engi-
neering.
THE COLLEGE OF LAW:
A Curriculum leading to the degree of LL.B.
THE TEACHERS COLLEGE AND NORMAL SCHOOL:
(a) A Curriculum leading to the A.B. degree in Education.
(b) A Curriculum leading to the B.S. degree in Education.
(c) A Normal Course leading to a Diploma.
(d) The University Summer School.


TATE PLANT BOARD:
Citrus Canker Eradication.







UNIVERSITY






UNIVERSITY


CALENDAR






CALENDAR


1915-1916


1915-June 14, Monday -...----
August 6, Friday ---- -
September 20, Monday --


- --- --- S
. - --- a -


-Summer School begins.
-Summer School ends.
_Summer Recess ends.
Examinations for Admission.


October
October
Novemb
Decembi
1916--January
January


Tuesday -.....


Friday__..
25, Thurs
18, Satur
Saturday
Monday -


January 11, Tuesday


January 29,


Saturday


Registration of Students.
School for County Demonstra-
tion Agents begins.
.-......-----School for County Demonstra-
tion Agents ends.
--........-. Citrus Seminar begins.


..-.-- -..... Citrus Seminar ends.
day .... -.. ..- Thanksgiving Holiday.
lay, 11:30 a. m._ Christmas Recess begins.
-....---- ..........- -----Christmas Recess ends.
--- --...... Resumption of Classes.
Review Course for Teachers
begins.
.....-.....- Farmers' Ten-Day Course be-
gins.
--...............First Semester ends.
.---.---..--.... Second Semester begins.
ly, 2:30 p. m. ....Meeting of General Faculty.
.:30 p. m........Re-examinations.
30 p. m. ........Meeting of General Faculty.
-........-------..------ .....Commencement.
--------------.............. Baccalaureate Sermon.
...... ----.....Oratorical Contests.
Annual Alumni Meeting.
--------- ..--... Graduating Day.
----- ---.. .. Summer Recess begins.
-_--------- ____Examinations for Admission.
............----- .. Summer School begins.


September 25, Saturday


January 31, Monday.
February 12, Saturdc
March 4, Saturday, 1
June 3, Saturday, 2:.
June 4 to 6.........
June 4, Sunday-..
June 5, Monday __

June 6, Tuesday..
June 7, Wednesday -
June 9, Friday .....
June 12, Monday __


W








UNIVERSITY


COLLEGE


OF FLORIDA


AGRICULTURE


FACULTY


OF THE COLLEGE OF


ALBERT


A. MURPHREE, A.


President of the University.


AGRICULTURE
M., LL.D.,


P. H. ROLFS, M.S.,
Dean of the College of Agriculture and Director of the Agricultural Experiment
Station and of the Extension Division.


DEPARTMENT


REPRESENTING THE TECHNICAL


WORK


THE COLLEGE


FLOYD


M.S.,


Assistant Dean and Professor of Botany and Horticulture.
CLAUDE L. WILLOUGHBY, B.Agr.,
Professor of Animal Husbandry and Dairying.


ETHERIDGE


Professor of Agronomy.


RAST, JR.,


M.S.,


Professor of Soils and Fertilizers.


DEPARTMENT


REPRE


ENTING OTHER


REQUIRED


WORK


OF THE COLLEGE


R. FLINT


Ph.D.


(Goettingen),


M.D.


(Harvard),


Professor of Chemistry and Resident Physician.


DAVIS,


Ph.D.


Harvard),


Professor of Zoology and Bacteriology.
J. M. FARR, A.M., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins),
Professor of English Language and Literature.


H. G.


KEPPEL


A.B.


Ph.D.


Clark)


Professor of Mathematics and Astronomy.


T. NELSON


Ph.D.


Chicago),


Instructor in Botany and Bacteriology.


COX, A.M.


Ph.D.


Harvard),


Professor of Philosophy and Education.


NEWELL


L. SIMS, A.M.


, Ph.D. (Columbia)


Assistan


M.S.,


_ _







FACULTY


THACKSTON


A.B.


, Pd.M., Ph.D.


(New


York University),


Professor of Education and Inspector of High Schools.


WALKER, Major,


(Retired),


Commandant of Cadets and Professor of Military Science and Tactics.


M. B.


F.


HADLEY, A.B.,
Librarian.


L. THOMPSON,
Acting Secretary.


A. G.


COLCLOUGH,


Farm Foreman.


SPECIAL


LECTURERS


FOR


HON.


McRAE


Commissioner of Agriculture.


PROF.


HAROLD


HUME,


President State Horticultural Society.


HON.


C. F


BARBER,


President State Live Stock Association.


CHAS.


DAWSON,


Veterinarian, State Board of Health.


SELLARD


State Geologist.


APT


ROSE,


State Chemist.


DR. E. W. BERGER,
State Entomologist.
DR. A. H. LOGAN,
Veterinary Field Agent, I


AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT


STATION


STAFF


J. M. SCOTT, B.S.,
Vice Director, and Animal Industrialist, and Lecturer on Animal Husbandry
and Agronomy.


B. F


Plant Physiologis


FLOYD


and Lecturer on


Citrus.


, A.M.,


i








UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


S. E. COLLISION, M.S.,
Chemist and Lecturer on Soils and Fertilizers.


JOHN BELLING, B.Sc.,
Assistant Botanist and Editor.


D. SHERBAKOFF,
Associate Plant Pathol<

S. S. WALKER, M
Associate Chemist.


Ph.D.
)gist.

.S.,


JOHN SCHNABEL,
Assistant Horticulturist.


JULIUS MATZ
Laboratory Assistant in P


MASON


, B.S.,
lant Pathology.


, M.S.,


Laboratory Assistant in Entomology.
H. G. CLAYTON, B.S.A.,
Laboratory Assistant in Dairying.
C. D. McDOWALL, B.S.A.,
Laboratory Assistant in Plant Physiology.


K. H. GRAHAM,
Auditor and Bookkeeper


VAN HYNING,
Librarian.


G. SHAW,
Secretary.


L. T


NIELAND,


Farm Foreman.


EXTENSION


DIVI


SION


STAFF


McQUARRIE,


State Agent in Charge of Farmers' Cooperative Demonstration


Farmers'


Institutes.


Work and


SPENCER, M


District Agent for Central and South Florida, Farmers' Cooperative Dem-
onstration Work.


PACE, B.


District Agent for North and West Florida,


I, T 4


flJa 4n t A. 1S 2% a SAl 2% -


Farmers


Cooperative Dem-


S1 I






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

COUNTY AGENTS FOR FARMERS' COOPERATIVE
DEMONSTRATION WORK


Name


Stafford Burg'
E. W. Turner
B. V. Mathis
O. L. Mizell
J. E. Yon
W. E. Allen
W. E. Brown


J.
Jo
W
S.
M
S.
J.
R.
R.
G.
E.
D.
W
Fr
A.
D.
S.
Ja


is


D. Brown


s. Crews
. L. Watson
W. Hiatt
. C. Gardner
S. Smith
T. Daniel
ST. Kelly
I. Mathews
W. Belser
W. Lumpkin
C. Geiger
m. Gomme
ank Robinson
W. Turner
R. McQuarrie
J. McCully
s. Shaw
H. Baker
E. Evans
A. Lewis
O. Simmons
. C. Lawton
SL. Herrington
Z. Atkeson
H-T Qt nlr nrr


Postoffice
Gainesville
Macclenny
Panama City
Dukes
Blountstown
Lecanto
Green Cove Springs
Lake City
Wauchula
Jacksonville
Gonzalez
Greensboro
Jennings
Brooksville
Plant City
Bonifay
Marianna
Monticello
Mayo
Tavares
Tallahassee
Bristol
Madison
Berlin
Hilliard
Orlando
Kissimmee
Kathleen
Botts
Hastings
Bushnell
Live Oak
PDa<


County
Alachua
Baker
Bay
Bradford
Calhoun
Citrus
Clay
Columbia
DeSoto
Duval
Escambia
Gadsden
Hamilton
Hernando
Hillsboro
Holmes
Jackson
Jefferson
Lafayette
Lake
Leon
Liberty
Madison
Marion
Nassau
Orange
Osceola
Polk
Santa Rosa
St. John
Sumter
Suwannee
T'^,ln .1 >






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

COUNTY AGENTS FOR CANNING CLUBS


Name


Miss Lila Fraser
Miss Lizzie Dowling


Mrs. T. E.


Waldrup


Postoffice
Gainesville
Taylor
Lake Butler


County
Alachua
Baker
Bradford


Miss Nellie McQuarrie
Miss Lonny Landrum
Mrs. A. J. Henry
Mrs. A. L. Monroe
Miss Allie Stribbling
Mrs. Nevada Reddick
Mrs. Mollie Evers
Mrs. J. R. Moorhead
Miss Anne B. Carson
Miss Verda Thompson
Miss Carrie Post
Miss Jessie Burton
Miss Mozelle Durst
Miss Lucia Hudson


Mrs.


W. E. Quarterman


Inverness


Citrus


Green Cove Springs Clay


Lake City
Miami
Arcadia
Bonifay
Plant City
Ocala


Kissimmee
Lakeland
Dade City
Crescent City
Sanford
St. Augustine
Live Oak


Columbia
Dade
DeSoto
Holmes
Hillsboro
Marion
Osceola
Polk
Pasco
Putnam
Seminole
St. John
Suwannee


Miss Eloise McGriff
Miss Myrtie Warren


DeLand
DeFuniak Springs


Volusia
Walton


STUDENT


ORGANIZATIONS


AND


Y. M. C. A.-There is a branch of the
University, which meets every Sunday.


PUBLICATIONS
Y. M. C. A. in the
At these meetings


the practical, rather than the theoretical, phases of


Chris-


tianity are freely and candidly talked over and the students
discuss among themselves the special problems which arise


in student life.


Members


of the


Faculty, the


ministers of


the city and distinguished Christian workers are frequently


invited


address


Association.


Bible


classes


organized in connection with the work.
Students, on entering the University, should by all means






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


THE AGRICULTURAL CLUB.--To receive training in pub-


lic speaking, to unify College thought and


promote in-


terest in agriculture, all students are strongly urged to be-


come


members


Agricultural


Club.


the inter-


society debates of this year for the


Faculty loving-cup the


Club took second


place


among the


five


societies of


University.
A reading and recreation room for the use of members
and their friends is being fitted up by the Club on the third
floor of the College building.


PUBLICATIONS.-Beginning


with


the session of 1909-10


each Senior class has published an annual, known


"Seminole,"


which appears an account of the


as the
college


year as seen by the Seniors.


The annual is profusely and


handsomely illustrated.
The "Florida Alligator" is a weekly newspaper owned


and controlled by the student body.


In it are recorded the


local


happenings of interest to the


students.


editorial


articles discuss University problems from the viewpoint of


the under-graduates.


It seeks the support of all the alumni,


who will find in it the best means of keeping in close touch
with the University.
GENERAL STATEMENT
AIM AND ScoPE.-The work of the College of Agricul-


ture is carried on in three principal Divisions:


structional Division,


The In-


which concerns itself with giving in-


struction to men resident at the University.


(2) The Exper-


iment Station Division, the members of whose staff devote


their time and energies to


investigation and publication of


results upon such agricultural problems as


service to the State.


are of greatest


The Extension Division, which


devotes its energies to disseminating information


obtained


by the Experiment Station


and


the U.


Department of


Agriculture.


This information is brought to


the farmers


- -i aI a. r r






12 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

The College was established under the Acts of Congress
creating and endowing colleges for the liberal and practical


education of the industrial


classes in


different States.


The recognition of agriculture as a branch of collegiate in-


struction
founded.


a distinctive


The


aim


feature


instructional


the institutions thus


division


of the


College is to offer young men the best possible preparation


for agricultural pursuits.


The


courses


afford


opportunity


for gaining both technical knowledge and training in


and


science


agriculture.


About


one-third


student's time is devoted to technical


and


other two-thirds


studies.


basic


agricultural


sciences


A broad foundation is thus laid which


and


will


studies
cultural
enable


graduates to become either leaders in educational work or
effective producing agriculturists.


GROUPS.-The group courses offered during the


Sopho-


more, Junior and Senior years afford opportunity for select-
ing and preparing for the phase of agriculture best suited to


the qualifications and taste of the individual students.


The


Agronomy or Animal Husbandry Group should be elected
by those wishing to pursue general farming; the Horticul-


tural


Group by


those


interested


fruit


production


market gardening; the Chemical group by those wishing to


become agricultural analysts.


order to


meet


con-


stantly increasing demand for men competent to give in-
struction in agriculture, a special group has been prepared


for teachers, in cooperation with the
the University.


Teachers College of


The General


Group


will


appeal


to students


seeking a


knowledge


principal


subjects


embraced


branches of agriculture, and will specially train men for ser-


vice as County Agricultural Experts and


Farm Demonstra-


tion Agents, under the appropriations recently made by Con-
gress under the Smith-Lever Act.
Great care should be exercised by students in the selection






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


Southern Railway Scholarship.-William
Foundation, $200.


Wilson Finley


County Scholarships.-The Legislature of 1915 made
provision for one scholarship for each County in the State
under the following Act:


CHAPTER 6837


(No. 31)


Be It Enacted by the Legislature of the State of Florida:


Secti
each C
and crea
of the U
Sec.
petitive
scribed
shall en
tion at


on 1. That the Board of County Commissioners of
county in this State is hereby authorized to offer
Lte one scholarship to the Agricultural Department
university of Florida at Gainesville.
ra, rr'l 1 1 1 *1_, 1 111 1 11


2.
exa
by
title
the


holder there


students
Sec.
be eligil
anyone
capable
pursuits


at t
3.
ble 1
so


I ne said scnolarsnmp snail De awaraea oy com-
mination under the rules and authority pre-
the said Board of County Commissioners and
the holder thereof to a full course of instruc-
University of Florida and shall subject the
eof to the same rules and regulations as other
he University of Florida.
All applicants for the said scholarship shall
for admission to the University of Florida and
appointed shall sign a certificate agreeing, if


and otherwise quali
in this State. Not


tfied, to
thing in


engage in agricultural
this Act shall be con-


strued to interfere with their receiving compensation for
services rendered while engaged in such pursuits.
Sec. 4. That for the purpose of maintaining such
scholarships the Board of County Commissioners of each
County in this State is hereby authorized to appropriate
from any funds at their disposal a sum sufficient to pay
the board of the person receiving the said scholarship.
Sec. 5. The term board herein named shall be con-
strued to mean the regular dormitory rate and shall be
paid monthly while the holder of the said scholarship is in
attendance at the University of Florida.
Sec. 6. All laws and parts of laws in conflict with this
Act are hereby repealed.
Sec. 7. This Act shall take effect upon its passage and
approval.
Annrmrr d TIna 11 1910






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


laboratories in soils and


fertilizers, crops and grain judging,


farm


machinery, farm


power, milk


testing,


dairy manufac-


tures, etc.
The classrooms


and


laboratories


were


planned


meet


the needs of the instruction to


be given, and a large amount


apparatus


has


been


added


recently


that


materially


strengthens the work of the College.


Library.


-The Agricultural Library is


small


but well se-


elected, and is added to


every


year.


books and a fairly complete set of


and Government Bulletins are


The


State


placed


leading


technical


Experiment Station


within


easy


reach of


the students.


The general library is also open to the students


of the College.
The Experiment Station library is


one


most cornm-


plete of its kind in the South.


In this


may


found


publi-


cations


from


Experiment


Stations


and


similar


institutions


not only in the United States but from all parts of the world.
A competent librarian is in charge to assist any one wishing
to consult the library.


The College Farm.-The


farm


connected


with


Col-


lege of


growing


Agriculture,


crops


consists of


with
acres;


used for


which
about


instruction


feed


purposes
instruction


acres for trucking, 95


and for
herds,


acres


for pasture and


general field


crops,


acres


orchard, 7


acres


for soiling


purposes


and stock


lots,


and


acres


buildings and grounds.


storage barn, a farm


The equipment includes a hay and


foreman's


house, a modern dairy barn,


machinery


shed


and


corn


crib,


a potting


house


and


irrigation system.


The


Experiment


Station


farm


and farm


buildings


located on the University grounds and are


easily accessible


to students.


STATEMENT


EXPENSES


UNIVERSITY CHARGES.-Tuition.--A student whose legal






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


($5.00) per year is charged all students, except one scholar-


ship student from each county in Florida.


In order to secure


this exemption, the scholarship must be filed with the auditor


on the day of registration.


These scholarships are to be ob-


trained from County Superintendents of Public Instruction.
An additional fee of two dollars ($2.00) is required of stu-
dents who enter after the day scheduled for registration.


Damage


Deposit. -In


order


to secure


University


against damage, the sum of five dollars ($5.00) must be de-


posited at registration.


Damage known to have been done


by any student will be charged to his individual account;
other damages will be prorated among the students.


At the end of


the scholastic year this deposit, less the


amount


deducted,


will


returned


the student.


ders for the disbursement of sums remaining to the credit of
individual students must be presented in person and will be
recognized by the auditor only after the close of the second
semester.
Infirmary Fee.-An infirmary fee of three dollars ($3.00)
is charged each student whose parent or guardian does not


reside


Gainesville,


the proceeds of


which


towards


defraying the salary of a resident nurse.


This secures for


the student, in case of illness, the privilege of a bed in the
infirmary (which occupies Section A of Thomas Hall), the


services of


nurse,


and attention


from


University


physician, E. R. Flint, M. D. (Harvard).
*Contingent Fee.-A contingent fee of $5.00 for physical


instruction will be charged each student.


The payment of


this fee will also entitle the student to a ticket admitting him
to all athletic games played on the campus by University
teams.


Board


and Lodging.--Board


and


lodging


and


janitor


service


will be


furnished


by the


University at


a cost


sixty-two dollars ($62.00) for the first semester, not including


the Christmas


vacation,


and


sixty-six


and


a half


dollars


IOLL A\


~n arr a S


IAM a an


rrT .L J~ a~ -h


-a~Y n


-a


*ll f T |1 rf ** **- a *U t...Ntll, i 1 I ..- r wl. N1/--. .....*'* 1"1 111& *.j K







UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


stance
these


s, except on
charges be


period of less


than


account
refunded


one month;


of sickness,
because o:


m case


will


any


absence
a student


part
for


is dis-


missed from the University, no part will be refunded. In
very exceptional cases, arrangements may be made to pay as


follows:
December


14 and


$21 on September 21 and $20.50 on October 30 and


r 7;


$26.50 on


on April


Janua


Under


ry 29;
Board


and $20.00 on


and


Lodging


March
are in-


eluded meals in the dining-hall and room (with heat, jani-
tor service, light and access to a bathroom), furnished as


stated below1
Yale locks.


The doors of the rooms are provided with


*


A deposit of 50 cents is required for each key,


which will be returned when the key is surrendered.


itor Service includes the care of rooms by maids under the
supervision of a competent housekeeper.
Lodging without Board.--Students occupying a room in
the dormitories, but not taking meals in the dining-hall, will
be charged $5.00 per month for lodging.
Board without Lodging.--Board without lodging will be
furnished at the rate of $13.50 per calendar month, payable


in advance.


Furniture.


No part of this sum will be refunded.
-All rooms are partially furnished. The furn-


iture


consists of two iron bedsteads and


fonnier


bureau,


table,


washstand,


mattresses, chif-


and


chairs.


The


students are required to provide all other articles, including


pillows, bedding,
mosquito-bar, etc.


wash-bowl, pitcher, mirror, half-curtains,


Uniform.-Students in the military department are re-
quired to provide themselves with the prescribed uniform,


which


furnished


under


contract.


The suit is of Char-


lottesville cadet gray, of good quality and inexpensive. A
cap of dark blue cloth and two pairs of white duck trousers
are also required. This uniform is neat and serviceable and
may be worn at all times. The total cost is about $17.00.


Rnnks--The cost


of books


depends largely


upon


Jan-


i


ULX&:l











































AGRICULTURAL CLUB

















its


SOILS LABORATORY






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


minimum expenses of a Florida student registered
College of Agriculture:


Tuition -.--.------ ---.. .-
Registration Fee . ..--
Damage Deposit ..--.....--
Infirmary Fee-.......--- --
Contingent Fee .-...------
Board and Lodging .-- -
Uniform (about) ----.....----
Books (about)....-- ....- -


Incidentals


(laundry, athletic,


_----$000.00


-- -- - --..... - .
------. -- -- -- -
----. - - - -- -
- .- - -- - --..- -.

-. .---- .- -- - -


literary


society,


etc.,


5.00
5.00
3.00
5.00
128.50
17.00
10.00


dues), about- ------. -----------


Less Damage Deposit returned at end of


20.00


$193.50


year ...---..


$188.50
Students who are exempt from buying uniforms will de-
duct $17.00 from the above table; students from other States
will add a tuition fee of $20.00.


REMITTANCES.-All


remittances should be made to the


Auditor, University of Florida, Gainesville, Fla.

DISCIPLINE
OFFICERS.--An Officer in Charge, occupying quarters in
one of the dormitories, has immediate supervision of the gen-
eral life of the student body.
In each section of the dormitories a Monitor maintains a


general
Charge.


oversight


and


makes


reports


Officer


Monitors are appointed from among those students


who are more than twenty-one years of age.


OFFENSES


AGAINST


GooD


CONDUCT.--Any


offense


against good conduct, in the ordinary meaning of the word,
renders a student liable to discipline, whether or not a formal
rule against the offense has been published.
The following offenses will be treated with special sever-
ity: Disrespect to an officer of the University; wanton de-
struction.of property; gambling; drunkenness; or having in-
toxicating liquors in possession on the University grounds.
"n ^ ..f. t : 4 t : s fl 4 n a I a a ..






18 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

University and no student will be assigned to a room in a
dormitory until he has matriculated and signed the follow-
ing pledge:
"I hereby promise upon my word of honor, without any
mental reservation whatsoever, to refrain from all forms of


hazing


while


connected


with


University


Florida."


ABSENCE


FROM


THE


UNIVERSITY.-No


undergraduate


student is permitted to be absent from the


University over


night


without


written


permission


from


Officer


Charge.


ABSENCE FROM


CLASSES.-A student who accumulates


unexcused absences from classes, or


three


unexcused


absences from drill,


will be given a severe reprimand and


parent


guardian will be notified.


Two


additional


excused absences will


cause the student to


dismissed


from the University.


Ten unexcused absences from Chapel


will subject all students, except Seniors, to the same penalty.


ATTENDANCE


UPON


DUTIES.-A student


who,


without


good cause, persistently absents himself from his University
duties, is, after due warning, dishonorably dismissed for the


remainder of the academic year.


A student who, by reason


of ill health or outside demands upon his time, finds it im-
possible to give regular attention to University duties, is re-
quested to withdraw; but such request does not in any way
reflect upon his good standing.
All delinquencies in University duties are reported to the
Officer in Charge, who brings them to the attention of the


students


and requires a


prompt explanation


be made.


Careful records of all delinquencies are kept.


REQUIREMENTS.


"Entrance Units."


--The requirements


for admission are measured in "Entrance Units," based upon


the curriculum of the high schools of Florida.


A unit rep-


resents a course of


study pursued


throughout the


school






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


laboratory periods


should


counted


one


recitation


period.
Number of Units.--Admission to the Freshman class of


University will be granted to candidates who


present


properly certified credentials, showing that they have been


graduated from a standard Senior high school with a


full


four-year curriculum


based


upon an


eight-year


grammar


school course, or who present satisfactory evidence of hav-


ing completed courses amounting to sixteen units
paratory work.


of pre-


In no case will credit


for more than


sixteen


units


given for work done at a high school.
These requirements are at the very
teen and one-half units as defined by


least equal to four-
he Carnegie Foun-


dation or the National Educational Association.
Distribution of Units.-Of the sixteen units required for
admission, ten are specified and six are elective.


COLLEGE OF


AGRICULTURE REQUIREMENT


English .--. -.-.-.-


Mathematics
History ---
Science ...
Agriculture -
History )


.- --- -- -- -- - -- - -


-3 units
.3 units
-1 unit
-1 unit
-1 unit


or --------.-------.----.-.---------.-- -- 1 unit
Science )
Elective Units.-The elective units are to be chosen from
the list of elective subjects given below and from such other
subjects as are regularly taught in a standard high school.
Not more than four of these units will be accepted in voca-
tional subjects, such as typewriting, stenography, mechanic
arts, agriculture, etc.
LIST OF ELECTIVE SUBJECTS
Agriculture -.. .- - ..- ....-- - - . - ----- 1 unit
Botany .... .--...--..--.------.----..------. or 1 unit
Chemistry -..------- ..--- .. --.. --. --.------. 1 unit
English .-. .--- .-... -. ..--- ..- ------. -1 unit
Latin ........................ ....--- ---..4 units






z2 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Deficiencies.--A deficiency of two units will be allowed
a candidate, but such deficiencies must be removed by the
end of the first year of admission.

AGRONOMY DEPARTMENT


The


Agronomy


Department


occupies


four


rooms-a


large, well lighted, well


equipped


soil


laboratory, with an


adjoining storage and work room, and a large crop judging
laboratory, with an adjoining mouse-proof storage room for
seed and forage crops.


The soil laboratory


equipment comprises


microscopes,


sampling augers, tubes and carriers;


balances,


ovens,


soil


thermometers, packers, cylinders and tubes; moisture absorp-
tion box with trays; percolation, capillary and evaporation


apparatus; sieves, shaker, etc.


The equipment is of the best


type and fully adequate for giving thorough courses in soils.
There are three large stone-top desks with individual lockers


seventy-two


students.


The storage room is


provided


with soil bins, packer, cases and shelving in abundance.


The


field


crop laboratory is provided


with


five


long


judging tables, and the storage room for seed and forage is
lined with suitable shelving.


For


Agricultural Engineering work, which for the pres-


ent is connected with the Agronomy Department, there are


two


specially


equipped


laboratories-the


one


farm


motors and iron work,


the other for farm machinery


and


wood work.
These laboratories are equipped with a large collection


of modern


labor-saving


machinery, consisting of gasoline


engines, windmills, feed grinders, stalk cutter, walking and
riding plows, various types of harrows, walking and riding


cultivators,


seeders,


one


and


two-horse


corn


planters,


manure spreader, etc.


Special stress is placed upon instruc-


tion in farm machinery,


because


labor-saving machinery


has not yet come into general use upon Florida farms.







COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE

The John Deere Plow Company, Atlanta, Ga.


International


Harvester Company,


Chicago,


and


Jacksonville, Fla.
Stover Manufacturing Company, Freeport, Ill.
Perkins Windmill Company, Mishawaka, Ind.
Through an agreement to carry out demonstration tests


on the College farm, t
Wis., has provided the


J. I. Case Plow


farm


laboratory


Works, Racine,


with


complete


equipment of up-to-date crop growing machinery.


The


Mich.,
filler


Wilder-Strong
has furnished tI


latest


Implement
e College


Company of


with


pattern for use on the


Monroe,


Whirlwind


farm


silo


and


demonstration purposes.

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY DEPARTMENT
The Animal Husbandry Department is provided with a


large


lecture and exhibit room containing tiered seats for


sixty students and a paddock, 12x24 feet in
create floor and iron railing, for exhibiting


size,


with


animals.


con-
The


equipment includes a two-ton Fairbanks platform scale, tape


lines,


measuring


standards


and projectors.


new


dairy barn a stock judging arena 30x40 feet has been pro-
vided for practice in scoring animals.
A basement room in Science Hall is being fitted for prac-
tice in butchering and curing meats, in order to familiarize


students with the cuts of the animal carcass and the


best


methods of saving meat.
The equipment in Veterinary Science consists of excel-
lent mounted skeletons of the horse and cow, several wall


charts


on anatomy and


physiology,


veterinary


operating instruments and sample jars of common drugs and
medicines.
For Dairy Work, which for the present is connected with
the Animal Husbandry Department, the College has a large,


WPll


ii crhtpd lahnratnr r


Thp anninmpntt


inrlideg snvern1







22 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

starter and mixing cans, vats for cream ripening and cheese


making;


milk


cooler,


Pasteurizer,


bottling


machine,


storage refrigerator, creamery scales,


wash sinks, sterilizer


chest and the necessary cans, buckets, bottles and brushes.
The milk testing laboratory contains working desks and


machinery for all the modern tests of dairy products.


The


equipment includes Babcock testers of different sizes, cream


scales,


lactometers,


acidmeters,


butter moisture


tests


and


the necessary glassware, reagents, etc.
The equipment in Live Stock is fairly well begun, and


the individuals on hand are of a high grade.


A special fund


provided by the Legislature is being used to buy additional


cattle,


sheep and swine.


The


herds


now include


Jersey


and Short-horn cattle, Tamworth and Duroc


Jersey swine;


and will be increased from year to year, by breeding and as
additional funds are secured, until representatives of all the
important breeds and classes of farm animals are available
for use in the study of breeds of live stock and score card
judging.


The Legislature of 1913 provided funds for


Dairy Barn with modern equipment.


sanitary


This will house the


dairy herds of both the Experiment Station and the College
of Agriculture and will form a splendid object lesson in daily
operation for observation and practice in sanitary milk pro-
duction.
Through the aid of the State Board of Health, one of the
best concrete cattle Dipping Vats in the State has been con-
structed for the use of the College and the public, and pro-
gress is being made in tick eradication work.
A number of Feeding Pens and Grazing Yards have been
provided for hogs, with portable shelters and modern equip-
ment suitable to Southern conditions. The equipment for
teaching poultry culture includes colony houses, Cyphers in-


cubator, brooders and small apparatus.


Poultry breeders of


the County and State aid the work by lending prize winning






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


A propagating house and nursery on the farm are


used


carrying


stratification,


layerage,


cuttage,


budding,


grafting and other methods of plant propagation.


Trees of


which,


different kinds are


though still small, is being


growing


gradually


orchard,


enlarged


new plants are ready for transplanting into it.


Hot


young


beds and


plants.


cold


frames


irrigation


provided


plant


has


recently


starting
been in-


stalled with Skinner, Campbell, Florida Favorite and modi-


field


Skinner


sprinkling


devices,


and


surface


furow


system.


Large


maturity


canvas
will be


covered


frames for


constructed


growing


this


winter,


crops


and


canning outfit for


fruit and vegetables will be


installed to


take care of the next crops.
COURSES OFFERED
The following courses are offered:
1. A Four-Year Course.
2. A Middle Course of Two Years.
3. A One-Year Course.
4. Two Four-Month Courses.
5. A Ten-Day Short Course for Farmers.
6. Fourteen Correspondence Courses for Home Study.
FOUR-YEAR COURSES
ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS.-See pages 18 and 19.
While one unit of agriculture is required, owing to the
fact that this subject has been so recently included in the


curriculum of the public high


schools,


candidates will be


allowed to take during the Freshman year the agricultural
work in which they are deficient.
DEGREES.-The Four-Year Course culminating in one of


groups--General


Agriculture,


Agronomy,


Horti-


culture, Animal Husbandry, Agricultural-Chemical or Agri-


cultural


Education-leads


degree


Bachelor of







24 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

previous agreement with the head of a department and the


Dean,


do practical work, during their course of


study, in


any recognized agricultural pursuit, and who render com-
petent and faithful service, will, on their return to College


and


on the


presentation


concise


written


report


resume of their observations and experience, be entitled to


one semester-hour


credit


each


month


such


work.


Such credit shall not total more than six semester-hours in


the Two-Year and Four-Year courses.


Students must have


at least three months of practical work before graduation,
but credit will be given for such work only as stated above.


REMUNERATIVE


offered


AND


opportunity


INSTRUCTIVE


LABOR.--Students


considerable


work in


fields and truck gardens, about the barns, in the buildings


and in the Agricultural Experiment Station.


tion


usually


ranges


from


ten to


twenty


The compensa-


cents


hour,


according to the experience of the student and the nature of


the work.


Some students


also strengthen their


by the practical knowledge thus gained.


vacation periods


find


employment


education


Those who during


on farms or in


other


agricultural pursuits will be markedly benefited and after


graduation will be able to


remunerative


positions, or


command


will


find


more desirable and


their


efforts


farm more effective.


In this


connection emphasis should


be placed upon a thorough understanding of the
application of scientific principles.


practical


LABORATORY


WORK. -Two


hours of


laboratory


work


are considered equivalent to one hour of recitation.
ELECTIVES.-The elective hours in each of the groups
printed below may be chosen from other groups or from
other colleges of the University; but the choice is, in every
case, subject to the approval of the Dean.
CHANGES IN STUDIES.-After a student is once register-
aA, 1. nn-'-r ,I.. n,-, i14;, n i noa ar ralo o rr t haor-n






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


at the beginning of the second semester,
ment of a fee of two dollars ($2.00).


GRADES AND


without the pay-


REPORTS.--Each instructor keeps a record


of the quality of work done by each student in his classes


and assigns grades, on the scale of 100.


At the end of each


month the average grades for the month of


each


student


are reported to the office of the University for permanent
record and for entry upon a monthly report to parent or


guardian.
If the monthly grades show that a student is not
satisfactory work, he may be required to drop some


doing
of his


studies and substitute studies in a lower class, or he may be
required to withdraw from the University.
EXAMINATIONS.--At the end of each semester examina-
tions are held on all of the work of that semester.
FAILURE IN STUDIES.-A final grade for each semester's


work


assigned,


based


upon


examination


and


monthly grades.


If this grade falls below 75, the student is


considered to have failed and may proceed only subject to a
condition in the study in which failure has occurred.


RE-EXAMINATIONS. -A


student


who


has


failed


work of a semester is allowed, in case his


grade does


not


fall below 60, to make up the condition by re-examination,


first


October.
allowed;


01


Saturday
aly one


March or the


re-examination


in case of failure to pass


first


any


Saturday
subject


this, the student


must


repeat the semester's work in the subject concerned.








UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


CURRICULUM
Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture
FOR ALL GROUPS
Freshman Year
NAMES OF COURSES NATURE OF WORK *HOURS PER WEEK
Agronomy I.----. ------- Soil Physics.....----.....--------------- 2 2
Horticulture I--.....------ Plant Propagation ..------.......-----.... 2 0
Horticulture II- -- ----Greenhouse Management--.. ------- 0 2
Animal Husbandry I .. ._Types and Breeds of Animals.. ---------- 2 2
Agricultural Engineering I-_Farm Machinery and Farm Motors--- 2 2
Botany I- ............------- ---- ..-General Botany -----....--.-------- -- 3 3
English I ....---------..... Advanced College Rhetoric ..---------- 3 3
Mathematics B ..---------....... Plane Trigonometry .........------ ------ 2 2
Agricultural Seminar......----------------------- --------------- 1 0
Library Work ........ --- ---.---- ---------------------------------- 1
Military Science I ------.Drill and Firing Regulations -----1 1
18 18
FOR ALL GROUPS EXCEPT ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
Sophomore Year
Agronomy II ------ __Fertilizers ---------------------------- 0 3
Horticulture III----- Trucking .- - - - - -------- 2 2
Chemistry I-II ----- -General Inorganic Chemistry...------..---- 5 5
Botany II -...... --------Plant Physiology- -- --- ---------- 3 0
Zoology I -----......... --General Zoology .. ---------- 3 0
Zoology III..------------ -Entomology .-------. ---------- ---- 0 3
Military Science II ...._- _Field Regulations and Guard Duty 1 1
Elective--..-....----- ----------- ------------------------------- 2 2
16 16
GENERAL GROUP
Junior Year
Chemistry III.........-------. Qualitative Analysis .---........--- ....--- 3 0
Chemistry VII .------....... Quantitative Analysis .....----- 0.. 3
Botany IV-- ..------- .- .Plant Pathology ------ ---------....... 3 0
Bacteriology I ....----.. General Bacteriology ------..-------.- 3 0
Bacteriology II .-.......- Agricultural Bacteriology ....---.---- 0 3
Agronomy V ....----------..Rural Law and Farm Accounts ---- 0 3
Elective ...----- ----...-------.--------- ----- ---- ---------- 7
16 16
Senior Year


Chemistry
Sociology
or
Economic!
Agricultur
Agricultur


IX.............. Chemistry of Soils, Fertilizers, etc. ---
III ............. Rural Sociology .....-----a-------- -)

s I ..----.........--- Principles of Economics ---------........


al Education I--
al Education II


. Methods of Teaching Agriculture
__Extension Teaching ..----.......--


a a








COLLEGE OF

AGRONO0
Junior


AGRICULTURE

MIY GROUP
r Year


NAMES OF COURSES


NATURE OF WORK


*HOURS PER


WEEK


Agronomy III
Agronomy IV-
Agronomy V -
Chemistry IIIa
Chemistry VII
Botany IV .--
Bacteriology I
Bacteriology I]
Elective.-----


- - -- .. -
I -- --- - - -
-_---___---___ a
- ---- -: :
- --- - - -

- - - --


Field Crops -....------.---- ---- ---
Forage Crops and Grasses........--------
Rural Law and Farm Accounts------.....
Qualitative Analysis ..-...-.......-...
Quantitative Analysis ...... .......
Plant Pathology ......-----..... -...
General Bacteriology ........... ...
Agricultural Bacteriology ----- .......


Senior Year


Agronomy VI ------- --.......--...--
Horticulture X ..-___,__.
Agricultural Engineering II_


Chemistry I
Sociology II
or
Economics I
Agricultural
Electives .--


- ---- -----a
[I- ------------


Farm Management.----....
Landscape Gardening ....-.
Buildings, Roads, Irrigation an
age---......--.. ---.------
Chemistry of Soils, Fertilizers,
Rural Sociology .......-------


d Drain-

etc. ----


---- -- ----- -Principles of Economics ----------
Education II__Extension Teaching ---------.......


HORTICULTURAL GROUP
Junior Year


Horticulture IV.---
Horticulture V--- -


Horticulture I
Horticulture 1
Agronomy V
Botany IV._
Bacteriology ]
Bacteriology ]
Elective ----


V.II
VIII


-. -- -


.- .....
- ... -----


II -.......


-Citrus Culture ------- -----------
_Citrus Harvesting, Marketing and
ing ..-- --,-.------- .-------
-Deciduous and Subtropical Fruits
-Plant Breeding -..- -- ....-------
-Rural Law and Farm Accounts .--
_Plant Pathology ------.-..-------
_General Bacteriology ...... ----
-Agricultural Bacteriology -----........


Judg-
--- -


*The first column gives the hours per week for the first semester, the
second column the hours per week for the second semester.








UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


Senior Year


NAMES OF COURSES NATURE OF WORK *HOURS PER WEEK
Horticulture IX .---...--Landscape Gardening _- ....--- 0 2
Horticulture VlI ..---- ...- Insects and Diseases of Citrus Fruits-
or 3 0
Horticulture X ...... General Forestry -.--
Agronomy VI ..--.... -----Farm Management-.....------......-.. 0 2
Agricultural Engineering IIBuildings, Roads, Irrigation and Drain-
age ......--- -...........-........ 3 0
Agricultural Education II _Extension Teaching ---.-------- 0 2
Chemistry IX ..--...--..Chemistry of Soils, Fertilizers, etc.....--- 3 0
Sociology III .- --....-.-- Rural Sociology -----.... .......--------.....
or .- 3 3
Economics I - .... - - Principles of Economics ..- )
Elective --------.-------- ------------4------ ----------..---- 7

16 16
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY GROUP
Sophomore Year
Animal Husbandry II ....---- Animal Feeding ........--------..........-- 3 0
Animal Husbandry III...-..Animal Breeding -..... .... 0 3
Dairying I - - - -...... --Dairy Testing ........ ..... 2 0
Dairying II .-- ............Farm Buttermaking ......-- ....- 0 2
Chemistry I-II ............ General Inorganic Chemistry ....-. 5 5
Zoology I .------.-- .....----General Zoology.......------.---------- 3 3
Military Science II ....--. ---Field Regulations and Guard Duty ----.. 1 1
Elective .------. -.------.-----.---- ....------------- ----..--. 2 2

16 16
Junior Year
Animal Husbandry IV ...------Beef Production. --............------ 2 0
Animal Husbandry V .------Swine Production ....---------------.... 0 2
Animal Husbandry VI ..Poultry Culture---------------- 0 3
Dairying III -......... ---Dairy Farming .... ...-- --- ----.. 0
Agronomy III ---.------- -.Field Crops .- .--------- --- ---- 3 0
Agronomy IV ..--------....... Forage Crops and Grasses ----.......... 3
Bacteriology I ..o.... General Bacteriology .... 3 0
Bacteriology II -...-...- Agricultural Bacteriology ...... ... 0 3
Elective o *..a..a a a .. ------.. .. .. -e o a.a...a .. 5 5

16 16
Senior Year
Animal Husbandry VII.....--Animal Hygiene.. ------.. .......... 3 0
Animal Husbandry VIII ....Animal Diseases-------................. O 3
Animal Husbandry IX -----Seminar- --------- -- -...... 2 0
Agronomy VI ....----.--.. Farm Management .-..--------..-----. 2
Agricultural Engineering IIBuildings, Roads, Irrigation and Drain-
bA ,..: l1 i, T. TYle . ....l ... .. A.. I 0







COLLEGE OF


AGRICULTURE


AGRICULTURAL-CHEMICAL GROUP


Junior


Year


NAMES OF COURSES


NATURE OF WORK


*HOURS PER


WEEK


Chemistry IV
Chemistry V
Bacteriology
Bacteriology
Elective


Qualitative Analysis


----....----.....Organic Chemistry-....
I---....--.......-.--- General Bacteriology -
II .....-- ..... Agricultural Bacteriolc


.. -


-5


gy-
- - -


I- - - -
i-- --- -


Senior


Year


Chemistry VIII
Chemistry IX_-
Sociology III _.
or
Economics I..- -
Elective ......


I- ---~----
- - - -- -


Quantitative Analysis .-------
Chemistry of Soils, Fertilizers, etc.
Rural Sociology ..--- ---------


Principles of Economics .----


- .- --
- -


AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION GROUP
Junior Year

Bacteriology I -.... .-..-.. General Bacteriology ..... -_ 3 0
Bacteriology II ... ------Agricultural Bacteriology ------------- 0 3
Teachers College------ ..........-------....------------- ------------ 6 6
3Elective -----.. -- .- .----- .. ----------------- --------- -- -- ---- 7 7
-
16 16

Senior Year

Agricultural Education I....---Methods of Teaching Agriculture ..- 1 0
Agricultural Education II --Extension Teaching .------------------ 0 2
Sociology III .........-.--- Rural Sociology ...........----------..
or 3 3
Economics I .----- ---- Principles of Economics-----------
Agronomy VI -- ..... Farm Management 0........... 0 2
Teachers College....-----------. ........... ............ ----- 7 7
Elective -..-.- .-- --- --..---- .-.---- ,-------- ----------- 41 1

16 16

*The first column gives the hours per week for the first semester, the
second column the hours per week for the second semester.






30 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION

AGRONOMY AND AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
Professor Etheridge
Assistant Professor Rast

AGRONOMY
Agronomy is the science and art of crop production. It
includes-Soils: Classification, fertility, cultivation and im-
provement; Crops: Classification, production and improve-


ment;


and


Management:


The


application


economic


business methods to farm practices.
The laboratory work and field observations aim to fix the


principles learned i:
practical application.


classroom


and


give


them


AGRONOMY


Aa.--Elements


Agronomy.--A study


soils and soil fertility in their relations to plant growth and
the underlying principles governing the production of field


and


forage


crops.


(Short


courses


and


Eleventh


Grade


Practice High School, Teachers College; 3 hours.)


AGRONOMY
classification,


I.-Soil
moisture,


Physics.-Th
ventilation,


origin,


temperature


formation,
e of soils;


general methods of soil management and amelioration, etc.
(Freshman year; 2 hours.)


AGRONOMY


IIb.-Fertilizers. -The nature of plant food


and its relation to the composition of soils, sources and cornm-


position of commercial fertilizers and principles


governing


their application, the making and economical use of


farm


manures, fertilizer requirements of various crops and other


related topics.
AGRONOMY


(Sophomore year; 3 hours.)


IIIa.--Field


Crops.--The


various


gram,


fiber and sugar crops will be discussed with respect to their


habits of


growth, soil


adaptations, fertilizer requirements,


general methods of tillage and harvesting and the most prof-


La.-1- -. _1- -1- u ...... _._


rf _- 1 1 "






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


be given to corn, cotton and sugar cane.


(Junior year; class


2 hours, laboratory 2 hours; credit 3 hours.)
AGRONOMY IVb.--Forage Crops and Grasses.--A study
will be made of forage crops and grasses, including an in-


vestigation into


their adaptability to


various


Florida


soils, seeding and cultural methods, harvesting and storing,


composition


and


use,


illustrated


specimens


brought


before the students and by field observations.


This course


includes one hour of work in the botany of grasses, given by


the botanist.
AGRONOMY


(Junior year; 3 hours.)
Vb.-Rural Law and Farm Accounts.-Clas-


sification of property, boundaries, fences, stock laws, rents,
contracts, deeds, mortgages, taxes, laws governing shipping


and


other


topics of


special


interest


farmers


will


treated; and a system of farm bookkeeping will be worked
out, using the transactions of the College farm as a basis for


material for instruction.


(Junior year; 3 hours.)


AGRONOMY


VIb. Farm Management.-A


study


principle
general


marketing;


underlying


farming;


farm


problems


laying


management;


labor,


farms,


specialized


machinery,


systems


and


storing,


rotation,


etc.


(Senior year; 2 hours.)


AGRONOMY


VIIb.- Weeds.--Origin and distribution; col-


electing


and identifying;


injury


crops


and


methods of


eradication. (Elective, Junior or Senior year; 2 hours.)
AGRONOMY VIIIb.-Soil Fertility.-A study of the prin-
ciples of soil fertility, including the relations that exist be-


tween the


plant


and


plant


food,


water,


climate,


texture,


humus
hours.)


and


tillage.


(Elective,


Junior


or Senior


year;


AGRONOMY


IXa or b.-Special Courses.--Special courses


will be offered at the option of the instructors, on approval
of the Dean.
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING
AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING Ab.--Elements of Agricul-


hrttrl 'ti riM a ofewltr at 4nrrn mnnhnar r nnA .I n cm


*FrK cm






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


fortable, healthful


homes.


(Twelfth


grade,


Practice


High


School, Teachers College; 3 hours.)


AGRICULTURAL


ENGINEERING


The course includes a study of the


I.-Farm Machinery.-
history of the develop-


ment, details of construction, functions, methods of operation
and care of the various forms of tillage, seeding and harvest-


machinery.


Special


attention


given


plows,


harrows, seeders and drills, corn and Irish potato planters,
cultivators and weeders, mowers and rakes, potato diggers,
spraying machines and vehicles.


Farm Motors.-A study of


farm


power,


water


power,


horse power, windmills; water, air and oil cooled internal-


combustion


engines-stationary,


portable


and


traction-


using gas, gasoline, naphtha, kerosene or crude oil as fuel;
steam engines-stationary and traction, in their relation and


application to farm work.


(Freshman year; class


hour,


laboratory 2 hours; credit 2 hours.)


AGRICULTURAL


ENGINEERING


IIa.-Buildings,


Roads,


Irrigation and Drainage.-Such


topics as the construction


farm residences,


barns and


other


farm


buildings;


laying out of roads and fields; underdrainage; and irrigation


plants will be considered, and the students will be
practice in drawing plans and writing specifications.
ior year; 3 hours.)
AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION
Professor Etheridge
Professor McQuarrie
Professor Spencer
Professor Pace


given
(Sen-


AGRICULTURAL


EDUCATION


Ia.-Methods of


Teaching


Agriculture.--A course of lectures in methods of presenting


agricultural subjects.


tory usage.


It will include materials and labora-


AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION IIb.-Extension Teaching.-
A course of lectures covering the history, methods, purposes


(Senior year; 1 hour.)








































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COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 33

HORTICULTURE
Professor Floyd
Horticulture is applied to the cultivation of useful and


ornamental garden plants


and


orchard


fruits.


These are


the plants most intimately associated with the private life


of the home.
for practical


In a subtropical climate unusual opportunities


and


interesting


study


presented.


The


wonderful variety of plants, the peculiar problems involved
in their growth and development and the accomplishments
of those who have given time and labor to the solution of


these problems, offer inviting fields for study


mentation.


and experi-


Both the practical and the aesthetic tendencies


may be cultivated.
The department with its orchard, garden, laboratory and


library


offers fine opportunity for instruction,


experiment


and research.
HORTICULTURE Ab.-Elements of Horticulture.--A study
of varieties and culture requirements of our principal fruits
and vegetables; location of orchards and gardens with ref-


erence


sects


to soils,


and


diseases;


climate and markets; protection


harvesting


and


marketing;


decorative planting adapted to home and school.


from in-
styles of
(Eleventh


Grade, Practice High School, Teachers College; 3 hours.)


HORTICULTURE


Ia.-Plant


Propagation.--Study


and


practice in propagation by means of division, cutting, layer-
ing, budding and grafting; seed selection, storing and testing;


and the fundamental


physiological


processes.


(Freshman


year; 2 hours.)


HORTICULTURE


IIb. -Greenhouse


Management. -This


includes


construction,


heating,


planting


and


care


greenhouses,


mental


and


veranda greenhouses, the


forcing


of vegetables.


growing
(Freshman


orna-


year;


hours.)
HORTICULTURE III.-Trucking.- This course includes a


study of the vegetables adapted


Florida, the


seasons in


1 1 .1 4 -4 4 e -






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


aration,
varieties


planting,


and


cultivation,


the use


cover


fertilization,


crops.


selection


(Junior


year;


hours.)


HORTICULTURE


Vb.-Citrus Harvesting, Marketing and


Judging.-This includes methods of picking, handling, wash-


ing, drying, packing and shipping citrus


fruits.


Attention


will also be given to identifying the leading commercial va-


rieties and judging by the use of the score
year; 2 hours.)


card.


(Junior


HORTICULTURE


VIa. -Insects


and


Diseases


Citrus


Fruits.-A study of the injurious insects and of important


physiological
(Prerequisite


and


fungus


required


diseases


with


this


and


their


course,


treatment.


Hort.


IVa;


Senior year; 3 hours.)
HORTICULTURE VIIa.-Deciduous and Subtropical Fruits.


-A study of the growing of peaches,


pears, persimmons,


grapes, pecans, guavas, avocados, mangoes, etc.


The varie-


ties adapted to the State, their planting, cultivation, diseases


and insect enemies.
HORTICULTURE


(Junior year; 3 hours.)
VIIIb.-Plant Breeding.-Cross pollina-


tion and hybridization of plants, improvement by selection,
breeding for special qualities, with field work and a study of


the methods of successful breeders.


(Prerequisites,


and


Botany I; Junior year; 3 hours.)
HORTICULTURE IXb.-Landscape Gardening.-The prin-
ciples underlying the various styles of landscape gardening,


plants


suitable


planting, improvement


home


grounds, making more attractive school and public grounds,


are some of the topics studied.


(Senior year; 2 hours.)


HORTICULTURE Xa.--General Forestry.-The principles
of forestry, forest cropping, protecting the home wood lot,


use of Florida woods,


varieties of timber trees and


the in-


fluences of the forests on the other industries of the State.
(Junior or Senior year; 3 hours.)


- E s U Ar -


-- -- -- .. n


__ L II






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


and yield; tables and log rules.
or Senior year; 3 hours.)


(Prerequisite, IXa;


Junior


HORTICULTURE


XIIa.-The


Evolution


Cultivated


Plants.--A study of evolution as applied to the modification


of our cultivated plants, particularly the fruits.


(Prerequisite,


VIIIb; Senior year; 2 hours.)
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY AND DAIRYING
Professor Willoughby
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY
Animal Husbandry includes subjects relating to the do-


mestic


animals,


their


history,


classification


and


judging;


breeding,


selection


and improvement;


feeding,


care


and


management;


the production and marketing of


and other animal products;


beef, pork


and the prevention and


treat-


ment of ordinary diseases of farm animals.
Live stock raising commands a steady income and is a


most


valuable aid in maintaining soil fertility.


Since this


industry


will


become an


important factor in the


general


prosperity of the State, the instruction is being broadened
and the equipment enlarged as rapidly as funds will permit.


The


underlying


principles


applicable


parts


America.


Additional special instruction is given for South-


eastern conditions.


ANIMAL


HUSBANDRY


Aa.--Elements


Animal


Hus-


bandry.-Brief study of types and breeds of farm animals,
with some judging practice; principles of breeding, feeding


and


management;


production


of meat, milk and poultry.


(Short Courses and


Practice High


School,


Teachers Col-


lege, Twelfth Grade; 3 hours.)
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY I.-Types and Breeds of Animals.-
The various types and classes of farm animals; practice in
score card and comparative judging; history and utility of


the leading breeds.


Horses, mules and swine will be studied


in the first semester; cattle, sheep and goats in the second.


A t


-.1 .n1 .... A'_ --a111 n ..i....11 1 .n n .1 1 aa


* 4


I~ Ylrmnlrr







38 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

tion of plants to animal life; digestion and assimilation, the


formation


animal


tissues from nutrients in feeds;


feed


analyses, digestion coefficients and feeding standards; prac-
tice in compounding and balancing rations for various farm


animals
hours.)


under


ANIMAL


different


HUSBANDRY


conditions.


IIIb.-Animal


(Sophomore year; 3


Breeding. -Princi-


ples underlying the breeding of animals, including heredity,
variation, environment, natural and artificial selection; ap-
plication of breeding principles to the foundation and man-


agement


a breeding herd; value of pedigrees and


per-


formance records. (Sophomore year; 3 hours.)
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY IVa.-Beef Production.--Practical
methods in beef production, including selection of feeders,
feeding and management of beef cattle, finishing and mar-


keting,


slaughter and


packing-house methods.


Brief con-


sideration
included.


of same subjects in mutton production will be
(Junior year; 2 hours.)


ANIMAL HUSBANDRY Vb.-Swine Production.-Location
and equipment of a hog farm, breeds of swine suited to the
South, raising young stock; growing feeds for grazing and


fattening, feeding


and managing the herd; marketing and


slaughtering,


curing meats on the farm.


(Junior


year; 2


hours.)
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY VIb.-Poultry Culture.--Location
and construction of houses and runs; the principal breeds of
poultry, with judging of best specimens obtainable; methods
of breeding, incubation and brooding; egg production; feed-
ing and marketing poultry; management of flock and treat-


ment of diseases.


(Junior year; 3 hours.)


ANIMAL HUSBANDRY VIIa.-Animal Hygiene.--Elements
of anatomy and physiology; care and training of young ani-


mals; prevention of disease, disinfection, sanitation.
year; 3 hours.)


(Senior


ANTM A T.


HiT.RANnRY


VTTTb--. Animal Diseases. -Svmn-






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


ANIMAL HUSBANDRY


IXb.-Veterinary Elements.--Brief


course on hygiene and diseases of animals for students in
Short Courses and Groups other than Animal Husbandry.
(Elective; 3 hours.)


ANIMAL


HUSBANDRY


Xa.--Seminar.--Special topics in


animal industry, including essays and reports; preparation
of articles for agricultural papers and answers to local prob-


lems; abstracting bulletins; monograph work.


(Senior year;


2 hours.)
ANIMAL HUSBANDRY XIa.-Animal Conformation. -De-
tailed study of form, mechanism and characteristics of ani-
mal breeds and types, including measurements and relations


of structure with special reference to utility.
Juniors, Seniors and Graduates; 2 hours. E


Course XIII.)


ANIMAL


HUSBANDRY


XIIb.- Animal


Nutrition. Ad-


vanced work in the principles of animal nutrition, including


digestion,


metabolism, calorimetry, utilization of nutrients


for various


purposes.


(Prerequisite,


IIa; elective for


Jun-


lors,


Seniors


and


Graduates;


hours.


Alternates with


Course


XIV.)


ANIMAL


HUSBANDRY


XIIIa.--Breeding


History.-Ad-


vanced work in the history of breeds and breeders; tabula-
tion of pedigrees; principles thremmatology. (Prerequisite,
IIIb; elective for Juniors, Seniors and Graduates; 2 hours.


Alternates with Course XI.)


ANIMAL


HUSBANDRY


XIVb. Poultry


Practice.-Ad-


vanced study and practice in the feeding and management


of poultry;


principles


of incubation; development


em-


bryo and chick; brooder methods, broiler production, cap-


onizing; advanced judging work.


tive for Seniors and


(Prerequisite,


Graduates; 2 hours.


VIb; elec-


Alternates with


Course XII.)
DAIRYING
l rxrn ni eTr ; .,l.-.i 4-Trf A rc' ok ,+m .r,-A mvyvK ,'Cr. ? :17a:+:


(Elective for
Alternates with






UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


DAIRYING


Ia. -Dairy


Testing. -Secretion, composition


and properties of milk; testing milk and its products by the
Babcock method, lactometer and acidmeter; moisture tests


butter;


scoring


dairy


products.


(Sophomore year; 2


hours.)
DAIRYING IIb.-Farm Buttermaking.-Methods of cream-
ing, operation and care of cream separators; ripening cream
and use of starters; churning, manufacturing and marketing


butter.


(Sophomore year; 2 hours.)


DAIRYING IIIa.-Dairy Farming.--Locations suitable for
dairy farming; construction of sanitary barns, dairy houses,


silos; selection


of breeds, feeding and management of the


dairy herd, testing and herd records; pastures; soiling crops


and silage; marketing dairy products.


(Junior year; 3 hours.)


DAIRYING IVb.-Milk Inspection. -Methods of producing


sanitary


milk, transportation and marketing, city milk in-


section; Pasteurization and care of milk in the home; score


cards


dairy


and


milk depots;


milk


and


cream con-


tests.


DAIRYING


V.-Dairy Manufactures.--Advanced work in


making


butter,


cottage


and


Cheddar


cheese, fermented


milks, ice cream


and


various market products; creamery


management


and


accounting.


(Prerequisites, Dairying Ia


and


IIb;


elective


Juniors,


Seniors


and


Graduates;


hours.)
SOCIOLOGY
Professor Sims
SOCIOLOGY III.-Rural Sociology.--The social aspects of
rural life as regards the problems, status of the country, pop-
ulation, social mind, community types and classes, institu-
tions, health and sanitation, labor and production, commun-


ication,
progress.


cooperation


and


organization,


socialization


and


(Entire year; 3 hours.)


(Elective, Junior or Senior year; 2 hours.)






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


MIDDLE COURSE IN AGRICULTURE
For the convenience and accommodation of those who
cannot meet the requirements for entrance to the Freshman
year, or who may not wish to pursue the Four-Year Course
and yet desire to obtain thorough training in practical and


scientific


agriculture,


a two-year


course is offered.


The


course is not designed to supplant or in any way to be a
substitute for the college course outlined above.


ENTRANCE


REQUIREMENTS.-The requirements for ad-


mission to the Middle Course are:


English -.-.
Mathematics
History ---.....
Elective...--..


- -. -


2 units
2 units
1 unit
3 units


8 units


These requirements


are equivalent to


work cornm-


pleted in the tenth grade or Junior high schools.


Students


must be at least sixteen years of age to be admitted.


TITLE.-The title of


Graduate in Farming (G.


F.) will


conferred


upon


students


who satisfy the entrance re-


quirements and complete the Middle Course in Agriculture.
CERTIFICATE.-Those who cannot satisfy these entrance


requirements may be admitted to the


Middle Course upon


showing a good knowledge of the common school branches,
and will be awarded a certificate for the work done.

MIDDLE COURSE
Leading to the Title of Graduate in Farming
First Year


NAMES OF COURSES


NATURE OF WORK


HOURS PER WEEK


(First Semester)


Agronomy A ------- --Elements of Agronomy ....-. --.-..---..-
Agronomy I -----.-------. Soil Physics___ -----..---- .-------. -.. .
Animal Husbandry A ......---Elements of Animal Husbandry --..--.... -
Agricultural Engineering I__Farm Machinery .....------.....--- _......
Agricultural Seminar .---.. .-- .--.-----. -...-..---.-----.-- .------








UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


(Second Semester)


NAMES OF COURSES


NATURE OF WORK


HOURS PER


WEEK


Agronomy I..------.
Horticulture A .----
Animal Husbandry IX
Agricultural Engineeri
Library Work.....-----
*Military Drill---.--
Elective ---_-_--- -----


..... Soil Physics .....-------
S__-- Elements of Horticulture-
- ___-Veterinary Elements -----
ng- I__Farm Motors --------....


...-Se ---- Year-------


------ ------ a -
- ------------------- -


--- -- ----- -


- - ---


Second Year -


(First Semester)
Agronomy III ----....-- Field Crops -----
Horticulture I ..--........ Plant Propagation .
Horticulture III__ .____ Trucking ..---..-
*Military Drill--------............--.....-- -----
Elective....................---------------- --


I- -- '* -. -
...-.. -


- -------- 2
--- ---- ------- ----2
--- ----- -- --R
.-. -------------11


(Second Semester)


Agronomy II ...
Agronomy V _--
Horticulture III.
*Military Drill._
Elective-----......---


- --
- -


Fertilizers .-----.....--------.--------
Rural Law and Farm Accounts ..
Trucking ....- -- .-----...... -


-- - -- -- - a -- -- ------- 5 -- ---- -------------- -- -- -


Elective Studies:
(First Semester)
Horticulture IV -....-


Horticulture VI-....
Horticulture VII - -
Horticulture IX _. .
Animal Husbandry
Animal Husbandry
Animal Husbandry ]
Dairying I......----
Dairying III- ...---


- -


!!- -
- --
- ---


--- S


Agricultural Engineering II
Botany I -------------
Chemistry I-II T.........-
Bacteriology I ..-------.....


Citrus Culture ------------------
Insects and Diseases of Citrus Fruits
Deciduous and Subtropical Fruits --
Forestry -- .. -----.......--...-------
Types and Breeds of Animals .-----


-Animal Feeding -.
_Beef Production..--
_Dairy Testing ....- -
- Dairy Farming - -
.Buildings, Roads,
_General Botany_--
_General Inorganic


.General Bacteriology ........-


------ -
-- -- --


-- ---


S- -----1 ----- -
- - --- --- C
e- ~1- -- - - -- -


Irrigation and Drainage__


Chemistry--
Chemistry -


<--- J -






COLLEGE OF


AGRICULTURE


(Second Semester)


NAMES OF COURSES NATURE OF WORK HOURS PER WEEK
Agronomy IV ....---------Forage Crops and Grasses--.---- ---------.. 2
Agronomy VI ....------- ----Farm anagement--- ----........----- .. 2
Horticulture II ..-...... Greenhouse Management ----.---------.--. 2
Horticulture V............ ---------Citrus Harvesting and Marketing ......... 2
Horticulture VIII ....-----.. Plant Breeding ---..............._ .. 3
Horticulture X .._-. Landscape Gardening. -..---._ 2
Horticulture XI.._ _...... Development of American Horticulture----- 2
Animal Husbandry I ....--.Types and Breeds of Animals .............. 2
Animal Husbandry III ..-- Animal Breeding -...... -----.. ....._.... 3
Animal Husbandry V------Swine Production .... _---..__.. 2
Animal Husbandry VI ..... Poultry Culture .------.-... ..-----------... 3
Dairying II -------------- Farm Buttermaking- -...-----.------------_ 2
Agricultural Education II Extension Teaching _ ................. 2
Botany I - -----. .. ----. General Botany .-.. .-- ---.-.--.. ..-._ .- 3
Chemistry I-II ..-... ..... General Inorganic Chemistry .. ..........._ 5
Bacteriology II --..--...-..Agricultural Bacteriology ------------------........... 3
Zoology III .--------.............Entomology ------------ ---.......---- --- 3


Note.-This course
sent of the instructors,
dents. Students shall cl
or from the Practice Hil
ber to make a total of r
per week, except on ap;
furthermore, be submit


may, withn me approval oi mte uean ana tme con-
be altered to suit the needs of the individual stu-
hoose from the elective studies, from other courses
gh School of the Teachers College, a sufficient num-
lot less than sixteen nor more than eighteen hours
)roval of the Dean. All choice of electives must,
ed to the Dean.


SHORT COURSES


IN AGRICULTURE


Practically all of the
States have found short c
large class of young or p
unwise to withhold from


ducers the advantages
vided by the federal
have completed a high
regular college course


.I


agricultural colleges of th
courses necessary in order t
respective farmers. It ha
this deserving class of we
the equipment and instruc
d State appropriations.
:hool course are fitted to <
In the Middle and Short


e United
o reach a
s seemed
ialth pro-
:tion pro-
ten who
inter the
Courses


the
enter
the
beei
are


same advantage
r the Four-yea
wisdom of the
a satisfactorily
offered, desig


es are thrown open to those who cannot
r Course, and the results obtained indicate
step. Since the value of such courses has
demonstrated, the courses outlined below
ned to meet the varying needs of the


- -- -, a


farmer.


-- __ -- v m V W


*^1 I 1- l .- lf j T ^1 ^


of









UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


ONE-YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE


This course will meet the needs of those who can spend
only one year at school. The only requirement for admis-
sion is a good knowledge of the common school branches.


NAMES OF COURSES


NATURE OF WORK


HOURS PER


WEEK


(First Semester)


Agronomy A -
Agronomy I .
Agronomy IIIl
Horticulture I_
Horticulture II
Horticulture P
Horticulture V
Horticulture V
Animal Husbar
Animal Husbai


.......


I----------
I_.. _ _
-I .------------- -


idry A
idry I .


Animal Husbandry II
Animal Husbandry IV
Dairying I .- .--...-
lniruincr TIT


----

- ---
----


J j'tJ L... aat -- ------ -- ----- --
Agricultural Engineering I
Agricultural Engineering I
Agricultural Seminar_ - -
*Military Drill--


._Elements of Agronom3
-.Soil Physics.... ---.-
__Field Crops ..----..
-_Plant Propagation- - -
__Trucking ------------
__Citrus Culture- ......
_.Insects and Diseases of
-_Deciduous and Subtror
._Elements of Animal Ht
- Types and Breeds of A
._Animal Feeding --.--
--Beef Production ----.-
._Dairy Testing
_. Dairy Farming ..
S..Farm Machinery -----
IBuildings, Roads, Irrigi


----- -


J-------------.--.--- --





Citrus Fruits .-----
,ical Fruits_-------
sbandry -- --....._--
nimals -.------ --....
-- - - --------------
-------------------- - ----------------


ition and Drainage--_


- - - -.--- -- -


(Second Semester)


Agronomy I-
Agronomy II
Agronomy IV
Agronomy V
Agronomy VI
Horticulture I
Horticulture I
Horticulture I
Horticulture '
Horticulture


__--.... ---_---



I 222--
II ... ... ..
V -- .-----


a


Animal Husbandry I
Animal Husbandry V
Animal Husbandry VI
Animal Husbandry IX


--- -
- ---
-a


Dairying II ---
Agricultural Engineering I_


-_Soil Physics ..---- ------ ----
--Fertilizers ---..--.----------------
..Forage Crops and Grasses.-----
..Rural Law and Farm Accounts _
- .Farm Management -----
_-Elements of Horticulture ...---___
-_Greenhouse Management --.---
_ Trucking -. ........
__Citrus Harvesting, Marketing, Ji
-.Landscape Gardening .----.....


.Types and Breeds of
.Swine Production --
.Poultry Culture -_ _
-Veterinary Elements
_Farm Buttermaking-
Farm Motors ......


Animals


------------------------ - -
,~ - - ------------------------
-- - -
-- - -
- - - .---------------------
---------------------------------------------
a - - -- - -


edging


-. - - -
-- ----


- --------------------------------
---- - - - -


- - ---------------------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------- - - --- - ---------------------
- - - ----- - - - --- - -
- - ----------------------------------------------- -
- --------------------------------------------------------------------------


Library Work i. --'-' . . -
Milihtary Drill ---....-.. ------


*Attendance upon Military Drill is required.
NOTE.-Students shall select not less than sixteen nor more than
. 4 4 4 j 4 T^ 1t


D w






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


FOUR-MONTH COURSES IN AGRICULTURE FOR FARMERS
The work of each semester of the One-Year Course out-
lined above has been so planned as to form of itself a well
rounded course of study which can be pursued to great ad-
vantage by those who are unable to spend more than four


months at the University.


Each of these Four-Month Short


Courses, one of which begins on September 21, 1915, and


other on


farmers


January


31, 1916, should appeal to


who wish to increase their


productive


practical
power, to


young


men


who expect to


become


farmers and to those


who are turning from other lines of work in order to possess
land and obtain the advantages of country life.
Military Drill is not required of those who take only one


of these courses, but is required of


those


who


take


both


during the same scholastic year.


Under "Types and Breeds


of Animals," Horses, Mules and Swine are studied in the
first semester; Cattle, Sheep and Goats in the second.

TEN-DAY SHORT COURSE IN AGRICULTURE FOR FARMERS
Beginning January 11, 1916, and ending January 21, 1916.


The


Ten-Day Farmers' Short Course in Agriculture is


offered to meet the needs of those who for any reason can-


pursue a longer course.


following classes:


It is especially suited to the


First, busy farmers of all ages who, rec-


ognizing their


needs for


better


preparation, desire


more


knowledge of scientific agriculture in order to render effec-
tive the practical knowledge they have already gained; sec-
ond, ambitious young men who are compelled to drop out
of school and desire to devote a short time to special prepa-
ration for their life-work upon the farm; third, city students
who desire to fit themselves for farm life; and, fourth, colo-


nists


who


wish


secure


special


information


regarding


Florida conditions and methods.
The laboratory equipment, the pure-bred live stock and
.1 P 1 t 4 *4'.4 #4 '4 t *







UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


ers' Short Course so as to meet
editions of the practical farmer.


the needs


and


suit


con-


There are no age limits and no educational requirements
for entrance to the Farmers' Short Course.


The course v
field observation
will be made to
of the Universit
fore the classes
their methods.


vill consist of lectures, lal
n and demonstration.
large truck and stock fai
y, and successful farmers
occasionally for the pur


boratory
Trips of
rms in ti
will be
pose of


work and
inspection
he vicinity
called be-
explaining


Subjects for the Farmers' Short Course in
will be selected each year from the following
cordance with the special needs of the students:


Principles of Agriculture.
Soils.
Soils Laboratory.
Fertilizers.
a. Chemical.
b. Experimental.
c. Practical.
Field Crops.
a. General.
b. Special.
c. Experimental.
Crop Judging.
Agricultural Engineering.
a. Farm Machinery.
b. Farm Motors.
c. Buildings, Fences and Roads.
d. Drainage and Irrigation.
Plant Propagation.
Citrus Fruits and Citrus Culture.


Agriculture
list, in ac-


Trucking.
a. Crops.
b. Marketing.
c. Protection.
Types and Breeds of Live Stock.
Stock Judging.
Animal Breeding.
Feeds and Feeding.
Dairying.
a. Home Dairy.
b. Feeding, Care and Manage-
ment of the Dairy Herd.
Poultry Raising.
Injurious Insects.
Plant Diseases.
Farm Bacteriology.
Farm Chemistry.
Library Research.


EXPENSES.-The necessary expenses for the Farmers'
Short Course for those who board at the University are:


Board, room, heat and light for eleven days--..
Laundry and Incidentals (estimated)--..--....-- -
Tuition -...- .-


a --I--- - -


$ 6.00
1.00
0.00


Total


--s_$ 7.00


The rooms in the dormitories of the University are sup-






COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE


Board, room,


etc. -------------------- --


Laundry and Incidentals (estimated) ......
Tuit ionf .-. ... . . .


.----. --- .. -- ---....$ 8.00
--.------- .--. 0.00


Total


.$ 9.00


The Ten-Day Short Course in Agriculture will be open


to Corn Club Boys, but all boys under sixteen years of


will be required to secure room and board in


age


Gainesville.


Through the ministers of Gainesville, accommodations have


been


pledged for


the Corn


Club


Boys


homes


church members.
CORRESPONDENCE COURSES


The Legislature of 1909 authorized


instruction


in agri-


culture in the public schools and, therefore, all who choose


farming in the future will have an opportunity


g


some training designed to fit for life upon the farm.


gainingg
Few


who


now engaged


in agricultural pursuits have


had


such an opportunity.


Recognizing this fact, the College is


striving in every way possible to carry its benefits to every


section of the State.


By means of


correspondence courses


it hopes to reach a large number who have heretofore been


unable


gain


both


scientific


knowledge


and


practical


training.
Correspondence courses are not as effective as resident


study, since they lack the personal factor of the


instructor


and most of the benefits of laboratory work and illustrative


equipment.


On the other hand,


with ambitious and indus-


trious


persons,


such


courses


develop


independence


thought and effective individuality of action.
Registration for any of the courses offered may be made


any time


during the year.


Manuscripts are


corrected


only between October 1st and June 1st of


each year.


The


work may be pursued as rapidly or as slowly as other duties


permit.


To cover office expenses a registration fee of $1.00


will


be charged for each


course.


The


instruction


J> 4 SI 4 S 44 4


0"t at






UNIVERSITY


OF FLORIDA


rural


Colored


activity
persons


Only


white


persons


referred


will


accepted,


Agricultural and


Me-


chanical College for Negroes at Tallahassee.


For


Teachers. -The Correspondence Course in Ag-


riculture for Teachers is open to any person connected with


or interested in the educational work of the


State.


It aims


prepare


examinations


teachers' certificates and


elementary


fit teachers for


agriculture for
giving instruc-


tion in


nature study


and


agriculture


public


schools.


The work will consist of text-book study


and


experimental


exercises.
elaborate


In order to approximate classroom results, rather


lists


questions,


each


question


embodying


most
The


cases


only


answers


one


idea,


will


these questions


issued


will


on every
corrected,


lesson.
errors


fully explained and the manuscripts returned.


The course is based upon


State


Superintendent


Public


text-book
Instruction.


adopted by the
Other neces-


sary literature is furnished by the


lay of about 50 cents for
cises will be necessary.


University free.


equipment for


experimental


L Out-
exer-


For


Farmers.-The


following


courses are offered


1915-1916:


Elementary Agriculture.
Soils.
Tillage.
Drainage and Irrigation.
Manures and Fertilizers.
Field Crops (General).
Field Crops (Southern).


Any course may be selected.


Types and Breeds of Live Stock.
Dairy Husbandry.
Poultry Husbandry.
Animal Breeding.
Feeds and Feeding.
Citrus Fruits and Citrus Culture.
Trucking.
It is usually best to pursue


one course at a time, upon the completion of which another
may be started, although a logical order should be followed.
A succession of courses covering two or more years affords
opportunity to acquire during leisure moments a knowledge


agricultural


science.


For further


information,


address


Asst.


Dean,


Floyd.


Blanks for registration


will


1








COLLEGE OF


AGRICULTURE


STUDENT ROLL
(1914-15)


Name
Gracy, B. B., Jr..
Hainlin, N. E. ..
Harn, S. P. --......--
Jackson, T. U....
McDowall, C. D..
McPherson, R. J.
Musser, A. M.


Seniors
Postoffice
-Smyrna ....---
Homestead---..
.Mooresville ..
.Lakeland------
_Gainesville....
_Juniper ....
-Conant


County or State
.Tennessee
.Dade
.Alabama
-Polk
.Alachua
-Gadsden
.Lake


Juniors


Bishop, C. P. .....
Dukes, R. A.-.... -
Gleichman, M. I...
Grace, C. B.--.....--
Gunn, C. D.-..--..
Pancoast, B. K....
Rich, E. E. ....- ..
Taylor, W. H., Jr.
Wong, Y. K. ......


Briggs, W. R....--
Johnson, J. A.--....-
Jones, A. F.......---
Mann, C.M.
Stebbins, C. W...
Thompson, F. L...

Edwards, F. R....
Futch, I. S..-------
Goldsby, J. K. --.
Manecke, Otto-.....-
Smalley, R. C.-....--
Sparkman, J. K...
Storms, D. A......
Sullivan, A. J.....
Tillman, J.M.......
Tyndale, H. R. ...-
Wood, Harry E..._

Allen, M. B. ......---
Barkwell, E. W...-
Bradford, T. N....
Caldwell, B...---....
Crawford, H. C. ...
Durrance, J. .......-
Finlayson, E. H.--
Ford, W. H.. .......
Helseth G. A ...... -
Hinson, A. W.--
Maldanado, E... -
Mathews, E. W._ -
NcCluer D. H


.Eustis........
.Worthington_
.Largo .......
.Evinston......
_Marianna.. -
.St. Petersburg
-Salisbury ...
.Greenwood-.. -
_Hong San....


Sophomores
- _Zephyrhills.....- -..
...St. Petersburg......
...Nichols -----...- ---.
-- Fernandina. - .- .
.iThonotosassa.......
---Pensacola ...........
Freshmen
... -Jacksonville ......
...Alachua. ............
-__Fort Myers .----.-..
- -. Brooklyn .....--..
.-_St. Petersburg--- ---
._ Tampa ----........-
- Zephyrhills... -- --
-..Virginia --..... ----
.. B artow - --.
--.Merrill ..............


........ ..Evinston.


.--Lake
-....Alachua
_ _Pinellas
_..Alachua
... Jackson
... Pinellas
... Massachusetts
....Jackson
....--Kwongtong, China


---...... Pasco
--.... Pinellas
S---.- .South Carolina
----...Nassau
....-.....- Hillsboro
.........Escambia


..Duval
.Alachua
.Lee
.New York
. Pinellas
.Hillsboro
.Pasco
.Minnesota
.Polk
.Wisconsin


- -------......... A-lachua


Two-Year Course
.Ambridge.--......--
.Crooked Lake ......
.Vero..---......... ..
_Gainesville .........
_Tallahassee---.... ....
_Bowling Green ....
_Ashville. --- ,
-Vero-........... -..
_Oslo ----- -----.---
.Hinson ---------
-Gainesville.. ......
-Leesburg ..--........----
Fellsmere ...--..


---Pennsylvania


-..--. .-Polk
-"......-St. Lucie
........ Alachua
-------..........--Leon
-......... DeSoto
. --.--- Jefferson
--.........St. Lucie
.....St. Lucie
.--.Gadsden
--......... Alaohua
.........-Lake
.--.--.-- St. Lucie


S









UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA


Name PostoffiMe County or State
Cooper, F. C..--------. --St. Louis....- .............------Missouri
Fielding, E.-..-..--. -- Miami.-.............--- .......--. Dade
Fouts, M. L. _--............-- Gainesville----- .--------........ Alachua
Hecker, F. J. -.. -Century- --.-- -.- ..IEscambia
Knight, D. S.... --.--.--.--St. Louis ---. --- --..--. Missouri
Lee, T. G. -.................... Orlando ..-..-----.------ Orange
Lyle, V. W...........-.-- .-- Bartow--..-.. ........ .........Polk
McMullen, H. L. ..--..-.-- .-Clearwater -.. --................--- Pinellas
Millidge, S. .... - .........- - Homestead - - ....... Dade
Montgomery, J. E. ...... ---Tampa--........----- ------ Hillsboro
Nieland, C. J.-.........-----St. Johns Park- .......... St. John
Nieland, E. R.-....--.....----St. Johns Park ..... ......St. John
Oliphant, R. G. -------------Manatee ----------. Manatee
Pittman, R. B............... Punta Gorda... -- -- ..DeSoto


- -- -


Sloan, tG, ...
Smith, Paul Alden


Annadown, T. S. .-
Bass, L. H.---........--
Diaz, C.J. ---.-----
Diaz, R. J. .....
Johnson, T. N. -.--
Koepke, R. V. .-. .-
Opitz, E. W.--........----
Schmidt,W. E. ..
Shelfer, C. 0..-....
Smith, L. T...-.....--
VanDuzer, C. J......


B.artow --------- ---


--.. .-.--St. Petersburg .--.....


One-Year Cour
-.Pasco ..--- ----


_Rome ----..........
-Pensacola ---. -
.Pensacola ----
.Gretna
SCleveland.. ---
_Philadelphia.. -
Chicago........
.Quincy --- -.. -
.DeFuniak Sprin
.Athens --.........


-- -. ---P-iefO
--"- .---Pinellas


- -..--.-------Pasco
-- --..............Georgia
_ .---- ...-. Escambia
S- - - - Escambia
--- Gadsden
----- .... Ohio
- - .. - Pennsylvania
. ...........- Illinois
-.- ----.- -- -Gadsden


Igs
- -


.Walton
_Pennsylvania


Four-Month Course
Burke, E. ........ ..... ......-Lynn Haven .....--------------. Washington
Ingram, P. G..--.. -.. -.. --.......Daytona -..............----- ----. Volusia
Stott, E. F.----.--- .- .-- Irvine -..----- -.. .- -- -. --Marion

Ten-Day Courses for Farmers


-...-.. -Sunbeam - -


Bouer, L. D. ---...
Blair, H.......
Brown, J. D
Brown, W. A...--
Council, R. B., Jr...
Davis, E. N..........
Davis, W. P..-.. --
Diaz, I. J. ....-----.
Diaz, R. J..--- --..-
Evers, F. O..--.-----
Forbes, J. W. ....-
Gillies, N. -.....
Gomme, W. H.......
Henry, J. C.-..--.......-
Hiers, D. .........
Jameson, W. E.......---
Lightfoot, J. P. .... -
McInturff, E. H. ...
Morgan, A. S.-......-
Patterson, E. L. --.... -
Peterson, A. E. -..
Stanaland. B. P. -....-


.I--.-


S._Jennings ..- ...
...Lake City --
..Bradento wn......
... Tallahassee....-..-
__. Plant City-........
... Wauchula ..... --
. Pensacola ---
- Pensacola ----
-_ Alafia .--.........
---Dover .............
. -Greenville ........
- _..Brooksville.... ...
...Live Oak ..-. ..-
S-.. Jennings- -.... .
-...Keysville ......
- -.... Gainesville ........
-. West Tocoi ... ...
. .Greenville.........
---White Springs ...
.. Groveland-.. .. ---
... Wim auma ....- -


* J- -- -

- - -

-. - -
P....
m...
-. --
- - -


-----_-Duval


.--. Hamilton
---.Columbia
-... Manatee
.-..Leon
....Hillsboro
.... DeSoto
...-Escambia
-.--Escambia
- .Hillsboro
....Hillsboro
-.--Madison
.... Hernando
.... Suwannee
.... Hamilton
-....Hillsboro
.-- Alachua
....Clay
.... Madison
....Hamilton
.....Lake
- -. Hillsboro






I'il


FARM ENGINEERING








































































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